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Sample records for anatomic landmarks based

  1. Collaborative regression-based anatomical landmark detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g. for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among the various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods have recently attracted much attention due to their robustness and efficiency. In these methods, landmarks are localised through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from the classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite their robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to (1) the inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and (2) the lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. (1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localise landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed at the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. (2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of ‘difficult-to-detect’ landmarks by using spatial guidance from ‘easy-to-detect’ landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods.

  2. MRI-based anatomical landmarks for the identification of thoracic vertebral levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To identify soft-tissue and bony anatomical landmarks on dedicated thoracic spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to assess their detectability, reproducibility, and accuracy in predicting specific thoracic vertebral levels. Materials and methods: One hundred dedicated thoracic MRI studies were retrospectively analysed by two radiologists independently. Ten bone and soft-tissue landmarks were localized to the adjacent vertebral level. The true numerical thoracic vertebral level was subsequently determined and recorded by cross referencing with a sagittal cervico-thoracic “counting scan”. Results: Six landmarks were defined in ?98% cases; however, there was a low interobserver percentage agreement for the defined vertebral levels (>70% for only one landmark). The most useful landmark for defining a specific vertebral level was the most superior rib (98% detection, 95% interobserver agreement, 98% at a single vertebral level, 0.07 SD). Eight landmarks localized to a specific thoracic segment in only 16–44% of cases, with a standard deviation of >0.5 vertebral levels and with a range which was greater than four vertebral levels. Conclusion: The C2 vertebra must be identified and cross referenced to the dedicated thoracic spine MRI, as other MRI-based anatomical landmarks are unreliable in determining the correct thoracic vertebral level

  3. MR-guided stereotactic neurosurgery-comparison of fiducial-based and anatomical landmark transformation approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For application in magnetic resonance (MR) guided stereotactic neurosurgery, two methods for transformation of MR-image coordinates in stereotactic, frame-based coordinates exist: the direct stereotactic fiducial-based transformation method and the indirect anatomical landmark method. In contrast to direct stereotactic MR transformation, indirect transformation is based on anatomical landmark coregistration of stereotactic computerized tomography and non-stereotactic MR images. In a patient study, both transformation methods have been investigated with visual inspection and mutual information analysis. Comparison was done for our standard imaging protocol, including t2-weighted spin-echo as well as contrast enhanced t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. For t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, both methods showed almost similar and satisfying performance with a small, but significant advantage for fiducial-based transformation. In contrast, for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging with more geometric distortions due to field inhomogenities and gradient nonlinearity than t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, mainly caused by a reduced bandwidth per pixel, anatomical landmark transformation delivered markedly better results. Here, fiducial-based transformation yielded results which are intolerable for stereotactic neurosurgery. Mean Euclidian distances between both transformation methods were 0.96 mm for t2-weighted spin-echo and 1.67 mm for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. Maximum deviations were 1.72 mm and 3.06 mm, respectively

  4. Automatic categorization of anatomical landmark-local appearances based on diffeomorphic demons and spectral clustering for constructing detector ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Shouhei; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Nemoto, Mitsutaka; Nomura, Yukihiro; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    A method for categorizing landmark-local appearances extracted from computed tomography (CT) datasets is presented. Anatomical landmarks in the human body inevitably have inter-individual variations that cause difficulty in automatic landmark detection processes. The goal of this study is to categorize subjects (i.e., training datasets) according to local shape variations of such a landmark so that each subgroup has less shape variation and thus the machine learning of each landmark detector is much easier. The similarity between each subject pair is measured based on the non-rigid registration result between them. These similarities are used by the spectral clustering process. After the clustering, all training datasets in each cluster, as well as synthesized intermediate images calculated from all subject-pairs in the cluster, are used to train the corresponding subgroup detector. All of these trained detectors compose a detector ensemble to detect the target landmark. Evaluation with clinical CT datasets showed great improvement in the detection performance. PMID:23286038

  5. Anatomic Landmarks for the First Dorsal Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    Hazani, Ron; Engineer, Nitin J.; Cooney, Damon; Wilhelmi, Bradon J

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Knowledge of anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment can assist clinicians with management of de Quervain's disease. The radial styloid, the scaphoid tubercle, and Lister's tubercle can be used as superficial landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. Methods: Thirty-two cadaveric wrists were dissected, and measurements were taken from the predetermined landmarks to the extensor retinaculum. The compartments were also inspected for variability of the abductor pollicis ...

  6. Pterion: An anatomical variation and surgical landmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant E Natekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The frontal and the parietal bones superiorly and the greater wing of the sphenoid and the squamous temporal inferiorly of one side meet at an H-shaped sutural junction termed the pterion. This is an important anatomical and anthropological landmark as it overlies both the anterior branch of middle meningeal artery and the lateral fissure of the cerebral hemisphere. The knowledge of sutural joints between frontal, parietal, sphenoid and temporal bones at pterion is clinically, radiologically and surgically important during surgical interventions involving burr hole surgeries. Materials and Methods : Study performed on 150 dry temporal bones. The pterion, and its sutural articulations with frontal, parietal, sphenoid and temporal bones and also anatomical variations, if any, were studied. Results : Four types of pterion, i.e. sphenoparietal, frontotemporal, stellate and epipteric, were observed. Conclusions : The knowledge of the variations of pterion and its surgical anatomy, in Indian population are important for surgeons operating in the fieldThe present study will also contribute additional information of skull bone fractures in infancy and early childhood, which may be associated with large intersutural bones giving false appearance of fracture radiologically and also during surgical interventions involving burr hole surgeries, as their extensions may lead to continuation of fracture lines.

  7. Interventional guidance for cardiac resynchronization therapies: merging anatomic X-ray imaging with functional ultrasound imaging based on mutually-shared landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed knowledge of cardiac anatomy and function is required for complex cardiac electrophysiology interventions. Cardiac resynchronization therapies (CRT), for example, requires information about coronary venous anatomy for left ventricular lead placement. In CRT, heart failure patients are equipped with dual-chamber pacemakers in order to improve cardiac output and heart failure symptoms. Cardiac function is mainly assessed with Ultrasound imaging. Fusion of complementary information from X-ray and ultrasound is an essential step towards fully utilizing all available information for CRT guidance. We present an approach for fusion of anatomical information (coronary vein structure) from X-ray with functional information (left ventricular deformation and dynamics) from ultrasound. We propose an image-based fusion approach based on mutually-shared landmarks which enable registration of both imaging spaces without the need for external tracking. (orig.)

  8. Application of Soft Tissue Artifact Compensation Using Displacement Dependency between Anatomical Landmarks and Skin Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Taebeum Ryu

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue artifact is known to be one of the main sources of errors in motion analysis by means of stereophotogrammetry. Among many approaches to reduce such errors, one is to estimate the position of anatomical landmarks during a motion with joint angle or displacement of skin markers, which is the so-called compensation method of anatomical landmarks. The position of anatomical landmarks was modeled from the data of the so-called dynamic calibration, in which anatomical landmark positions...

  9. Estimation of the central position of the prostate-gland based on anatomical landmarks in X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robust segmentation of pelvic organ in non-contrast CT image has been required for developing computer-aided diagnosis systems. We proposed a method to normalize the position of the pelvis based on anatomical point (LM) of pelvic bones and use those LMs to estimate central position of prostate-gland in CT images in preview works. However, the evaluation of LM placement and procedure was insufficient. In this study, we aim to investigate the effective LM location and the apply different methods for identifying the prostate center positions. In the experiment, we applied three methods to 75 cases of CT images using the different number of LMs. The distances between the estimated central positions of the prostate to the human input was regarded as estimation error. The result showed that the average estimation-error of the prostate central positions was about 5 [mm] when using 12 LMs. Furthermore, we confirmed that the estimated center coordinates of the prostate exist within the prostate-gland regions in all CT cases. (author)

  10. Safe Treatment of Trigger Thumb With Longitudinal Anatomic Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Hazani, Ron; Elston, Josh; Whitney, Ryan D.; Redstone, Jeremiah; Chowdhry, Saeed; Wilhelmi, Bradon J

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Stenosing tenosynovitis of the thumb flexor tendon sheath is also known as trigger thumb. It is an inflammatory process that involves the flexor tendon sheath at the A1 pulley. Successful percutaneous or open treatment of trigger thumb depends on the ability of the clinician to properly predict the location of the A1 pulley. Longitudinal anatomic landmarks can facilitate safe treatment for the trigger thumb while circumventing injury to the neurovascular bundles. Methods: Fourteen ...

  11. Cardiac Conduction System: Delineation of Anatomic Landmarks With Multidetector CT

    OpenAIRE

    Farhood Saremi; Maria Torrone; Nooshin Yashar

    2009-01-01

    Major components of the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node (SAN), atrioventricular node (AVN), the His Bundle, and the right and left bundle branches are too small to be directly visualized by multidetector CT (MDCT) given the limited spatial resolution of current scanners. However, the related anatomic landmarks and variants of this system a well as the areas with special interest to electrophysiologists can be reliably demonstrated by MDCT. Some of these structures and ...

  12. Modified Anterior Temporal Lobectomy: Anatomical Landmarks and Operative Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghizoni, Enrico; Almeida, J P; Joaquim, Andrei F; Yasuda, Clarissa L; de Campos, Brunno M; Tedeschi, Helder; Cendes, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    There is great controversy about which surgical approach is the most selective and efficient for resection of mesial structures of the temporal lobe for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Selective approaches have been described in an attempt to preserve the neocortex and the temporal stem. Nonselective approaches, such as anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL), result in injuries in these structures. We describe a modified selective technique for resection of the amygdala and hippocampus with resection of the temporal pole performed through the Sylvian fissure based on anatomical landmarks and diligent microsurgical techniques. Briefly, after opening the Sylvian fissure, the temporal pole is resected and the temporal horn is directly accessed through the uncus, in an anteroposterior direction, preserving the temporal stem and the neocortex of the temporal lobe. The surgical technique used by our group is described in detail with illustrations. Precise microsurgical techniques associated with knowledge of microsurgical anatomy are of paramount importance for temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. According to our analysis, the modified ATL approach to the temporal mesial structures is a feasible selective technique that can be used as an alternative to traditional surgical procedures. PMID:26008956

  13. Robust anatomical landmark detection with application to MR brain image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong; Gao, Yaozong; Wu, Guorong; Yap, Pew-Thian; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Comparison of human brain MR images is often challenged by large inter-subject structural variability. To determine correspondences between MR brain images, most existing methods typically perform a local neighborhood search, based on certain morphological features. They are limited in two aspects: (1) pre-defined morphological features often have limited power in characterizing brain structures, thus leading to inaccurate correspondence detection, and (2) correspondence matching is often restricted within local small neighborhoods and fails to cater to images with large anatomical difference. To address these limitations, we propose a novel method to detect distinctive landmarks for effective correspondence matching. Specifically, we first annotate a group of landmarks in a large set of training MR brain images. Then, we use regression forest to simultaneously learn (1) the optimal sets of features to best characterize each landmark and (2) the non-linear mappings from the local patch appearances of image points to their 3D displacements towards each landmark. The learned regression forests are used as landmark detectors to predict the locations of these landmarks in new images. Because each detector is learned based on features that best distinguish the landmark from other points and also landmark detection is performed in the entire image domain, our method can address the limitations in conventional methods. The deformation field estimated based on the alignment of these detected landmarks can then be used as initialization for image registration. Experimental results show that our method is capable of providing good initialization even for the images with large deformation difference, thus improving registration accuracy. PMID:26433614

  14. Preliminary study of automatic detection method for anatomical landmarks in body trunk CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the research field of medical image processing and analysis, it is important to develop medical image understanding methods which are robust for individual and case differences, since they often interfere with accurate medical image processing and analysis. Location of anatomical landmarks, which are localized regions with anatomical reference to the human body, allows for robust medical understanding since the relative position of anatomical landmarks is basically the same among cases. This is a preliminary study for detecting anatomical point landmarks by using a technique of local area model matching. The model for matching process, which is called appearance model, shows the spatial appearance of voxel values at the detection target landmark and its surrounding region, while the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is used to train appearance models. In this study, we experimentally investigate the optimal appearance model for landmark detection and analyze detection accuracy of anatomical point landmarks. (author)

  15. Reliability of a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks of the maxillofacial skeleton. An evaluation method for three-dimensional images obtained by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a method for evaluating the reliability of a coordinate system based on maxillofacial skeletal landmarks and use it to assess two coordinate systems. Scatter plots and 95% confidence ellipses of an objective landmark were defined as an index for demonstrating the stability of the coordinate system. A head phantom was positioned horizontally in reference to the Frankfurt horizontal and occlusal planes and subsequently scanned once in each position using cone-beam computed tomography. On the three-dimensional images created with a volume-rendering procedure, six dentists twice set two different coordinate systems: coordinate system 1 was defined by the nasion, sella, and basion, and coordinate system 2 was based on the left orbitale, bilateral porions, and basion. The menton was assigned as an objective landmark. The scatter plot and 95% ellipse of the menton indicated the high-level reliability of coordinate system 2. The patterns with the two coordinate systems were similar between data obtained in different head positions. The method presented here may be effective for evaluating the reliability (reproducibility) of coordinate systems based on skeletal landmarks. (author)

  16. Value of anatomical landmarks in single-nostril endonasal transnasal-sphenoidal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    WEI, LIANG-FENG; ZHANG, JINCHAO; CHEN, HONG-JIE; WANG, RUMI

    2013-01-01

    The sphenoid sinus occupies a central location in transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). It is important to identify relevant anatomical landmarks to enter the sphenoid sinus and sellar region properly. The aim of this study was to identify anatomical landmarks and their value in single-nostril endonasal TSS. A retrospective study was performed to review 148 cases of single-nostril endonasal TSS for pituitary lesions. The structure of the nasal cavities and sphenoid sinus, the position of apertures o...

  17. The stylomastoid artery as an anatomical landmark to the facial nerve during parotid surgery: a clinico-anatomic study

    OpenAIRE

    Nouraei Seyed; Jerjes Waseem; Upile Tahwinder; Singh Sandeep U; Kafas Panagiotis; Sandison Ann; Sudhoff Holger; Hopper Colin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The identification of the facial nerve can be difficult in a bloody operative field or by an incision that limits exposure; hence anatomical landmarks and adequate operative exposure can aid such identification and preservation. In this clinico-anatomic study, we examined the stylomastoid artery (SMA) and its relation to the facial nerve trunk; the origin of the artery was identified on cadavers and its nature was confirmed histologically. Methods The clinical component of...

  18. Reproducibility of imaging skull anatomic landmarks utilizing three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study investigated the reproducibility of locating specific anatomic landmarks, utilizing computed tomography (CT), for the purpose of assigning accurate coordinates on the skull. Three-dimensional (3-D) CT data, obtained by scanning a dry adult skull, were processed using a multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) system. Each landmark was identified five times by the same technician, and the average distances between points identifying the same landmark were calculated. The 15 landmarks studied were the infra-orbital foramina, the external auditory meatus, the foramina rotundum, the foramina ovale, the optic canals, anterior crinoid processes, anterior nasal spine, crista galli, and the sella turcica. Three additional artificial markers placed in occlusal dental splints were also examined. The crinoid processes were identified with the highest degree of accuracy. The crista galli and optic canals were also located with reproducible results. The standard deviation calculated from the fine attempts to locate the artificial markers was smaller than that calculated from attempts to identify any of the landmarks. This implies that coordinates on the craniofacial bones should be defined using artificial markers rather than bony landmarks. Artificial markers placed in occlusal dental splints easily can be applied clinically. Complicated facial bone contours should be analyzed mathematically. In clinical setting, these points were found to be reproducible in 15 bony landmarks on the skull. (N.K.)

  19. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The use of landmarks for robot navigation is a popular alternative to having a geometrical model of the environment through which to navigate and monitor self-localization. If the landmarks are defined as special visual structures already in the environment then we have the possibility of fully autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally available environment features (natural landmarks). The goal is also to integrate techniques and algorithms (also related to other research field) in the same navigation system, in order to improve localization performance and system autonomy. The proposed localization strategy is based on a continuous update of the estimated robot position while the robot is moving. In order to make the system autonomous, both acquisition and observation of landmarks have to be carried out automatically. The thesis consequently proposes a method for learning and navigation of a working environment and it explores automatic acquisition and recognition of visual landmarks. In particular, a two-phase procedure is proposed: first phase is for an automatic acquisition of visual-landmarks, second phase is for estimating robot position during navigation (based on the acquired landmarks). The feasibility and applicability of the proposed method is based on a system with a simple setup. The novelty and potentiality, are in combining algorithms for panoramic view-synthesis, attention selection, stereo reconstruction, triangulation, optimal triplet selection, and image-based rendering. Experiments demonstrate that the system can automatically learn and store visual landmarks, and later recognize these landmarks from arbitrary positions and thus estimate robot position and heading.

  20. Anatomic Landmarks Versus Fiducials for Volume-Staged Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Large Arteriovenous Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of using internal anatomic landmarks instead of surgically implanted fiducials in the image registration process for volume-staged gamma knife (GK) radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations. Methods and Materials: We studied 9 patients who had undergone 10 staged GK sessions for large arteriovenous malformations. Each patient had fiducials surgically implanted in the outer table of the skull at the first GK treatment. These markers were imaged on orthogonal radiographs, which were scanned into the GK planning system. For the same patients, 8-10 pairs of internal landmarks were retrospectively identified on the three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging studies that had been obtained for treatment. The coordinate transformation between the stereotactic frame space for subsequent treatment sessions was then determined by point matching, using four surgically embedded fiducials and then using four pairs of internal anatomic landmarks. In both cases, the transformation was ascertained by minimizing the chi-square difference between the actual and the transformed coordinates. Both transformations were then evaluated using the remaining four to six pairs of internal landmarks as the test points. Results: Averaged over all treatment sessions, the root mean square discrepancy between the coordinates of the transformed and actual test points was 1.2 ± 0.2 mm using internal landmarks and 1.7 ± 0.4 mm using the surgically implanted fiducials. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that using internal landmarks to determine the coordinate transformation between subsequent magnetic resonance imaging scans for volume-staged GK arteriovenous malformation treatment sessions is as accurate as using surgically implanted fiducials and avoids an invasive procedure

  1. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average ±sd: gw 22 ± 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p=0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p<0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided. (orig.)

  2. Fully automatic detection of corresponding anatomical landmarks in volume scans of different respiratory state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described which provides fully automatic detection of corresponding anatomical landmarks in volume scans taken at different respiratory states. The resulting control points are needed for creating a volumetric deformation model for motion compensation in radiotherapy. Prior to treatment two CT volumes are taken, one scan during inhalation, one during exhalation. These scans and the detected control point pairs are taken as input for creating the four-dimensional model by using thin-plate splines

  3. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmook, Maria T.; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology/Division of Neuro- and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Integrative Morphology Group, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology / Division of Obstetrics and Feto-maternal Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average {+-}sd: gw 22 {+-} 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p=0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p<0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided. (orig.)

  4. Impact of different anatomical landmarks on registration in imaging-guided radiation for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of different anatomical landmarks on registration in imaging-guided radiation (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods: For 20 patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Fudan University Cancer Hospital, 100 frames of kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography scanning were evaluated in this study. The spine, carina and tumor were selected as landmarks for registration, respectively. Results of registration using different landmarks were documented and compared. Results: The average set-up errors in the left-right, superior inferior and anterior-posterior directions were -0.08 cm ±0.32 cm, -0.16 cm ±0.45 cm and 0.06 cm ±0.23 cm with the spine for registration; 0.06 cm ±0.34 cm, -0.13 cm ±0.45 cm and -0.02 cm±0.23 cm with the carina; and -0.17 cm ±0.25 cm, 0.03 cm ±0.47 cm and 0.15 cm ±0.38 cm with tumor. The registration results between using the carina and tumor as landmarks were statistically significant different (q=4.61, P=0.002; q = 2.23 , P=0.118; q=3.44, P=0.017). The registration results were equal when using the spine and tumor as landmarks (q =1.85, P = 0.195; q = 2.54, P = 0.075; q = 1.89, P=0.185), as well as using the carina and tumor as landmarks (q=2.76, P=0.054; q=0.31, P=0.826; q=1.55, P=0.276). Conclusions: For early stage lung cancer, the spine and tumor can be used equally as registration landmarks in imaging-guided SBRT. The carina is not suggested for its poor reproducible position. (authors)

  5. Are anatomical landmark measurements accurate for predicting endotracheal tube depth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanand Mangar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A traditional method for depth of intubation in adult patients is taping the endotracheal tube (ETT at the upper incisors a distance of 21 or 23 cm for women and men respectively (21/23 method. A novel “topographical” measurement for estimating proper intubation depth has been suggested as a better depth predictor compared to the 21/23 method.   Objectives: To compare the 21/23 method to topographical measurements. Methods: 100 ASA physical status I-II patients scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled. The 21/23 method was initially utilized for intubation and the ETT tip to carina distance was then fiberoptically measured. Anatomical (topographical measurements were then obtained from each patient by adding the distance from the corner of the mouth to the mandibular angle to the distance from the mandibular angle to the center of the sternal notch and were recorded as the topographical intubation depth. Both measurements were assessed for percentage of ETTs that fell outside of our desired tip to carina range of 2-4 cm. Results: After the 21/23 method, 29% of ETTs fell outside our desired tip to carina range compared to 47% of ETTs with the topographical method (p=0.010. No correlation was found between the topographical measurements and airway length (upper incisors to vocal cords (r=0.248. Conclusions: Topographical measurements were not re-confirmed as an accurate intubation method and were found to be less reliable than the 21/23 method. We maintain that regardless of ETT insertion method utilized, the gold standard to ensure accurate ETT placement is fiberoptic inspection.

  6. Software Designation to Assess the Proximity of Different Facial Anatomic Landmarks to Midlines of the Mouth and Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshkelgosha V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Recognition and determination of facial and dental midline is important in dentistry. Currently, there are no verifiable guidelines that direct the choice of specific anatomic landmarks to determine the midline of the face or mouth. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine which of facial anatomic landmarks is closest to the midline of the face as well as that of the mouth. Materials and Methods: Frontal full-face digital images of 92 subjects (men and women age range: 20-30 years in smile were taken under standardized conditions; commonly used anatomic landmarks, nasion, tip of the nose, and tip of the philtrum were digitized on the images of subjects and aesthetic analyzer software used for midline analysis using Esthetic Frame. Deviations from the midlines of the face and mouth were measured for the 3 clinical landmarks; the existing dental midline was considered as the fourth landmark. The entire process of midline analysis was done by a single observer and repeated twice. Reliability analysis and 1-sample t- tests were conducted. Results: The Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs for reliability analysis of RFV and RCV measures made two times revealed that the reliabilities were all acceptable. The results indicated that each of the 4 landmarks deviated uniquely and significantly (P<.001 from the midlines of the face as well as mouth in both males and females. Conclusions: There was a significant difference between the mean ratios of the chosen anatomic landmarks and the midlines of the face and mouth. The hierarchy of anatomic landmarks closest to the midline of the face is: (1 midline of the commissures, (2 nasion , (3 tip of philtrum,(4 dental midline, and (5 tip ofthe nose. The closest anatomic landmarks to the mouth midline are: (1 tip of philtrum, (2 dental midline, (3 tip of nose, and (4 nasion.

  7. The accuracy of image registration for the brain and the nasopharynx using external anatomical landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the accuracy of 3D image registration using markers that are repeatedly applied to external anatomical landmarks on the head. The purpose of this study is to establish a lower limit of the errors that would occur in, for instance, MRI-SPECT matching, which in some situations can only be achieved using external landmarks. Marker matching was compared with (single-modality) volume matching for 20 MRI scans. The results were compared with a published expression for the target registration error (TRE) which gives the 3D distribution of the mismatch between both scans. It was found that the main error source is reapplying the external markers on the anatomical landmarks. The published expression describes the relative distribution of the TRE in space well, but tends to underestimate the actual registration error. This deviation is due to anisotropy in the error distribution of the marker position (errors in the direction perpendicular to the skin surface are in general much smaller than errors in other directions). A simulation of marker matching with anisotropy in the errors confirmed this finding. With four reapplied markers, the TRE is 6 mm or smaller in most regions of the head. (author)

  8. Automatic recognition of surface landmarks of anatomical structures of back and posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micho?ski, Jakub; Glinkowski, Wojciech; Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Faulty postures, scoliosis and sagittal plane deformities should be detected as early as possible to apply preventive and treatment measures against major clinical consequences. To support documentation of the severity of deformity and diminish x-ray exposures, several solutions utilizing analysis of back surface topography data were introduced. A novel approach to automatic recognition and localization of anatomical landmarks of the human back is presented that may provide more repeatable results and speed up the whole procedure. The algorithm was designed as a two-step process involving a statistical model built upon expert knowledge and analysis of three-dimensional back surface shape data. Voronoi diagram is used to connect mean geometric relations, which provide a first approximation of the positions, with surface curvature distribution, which further guides the recognition process and gives final locations of landmarks. Positions obtained using the developed algorithms are validated with respect to accuracy of manual landmark indication by experts. Preliminary validation proved that the landmarks were localized correctly, with accuracy depending mostly on the characteristics of a given structure. It was concluded that recognition should mainly take into account the shape of the back surface, putting as little emphasis on the statistical approximation as possible.

  9. The secondary lobe as anatomic landmark for different pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to present the spectrum of pathological findings in the pulmonary parenchyma, based on the knowledge of the secondary lobe and its components. The evaluation was made using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and compared with the histopathological findings. By definition, the secondary lobe is the small portion of pulmonary tissue separated by septa of connective tissue and supplied by 2-5 or more terminal bronchioles according to their central or peripheral location. Different disorders may become evident as a consequence of : 1) Bronchiolar obstruction (transient or definitive); 2) Intra-alveolar or wall involvement; 3) Involvement of the support tissue; 4) Involvement of the vascular or lymphatic structures. The etiology may be idiopathic, infectious, due to inhalation, neoplastic, allergic, due to collagen diseases, secondary to drug administration and/or post-transplantation. The evaluation of the secondary lobe components, with fine section HRCT, is the dynamic method of choice for the characterisation of pulmonary diseases, and allows to perform earlier and more precise differential diagnoses, when correlated with the clinical findings. The addition of sections during expiration to the routine study is paramount to underscore perfusion disturbances, which may remain undiagnosed during deep inspiration. The goal of this study is to review some of these disorders in which HRCT may be very useful and to correlate our observations with the histopathological findings. (author)

  10. Optimization and evaluation of landmark-based image correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image correlation methods enable the complementary use of information from different medical images of a patient. There is a need for correlation techniques requiring no preparation in advance. The authors have developed two correlation methods, both based on three or more anatomical or artificial landmarks, to be defined in corresponding image data sets. These methods have been evaluated with phantom data as well as with patient data. The authors have improved these correlation methods by using more landmarks and special selection criteria. They are applicable to all medical tomograms and to x-ray pictures taken under stereotactical conditions. The results obtained have error ranges in the order of the three-dimensional image resolution. (author)

  11. Efficacy and costs comparison of anatomical landmarks and ultrasonic guidance during brachial plexus block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and costs of brachial plexus block (BPB) guided by ultrasound with that used anatomical landmarks. Methods: Eighty ASA ? or ? patients scheduled for upper extremity operation were prospectively randomized into 2 groups: Group A (n=40, BPB using anatomical landmarks) and group U (n=40, BPB guided in real time by a two-dimensional ultrasonic image). The time spent on performing the block, the onset time and duration of analgesia were measured. The proportion of successful and excellent blocks and the incidence of complications were assessed. The cost of anesthetic and the total cost of anesthesia were recorded. Results: Compared with group A, in group U the time spent on performing the block and the onset time of analgesia were significantly shorter, the duration of analgesia was significantly longer, the excellence rate of block was significantly higher (all P<0.05). 95.0% of patients in group A and 97.5% of patients in group U had a successful block (P >0.05). Four patients in group A and two patients in group U had occurred complications (P>0.05). The cost of anesthetic in group U was significantly less than in group A (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the total cost of anesthesia between the two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: BPB guided by ultrasound provides better block with more rapid performance and longer duration of analgesia as compared with that used anatomical landmarks. Ultrasound-guided BPB is suitable for upper extremity operation and lowers the anesthetic cost. (authors)

  12. Pressure distribution on the anatomic landmarks of the knee and the effect of kneepads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William L; Mayton, Alan G; Moore, Susan M

    2010-12-01

    This study examines stress transmitted to anatomic landmarks of the knee (patella, combined patella tendon and tibial tubercle) while in static kneeling postures without kneepads and while wearing two kneepads commonly worn in the mining industry. Ten subjects (7 male, 3 female) simulated postures utilized in low-seam mines: kneeling in full flexion; kneeling at 90° of knee flexion; and kneeling on one knee while in one of three kneepad states (no kneepads, non-articulated kneepads, and articulated kneepads). For each posture, peak and mean pressure on the anatomic landmarks of the knee were obtained. The majority of the pressure was found to be transmitted to the knee via the combined patellar tendon and tibial tubercle rather than through the patella. While the kneepads tested decreased the maximum pressure experienced at the combined patellar tendon and tibial tubercle, peak pressures of greater than 25 psi were still experienced over structures commonly injured in mining (e.g. bursa sac - bursitis/Miner's Knee). The major conclusion of this study is that novel kneepad designs that redistribute the stresses at the knee across a greater surface area and to other regions of the leg away from key structures of the knee are needed. PMID:20554268

  13. A new method to validate thoracic CT-CT deformable image registration using auto-segmented 3D anatomical landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin S; Østergaard, Lasse R; Carl, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deformable image registrations are prone to errors in aligning reliable anatomically features. Consequently, identification of registration inaccuracies is important. Particularly thoracic three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT)-CT image registration is challenging due to lack of contrast in lung tissue. This study aims for validation of thoracic CT-CT image registration using auto-segmented anatomically landmarks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five lymphoma patients were CT scanned ...

  14. Methods for determining hip and lumbosacral joint centers in a seated position from external anatomical landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Junfeng; Panda, Jules; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Wang, Xuguang

    2015-01-21

    A global coordinate system (GCS) method is proposed to estimate hip and lumbosacral joint centers (HJC and LSJC) from at least three distances between joint center of interest and target anatomic landmarks (ALs). The distances from HJC and LSJC to relevant pelvis and femur ALs were analyzed with respect to usual pelvis and femur scaling dimensions. Forty six pelves and related pairs of femurs from a same sample of adult specimens were examined. The corresponding regression equations were obtained. These equations can be used to estimate HJC and LSJC in conditions where a very limited number of ALs are available: for example, during seated posture analysis as performed in the automotive industry. Compared to currently existing HJC and LSJC methods from ALs, the proposed method showed better results with an average error less than 11 mm. PMID:25497377

  15. Landmark-based pedestrian navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Basiri, Anahid; Winstanley, Adam; Amirian, Pouria

    2013-01-01

    Car navigation has become one of the most widely used examples of Location-Based Services (LBSs). However current car navigation systems are not fully suitable for the navigational needs of pedestrians mainly because walkers are not as restricted as car drivers. Pedestrians can easily go into a building or underground to get to their destination where GPS signals are unavailable. Seamless indoor and outdoor navigation is one of the most important features which should be handle...

  16. Anatomic landmarks of fluoroscopy guided puncture of the pulseless femoral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to improve puncturing the pulseless femoral artery by evaluating the anatomic landmarks that suggest the course of the femoral artery on fluoroscopy. We analyzed 37 hemipelvis spot images that were centered on the arterial sheath after puncture of the femoral artery. The inguinal angles were measured between the inguinal line connecting the anterior superior iliac spine and the symphysis pubis, and the line of the arterial sheath. Inguinal ligament ratios were measured as the distance from the symphysis pubis to the arterial sheath to the length of the inguinal ligament on the inguinal line. The femoral head ratios were measured as the distance from the medial margin of the femur head to the arterial sheath to the transverse length of the femur head. The mean inguinal angle was 66.5 and the mean inguinal ligament ratio was 0.42 (± 0.03). The mean femoral head ratio was 0.08 (± 0.18). In comparing the men and women, there was no significant difference in the inguinal angle and the femoral head ratio, but the inguinal distance ratio was larger in women (men: 0.41 ± 0.033, women: 0.44 ± 0.031, ? < 0.05). The femoral artery generally courses just lateral to the medial margin of the femur head (femoral head ratio: 0.08) and the medial 40% of the inguinal ligament (inguinal ligament ratio: 0.42). So, consideration of these relations may be helpful for puncturing the pulseless femoral artery

  17. Analysis of anatomical landmarks of the mandibular interforaminal region using CBCT in a Brazilian population

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Paloma Rodrigues, Genú; Ricardo José de Holanda, Vasconcellos; Bruna Paloma de, Oliveira; Bruna Caroline Gonçalves de, Vasconcelos; Nádia Cristina da Cruz, Delgado.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the position, presence, appearance and extent of various anatomical landmarks in the mandibular interforaminal region of Brazilian patients using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: A total of 142 CBCT examinations were analyzed to determine the most common location of th [...] e mental foramen (MF), the presence and extent of the anterior loop (AL) of the inferior alveolar nerve, and the appearance and length of the incisive canal (IC). The presence of sexual dimorphism and differences with relation to the left and right sides were also evaluated. Results: Most of the MF (45.5%) was located below the second premolar. The AL and the IC were observed in 18.9 and 96.5% of the images respectively. The average length of AL and IC was 3.14±1.25 mm and 13.68±5.94 mm respectively. No significant differences (p>0.05) between genders or left and right sides were observed for all evaluated parameters. Conclusions: The most common location of the MF, the high rate of visualization of the IC and the occasional presence of AL in the studied Brazilian population demonstrate the importance of using three-dimensional images of the mandibular anterior region, allowing proper surgical planning and preventing injury to the neurovascular bundle.

  18. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    The use of landmarks for robot navigation is a popular alternative to having a geometrical model of the environment through which to navigate and monitor self-localization. If the landmarks are defined as special visual structures already in the environment then we have the possibility of fully autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the v...

  19. A new method to validate thoracic CT-CT deformable image registration using auto-segmented 3D anatomical landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin S; Østergaard, Lasse R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deformable image registrations are prone to errors in aligning reliable anatomically features. Consequently, identification of registration inaccuracies is important. Particularly thoracic three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT)-CT image registration is challenging due to lack of contrast in lung tissue. This study aims for validation of thoracic CT-CT image registration using auto-segmented anatomically landmarks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five lymphoma patients were CT scanned three times within a period of 18 months, with the initial CT defined as the reference scan. For each patient the two successive CT scans were registered to the reference CT using three different image registration algorithms (Demons, B-spline and Affine). The image registrations were evaluated using auto-segmented anatomical landmarks (bronchial branch points) and Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC). Deviation of corresponding bronchial landmarks were used to quantify inaccuracies in respect of both misalignment and geometric location within lungs. RESULTS: The median bronchial branch point deviations were 1.6, 1.1 and 4.2 (mm) for the three tested algorithms (Demons, B-spline and Affine). The maximum deviations (> 15 mm) were found within both Demons and B-spline image registrations. In the upper part of the lungs the median deviation of 1.7 (mm) was significantly different (p 15 mm in both Demons and B-spline deformable algorithms.

  20. Anatomical landmarks and skin markers are not reliable for accurate labeling of thoracic vertebrae on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Numbering of the thoracic spine on MRI can be tedious if C2 and L5-S1 are not included and may lead to errors in lesion level. Purpose: To determine whether anatomic landmarks or external markers are reliable as an aid for accurate numbering of thoracic vertebrae on MRI. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven thoracic spine MR studies of 67 patients (30 males, 37 females, age range 18-83 years) were studied, composed of 52 consecutive MR studies and an additional 15 MRI in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin. In the 52 thoracic MR examinations potential numbering aids such as the level of the sternal apex, pulmonary artery, aortic arch, and osseous or disc abnormalities were numbered on both cervical localizer (standard of reference) and thoracic sagittal images. The additional 15 examinations in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin were evaluated for consistency in the level of the markers on different sequences in the same exam. Results: The sternal apex level ranged from T2 to T5 [T3 in 28/51 patients (55%), T2 in 10/51 (20%)]. The aortic arch level ranged from T2 to T4 [T4 in 18/48 (38%) and T3 in 17 (35%)]. Pulmonary artery level ranged from T4 to T6-7 disc [T5 in 20/52 patients (38%) and T6 in 14/52 (27%)]. In 3 of 12 patients who had abnormalities in a vertebral body or disc as definite point reference, the non-localizer image mislabelled the level. In 11/15 (73%) patients with vitamin E markers that were placed over the upper thoracic spine, the results showed consistency in the level of the markers in relation to the reference points or consistent inter-marker gap between the sequences. Conclusion: There are only two reliable ways to accurately define the levels if no landmarking feature is available on the magnet. The first is by including C2 in the thoracic sequence of a diagnostic quality, and the second is by using an abnormality in the discs or vertebral bodies as a point of reference

  1. Anatomical landmarks and skin markers are not reliable for accurate labeling of thoracic vertebrae on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabshin, Nogah (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-HaShomer (Israel)), e-mail: shabshin@gmail.com; Schweitzer, Mark E. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital and Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada)); Carrino, John A. (Dept. of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Numbering of the thoracic spine on MRI can be tedious if C2 and L5-S1 are not included and may lead to errors in lesion level. Purpose: To determine whether anatomic landmarks or external markers are reliable as an aid for accurate numbering of thoracic vertebrae on MRI. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven thoracic spine MR studies of 67 patients (30 males, 37 females, age range 18-83 years) were studied, composed of 52 consecutive MR studies and an additional 15 MRI in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin. In the 52 thoracic MR examinations potential numbering aids such as the level of the sternal apex, pulmonary artery, aortic arch, and osseous or disc abnormalities were numbered on both cervical localizer (standard of reference) and thoracic sagittal images. The additional 15 examinations in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin were evaluated for consistency in the level of the markers on different sequences in the same exam. Results: The sternal apex level ranged from T2 to T5 [T3 in 28/51 patients (55%), T2 in 10/51 (20%)]. The aortic arch level ranged from T2 to T4 [T4 in 18/48 (38%) and T3 in 17 (35%)]. Pulmonary artery level ranged from T4 to T6-7 disc [T5 in 20/52 patients (38%) and T6 in 14/52 (27%)]. In 3 of 12 patients who had abnormalities in a vertebral body or disc as definite point reference, the non-localizer image mislabelled the level. In 11/15 (73%) patients with vitamin E markers that were placed over the upper thoracic spine, the results showed consistency in the level of the markers in relation to the reference points or consistent inter-marker gap between the sequences. Conclusion: There are only two reliable ways to accurately define the levels if no landmarking feature is available on the magnet. The first is by including C2 in the thoracic sequence of a diagnostic quality, and the second is by using an abnormality in the discs or vertebral bodies as a point of reference

  2. Endoscopic Orientation of the Parasellar Region in Sphenoid Sinus with Ill-Defined Bony Landmarks: An Anatomic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Sameh M.; Ashraf Y. Nasr; Hamid A. Saleh; Foad, Mohamed M.; Herzallah, Islam R.

    2010-01-01

    The sphenoid bony landmarks are important for endoscopic orientation in skull base surgery but show a wide range of variations. We aimed to describe an instructional model for the endoscopic parasellar anatomy in sphenoid sinuses with ill-defined bony landmarks. Five preserved injected cadaveric heads and four sides of dry skulls were studied endoscopically via transethmoid, transsphenoidal approach. The parasellar region was exposed by drilling along the maxillary nerve (V2) canal [the lengt...

  3. Content-Based Visual Landmark Search via Multimodal Hypergraph Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Shen, Jialie; Jin, Hai; Zheng, Ran; Xie, Liang

    2015-12-01

    While content-based landmark image search has recently received a lot of attention and became a very active domain, it still remains a challenging problem. Among the various reasons, high diverse visual content is the most significant one. It is common that for the same landmark, images with a wide range of visual appearances can be found from different sources and different landmarks may share very similar sets of images. As a consequence, it is very hard to accurately estimate the similarities between the landmarks purely based on single type of visual feature. Moreover, the relationships between landmark images can be very complex and how to develop an effective modeling scheme to characterize the associations still remains an open question. Motivated by these concerns, we propose multimodal hypergraph (MMHG) to characterize the complex associations between landmark images. In MMHG, images are modeled as independent vertices and hyperedges contain several vertices corresponding to particular views. Multiple hypergraphs are firstly constructed independently based on different visual modalities to describe the hidden high-order relations from different aspects. Then, they are integrated together to involve discriminative information from heterogeneous sources. We also propose a novel content-based visual landmark search system based on MMHG to facilitate effective search. Distinguished from the existing approaches, we design a unified computational module to support query-specific combination weight learning. An extensive experiment study on a large-scale test collection demonstrates the effectiveness of our scheme over state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:25576590

  4. Adaptive Landmark-Based Navigation System Using Learning Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidan, Bassel; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    The goal-directed navigational ability of animals is an essential prerequisite for them to survive. They can learn to navigate to a distal goal in a complex environment. During this long-distance navigation, they exploit environmental features, like landmarks, to guide them towards their goal. Inspired by this, we develop an adaptive landmark-based navigation system based on sequential reinforcement learning. In addition, correlation-based learning is also integrated into the system to improve l...

  5. An analysis of anatomic landmark mobility and setup errors in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify visible structures in the thorax which exhibit little internal motion during irradiation and, to determine random and systematic setup deviations in lung cancer patients with the use of these structures. Methods: Ten patients with lung cancer were set up in the supine position, and aligned using lasers. No immobilization devices were used. With an electronic portal imaging device (Siemens Beam ViewPLUS), 12 sequential images (exposure 0.54 sec.; processing time 1.5 sec.) were obtained during a single fraction of radiotherapy. These 'movie loops' were generated for the A-P fields during each of 3-5 fractions. In order to determine the mobility of internal structures during each fraction, visible structures such as the trachea, carina, the upper chest wall, aortic arch, clavicle and paraspinal line were contoured manually in each image and matched with the first image of the corresponding movie loop by means of a cross-correlation algorithm. Translations in the cranial and lateral directions and in-plane rotations were determined for each structure separately. As the reference image represents a random position, relative movements were determined by comparing the translations and rotation for every image to the calculated means per movie-loop. Standard deviations of the relative movements were determined for each structure and each patient. Patient setup was evaluated for 15 patients with lung cancer. Setup was not corrected at any time during the treatment. The electronic portal images of each fraction were matched with the digitized simulator films by using a combination of the structures which had been determined to be relatively stable in the infra-fractional analysis. Results: In the infra-fractional analysis 120 to 380 matches were made per structure (a total of 1400). The standard deviation (SD) of translations in the lateral direction was small (?1 mm) for the trachea, thoracic wall, paraspinal line and aortic arch. This was also the case for the SD of the translations in the cranial direction of the clavicle, aortic arch and upper thoracic wall. The carina was found to be relatively mobile (up to 6 mm) in both directions. The SD for in-plane rotations was negligible (<0.5 deg.) for all structures. The interpatient variation was very small (SD < 0.5 mm). In a preliminary analysis of patient setup, the random errors for translations are 2.0 mm in the lateral direction and 2.4 mm in the cranial direction (1 SD). The standard deviations of systematic errors are about 3 mm in both directions. In plane rotations were found to be negligible. Conclusions: We have identified a number of structures which exhibit little internal motion in the frontal plane, and recommend that a combination of these structures be used as anatomic landmarks for setup verification during radiotherapy of thoracic tumors. Preliminary results indicate that setup errors of patients with lung cancer in our center appear to be acceptable, even though no specific immobilization devices were used

  6. Opacification of tympanic membrane: As an anatomic landmark of oto-radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opacification of tympanic membrane was done by attachment of a cotton patch soaked with contrast media through external meatus. Detailed evaluation of fine structures in middle ear of normal adult is easily done after opacification of tympanic membrane. It was believed that opacified tympanic membrane would be an useful landmark for early detection of cholesteatoma and a good marker also in tomography of temporal bone.

  7. Adaptive Landmark-Based Navigation System Using Learning Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidan, Bassel; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha

    2014-01-01

    The goal-directed navigational ability of animals is an essential prerequisite for them to survive. They can learn to navigate to a distal goal in a complex environment. During this long-distance navigation, they exploit environmental features, like landmarks, to guide them towards their goal. Inspired by this, we develop an adaptive landmark-based navigation system based on sequential reinforcement learning. In addition, correlation-based learning is also integrated into the system to improve learning performance. The proposed system has been applied to simulated simple wheeled and more complex hexapod robots. As a result, it allows the robots to successfully learn to navigate to distal goals in complex environments.

  8. Is the omega sign a reliable landmark for the neurosurgical team? An anatomical study about the central sulcus region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe central sulcus region is an eloquent area situated between the frontal and parietal lobes. During neurosurgical procedures, it is sometimes difficult to understand the cortical anatomy of this region.Objective Find alternative ways to anatomically navigate in this region during neurosurgical procedures.Method We analyzed eighty two human hemispheres using a surgical microscope and completed a review of the literature about central sulcus region.Results In 68/82 hemispheres, the central sulcus did not reach the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus. A knob on the second curve of the precentral gyrus was reliably identified in only 64/82 hemispheres.Conclusion The morphometric data presented in this article can be useful as supplementary method to identify the central sulcus region landmarks.

  9. Is the omega sign a reliable landmark for the neurosurgical team? An anatomical study about the central sulcus region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Thiago; Rodrigues, Mariana; Paz, Daniel; Costa, Marcos Devanir; Santos, Bruno; Braga, Vinicius; Paiva Neto, Manoel de; Centeno, Ricardo; Cavalheiro, Sergio; Chaddad-Neto, Feres

    2015-11-01

    The central sulcus region is an eloquent area situated between the frontal and parietal lobes. During neurosurgical procedures, it is sometimes difficult to understand the cortical anatomy of this region.Objective Find alternative ways to anatomically navigate in this region during neurosurgical procedures.Method We analyzed eighty two human hemispheres using a surgical microscope and completed a review of the literature about central sulcus region.Results In 68/82 hemispheres, the central sulcus did not reach the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus. A knob on the second curve of the precentral gyrus was reliably identified in only 64/82 hemispheres.Conclusion The morphometric data presented in this article can be useful as supplementary method to identify the central sulcus region landmarks. PMID:26517217

  10. Describing Wing Geometry of Aedes Aegypti Using Landmark-Based Geometric Morphometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    udy P. Sendaydiego

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Insect wing morphology has been used in many studies to describe variations among species and populations using traditional morphometrics and more recently, geometric morphometrics. This study was conducted to determine intraspecific divergence in wing shape and venation in Aedes aegypti using landmark-based geometric morphometrics. In the Philippines, Ae. aegypti has been identified as a common dengue vector species. With the increasing cases of dengue, mosquito control programs are faced with problems on vector species diversification and proper identification. Variation in wing geometry may provide relevant information on proper identification of species and in describing population diversity. In this study, the geometry of 30 wings of female Ae. Aegypti was described using 18 anatomical landmarks and subjected to Procrustes superimposition and relative warp analysis. Results of the relative warp analysis showed some intraspecific variation in the wing outline of Ae. aegypti. The observed morphological disparity in wing shape suggest a possible morphological divergence among populations of Ae. aegypti. Based from the results of the study, landmark-based geometric morphometrics is a good tool in describing quantitatively variations in wing shape of the mosquitoes.

  11. Referências anatômicas na cirurgia do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral / Anatomical landmarks in auditory brainstem implant surgery

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rubens Vuono, Brito Neto; Ricardo Ferreira, Bento; Alexandre, Yasuda; Guilherme Carvalhal, Ribas; Aldo Junqueira, Rodrigues Jr..

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O implante auditivo de tronco cerebral é uma opção os pacientes surdos que não têm a integridade das vias auditivas preservada. A cirurgia, por sua complexidade anatômica e funcional, requer treinamento específico em laboratório de anatomia por parte do cirurgião. OBJETIVOS: Estudar a anatomia cirúr [...] gica da cirurgia do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo anatômico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Neste estudo dissecamos cadáver fresco preparado com solução corante injetada nas artérias e veias intra-cranianas. O local de inserção do eletrodo do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral foi estudado através do acesso translabiríntico. RESULTADOS: A técnica cirúrgica utilizada para a implantação do eletrodo de tronco cerebral é semelhante à utilizada na remoção do shwannoma vestibular. O complexo de núcleo coclear, composto pelo núcleo coclear ventral e dorsal, é o local para a colocação do eletrodo. O núcleo coclear ventral é o principal núcleo de transmissão de impulsos neurais do VIII par e seus axônios formam a principal via ascendente do nervo coclear. Tanto o núcleo ventral como o dorsal não são visíveis durante a cirurgia e sua localização depende de identificação de estruturas anatômicas adjacentes. CONCLUSÃO: A região de implantação do eletrodo do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral apresenta referências anatômicas que permitem sua fácil identificação durante a cirurgia. Abstract in english Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) is an option for deaf patients who do not have the whole auditory pathways preserved. The surgery, because of its anatomical and functional complexity, requires specific training of the surgeon in an anatomy lab. AIM: To study the surgical anatomy of the auditory bra [...] instem implant surgery. STUDY DESIGN: Anatomic study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: In the present study, we dissected a fresh cadaver prepared with a dye solution injected into the arteries and intracranial veins. The location of the insertion of the ABI electrode was studied through translabyrinthine access. RESULTS: The surgical technique used for implanting the brainstem electrode is similar to that used in the removal of vestibular schwannoma. The cochlear nucleus complex, comprising ventral and dorsal cochlear nuclei, is the optimal electrode site. The ventral cochlear nucleus is the principal nucleus for transmission of neural impulses from the 8th pair and form the main ascending route of the cochlear nerve. Neither the ventral nor the dorsal nuclei are visible during surgery and their location depends on the identification of adjacent anatomical structures. CONCLUSION: The region for the implantation of the electrode in the auditory brainstem implant presents anatomical landmarks that allow its easy identification during surgery.

  12. Referências anatômicas na cirurgia do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral Anatomical landmarks in auditory brainstem implant surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Vuono Brito Neto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O implante auditivo de tronco cerebral é uma opção os pacientes surdos que não têm a integridade das vias auditivas preservada. A cirurgia, por sua complexidade anatômica e funcional, requer treinamento específico em laboratório de anatomia por parte do cirurgião. OBJETIVOS: Estudar a anatomia cirúrgica da cirurgia do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo anatômico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Neste estudo dissecamos cadáver fresco preparado com solução corante injetada nas artérias e veias intra-cranianas. O local de inserção do eletrodo do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral foi estudado através do acesso translabiríntico. RESULTADOS: A técnica cirúrgica utilizada para a implantação do eletrodo de tronco cerebral é semelhante à utilizada na remoção do shwannoma vestibular. O complexo de núcleo coclear, composto pelo núcleo coclear ventral e dorsal, é o local para a colocação do eletrodo. O núcleo coclear ventral é o principal núcleo de transmissão de impulsos neurais do VIII par e seus axônios formam a principal via ascendente do nervo coclear. Tanto o núcleo ventral como o dorsal não são visíveis durante a cirurgia e sua localização depende de identificação de estruturas anatômicas adjacentes. CONCLUSÃO: A região de implantação do eletrodo do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral apresenta referências anatômicas que permitem sua fácil identificação durante a cirurgia.Auditory brainstem implant (ABI is an option for deaf patients who do not have the whole auditory pathways preserved. The surgery, because of its anatomical and functional complexity, requires specific training of the surgeon in an anatomy lab. AIM: To study the surgical anatomy of the auditory brainstem implant surgery. STUDY DESIGN: Anatomic study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: In the present study, we dissected a fresh cadaver prepared with a dye solution injected into the arteries and intracranial veins. The location of the insertion of the ABI electrode was studied through translabyrinthine access. RESULTS: The surgical technique used for implanting the brainstem electrode is similar to that used in the removal of vestibular schwannoma. The cochlear nucleus complex, comprising ventral and dorsal cochlear nuclei, is the optimal electrode site. The ventral cochlear nucleus is the principal nucleus for transmission of neural impulses from the 8th pair and form the main ascending route of the cochlear nerve. Neither the ventral nor the dorsal nuclei are visible during surgery and their location depends on the identification of adjacent anatomical structures. CONCLUSION: The region for the implantation of the electrode in the auditory brainstem implant presents anatomical landmarks that allow its easy identification during surgery.

  13. An analysis of anatomic landmark mobility and setup deviations in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify thoracic structures that exhibit little internal motion during irradiation and to determine setup variations in patients with lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional images were generated with an electronic portal-imaging device from the AP fields of 10 patients, during several fractions. To determine the intrafractional mobility of thoracic structures, visible structures were contoured in every image and matched with a reference image by means of a cross-correlation algorithm. Setup variations were determined by comparing portal images with the digitized simulator films using the stable structures as landmarks. Results: Mobility was limited in the lateral direction for the trachea, thoracic wall, paraspinal line, and aortic notch, and in the craniocaudal direction for the clavicle, aortic notch, and thoracic wall. Analysis of patient setup revealed random deviations of 2.0 mm (1 SD) in the lateral direction and 2.8 mm in the craniocaudal direction, while the systematic deviations were 2.5 and 2.0 mm (1 SD) respectively. Conclusions: We have identified thoracic structures that exhibit little internal motion in the frontal plane, and recommend that these structures be used for verifying patient setup during radiotherapy. The daily variation in the setup of lung cancer patients at our center appears to be acceptable

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral trochlea: evaluation of anatomical landmarks and grading articular cartilage in cadaveric knees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, Claus [Marienhospital Vechta, Department of Radiology, Vechta (Germany); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Mo Ahn, Joong [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to define magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings before and after contrast medium opacification of the knee joint in cadaveric specimens to demonstrate anatomical landmarks of the trochlear surface in relation to the neighboring structures, and to evaluate different MRI sequences in the detection of cartilage defects of the trochlear and patellar surface of the knee. The morphology and relationship of the proximal trochlear surface to the prefemoral fat of the distal femur were investigated by use of different MR sequences before and after intra-articular gadolinium administration into the knee joint in ten cadaveric knees. Anatomic sections were subsequently obtained. In addition, evaluation of the articular surface of the trochlea was performed by two independent observers. The cartilage surfaces were graded using a 2-point system, and results were compared with macroscopic findings. Of 40 cartilage surfaces evaluated, histopathologic findings showed 9 normal surfaces, 20 containing partial-thickness defects, and 11 containing full-thickness defects. Compared with macroscopic data, sensitivity of MR sequences for the two reviewers was between 17 and 90%; specificity, 75 and 100%; positive predictive value, 75 and 100%; negative predictive value, 20 and 100%, depending on patellar or trochlea lesions. Interobserver variability for the presence of disease, which was measured using the kappa statistic, was dependent on the MR sequence used between 0.243 and 0.851. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences can be used to evaluate the cartilage of the trochlear surface with less accuracy when compared with the results of grading the articular cartilage of the patella. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral trochlea: evaluation of anatomical landmarks and grading articular cartilage in cadaveric knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to define magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings before and after contrast medium opacification of the knee joint in cadaveric specimens to demonstrate anatomical landmarks of the trochlear surface in relation to the neighboring structures, and to evaluate different MRI sequences in the detection of cartilage defects of the trochlear and patellar surface of the knee. The morphology and relationship of the proximal trochlear surface to the prefemoral fat of the distal femur were investigated by use of different MR sequences before and after intra-articular gadolinium administration into the knee joint in ten cadaveric knees. Anatomic sections were subsequently obtained. In addition, evaluation of the articular surface of the trochlea was performed by two independent observers. The cartilage surfaces were graded using a 2-point system, and results were compared with macroscopic findings. Of 40 cartilage surfaces evaluated, histopathologic findings showed 9 normal surfaces, 20 containing partial-thickness defects, and 11 containing full-thickness defects. Compared with macroscopic data, sensitivity of MR sequences for the two reviewers was between 17 and 90%; specificity, 75 and 100%; positive predictive value, 75 and 100%; negative predictive value, 20 and 100%, depending on patellar or trochlea lesions. Interobserver variability for the presence of disease, which was measured using the kappa statistic, was dependent on the MR sequence used between 0.243 and 0.851. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences can be used to evaluate the cartilage of the trochlear surface with less accuracy when compared with the results of grading the articular cartilage of the patella. (orig.)

  16. Infraorbital nerve block within the Pterygopalatine fossa of the horse: anatomical landmarks defined by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to provide anaesthesia of the equine maxillary cheek teeth, a local nerve block of the infraorbital nerve in the pterygopalatine fossa had been proposed, which is referred to as the 'Palatine Bone Insertion' (PBI). As several complications with this method were reported, our study was designed to recommend a modified injection technique which avoids the risk of puncturing of relevant anatomical structures. Five cadaver heads and two living horses were examined by contrast medium injections and subsequent computed tomography (CT). Spinal needles were inserted using two different insertion techniques: The above mentioned (PBI), and a modification called 'Extraperiorbital Fat Body Insertion' (EFBI). Both techniques (PBI and EFBI) provide a consistent distribution of contrast medium around the infraorbital nerve. However, only the EFBI technique is appropriate to minimize the risk of complications. This study is an example for the permanent challenge of anatomists to supply a basis for clinical and surgical procedures

  17. Evaluation of polynomial image deformation for matching of 3D- abdominal MR-images using anatomical landmarks and for atlas construction

    CERN Document Server

    Kimiaei, S; Jonsson, E; Crafoord, J; Maguire, G Q

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the potential usability of linear and non-linear (polynomial) 3D-warping for constructing an atlas by matching abdominal MR-images from a number of different individuals using manually picked anatomical landmarks. The significance of this study lies in the fact that it illustrates the potential to use polynomial matching at a local or organ level. This is a necessary requirement for constructing an atlas and for fine intra-patient image matching and fusion. Finally 3D-image warping using anatomical landmark for inter-patient intra-modality image co-registration and fusion was found to be a very powerful and robust method. Additionally it can be used for intra-patient inter- modality image matching.

  18. Retzius-sparing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: Critical appraisal of the anatomic landmarks for a complete intrafascial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimakopoulos, Anastasios D; Miano, Roberto; Galfano, Antonio; Bocciardi, Aldo Massimo; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Spera, Enrico; Gaston, Richard

    2015-10-01

    To provide an overview of the anatomical landmarks needed to guide a retropubic (Retzius)-sparing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), and a step-by-step description of the surgical technique that maximizes preservation of the periprostatic neural network. The anatomy of the pelvic fossae is presented, including the recto-vesical pouch (pouch of Douglas) created by the reflections of the peritoneum. The actual technique of the trans-Douglas, intrafascial nerve-sparing robotic radical prostatectomy is described. The technique allows the prostate gland to be shelled out from under the overlying detrusor apron and dorsal vascular complex (DVC-Santorini plexus), entirely avoiding the pubovesical ligaments. There is no need to control the DVC, since the line of dissection passes beneath the plexus. Three key points to ensure enhanced nerve preservation should be respected: (1) the tips of the seminal vesicles, enclosed in a "cage" of neuronal tissue; a seminal vesicle-sparing technique is therefore advised when oncologically safe; (2) the external prostate-vesicular angle; (3) the lateral surface of the prostate gland and the apex. The principles of tension and energy-free dissection should guide all the maneuvers in order to minimize neuropathy. Using robotic technology, a complete intrafascial dissection of the prostate gland can be achieved through the Douglas space, reducing surgical trauma and providing excellent functional and oncological outcomes. PMID:26194970

  19. Evidence consistent with the multiple-bearings hypothesis from human virtual landmark-based navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Forloines, Martha R.; Bodily, Kent D.; Sturz, Bradley R.

    2015-01-01

    One approach to explaining the conditions under which additional landmarks will be learned or ignored relates to the nature of the information provided by the landmarks (i.e., distance versus bearings). In the current experiment, we tested the ability of such an approach to explain the search behavior of human participants in a virtual landmark-based navigation task by manipulating whether landmarks provided stable distance, stable direction, or both stable distance and stable direction infor...

  20. Interfraction Displacement of Primary Tumor and Involved Lymph Nodes Relative to Anatomic Landmarks in Image Guided Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze primary tumor (PT) and lymph node (LN) position changes relative to each other and relative to anatomic landmarks during conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In 12 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer PT, LN, carina, and 1 thoracic vertebra were manually contoured on weekly 4-dimensional fan-beam CT scans. Systematic and random interfraction displacements of all contoured structures were identified in the 3 cardinal directions, and resulting setup margins were calculated. Time trends and the effect of volume changes on displacements were analyzed. Results: Three-dimensional displacement vectors and systematic/random interfraction displacements were smaller for carina than for vertebra both for PT and LN. For PT, mean (SD) 3-dimensional displacement vectors with carina-based alignment were 7 (4) mm versus 9 (5) mm with bony anatomy (P.05). Displacements between PT and bone (P=.04) and between PT and LN (P=.01) were significantly correlated with PT volume regression. Displacements between LN and carina were correlated with LN volume change (P=.03). Conclusions: Carina-based setup results in a more reproducible PT and LN alignment than bony anatomy setup. Considering the independence of PT and LN displacement and the impact of volume regression on displacements over time, repeated CT imaging even with PT-based alignment is recommended in locally advanced disease

  1. Is peritoneal reflection the best anatomical repair landmark in experimental colorectal surgery on rats? / A reflexão peritoneal é o melhor reparo anatômico na cirurgia experimental colorretal em ratos?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Denise Gonçalves, Priolli; Pamela Lícia Eiras da, Silva; Adriane Moro, Betini; José Aires, Pereira; Nelson Fontana, Margarido; Carlos Augusto Real, Martinez.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Validar a placa de Peyer como reparo anatômico para a cirurgia colorretal em ratos e mensurar a quantidade de colágeno em segmentos da parede cólica que contém ou não a placa de Peyer. MÉTODOS: Foi aferida a distância entre a placa de Peyer e a reflexão peritoneal em 45 ratos Wistar. O cól [...] on e o reto foram ressecados, para a quantificação do colágeno, por meio de análise de imagem assistida por computador, em regiões do cólon que continham ou não a placa de Peyer. RESULTADOS: Existe grande variação entre a distância da placa de Peyer e a reflexão peritoneal quando se consideraram os animais de ambos os gêneros como grupo único (p= 0.04), sendo a distância entre a placa e a reflexão peritoneal maior entre as fêmeas (p=0.001). Constatou-se que o segmento cólico que contém a placa de Peyer apresenta conteúdo menor de colágeno quando comparado ao segmento onde a estrutura não estava presente (p=0.02). CONCLUSÃO: A placa de Peyer pode ser indicada como reparo anatômico e no estudo da cicatrização de anastomoses colorretais em ratos, baseado nas diferentes quantidades de colágeno tecidual existente na parede cólica que contém ou não esta estrutura. Abstract in english PURPOSE: To validate Peyer's patch as an anatomical repair landmark for colorectal surgery in rats and to measure the collagen content in segments of the colon containing or not containing Peyer's patch. METHODS: The distance between Peyer's patch and the peritoneal reflection was measured in forty- [...] five Wistar rats. The colon and rectum were resected for quantification of collagen content by means of computer-assisted image analysis in regions of the colon with and without Peyer's patch. RESULTS: There was great variation in the distance between Peyer's patch and the peritoneal reflection when the male and female rats were considered as a single group (p=0.04). Comparison between the genders showed that the distance between the patch and the peritoneal reflection was greater in female than in male rats (p=0.001). The colonic segment containing Peyer's patch was observed to have lower tissue collagen content than the segment in which this structure was not present (p=0.02). CONCLUSION: Peyer's patch can be indicated as an anatomical repair landmark, and there is a need to study the healing of colorectal anastomoses in rats based on differing quantities of tissue collagen existing in the colonic wall with or without this structure.

  2. Is peritoneal reflection the best anatomical repair landmark in experimental colorectal surgery on rats? A reflexão peritoneal é o melhor reparo anatômico na cirurgia experimental colorretal em ratos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Gonçalves Priolli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To validate Peyer's patch as an anatomical repair landmark for colorectal surgery in rats and to measure the collagen content in segments of the colon containing or not containing Peyer's patch. METHODS: The distance between Peyer's patch and the peritoneal reflection was measured in forty-five Wistar rats. The colon and rectum were resected for quantification of collagen content by means of computer-assisted image analysis in regions of the colon with and without Peyer's patch. RESULTS: There was great variation in the distance between Peyer's patch and the peritoneal reflection when the male and female rats were considered as a single group (p=0.04. Comparison between the genders showed that the distance between the patch and the peritoneal reflection was greater in female than in male rats (p=0.001. The colonic segment containing Peyer's patch was observed to have lower tissue collagen content than the segment in which this structure was not present (p=0.02. CONCLUSION: Peyer's patch can be indicated as an anatomical repair landmark, and there is a need to study the healing of colorectal anastomoses in rats based on differing quantities of tissue collagen existing in the colonic wall with or without this structure.OBJETIVO: Validar a placa de Peyer como reparo anatômico para a cirurgia colorretal em ratos e mensurar a quantidade de colágeno em segmentos da parede cólica que contém ou não a placa de Peyer. MÉTODOS: Foi aferida a distância entre a placa de Peyer e a reflexão peritoneal em 45 ratos Wistar. O cólon e o reto foram ressecados, para a quantificação do colágeno, por meio de análise de imagem assistida por computador, em regiões do cólon que continham ou não a placa de Peyer. RESULTADOS: Existe grande variação entre a distância da placa de Peyer e a reflexão peritoneal quando se consideraram os animais de ambos os gêneros como grupo único (p= 0.04, sendo a distância entre a placa e a reflexão peritoneal maior entre as fêmeas (p=0.001. Constatou-se que o segmento cólico que contém a placa de Peyer apresenta conteúdo menor de colágeno quando comparado ao segmento onde a estrutura não estava presente (p=0.02. CONCLUSÃO: A placa de Peyer pode ser indicada como reparo anatômico e no estudo da cicatrização de anastomoses colorretais em ratos, baseado nas diferentes quantidades de colágeno tecidual existente na parede cólica que contém ou não esta estrutura.

  3. The Comparison of Learning Radiographic Extraoral Anatomic Landmarks through Lecture and blended method(Computer-Assisted teaching and Lecture:An interventional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T ahmine Razi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the main problems in learning extraoral radiographic anatomic indexes is the long interval between presentation of radiology and human anatomy courses, resulting in forgetting anatomic regions. Therefore, radiographic indexes are formed as complete abstract and transient images in students’ minds; as a result, their learning and retention decrease. The aim of this study was to compare lecture with combination of computer-assisted learning and lecture of extra-oral radiographic landmarks among dental students. Methods: This interventional study was carried out in 2009 on 51 dental students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Students were randomly allocated into two groups. The first group was taught through a teaching method which involved lectures in the classroom. In the second group, a CD was given to the students. The teaching was accomplished through presentation using skull. Six months after finishing the teaching, both groups took a similar test for evaluation of long term learning. The data was analyzed by SPSS 16 using U Mann-Whitney test. Results: There was no significant differences in the mean scores between the two groups in the first exam after teaching (P=0.13, yet it was significant in the second exam (regarding retention (P=0.006, and average of non-traditional teaching method group (20.89±10.23 was higher than that of lecture group (13.48±6.39. Conclusion: Based on the results, non-traditional technique of teaching was not more effective than the lecture in short-term learning but in longterm learning, non-traditional technique was more effective than the lecture.

  4. Interfraction Displacement of Primary Tumor and Involved Lymph Nodes Relative to Anatomic Landmarks in Image Guided Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Nuzhat; Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Nitai [Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Weiss, Elisabeth, E-mail: eweiss@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze primary tumor (PT) and lymph node (LN) position changes relative to each other and relative to anatomic landmarks during conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In 12 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer PT, LN, carina, and 1 thoracic vertebra were manually contoured on weekly 4-dimensional fan-beam CT scans. Systematic and random interfraction displacements of all contoured structures were identified in the 3 cardinal directions, and resulting setup margins were calculated. Time trends and the effect of volume changes on displacements were analyzed. Results: Three-dimensional displacement vectors and systematic/random interfraction displacements were smaller for carina than for vertebra both for PT and LN. For PT, mean (SD) 3-dimensional displacement vectors with carina-based alignment were 7 (4) mm versus 9 (5) mm with bony anatomy (P<.0001). For LN, smaller displacements were found with carina- (5 [3] mm, P<.0001) and vertebra-based (6 [3] mm, P=.002) alignment compared with using PT for setup (8 [5] mm). Primary tumor and LN displacements relative to bone and carina were independent (P>.05). Displacements between PT and bone (P=.04) and between PT and LN (P=.01) were significantly correlated with PT volume regression. Displacements between LN and carina were correlated with LN volume change (P=.03). Conclusions: Carina-based setup results in a more reproducible PT and LN alignment than bony anatomy setup. Considering the independence of PT and LN displacement and the impact of volume regression on displacements over time, repeated CT imaging even with PT-based alignment is recommended in locally advanced disease.

  5. Computing Topology Preservation of RBF Transformations for Landmark-Based Image Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Cavoretto, R; De Rossi, A; Qiao, H.; Quatember, B.; Recheis, W.; Mayr, M.

    2014-01-01

    In image registration, a proper transformation should be topology preserving. Especially for landmark-based image registration, if the displacement of one landmark is larger enough than those of neighbourhood landmarks, topology violation will be occurred. This paper aim to analyse the topology preservation of some Radial Basis Functions (RBFs) which are used to model deformations in image registration. Mat\\'{e}rn functions are quite common in the statistic literature (see, ...

  6. Landmark based registration of 18F FDG PET to CT in patients with head and neck cancer: Case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have suggested that 18F-FDG PET can be of assistance in the monitoring of disease activity in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radical radiotherapy treatment. Provided that an adequate period of time elapses between radiotherapy treatment and FDG-PET scanning, this metabolic imaging modality has distinct advantages over anatomical imaging modalities such as CT or MRI which rely largely on changes in size, contrast enhancement and radiodensity of residual mass. The distinction between radiation necrosis and residual tumour is particularly difficult with these modalities. Co-registration of anatomical images from CT or MRI with metabolic images from FDG-PET in this setting may help to locate residual tumour tissue more accurately than PET alone. THE PET scan was peformed on a Siemens 951/3t R PET scanner (6.5 mm in-plane resolution). Patients were positioned supine on the bed in the radiotherapy planning mask to hold the head and neck immobile. A three-bed transmission scan was peformed followed by an intravenous injection of 370 MBq of 18F-FDG. After a 45 min uptake period, a three-bed emission scan was performed to complete the study. Contrast enhanced CT was pedormed on a Picker PQ2000 helical CT scanner. Patients were scanned supine on the bed in the radiotherapy planning mask at a resolution of 21 line pairs/cm. Landmark based registration was used to co-register the PET mages to the CT images. The algorithm uses an analytic linear least-squares solution for a 12 parameter fit of at least 12 operator defined anatomical homologous landmarks in the two image volumes. Both the CT and PET scans include an area of the patient from the base of the brain to the lung apices, thus providing sufficient landmarks for the registration algorithm. We present two patients in whom FDG-PET and CT were used as tools in monitoring disease activity

  7. Indoor Localization System based on Artificial Landmarks and Monocular Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Paulo G.; A. Paulo Moreira; Andry Maykol G. Pinto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a visual localization approach well suited for the domestic and industrial environments due to its ability to provide an accurate, reliable and robust pose estimation.The mobile robot is equipped with a single camera to update their pose whenever a landmark is available on the field of view.The innovation presented by this research focus, especially, on the artificial landmark that has the ability to detect the presence of the robot, sinceboth entities communicates with ea...

  8. The Reproducibility of a Kinematically-Derived Axis of the Knee versus Digitized Anatomical Landmarks using a Knee Navigation System

    OpenAIRE

    Doro, Lisa Case; Hughes, Richard E.; Miller, Joshua D.; Schultz, Karl F; Hallstrom, Brian; Urquhart, Andrew G

    2008-01-01

    Component position is critical to longevity of knee arthroplasties. Femoral component rotation is typically referenced from the transepicondylar axis (TEA), the anterior-posterior (AP) axis or the posterior condylar axis. Other studies have shown high variability in locating the TEA while proposing digitization of other landmarks such as the AP axis as a less-variable reference. This study uses a navigation system to compare the reproducibility of computing a kinematically-derived, navigated ...

  9. Integrated landmark and outline-based morphometric methods efficiently distinguish species of Euglossa (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Euglossini)

    OpenAIRE

    Francoy, Tiago; Faria Franco, Fernando; Roubik, David

    2012-01-01

    Morphometric methods permit identification of insect species and are an aid for taxonomy. Quantitative wing traits were used to identify male euglossine bees. Landmark- and outline-based methods have been primarily used independently. Here, we combine the two methods using five Euglossa. Landmark-based methods correctly classified 84% and outline-based 77%, but an integrated analysis correctly classified 91% of samples. Some species presented significantly high reclassification percentages wh...

  10. Anatomical landmarks for the localization of the greater palatine foramen--a study of 1200 head CTs, 150 dry skulls, systematic review of literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Kmiotek, Elizabeth K; Pena, Iwona Z; Urbanik, Andrzej; Nowakowski, Micha?; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of greater palatine foramen (GPF) anatomy is necessary when performing a variety of anaesthesiological, dental or surgical procedures. The first aim of this study was to localize the GPF in relation to multiple anatomical landmarks. The second aim was to perform a systematic review of literature, and to conduct a meta-analysis on the subject of GPF position to aid clinicians in their practice. One-hundred and fifty dry, adult, human skulls and 1200 archived head computed tomography scans were assessed and measured in terms of GPF relation to other anatomical reference points. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases, and a meta-analysis on the subject of GPF relation to the maxillary molars was conducted. On average, in the Polish population, the GPF was positioned 15.9?±?1.5?mm from the midline maxillary suture (MMS), 3.0?±?1.2?mm from the alveolar ridge (AR) and 17.0?±?1.5?mm from the posterior nasal spine (PNS); 74.7% of GPF were positioned opposite the third maxillary molar (M3). Twenty-seven studies were included in the systematic review and 23 in the meta-analysis (n?=?6927 GPF). The pooled prevalence of the GPF being positioned opposite the M3 was 63.9% (95% confidence interval?=?56.6-70.9%). Concluding, the GPF is most often located opposite the M3 in the majority of the world's populations. The maxillary molars are the best landmarks for locating the GPF. In edentulous patients the most useful points for approximating the position of the GPF are the AR, MMS and PNS. This study introduces an easy and repeatable classification to reference the GPF to the maxillary molars. PMID:25131842

  11. Optimal reinforcement of training datasets in semi-supervised landmark-based segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2015-03-01

    During the last couple of decades, the development of computerized image segmentation shifted from unsupervised to supervised methods, which made segmentation results more accurate and robust. However, the main disadvantage of supervised segmentation is a need for manual image annotation that is time-consuming and subjected to human error. To reduce the need for manual annotation, we propose a novel learning approach for training dataset reinforcement in the area of landmark-based segmentation, where newly detected landmarks are optimally combined with reference landmarks from the training dataset and therefore enriches the training process. The approach is formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem, where the solution is a vector of weighting factors that measures how reliable are the detected landmarks. The detected landmarks that are found to be more reliable are included into the training procedure with higher weighting factors, whereas the detected landmarks that are found to be less reliable are included with lower weighting factors. The approach is integrated into the landmark-based game-theoretic segmentation framework and validated against the problem of lung field segmentation from chest radiographs.

  12. A class of spline functions for landmark-based image registration

    OpenAIRE

    De Rossi, Alessandra; Cavoretto, Roberto; Allasia, Giampietro

    2012-01-01

    A class of spline functions, called Lobachevsky splines, is proposed for landmark-based image registration. Analytic expressions of Lobachevsky splines and some of their properties are given, reasoning in the context of probability theory. Since these functions have simple analytic expressions and compact support, landmark-based transformations can be advantageously defined using them. Numerical results point out accuracy and stability of Lobachevsky splines, comparing them with Gaussians and...

  13. Vision-based Navigation Using Landmark Recognition for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Mannberg, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes a new approach for a vision-based positioning system for Un- manned Aerial Vehicles using a recognition method based on known, robust geo- graphic landmarks. Landmarks are used to calculate a position estimate in a global coordinate frame without requiring external signals, such as GPS. Absolute systems are of interest as they provide a redundant positioning system, allow UAVs to oper- ate when GPS-denied and can enable high-precision landings for spacecra...

  14. Landmark-based versus ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve blocks in the treatment of chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trainor D

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Drew Trainor,1 Susan Moeschler,2 Matthew Pingree,1,2 Brian Hoelzer,2 Zhen Wang,2 William Mauck,2 Wenchun Qu1,2 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USABackground: Chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain (CPGP is a debilitating condition, which is often refractory to conservative medical management. To our knowledge, there have been no studies directly comparing landmarked-based and ultrasound-guided approaches in this population.Objective: To compare the effectiveness of landmark-based and ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve blocks in the treatment of CPGP.Study design: This is a retrospective chart review of patients who presented to our tertiary care pain medicine clinic with a diagnosis of CPGP. Inclusion criteria were the following: age >18 years, diagnosis of groin pain, and prior history of herniorrhaphy. Exclusion criteria included those who were seen for initial consultation but were lost to follow-up. Primary outcomes were 50% or greater reduction in pain on visual analog scale (VAS. Secondary outcomes were 30% or greater reduction in VAS pain score, changes in VAS pain scores, and reported complications.Results: A total of 36 patients were included in the study. Of them, 20 patients underwent the landmark-based and 16 underwent the ultrasound-guided techniques. There was no significant difference in baseline demographics. The average VAS score preinjection was 7.08 in the landmark-based and 7.0 in the ultrasound-guided groups (P=0.65. A total of 14 patients (70% in the landmark-based and eleven patients (79% in the ultrasound-guided groups experienced at least a 50% reduction in VAS scores. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P=1.0, and no complications were noted. We also did not find a significant difference in terms of number of patients with 30% or greater reduction (P=0.71 and changes in VAS pain scores (P=0.64. No complications were reported in either group.Conclusion: In our study, there was no statistically significant difference between the landmark-based and ultrasound-guided groups in terms of a reduction in VAS pain scores, and no complications were noted in either group.Keywords: abdominal wall, intramuscular injections, ultrasound, anatomic landmarks

  15. Landmark Detection via Ann for a Web Based Autonomous Mobile Robot: Sunar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Y?lmaz

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a landmark detection method was developed for finding or position correction of a web based mobile robot designed and implemented for long term and regular scientific purposes. Colored numeric and alphanumeric character sticker in place of other artificial landmarks appropriate for robot is selected to be landmark for understanding of both human and robot. Statistical analysis of captured and segmented image part is used for feature vector extraction. Statistical properties of histogram, projections and image raw data are selectable components of feature vector. The feature vector is tested by previously trained multilayer perceptron feed forward neural network (ANN. For this aim, online programs required for robotic activities, image processing and neural network processes have been developed on web interface of web-robot. In this program, improved software libraries for SUNAR system are employed. Real time results and robot scenes are monitored online on web portal.

  16. Robust 3D face landmark localization based on local coordinate coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingli; Tao, Dacheng; Sun, Shengpeng; Chen, Chun; Maybank, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    In the 3D facial animation and synthesis community, input faces are usually required to be labeled by a set of landmarks for parameterization. Because of the variations in pose, expression and resolution, automatic 3D face landmark localization remains a challenge. In this paper, a novel landmark localization approach is presented. The approach is based on local coordinate coding (LCC) and consists of two stages. In the first stage, we perform nose detection, relying on the fact that the nose shape is usually invariant under the variations in the pose, expression, and resolution. Then, we use the iterative closest points algorithm to find a 3D affine transformation that aligns the input face to a reference face. In the second stage, we perform resampling to build correspondences between the input 3D face and the training faces. Then, an LCC-based localization algorithm is proposed to obtain the positions of the landmarks in the input face. Experimental results show that the proposed method is comparable to state of the art methods in terms of its robustness, flexibility, and accuracy. PMID:25296404

  17. Can osseous landmarks in the distal medial humerus be used to identify the attachment sites of ligaments and tendons: paleopathologic-anatomic imaging study in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe osseous landmarks that allow identification of the attachments of the ligaments and tendons in the distal medial aspect of the humerus. Reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus were identified in 34 well-preserved specimens from a paleopathologic collection. These osseous landmarks were then sought in magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten cadaveric elbow specimens so that the ease of their visualization and optimal imaging plane could be assessed. To assign these osseous landmarks to specific attachments of the tendons and ligaments in the distal medial humerus, we cut the specimens in slices and photographed and examined them. Subsequently, the prevalence of these osseous landmarks as well as the attachment sites of the tendons and ligaments in this location was determined. We determined ten reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus, their prevalence and ease of identification, and their relationship to the attachments of the tendons and ligaments at the medial distal humerus. It is possible to use osseous landmarks at the distal medial humerus to facilitate identification of the different attachments of tendons and ligaments when MR images of the elbow are assessed. (orig.)

  18. Can osseous landmarks in the distal medial humerus be used to identify the attachment sites of ligaments and tendons: paleopathologic-anatomic imaging study in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Zoner, Cristiane S.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Randall, Tori D. [San Diego Museum of Man, Physical Anthropology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To describe osseous landmarks that allow identification of the attachments of the ligaments and tendons in the distal medial aspect of the humerus. Reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus were identified in 34 well-preserved specimens from a paleopathologic collection. These osseous landmarks were then sought in magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten cadaveric elbow specimens so that the ease of their visualization and optimal imaging plane could be assessed. To assign these osseous landmarks to specific attachments of the tendons and ligaments in the distal medial humerus, we cut the specimens in slices and photographed and examined them. Subsequently, the prevalence of these osseous landmarks as well as the attachment sites of the tendons and ligaments in this location was determined. We determined ten reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus, their prevalence and ease of identification, and their relationship to the attachments of the tendons and ligaments at the medial distal humerus. It is possible to use osseous landmarks at the distal medial humerus to facilitate identification of the different attachments of tendons and ligaments when MR images of the elbow are assessed. (orig.)

  19. Visual Homing in the Absence of Feature-Based Landmark Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillner, Sabine; Weiss, Anja M.; Mallot, Hanspeter A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite that fact that landmarks play a prominent role in human navigation, experimental evidence on how landmarks are selected and defined by human navigators remains elusive. Indeed, the concept of a "landmark" is itself not entirely clear. In everyday language, the term landmark refers to salient, distinguishable, and usually nameable objects,…

  20. Landmark-based registration using a local radial basis function transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Cavoretto, Roberto; De Rossi, Alessandra; Quatember, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose the use of a local image transformation involving radial basis functions for landmark-based registration of medical images. More precisely, we consider radial basis functions as nodal functions in the modified Shepard method. In this way we obtain an image transformation more accurate and stable than the one given by the global radial basis functions, as shown by numerical results.

  1. A landmark-based method for the geometrical 3D calibration of scanning microscopes

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a new strategy and a spatial method for the geometric calibration of 3D measurement devices at the micro-range, based on spatial reference structures with nanometersized landmarks (nanomarkers). The new method was successfully applied for the 3D calibration of scanning probe microscopes (SPM) and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). Moreover, the spatial method was also used for the photogrammetric self-calibration of scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In order t...

  2. Knee joint secondary motion accuracy improved by quaternion-based optimizer with bony landmark constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongsheng; Zheng, Naiqaun Nigel

    2010-12-01

    Skin marker-based motion analysis has been widely used in biomechanical studies and clinical applications. Unfortunately, the accuracy of knee joint secondary motions is largely limited by the nonrigidity nature of human body segments. Numerous studies have investigated the characteristics of soft tissue movement. Utilizing these characteristics, we may improve the accuracy of knee joint motion measurement. An optimizer was developed by incorporating the soft tissue movement patterns at special bony landmarks into constraint functions. Bony landmark constraints were assigned to the skin markers at femur epicondyles, tibial plateau edges, and tibial tuberosity in a motion analysis algorithm by limiting their allowed position space relative to the underlying bone. The rotation matrix was represented by quaternion, and the constrained optimization problem was solved by Fletcher's version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization technique. The algorithm was validated by using motion data from both skin-based markers and bone-mounted markers attached to fresh cadavers. By comparing the results with the ground truth bone motion generated from the bone-mounted markers, the new algorithm had a significantly higher accuracy (root-mean-square (RMS) error: 0.7 ± 0.1 deg in axial rotation and 0.4 ± 0.1 deg in varus-valgus) in estimating the knee joint secondary rotations than algorithms without bony landmark constraints (RMS error: 1.7 ± 0.4 deg in axial rotation and 0.7 ± 0.1 deg in varus-valgus). Also, it predicts a more accurate medial-lateral translation (RMS error: 0.4 ± 0.1 mm) than the conventional techniques (RMS error: 1.2 ± 0.2 mm). The new algorithm, using bony landmark constrains, estimates more accurate secondary rotations and medial-lateral translation of the underlying bone. PMID:21142329

  3. Dissimilarity-based classification of anatomical tree structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SØrensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for classification of abnormality in anatomical tree structures is presented. A tree is classified based on direct comparisons with other trees in a dissimilarity-based classification scheme. The pair-wise dissimilarity measure between two trees is based on a linear assignment between the branch feature vectors representing those trees. Hereby, localized information in the branches is collectively used in classification and variations in feature values across the tree are taken into account. An approximate anatomical correspondence between matched branches can be achieved by including anatomical features in the branch feature vectors. The proposed approach is applied to classify airway trees in computed tomography images of subjects with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using the wall area percentage (WA%), a common measure of airway abnormality in COPD, as well as anatomical features to characterize each branch, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curveof 0.912 is achieved. This is significantly better than computing the average WA%.

  4. Dissimilarity-based classification of anatomical tree structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Dirksen, Asger; Petersen, Jens; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for classification of abnormality in anatomical tree structures is presented. A tree is classified based on direct comparisons with other trees in a dissimilarity-based classification scheme. The pair-wise dissimilarity measure between two trees is based on a linear assignment between the branch feature vectors representing those trees. Hereby, localized information in the branches is collectively used in classification and variations in feature values across the tree are taken in...

  5. Percutaneous Placement of Central Venous Catheters: Comparing the Anatomical Landmark Method with the Radiologically Guided Technique for Central Venous Catheterization Through the Internal Jugular Vein in Emergent Hemodialysis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the success and immediate complication rates of the anatomical landmark method (group 1) and the radiologically (combined real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy) guided technique (group 2) in the placement of central venous catheters in emergent hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: The study was performed prospectively in a randomized manner. The success and immediate complication rates of radiologically guided placement of central venous access catheters through the internal jugular vein (n = 40) were compared with those of the anatomical landmark method (n 40). The success of placement, the complications, the number of passes required, and whether a single or double-wall puncture occurred were also noted and compared. Results: The groups were comparable in age and sex. The indication for catheter placement was hemodialysis access in all patients. Catheter placement was successful in all patients in group 2 and unsuccessful in 1 (2.5%) patient in group 1. All catheters functioned adequately and immediately after the placement (0% initial failure rate) in group 2, but 3 catheters (7.5% initial failure rate) were non-functional just after placement in group 1. The total number of needle passes, double venous wall puncture, and complication rate were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusion: Percutaneous central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein can be performed by interventional radiologists with better technical success rates and lower immediate complications. In conclusion, central venous catheterization for emergent dialysis should be performed under both real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance

  6. Image-based dose planning of intracavitary brachytherapy: registration of serial-imaging studies using deformable anatomic templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate that high-dimensional voxel-to-voxel transformations, derived from continuum mechanics models of the underlying pelvic tissues, can be used to register computed tomography (CT) serial examinations into a single anatomic frame of reference for cumulative dose calculations. Methods and Materials: Three patients with locally advanced cervix cancer were treated with CT-compatible intracavitary (ICT) applicators. Each patient underwent five volumetric CT examinations: before initiating treatment, and immediately before and after the first and second ICT insertions, respectively. Each serial examination was rigidly registered to the patient's first ICT examination by aligning the bony anatomy. Detailed nonrigid alignment for organs (or targets) of interest was subsequently achieved by deforming the CT exams as a viscous-fluid, described by the Navier-Stokes equation, until the coincidence with the corresponding targets on CT image was maximized. In cases where ICT insertion induced very large and topologically complex rearrangements of pelvic organs, e.g., extreme uterine canal reorientation following tandem insertion, a viscous-fluid-landmark transformation was used to produce an initial registration. Results: For all three patients, reasonable registrations for organs (or targets) of interest were achieved. Fluid-landmark initialization was required in 4 of the 11 registrations. Relative to the best rigid bony landmark alignment, the viscous-fluid registration resulted in average soft-tissue displacements from 2.8 to 28.1 mm, and improved organ coincidence from the range of 5.2% to 72.2% to the range of 90.6% to 100%. Compared to the viscous-fluid transformation, global registration of bony anatomy mismatched 5% or more of the contoured organ volumes by 15-25 mm. Conclusion: Pelvic soft-tissue structures undergo large deformations and displacements during the external-beam and multiple-ICT course of radiation therapy for locally advanced cervix cancer. These changes cannot be modeled by the conventional rigid landmark transformation method. In the current study, we found that the deformable anatomic template registration method, based on continuum-mechanics models of deformation, successfully described these large anatomic shape changes before and after ICT. These promising modeling results indicate that realistic registration of the cumulative dose distribution to the organs (or targets) of interest for radiation therapy of cervical cancers is achievable

  7. Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernioplasty using two trocars: anatomical landmarks and surgical technique / Hernioplastia laparoscópica totalmente extraperitoneal (TEP) utilizando dois trocárteres: reparos anatômicos e técnica cirúrgica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Leandro Ryuchi, IUAMOTO; Juliana Mika, KATO; Alberto, MEYER; Pierre, BLANC.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Dentre as correções endoscópicas das hérnias, as abordagens totalmente extraperitoneal (TEP) e transabdominal pré-peritoneal (TAPP) são amplamente aceitas como alternativas à operação aberta, fornecendo menos dor no período pós-operatório, menor tempo de permanência hospitalar e retorno p [...] recoce ao trabalho. A técnica TEP clássica requer três incisões na pele para a colocação de três trocárteres na linha média ou em triangulação. OBJETIVO: Descrever uma técnica utilizando apenas dois trocárteres para hernioplastia laparoscópica totalmente extraperitoneal (TEP). MÉTODO: Acesso extraperitoneal: são inseridos dois trocárteres sobre a linha média; um de 10 mm é inserido no subcutâneo em direção horizontal após incisão infra-umbilical transversal e, em seguida, elevado ao ângulo de 60°; outro de 5 mm é inserido ao nível do pubis com visão direta. Tempos operatórios: 1) dissecção do espaço preperitoneal: introdução da ótica laparoscópica de 0º através da incisão infra-umbilical para visualização e dissecção pré-peritoneal; pressão de insuflação inferior a 12 mmHg; 2) Dissecção de alguns reparos anatômicos: pubis, linha arqueada e vasos epigástricos inferiores; 3) reconhecimento do "triângulo da dor" e "triângulo do desastre"; 4) Inserção através do trocáter de 10 mm de tela de polipropileno de 10x15 cm para cobrir o sitio da hérnia; 5) Reposicionamento do peritônio e da borda dorsal da tela para evitar dobras ou deslocamento da tela. Não é necessária a drenagem. RESULTADOS: Esta técnica foi utilizada em nove pacientes e apresentou bom resultado sem necessidade de um cirurgião auxiliar para executá-la, apenas dois trocáteres, menos material de sutura e de curativos. Além disso, exigiu apenas duas incisões, o que proporcionou melhor resultado estético e menor dor no período pós-operatório. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica proposta utilizando dois trocárteres é uma alternativa viável, com melhora dos resultados cosméticos e financeiros. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Among endoscopic hernioplasties, totally extraperitoneal (TEP) and transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach are widely accepted alternatives to open surgery, both providing less postoperative pain, hospital length of stay and early return to work. Classical TEP technique requires th [...] ree skin incisions for placement of three trocars in the midline or in triangulation. AIM: To describe a technique using only two trocars for laparoscopic total extraperitoneal for inguinal hernia repair. METHOD: Extraperitoneal access: place two regular trocars on the midline. The 10 mm is inserted into the subcutaneous in horizontal direction after a transverse infra-umbilical incision and then elevated at 60º angle. The 5 mm trocar is inserted at the same level of the pubis with direct vision. Preperitoneal space dissection: introduction 0º optical laparoscope through the infra-umbilical incision for visualization and preperitoneal dissection; insufflation pressure must be below 12 mmHg. Dissection of some anatomical landmarks: pubic bone, arcuate line and inferior epigastric vessels. Exposure of "triangle of pain" and "triangle of doom". Insertion through the 10 mm trocar polypropylene mesh of 10x15 cm to cover the hernia sites. Peritoneal sac and the dorsal edge of the mesh are repositioned in order to avoid bending or mesh displacement. It is also important to remember that the drainage is not necessary. RESULTS: The 2-port TEP required less financial costs than usual because it is not necessary an auxiliary surgeon to perform the technique. Trocars, suturing material and wound dressing were spared in comparison to the classical technique. Besides, there were only two incisions, which provides a better plastic result and less postoperative pain. CONCLUSION: The TEP technique using two trocars is an alternative technique which improves cosmetic and financial outcomes.

  8. Biomimetic bayesian models of navigation: How are environment geometry-based and landmark-based strategies articulated in humans?

    OpenAIRE

    Diard, Julien; Panagiotaki, Panagiota; Berthoz, Alain

    2009-01-01

    We propose a computational model of human navigation, which encompasses both geometry-based and landmark-based navigation strategies. This model is based on a study of human cognitive strategies during a path memorization task in a Virtual Reality (VR) experiment. Participants were asked to memorize prede?ned paths in a large-scale virtual city (COSMOpoliS (c)). Our computational model qualitatively reproduces the results of this experiment. This model uses the Bayesian formalism, and focuses...

  9. A Sensor Network Data Compression Algorithm Based on Suboptimal Clustering and Virtual Landmark Routing Within Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengqiang Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A kind of data compression algorithm for sensor networks based on suboptimal clustering and virtual landmark routing within clusters is proposed in this paper. Firstly, temporal redundancy existing in data obtained by the same node in sequential instants can be eliminated. Then sensor networks nodes will be clustered. Virtual node landmarks in clusters can be established based on cluster heads. Routing in clusters can be realized by combining a greedy algorithm and a flooding algorithm. Thirdly, a global structure tree based on cluster heads will be established. During the course of data transmissions from nodes to cluster heads and from cluster heads to sink, the spatial redundancy existing in the data will be eliminated. Only part of the raw data needs to be transmitted from nodes to sink, and all raw data can be recovered in the sink based on a compression code and part of the raw data. Consequently, node energy can be saved, largely because transmission of redundant data can be avoided. As a result the overall performance of the sensor network can obviously be improved.

  10. BasemapLandmarks_CEMETERY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The BasemapLandmarks_CEMETERY point layer contains cemeteries in the state of Vermont. The data is based on VTrans Town Highway Maps. Some points have been moved to...

  11. Preservation of the Optic Radiations based on comparative analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography and Anatomical dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Nooij

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Visualization of the precise course of the visual pathways is relevant to prevent damage that may inflict visual field deficits during neurosurgical resections. In particular the optic radiations (OR are susceptible to such damage during neurosurgery. Cortical pathways can be mapped in vivo, by using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI. Visualization of these pathways would be potentially helpful to prevent neurosurgical visual morbidity. In this study an anatomical dissection of the visual pathways was compared to DTI fiber tractography (DTI-FT data of four human brains. The feasibility of a definition of a Safety Zone is investigated. Methods Four adult brains were dissected using Klingler’s fiber dissection method, which allowed preparation of the OR. Measurements before and after dissection were used to establish distances from the cortex to the OR. DTI-scans were also obtained from these brains to determine the same distances. Results Measurements from specific landmark points on the cortex to the lateral border of the OR were performed in four brains. Analysis through DTI tractography corresponded with the dissection results. Based on the combined results of both dissection and DTI-FT, we defined a quantitative surgical Safety Zone with respect to various anatomical landmarks (in particular the ventricle system Conclusion We conclude that there is a good correlation between the visualizations of the optic pathways based on dissection and DTI. Furthermore, we conclude that defining a neurosurgical Safety Zone which could preserve the integrity of the OR during surgery, based on the combination of DTI-FT images and dissection is feasible.

  12. A landmark-based method for the geometrical 3D calibration of scanning microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, M.

    2007-04-27

    This thesis presents a new strategy and a spatial method for the geometric calibration of 3D measurement devices at the micro-range, based on spatial reference structures with nanometersized landmarks (nanomarkers). The new method was successfully applied for the 3D calibration of scanning probe microscopes (SPM) and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). Moreover, the spatial method was also used for the photogrammetric self-calibration of scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In order to implement the calibration strategy to all scanning microscopes used, the landmark-based principle of reference points often applied at land survey or at close-range applications has been transferred to the nano- and micro-range in the form of nanomarker. In order to function as a support to the nanomarkers, slope-shaped step pyramids have been developed and fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) induced metal deposition. These FIB produced 3D microstructures have been sized to embrace most of the measurement volume of the scanning microscopes. Additionally, their special design allows the homogenous distribution of the nanomarkers. The nanomarkers were applied onto the support and the plateaus of the slope-step pyramids by FIB etching (milling) as landmarks with as little as several hundreds of nanometers in diameter. The nanomarkers are either of point-, or ring-shaped design. They are optimized so that they can be spatially measured by SPM and CLSM, and, imaged and photogrammetrically analyzed on the basis of SEM data. The centre of the each nanomarker serves as reference point in the measurement data or images. By applying image processing routines, the image (2D) or object (3D) coordinates of each nanomarker has been determined with subpixel accuracy. The correlative analysis of the SPM, CLSM and photogrammetric SEM measurement data after 3D calibration resulted in mean residues in the measured coordinates of as little as 13 nm. Without the coupling factors the mean residues are up to 6 times higher. By taking into account the orthogonality of the measurement coordinate axes when performing a 3D calibration, a comparative and quantitative analysis of 3D scanning microscopy has been made possible. (orig.)

  13. Anatomically based lower limb nerve model for electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soboleva Tanya K

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES is a technique that aims to rehabilitate or restore functionality of skeletal muscles using external electrical stimulation. Despite the success achieved within the field of FES, there are still a number of questions that remain unanswered. One way of providing input to the answers is through the use of computational models. Methods This paper describes the development of an anatomically based computer model of the motor neurons in the lower limb of the human leg and shows how it can be used to simulate electrical signal propagation from the beginning of the sciatic nerve to a skeletal muscle. One-dimensional cubic Hermite finite elements were used to represent the major portions of the lower limb nerves. These elements were fit to data that had been digitised using images from the Visible Man project. Nerves smaller than approximately 1 mm could not be seen in the images, and thus a tree-branching algorithm was used to connect the ends of the fitted nerve model to the respective skeletal muscle. To simulate electrical propagation, a previously published mammalian nerve model was implemented and solved on the anatomically based nerve mesh using a finite difference method. The grid points for the finite difference method were derived from the fitted finite element mesh. By adjusting the tree-branching algorithm, it is possible to represent different levels of motor-unit recruitment. Results To illustrate the process of a propagating nerve stimulus to a muscle in detail, the above method was applied to the nerve tree that connects to the human semitendinosus muscle. A conduction velocity of 89.8 m/s was obtained for a 15 ?m diameter nerve fibre. This signal was successfully propagated down the motor neurons to a selected group of motor units in the muscle. Conclusion An anatomically and physiologically based model of the posterior motor neurons in the human lower limb was developed. This model can be used to examine the effect of external stimulation on nerve and muscle activity, as may occur, for example, in the field of FES.

  14. Look and turn: landmark-based goal navigation in honey bees.

    OpenAIRE

    Fry, S. N.; Wehner, R

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the piloting mechanisms employed by honey bees during their final approach to a goal. Conceptually applying a bottom-up approach, we systematically varied the position, number and appearance landmarks associated with a rewarded target location within a large, homogenous flight tent. The flight behavior measured under various conditions is well explained with visuo-motor control loops that link perceived landmarks with appropriate turning responses. This view is consisten...

  15. Knowledge-based recognition of man-made landmarks in a simulated control cycle using a virtual-globe system

    OpenAIRE

    Michaelsen, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    Automatic knowledge-based recognition of landmarks in aerial images for UAV navigation is an alternative to GNSS navigation. It provides absolute position estimates thus complementing INS navigation. Relying on knowledge instead of template images or training samples is advantageous because the first may be out-of-date and the latter not representative. The robustness and precision of the method can be assessed using internet-based virtual globe systems such as Google Earth as camera simulato...

  16. Dorsolateral Striatal Lesions Impair Navigation Based on Landmark-Goal Vectors but Facilitate Spatial Learning Based on a "Cognitive Map"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Yutaka; Poulter, Steven L.; Austen, Joe M.; McGregor, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    In three experiments, the nature of the interaction between multiple memory systems in rats solving a variation of a spatial task in the water maze was investigated. Throughout training rats were able to find a submerged platform at a fixed distance and direction from an intramaze landmark by learning a landmark-goal vector. Extramaze cues were…

  17. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Meiberdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight parameters were determined for the weighted S-TPS-RPM. Results: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with optimal parameters significantly improved the anatomical accuracy as compared to S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder alone and reduced the range of the anatomical errors by half as compared with the simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. The weighted algorithm reduced the RDE range of lipiodol markers from 0.9-14 mm after rigid bone match to 0.9-4.0 mm, compared to a range of 1.1-9.1 mm with S-TPS-RPM of bladder alone and 0.9-9.4 mm for simultaneous nonweighted registration. All registration methods resulted in good geometric accuracy on the bladder; average error values were all below 1.2 mm. Conclusions: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with additional weight parameter allowed indirect control over structure-specific flexibility in multistructure registrations of bladder and bladder tumor, enabling anatomically coherent registrations. The availability of an anatomically validated deformable registration method opens up the horizon for improvements in IGART for bladder cancer.

  18. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors’ unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight parameters were determined for the weighted S-TPS-RPM. Results: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with optimal parameters significantly improved the anatomical accuracy as compared to S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder alone and reduced the range of the anatomical errors by half as compared with the simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. The weighted algorithm reduced the RDE range of lipiodol markers from 0.9–14 mm after rigid bone match to 0.9–4.0 mm, compared to a range of 1.1–9.1 mm with S-TPS-RPM of bladder alone and 0.9–9.4 mm for simultaneous nonweighted registration. All registration methods resulted in good geometric accuracy on the bladder; average error values were all below 1.2 mm. Conclusions: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with additional weight parameter allowed indirect control over structure-specific flexibility in multistructure registrations of bladder and bladder tumor, enabling anatomically coherent registrations. The availability of an anatomically validated deformable registration method opens up the horizon for improvements in IGART for bladder cancer.

  19. Towards a new speech event detection approach for landmark-based speech recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Stefan; Ludusan, Bogdan; Gravier, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present a new approach for the classification and detection of speech units for the use in landmark or eventbased speech recognition systems. We use segmentation to model any time-variable speech unit by a fixed-dimensional observation vector, in order to train a committee of boosted decision stumps on labeled training data. Given an unknown speech signal, the presence of a desired speech unit is estimated by searching for each time frame the corresponding segment, that provi...

  20. Piriformis Fossa – An Anatomical and Orthopedics Consideration

    OpenAIRE

    O. P. Lakhwani; Mittal, P.S.; Naik, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Piriformis fossa is an important anatomical landmark having significant clinical value in orthopedic surgery; but its location and anatomical relationship with surrounding structures are not clearly defined. Hence it is necessary to clearly describe it in respect to anatomical and orthopedic aspect.

  1. Reliability of lower limb alignment measures using an established landmark-based method with a customized computer software program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sled, Elizabeth A; Sheehy, Lisa M; Felson, David T; Costigan, Patrick A; Lam, Miu; Cooke, T Derek V

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the reliability of frontal plane lower limb alignment measures using a landmark-based method by (1) comparing inter- and intra-reader reliability between measurements of alignment obtained manually with those using a computer program, and (2) determining inter- and intra-reader reliability of computer-assisted alignment measures from full-limb radiographs. An established method for measuring alignment was used, involving selection of 10 femoral and tibial bone landmarks. (1) To compare manual and computer methods, we used digital images and matching paper copies of five alignment patterns simulating healthy and malaligned limbs drawn using AutoCAD. Seven readers were trained in each system. Paper copies were measured manually and repeat measurements were performed daily for 3 days, followed by a similar routine with the digital images using the computer. (2) To examine the reliability of computer-assisted measures from full-limb radiographs, 100 images (200 limbs) were selected as a random sample from 1,500 full-limb digital radiographs which were part of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. Three trained readers used the software program to measure alignment twice from the batch of 100 images, with two or more weeks between batch handling. Manual and computer measures of alignment showed excellent agreement (intraclass correlations [ICCs] 0.977-0.999 for computer analysis; 0.820-0.995 for manual measures). The computer program applied to full-limb radiographs produced alignment measurements with high inter- and intra-reader reliability (ICCs 0.839-0.998). In conclusion, alignment measures using a bone landmark-based approach and a computer program were highly reliable between multiple readers. PMID:19882339

  2. Optimization of Landmark Selection for Cortical Surface Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Anand,; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Damasio, Hanna; Shattuck, David; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Manually labeled landmark sets are often required as inputs for landmark-based image registration. Identifying an optimal subset of landmarks from a training dataset may be useful in reducing the labor intensive task of manual labeling. In this paper, we present a new problem and a method to solve it: given a set of N landmarks, find the k(< N) best landmarks such that aligning these k landmarks that produce the best overall alignment of all N landmarks. The resulting procedure allows us to s...

  3. Reproducibility of the sella turcica landmark in three dimensions using a sella turcica-specific reference system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittayapat, Pisha; Jacobs, Reinhilde [University Hospitals Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Odri, Guillaume A. [Service de Chirurgie Orthopedique et Traumatologique, Centre Hospitalier Regional d' Orleans, Orleans Cedex2 (France); De Faria Vasconcelos, Karla [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Division of Oral Radiology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Willems, Guy [Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, Orthodontics, KU Leuven and Dentistry, University Hospitals Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Olszewski, Raphael [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to assess the reproducibility of identifying the sella turcica landmark in a three-dimensional (3D) model by using a new sella-specific landmark reference system. Thirty-two cone-beam computed tomographic scans (3D Accuitomo 170, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) were retrospectively collected. The 3D data were exported into the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine standard and then imported into the Maxilim software (Medicim NV, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium) to create 3D surface models. Five observers identified four osseous landmarks in order to create the reference frame and then identified two sella landmarks. The x, y, and z coordinates of each landmark were exported. The observations were repeated after four weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using the multiple paired t-test with Bonferroni correction (intraobserver precision: p<0.005, interobserver precision: p<0.0011). The intraobserver mean precision of all landmarks was <1 mm. Significant differences were found when comparing the intraobserver precision of each observer (p<0.005). For the sella landmarks, the intraobserver mean precision ranged from 0.43±0.34 mm to 0.51±0.46 mm. The intraobserver reproducibility was generally good. The overall interobserver mean precision was <1 mm. Significant differences between each pair of observers for all anatomical landmarks were found (p<0.0011). The interobserver reproducibility of sella landmarks was good, with >50% precision in locating the landmark within 1 mm. A newly developed reference system offers high precision and reproducibility for sella turcica identification in a 3D model without being based on two-dimensional images derived from 3D data.

  4. Reproducibility of the sella turcica landmark in three dimensions using a sella turcica-specific reference system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to assess the reproducibility of identifying the sella turcica landmark in a three-dimensional (3D) model by using a new sella-specific landmark reference system. Thirty-two cone-beam computed tomographic scans (3D Accuitomo 170, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) were retrospectively collected. The 3D data were exported into the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine standard and then imported into the Maxilim software (Medicim NV, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium) to create 3D surface models. Five observers identified four osseous landmarks in order to create the reference frame and then identified two sella landmarks. The x, y, and z coordinates of each landmark were exported. The observations were repeated after four weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using the multiple paired t-test with Bonferroni correction (intraobserver precision: p<0.005, interobserver precision: p<0.0011). The intraobserver mean precision of all landmarks was <1 mm. Significant differences were found when comparing the intraobserver precision of each observer (p<0.005). For the sella landmarks, the intraobserver mean precision ranged from 0.43±0.34 mm to 0.51±0.46 mm. The intraobserver reproducibility was generally good. The overall interobserver mean precision was <1 mm. Significant differences between each pair of observers for all anatomical landmarks were found (p<0.0011). The interobserver reproducibility of sella landmarks was good, with >50% precision in locating the landmark within 1 mm. A newly developed reference system offers high precision and reproducibility for sella turcica identification in a 3D model without being based on two-dimensional images derived from 3D data.

  5. Reconciling Landmarks and Level Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Maurel, Pierre; Keriven, Renaud; Faugeras, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Shape warping is a key problem in statistical shape analysis. This paper proposes a framework for geometric shape warping based on both shape distances and landmarks. Our method is compatible with implicit representations and a matching between shape surfaces is provided at no additional cost. It is, to our knowledge, the rst time that landmarks and shape distances are reconciled in a pure geometric level set framework. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated with two- and three-dimensi...

  6. Look and turn: landmark-based goal navigation in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, S N; Wehner, R

    2005-10-01

    This report describes the piloting mechanisms employed by honey bees during their final approach to a goal. Conceptually applying a bottom-up approach, we systematically varied the position, number and appearance landmarks associated with a rewarded target location within a large, homogenous flight tent. The flight behavior measured under various conditions is well explained with visuo-motor control loops that link perceived landmarks with appropriate turning responses. This view is consistent with the requirement of prolonged reinforcement learning for efficient goal navigation. A simple model is able to provide a comprehensive explanation for diverse flight patterns that range from convoluted searching behavior to highly idiosyncratic approaches, depending on the experimental context. Our results challenge the prevalent notion that honey bees employ image matching for visual guidance toward a goal site. Basic visuo-motor control loops may better meet the high demands for robust and fast flight control, which could serve as a powerful bio-mimetic design principle for micro-robotic aircraft. PMID:16215221

  7. Sartorial Branch of Saphenous Nerve: Anatomical Relationship with Bony Landmarks and Great Saphenous Vein / Ramo Sartorial del Nervio Safeno Safeno: Relación Anatómica con Puntos de Referencia Óseos y de la vena Safena Magna

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Amornrat, Tothonglor; Sithiporn, Agthong; Thanasil, Huanmanop; Vilai, Chentanez.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El ramo sartorial del nervio safeno (nervio cutáneo medial de la pierna) se origina en el lado medial de la rodilla y desciende a lo largo de la vena safena magna (VSM) para inervar la cara medial de la pierna. Su anatomía es motivo de preocupación en los procedimientos quirúrgicos y en el bloqueo a [...] nestésico. Sin embargo, los datos de medición relacionados con puntos de referencia óseos palpables y la comparación entre los lados y en ambos sexos son escasas. Se realizó la disección en 95 miembros inferiores de ambos sexos. Se encontró que el nervio perforó la fascia profunda en la mayoría de los casos (92,6%). Esta punta de perforación fue siempre distal al tubérculo del músculo aductor magno a una distancia de 5-6 cm, que representaba el 15% del largo de la pierna (la distancia entre el tubérculo del aductor magno y el maléolo medial). El nervio se localizaba 7 cm medial a la tuberosidad tibial. Al nivel del tercio medio en ambas piernas, el nervio estaba a una distancia un poco mayor a 4 cm medial al margen anterior de la tibia. El nervio se dividía 7 cm proximal al maléolo medial. Por otra parte, la relación anatómica entre el nervio y la VSM fue muy variable. El nervio era constantemente anterior, posterior o profundo a la VSM en 8,4%, 15,8% y 2,1%, respectivamente. Cruce entre las dos estructuras anatómicas se observó en el 57,9% de las muestras y la distancia hasta el maléolo medial fue de 18 cm. La simetría se encuentra en la mayoría de los parámetros y diferencias de sexo significativas se observaron en algunas distancias. Estos resultados son importantes para evitar la lesión del nervio sartorial y localizar el nervio durante los procedimientos pertinentes. Abstract in english Sartorial branch of saphenous nerve (medial crural cutaneous nerve) originates at the medial side of the knee and descends along the great saphenous vein (GSV) to innervate the medial aspect of the leg. Its anatomy is of concern in surgical procedures and anesthetic block. However, the measurement d [...] ata related to palpable bony landmarks with comparison between sexes and sides are lacking. Dissection was done in 95 lower limbs from both sexes. We found that the nerve pierced the deep fascia alone in most cases (92.6%). This piercing point was always distal to the adductor tubercle with the distance of 5-6 cm which was 15% of the leg length (the distance between the adductor tubercle and medial malleolus). The nerve was 7 cm medial to the tibial tuberosity. At the mid-level of leg length, the nerve was slightly over 4 cm medial to the anterior tibial margin. The nerve terminally divided 7 cm proximal to the medial malleolus. Furthermore, the anatomical relationship between the nerve and the GSV was highly variable. The nerve was constantly anterior, posterior or deep to the GSV in 8.4%, 15.8% and 2.1%, respectively. Crossing between the two structures was observed in 57.9% of specimens and the distance to the medial malleolus was 18 cm. Symmetry was found in most parameters and significant gender differences were observed in some distances. These results are important for avoiding the sartorial nerve injury and locating the nerve during relevant procedures.

  8. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Madabhushi, Anant, E-mail: anant.madabhushi@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C. [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118 (United States); Genega, Elizabeth M. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Lenkinski, Robert E.; Rofsky, Neil M. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States); Feleppa, Ernest [Riverside Research Institute, New York, New York 10038 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework yielded a central gland Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 90%, and prostate DSC of 88%, while the misalignment of the urethra and verumontanum was found to be 3.45 mm, and 4.73 mm, respectively, which were measured to be significantly smaller compared to the alternative strategies. As might have been anticipated from our limited cohort of biopsy confirmed cancers, the disease atlas showed that most of the tumor extent was limited to the peripheral zone. Moreover, central gland tumors were typically larger in size, possibly because they are only discernible at a much later stage. Conclusions: The authors presented the AnCoR framework to explicitly model anatomic constraints for the construction of a fused anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The framework was applied to constructing a preliminary version of an anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate, the prostatome. The prostatome could facilitate the quantitative characterization of gland morphology and imaging features of prostate cancer. These techniques, may be applied on a large sample size data set to create a fully developed prostatome that could serve as a spatial prior for targeted biopsies by urologists. Additionally, the AnCoR framework could allow for incorporation of complementary imaging and molecular data, thereby enabling their careful correlation for population based radio-omics studies.

  9. FlyBase: anatomical data, images and queries

    OpenAIRE

    Grumbling, Gary; Strelets, Victor

    2005-01-01

    FlyBase () is a database of genetic and genomic data on the model organism Drosophila melanogaster and the entire insect family Drosophilidae. The FlyBase Consortium curates, annotates, integrates and maintains a wide variety of data within this domain. Access to the data is provided through graphical and textual user interfaces tailored to particular types of data. FlyBase data types include maps at the cytological, genetic and sequence levels, genes and alleles including their products, fun...

  10. Establishing Cephalometric Landmarks for the Translational Study of Le Fort-based Facial Transplantation in Swine: Enhanced applications using computer-assisted surgery and custom cutting guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Gabriel F.; Susarla, Srinivas M.; Al Rakan, Mohammed; Coon, Devin; Rada, Erin M.; Sarhane, Karim; Shores, Jamie T.; Bonawitz, Steven C.; Cooney, Damon; Sacks, Justin; Murphy, Ryan J.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Brandacher, Gerald; Lee, WP Andrew; Liacouras, Peter; Grant, Gerald; Armand, Mehran; Gordon, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Le Fort-based, maxillofacial allotransplantation is a reconstructive alternative gaining clinical acceptance. However, the vast majority of single-jaw transplant recipients demonstrate less-than-ideal skeletal and dental relationships with suboptimal aesthetic harmony. The purpose of this study was to investigate reproducible cephalometric landmarks in a large animal model, where refinement of computer-assisted planning, intra-operative navigational guidance, translational bone osteotomies, and comparative surgical techniques could be performed. Methods Cephalometric landmarks that could be translated into the human craniomaxillofacial skeleton, and would remain reliable following maxillofacial osteotomies with mid-facial alloflap inset, were sought on six miniature swine. Le Fort I-and Le Fort III-based alloflaps were harvested in swine with osteotomies, and all alloflaps were either auto-replanted or transplanted. Cephalometric analyses were performed on lateral cephalograms pre- and post-operatively. Critical cephalometric data sets were identified with the assistance of surgical planning and virtual prediction software, and evaluated for reliability and translational predictability. Results Several pertinent landmarks and human analogues were identified including pronasale (PRN), zygion (Zy), parietale (PA), gonion (GO), gnathion (GN), lower incisior base (LIB), and alveolare (ALV). PA-PRN-ALV and PA-PRN-LIB were found to be reliable correlates of SNA and SNB measurements in humans, respectively. Conclusions There is a set of reliable cephalometric landmarks and measurement angles pertinent for utilization within a translational large animal model. These craniomaxillofacial landmarks will allow us to develop novel navigational software technology, improve our cutting guide designs, and explore new avenues for investigation and collaboration. Level of Evidence N/A (Large Animal Study) PMID:24445879

  11. Neural Network-Based Landmark Recognition and Navigation with IAMRs. Understanding the Principles of Thought and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    Research on neural networks and hippocampal function demonstrating how mammals construct mental maps and develop navigation strategies is being used to create Intelligent Autonomous Mobile Robots (IAMRs). Such robots are able to recognize landmarks and navigate without "vision." (SK)

  12. Landmarks in Hybrid Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Elkawkagy; Heba Elbeh

    2013-01-01

    Although planning techniques achieved a significant progress during recent years, solving many planning problem still difficult even for modern planners. In this paper, we will adopt landmark concept to hybrid planning setting - a method that combines reasoning about procedural knowledge and causalities. Land-marks are a well-known concept in the realm of classical planning. Recently, they have been adapted to hierarchical approaches. Such landmarks can be extracted in a pre-processing step f...

  13. 3D facial landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Harder, Stine; Rosengren, Anders; Moeller, Christian; Werge, Thomas; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Hansen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manual annotation of landmarks is a known source of variance, which exist in all fields of medical imaging, influencing the accuracy and interpretation of the results. However, the variability of human facial landmarks is only sparsely addressed in the current literature as opposed to e.g. the research fields of orthodontics and cephalometrics. We present a full facial 3D annotation procedure and a sparse set of manually annotated landmarks, in effort to reduce operator time and mini...

  14. Automatic Insall-Salvati ratio measurement on lateral knee x-ray images using model-guided landmark localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Wu, Chia-Hsing; Sun, Yung-Nien [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chii-Jeng [Department of Orthopedics, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chien-Kuo, E-mail: ynsun@mail.ncku.edu.t, E-mail: wale1212@gmail.co, E-mail: btmage@gmail.co, E-mail: mark@mail.ncku.edu.t, E-mail: n044206@mail.hosp.ncku.edu.t [Department of Radiology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-21

    The Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) is important for detecting two common clinical signs of knee disease: patella alta and patella baja. Furthermore, large inter-operator differences in ISR measurement make an objective measurement system necessary for better clinical evaluation. In this paper, we define three specific bony landmarks for determining the ISR and then propose an x-ray image analysis system to localize these landmarks and measure the ISR. Due to inherent artifacts in x-ray images, such as unevenly distributed intensities, which make landmark localization difficult, we hence propose a registration-assisted active-shape model (RAASM) to localize these landmarks. We first construct a statistical model from a set of training images based on x-ray image intensity and patella shape. Since a knee x-ray image contains specific anatomical structures, we then design an algorithm, based on edge tracing, for patella feature extraction in order to automatically align the model to the patella image. We can estimate the landmark locations as well as the ISR after registration-assisted model fitting. Our proposed method successfully overcomes drawbacks caused by x-ray image artifacts. Experimental results show great agreement between the ISRs measured by the proposed method and by orthopedic clinicians.

  15. Automatic Insall-Salvati ratio measurement on lateral knee x-ray images using model-guided landmark localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) is important for detecting two common clinical signs of knee disease: patella alta and patella baja. Furthermore, large inter-operator differences in ISR measurement make an objective measurement system necessary for better clinical evaluation. In this paper, we define three specific bony landmarks for determining the ISR and then propose an x-ray image analysis system to localize these landmarks and measure the ISR. Due to inherent artifacts in x-ray images, such as unevenly distributed intensities, which make landmark localization difficult, we hence propose a registration-assisted active-shape model (RAASM) to localize these landmarks. We first construct a statistical model from a set of training images based on x-ray image intensity and patella shape. Since a knee x-ray image contains specific anatomical structures, we then design an algorithm, based on edge tracing, for patella feature extraction in order to automatically align the model to the patella image. We can estimate the landmark locations as well as the ISR after registration-assisted model fitting. Our proposed method successfully overcomes drawbacks caused by x-ray image artifacts. Experimental results show great agreement between the ISRs measured by the proposed method and by orthopedic clinicians.

  16. First Steps toward Location of Landmarks on X-Ray Images

    OpenAIRE

    Desvignes, Michel; Romaniuk, Barbara; Clouard, Régis; Demoment, Ronan; Revenu, Marinette; Deshayes, Marie-Josèphe

    2000-01-01

    We address the problem of locating some anatomical bone structures on lateral cranial X-ray images. These structures are landmarks used in orthodontic therapy. The main problem in this pattern recognition application is that the landmarks are difficult to distinguish on images even for the human expert, because of lateral projection of the X-ray process. We propose a 3 steps approach: the first step provides a statistical estimation of the landmarks, using an adaptive coordinates space; the s...

  17. 3D ultrasound-CT registration of the liver using combined landmark-intensity information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important issue in computer-assisted surgery of the liver is a fast and reliable transfer of preoperative resection plans to the intraoperative situation. One problem is to match the planning data, derived from preoperative CT or MR images, with 3D ultrasound images of the liver, acquired during surgery. As the liver deforms significantly in the intraoperative situation non-rigid registration is necessary. This is a particularly challenging task because pre- and intraoperative image data stem from different modalities and ultrasound images are generally very noisy. One way to overcome these problems is to incorporate prior knowledge into the registration process. We propose a method of combining anatomical landmark information with a fast non-parametric intensity registration approach. Mathematically, this leads to a constrained optimization problem. As distance measure we use the normalized gradient field which allows for multimodal image registration. A qualitative and quantitative validation on clinical liver data sets of three different patients has been performed. We used the distance of dense corresponding points on vessel center lines for quantitative validation. The combined landmark and intensity approach improves the mean and percentage of point distances above 3 mm compared to rigid and thin-plate spline registration based only on landmarks. The proposed algorithm offers the possibility to incorporate additional a priori knowledge - in terms of few landmarks - provided by a human expert into a non-rigid registration process. (orig.)

  18. What Is Expected of the Facial Nerve in Michel Aplasia? Anatomic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Zarandy, Masoud Motasaddi; Kouhi, Ali; Kashany, Shervin Sharif; Rabiei, Sohrab; Hajimohamadi, Fatemeh; Rabbani-Anari, Mahtab

    2010-01-01

    We sought better understanding about the facial nerve anatomy in the rare inner ear Michel anomaly to help better define this aplasia and prevent potential complications in surgery on these patients. The data from computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance images of six Michel aplastic ears (three patients) were evaluated for a facial nerve course. Facial nerve course and anatomic landmarks were noted. Based on data obtained from this group of very rare patients, three different facial ...

  19. Landmarks in Hybrid Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elkawkagy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although planning techniques achieved a significant progress during recent years, solving many planning problem still difficult even for modern planners. In this paper, we will adopt landmark concept to hybrid planning setting - a method that combines reasoning about procedural knowledge and causalities. Land-marks are a well-known concept in the realm of classical planning. Recently, they have been adapted to hierarchical approaches. Such landmarks can be extracted in a pre-processing step from a declarative hierarchical planning domain and problem description. It was shown how this technique allows for a considerable reduction of the search space by eliminating futile plan development options before the actual planning. Therefore, we will present a new approach to in¬tegrate landmark pre-processing technique in the context of hierarchical planning with landmark technique in the classical planning. This integration allows to incorporate the ability of using extracted landmark tasks from hierarchical domain knowledge in the form of HTN and using landmark literals from classical planning. To this end, we will construct a transformation technique to transform the hybrid planning domain into a classical domain model. The method¬ologies in this paper have been implemented successfully, and we will present some experimental results that give evidence for the consid-erable performance increase gained through planning system.

  20. Early fetal anatomical sonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Jennifer C

    2012-10-01

    Over the past decade, prenatal screening and diagnosis has moved from the second into the first trimester, with aneuploidy screening becoming both feasible and effective. With vast improvements in ultrasound technology, sonologists can now image the fetus in greater detail at all gestational ages. In the hands of experienced sonographers, anatomic surveys between 11 and 14 weeks can be carried out with good visualisation rates of many structures. It is important to be familiar with the normal development of the embryo and fetus, and to be aware of the major anatomical landmarks whose absence or presence may be deemed normal or abnormal depending on the gestational age. Some structural abnormalities will nearly always be detected, some will never be and some are potentially detectable depending on a number of factors.

  1. The reliability of tablet computers in depicting maxillofacial radiographic landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the identification of anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs on a standard medical grade picture archiving communication system (PACS) monitor and a tablet computer (iPad 5). A total of 1000 radiographs, including 500 panoramic and 500 lateral cephalometric radiographs, were retrieved from the de-identified dataset of the archive of the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology of the University Of Connecticut School Of Dental Medicine. Major radiographic anatomical landmarks were independently reviewed by two examiners on both displays. The examiners initially reviewed ten panoramic and ten lateral cephalometric radiographs using each imaging system, in order to verify interoperator agreement in landmark identification. The images were scored on a four-point scale reflecting the diagnostic image quality and exposure level of the images. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the two displays regarding the visibility and clarity of the landmarks in either the panoramic or cephalometric radiographs. Tablet computers can reliably show anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs

  2. Landmarks in Linoleum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This printmaking unit will get students excited about geography and history. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created a report and a linoleum print of a famous "landmark."

  3. Computed tomography landmark-based semi-automated mesh morphing and mapping techniques: generation of patient specific models of the human pelvis without segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Zoryana; Beek, Maarten; Wright, David; Whyne, Cari Marisa

    2015-04-13

    Current methods for the development of pelvic finite element (FE) models generally are based upon specimen specific computed tomography (CT) data. This approach has traditionally required segmentation of CT data sets, which is time consuming and necessitates high levels of user intervention due to the complex pelvic anatomy. The purpose of this research was to develop and assess CT landmark-based semi-automated mesh morphing and mapping techniques to aid the generation and mechanical analysis of specimen-specific FE models of the pelvis without the need for segmentation. A specimen-specific pelvic FE model (source) was created using traditional segmentation methods and morphed onto a CT scan of a different (target) pelvis using a landmark-based method. The morphed model was then refined through mesh mapping by moving the nodes to the bone boundary. A second target model was created using traditional segmentation techniques. CT intensity based material properties were assigned to the morphed/mapped model and to the traditionally segmented target models. Models were analyzed to evaluate their geometric concurrency and strain patterns. Strains generated in a double-leg stance configuration were compared to experimental strain gauge data generated from the same target cadaver pelvis. CT landmark-based morphing and mapping techniques were efficiently applied to create a geometrically multifaceted specimen-specific pelvic FE model, which was similar to the traditionally segmented target model and better replicated the experimental strain results (R(2)=0.873). This study has shown that mesh morphing and mapping represents an efficient validated approach for pelvic FE model generation without the need for segmentation. PMID:25680299

  4. Non-rigid landmark-based large-scale image registration in 3-D reconstruction of mouse and rat kidney nephrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yan-Ling; Chang, Shi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serial histological sections are suffering from mechanical distortions that disturb the reconstruction of 3-D objects. We have corrected such artifacts with a non-rigid landmark-based method that respects the original geometry in the tissue block. The method is exemplified on a large scale in the registration of semi-thin serial sections of the mouse and rat kidneys, and has been tested on FFPE-sections. AIM: In this study of mouse and rat kidneys, we have measured and characterized the deformations introduced in the preparation of 2.5-?m-thick Epon sections and then eliminated them by a landmark-based non-rigid transformation (NRT). METHODS: We obtained 2.5-?m-thick serial Epon sections from three mouse kidneys and three rat kidneys for 3-D reconstruction of the nephron tubules. First, the images from 3000 serial mouse and 13,000 serial rat sections underwent a classic rigid registration (CRR), and the distortions were measured and indexed. The section images underwent a further NRT in order tocompensate for the deformations. The NRT used is a classic interactive landmark-based approach. The quality of the NRT was verified by comparing the geometry of the transformed images with corresponding block images. RESULTS: After CRR, the 2.5-?m-thick sections had a linear deformation of up to 2%, the tubular lengths were overestimated with up to 1.5×, and it was most difficult to trace the tubules from section to section. After the additional NRT, the geometry of the images reflected the original geometry in the block, the tubular lengths were no longer overestimated, and the NRT highly facilitated the tracing of the tubular system. CONCLUSIONS: NRT has facilitated the tracing of the tubular system in kidneys, a tracing, which would otherwise have been most difficult to perform. NRT has yielded substantial new knowledge to segmental and spatial nephron organization in the mouse and rat kidneys.

  5. Non-rigid landmark-based large-scale image registration in 3-D reconstruction of mouse and rat kidney nephrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yan-Ling; Chang, Shi-Jie; Zhai, Xiao-Yue; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Christensen, Erik I; Andreasen, Arne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serial histological sections are suffering from mechanical distortions that disturb the reconstruction of 3-D objects. We have corrected such artifacts with a non-rigid landmark-based method that respects the original geometry in the tissue block. The method is exemplified on a large scale in the registration of semi-thin serial sections of the mouse and rat kidneys, and has been tested on FFPE-sections. AIM: In this study of mouse and rat kidneys, we have measured and characterized ...

  6. Evaluation and calibration of functional network modeling methods based on known anatomical connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Debra Ann; Cha, Kuwook; Lewis, Lindsay B; Mendola, Janine D; Shmuel, Amir

    2013-02-15

    Recent studies have identified large scale brain networks based on the spatio-temporal structure of spontaneous fluctuations in resting-state fMRI data. It is expected that functional connectivity based on resting-state data is reflective of - but not identical to - the underlying anatomical connectivity. However, which functional connectivity analysis methods reliably predict the network structure remains unclear. Here we tested and compared network connectivity analysis methods by applying them to fMRI resting-state time-series obtained from the human visual cortex. The methods evaluated here are those previously tested against simulated data in Smith et al. (Neuroimage, 2011). To this end, we defined regions within retinotopic visual areas V1, V2, and V3 according to their eccentricity in the visual field, delineating central, intermediate, and peripheral eccentricity regions of interest (ROIs). These ROIs served as nodes in the models we study. We based our evaluation on the "ground-truth", thoroughly studied retinotopically-organized anatomical connectivity in the monkey visual cortex. For each evaluated method, we computed the fractional rate of detecting connections known to exist ("c-sensitivity"), while using a threshold of the 95th percentile of the distribution of interaction magnitudes of those connections not expected to exist. Under optimal conditions - including session duration of 68min, a relatively small network consisting of 9 nodes and artifact-free regression of the global effect - each of the top methods predicted the expected connections with 67-85% c-sensitivity. Correlation methods, including Correlation (Corr; 85%), Regularized Inverse Covariance (ICOV; 84%) and Partial Correlation (PCorr; 81%) performed best, followed by Patel's Kappa (80%), Bayesian Network method PC (BayesNet; 77%), General Synchronization measures (67-77%), and Coherence (CohB; 74%). With decreased session duration, these top methods saw decreases in c-sensitivities, achieving 59-76% for 17min sessions. With a short resting-state fMRI scan of 8.5min, none of the methods predicted the real network well, with Corr (65%) performing best. With increased complexity of the network from 9 to 36 nodes, multivariate methods including PCorr and BayesNet saw a decrease in performance. Artifact-free regression of the global effect increased the c-sensitivity of the top-performing methods. In an overall evaluation across all tests we performed, correlation methods (Corr, ICOV, and PCorr), Patel's Kappa, and BayesNet method PC set themselves somewhat above all other methods. We propose that data-based calibration based on known anatomical connections be integrated into future network studies, in order to maximize sensitivity and reduce false positives. PMID:23153969

  7. Automatic Landmark Identification in Mars Orbital Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, K. L.; Panetta, J.; Greeley, R.; Schorghofer, N.; Bunte, M.; Hoffer, M. P.; Ansar, A.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed new methods for automatically identifying landmarks such as craters, gullies, dark slope streaks, and dust devil tracks in remote sensing imagery. These methods are based on statistical measures of local terrain salience. The salience of a region is defined as the degree to which it differs from its surrounding context. We use pixel intensity histograms to represent each candidate region, and we compute salience in one of two ways. The first method calculates the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the region's histogram and a larger enclosing region. The second method calculates the entropy of the region's histogram independently. The KL-divergence approach is useful for detecting unusual landmarks, while the entropy approach detects high-contrast features such as ridges and crater edges. We have automatically identified landmarks in several Mars surface images collected from orbit (MOC and THEMIS data) and evaluated them against manual annotations of dark slope streaks and dust devil tracks. We have also trained a landmark machine classifier that can assign new landmarks to one of several categories. In an evaluation on dark slope streaks, dust devil tracks, and craters, the classifier achieved an accuracy of 93%. Further, because detections are made based on a generic notion of salience, they are not restricted to known landmark types. It is possible to identify landmarks that do not fit into any existing category as novel features, enabling scientific advances that otherwise rely on serendipity to bring them to light. Automated landmark identification can be useful both onboard a remote spacecraft and in ground-based processing on the Earth. In an onboard setting, salient landmarks can be detected and catalogued as they are observed, providing a highly compressed summary of the region under study (e.g., "five craters, two gullies, and 37 sand dunes" along with their locations). On the ground, gigabyte archives of past images can be analyzed and annotated with meta-data indicating the existence and location of different landmark types. These annotations can enable a content-based search facility that will permit the easy retrieval of images that contain a specific feature of interest.

  8. Facial Landmarks Localization Estimation by Cascaded Boosted Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Chevallier, Louis; Vigouroux, Jean-Ronan; Goguey, Alix; Ozerov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Accurate detection of facial landmarks is very important for many applications like face recognition or analysis. In this paper we describe an efficient detector of facial landmarks based on a cascade of boosted regressors of arbitrary number of levels. We define as many regressors as landmarks and we train them separately. We describe how the training is conducted for the series of regressors by supplying training samples centered on the predictions of the previous levels. We employ gradient...

  9. Relative warps meet cladistics: A contribution to the phylogenetic relationships ofbaleen whales based on landmark analyses of mysticete crania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampe O Baszio S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years research on fossil baleen whales experienced a renaissance. Several important fossils weredescribed, and new and extended cladistic analyses were performed, partly including molecular data from living species.Despite the progress in our knowledge of their phylogeny, many questions have still not been resolved. A different attemptto illustrate mysticete relationships is presented here using landmark analyses. For the present analysis, 38 dorsalviews of mysticete skulls and skull reconstructions were scanned and thirteen landmarks were defined. The method usedis the relative warp analysis. This method allows a clustering of elements according to their similarity in shape. The calculatedrelative warps explain main shape variations in the sample. As in parsimony analyses the toothed mysticetes areclearly distinguishable. Representatives of the Aetocetoidea are grouped very closely together and therefore their classificationin this family is strongly supported. The performed analysis shows that the crania of the Balaenidae have developedsimilarities to the cranium of Janjucetus hunderi. The restriction of the Cetotheriidae to a small group of taxa isconfirmed here and includes in this analysis Cetotherium, Mixocetus, Piscobalaena, and Titanocetus with a close relationshipto the living gray whale. The stem-balaenopterids do not show any clear signals in the present analysis. There isno support for a subdivision into further families. The structure of the dorsal cranium of Protororqualus andPraemegaptera is very similar to that of Balaenoptera

  10. The Yale Pharyngeal Residue Severity Rating Scale: An Anatomically Defined and Image-Based Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Paul D; Rademaker, Alfred W; Leder, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    The Yale Pharyngeal Residue Severity Rating Scale was developed, standardized, and validated to provide reliable, anatomically defined, and image-based assessment of post-swallow pharyngeal residue severity as observed during fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). It is a five-point ordinal rating scale based on residue location (vallecula and pyriform sinus) and amount (none, trace, mild, moderate, and severe). Two expert judges reviewed a total of 261 FEES evaluations and selected a no residue exemplar and three exemplars each of trace, mild, moderate, and severe vallecula and pyriform sinus residue. Hard-copy color images of the no residue, 12 vallecula, and 12 pyriform sinus exemplars were randomized by residue location for hierarchical categorization by 20 raters with a mean of 8.3 years of experience (range 2-27 years) performing and interpreting FEES. Severity ratings for all images were performed by the same 20 raters, 2 weeks apart, and with the order of image presentations randomized. Intra-rater test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity were determined by pooled multi-category multi-rater kappa statistics. Residue ratings were excellent for intra-rater reliability for vallecula (kappa = 0.957 ± 0.014) and pyriform sinus (kappa = 0.854 ± 0.021); very good to excellent for inter-rater reliability for vallecula (kappa = 0.868 ± 0.011) and pyriform sinus (kappa = 0.751 ± 0.011); and excellent for validity for vallecula (kappa = 0.951 ± 0.014) and pyriform sinus (kappa = 0.908 ± 0.017). Clinical uses include accurate classification of vallecula and pyriform sinus residue severity patterns as none, trace, mild, moderate, or severe for diagnostic purposes, determination of functional therapeutic change, and precise dissemination of shared information. Scientific uses include tracking outcome measures, demonstrating efficacy of interventions to reduce pharyngeal residue, investigating morbidity and mortality in relation to pharyngeal residue severity, and improving training and accuracy of FEES interpretation by students and clinicians. The Yale Pharyngeal Residue Severity Rating Scale is a reliable, validated, anatomically defined, and image-based tool to determine residue location and severity based on FEES. PMID:26050238

  11. Support vector machine-based classification of Alzheimer's disease from whole-brain anatomical MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present and evaluate a new automated method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification of whole-brain anatomical magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly control subjects. We studied 16 patients with AD [mean age ± standard deviation (SD)=74.1 ±5.2 years, mini-mental score examination (MMSE) = 23.1 ± 2.9] and 22 elderly controls (72.3±5.0 years, MMSE=28.5± 1.3). Three-dimensional T1-weighted MR images of each subject were automatically parcellated into regions of interest (ROIs). Based upon the characteristics of gray matter extracted from each ROI, we used an SVM algorithm to classify the subjects and statistical procedures based on bootstrap resampling to ensure the robustness of the results. We obtained 94.5% mean correct classification for AD and control subjects (mean specificity, 96.6%; mean sensitivity, 91.5%). Our method has the potential in distinguishing patients with AD from elderly controls and therefore may help in the early diagnosis of AD. (orig.)

  12. CFD simulation of aerosol deposition in an anatomically based human large-medium airway model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative data on aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract are useful for understanding the causes of certain lung diseases and for designing efficient drug delivery systems via inhalation. In this study, aerosol deposition in a 3D anatomically based human large-medium airway model was simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The model extended from mouth to generation 10 and included two-thirds of the airways obtained by multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging on normal healthy human subjects. Steady oral inhalation (15, 30, and 60 L/min) and aerosol (1-30 micrometer) deposition were computed by CFD using the realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. Based on the mean turbulence flow field, the computed extrathoracic deposition, ratio of left to right lung deposition, and deposition efficiency at each generation compared favorably with existing in vivo and in vitro experiments. The significant deposition in the large-medium airway model showed that the total tracheobronchial deposition is dominated by the large-medium airways for micrometer-sized aerosol particles. These quantitative data and the methods developed in this study provided valuable means toward subject-specific modeling of aerosol deposition in the human lung based on realistic lung geometry. PMID:19082892

  13. Anatomical basis for the intrahepatic glissonian approach during hepatectomies / Bases anatômicas para o acesso intra-hepático aos pedículos glissonianos durante hepatectomias

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rodrigo Cañada Trofo, SURJAN; Fábio Ferrari, MAKDISSI; Marcel Autran Cesar, MACHADO.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Ressecções hepáticas anatômicas são baseadas em alguns princípios técnicos básicos, como o controle vascular, delimitação de área isquêmica a ser ressecada e máxima preservação do parênquima. Isto pode ser obtido pelo acesso intra-hepático aos pedículos glissonianos, que consiste em contr [...] ole dos pedículos dos segmentos dentro do parênquima hepático. Pequenas incisões ao redor da placa hilar, em marcos anatômicos bem definidos, são utilizadas para acesso aos pedículos, tornando desnecessária a dissecção do hilo hepático. OBJETIVO: Analisar parâmetros da anatomia do fígado relacionada com a técnica cirúrgica da abordagem intra-hepática aos pedículos glissonianos, para definir a anatomia normal relacionada ao procedimento e, assim, facilitar a realização desta técnica. MÉTODOS: Parâmetros anatômicos relacionados à abordagem intra-hepática aos pedículos glissonianos foram estudados em 37 cadáveres. As medições foram realizadas com instrumentos de precisão. Os dados foram expressos em média±desvio-padrão. Os indivíduos foram divididos em grupos de acordo com o sexo e peso do fígado e os grupos foram comparados estatisticamente. RESULTADOS: Vinte e cinco cadáveres eram do sexo masculino e 12 do feminino. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa em praticamente todos os parâmetros quando os grupos foram comparados. Isto demonstra a consistência dos parâmetros anatômicos relacionadas com a técnica intra-hepática de acesso glissoniano. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados obtidos neste estudo possibilitaram grandes avanços técnicos na realização de hepatectomias abertas e laparoscópicas com abordagem intra-hepática aos pedículos glissonianos, e pode ajudar cirurgiões a realizar procedimentos seguros e eficazes por este método. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Anatomical liver resections are based on some basic technical principles such as vascular control, ischemic area delineation to be resected and maximum parenchymal preservation. These aspects are achieved by the intrahepatic glissonian approach, which consists in accessing the pedicles [...] of hepatic segments within the hepatic parenchyma. Small incisions on well-defined anatomical landmarks are performed to approach the pedicles, making dissection of the hilar plate unnecessary. AIM: Analyze parameters in liver anatomy related to intrahepatic surgical technique to glissonians pedicles, to set the normal anatomy related to the procedure and thereby facilitate the attainment of this technique. METHODS: Anatomical parameters related to the intrahepatic glissonian approach were studied in 37 cadavers. Measurements were performed with precision instruments. Data were expressed as mean±standard deviation. The subjects were divided into groups according to gender and liver weight and groups were compared statistically. RESULTS: Twenty-five cadavers were male and 12 female. No statistically significant difference was observed in virtually all parameters when groups were compared. This demonstrates the consistency of the anatomical parameters related to the intrahepatic glissonian approach. CONCLUSION: The results obtained in this study made possible major technical advances in the realization of open and laparoscopic hepatectomies with intrahepatic glissonian approach, and can help surgeons to perform liver resections by this method.

  14. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved landmark-only registration provided the noise in the surface points is not excessively high. Increased variability on the landmark fiducials resulted in increased registration errors; however, refinement of the initial landmark registration by the surface-based algorithm can compensate for small initial misalignments. The surface-based registration algorithm is quite robust to noise on the surface points and continues to improve landmark registration even at high levels of noise on the surface points. Both the canine and patient studies also demonstrate that combined landmark and surface registration has lower errors than landmark registration alone. Conclusions: In this work, we describe a model for evaluating the impact of noise variability on the input parameters of a registration algorithm in the context of cardiac ablation therapy. The model can be used to predict both registration error as well as assess which inputs have the largest effect on registration accuracy

  15. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettmann, Maryam E., E-mail: rettmann.maryam@mayo.edu; Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A. [Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Kwartowitz, David M. [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Gunawan, Mia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. 20057 (United States); Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L. [Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Dalegrave, Charles [Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology, Cardiology Division Hospital Sao Paulo, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04024-002 Brazil (Brazil); Kolasa, Mark W. [David Grant Medical Center, Fairfield, California 94535 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved landmark-only registration provided the noise in the surface points is not excessively high. Increased variability on the landmark fiducials resulted in increased registration errors; however, refinement of the initial landmark registration by the surface-based algorithm can compensate for small initial misalignments. The surface-based registration algorithm is quite robust to noise on the surface points and continues to improve landmark registration even at high levels of noise on the surface points. Both the canine and patient studies also demonstrate that combined landmark and surface registration has lower errors than landmark registration alone. Conclusions: In this work, we describe a model for evaluating the impact of noise variability on the input parameters of a registration algorithm in the context of cardiac ablation therapy. The model can be used to predict both registration error as well as assess which inputs have the largest effect on registration accuracy.

  16. My Corporis Fabrica: an ontology-based tool for reasoning and querying on complex anatomical models

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier Palombi; Federico Ulliana; Valentin Favier; Jean-Claude L\\xe9on; Marie-Christine Rousset

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundMultiple models of anatomy have been developed independently and for different purposes. In particular, 3D graphical models are specially useful for visualizing the different organs composing the human body, while ontologies such as FMA (Foundational Model of Anatomy) are symbolic models that provide a unified formal description of anatomy. Despite its comprehensive content concerning the anatomical structures, the lack of formal descriptions of anatomical functions in FMA limits it...

  17. ANATOMICAL PRINCIPLES BEHIND PRESERVATION OF LARYNGEAL NERVES DURING THYROIDECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Fabian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the anatomical principles behind preservation of inferior laryngeal nerve and of the external branch of superior laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy. The embryological development of thyroid and recurrent laryngeal nerves explains the constant relationship between Zuckerkandl’s tuberculum and the recurrent laryngeal nerve, while anomalies in development of the aortic arches explain the presence of rare anatomical variants, with a high risk of nerve injury, of non-recurrent course of the inferior laryngeal nerve. Good knowledge of the relationship between the external branch of superior laryngeal nerve and the superior thyroid artery makes possible to avoid transection of this branch during ligature around superior thyroid artery and vein. Anatomical landmarks used to identify the recurrent laryngeal nerve (tracheo-oesophageal sulcus, the cross-over with the inferior thyroid artery, Berry’s ligament, Zuckerkandl’s tuberculum and variations in the extra-laryngeal branching of the nerve are discussed based on data from the literature. The anatomical variants when the inferior laryngeal nerve doesn’t have a recurrent course are also discussed

  18. Anatomical bases for the radiological delineation of lymph node areas. Major collecting trunks, head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer spreads locally through direct infiltration into soft tissues or at distance by invading vascular structures, then migrating through the lymphatic or blood flow. Although cancer cells carried in the blood can end in virtually any corner of the body, lymphatic migration is usually stepwise, through successive nodal stops, which can temporarily delay further progression. In radiotherapy, irradiation of lymphatic paths relevant to the localisation of the primary has been common practice for decades. Similarly, excision of cancer is often completed by lymphatic dissection. Both in radiotherapy and in surgery, advanced knowledge of the lymphatic pathways relevant to any tumor location is an important information for treatment preparation and execution. This first part describes the major collecting trunks of the lymphatic system and then the lymphatics of the head and neck providing anatomical bases for the radiological delineation of lymph node areas in the cervical region, it adds to the existing nomenclature of six nodal levels (I-VI), three new areas listed as parotid, buccal and external jugular levels

  19. PACS-based interface for 3D anatomical structure visualization and surgical planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Christophe; Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2002-05-01

    The interpretation of radiological image is routine but it remains a rather difficult task for physicians. It requires complex mental processes, that permit translation from 2D slices into 3D localization and volume determination of visible diseases. An easier and more extensive visualization and exploitation of medical images can be reached through the use of computer-based systems that provide real help from patient admission to post-operative followup. In this way, we have developed a 3D visualization interface linked to a PACS database that allows manipulation and interaction on virtual organs delineated from CT-scan or MRI. This software provides the 3D real-time surface rendering of anatomical structures, an accurate evaluation of volumes and distances and the improvement of radiological image analysis and exam annotation through a negatoscope tool. It also provides a tool for surgical planning allowing the positioning of an interactive laparoscopic instrument and the organ resection. The software system could revolutionize the field of computerized imaging technology. Indeed, it provides a handy and portable tool for pre-operative and intra-operative analysis of anatomy and pathology in various medical fields. This constitutes the first step of the future development of augmented reality and surgical simulation systems.

  20. Ordered Landmarks in Planning

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, J; Sebastia, L; 10.1613/jair.1492

    2011-01-01

    Many known planning tasks have inherent constraints concerning the best order in which to achieve the goals. A number of research efforts have been made to detect such constraints and to use them for guiding search, in the hope of speeding up the planning process. We go beyond the previous approaches by considering ordering constraints not only over the (top-level) goals, but also over the sub-goals that will necessarily arise during planning. Landmarks are facts that must be true at some point in every valid solution plan. We extend Koehler and Hoffmann's definition of reasonable orders between top level goals to the more general case of landmarks. We show how landmarks can be found, how their reasonable orders can be approximated, and how this information can be used to decompose a given planning task into several smaller sub-tasks. Our methodology is completely domain- and planner-independent. The implementation demonstrates that the approach can yield significant runtime performance improvements when used...

  1. Visual SLAM for underwater vehicles using video velocity log and natural landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Salvi, Joaquim; Petillot, Yvan; Thomas, Stephen; Aulinas Masó, Josep M.

    2008-01-01

    A visual SLAM system has been implemented and optimised for real-time deployment on an AUV equipped with calibrated stereo cameras. The system incorporates a novel approach to landmark description in which landmarks are local sub maps that consist of a cloud of 3D points and their associated SIFT/SURF descriptors. Landmarks are also sparsely distributed which simplifies and accelerates data association and map updates. In addition to landmark-based localisation the system utilises visual odom...

  2. Identification keys on rattans (Calamus spp. from Central Sulawesi based on anatomical structure of stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDI TANRA TELLU

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to obtain information the anatomical characteristics of 20 rattan species from Central Sulawesi and to use it for anatomical identification of rattan species. The rattan comprised 16 Calamus species, three Daemonorops species and one Korthalsia species. For anatomical observation 10-15 mm pieces of the mature stem from shares of tip do not have frond were processed with polyethilene glycol 2000, cut at 18-32 µm and stained with a combination of acridin-cryzoidin red and astrablue. Cleared preparation were used to observe stegmata, and macerated material was used to measure the length of fibers and vessel elements. Anilin sulfate was used to confirm the existence of lignin. Anatomical characteristics used in identification were shape and will thickening of epidermal cells and the position stomata at epidermal; the arrangement of sub epidermal parenchyma; composition of vascular bundles and their distribution; the shape and arrangement of central ground parenchyma and the occurrence of fiber bundles. The research result indicated that the anatomical character can be compiled to a key identify the rattan at genus and species level.

  3. Anatomic considerations of the anterior upper cervical spine during decompression and instrumentation: a cadaveric based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Salman Abbasi; Patel, Apar S; Avila, Mauricio J; Sattarov, Kamran V; Walter, Christina M; Skoch, Jesse; Baaj, Ali A

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated the anatomical considerations specific to the high anterior retropharyngeal approach to the cervical spine. Surgical exposure of the anterior upper cervical spine can sometimes be challenging due to the surrounding neurovascular structures. Using three adult cadavers, we performed high anterior retropharyngeal cervical dissection of the left and right side for a total of six approaches (six sides). During the dissection, all important neurovascular elements were noted and photographed, and anatomical relationships to the spinal vertebral bodies and disc spaces were analyzed. There are certain anatomic considerations that are unique to the high anterior cervical spine. The unique structures include the hypoglossal nerve and the superior thyroid artery/nerve. Only the superior thyroid artery in this region has numerous anatomical variations. Awareness of other structures, including the carotid artery, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and esophagus also remains important. Awareness of the anatomical structures in the anterior upper cervical spine is essential for performing safe anterior upper cervical spinal surgery, avoiding serious complications. PMID:26190220

  4. Parsing radiographs by integrating landmark set detection and multi-object active appearance models

    OpenAIRE

    Montillo, Albert; Song, Qi; LIU, XIAOMING; Miller, James V

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses the challenging problem of parsing 2D radiographs into salient anatomical regions such as the left and right lungs and the heart. We propose the integration of an automatic detection of a constellation of landmarks via rejection cascade classifiers and a learned geometric constellation subset detector model with a multi-object active appearance model (MO-AAM) initialized by the detected landmark constellation subset. Our main contribution is twofold. First, we propose a re...

  5. Enhancing Planning Heuristic with Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Jingjing Zhao; Dayou Liu; Yongming Yang

    2011-01-01

    Recently, landmarks count heuristic can increase the number of problem instances solved and improve the quality of the solutions in satisfying non-optimal planning.  In order to make the heuristic optimal, we give the solution to solve the overestimate of landmarks count heuristic. We extend landmarks count heuristic without action cost assignments, and prove that the extension of heuristic is admissible. Our empirical evaluation shows that the extension of heuristic is admissible and ca...

  6. WE-D-9A-02: Automated Landmark-Guided CT to Cone-Beam CT Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The anatomical changes that occur between the simulation CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) are investigated using an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm with simultaneous intensity correction. LDIR was designed to be accurate in the presence of tissue intensity mismatch and heavy noise contamination. Method: An auto-landmark generation algorithm was used in conjunction with a local small volume (LSV) gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and planning CT. The LSVs offsets were used to perform an initial deformation, generate landmarks, and correct local intensity mismatch. The landmarks act as stabilizing controlpoints in the Demons objective function. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm was evaluated on one synthetic case with ground truth and data of ten head and neck cancer patients. The deformation vector field (DVF) accuracy was accessed using a synthetic case. The Root mean square error of the 3D canny edge (RMSECE), mutual information (MI), and feature similarity index metric (FSIM) were used to access the accuracy of LDIR on the patient data. The quality of the corresponding deformed contours was verified by an attending physician. Results: The resulting 90 percentile DVF error for the synthetic case was within 5.63mm for the original demons algorithm, 2.84mm for intensity correction alone, 2.45mm using controlpoints without intensity correction, and 1.48 mm for the LDIR algorithm. For the five patients the mean RMSECE of the original CT, Demons deformed CT, intensity corrected Demons CT, control-point stabilized deformed CT, and LDIR CT was 0.24, 0.26, 0.20, 0.20, and 0.16 respectively. Conclusion: LDIR is accurate in the presence of multimodal intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination. Since LDIR is GPU based it can be implemented with minimal additional strain on clinical resources. This project has been supported by a CPRIT individual investigator award RP11032

  7. Free-space fluorescence tomography with adaptive sampling based on anatomical information from microCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Badea, Cristian T.; Hood, Greg; Wetzel, Arthur W.; Stiles, Joel R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2010-02-01

    Image reconstruction is one of the main challenges for fluorescence tomography. For in vivo experiments on small animals, in particular, the inhomogeneous optical properties and irregular surface of the animal make free-space image reconstruction challenging because of the difficulties in accurately modeling the forward problem and the finite dynamic range of the photodetector. These two factors are fundamentally limited by the currently available forward models and photonic technologies. Nonetheless, both limitations can be significantly eased using a signal processing approach. We have recently constructed a free-space panoramic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography system to take advantage of co-registered microCT data acquired from the same animal. In this article, we present a data processing strategy that adaptively selects the optical sampling points in the raw 2-D fluorescent CCD images. Specifically, the general sampling area and sampling density are initially specified to create a set of potential sampling points sufficient to cover the region of interest. Based on 3-D anatomical information from the microCT and the fluorescent CCD images, data points are excluded from the set when they are located in an area where either the forward model is known to be problematic (e.g., large wrinkles on the skin) or where the signal is unreliable (e.g., saturated or low signal-to-noise ratio). Parallel Monte Carlo software was implemented to compute the sensitivity function for image reconstruction. Animal experiments were conducted on a mouse cadaver with an artificial fluorescent inclusion. Compared to our previous results using a finite element method, the newly developed parallel Monte Carlo software and the adaptive sampling strategy produced favorable reconstruction results.

  8. Geodesic atlas-based labeling of anatomical trees : Application and evaluation on airways extracted from CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast and robust atlas-based algorithm for labeling airway trees, using geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for an unlabeled airway tree are evaluated using distances to a training set of labeled airway trees. In tree-space, airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural automatic handling of anatomical differences and noise. A hierarchical approach makes the algorithm efficient, assigning labels from the trachea and downwards. Only the airway centerline tree is used, which is relatively unaffected by pathology. The algorithm is evaluated on 80 segmented airway trees from 40 subjects at two time points, labeled by 3 medical experts each, testing accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The accuracy of the algorithm is statistically similar to that of the experts and not significantly correlated with COPD severity. The reproducibility of the algorithm is significantly better than that of the experts, and negatively correlated with COPD severity. Evaluation of the algorithm on a longitudinal set of 8724 trees from a lung cancer screening trial shows that the algorithm can be used in large scale studies with high reproducibility, and that the negative correlation of reproducibility with COPD severity can be explained by missing branches, for instance due to segmentation problems in COPD patients. We conclude that the algorithm is robust to COPD severity given equally complete airway trees, and comparable in performance to that of experts in pulmonary medicine, emphasizing the suitability of the labeling algorithm for clinical use.

  9. Geodesic atlas-based labeling of anatomical trees : application and evaluation on airways extracted from CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast and robust atlas-based algorithm for labeling airway trees, using geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for an unlabeled airway tree are evaluated using distances to a training set of labeled airway trees. In tree-space, airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural automatic handling of anatomical differences and noise. A hierarchical approach makes the algorithm efficient, assigning labels from the trachea and downwards. Only the airway centerline tree is used, which is relatively unaffected by pathology. The algorithm is evaluated on 80 segmented airway trees from 40 subjects at two time points, labeled by 3 medical experts each, testing accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The accuracy of the algorithm is statistically similar to that of the experts and not significantly correlated with COPD severity. The reproducibility of the algorithm is significantly better than that of the experts, and negatively correlated with COPD severity. Evaluation of the algorithm on a longitudinal set of 8724 trees from a lung cancer screening trial shows that the algorithm can be used in large scale studies with high reproducibility, and that the negative correlation of reproducibility with COPD severity can be explained by missing branches, for instance due to segmentation problems in COPD patients. We conclude that the algorithm is robust to COPD severity given equally complete airway trees, and comparable in performance to that of experts in pulmonary medicine, emphasizing the suitability of the labeling algorithm for clinical use.

  10. 3D facial landmarks: Inter-operator variability of manual annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Harder, Stine

    2014-01-01

    Background Manual annotation of landmarks is a known source of variance, which exist in all fields of medical imaging, influencing the accuracy and interpretation of the results. However, the variability of human facial landmarks is only sparsely addressed in the current literature as opposed to e.g. the research fields of orthodontics and cephalometrics. We present a full facial 3D annotation procedure and a sparse set of manually annotated landmarks, in effort to reduce operator time and minimize the variance. Method Facial scans from 36 voluntary unrelated blood donors from the Danish Blood Donor Study was randomly chosen. Six operators twice manually annotated 73 anatomical and pseudo-landmarks, using a three-step scheme producing a dense point correspondence map. We analyzed both the intra- and inter-operator variability, using mixed-model ANOVA. We then compared four sparse sets of landmarks in order to construct a dense correspondence map of the 3D scans with a minimum point variance. Results The anatomical landmarks of the eye were associated with the lowest variance, particularly the center of the pupils. Whereas points of the jaw and eyebrows have the highest variation. We see marginal variability in regards to intra-operator and portraits. Using a sparse set of landmarks (n=14), that capture the whole face, the dense point mean variance was reduced from 1.92 to 0.54 mm. Conclusion The inter-operator variability was primarily associated with particular landmarks, where more leniently landmarks had the highest variability. The variables embedded in the portray and the reliability of a trained operator did only have marginal influence on the variability. Further, using 14 of the annotated landmarks we were able to reduced the variability and create a dense correspondences mesh to capture all facial features.

  11. 3D facial landmarks : Inter-operator variability of manual annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Harder, Stine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manual annotation of landmarks is a known source of variance, which exist in all fields of medical imaging, influencing the accuracy and interpretation of the results. However, the variability of human facial landmarks is only sparsely addressed in the current literature as opposed to e.g. the research fields of orthodontics and cephalometrics. We present a full facial 3D annotation procedure and a sparse set of manually annotated landmarks, in effort to reduce operator time and minimize the variance. METHOD: Facial scans from 36 voluntary unrelated blood donors from the Danish Blood Donor Study was randomly chosen. Six operators twice manually annotated 73 anatomical and pseudo-landmarks, using a three-step scheme producing a dense point correspondence map. We analyzed both the intra- and inter-operator variability, using mixed-model ANOVA. We then compared four sparse sets of landmarks in order to construct a dense correspondence map of the 3D scans with a minimum point variance. RESULTS: The anatomical landmarks of the eye were associated with the lowest variance, particularly the center of the pupils. Whereas points of the jaw and eyebrows have the highest variation. We see marginal variability in regards to intra-operator and portraits. Using a sparse set of landmarks (n=14), that capture the whole face, the dense point mean variance was reduced from 1.92 to 0.54 mm. CONCLUSION: The inter-operator variability was primarily associated with particular landmarks, where more leniently landmarks had the highest variability. The variables embedded in the portray and the reliability of a trained operator did only have marginal influence on the variability. Further, using 14 of the annotated landmarks we were able to reduced the variability and create a dense correspondences mesh to capture all facial features.

  12. Bases anatómicas vasculares de los colgajos perforantes cutáneos / Vascular anatomical basis of perforator skin flaps

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    S., Morris; M., Tang; C.R., Geddes.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En las ultimas dos décadas, el uso de colgajos perforantes musculocutaneos se ha incrementado a medida que los microcirujanos se han familiarizado con la técnica y estos colgajos se han convertido en una parte de la evolución de la Microcirugía. Como se basan en perforantes musculocutaneas o septocu [...] taneas individuales, el microcirujano reconstructivodebe tener la información anatómica detallada para planificar la transferencia de colgajos perforantes. El fin de este trabajo es la revisión de las diversas técnicas angiográficas disponibles para estudiar la anatomía vascular del cuerpo humano y presentar nuestra técnica habitual de inyección vascular. Exhibiremos ejemplos ilustrativos utilizando la técnica de la inyección de gelatina de oxido de plomo para visualizar la anatomía relevante de los sitios donantes de colgajos perforantes. La técnica de la inyección de gelatina de óxido descrita por Salmon y Rees y Taylor, puede ser utilizada para inyecciones arteriales o venosas, pero la hemos utilizado primariamente para inyección arterial. Los pasos para la inyección se describen detalladamente en el trabajo. En los pasados 5 años hemos disecado un total de 21 cadáveres frescos tras estudios de inyección arterial de gelatina de oxido de plomo. Se han revisado un total de 7000 radiografías. Presentamos los resultados de la búsqueda anatómica en las áreas de cabeza, cuello, miembros superiores, torso y miembros inferiores. La técnica de la inyección de gelatina de oxido de plomo es simple y económica a su vez; la técnica de análisis computarizado es barata y las técnicas de análisis informático son directas y proveen excelente visualización de la arquitectura de la piel humana. Los delicados detalles identificados utilizando esta técnica de inyección proveen información útil a los cirujanos para planificar transferencias de piel, músculo, hueso y nervio, y por tanto favorecen nuestra comprensión de la anatomía vascular clínicamente relacionada de los colgajos perforantes. Abstract in english Over the past 2 decades the use of musculocutaneous perforator flaps has increased worldwide as microsurgeons have become more comfortable with the technique. Perforator flaps have now become well established as a part of the evolution of microsurgery. Since perforator flaps are based on individual [...] musculocutaneous or septocutaneous perforators, it is imperative that the reconstructive microsurgeon has the detailed anatomical information necessary to plan perforator flap transfers. The goal of this paper is to review the various angiographic techniques which are available to study the vascular anatomy of the human body and to present our current vascular injection technique. We will show illustrative examples using the lead oxide gelatin injection technique to elucidate the relevant anatomy of perforator flap donor sites. The lead oxide gelatin injection technique has been previously reported by Salmon and Rees and Taylor. The injection technique may be used for arterial or venous injections but we have primarily used it for arterial injections. The injection steps are detailed in the paper. Over the past five years we have dissected a total of 21 human fresh cadavers after lead oxide gelatin arterial injection studies. A total of over 7000 radiographs have been reviewed and summarized. We present summarized results of the anatomical research in the areas of head and neck, upper limb, torso and lower limb regions. The lead oxide gelatin injection technique is simple and inexpensive and the computer analysis technique is straight forward and provides excellent visualization of the architecture of the human skin. The fine details identified using this injection technique provides useful information to surgeons planning transfers of skin, muscle, bone and nerve and therefore our understandingly of clinically related vascular anatomy of perforator flaps can be improved.

  13. Bases anatómicas vasculares de los colgajos perforantes cutáneos Vascular anatomical basis of perforator skin flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Morris

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En las ultimas dos décadas, el uso de colgajos perforantes musculocutaneos se ha incrementado a medida que los microcirujanos se han familiarizado con la técnica y estos colgajos se han convertido en una parte de la evolución de la Microcirugía. Como se basan en perforantes musculocutaneas o septocutaneas individuales, el microcirujano reconstructivodebe tener la información anatómica detallada para planificar la transferencia de colgajos perforantes. El fin de este trabajo es la revisión de las diversas técnicas angiográficas disponibles para estudiar la anatomía vascular del cuerpo humano y presentar nuestra técnica habitual de inyección vascular. Exhibiremos ejemplos ilustrativos utilizando la técnica de la inyección de gelatina de oxido de plomo para visualizar la anatomía relevante de los sitios donantes de colgajos perforantes. La técnica de la inyección de gelatina de óxido descrita por Salmon y Rees y Taylor, puede ser utilizada para inyecciones arteriales o venosas, pero la hemos utilizado primariamente para inyección arterial. Los pasos para la inyección se describen detalladamente en el trabajo. En los pasados 5 años hemos disecado un total de 21 cadáveres frescos tras estudios de inyección arterial de gelatina de oxido de plomo. Se han revisado un total de 7000 radiografías. Presentamos los resultados de la búsqueda anatómica en las áreas de cabeza, cuello, miembros superiores, torso y miembros inferiores. La técnica de la inyección de gelatina de oxido de plomo es simple y económica a su vez; la técnica de análisis computarizado es barata y las técnicas de análisis informático son directas y proveen excelente visualización de la arquitectura de la piel humana. Los delicados detalles identificados utilizando esta técnica de inyección proveen información útil a los cirujanos para planificar transferencias de piel, músculo, hueso y nervio, y por tanto favorecen nuestra comprensión de la anatomía vascular clínicamente relacionada de los colgajos perforantes.Over the past 2 decades the use of musculocutaneous perforator flaps has increased worldwide as microsurgeons have become more comfortable with the technique. Perforator flaps have now become well established as a part of the evolution of microsurgery. Since perforator flaps are based on individual musculocutaneous or septocutaneous perforators, it is imperative that the reconstructive microsurgeon has the detailed anatomical information necessary to plan perforator flap transfers. The goal of this paper is to review the various angiographic techniques which are available to study the vascular anatomy of the human body and to present our current vascular injection technique. We will show illustrative examples using the lead oxide gelatin injection technique to elucidate the relevant anatomy of perforator flap donor sites. The lead oxide gelatin injection technique has been previously reported by Salmon and Rees and Taylor. The injection technique may be used for arterial or venous injections but we have primarily used it for arterial injections. The injection steps are detailed in the paper. Over the past five years we have dissected a total of 21 human fresh cadavers after lead oxide gelatin arterial injection studies. A total of over 7000 radiographs have been reviewed and summarized. We present summarized results of the anatomical research in the areas of head and neck, upper limb, torso and lower limb regions. The lead oxide gelatin injection technique is simple and inexpensive and the computer analysis technique is straight forward and provides excellent visualization of the architecture of the human skin. The fine details identified using this injection technique provides useful information to surgeons planning transfers of skin, muscle, bone and nerve and therefore our understandingly of clinically related vascular anatomy of perforator flaps can be improved.

  14. Anatomic-Based Three-Dimensional Planning Precludes Use of Catheter-Delivered Contrast for Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Retrograde urethrography is a standard method to identify the prostatic apex during planning for prostate cancer radiotherapy. This is an invasive and uncomfortable procedure. With modern three-dimensional computed tomography planning, we explored whether retrograde urethrography was still necessary to accurately identify the prostatic apex. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients underwent computed tomography simulation with and without bladder, urethral, and rectal contrast. The prostatic base and apex were identified on both scans, using contrast and anatomy, respectively. The anatomic location of the prostatic apex as defined by these methods was confirmed in another 57 patients with postbrachytherapy imaging. Results: The prostatic base and apex were within a mean of 3.8 mm between the two scans. In every case, the beak of the retrograde urethrogram abutted the line drawn parallel to, and bisecting, the pubic bone on the lateral films. With these anatomic relationships defined, in the postbrachytherapy patients, the distance from the prostatic apex to the point at which the urethra traversed the pelvic floor was an average of 11.7 mm. On lateral films, we found that the urethra exited the pelvis an average of 16.6 mm below the posterior-most fusion of the pubic symphysis. On axial images, this occurred at a mean separation of the ischia of about 25 mm. Conclusion: With a knowledge of the anatomic relationships and modern three-dimensional computed tomography planning equipment, the prostatic apex can be easily and consistently identified, obviating the need to subject patients to retrograde urethrography

  15. Classification of error in anatomic pathology: a proposal for an evidence-based standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucar, Elliott

    2005-05-01

    Error in anatomic pathology (EAP) is an appropriate problem to consider using the disease model with which all pathologists are familiar. In analogy to medical diseases, diagnostic errors represent a complex constellation of often-baffling deviations from the "normal" condition. Ideally, one would wish to approach such "diseases of diagnosis" with effective treatments or preventative measures, but interventions in the absence of a clear understanding of pathogenesis are often ineffective or even harmful. Medical therapy has its history of "bleeding and purging," and error-prevention has a history of "blaming and shaming." The urge to take action in dealing with either medical illnesses or diagnostic failings is, of course, admirable. However, the principle of primum non nocere should guide one's action in both circumstances. The first step in using the disease model to address EAP is the development of a valid taxonomy to allow for grouping together of abnormalities that have a similar pathogenesis. It is apparent that disease categories such as "tumor" are not valuable until they are further refined by precise and accurate classification. Likewise, "error" is an impossibly broad concept that must be parsed into meaningful subcategories before it can be understood with sufficient clarity to be prevented. One important EAP subtype that has been particularly difficult to understand and classify is knowledge-based interpretative (KBI) error. Not only is the latter sometimes confused with distinctly different error types such as human lapses, but there is danger of mistaking system-wide problems (eg, imprecise or inaccurate diagnostic criteria) for the KBI errors of individual pathologists. This paper presents a theoretically-sound taxonomic system for classification of error that can be used for evidence-based categorization of individual cases. Any taxonomy of error in medicine must distinguish between the various factors that may produce mistakes, and importantly, whether they are individual, small system (e.g., my histology laboratory), or big system (e.g., published diagnostic criteria). Because no overarching governing agency exists to coordinate this initiative, the recognition of need and effective implementation of EAP counter-measures must emanate from our specialty group itself. PMID:16639992

  16. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly for low count cardiac SPECT studies, typically obtained from low-dose protocols, gated studies, and dynamic applications.

  17. Diversity analysis of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana irradiated by gamma-ray based on morphological and anatomical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUH RAHMAD SUHARTANTO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Widiastuti A, Sobir, Suhartanto MR. 2010. Diversity analysis of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. irradiated by gamma-ray based on morphological and anatomical characteristics. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 23-33. The aim of this research was to increase genetic variability of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. irradiated by gamma rays dosage of 0 Gy, 20 Gy, 25 Gy, 30 Gy,35 Gy and 40 Gy. Plant materials used were seeds collected from Cegal Sub-village, Karacak Village, Leuwiliang Sub-district, Bogor District, West Java. Data was generated from morphological and anatomical characteristics. The result indicated that increasing of gamma ray dosage had inhibited ability of seed to growth, which needed longer time and decreased seed viability. Morphologically, it also decreased plant heigh, stem diameter, leaf seizure, and amount of leaf. Anatomically, stomatal density had positive correlation with plant height by correlation was 90% and 74%. Gamma rays irradiation successfully increase morphological variability until 30%. Seed creavage after irradiation increased variability and survival rate of mangosteen.

  18. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  19. An image processing system for locating craniofacial landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new automatic target recognition algorithm has been developed to extract craniofacial landmarks from lateral skull x-rays (cephalograms). The locations of these landmarks are used by orthodontists in what is referred to as a cephalometric evaluation. The evaluation assists in the diagnosis of anomalies and in the monitoring of treatments. The algorithm is based on gray-scale mathematical morphology. A statistical approach to training was used to overcome subtle differences in skeletal topographies. Decomposition was used to desensitize the algorithm to size differences. A system was trained to locate 20 landmarks. Tests on 40 x-rays showed an 85% recognition rate on average

  20. Describing head shapes of white stem borers (Schirpophaga innotata Walker that are able to survive on different rice types using Landmark based geometric morphometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queenilyn B. Albutra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice stem borers are considered as the most serious insect pest of rice in Asia. It infects itsplant host by burrowing into the stem using its mandible. However, apart from the mandible, the head ofrice stem borers is also associated in the incursion process since it facilitates the entry of larvae to the riceplant. Differences in the head capsules have a direct effect on the ability of the insects to ingest hardfoods rapidly. Different rice varieties in the Philippines serve as plant host for this pest and infestationoccurred in different geographical location. Variations in habitat and plant host were thought to generateenvironmental variation in morphometric traits and host adapted herbivore phenotype respectively.Landmark based geometric morphometric analysis was used to assess the hypothesis that the head shapeof white stem borer differ between populations with respect to different rice varieties and geographicallocation where it was obtained. Relative warp analysis showed variation in the head shape betweendifferent white stem borer (Schirpophaga innotata Walker populations infesting different varieties of rice.Non-significant head shape variations were obtained between geographically separated populations. Theseresults indicate that the rice host varieties play an important role in the selection of individuals that areable to counteract the resistance factors in plants.

  1. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with125I, 103Pd, or 131Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model simulations, the average dose to the lens is larger by 7%–9% than the dose to the center of the lens, and the maximum dose to the optic nerve is 17%–22% higher than the dose to the optic disk for all radionuclides. In general, when normalized to the same prescription dose at the tumor apex, doses delivered to all structures of interest in the full eye model are lowest for103Pd and highest for 131Cs, except for the tumor where the average dose is highest for 103Pd and lowest for 131Cs. Conclusions : The eye is not radiologically water-equivalent, as doses from simulations of the plaque in the full eye model differ considerably from doses for the plaque in a water phantom and from simulated TG-43 calculated doses. This demonstrates the importance of model-based dose calculations for eye plaque brachytherapy, for which accurate elemental compositions of ocular media are necessary

  2. Effects of landmark distance and stability on accuracy of reward relocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, David J; Hurly, T Andrew; Healy, Susan D

    2015-11-01

    Although small-scale navigation is well studied in a wide range of species, much of what is known about landmark use by vertebrates is based on laboratory experiments. To investigate how vertebrates in the wild use landmarks, we trained wild male rufous hummingbirds to feed from a flower that was placed in a constant spatial relationship with two artificial landmarks. In the first experiment, the landmarks and flower were 0.25, 0.5 or 1 m apart and we always moved them 3-4 m after each visit by the bird. In the second experiment, the landmarks and flower were always 0.25 m apart and we moved them either 1 or 0.25 m between trials. In tests, in which we removed the flower, the hummingbirds stopped closer to the predicted flower location when the landmarks had been closer to the flower during training. However, while the distance that the birds stopped from the landmarks and predicted flower location was unaffected by the distance that the landmarks moved between trials, the birds directed their search nearer to the predicted direction of the flower, relative to the landmarks, when the landmarks and flower were more stable in the environment. In the field, then, landmarks alone were sufficient for the birds to determine the distance of a reward but not its direction. PMID:26198691

  3. Landmarks or panoramas: what do navigating ants attend to for guidance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnon Guy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects are known to rely on terrestrial landmarks for navigation. Landmarks are used to chart a route or pinpoint a goal. The distant panorama, however, is often thought not to guide navigation directly during a familiar journey, but to act as a contextual cue that primes the correct memory of the landmarks. Results We provided Melophorus bagoti ants with a huge artificial landmark located right near the nest entrance to find out whether navigating ants focus on such a prominent visual landmark for homing guidance. When the landmark was displaced by small or large distances, ant routes were affected differently. Certain behaviours appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that guidance was based on the landmark only. Instead, comparisons of panoramic images recorded on the field, encompassing both landmark and distal panorama, could explain most aspects of the ant behaviours. Conclusion Ants navigating along a familiar route do not focus on obvious landmarks or filter out distal panoramic cues, but appear to be guided by cues covering a large area of their panoramic visual field, including both landmarks and distal panorama. Using panoramic views seems an appropriate strategy to cope with the complexity of natural scenes and the poor resolution of insects' eyes. The ability to isolate landmarks from the rest of a scene may be beyond the capacity of animals that do not possess a dedicated object-perception visual stream like primates.

  4. Detection of point landmarks in multidimensional tensor data?

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Alzola, J.; Kikinis, R; Westin, C.-F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a unified approach to the detection of point landmarks—whose neighborhoods convey discriminant information—including multidimensional scalar, vector, and higher-order tensor data. The method is based on the interpretation of generalized correlation matrices derived from the gradient of tensor functions, a probabilistic interpretation of point landmarks, and the application of tensor algebra. Results on both synthetic and real tensor data are presented.

  5. Visually-Guided Robot Navigation: From Artificial To Natural Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Celaya, Enric; Albarral García, José Luís; Jiménez Schlegl, Pablo; Torras, Carme

    2007-01-01

    Landmark-based navigation in unknown unstructured environments is far from solved. The bottleneck nowadays seems to be the fast detection of reliable visual references in the image stream as the robot moves. In our research, we have decoupled the navigation issues from this visual bottleneck, by first using artificial landmarks that could be easily detected and identified. Once we had a navigation system working, we developed a strategy to detect and track salient regions along image streams ...

  6. Prognostic classification of Hodgkin disease in pathologic stage III, based on anatomic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desser, R.K.; Golomb, H.M.; Ultmann, J.E.; Ferguson, D.J.; Moran, E.M.; Griem, M.L.; Vardiman, J.; Miller, B.; Oetzel, N.; Sweet, D.

    1977-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with pathologic stage III Hodgkin's disease were studied in an effort to determine whether location of involved abdominal nodes influenced survival. Treatment consisted of total nodal radiotherapy with or without subsequent combination chemotherapy. The initial radiation field was the ''extended mantle,'' which included supradiaphragmatic nodes, the splenic hilar area, and paraaortic nodes to the level of L2-L4. Subsequently, lower paraaortic and iliac regions were treated (''lower inverted Y''). Patients with disease limited to the spleen and/or splenic, celiac, or portal nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 1/) had a more favorable 5-yr survival than did patients with involvement of paraaortic, iliac, or mesenteric nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 2/) : 93% versus 57%, respectively (p < 0.05). The addition of combination chemotherapy to total nodal irradiation was associated with improved survival of patients in stage III/sub 2/, but not of those in stage III/sub 1/.

  7. Microstereolithography-Based Fabrication of Anatomically Shaped Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dajiang; Asaoka, Teruo; Shinohara, Makoto; Kageyama, Tomonori; Ushida, Takashi; Furukawa, Katsuko Sakai

    2015-01-01

    Porous ceramic scaffolds with shapes matching the bone defects may result in more efficient grafting and healing than the ones with simple geometries. Using computer-assisted microstereolithography (MSTL), we have developed a novel gelcasting indirect MSTL technology and successfully fabricated two scaffolds according to CT images of rabbit femur. Negative resin molds with outer 3D dimensions conforming to the femur and an internal structure consisting of stacked meshes with uniform interconnecting struts, 0.5?mm in diameter, were fabricated by MSTL. The second mold type was designed for cortical bone formation. A ceramic slurry of beta-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) with room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone as binder was cast into the molds. After the RTV silicone was completely cured, the composite was sintered at 1500°C for 5?h. Both gross anatomical shape and the interpenetrating internal network were preserved after sintering. Even cortical structure could be introduced into the customized scaffolds, which resulted in enhanced strength. Biocompatibility was confirmed by vital staining of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the customized scaffolds for 5 days. This fabrication method could be useful for constructing bone substitutes specifically designed according to local anatomical defects. PMID:26504839

  8. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ivy Kiemle, Trindade-Suedam; Bruno Felipe, Gaia; Cheong Kuo, Cheng; Paulo Alceu Kiemle, Trindade; José Carlos da Cunha, Bastos; Beatriz Silva Câmara, Mattos.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and [...] that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2) to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3) to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  9. Landmarks GIScience for intelligent services

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Kai-Florian

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the latest research on landmarks in GIS, including practical applications. It addresses perceptual and cognitive aspects of natural and artificial cognitive systems, computational aspects with respect to identifying or selecting landmarks for various purposes, and communication aspects of human-computer interaction for spatial information provision. Concise and organized, the book equips readers to handle complex conceptual aspects of trying to define and formally model these situations. The book provides a thorough review of the cognitive, conceptual, computational and commun

  10. The Virtual Family-development of surface-based anatomical models of two adults and two children for dosimetric simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to develop anatomically correct whole body human models of an adult male (34 years old), an adult female (26 years old) and two children (an 11-year-old girl and a six-year-old boy) for the optimized evaluation of electromagnetic exposure. These four models are referred to as the Virtual Family. They are based on high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of healthy volunteers. More than 80 different tissue types were distinguished during the segmentation. To improve the accuracy and the effectiveness of the segmentation, a novel semi-automated tool was used to analyze and segment the data. All tissues and organs were reconstructed as three-dimensional (3D) unstructured triangulated surface objects, yielding high precision images of individual features of the body. This greatly enhances the meshing flexibility and the accuracy with respect to thin tissue layers and small organs in comparison with the traditional voxel-based representation of anatomical models. Conformal computational techniques were also applied. The techniques and tools developed in this study can be used to more effectively develop future models and further improve the accuracy of the models for various applications. For research purposes, the four models are provided for free to the scientific community. (note)

  11. Use of CT simulation for treatment of cervical cancer to assess the adequacy of lymph node coverage of conventional pelvic fields based on bony landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the adequacy of nodal coverage of 'conventional' pelvic radiation fields for carcinoma of the cervix, with contoured pelvic vessels on simulation computed tomography (CT) as surrogates for lymph node location. Methods and Materials: Pelvic arteries were contoured on non-contrast-enhanced CT simulation images of 43 patients with cervix cancer, FIGO Stages I-III. Vessel contours were hidden, and conventional pelvic fields were outlined: (1) anterior/posterior fields (AP): superior border, L5-S1 interspace; inferior border, obturator foramina; lateral border, 2 centimeters lateral to pelvic brim. (2) Lateral fields (LAT): Anterior border, symphysis pubis; posterior border, S2-S3 interspace. Distances were measured between the following: (1) bifurcation of the common iliac artery and superior border (2) external iliac artery and lateral border of the AP field, and (3) external iliac artery and anterior border of the LAT field. The distances were considered as 'inadequate' if 20 mm. Results: Superiorly, 34 patients (79.1%) had inadequate coverage. On the AP, margins were generous in 19 (44.2%), but inadequate in 9 (20.9%). On the LAT, margins were inadequate in 30 (69.8%) patients. Overall, 41 (95.4%, CI, 84.2%-99.4%) patients had at least 1 inadequate margin, the majority located superiorly. Twenty-four (55.8%; CI, 39.9%-70.9%) patients had at least 1 generous margin, the majority located laterally on the AP field. Conclusion: Conventional pelvic fields based on bony landmarks do not provide optimal lymph node coverage in a substantial proportion of patients and may include excess normal tissue in some. CT simulation with vessel contouring as a surrogate for lymph node localization provides more precise and individualized field delineation

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Small Vessel Cannulation: Long-Axis Approach Is Equivalent to Short-Axis in Novice Sonographers Experienced with Landmark-Based Cannulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Catherine S.; Liao, Michael M.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Douglass, Erica; DiGeronimo, Margaret; Christensen, Eric; Hopkins, Emily; Bender, Brooke; Kendall, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our primary objective was to describe the time to vessel penetration and difficulty of long-axis and short-axis approaches for ultrasound-guided small vessel penetration in novice sonographers experienced with landmark-based small vessel penetration. Methods This was a prospective, observational study of experienced certified emergency nurses attempting ultrasound-guided small vessel cannulation on a vascular access phantom. We conducted a standardized training, practice, and experiment session for each participant. Five long-axis and five short-axis approaches were attempted in alternating sequence. The primary outcome was time to vessel penetration. Secondary outcomes were number of skin penetrations and number of catheter redirections. We compared long-axis and short-axis approaches using multivariable regression adjusting for repeated measures, vessel depth, and vessel caliber. Results Each of 10 novice sonographers made 10 attempts for a total of 100 attempts. Median time to vessel penetration in the long-axis and short-axis was 11 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7–12) and 10 (95% CI 6–13) seconds, respectively. Skin penetrations and catheter redirections were equivalent and near optimal between approaches. The median caliber of cannulated vessels in the long-axis and short-axis was 4.6 (95% CI 4.1–5.5) and 5.6 (95% CI 5.1–6.2) millimeters, respectively. Both axes had equal success rates of 100% for all 50 attempts. In multivariable regression analysis, long-axis attempts were 32% (95% CI 11%–48%; p=0.009) faster than short-axis attempts. Conclusion Novice sonographers, highly proficient with peripheral IV cannulation, can perform after instruction ultrasound-guided small vessel penetration successfully with similar time to vessel penetration in either the long-axis or short-axis approach on phantom models. PMID:25493126

  13. A study on the reproducibility of cephalometric landmarks when undertaking a three-dimensional (3D) cephalometric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zamora, Natalia; Llamas, José M.; Cibrián, Rosa; Gandia, José L.; Paredes, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) allows the possibility of modifying some of the diagnostic tools used in orthodontics, such as cephalometry. The first step must be to study the characteristics of these devices in terms of accuracy and reliability of the most commonly used landmarks. The aims were 1- To assess intra and inter-observer reliability in the location of anatomical landmarks belonging to hard tissues of the skull in images taken with a CBCT device, 2- To determi...

  14. Mapped Landmark Algorithm for Precision Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew; Ansar, Adnan; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses a computer vision algorithm for position estimation to enable precision landing during planetary descent. The Descent Image Motion Estimation System for the Mars Exploration Rovers has been used as a starting point for creating code for precision, terrain-relative navigation during planetary landing. The algorithm is designed to be general because it handles images taken at different scales and resolutions relative to the map, and can produce mapped landmark matches for any planetary terrain of sufficient texture. These matches provide a measurement of horizontal position relative to a known landing site specified on the surface map. Multiple mapped landmarks generated per image allow for automatic detection and elimination of bad matches. Attitude and position can be generated from each image; this image-based attitude measurement can be used by the onboard navigation filter to improve the attitude estimate, which will improve the position estimates. The algorithm uses normalized correlation of grayscale images, producing precise, sub-pixel images. The algorithm has been broken into two sub-algorithms: (1) FFT Map Matching (see figure), which matches a single large template by correlation in the frequency domain, and (2) Mapped Landmark Refinement, which matches many small templates by correlation in the spatial domain. Each relies on feature selection, the homography transform, and 3D image correlation. The algorithm is implemented in C++ and is rated at Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 4.

  15. Outline-based morphometrics, an overlooked method in arthropod studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Jean-Pierre; Kaba, D; Solano, P; Dupraz, M; McCoy, K D; Jaramillo-O, N

    2014-12-01

    Modern methods allow a geometric representation of forms, separating size and shape. In entomology, as well as in many other fields involving arthropod studies, shape variation has proved useful for species identification and population characterization. In medical entomology, it has been applied to very specific questions such as population structure, reinfestation of insecticide-treated areas and cryptic species recognition. For shape comparisons, great importance is given to the quality of landmarks in terms of comparability. Two conceptually and statistically separate approaches are: (i) landmark-based morphometrics, based on the relative position of a few anatomical "true" or "traditional" landmarks, and (ii) outline-based morphometrics, which captures the contour of forms through a sequence of close "pseudo-landmarks". Most of the studies on insects of medical, veterinary or economic importance make use of the landmark approach. The present survey makes a case for the outline method, here based on elliptic Fourier analysis. The collection of pseudo-landmarks may require the manual digitization of many points and, for this reason, might appear less attractive. It, however, has the ability to compare homologous organs or structures having no landmarks at all. This strength offers the possibility to study a wider range of anatomical structures and thus, a larger range of arthropods. We present a few examples highlighting its interest for separating close or cryptic species, or characterizing conspecific geographic populations, in a series of different vector organisms. In this simple application, i.e. the recognition of close or cryptic forms, the outline approach provided similar scores as those obtained by the landmark-based approach. PMID:25111609

  16. Anatomical Bases of the Mechanical Complications during the Positioning of Subclavian Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannelli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The subclavian vein is located at the edge of scalenecosto-clavicular triangle, surrounded by the medial aspect of the clavicle in its anterior side, the first rib on its underside and the anterior scalene muscle in his back side. Subclavian catheterization by puncture is not a harmless procedure, in fact, is the path that shows more of major mechanical complications. The main mechanical complications observed with the subclavian approach are the development of uncomplicated supraclavicular hematoma (5% and pneumothorax (1.5 - 3%. The fact of not having in mind the concept of proximity of the subclavian vein with the subclavian artery and the lung, favors the occurrence of such complications. The aim of this work is to show the structures involved in more frequent mechanical complications of percutaneous subclavian venous catheters.We used human cadaveric material, preserved in formaldehyde 10%, in which conventional and special dissected supra-and infraclavicular regions showing subclavian vein and adjacent structures.Through dissection of supraclavicular and infraclavicular regions was achieved by a proper display of the morphology of the subclavian vein and surrounding structures to be taken into account while performing the puncture of the vein and the development of complications.Considering that the puncture of the subclavian vein is a blind procedure where the vein can not be seen through the skin or palpated, it is essential to accurate knowledge of the anatomical relations of the region to successfully channel the vein and lower the risk of mechanical complications.

  17. Population-based evaluation of a suggested anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart defects based on the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of the overall spectrum of congenital heart defects (CHD has always been challenging, in part because of the diversity of the cardiac phenotypes, but also because of the oft-complex associations. The purpose of our study was to establish a comprehensive and easy-to-use classification of CHD for clinical and epidemiological studies based on the long list of the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC. Methods We coded each individual malformation using six-digit codes from the long list of IPCCC. We then regrouped all lesions into 10 categories and 23 subcategories according to a multi-dimensional approach encompassing anatomic, diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. This anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart disease (ACC-CHD was then applied to data acquired from a population-based cohort of patients with CHD in France, made up of 2867 cases (82% live births, 1.8% stillbirths and 16.2% pregnancy terminations. Results The majority of cases (79.5% could be identified with a single IPCCC code. The category "Heterotaxy, including isomerism and mirror-imagery" was the only one that typically required more than one code for identification of cases. The two largest categories were "ventricular septal defects" (52% and "anomalies of the outflow tracts and arterial valves" (20% of cases. Conclusion Our proposed classification is not new, but rather a regrouping of the known spectrum of CHD into a manageable number of categories based on anatomic and clinical criteria. The classification is designed to use the code numbers of the long list of IPCCC but can accommodate ICD-10 codes. Its exhaustiveness, simplicity, and anatomic basis make it useful for clinical and epidemiologic studies, including those aimed at assessment of risk factors and outcomes.

  18. The landmark citation method: analysis of a citation pattern as a collection assessment method.

    OpenAIRE

    Soehner, C B; Wray, S T; Richards, D T

    1992-01-01

    The landmark citation method is a new collection assessment method based on the citation record of a single landmark article. This citation record is developed by identifying sources which cite the landmark article. A bibliography, extracted from the citation record, is then used to complete an assessment of the collection. This method was developed and used to assess the biotechnology collection of the National Library of Medicine. The information gained from this study, in addition to demon...

  19. All that Glitters is not Gold: Using Landmarks for Reward Shaping in FPG

    OpenAIRE

    Buffet, Olivier; Hoffmann, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Landmarks are facts that must be true at some point in any plan. It has recently been proposed in classical planning to use landmarks for the automatic generation of heuristic functions. We herein apply this idea in probabilistic planning. We focus on the FPG tool, which derives a factored policy based on learning from samples into the state space. The rationale is that FPG's performance can be improved significantly by a trivial heuristic that counts the number of false goals; landmarks prov...

  20. "Localization Space" : a framework for localization and planning, for systems using a Sensor/Landmarks module

    OpenAIRE

    Pradalier, Cédric; Sekhavat, Sepanta

    2002-01-01

    One of the common ways of localization in robotics is the triangulation using a system composed of a sensor and some landmarks (which can be artificial or natural). This paper presents a framework, namely the Localization Space, in order to deal with problems such as the landmark placement and motion planning including the localization constraint. Based on this framework, we present general approaches to the optimal distribution of the landmarks or to the computation of reliable trajectories....

  1. Individual 3D region-of-interest atlas of the human brain: knowledge-based class image analysis for extraction of anatomical objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Sabri, Osama; Buell, Udalrich

    2000-06-01

    After neural network-based classification of tissue types, the second step of atlas extraction is knowledge-based class image analysis to get anatomically meaningful objects. Basic algorithms are region growing, mathematical morphology operations, and template matching. A special algorithm was designed for each object. The class label of each voxel and the knowledge about the relative position of anatomical objects to each other and to the sagittal midplane of the brain can be utilized for object extraction. User interaction is only necessary to define starting, mid- and end planes for most object extractions and to determine the number of iterations for erosion and dilation operations. Extraction can be done for the following anatomical brain regions: cerebrum; cerebral hemispheres; cerebellum; brain stem; white matter (e.g., centrum semiovale); gray matter [cortex, frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal lobes, cingulum, insula, basal ganglia (nuclei caudati, putamen, thalami)]. For atlas- based quantification of functional data, anatomical objects can be convoluted with the point spread function of functional data to take into account the different resolutions of morphological and functional modalities. This method allows individual atlas extraction from MRI image data of a patient without the need of warping individual data to an anatomical or statistical MRI brain atlas.

  2. Landmark Discrimination Learning in the Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Milgram, Norton W; Adams, Beth; Callahan, Heather; Head, Elizabeth; Mackay, Bill; Thirlwell, Celeste; Cotman, Carl W

    1999-01-01

    Allocentric spatial memory was studied in dogs of varying ages and sources using a landmark discrimination task. The primary goal of this study was to develop a protocol to test landmark discrimination learning in the dog. Using a modified version of a landmark test developed for use in monkeys, we successfully trained dogs to make a spatial discrimination on the basis of the position of a visual landmark relative to two identical discriminanda. Task performance decreased, however, as the dis...

  3. 75 FR 69120 - National Natural Landmark Designations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... National Natural Landmark Designations AGENCY: National Park Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Public Notice of National Natural Landmark Designations. SUMMARY: On January 16, 2009, then Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne designated the following National Natural Landmarks: Big Bone Lick,...

  4. Acquistion of Structural versus Object Landmark Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, Brian J.; Kalia, Amy A.

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the acquisition and retention of structural and object landmarks in virtual indoor environments. The experiments investigated the rate of acquisition and memory retention for hallway structure (structural landmarks) and pictures (object landmarks). The experiments investigated the rate of acquisition, the role of…

  5. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Landmark signs. 750.710 Section 750.710 Highways FEDERAL... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23 U.S.C. 131(c) permits the existence of signs... Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic...

  6. 36 CFR 62.6 - Natural landmark monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural landmark monitoring... INTERIOR NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.6 Natural landmark monitoring. (a) Owner contact. The... landmarks to determine whether the landmarks retain the values that qualified them for landmark...

  7. Bases Anatómicas de la Gluteoplastía Dinámica / Anatomical Basis of the Dinamic Gluteoplaty

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Laura, Borgno; Varinia, Scanniello; Omar, Rompani; Alejandra, Laxague; Sofía, Páez.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available La disrupción anatómica del esfínter es el mecanismo más común de incontinencia fecal. La creación de un mecanismo esfinteriano con control voluntario permite mantener la contracción en el reposo o durante los movimientos y es uno de los principios fisiológicos y quirúrgicos para la continencia. Est [...] a corrección puede realizarse mediante la transposición de músculo glúteo mayor alrededor del ano y recrear así un esfínter voluntario. La gluteoplastía dinámica consiste en la colocación de un marcapasos que permite la estimulación eléctrica crónica intermitente del músculo esquelético, resultando en la adaptación de la contractilidad basal. El objetivo del trabajo consiste en el estudio anatómico de la longitud in situ y esqueletizado del fascículo inferior del músculo glúteo máximo, de su principal pedículo nervioso, la altura en la cual penetra al músculo desde el cóccix, y la longitud de su rama más distal para finalmente, proponer variantes técnicas para este procedimiento. Se disecaron 21 regiones glúteas de ambos lados de cadáveres frescos y formolizados al 10% de ambos sexos. La longitud del fascículo muscular sin esqueletizar osciló entre 17,8 y 19,65 cm, y esqueletizado entre 23,9 y 20.7 cm. La distancia de penetración del nervio principal fue entre 11,25 10,2 cm y la del nervio más medial se situó promedialmente entre 8,72 y 5,97 cm. La máxima longitud adquirida por el nervio principal hasta su rama más distal, osciló entre 10,4 y 9,2 cm. El fascículo inferior posee una longitud final que permite rodear completamente al ano e incluso, llegar al isquion contralateral hechos que apoyan el uso de este músculo en las transposiciones para la corrección de las incontinencias anales, sin la necesidad de realizar abordajes desmedidos y lejanos, permitiendo a su vez, el uso de un músculo de la región, evitando tracciones del pedículo neurovascular y la consiguiente isquemia luego del procedimiento quirúrgico. Se proponen tres técnicas para la rotación del colgajo Abstract in english The anatomical disruption of the sphincter is the most common mechanism of fecal incontinence. The creation of an sphincter mechanism with voluntary control allows to maintain the contraction during rest or movements and is one of the physiological and surgical principles of continence. This correct [...] ion can be made by the gluteus maximus muscle transposition around the anus recreating a voluntary sphincter. The dynamic gluteoplasty consists in the positioning of a nerve stimulator that allows the intermittent chronic electrical stimulation of the skeletal muscle resulting in the adaptation of the basal contractility. The objective of the work is the anatomic study of the inferior fascicle of the gluteus maximus muscle (its length in situ and squeletized) and of its main nervous pedicle (the height in which penetrates the muscle from coccyx, and the length of its distal branch) so as to propose technical changes for the procedure. Twenty and one gluteus regions of both sides from fresh and formalized cadavers of both sexes were dissected. The length of muscular fascicle without squeletized oscillated between 17.8 and 19.65 cm, and squeletized between 23.9 and 20.7 cm. The distance of penetration of the main nerve was between 11.25 and 10.2 cm and the one of the most internal nerve was located promedially between 8.72 and 5.97 cm. The maximun length acquired by the main nerve until its distal branch oscillated between 10.4 and 9.2 cm. The inferior fascicle has a final length that allows to surround completely the anus or even to reach the contralateral isquion, facts which support the use of this muscle in the transpositions for the correction of the anal incontinence, without making excessive or distant boardings, allowing as well the use of a muscle from the region, avoiding tractions of neurovascular pedicle and the consequent isquemia after the surgical procedure. Three technical changes for the rotation of flap are proposed

  8. Support vector machine-based classification of Alzheimer's disease from whole-brain anatomical MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnin, Benoit [UMR-S 678, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mesrob, Lilia [UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kinkingnehun, Serge [UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[BRAIN, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Pelegrini-Issac, Melanie [UMR-S 678, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Colliot, Olivier [IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[UPR 640 LENA, CNRS, Paris (France); Sarazin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno [UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neurology, Paris (France); Lehericy, Stephane [UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[UMPC Univ. Paris 06, Center for NeuroImaging Research-CENIR, Paris (France)]|[Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Benali, Habib [UMR-S 678, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[UNF/CRIUGM, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    We present and evaluate a new automated method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification of whole-brain anatomical magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly control subjects. We studied 16 patients with AD [mean age {+-} standard deviation (SD)=74.1 {+-}5.2 years, mini-mental score examination (MMSE) = 23.1 {+-} 2.9] and 22 elderly controls (72.3{+-}5.0 years, MMSE=28.5{+-} 1.3). Three-dimensional T1-weighted MR images of each subject were automatically parcellated into regions of interest (ROIs). Based upon the characteristics of gray matter extracted from each ROI, we used an SVM algorithm to classify the subjects and statistical procedures based on bootstrap resampling to ensure the robustness of the results. We obtained 94.5% mean correct classification for AD and control subjects (mean specificity, 96.6%; mean sensitivity, 91.5%). Our method has the potential in distinguishing patients with AD from elderly controls and therefore may help in the early diagnosis of AD. (orig.)

  9. Ischial and pubic osteotomies performed by medial approach during periacetabular osteotomies: an anatomical study

    OpenAIRE

    Bilgili, Fuat; Gurses, Ilke Ali; Ozkaya, Ufuk; Gayretli, Ozcan; Parmaksizoglu, Atilla Sancar; Kale, Aysin Cetiner

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the anatomic landmarks of ischial and pubic osteotomies performed as part of Bernese periacetabular osteotomy, measure the distances of these landmarks to the main neurovascular structures and determine whether these osteotomies can be performed and visualized using a medial approach. Methods: The study included 20 hemipelvises of 10 formaldehyde-fixed cadavers. A medial surgical approach between the adductor longus and pectineus muscles was...

  10. The distally based radial forearm fasciosubcutaneous flap with preservation of the radial artery: an anatomic and clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzweig, N; Chen, L; Chen, Z W

    1994-10-01

    The axial-pattern reverse radial forearm fasciocutaneous flap has become one of the primary flaps for reconstruction of soft-tissue defects of the hand. The two main disadvantages of this flap are (1) sacrifice of a major artery that may possibly jeopardize hand viability and (2) morbidity and appearance of the donor site. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, an anatomic study of a distally based radial forearm fasciosubcutaneous flap with preservation of the radial artery was conducted. Seventeen fresh cadaver forearms were dissected to investigate the contribution of the distal radial artery and its superficial and deep branches to the fasciosubcutaneous plexus of the forearm. The blood supply to the radial forearm fasciosubcutaneous tissue was found to emanate from 6 to 10 septocutaneous perforators of the distal radial artery in the vicinity of the anatomic snuff box that "fan out" at the level of the deep fascia to form a rich plexus supplying the forearm fascia, subcutaneous tissue, and skin. There appeared to be a definite directional component, with the arterioles running longitudinally along the intermuscular septum. The deep fascia and subcutaneous tissue were found to have their own venous system accompanying the small perforating arterioles. Encouraged by these findings, we proceeded to utilize this fasciosubcutaneous flap for coverage of the thumb-index web space (three patients), the dorsum of the hand (two patients), and both the palmar and dorsal aspects of the hand (one patient). Five flaps had almost complete survival. The largest flap in our series suffered significant loss. Minor skin-graft loss occurred in a few cases, and we now delay skin grafting for several days. The distally based radial forearm fasciosubcutaneous flap with preservation of the radial artery can be a very useful and reliable alternative for repairing soft-tissue defects of the hand, obviating the need for the classic fasciocutaneous flap or even a free flap. This flap not only preserves the radial artery, which is essential in cases where only the radial artery is functioning, such as following severe hand injuries, but also provides a more acceptable donor site. PMID:7938291

  11. Predicting efficiency of post-induction mask ventilation based on demographic and anatomical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Saghaei

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Using EMV is an easy and reliable tool for measuring efficiency of mask ventilation. Based on the result of this study, EMV can be estimated from patient?s demographic and physical factors. In edentolous patients, using the lip-over-mask method results in adequate ventilation of lungs.

  12. Metabolic Predispositions and Increased Risk of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma by Anatomical Location: A Large Population-Based Cohort Study in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yunxia; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; Martling, Anna

    2015-11-15

    Whether different definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS) are differently associated with colorectal adenocarcinoma (CA) by anatomical location is unclear. A population-based cohort study, the Cohort of Norway (CONOR) Study, was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 2010. Anthropometric measurements, blood samples, and lifestyle data were collected at recruitment. CAs were identified through linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Register. A composite index of MetS as defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) or/and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and single components of MetS, including anthropometric factors, blood pressure, lipids, triglycerides, and glucose, were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant associations between single MetS components and CA, except for reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and nonfasting glucose levels, were observed. MetS defined by 2 criteria separately showed a similar association with CA in general, and MetS defined by both the IDF and ATP III showed consistent results. Stronger associations were observed in the proximal colon among men (IDF: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24, 1.84; ATP III: HR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.70) and in the rectum among women (IDF: HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.89; ATP III: HR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.90). PMID:26511906

  13. Patient specific color texture mapping of CT-based anatomical surface models utilizing cryosection data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, D; Kerr, J P; Sellberg, M

    1997-01-01

    In traditional medical imaging modalities, color and texture information can add considerable information for diagnostics. Presently, multimodal images of a patient are unregistered and referenced independent of each other, or registered and fused into a single hybrid volume. Doctors and other medical professionals need to be able to visualize and interrogate, on a per-patient basis, a wide variety of 2D and 3D data representations that can be created from non-invasive imaging modalities, such as MRI and CT. In addition, any colorization that may be applied to the image data is strictly based on tissue density, radiation emission, or magnetic signature, and not on any physiological foundation. In order for "true-to-life" color information to be incorporated with non-invasive imaging techniques, and for it to be of consistent quality across the entire body, a single whole-body cryosection specimen with associated medical image data is needed. The National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project offers just such a specimen. Using the full-body medical image data along with the cryosection images of the Visible Human subject, a set of color lookup tables for all visually well defined structures and organs can be created. As a result, patient-specific colorization based on real tissue color and characteristics can be incorporated into traditional intensity-based imaging modalities. The primary goal of this work has been to create CT color lookup tables for all visually well-defined structures in the Visible Human male cryosection data set. The subsequent goal has been to develop a method for stripping textures from a volumetric data set for polygonal models and non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) models, also generated from the volumetric data. PMID:10168955

  14. Geographic Surveillance - Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  15. Evaluation of sexual history-based screening of anatomic sites for chlamydia trachomatis and neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in men having sex with men in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Casper L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually transmitted infection (STI screening programmes are implemented in many countries to decrease burden of STI and to improve sexual health. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae has a prominent role in these protocols. Most of the screening programmes concerning men having sex with men (MSM are based on opportunistic urethral testing. In The Netherlands, a history-based approach is used. The aim of this study is to evaluate the protocol of screening anatomic sites for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infection based on sexual history in MSM in routine practice in The Netherlands. Methods All MSM visiting the clinic for STI in The Hague are routinely asked about their sexual practice during consulting. As per protocol, tests for urogenital, oropharyngeal and anorectal infection are obtained based on reported site(s of sexual contact. All consultations are entered into a database as part of the national STI monitoring system. Data of an 18 months period were retrieved from this database and analysed. Results A total of 1455 consultations in MSM were registered during the study period. The prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae per anatomic site was: urethral infection 4.0% respectively and 2.8%, oropharynx 1.5% and 4.2%, and anorectum 8.2% and 6.0%. The majority of chlamydia cases (72% involved a single anatomic site, which was especially manifest for anorectal infections (79%, while 42% of gonorrhoea cases were single site. Twenty-six percent of MSM with anorectal chlamydia and 17% with anorectal gonorrhoea reported symptoms of proctitis; none of the oropharyngeal infections were symptomatic. Most cases of anorectal infection (83% and oropharyngeal infection (100% would have remained undiagnosed with a symptom-based protocol. Conclusions The current strategy of sexual-history based screening of multiple anatomic sites for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in MSM is a useful and valid guideline which is to be preferred over a symptom-based screening protocol.

  16. Dosimetric intercomparison for multicenter clinical trials using a patient-based anatomic pelvic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, M. A.; Harrison, K. M.; Howlett, S. J.; Cornes, D.; Bulsara, M.; Hamilton, C. S.; Kron, T.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia 6009, Australia and School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 6009 Australia (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales 2298 (Australia); Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine, Mascot, New South Wales 2020 (Australia); Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, Calvary Mater Newcastle, New South Wales 2298 (Australia); Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160 (Australia); Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Victoria 3084 (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia 6009, Australia and School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales 2298, Australia and School of Medicine and Population Health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: To assess dose delivery accuracy to clinically significant points in a realistic patient geometry for two separate pelvic radiotherapy scenarios. Methods: An inhomogeneous pelvic phantom was transported to 36 radiotherapy centers in Australia and New Zealand. The phantom was treated according to Phase III rectal and prostate trial protocols. Point dose measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an ionisation chamber. Comprehensive site-demographic, treatment planning, and physical data were collected for correlation with measurement outcomes. Results: Dose delivery to the prescription point for the rectal treatment was consistent with planned dose (mean difference between planned and measured dose - 0.1 {+-} 0.3% std err). Dose delivery in the region of the sacral hollow was consistently higher than planned (+1.2 {+-} 0.2%). For the prostate treatment, dose delivery to the prostate volume was consistent with planned doses (-0.49 {+-} 0.2%) and planned dose uniformity, though with a tendency to underdose the PTV at the prostate-rectal border. Measured out-of-field doses were significantly higher than planned. Conclusions: A phantom based on realistic anatomy and heterogeneity can be used to comprehensively assess the influence of multiple aspects of the radiotherapy treatment process on dose delivery. The ability to verify dose delivery for two trials with a single phantom was advantageous.

  17. Anatomical correlates of quality of life: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Nagase, Tomomi; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-05-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has been defined in many ways, and these definitions usually emphasize happiness and satisfaction with life. Health-related problems are known to cause lower QOL. However, the neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in QOL measured by questionnaire (QOLMQ) in young healthy subjects are unknown. QOL is essential to our well-being, and investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying QOL in uncompromised subjects is obviously of great scientific and social interest. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the association between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and QOLMQ across the brain in healthy young adults (age, 21.4 ± 1.8 years) men (n = 88) and women (n = 68) in humans. We found significant negative relationships between QOLMQ and rGMV in a region in the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex and regions in the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate gyrus and contingent cingulate regions. These findings show that structural variations in regions associated with processing of negative emotions such as fear and anger as well as those associated with evaluation of internally generated information are associated with QOLMQ. These findings suggest that these processes might be related to QOLMQ in healthy young adults. PMID:23671021

  18. Dosimetric intercomparison for multicenter clinical trials using a patient-based anatomic pelvic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess dose delivery accuracy to clinically significant points in a realistic patient geometry for two separate pelvic radiotherapy scenarios. Methods: An inhomogeneous pelvic phantom was transported to 36 radiotherapy centers in Australia and New Zealand. The phantom was treated according to Phase III rectal and prostate trial protocols. Point dose measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an ionisation chamber. Comprehensive site-demographic, treatment planning, and physical data were collected for correlation with measurement outcomes. Results: Dose delivery to the prescription point for the rectal treatment was consistent with planned dose (mean difference between planned and measured dose - 0.1 ± 0.3% std err). Dose delivery in the region of the sacral hollow was consistently higher than planned (+1.2 ± 0.2%). For the prostate treatment, dose delivery to the prostate volume was consistent with planned doses (-0.49 ± 0.2%) and planned dose uniformity, though with a tendency to underdose the PTV at the prostate-rectal border. Measured out-of-field doses were significantly higher than planned. Conclusions: A phantom based on realistic anatomy and heterogeneity can be used to comprehensively assess the influence of multiple aspects of the radiotherapy treatment process on dose delivery. The ability to verify dose delivery for two trials with a single phantom was advantageous.

  19. Muscle fibre direction of longissimus, iliocostalis and multifidus: landmark-derived reference lines.

    OpenAIRE

    De Foa, J L; Forrest, W.; Biedermann, H J

    1989-01-01

    Considerable inter-individual variations in the fibre direction angles of the iliocostalis lumborum, longissimus and multifidus were observed, thus bringing the applicability of a two dimensional fixed angle grid system for fibre direction determination into question. However, the angulation of the fibres of the multifidus and iliocostalis lumborum were found to be easily identifiable by the use of three surface anatomical landmarks: the caudal tip of the superior iliac spine, the lateral bor...

  20. The Effect of Electrode Designs Based on the Anatomical Heart Location for the Non-Contact Heart Activity Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Sun Ok; Lee, Young-Jae; Koo, Hye Ran; Lee, Seung Pyo; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kim, Kyeng-Nam; Kang, Seung-Jin; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2015-12-01

    This research is an extension of a previous research [1] on the different effects of sensor location that is relatively suitable for heart rate sensing. This research aimed to elucidate the causes of wide variations in heart rate measurements from the same sensor position among subjects, as observed in previous research [1], and to enhance designs of the inductive textile electrode to overcome these variations. To achieve this, this study comprised two parts: In part 1, X-ray examinations were performed to determine the cause of the wide variations noted in the findings from previous research [1], and we found that at the same sensor position, the heart activity signal differed with slight differences in the positions of the heart of each subject owing to individual differences in the anatomical heart location. In part 2, three types of dual-loop-type textile electrodes were devised to overcome variations in heart location that were confirmed in part 1 of the study. The variations with three types of sensor designs were compared with that with a single-round type of electrode design, by using computer simulation and by performing a t-test on the data obtained from the experiments. We found that the oval-oval shaped, dual-loop-type textile electrode was more suitable than the single round type for determining morphological characteristics as well as for measuring appropriate heart activity signals. Based on these results, the oval-oval, dual-loop-type was a better inductive textile electrode that more effectively overcomes individual differences in heart location during heart activity sensing based on the magnetic-induced conductivity principle. PMID:26490149

  1. Retrosplenial cortex codes for permanent landmarks.

    OpenAIRE

    Auger, S. D.; Mullally, S. L.; Maguire, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Landmarks are critical components of our internal representation of the environment, yet their specific properties are rarely studied, and little is known about how they are processed in the brain. Here we characterised a large set of landmarks along a range of features that included size, visual salience, navigational utility, and permanence. When human participants viewed images of these single landmarks during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and r...

  2. Neurocognitive development of memory for landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    van Ekert, Janneke; Wegman, Joost; Janzen, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to detect landmarks in the environment and to associate each landmark with its spatial context is a fundamental operation for navigation, especially when the context is relevant for successful navigation. Recent evidence suggests robust age-related improvements in contextual memory. The current study investigated the effect of spatial context on landmark recognition memory in children and adolescents. Participants, ages 8–18, watched a video depicting a route through a virtual en...

  3. Desert Ants Learn Vibration and Magnetic Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Buehlmann, Cornelia; Hansson, Bill S.; Knaden, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The desert ants Cataglyphis navigate not only by path integration but also by using visual and olfactory landmarks to pinpoint the nest entrance. Here we show that Cataglyphis noda can additionally use magnetic and vibrational landmarks as nest-defining cues. The magnetic field may typically provide directional rather than positional information, and vibrational signals so far have been shown to be involved in social behavior. Thus it remains questionable if magnetic and vibration landmarks a...

  4. Which Tibial Tray Design Achieves Maximum Coverage and Ideal Rotation: Anatomic, Symmetric, or Asymmetric? An MRI-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulberg, S David; Goyal, Nitin

    2015-10-01

    Two goals of tibial tray placement in TKA are to maximize coverage and establish proper rotation. Our purpose was to utilize MRI information obtained as part of PSI planning to determine the impact of tibial tray design on the relationship between coverage and rotation. MR images for 100 consecutive knees were uploaded into PSI software. Preoperative planning software was used to evaluate 3 different tray designs: anatomic, symmetric, and asymmetric. Approximately equally good coverage was achieved with all three trays. However, the anatomic compared to symmetric/asymmetric trays required less malrotation (0.3° vs 3.0/2.4°; P < 0.001), with a higher proportion of cases within 5° of neutral (97% vs 73/77%; P < 0.001). In this study, the anatomic tibia optimized the relationship between coverage and rotation. PMID:25976595

  5. Cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point as a reliable landmark to place the corticectomy and reach the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Frigeri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish preoperatively the localization of the cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point (ICP and use it as a reliable landmark when approaching the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus access. To review relevant anatomical features regarding selective amigdalohippocampectomy (AH for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. Method The cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point was used in more than 300 surgeries by one authors as a reliable landmark to reach the temporal horn. In the laboratory, forty cerebral hemispheres were examined. Conclusion The cortical projection of the ICP is a reliable landmark for reaching the temporal horn.

  6. A framework for evaluation of deformable image registration spatial accuracy using large landmark point sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expert landmark correspondences are widely reported for evaluating deformable image registration (DIR) spatial accuracy. In this report, we present a framework for objective evaluation of DIR spatial accuracy using large sets of expert-determined landmark point pairs. Large samples (>1100) of pulmonary landmark point pairs were manually generated for five cases. Estimates of inter- and intra-observer variation were determined from repeated registration. Comparative evaluation of DIR spatial accuracy was performed for two algorithms, a gradient-based optical flow algorithm and a landmark-based moving least-squares algorithm. The uncertainty of spatial error estimates was found to be inversely proportional to the square root of the number of landmark point pairs and directly proportional to the standard deviation of the spatial errors. Using the statistical properties of this data, we performed sample size calculations to estimate the average spatial accuracy of each algorithm with 95% confidence intervals within a 0.5 mm range. For the optical flow and moving least-squares algorithms, the required sample sizes were 1050 and 36, respectively. Comparative evaluation based on fewer than the required validation landmarks results in misrepresentation of the relative spatial accuracy. This study demonstrates that landmark pairs can be used to assess DIR spatial accuracy within a narrow uncertainty range.

  7. LARGE AREA LANDMARKS - DYNAMAP V.12.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    GDT Large Area Landmarks represents common landmark areas within United States including military areas, prisons, educational institutions, amusement centers, government centers, sport centers, golf courses, and cemeteries.

  8. Sparse Decomposition and Modeling of Anatomical Shape Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Rostrup, Egill

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in statistics have spawned powerful methods for regression and data decomposition that promote sparsity, a property that facilitates interpretation of the results. Sparse models use a small subset of the available variables and may perform as well or better than their full counterparts if constructed carefully. In most medical applications, models are required to have both good statistical performance and a relevant clinical interpretation to be of value. Morphometry of the corpus callosum is one illustrative example. This paper presents a method for relating spatial features to clinical outcome data. A set of parsimonious variables is extracted using sparse principal component analysis, producing simple yet characteristic features. The relation of these variables with clinical data is then established using a regression model. The result may be visualized as patterns of anatomical variation related to clinical outcome. In the present application, landmark-based shape data of the corpus callosum is analyzed in relation to age, gender, and clinical tests of walking speed and verbal fluency. To put the data-driven sparse principal component method into perspective, we consider two alternative techniques, one where features are derived using a model-based wavelet approach, and one where the original variables are regressed directly on the outcome.

  9. Sparse decomposition and modeling of anatomical shape variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Rostrup, Egill

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in statistics have spawned powerful methods for regression and data decomposition that promote sparsity, a property that facilitates interpretation of the results. Sparse models use a small subset of the available variables and may perform as well or better than their full counterparts if constructed carefully. In most medical applications, models are required to have both good statistical performance and a relevant clinical interpretation to be of value. Morphometry of the corpus callosum is one illustrative example. This paper presents a method for relating spatial features to clinical outcome data. A set of parsimonious variables is extracted using sparse principal component analysis, producing simple yet characteristic features. The relation of these variables with clinical data is then established using a regression model. The result may be visualized as patterns of anatomical variation related to clinical outcome. In the present application, landmark-based shape data of the corpus callosum is analyzed in relation to age, gender, and clinical tests of walking speed and verbal fluency. To put the data-driven sparse principal component method into perspective, we consider two alternative techniques, one where features are derived using a model-based wavelet approach, and one where the original variables are regressed directly on the outcome. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec

  10. Online updating of context-aware landmark detectors for prostate localization in daily treatment CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiubin [College of Geographic and Biologic Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210015, China and IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Gao, Yaozong [IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In image guided radiation therapy, it is crucial to fast and accurately localize the prostate in the daily treatment images. To this end, the authors propose an online update scheme for landmark-guided prostate segmentation, which can fully exploit valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images and can achieve improved performance in landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Methods: To localize the prostate in the daily treatment images, the authors first automatically detect six anatomical landmarks on the prostate boundary by adopting a context-aware landmark detection method. Specifically, in this method, a two-layer regression forest is trained as a detector for each target landmark. Once all the newly detected landmarks from new treatment images are reviewed or adjusted (if necessary) by clinicians, they are further included into the training pool as new patient-specific information to update all the two-layer regression forests for the next treatment day. As more and more treatment images of the current patient are acquired, the two-layer regression forests can be continually updated by incorporating the patient-specific information into the training procedure. After all target landmarks are detected, a multiatlas random sample consensus (multiatlas RANSAC) method is used to segment the entire prostate by fusing multiple previously segmented prostates of the current patient after they are aligned to the current treatment image. Subsequently, the segmented prostate of the current treatment image is again reviewed (or even adjusted if needed) by clinicians before including it as a new shape example into the prostate shape dataset for helping localize the entire prostate in the next treatment image. Results: The experimental results on 330 images of 24 patients show the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed online update scheme in improving the accuracies of both landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Besides, compared to the other state-of-the-art prostate segmentation methods, the authors’ method achieves the best performance. Conclusions: By appropriate use of valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images, the authors’ proposed online update scheme can obtain satisfactory results for both landmark detection and prostate segmentation.

  11. Online updating of context-aware landmark detectors for prostate localization in daily treatment CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In image guided radiation therapy, it is crucial to fast and accurately localize the prostate in the daily treatment images. To this end, the authors propose an online update scheme for landmark-guided prostate segmentation, which can fully exploit valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images and can achieve improved performance in landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Methods: To localize the prostate in the daily treatment images, the authors first automatically detect six anatomical landmarks on the prostate boundary by adopting a context-aware landmark detection method. Specifically, in this method, a two-layer regression forest is trained as a detector for each target landmark. Once all the newly detected landmarks from new treatment images are reviewed or adjusted (if necessary) by clinicians, they are further included into the training pool as new patient-specific information to update all the two-layer regression forests for the next treatment day. As more and more treatment images of the current patient are acquired, the two-layer regression forests can be continually updated by incorporating the patient-specific information into the training procedure. After all target landmarks are detected, a multiatlas random sample consensus (multiatlas RANSAC) method is used to segment the entire prostate by fusing multiple previously segmented prostates of the current patient after they are aligned to the current treatment image. Subsequently, the segmented prostate of the current treatment image is again reviewed (or even adjusted if needed) by clinicians before including it as a new shape example into the prostate shape dataset for helping localize the entire prostate in the next treatment image. Results: The experimental results on 330 images of 24 patients show the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed online update scheme in improving the accuracies of both landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Besides, compared to the other state-of-the-art prostate segmentation methods, the authors’ method achieves the best performance. Conclusions: By appropriate use of valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images, the authors’ proposed online update scheme can obtain satisfactory results for both landmark detection and prostate segmentation

  12. The SYNTAX score and SYNTAX-based clinical risk scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Vasim; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Serruys, Patrick W

    2011-01-01

    Risk stratification is an important and essential component in appropriately informing patients electing to undergo coronary artery bypass graft or percutaneous coronary intervention. This process is an integral part of the SYNTAX pioneered Heart Team approach in selecting the most appropriate revascularization modality in patients with complex coronary artery disease. The SYNTAX score was pioneered as an anatomical-based risk score that aided in this decision-making process. The purpose of this review is to examine the SYNTAX score and subsequent risk models that have been developed on the basis of this landmark anatomical-based risk score. PMID:22041038

  13. 4D measurement system for automatic location of anatomical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawi?ska, Ma?gorzata; Rapp, Walter; Kowalski, Marcin; Haex, Bart; Mooshake, Sven

    2006-04-01

    Orthopedics and neurosciences are fields of medicine where the analysis of objective movement parameters is extremely important for clinical diagnosis. Moreover, as there are significant differences between static and dynamic parameters, there is a strong need of analyzing the anatomical structures under functional conditions. In clinical gait analysis the benefits of kinematical methods are undoubted. In this paper we present a 4D (3D + time) measurement system capable of automatic location of selected anatomical structures by locating and tracing the structures' position and orientation in time. The presented system is designed to help a general practitioner in diagnosing selected lower limbs' dysfunctions (e.g. knee injuries) and also determine if a patient should be directed for further examination (e.g. x-ray or MRI). The measurement system components are hardware and software. For the hardware part we adapt the laser triangulation method. In this way we can evaluate functional and dynamic movements in a contact-free, non-invasive way, without the use of potentially harmful radiation. Furthermore, opposite to marker-based video-tracking systems, no preparation time is required. The software part consists of a data acquisition module, an image processing and point clouds (point cloud, set of points described by coordinates (x, y, z)) calculation module, a preliminary processing module, a feature-searching module and an external biomechanical module. The paper briefly presents the modules mentioned above with the focus on the feature-searching module. Also we present some measurement and analysis results. These include: parameters maps, landmarks trajectories in time sequence and animation of a simplified model of lower limbs.

  14. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed, but is more superiorly located at T12-L1 for SAT and at L3-L4 for VAT. Furthermore, the optimal anatomic locations for SAT and VAT estimation are not the same, contrary to common assumption. The proposed standardized space mapping achieves high consistency of anatomic localization by accurately managing nonlinearities in the relationships among landmarks. Multiple slices achieve greater improvement in correlation for VAT than for SAT. The optimal locations in the case of multiple slices are not contiguous

  15. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K., E-mail: jay@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Radiology, Medical Image Processing Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6021 (United States); Torigian, Drew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6021 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed, but is more superiorly located at T12-L1 for SAT and at L3-L4 for VAT. Furthermore, the optimal anatomic locations for SAT and VAT estimation are not the same, contrary to common assumption. The proposed standardized space mapping achieves high consistency of anatomic localization by accurately managing nonlinearities in the relationships among landmarks. Multiple slices achieve greater improvement in correlation for VAT than for SAT. The optimal locations in the case of multiple slices are not contiguous.

  16. Examining the Variations in the Results of the Hotelling T (2) Test in Case of Changing Baseline Landmarks in the Bookstein Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Ilker; Sigirli, Deniz; Ozkaya, Guven

    2015-06-01

    In many biological and biomedical investigations, the most effective way to analyze the forms of whole biological organs or organisms is by recording geometric locations of landmark points. If we want to compare shapes, then individuals should be translated, rotated and scaled in such a way that all of the individuals lie in a standard position and are centered. Bookstein conducted this process by choosing two landmarks as reference landmarks. Each individual is translated, rotated and scaled according to these reference landmarks. The aim of the present study was to examine the change in the p values in the case of choosing different baseline landmarks when performing the Hotelling T (2) test, which is commonly used when comparing two sample shape configurations based on Bookstein coordinates. For this purpose, the changes in the p values were investigated in shape configurations that are composed of a different number of landmarks by taking all of the possible paired landmark combinations at different variance levels and sample sizes. As a result of the present study, it was observed that with the increase in the landmark number, the number of possible baseline landmark combinations also increases and, for this reason, a substantial number of variations occur in the p values. Therefore, it is an important to decide which landmarks should be taken as reference landmarks when using the Bookstein coordinates. PMID:26199212

  17. 36 CFR 62.8 - Natural landmark designation removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural landmark designation... INTERIOR NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.8 Natural landmark designation removal. (a) Criteria for removal. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (f) of this section, national natural landmark designation...

  18. 36 CFR 65.6 - Recognition of National Historic Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Historic Landmarks. 65.6 Section 65.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.6 Recognition of National Historic Landmarks. (a) Following designation of a property by the Secretary as a National Historic Landmark, the...

  19. 36 CFR 65.4 - National Historic Landmark criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Historic Landmark... INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.4 National Historic Landmark criteria. The criteria applied to evaluate properties for possible designation as National Historic Landmarks or...

  20. 36 CFR 65.7 - Monitoring National Historic Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Landmarks. 65.7 Section 65.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.7 Monitoring National Historic Landmarks. (a) NPS maintains a continuing relationship with the owners of National Historic Landmarks. Periodic...

  1. 36 CFR 62.5 - Natural landmark criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural landmark criteria. 62... NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.5 Natural landmark criteria. (a) Introduction. (1) National... natural features sought for representation on the National Registry of Natural Landmarks. Most...

  2. Electronic and film portal images: a comparison of landmark visibility and review accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare a scanning liquid ion chamber electronic portal imaging device (SLIC-EPID) and an amorphous silicon flat panel (aSi) EPID with portal film in clinical applications using measures of landmark visibility and treatment review accuracy. Methods and Materials: Six radiation oncologists viewed 39 electronic portal images (EPIs) from the SLIC-EPID, 36 EPIs from the aSi-EPID, and portal films of each of these treatment fields. The physicians rated the clarity of anatomic landmarks in the portal images, and the scores were compared between EPID and film. Nine hundred portal image reviews were performed. EPID and film portal images were acquired with known setup errors in either phantom or cadaver treatments. Physicians identified the errors visually in portal films and with computerized analysis for EPID. Results: There were no statistically significant (p<0.05) differences between film and SLIC-EPID in ratings of landmark clarity. Eleven of 12 landmarks were more visible in aSi-EPID than in film. Translational setup errors were identified with an average accuracy of 2.5 mm in film, compared to 1.5 mm with SLIC-EPID and 1.3 mm with aSi-EPID. Conclusions: Both EPIDs are clinically viable replacements for film, but aSi-EPID represents a significant advancement in image quality over film

  3. Associative basis of landmark learning and integration in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth J. Leising; Aaron P. Blaisdell

    2009-01-01

    Early work on spatial navigation evaluated what stimuli (kinesthetic or extra-maze) support small-scale navigation and the nature of the underlying learning (place versus response) process. Contemporary research has focused primarily on how cues interact to determine spatial search. This review covers three general findings from research on landmark-based spatial search in vertebrates. First, pigeons and rats encode simple spatial maps in both open-field and touchscreen environments. Second, ...

  4. Elections and landmark policies in Tanzania and Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Therkildsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Much of the relevant literature on Africa downplays the salience of elections for policy-making and implementation. Instead, the importance of factors such as clientelism, ethnicity, organized interest group and donor influence, is emphasized. We argue that, in addition, elections now motivate political elites to focus on policies they perceive to be able to gain votes. This is based on analyses of six landmark decisions made during the last fifteen years in the social, productive and public fin...

  5. Color-contrast landmark detection and encoding in outdoor images

    OpenAIRE

    Todt, Eduardo; Torras Genís, Carme

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a system to extract salient regions from an outdoor image and match them against a database of previously acquired landmarks. Region saliency is based mainly on color contrast, although intensity and texture orientation are also taken into account. Remarkably, color constancy is embedded in the saliency detection process through a novel color ratio algorithm that makes the system robust to illumination changes, so common in outdoor environments. A region is characterized ...

  6. Basic Restriction and Reference Level in Anatomically-based Japanese Models for Low-Frequency Electric and Magnetic Field Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yukinori; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    Human exposed to electric and/or magnetic fields at low frequencies may cause direct effect such as nerve stimulation and excitation. Therefore, basic restriction is regulated in terms of induced current density in the ICNIRP guidelines and in-situ electric field in the IEEE standard. External electric or magnetic field which does not produce induced quantities exceeding the basic restriction is used as a reference level. The relationship between the basic restriction and reference level for low-frequency electric and magnetic fields has been investigated using European anatomic models, while limited for Japanese model, especially for electric field exposures. In addition, that relationship has not well been discussed. In the present study, we calculated the induced quantities in anatomic Japanese male and female models exposed to electric and magnetic fields at reference level. A quasi static finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method was applied to analyze this problem. As a result, spatially averaged induced current density was found to be more sensitive to averaging algorithms than that of in-situ electric field. For electric and magnetic field exposure at the ICNIRP reference level, the maximum values of the induced current density for different averaging algorithm were smaller than the basic restriction for most cases. For exposures at the reference level in the IEEE standard, the maximum electric fields in the brain were larger than the basic restriction in the brain while smaller for the spinal cord and heart.

  7. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT HIGHWAY BEAUTIFICATION Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23...is permitted. Substantial change in size, lighting, or message content will terminate its exempt...

  8. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to mark the anatomic neck. You can see up here, this is where the anatomic neck starts. We're going to follow this all the ... put it is wherever the osteotomy surface winds up being parallel to ... that's where we're going to start off with glenoid exposure. So now we're ...

  9. Improved Detection of Landmarks on 3D Human Face Data

    OpenAIRE

    Shu LIANG; Wu, Jia; Weinberg, Seth M; Shapiro, Linda G

    2013-01-01

    Craniofacial researchers make heavy use of established facial landmarks in their morphometric analyses. For studies on very large facial image datasets, the standard approach of manual landmarking is very labor intensive. With the goal of producing 20 established landmarks, we have developed a geometric methodology that can automatically locate 10 established landmark points and 7 other supporting points on human 3D facial scans. Then, to improve accuracy and produce all 20 landmarks, a defor...

  10. Referential framework for transcranial anatomical correspondence for fNIRS based on manually traced sulci and gyri of an infant brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mie; Homae, Fumitaka; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Watanabe, Hama; Katagiri, Masatoshi; Uda, Satoshi; Nakashima, Mitsuhiro; Dan, Ippeita; Taga, Gentaro

    2014-03-01

    Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which is compact, portable, and tolerant of body movement, is suitable for monitoring infant brain functions. Nevertheless, fNIRS also poses a technical problem in that it cannot provide structural information. Supplementation with structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) is not always feasible for infants who undergo fNIRS measurement. Probabilistic registration methods using an MRI database instead of subjects' own MRIs are optimized for adult studies and offer only limited resources for infant studies. To overcome this, we used high-quality infant MRI data for a 12-month-old infant and manually delineated segmented gyri from among the highly visible macroanatomies on the lateral cortical surface. These macroanatomical regions are primarily linked to the spherical coordinate system based on external cranial landmarks, and further to traditional 10-20-based head-surface positioning systems. While macroanatomical structures were generally comparable between adult and infant atlases, differences were found in the parietal lobe, which was positioned posteriorly at the vertex in the infant brain. The present study provides a referential framework for macroanatomical analyses in infant fNIRS studies. With this resource, multichannel fNIRS functional data could be analyzed in reference to macroanatomical structures through virtual and probabilistic registrations without acquiring subject-specific MRIs. PMID:24445146

  11. Quality-Aware Estimation of Facial Landmarks in Video Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Face alignment in video is a primitive step for facial image analysis. The accuracy of the alignment greatly depends on the quality of the face image in the video frames and low quality faces are proven to cause erroneous alignment. Thus, this paper proposes a system for quality aware face alignment by using a Supervised Decent Method (SDM) along with a motion based forward extrapolation method. The proposed system first extracts faces from video frames. Then, it employs a face quality assessment technique to measure the face quality. If the face quality is high, the proposed system uses SDM for facial landmark detection. If the face quality is low the proposed system corrects the facial landmarks that are detected by SDM. Depending upon the face velocity in consecutive video frames and face quality measure, two algorithms are proposed for correction of landmarks in low quality faces by using an extrapolation polynomial. Experimental results illustrate the competency of the proposed method while comparing with the state-of-theart methods including an SDM-based method (from CVPR-2013) and a very recent method (from CVPR-2014) that uses parallel cascade of linear regression (Par-CLR).

  12. Algorithms to automatically quantify the geometric similarity of anatomical surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, D; Clair, E St; Puente, J; Funkhouser, T; Patel, B; Jernvall, J; Daubechies, I

    2011-01-01

    We describe new approaches for distances between pairs of 2-dimensional surfaces (embedded in 3-dimensional space) that use local structures and global information contained in inter-structure geometric relationships. We present algorithms to automatically determine these distances as well as geometric correspondences. This is motivated by the aspiration of students of natural science to understand the continuity of form that unites the diversity of life. At present, scientists using physical traits to study evolutionary relationships among living and extinct animals analyze data extracted from carefully defined anatomical correspondence points (landmarks). Identifying and recording these landmarks is time consuming and can be done accurately only by trained morphologists. This renders these studies inaccessible to non-morphologists, and causes phenomics to lag behind genomics in elucidating evolutionary patterns. Unlike other algorithms presented for morphological correspondences our approach does not requir...

  13. The accuracy of a designed software for automated localization of craniofacial landmarks on CBCT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional projection radiographs have been traditionally considered the modality of choice for cephalometric analysis. To overcome the shortcomings of two-dimensional images, three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) has been used to evaluate craniofacial structures. However, manual landmark detection depends on medical expertise, and the process is time-consuming. The present study was designed to produce software capable of automated localization of craniofacial landmarks on cone beam (CB) CT images based on image registration and to evaluate its accuracy. The software was designed using MATLAB programming language. The technique was a combination of feature-based (principal axes registration) and voxel similarity-based methods for image registration. A total of 8 CBCT images were selected as our reference images for creating a head atlas. Then, 20 CBCT images were randomly selected as the test images for evaluating the method. Three experts twice located 14 landmarks in all 28 CBCT images during two examinations set 6 weeks apart. The differences in the distances of coordinates of each landmark on each image between manual and automated detection methods were calculated and reported as mean errors. The combined intraclass correlation coefficient for intraobserver reliability was 0.89 and for interobserver reliability 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 0.93). The mean errors of all 14 landmarks were <4 mm. Additionally, 63.57% of landmarks had a mean error of <3 mm compared with manual detection (gold standard method). The accuracy of our approach for automated localization of craniofacial landmarks, which was based on combining feature-based and voxel similarity-based methods for image registration, was acceptable. Nevertheless we recommend repetition of this study using other techniques, such as intensity-based methods

  14. The Mandibular Landmarks about the Facial Artery and Vein with Multidetector Computed Tomography Angiography (MDCTA): an Anatomical and Radiological Morphometric Study / Puntos de Referencia de la Mandíbula Relacionados a la Arteria y Vena Facial con Angiografía por Tomografía Computarizada Multidetector (ATCM): un Estudio Morfométrico Anatómico y Radiológico

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Aynur Emine, Cicekcibasi; Mehmet Tugrul, Yilmaz; Demet, Kiresi; Muzaffer, Seker.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue investigar el curso de los vasos faciales de acuerdo con varios puntos de referencias mandibulares en sujetos vivos mediante angiografía por tomografía computarizada multidetector (ATCM) para determinar si éstos están relacionados con el sexo y el lado. El estudio se [...] llevó a cabo en el Departamento de Radiología, Facultad de Medicina de Meram en Necmettin Erbakan (Konya, Turkey). En total, sesenta caras de 30 sujetos (15 hombres y 15 mujeres), que presentaban síntomas y signos de la enfermedad vascular fueron evaluados para explorar los vasos faciales por ATCM. Los parámetros sobre los vasos faciales se midieron en relación a puntos de referencia (ángulo de la mandíbula, proceso mental, foramen mental y línea mediana facial). La distancia desde el punto en el que la arteria facial aparece por primera vez en el margen inferior de la mandíbula hasta el ángulo mandibular de la arteria facial derecha y izquierda fueron 3,53±0,66 cm y 3,31±0,73 cm en hombres, respectivamente. En mujeres fueron 2,91±0,52 cm y 3,35± 0,48 cm. La ATCM es un examen nuevo, poderoso, seguro y no invasivo para demostrar la vascularización de la cabeza. Las estructuras óseas y la morfología de los vasos vecinos pueden ser evaluados por esta técnica en casos de trauma con sospecha de lesiones de los vasos y se puede considerar de selección en pacientes para realizar cirugías de colgajo. Abstract in english The aim of this study was to investigate the course of the facial vessels according to several mandibular landmarks in living individuals using multidetector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) to determine these related to sex and side. This study was conducted in the Radiology Department, Mera [...] m Faculty of Medicine, Necmettin Erbakan University (Konya, Turkey). In total, sixty faces from 30 specimens (15 males and 15 females) with symptoms and signs of vascular disease were evaluated for the facial vessels by MDCTA scan. The facial vessel parameters were measured according to the reference points (mandibular angle, mental protuberance, mental foramen and facial midline). The distance from the point at which the facial artery first appears in the lower margin of the mandible to the mandibular angle for right and left facial artery were observed as 3.53±0.66 cm and 3.31±0.73 cm in males, respectively. These distances were determined as 2.91±0.52 cm and 3.35±0.48 cm in females. MDCTA is a new, powerful, safe and noninvasive test to demonstrate the vasculature of the head. Bony structures and neighboring vessel morphology can be evaluated by this technique in cases of trauma with suspected vessel injuries and when considering patient selection for flap surgery.

  15. Comparison of Intraoperative Portable CT Scanners in Skull Base and Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Single Center Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Conley, David B.; Tan, Bruce; Bendok, Bernard R; Batjer, H. Hunt; Chandra, Rakesh; Sidle, Douglas; Rahme, Rudy J.; Adel, Joseph G.; Fishman, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Precise and safe management of complex skull base lesions can be enhanced by intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scanning. Surgery in these areas requires real-time feedback of anatomic landmarks. Several portable CT scanners are currently available. We present a comparison of our clinical experience with three portable scanners in skull base and craniofacial surgery. We present clinical case series and the participants were from the Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Three scanners are stud...

  16. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient's unique anatomical makeup. Dr. Gerald R. Williams, Jr., a shoulder specialist from the Rothman Institute ... at Methodist Hospital in Philadelphia, where Dr. Jerry Williams will be performing a total shoulder arthroplasty. Before ...

  17. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available GLOBAL AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient ...

  18. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... so that it comes out of the osteotomy surface at the anatomic neck. Hit me. 00:05: ... and then advance it over to the osteotomy surface, but pretty much anything else, I think anything ...

  19. Trade-offs between leaf hydraulic capacity and drought vulnerability: morpho-anatomical bases, carbon costs and ecological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Andrea; Pedà, Giulia; La Rocca, Nicoletta

    2012-11-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf) ) and vulnerability constrain plant productivity, but no clear trade-off between these fundamental functional traits has emerged in previous studies. We measured K(leaf) on a leaf area (K(leaf_area)) and mass basis (K(leaf_mass)) in six woody angiosperms, and compared these values with species' distribution and leaf tolerance to dehydration in terms of P(50), that is, the leaf water potential inducing 50% loss of K(leaf) . We also measured several morphological and anatomical traits associated with carbon investment in leaf construction and water transport efficiency. Clear relationships emerged between K(leaf_mass), P(50), and leaf mass per unit area (LMA), suggesting that increased tolerance to hydraulic dysfunction implies increased carbon costs for leaf construction and water use. Low P(50) values were associated with narrower and denser vein conduits, increased thickness of conduit walls, and increased vein density. This, in turn, was associated with reduced leaf surface area. Leaf P(50) was closely associated with plants' distribution over a narrow geographical range, suggesting that this parameter contributes to shaping vegetation features. Our data also highlight the carbon costs likely to be associated with increased leaf tolerance to hydraulic dysfunction, which confers on some species the ability to thrive under reduced water availability but decreases their competitiveness in high-resource habitats. PMID:22978628

  20. Use of known landmarks for satellite navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. L.; Gai, E. G.; Grant, F. D.; Adams, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    The use of known landmark measurements along with an onboard attitude reference system for estimation of both the ephemeris and attitude of an earth orbiting satellite is discussed. Simulation results are presented which show that, although known landmarks alone do not provide sufficient information to bound the uncertainty in attitude and ephemeris, they are useful in combination with other navigation aids, such as star tracking, ground tracking, or satellite tracking. An extended Kalman filter is used for optimal estimation. The result of using a smoothing algorithm is also shown.

  1. Iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block in inguinal hernia repair for postoperative pain management: comparison of the anatomical landmark and ultrasound guided techniques / Bloqueo de los nervios ileohipogástrico/ilioinguinal en corrección de hernia inguinal para el tratamiento del dolor en el postoperatorio: comparación entre la técnica de marcas anatómicas y la guiada por ultrasonido / Bloqueio dos nervos ílio-hipogástrico/ilioinguinal em correção de hérnia inguinal para tratamento da dor no pós-operatório: comparação entre a técnica de marcos anatômicos e a guiada por ultrassom

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Abdurrahman, Demirci; Esra Mercanoglu, Efe; Gürkan, Türker; Alp, Gurbet; Fatma Nur, Kaya; Ali, Anil; & #304; lker, Çimen.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar a eficácia de bloqueios dos nervos ílio-hipogástrico/ilioinguinal feitos com a técnica guiada por ultrassom e a de marcos anatômicos para o manejo da dor no pós-operatório em casos de herniorrafia inguinal em adultos. Métodos: Foram randomicamente divididos 40 pacientes, estado f [...] ísico ASA I-II, em dois grupos iguais: nos grupos AN (técnica de marcos anatômicos) e US (técnica guiada por ultrassom), o bloqueio dos nervos ílio-hipogástrico/ilioinguinal foi feito com 20 mL de levobupivacaína a 0,5% antes da cirurgia com as técnicas especificadas. Escore de dor na avaliação pós-operatória, tempo de primeira mobilização, tempo de internação hospitalar, escore de satisfação com a analgesia no pós-operatório, efeitos colaterais induzidos por opiáceos e complicações relacionadas ao bloqueio foram avaliados durante 24 horas de pós-operatório. Resultados: Escores EVAem repouso na sala de recuperação e todos os valores clínicos durante o acompanhamento foram significativamente menores no grupo ultrassom (p Abstract in spanish Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar la eficacia de bloqueos de los nervios ileohipogástrico/ilioinguinal realizados con la técnica guiada por ultrasonido y la de marca anatómicas para el manejo del dolor en el postoperatorio en casos de herniorrafia inguinal en adultos. Métodos: 40 p [...] acientes, estado físico ASA I-II, fueron aleatoriamente divididos en 2 grupos iguales: grupos con técnica de marcas anatómicas) y grupo con técnica guiada por ultrasonido. El bloqueo de los nervios iliohipogástrico/ilioinguinal fue realizado con 20 mL de levobupivacaína al 0,5% antes de la cirugía con las técnicas especificadas. La puntuación de dolor en la evaluación postoperatoria, tiempo de primera movilización, tiempo de ingreso hospitalario, puntuación de satisfacción con la analgesia en el postoperatorio, efectos colaterales inducidos por opiáceos y complicaciones relacionadas con el bloqueo fueron evaluados durante 24 h de postoperatorio. Resultados: Las puntuaciones EVA en reposo en la sala de recuperación y todos los valores clínicos durante el seguimiento fueron significativamente menores en el grupo con técnica guiada por ultrasonido (p Abstract in english Objectives: The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve blocks performed with the ultrasound guided and the anatomical landmark techniques for postoperative pain management in cases of adult inguinal herniorrhaphy. Methods: 40 patients, ASA I-II status [...] were randomized into two groups equally: in Group AN (anatomical landmark technique) and in Group ultrasound (ultrasound guided technique), iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block was performed with 20 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine prior to surgery with the specified techniques. Pain score in postoperative assessment, first mobilization time, duration of hospital stay, score of postoperative analgesia satisfaction, opioid induced side effects and complications related to block were assessed for 24 h postoperatively. Results: VAS scores at rest in the recovery room and all the clinical follow-up points were found significantly less in Group ultrasound (p

  2. The complexity of anatomical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Grizzi Fabio; Chiriva-Internati Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The conception of anatomical entities as a hierarchy of infinitely graduated forms and the increase in the number of observed anatomical sub-entities and structural variables has generated a growing complexity, thus highlighting new properties of organised biological matter. Results (1) Complexity is so pervasive in the anatomical world that it has come to be considered as a primary characteristic of anatomical systems. (2) Anatomical entities, when viewed at microscopic a...

  3. Plantar calcaneal enthesophytes: new observations regarding sites of origin based on radiographic, MR imaging, anatomic, and paleopathologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the relationship between sites of calcaneal plantar enthesophytes and surrounding fascial and soft tissue structures using routine radiography, MR imaging, and data derived from cadaveric and paleopathologic specimens.Design and patients. Two observers analyzed the MR imaging studies of 40 ankles in 38 patients (35 males, 3 females; mean age 48.3 years) with plantar calcaneal enthesophytes that were selected from all the ankle MR examinations performed during the past year. Data derived from these MR examinations were the following: the size of the enthesophyte; its location in relation to the plantar fascia (PF) and flexor muscles; and the thickness and signal of the PF. The corresponding radiographs of the ankles were evaluated at a different time by the same observers for the presence or absence of plantar enthesophytes and, when present, their measurements. A third observer reviewed all the discordant observations of MR imaging and radiographic examinations. Two observers analyzed 22 calcaneal specimens with plantar enthesophytes at an anthropology museum to determine the orientation of each plantar enthesophyte. MR imaging of a cadaveric foot with a plantar enthesophyte with subsequent sagittal sectioning was performed to provide further anatomic understanding.Results. With regard to MR imaging, the mean size of the plantar enthesophytes was 4.41 mm (SD 2.4). Twenty (50%) enthesophytes were located above the PF, 16 (40%) between the fascia and abductor digiti minimi, flexor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis muscles, and only one (3%) was located within the PF. In three (8%) cases the location was not determined. The size of enthesophytes seen with MR imaging and radiographs was highly correlated (P0.8, kappa >0.9). Eleven of the 22 bone specimens had plantar enthesophytes oriented in the direction of the abductor digiti minimi and 11 oriented in the direction of the flexor digitorum brevis and PF. The cadaveric sections revealed different types of enthesophytes.Conclusions. Plantar calcaneal enthesophytes arise in five different locations: at the insertion sites of abductor digiti minimi and flexor digitorum brevis muscles; between the PF and these muscles; and, less frequently, within the PF and at the insertion site of the short plantar ligament. (orig.)

  4. 36 CFR 62.7 - Natural landmark modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural landmark... INTERIOR NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.7 Natural landmark modifications. (a) Determination of need for modifications. After designation, the modification of the boundaries of a natural...

  5. Ultrasound of the elbow: A systematic approach using bony landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of bony landmarks can be helpful in performing an ultrasound study of the elbow. We discuss bony landmarks that can be used for evaluation of the common extensor tendon, ulnar collateral ligament and common flexor tendon, coronoid and olecranon fossa, ulnar nerve, and biceps tendon. We discuss bony landmarks for each of these structures.

  6. Placement of pedicle screws using three-dimensional fluoroscopy-based navigation in lumbar vertebrae with axial rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Wei; Lang, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Despite potential advantages of three-dimensional fluoroscopy-based navigation, there still remain a lot of controversies about the indications of this technology, especially whether it is worthy of being used in placement of pedicle screws in lumbar spine. However, according to the inconsistent conclusions reported in the literature and our experiences, the traditional method relying on anatomical landmarks and fluoroscopic views to guide lumbar pedicle screw insertion is unable to meet the ...

  7. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency.

  8. Landmark papers on photorefractive nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Pochi

    1995-01-01

    This book, intended for students, researchers and engineers, is a collection of classic papers on photorefractive nonlinear optics. Included are landmark papers on fundamental photorefractive phenomena, two-wave mixing, four-wave mixing, phase conjugators and resonators, material growth and physics, and applications in image processing, optical storage and optical computing.

  9. TINA manual landmarking tool: software for the precise digitization of 3D landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Schunke Anja C; Bromiley Paul A; Tautz Diethard; Thacker Neil A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Interest in the placing of landmarks and subsequent morphometric analyses of shape for 3D data has increased with the increasing accessibility of computed tomography (CT) scanners. However, current computer programs for this task suffer from various practical drawbacks. We present here a free software tool that overcomes many of these problems. Results The TINA Manual Landmarking Tool was developed for the digitization of 3D data sets. It enables the generation of a modifi...

  10. Tools for quantitative form description; an evaluation of different software packages for semi-landmark analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssaye, Alexandra; Herrel, Anthony; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Cornette, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    The challenging complexity of biological structures has led to the development of several methods for quantitative analyses of form. Bones are shaped by the interaction of historical (phylogenetic), structural, and functional constrains. Consequently, bone shape has been investigated intensively in an evolutionary context. Geometric morphometric approaches allow the description of the shape of an object in all of its biological complexity. However, when biological objects present only few anatomical landmarks, sliding semi-landmarks may provide good descriptors of shape. The sliding procedure, mandatory for sliding semi-landmarks, requires several steps that may be time-consuming. We here compare the time required by two different software packages (‘Edgewarp’ and ‘Morpho’) for the same sliding task, and investigate potential differences in the results and biological interpretation. ‘Morpho’ is much faster than ‘Edgewarp,’ notably as a result of the greater computational power of the ‘Morpho’ software routines and the complexity of the ‘Edgewarp’ workflow. Morphospaces obtained using both software packages are similar and provide a consistent description of the biological variability. The principal differences between the two software packages are observed in areas characterized by abrupt changes in the bone topography. In summary, both software packages perform equally well in terms of the description of biological structures, yet differ in the simplicity of the workflow and time needed to perform the analyses. PMID:26618086

  11. A study on the reproducibility of cephalometric landmarks when undertaking a three-dimensional (3D) cephalometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, José M.; Cibrián, Rosa; Gandia, José L.; Paredes, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) allows the possibility of modifying some of the diagnostic tools used in orthodontics, such as cephalometry. The first step must be to study the characteristics of these devices in terms of accuracy and reliability of the most commonly used landmarks. The aims were 1- To assess intra and inter-observer reliability in the location of anatomical landmarks belonging to hard tissues of the skull in images taken with a CBCT device, 2- To determine which of those landmarks are more vs. less reliable and 3- To introduce planes of reference so as to create cephalometric analyses appropriated to the 3D reality. Study design: Fifteen patients who had a CBCT (i-CAT®) as a diagnostic register were selected. To assess the reproducibility on landmark location and the differences in the measurements of two observers at different times, 41 landmarks were defined on the three spatial axes (X,Y,Z) and located. 3.690 measurements were taken and, as each determination has 3 coordinates, 11.070 data were processed with SPSS® statistical package. To discover the reproducibility of the method on landmark location, an ANOVA was undertaken using two variation factors: time (t1, t2 and t3) and observer (Ob1 and Ob2) for each axis (X, Y and Z) and landmark. The order of the CBCT scans submitted to the observers (Ob1, Ob2) at t1, t2, and t3, were different and randomly allocated. Multiple comparisons were undertaken using the Bonferroni test. The intra- and inter-examiner ICC´s were calculated. Results: Intra- and inter-examiner reliability was high, both being ICC ? 0.99, with the best frequency on axis Z. Conclusions: The most reliable landmarks were: Nasion, Sella, Basion, left Porion, point A, anterior nasal spine, Pogonion, Gnathion, Menton, frontozygomatic sutures, first lower molars and upper and lower incisors. Those with less reliability were the supraorbitals, right zygion and posterior nasal spine. Key words:Cone Beam Computed Tomography, cephalometry, landmark, orthodontics, reliability. PMID:22322503

  12. An anatomically oriented breast model for MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutra, Dominik; Bergtholdt, Martin; Sabczynski, Jörg; Dössel, Olaf; Buelow, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the western world. In the breast cancer care-cycle, MRIis e.g. employed in lesion characterization and therapy assessment. Reading of a single three dimensional image or comparing a multitude of such images in a time series is a time consuming task. Radiological reporting is done manually by translating the spatial position of a finding in an image to a generic representation in the form of a breast diagram, outlining quadrants or clock positions. Currently, registration algorithms are employed to aid with the reading and interpretation of longitudinal studies by providing positional correspondence. To aid with the reporting of findings, knowledge about the breast anatomy has to be introduced to translate from patient specific positions to a generic representation. In our approach we fit a geometric primitive, the semi-super-ellipsoid to patient data. Anatomical knowledge is incorporated by fixing the tip of the super-ellipsoid to the mammilla position and constraining its center-point to a reference plane defined by landmarks on the sternum. A coordinate system is then constructed by linearly scaling the fitted super-ellipsoid, defining a unique set of parameters to each point in the image volume. By fitting such a coordinate system to a different image of the same patient, positional correspondence can be generated. We have validated our method on eight pairs of baseline and follow-up scans (16 breasts) that were acquired for the assessment of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. On average, the location predicted and the actual location of manually set landmarks are within a distance of 5.6 mm. Our proposed method allows for automatic reporting simply by uniformly dividing the super-ellipsoid around its main axis.

  13. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masami; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Osamu [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Naoto [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki [Kanazawa University, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Takao, Hidemasa; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiology and Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iwatsubo, Takeshi [University of Tokyo, Department of Neuropathology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Fumio [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Yahaba, Iwate (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Integrative Brain Imaging Center National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Collaboration: Japanese Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2013-07-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: ''Frontal Lobe,'' ''Hippocampus,'' ''Occipital Lobe,'' ''Orbital Gyrus,'' ''Parietal Lobe,'' ''Putamen,'' and ''Temporal Lobe.'' Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies. (orig.)

  14. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advancing the standard of orthopedic patient care. In a few moments, you'll be able to watch a live global AP anatomic total shoulder surgery from Methodist Hospital in Philadelphia. A revolution in shoulder orthopedics, the Global AP gives ...

  15. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for restoration of version anatomically here? 00:37:25 GERALD WILLIAMS, MD: I use my three-dimensional study from preoperatively ... I'd like to thank everybody. 01:20:25 N. DOUGLAS BOARDMAN III, MD: So I think right now with things completed, ...

  16. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... And we have Dr. Song visiting us from South Korea. This patient is a 78-year-old male ... Anatomic Total Shoulder surgery, which featured the latest innovation in shoulder surgery from DePuy Orthopedics. OR-Live ...

  17. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... we'll put in an anatomic Global AP stem on the humeral side. And if you'll ... So we're going to use a 14 stem, a 52x21 head with a ball taper offset. ... position of the taper with respect to the stem. So then we take this off. We take ...

  18. Development and application of stent-based image guided navigation system for oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Seung [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Dental Research Institute and BK21, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Heo, Min Suk; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Kim, Myung Jin; Lee, Jee Ho [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a stent-based image guided surgery system and to apply it to oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites. We devised a patient-specific stent for patient-to-image registration and navigation. Three dimensional positions of the reference probe and the tool probe were tracked by an optical camera system and the relative position of the handpiece drill tip to the reference probe was monitored continuously on the monitor of a PC. Using 8 landmarks for measuring accuracy, the spatial discrepancy between CT image coordinate and physical coordinate was calculated for testing the normality. The accuracy over 8 anatomical landmarks showed an overall mean of 0.56 {+-} 0.16 mm. The developed system was applied to a surgery for a vertical alveolar bone augmentation in right mandibular posterior area and possible interior alveolar nerve injury case of an impacted third molar. The developed system provided continuous monitoring of invisible anatomical structures during operation and 3D information for operation sites. The clinical challenge showed sufficient accuracy and availability of anatomically complex operation sites. The developed system showed sufficient accuracy and availability in oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites.

  19. Development and application of stent-based image guided navigation system for oral and maxillofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to develop a stent-based image guided surgery system and to apply it to oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites. We devised a patient-specific stent for patient-to-image registration and navigation. Three dimensional positions of the reference probe and the tool probe were tracked by an optical camera system and the relative position of the handpiece drill tip to the reference probe was monitored continuously on the monitor of a PC. Using 8 landmarks for measuring accuracy, the spatial discrepancy between CT image coordinate and physical coordinate was calculated for testing the normality. The accuracy over 8 anatomical landmarks showed an overall mean of 0.56 ± 0.16 mm. The developed system was applied to a surgery for a vertical alveolar bone augmentation in right mandibular posterior area and possible interior alveolar nerve injury case of an impacted third molar. The developed system provided continuous monitoring of invisible anatomical structures during operation and 3D information for operation sites. The clinical challenge showed sufficient accuracy and availability of anatomically complex operation sites. The developed system showed sufficient accuracy and availability in oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites.

  20. Anatomical considerations of the neonatal ilio-inguinal/ iliohypogastric nerve block

    OpenAIRE

    Van Schoor, A.; Bosman, M.C.; Bosenberg, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    The ilioinguinal/ iliohypogastric nerve block is an effective technique that provides analgesia for a variety of inguinal surgical procedures in children. However, a relatively high failure rate of between 20-30% has been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the exact anatomical position of the ilio-inguinal and iliohypogastric nerves in relation to an easily identifiable bony landmark, the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS), in neonates. Dissections were performed on a sample o...

  1. Identification of Facial Nerve During Parotidectomy: A Combined Anatomical & Surgical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Somnath; Pal, Sudipta; Sengupta, Moushumi; Chowdhury, Kanishka; Saha, Vedula Padmini; Mondal, Lopamudra

    2013-01-01

    To find out the most easily identifiable and anatomically consistent landmark for identification of facial nerve during parotid surgery. Ten cadaveric dissections and ten live parotid surgeries for different types of parotid tumours were done. Cadaveric dissection was performed in the Department of Anatomy and the surgeries were done in the Department of ENT and Head and Neck surgery of R. G. Kar Medical College of Kolkata. The distance of the facial nerve trunk from three most commonly used ...

  2. An Anatomically Oriented Breast Coordinate System for Mammogram Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Sami; Karemore, Gopal Raghunath

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a breast coordinate system that is based on breast anatomy to register female breasts into a common coordinate frame in 2D mediolateral (ML) or mediolateral oblique (MLO) view mammograms. The breasts are registered according to the location of the pectoral muscle and the nipple and the shape of the breast boundary because these are the most robust features independent of the breast size and shape. On the basis of these landmarks, we have constructed a nonlinear mapping between the parameter frame and the breast region in the mammogram. This mapping makes it possible to identify the corresponding positions and orientations among all of the ML or MLO mammograms, which facilitates an implicit use of the registration, i.e., no explicit image warping is needed. We additionally show how the coordinate transform can be used to extract Gaussian derivative features so that the feature positions and orientations are registered and extracted without non-linearly deforming the images. We use the proposed breast coordinate transform in a cross-sectional breast cancer risk assessment study of 490 women, in which we attempt to learn breast cancer risk factors from mammograms that were taken prior to when the breast cancer became visible to a radiologist. The coordinate system provides both the relative position and orientation information on the breast region from which the features are derived. In addition, the coordinate system can be used in temporal studies to pin-point anatomically equivalent locations between the mammograms of each woman and among the mammograms of all of the women in the study. The results of the cross-sectional study show that the classification into cancer and control groups can be improved by using the new coordinate system, compared to other systems evaluated. Comparisons were performed using the area-under-the-receiveroperating- characteristic-curve (AUC) score. In general, the new coordinate system makes an accurate anatomical registration of breasts possible, which suggests its wide applicability wherever 2D mammogram registration is required.

  3. Manejo actual de la microtia: redefinición anátomo-quirúrgica Management of microtia based on a redefinition of its anatomical-surgical classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Sorolla P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Reportar y evaluar la efectividad de una técnica quirúrgica, previamente descrita para el tratamiento de microtias, basado en un nuevo concepto de clasificación anátomo-quirúrgica. Material y Método: Estudio retrospectivo de pacientes tratados en el Hospital Militar y Clínica Alemana de Santiago en el Servicio de Cirugía Plástica desde enero de 2008 hasta diciembre de 2010. Se reclutaron a un total de 15 pacientes, 13 (87% de los cuales eran unilaterales y 2 (13% bilaterales. A todos los pacientes se les realizó la reconstrucción mediante técnica quirúrgica de Firmin. Resultados: Se operó a 15 pacientes de rango de edad entre 9 y 25 años, con una mediana de 11 años. De los casos unilaterales; 7 correspondían a tipo I de Firmin, 5 casos a tipo II Firmin y un caso tipo IIIa. De los casos bilaterales, ambos tenían microtia tipo IIIb. Se logró en la totalidad de los casos unilaterales una buena proyección inicial del marco cartilaginoso durante el primer tiempo quirúrgico. Seis casos fueron sometidos a un segundo tiempo quirúrgico. Durante el seguimiento mínimo de 18 meses, se observaron complicaciones en 4 (16% pacientes. Conclusiones: Se comprueba que mediante una técnica basada en la clasificación anátomo-quirúrgica, los resultados a corto plazo fueron favorables y satisfactorios.Background: Incomplete development and growth of the pinna can lead to a small or deformed pinna, called microtia. Aim: To report and evaluate the effectiveness of a surgical technique previously described for the treatment of microtia, based on a new anatomical-surgical classification. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of patients treated at two plastic surgery departments from January 2008 to December 2010. We recruited a total of 15 patients aged 9 to 25 years. Thirteen (87% had unilateral and 2 (13% bilateral microtia. All patients underwent the surgical reconstructive technique described by Firmin. Results: Among patients with unilateral microtia, seven belonged to Firmin type I, five to type II and one to type IIIa. Both patients with bilateral microtia, were classified as type IIIb. In all cases with unilateral microtia, a good initial projection of the cartilage frame was achieved during the first surgical procedure. Six patients were subjected to a second operation. During 18 months follow up, four patients (16% had complications. Conclusions: This surgical technique that is based on an anatomical surgical classification, achieves favorable and satisfactory results.

  4. Manejo actual de la microtia: redefinición anátomo-quirúrgica / Management of microtia based on a redefinition of its anatomical-surgical classification

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan Pablo, Sorolla P; Douglas, Arbulo L; Miguel, Obaid G; Carla, Ibarra M; Montserrat, Fontbona; Rodrigo, Cabello P; Pamela, Wisnia C; Ángela, Bautista S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Reportar y evaluar la efectividad de una técnica quirúrgica, previamente descrita para el tratamiento de microtias, basado en un nuevo concepto de clasificación anátomo-quirúrgica. Material y Método: Estudio retrospectivo de pacientes tratados en el Hospital Militar y Clínica Alemana de S [...] antiago en el Servicio de Cirugía Plástica desde enero de 2008 hasta diciembre de 2010. Se reclutaron a un total de 15 pacientes, 13 (87%) de los cuales eran unilaterales y 2 (13%) bilaterales. A todos los pacientes se les realizó la reconstrucción mediante técnica quirúrgica de Firmin. Resultados: Se operó a 15 pacientes de rango de edad entre 9 y 25 años, con una mediana de 11 años. De los casos unilaterales; 7 correspondían a tipo I de Firmin, 5 casos a tipo II Firmin y un caso tipo IIIa. De los casos bilaterales, ambos tenían microtia tipo IIIb. Se logró en la totalidad de los casos unilaterales una buena proyección inicial del marco cartilaginoso durante el primer tiempo quirúrgico. Seis casos fueron sometidos a un segundo tiempo quirúrgico. Durante el seguimiento mínimo de 18 meses, se observaron complicaciones en 4 (16%) pacientes. Conclusiones: Se comprueba que mediante una técnica basada en la clasificación anátomo-quirúrgica, los resultados a corto plazo fueron favorables y satisfactorios. Abstract in english Background: Incomplete development and growth of the pinna can lead to a small or deformed pinna, called microtia. Aim: To report and evaluate the effectiveness of a surgical technique previously described for the treatment of microtia, based on a new anatomical-surgical classification. Materials an [...] d Methods: Retrospective study of patients treated at two plastic surgery departments from January 2008 to December 2010. We recruited a total of 15 patients aged 9 to 25 years. Thirteen (87%) had unilateral and 2 (13%) bilateral microtia. All patients underwent the surgical reconstructive technique described by Firmin. Results: Among patients with unilateral microtia, seven belonged to Firmin type I, five to type II and one to type IIIa. Both patients with bilateral microtia, were classified as type IIIb. In all cases with unilateral microtia, a good initial projection of the cartilage frame was achieved during the first surgical procedure. Six patients were subjected to a second operation. During 18 months follow up, four patients (16%) had complications. Conclusions: This surgical technique that is based on an anatomical surgical classification, achieves favorable and satisfactory results.

  5. Reconciling landmarks and level sets: geometric shape warping and matching using generalized gradients and correspondence-augmented implicit representations

    OpenAIRE

    Maurel, Pierre; Faugeras, Olivier; Keriven, Renaud

    2006-01-01

    Shape warping is a key problem in statistical shape analysis. This paper proposes a framework for geometric shape warping based on both shape distances and landmarks. Taking advantage of the recently proposed spatially coherent flows, our method is mathematically well-posed and uses only intrinsic shape information, namely some similarity measure between shapes and the correspondence of landmarks provided on the shape surface. No extrinsic quantity is considered, neither a diffeomorphism of t...

  6. An Efficient Ceiling-view SLAM Using Relational Constraints Between Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyukdoo Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new indoor ‘simultaneous localization and mapping’ (SLAM technique based on an upward-looking ceiling camera. Adapted from our previous work [17], the proposed method employs sparsely-distributed line and point landmarks in an indoor environment to aid with data association and reduce extended Kalman filter computation as compared with earlier techniques. Further, the proposed method exploits geometric relationships between the two types of landmarks to provide added information about the environment. This geometric information is measured with an upward-looking ceiling camera and is used as a constraint in Kalman filtering. The performance of the proposed ceiling-view (CV SLAM is demonstrated through simulations and experiments. The proposed method performs localization and mapping more accurately than those methods that use the two types of landmarks without taking into account their relative geometries.

  7. UAV Control on the Basis of 3D Landmark Bearing-Only Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Simon; Konovalenko, Ivan; Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an approach to the control of a UAV on the basis of 3D landmark observations. The novelty of the work is the usage of the 3D RANSAC algorithm developed on the basis of the landmarks' position prediction with the aid of a modified Kalman-type filter. Modification of the filter based on the pseudo-measurements approach permits obtaining unbiased UAV position estimation with quadratic error characteristics. Modeling of UAV flight on the basis of the suggested algorithm shows good performance, even under significant external perturbations. PMID:26633394

  8. Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Current Concepts and Future Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Murawski, Christopher D; Wolf, Megan R.; Araki, Daisuke; Muller, Bart; Tashman, Scott; Fu, Freddie H.

    2013-01-01

    Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons, particularly in association with sports-related injuries. Whereas traditional reconstruction techniques used a single bundle graft that was typically placed in a non-anatomic position, a renewed interest in anatomy has facilitated the popularization of anatomic reconstruction techniques. Recently, a focus has been placed on individualizing ACL surgery based on each patient’s native a...

  9. Using local symmetry for landmark selection

    OpenAIRE

    Kootstra, Geert; de Jong, Sjoerd; Schomaker, Lambert R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Most visual Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (SLAM) methods use interest points as landmarks in their maps of the environment. Often the interest points are detected using contrast features, for instance those of the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). The SIFT interest points, however, have problems with stability, and noise robustness. Taking our inspiration from human vision, we therefore propose the use of local symmetry to select interest points. Our method, the MUlti-scale Sy...

  10. Genomic differentiation of Neanderthals and anatomically modern man allows a fossil-DNA-based classification of morphologically indistinguishable hominid bones.

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, M.; Bachmann, L; Nicholson, G J; J. Bachmann; Giddings, I; Rüschoff-Thale, B; Czarnetzki, A; Pusch, C. M.

    2000-01-01

    Southern blot hybridizations of genomic DNA were introduced as a relatively simple fossil-DNA-based approach to classify remains of Neanderthals. When hybridized with genomic DNA of either human or Neanderthal origin, DNA extracted from two Neanderthal finds-the Os parietale, from Warendorf-Neuwarendorf, Germany, and a clavicula, from Krapina, Croatia-was shown to yield hybridization signals that differ by at least a factor of two compared to the signals obtained with the use of fossil DNA of...

  11. Design, construction and mechanical testing of digital 3D anatomical data-based PCL-HA bone tissue engineering scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingqiang; Wei, Bo; Guo, Yang; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Yan, Junwei; Hu, Wenhao; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Yijin; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the techniques of design and construction of CT 3D reconstructional data-based polycaprolactone (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold. Femoral and lumbar spinal specimens of eight male New Zealand white rabbits were performed CT and laser scanning data-based 3D printing scaffold processing using PCL-HA powder. Each group was performed eight scaffolds. The CAD-based 3D printed porous cylindrical stents were 16 piece × 3 groups, including the orthogonal scaffold, the Pozi-hole scaffold and the triangular hole scaffold. The gross forms, fiber scaffold diameters and porosities of the scaffolds were measured, and the mechanical testing was performed towards eight pieces of the three kinds of cylindrical scaffolds, respectively. The loading force, deformation, maximum-affordable pressure and deformation value were recorded. The pore-connection rate of each scaffold was 100 % within each group, there was no significant difference in the gross parameters and micro-structural parameters of each scaffold when compared with the design values (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the loading force, deformation and deformation value under the maximum-affordable pressure of the three different cylinder scaffolds when the load was above 320 N. The combination of CT and CAD reverse technology could accomplish the design and manufacturing of complex bone tissue engineering scaffolds, with no significant difference in the impacts of the microstructures towards the physical properties of different porous scaffolds under large load. PMID:25596860

  12. Anatomical Basis of the Myofascial Trigger Points of the Trapezius Muscle / Bases Anatómicas de los Puntos de Gatillo Miofasciales del Músculo Trapecio

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Flávia Emi, Akamatsu; Samir, Saleh; Henrique Trombini, Pinesi; Katarina Reichmann, Rodrigues; Cintia Benedicto, Zandoná; Mauro, Andrade; Alfredo Luiz, Jacomo.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue correlacionar los sitios de entrada de los ramos del nervio accesorio en el músculo trapecio con placas motoras y los puntos de gatillo miofasciales. A pesar de las correlaciones anatomoclínicas se constituyeren en la principal característica de los puntos de gatillo, [...] no hay informes en la literatura describiendo sobre la distribución de los ramos del nervio accesorio y su relación anatómica con los puntos de gatillo. Ambos músculos trapecio de doce cadáveres adultos fueron disecados por los autores (profesores de anatomía y estudiantes de postgrado en Medicina) para observar el punto exacto donde los ramos del nervio accesorio espinal penetraban en el vientre muscular. La disección se llevó a cabo respetando las capas estratigráficas para preservar la inervación del músculo ubicada profundamente a éste. Ocho puntos fueron identificados: En todos los casos correspondieron a la descripción clínica de los puntos gatillo miofasciales y eran comunes a todos los cadáveres. Esta correlación anatomoclínica entre la ramificación del nervio espinal accesorio y los puntos de gatillo miofascial es útil para una mejor comprensión de la fisiopatología de los puntos gatillo y puede proporcionar una base para un abordaje diagnóstico y terapéutico racional para estos trastornos. Abstract in english This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle, knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTP, no previous reports des [...] cribing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Eight points were identified: In all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTPs. The eight points where common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MPT is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, providing useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches.

  13. Common osteoporosis: anatomical, clinical and therapeutical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents anatomical, clinical and therapeutical aspects of common osteoporosis as well as exploration techniques based on X-ray, gamma-ray and neutron activation methods. The radioisotopes used in gamma ray absorption are: 125 I, 241 Am and 153 Ga. The neutron activation is based on natural isotope 48Ca becoming 49Ca isotope after radiative neutron capture

  14. The behavioural relevance of landmark texture for honeybee homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Dittmar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Honeybees visually pinpoint the location of a food source using landmarks. Studies on the role of visual memories have suggested that bees approach the goal by finding a close match between their current view and a memorized view of the goal location. The most relevant landmark features for this matching process seem to be their retinal positions, the size as defined by their edges, and their colour. Recently, we showed that honeybees can use landmarks that are statically camouflaged, suggesting that motion cues are relevant as well. Currently it is unclear how bees weight these different landmark features when accomplishing navigational tasks, and whether this depends on their saliency. Since natural objects are often distinguished by their texture, we investigate the behavioural relevance and the interplay of the spatial configuration and the texture of landmarks. We show that landmark texture is a feature that bees memorise, and being given the opportunity to identify landmarks by their texture improves the bees’ navigational performance. Landmark texture is weighted more strongly than landmark configuration when it provides the bees with positional information and when the texture is salient. In the vicinity of the landmark honeybees changed their flight behaviour according to its texture.

  15. Reference Man anatomical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  16. Cancer Prevalence - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  17. Historical Landmark Studies - About SEER

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  18. Second Cancers - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  19. Quantification of radiographic image quality based on patient anatomical contrast-to-noise ratio: a preliminary study with chest images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Foos, David H.; Barski, Lori; Samei, Ehsan

    2010-02-01

    The quality of a digital radiograph for diagnostic imaging depends on many factors, such as the capture system DQE and MTF, the exposure technique factors, the patient anatomy, and the particular image processing method and processing parameters used. Therefore, the overall image quality as perceived by the radiologists depends on many factors. This work explores objective image quality metrics directly from display-ready patient images. A preliminary study was conducted based on a multi-frequency analysis of anatomy contrast and noise magnitude from 250 computed radiography (CR) chest radiographs (150 PA, 50 AP captured with anti-scatter grids, and 50 AP without grids). The contrast and noise values were evaluated in different sub-bands separately according to their frequency properties. Contrast-Noise ratio (CNR) was calculated, the results correlated well with the human observers' overall impression on the images captured with and without grids.

  20. CISNET: Breast Cancer Landmark Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    After remaining relatively constant for many years, breast cancer mortality in the United States decreased by a dramatic 24% from 1989 to 2000. CISNET investigators initiated a joint comparative modeling effort among seven groups to determine the contributions of mammography and adjuvant therapy to this decline. While the benefits of adjuvant therapy were more settled, controversy regarding the benefits of mammography screening persisted due to uneven results and continuing criticism of the controlled trials on which the mortality benefits had been based.

  1. Pilot study: Computer-based virtual anatomical interactivity for rehabilitation of individuals with chronic acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Douglas Simmons, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in upper-limb motor function and executive functioning can compromise an affected individual’s ability to complete everyday activities. Impaired motor and executive functioning therefore pose a risk to increasing numbers of veterans who have been diagnosed with acquired brain injury. This article reports on changes in upper-limb motor function and executive functioning of 12 adult participants with chronic acquired brain injury using a novel, computer-based, motor and cognitive rehabilitation program called PreMotor Exercise Games (PEGs. Manual muscle, goniometric range of motion, and dynamometer assessments were used to determine motor functioning while the Executive Function Performance Test measured cognitive functioning. A three-level repeated measures design was conducted to determine changes pre- and postintervention. Participants demonstrated significant improvement in shoulder (p = 0.01 and wrist (p = 0.01 range of motion and clinically relevant improvement for elbow range of motion. Participants demonstrated clinically relevant improvement in shoulder, elbow, and wrist strength. Finally, participants demonstrated significant improvement in executive functioning (p < 0.05. Using PEGs as a modality for both motor and cognitive intervention is a potentially beneficial adjunct to rehabilitation and warrants further study.

  2. Precision landmark location for machine vision and photogrammetry finding and achieving the maximum possible accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, José A

    2007-01-01

    Shows the reader how to derive theoretical limits to the precision of landmark identification in electronic imagesMATLAB® package assists the reader with applying theoretical results in real engineering systemsSteps outside the usual earth-sciences and civil-engineering base of photogrammetry to improve animation, medical imaging and robotic vision applications

  3. Detection of natural landmarks through multiscale opponent features

    OpenAIRE

    Todt, Eduardo; Torras Genís, Carme

    2000-01-01

    This work presents a landmark detection system for the walking robot operating in unknown unstructured outdoor environments. Most landmark detection approaches are not adequate for this application, since they rely on either structured information or a priori knowledge about the landmarks. Instead, the proposed system makes use of visual saliency concepts stemming from studies of animal and human perception. Thus, biologically inspired opponent features (in color and orientation) are searched...

  4. Using landmarks to support older people in navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, J.; Gray, P.D.G.; Khammampad, K.; Brewster, S

    2004-01-01

    Although landmarks are an integral aspect of navigation, they have rarely been used within electronic navigation aids. This paper describes the design of a pedestrian navigation aid for a handheld computer, which guides the user along a route using photographs of landmarks, together with audio and text instructions that reference these landmarks. This aid was designed with older users in mind who often find their mobility hampered by declines in sensory, cognitive and motor abilities. It was ...

  5. Combining Path Integration and Remembered Landmarks When Navigating without Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Kalia, Amy A.; Schrater, Paul R.; Legge, Gordon E.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction between remembered landmark and path integration strategies for estimating current location when walking in an environment without vision. We asked whether observers navigating without vision only rely on path integration information to judge their location, or whether remembered landmarks also influence judgments. Participants estimated their location in a hallway after viewing a target (remembered landmark cue) and then walking blindfolded to the same...

  6. Visual motion-sensitive neurons in the bumblebee brain convey information about landmarks during a navigational task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Egelhaaf

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bees use visual memories to find the spatial location of previously learnt food sites. Characteristic learning flights help acquiring these memories at newly discovered foraging locations where landmarks - salient objects in the vicinity of the goal location - can play an important role in guiding the animal’s homing behavior. Although behavioral experiments have shown that bees can use a variety of visual cues to distinguish objects as landmarks, the question of how landmark features are encoded by the visual system is still open. Recently, it could be shown that motion cues are sufficient to allow bees localizing their goal using landmarks that can hardly be discriminated from the background texture. Here, we tested the hypothesis that motion sensitive neurons in the bee’s visual pathway provide information about such landmarks during a learning flight and might, thus, play a role for goal localization. We tracked learning flights of free-flying bumblebees (Bombus terrestris in an arena with distinct visual landmarks, reconstructed the visual input during these flights, and replayed ego-perspective movies to tethered bumblebees while recording the activity of direction-selective wide-field neurons in their optic lobe. By comparing neuronal responses during a typical learning flight and targeted modifications of landmark properties in this movie we demonstrate that these objects are indeed represented in the bee’s visual motion pathway. We find that object-induced responses vary little with object texture, which is in agreement with behavioral evidence. These neurons thus convey information about landmark properties that are useful for view-based homing.

  7. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using Active Shape Models and k-Nearest-Neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.

    2014-01-01

    n combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume in the bottom part of a maxillary sinus in two patients without any artifacts, due to their abnormal location, it succeeded in filling all dental artifact regions in all patients. In conclusion, we propose a method, which combines ASM and kNN into a simple approach which, as the results show, succeeds to find and correct the dental artifacts within the anatomical surface.

  8. Anatomical variations of the saphenous vein arc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ciucci

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There are many anatomical variations presented by the tributaries of the saphenous vein at the saphenous – femoral junction .In anatomical texts, they are plotted as usual tributaries to the femoral vein, presentations that are not found during routine surgical practice. Knowledge of the sapheno- femoral vein junction is imperative for the surgeon when operating the venous system of lower limbs, in order to avoid accidents and prevent intraoperative varicose recurrences. The aim of the present paper is to demonstrate which of the anatomical variations of the arc of the great saphenous vein is shown more often, contributing to the description of the anatomy of the region and its name in the anatomical terminology. The present work is based on experience of one hundred dissections (n = 100 of the femoral inguinal region in human cadavers fixed with formol aqueous solution of 5% v / v, twenty (n = 20 of which were filled with latex via endovascular before its fixation. The basic scheme of the arc of the great saphenous vein receives the following tributaries: the superficial circumflex iliac vein, superficial epigastric vein [subcutaneous abdominal vein], external pudendal veins, accessory vein of the thigh [dorsal thigh], inter saphenous vein [Giacomini vein]. Inter saphenous vein was observed [Giacomini vein] in a large percentage of the sample (66%. On 77% of the cases, a single saphenous trunk was found, 22% of duplication and triplication 1%. Exceptionally small caliber veins reach the common femoral vein on its inner side, draining the pudendal region, may correspond to the third vein pudendal described by Vilanova, or a tributary of the arc that ends in isolation while the rest of the arc remains on the basic disposition. Successful surgery of the saphenous vein arc is based on an optimal anatomical knowledge of the sapheno - femoral junction, its anatomical variations and relationships.

  9. A clinical test and application research of IMRT dose verification system based on patient's anatomical structure and on-line dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To test a three-dimensional dose verification system, which reconstructing dose to anatomy based on modeling and online measurements (RDBMOM), and to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of its application in clinical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance. Methods: Phantom plans of regular and irregular fields were selected for the testing. All test plans were implemented and the dose distributions were measured using the thimble ion-chamber and two-dimensional ion-chamber array, the accuracy of RDBMOM were then evaluated by comparing the corresponding results.Two practical treated nasopharyngeal carcinoma IMRT plans were verified with RDBMOM and the clinic significance were valued. Results: Compared with measurements of the thimble ion-chamber, deviations of RDBMOM were within 1% in all tested cases except small field of 3 cm x 3 cm. The largest deviation of reconstructed dose in IMRT cases was 2.12%. The dose profile reconstructed by RDBMOM coincided with the measurement using two-dimensional ion-chamber array. The ? rates (3%/3 mm) were 94.56% - 100%. The RDBMOM verification of IMRT cases shown that the ? rate > 99% in total and > 98% in planning target volume,deviation in D95 <0.4%, but the largest deviations in mean dose of the parotids and lens were 2.97% and 59.58% respectively. Conclusions: Accuracy of the tested system satisfies the demand of IMRT dose verification. RDBMOM is able to provide information of volumetric dosimetry and anatomical location of dose error, which is benefit for evaluating the clinical value of verification results. (authors)

  10. Landmark vs. Geometry Learning: Explaining Female Rats' Selective Preference for a Landmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Marta N.; Rodríguez, Clara A.; Chamizo, V. D.; Mackintosh, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    Rats were trained in a triangular-shaped pool to find a hidden platform, whose location was defined in terms of two sources of information, a landmark outside the pool and a particular corner of the pool. Subsequent test trials without the platform pitted these two sources of information against one another. In Experiment 1 this test revealed a…

  11. Landmark experiments in twentieth-century physics

    CERN Document Server

    Trigg, George L

    2011-01-01

    Physics is very much an experimental science, but too often, students at the undergraduate level are not exposed to the reality of experimental physics ? i.e., what was done in a given experiment, why it was done, the background of physics against which the experiment was carried out and the changes in theory and knowledge that resulted. In this hook, the author helps to remedy the situation by presenting a variety of ""landmark"" experiments that have brought about significant alterations in our ideas about some aspect of nature. Among these scientific milestones are discoveries about the wa

  12. Anatomical study of sacral hiatus for successful caudal epidural block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramamurthi KS, Anilkumar Reddy Y

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Present study determined the landmarks for caudal epidural block (CEB after morphometric measurements of the sacral hiatus on dry sacral bones. The CEB has been widely used procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal disorders. Anatomical features of the sacral hiatus and the detailed knowledge about sacral hiatus. Materials & Methods: 116 sacral bones are used for the study. Anatomical measurements were measured by using vernier caliper accuracy to 0.1 mm. Results: Agenesis of sacral hiatus was detected in two sacral bones. Various shapes of sacral hiatus were observed which included inverted U (31%, inverted V (25.8%, irregular (20.6%, Elongated (17.2% and dumbbell (5%. Apex of sacral hiatus was commonly found at the level of 4th sacral vertebra in 50.8%. The distance between the two supero lateral sacral crests and the distance between the apex of sacral hiatus and the right and left supero lateral crests were 69.5 (5.8 mm, 61.4 (11.2 mm, 57.4 (9.7 mm respectively, on average. The mean, mode, SD is calculated for all the measurements. Conclusion: The sacral hiatus has anatomic variations. Understanding of these variations may improve the reliability of CEB.

  13. Detailed Anatomical Orientations for Certain Types of Morphometric Measurements Can Be Determined Automatically With Geometric Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Doug M; Winchester, Julia M; Glynn, Chris; Puente, Jesus

    2015-11-01

    Morphometric datasets only convey useful information about variation when measurement landmarks and relevant anatomical axes are clearly defined. We propose that anatomical axes of 3D digital models of bones can be standardized prior to measurement using an algorithm that automatically finds a universal geometric alignment among sampled bones. As a case study, we use teeth of "prosimian" primates. In this sample, equivalent occlusal planes are determined automatically using the R-package auto3dgm. The area of projection into the occlusal plane for each tooth is the measurement of interest. This area is used in computation of a shape metric called relief index (RFI), the natural log of the square root of crown area divided by the square root of occlusal plane projection area. We compare mean and variance parameters of area and RFI values computed from these automatically orientated tooth models with values computed from manually orientated tooth models. According to our results, the manual and automated approaches yield extremely similar mean and variance parameters. The only differences that plausibly modify interpretations of biological meaning slightly favor the automated treatment because a greater proportion of differences among subsamples in the automated treatment are correlated with dietary differences. We conclude that-at least for dental topographic metrics-automated alignment recovers a variance pattern that has meaning similar to previously published datasets based on manual data collection. Therefore, future applications of dental topography can take advantage of automatic alignment to increase objectivity and repeatability. Anat Rec, 298:1816-1823, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26228692

  14. Improving anatomical mapping of complexly deformed anatomy for external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy dose accumulation in cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vásquez Osorio, Eliana M., E-mail: e.vasquezosorio@erasmusmc.nl; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Schuring-Pereira, Monica; Zolnay, András; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam 3075 (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In the treatment of cervical cancer, large anatomical deformations, caused by, e.g., tumor shrinkage, bladder and rectum filling changes, organ sliding, and the presence of the brachytherapy (BT) applicator, prohibit the accumulation of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and BT dose distributions. This work proposes a structure-wise registration with vector field integration (SW+VF) to map the largely deformed anatomies between EBRT and BT, paving the way for 3D dose accumulation between EBRT and BT. Methods: T2w-MRIs acquired before EBRT and as a part of the MRI-guided BT procedure for 12 cervical cancer patients, along with the manual delineations of the bladder, cervix-uterus, and rectum-sigmoid, were used for this study. A rigid transformation was used to align the bony anatomy in the MRIs. The proposed SW+VF method starts by automatically segmenting features in the area surrounding the delineated organs. Then, each organ and feature pair is registered independently using a feature-based nonrigid registration algorithm developed in-house. Additionally, a background transformation is calculated to account for areas far from all organs and features. In order to obtain one transformation that can be used for dose accumulation, the organ-based, feature-based, and the background transformations are combined into one vector field using a weighted sum, where the contribution of each transformation can be directly controlled by its extent of influence (scope size). The optimal scope sizes for organ-based and feature-based transformations were found by an exhaustive analysis. The anatomical correctness of the mapping was independently validated by measuring the residual distances after transformation for delineated structures inside the cervix-uterus (inner anatomical correctness), and for anatomical landmarks outside the organs in the surrounding region (outer anatomical correctness). The results of the proposed method were compared with the results of the rigid transformation and nonrigid registration of all structures together (AST). Results: The rigid transformation achieved a good global alignment (mean outer anatomical correctness of 4.3 mm) but failed to align the deformed organs (mean inner anatomical correctness of 22.4 mm). Conversely, the AST registration produced a reasonable alignment for the organs (6.3 mm) but not for the surrounding region (16.9 mm). SW+VF registration achieved the best results for both regions (3.5 and 3.4 mm for the inner and outer anatomical correctness, respectively). All differences were significant (p < 0.02, Wilcoxon rank sum test). Additionally, optimization of the scope sizes determined that the method was robust for a large range of scope size values. Conclusions: The novel SW+VF method improved the mapping of large and complex deformations observed between EBRT and BT for cervical cancer patients. Future studies that quantify the mapping error in terms of dose errors are required to test the clinical applicability of dose accumulation by the SW+VF method.

  15. Improving anatomical mapping of complexly deformed anatomy for external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy dose accumulation in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the treatment of cervical cancer, large anatomical deformations, caused by, e.g., tumor shrinkage, bladder and rectum filling changes, organ sliding, and the presence of the brachytherapy (BT) applicator, prohibit the accumulation of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and BT dose distributions. This work proposes a structure-wise registration with vector field integration (SW+VF) to map the largely deformed anatomies between EBRT and BT, paving the way for 3D dose accumulation between EBRT and BT. Methods: T2w-MRIs acquired before EBRT and as a part of the MRI-guided BT procedure for 12 cervical cancer patients, along with the manual delineations of the bladder, cervix-uterus, and rectum-sigmoid, were used for this study. A rigid transformation was used to align the bony anatomy in the MRIs. The proposed SW+VF method starts by automatically segmenting features in the area surrounding the delineated organs. Then, each organ and feature pair is registered independently using a feature-based nonrigid registration algorithm developed in-house. Additionally, a background transformation is calculated to account for areas far from all organs and features. In order to obtain one transformation that can be used for dose accumulation, the organ-based, feature-based, and the background transformations are combined into one vector field using a weighted sum, where the contribution of each transformation can be directly controlled by its extent of influence (scope size). The optimal scope sizes for organ-based and feature-based transformations were found by an exhaustive analysis. The anatomical correctness of the mapping was independently validated by measuring the residual distances after transformation for delineated structures inside the cervix-uterus (inner anatomical correctness), and for anatomical landmarks outside the organs in the surrounding region (outer anatomical correctness). The results of the proposed method were compared with the results of the rigid transformation and nonrigid registration of all structures together (AST). Results: The rigid transformation achieved a good global alignment (mean outer anatomical correctness of 4.3 mm) but failed to align the deformed organs (mean inner anatomical correctness of 22.4 mm). Conversely, the AST registration produced a reasonable alignment for the organs (6.3 mm) but not for the surrounding region (16.9 mm). SW+VF registration achieved the best results for both regions (3.5 and 3.4 mm for the inner and outer anatomical correctness, respectively). All differences were significant (p < 0.02, Wilcoxon rank sum test). Additionally, optimization of the scope sizes determined that the method was robust for a large range of scope size values. Conclusions: The novel SW+VF method improved the mapping of large and complex deformations observed between EBRT and BT for cervical cancer patients. Future studies that quantify the mapping error in terms of dose errors are required to test the clinical applicability of dose accumulation by the SW+VF method

  16. Automated extraction of skeletal muscles from torso X-ray CT images based on anatomical positional information between skeleton and skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose an automated approach to extract skeletal muscles in torso X-ray CT images. It transforms 3-D anatomy into 2-D stretched images for simplifying anatomical relationships to getting pathognomonical points. The experimental results show that the proposed method was effective to extract skeletal muscles. (author)

  17. Anatomical organization of aortic arch variations in the India: embryological basis and review / Organização anatômica das variações do arco aórtico na população indiana: base e revisão embriológica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Soubhagya R., Nayak; Mangala M., Pai; Latha V., Prabhu; Sujatha, D' Costa; Prakash, Shetty.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar a porcentagem e o tipo de variações do arco aórtico em indivíduos indianos, bem como sua importância clínica e cirúrgica e base embriológica. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Em nossa investigação, os padrões de ramificação do arco aórtico foram estudados em 62 cadáveres fixados em formali [...] na de ambos os sexos, de origem indiana e com idade entre 45 e 79 anos. As dissecações foram realizadas em cadáveres preservados em formalina, e as variações do arco aórtico foram observadas após a exposição das regiões torácica e cervical durante a dissecação de rotina de alunos da graduação do Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Índia. RESULTADOS: O arco aórtico normal de três ramificações foi encontrado em 56 cadáveres (91,4%); as variações foram encontradas em seis cadáveres (9,6%); 4,8% apresentavam origem comum das artérias carótidas; 1,6% tinham seqüência binominada, e o mesmo espécime tinha a origem da artéria coronária esquerda diretamente no arco aórtico; 1,6% apresentavam a origem da artéria subclávia direita diretamente na aorta; 1,6% tinham como ramificação do arco aórtico uma artéria vertebral esquerda. Cinco de seis cadáveres com padrão de ramificação anômalo do arco aórtico eram do sexo feminino. Um cadáver do sexo masculino apresentou origem anômala da artéria vertebral esquerda diretamente no arco. CONCLUSÃO: O amplo espectro de variações nos padrões anatômicos das ramificações do arco aórtico na população indiana estava em concordância com outras populações mundiais. Embora as origens anômalas das ramificações do arco aórtico sejam meramente variações anatômicas, informações precisas sobre elas é essencial para a cirurgia vascular na região do tórax, cabeça e pescoço. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: To determine the percentage and type of aortic arch variations in Indian subjects and their clinical and surgical importance and embryological basis. PATIENTS AND METHOD: In our investigation, branching patterns of the aortic arch were studied in 62 formalin-fixed cadavers of both sexes [...] of Indian origin, aged 45-79. The dissections were carried out in formalin-preserved cadavers and the aortic arch variations were observed after exposing the thoracic and cervical region during routine dissection of undergraduate students of Indian origin in Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. RESULTS: The usual three-branched aortic arch was found in 56 cadavers (91.4%); variations were found in six cadavers (9.6%); 4.8% presented common origin of the carotid arteries; 1.6% had bi-innominate sequence, and the same specimen had left coronary artery arising from arch of aorta directly; 1.6% presented right subclavian artery arising directly from the aorta; 1.6% had left vertebral artery a branch of aortic arch. Five out of six cadavers with anomalous aortic arch branching pattern were females. One male cadaver presented anomalous origin of left vertebral artery directly from the arch. CONCLUSION: The wide spectrum of variations in the anatomical arrangements of the aortic arch branches in the Indian population was at par with other populations of the world. Although anomalous origins of the aortic arch branches are merely anatomic variants, accurate information about them is vital for vascular surgery in the thorax, head and neck region.

  18. Anatomical organization of aortic arch variations in the India: embryological basis and review Organização anatômica das variações do arco aórtico na população indiana: base e revisão embriológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubhagya R. Nayak

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the percentage and type of aortic arch variations in Indian subjects and their clinical and surgical importance and embryological basis. PATIENTS AND METHOD: In our investigation, branching patterns of the aortic arch were studied in 62 formalin-fixed cadavers of both sexes of Indian origin, aged 45-79. The dissections were carried out in formalin-preserved cadavers and the aortic arch variations were observed after exposing the thoracic and cervical region during routine dissection of undergraduate students of Indian origin in Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. RESULTS: The usual three-branched aortic arch was found in 56 cadavers (91.4%; variations were found in six cadavers (9.6%; 4.8% presented common origin of the carotid arteries; 1.6% had bi-innominate sequence, and the same specimen had left coronary artery arising from arch of aorta directly; 1.6% presented right subclavian artery arising directly from the aorta; 1.6% had left vertebral artery a branch of aortic arch. Five out of six cadavers with anomalous aortic arch branching pattern were females. One male cadaver presented anomalous origin of left vertebral artery directly from the arch. CONCLUSION: The wide spectrum of variations in the anatomical arrangements of the aortic arch branches in the Indian population was at par with other populations of the world. Although anomalous origins of the aortic arch branches are merely anatomic variants, accurate information about them is vital for vascular surgery in the thorax, head and neck region.OBJETIVOS: Determinar a porcentagem e o tipo de variações do arco aórtico em indivíduos indianos, bem como sua importância clínica e cirúrgica e base embriológica. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Em nossa investigação, os padrões de ramificação do arco aórtico foram estudados em 62 cadáveres fixados em formalina de ambos os sexos, de origem indiana e com idade entre 45 e 79 anos. As dissecações foram realizadas em cadáveres preservados em formalina, e as variações do arco aórtico foram observadas após a exposição das regiões torácica e cervical durante a dissecação de rotina de alunos da graduação do Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Índia. RESULTADOS: O arco aórtico normal de três ramificações foi encontrado em 56 cadáveres (91,4%; as variações foram encontradas em seis cadáveres (9,6%; 4,8% apresentavam origem comum das artérias carótidas; 1,6% tinham seqüência binominada, e o mesmo espécime tinha a origem da artéria coronária esquerda diretamente no arco aórtico; 1,6% apresentavam a origem da artéria subclávia direita diretamente na aorta; 1,6% tinham como ramificação do arco aórtico uma artéria vertebral esquerda. Cinco de seis cadáveres com padrão de ramificação anômalo do arco aórtico eram do sexo feminino. Um cadáver do sexo masculino apresentou origem anômala da artéria vertebral esquerda diretamente no arco. CONCLUSÃO: O amplo espectro de variações nos padrões anatômicos das ramificações do arco aórtico na população indiana estava em concordância com outras populações mundiais. Embora as origens anômalas das ramificações do arco aórtico sejam meramente variações anatômicas, informações precisas sobre elas é essencial para a cirurgia vascular na região do tórax, cabeça e pescoço.

  19. 75 FR 49520 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ...of the Landmarks Committee are: Mr. Ronald...Historic Landmarks nominations, amendments to...and its Landmarks Committee may consider the following nominations: Nominations Delaware...HISTORIC DISTRICT, Independence, MO...

  20. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  1. 32 CFR 644.317 - Preserving historic landmarks and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Preserving historic landmarks and properties. 644.317 Section 644.317 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.317 Preserving historic landmarks...

  2. 36 CFR 65.5 - Designation of National Historic Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... criteria but which do meet the National Register criteria for evaluation in 36 CFR part 60 or determine... Historic Landmarks. 65.5 Section 65.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.5 Designation of National Historic...

  3. Elections and landmark policies in Tanzania and Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Therkildsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Much of the relevant literature on Africa downplays the salience of elections for policy-making and implementation. Instead, the importance of factors such as clientelism, ethnicity, organized interest group and donor influence, is emphasized. We argue that, in addition, elections now motivate political elites to focus on policies they perceive to be able to gain votes. This is based on analyses of six landmark decisions made during the last fifteen years in the social, productive and public finance sectors in Tanzania and Uganda. Such policies share a number of key characteristics: they are clearly identifiable with the party in power; citizens country-wide are targeted; and policy implementation aim at immediate, visible results. The influence of elections on policy making and implementation could therefore be more significant in countries where elections are more competitive than in Tanzania and Uganda.

  4. Muscle fibre direction of longissimus, iliocostalis and multifidus: landmark-derived reference lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Foa, J L; Forrest, W; Biedermann, H J

    1989-01-01

    Considerable inter-individual variations in the fibre direction angles of the iliocostalis lumborum, longissimus and multifidus were observed, thus bringing the applicability of a two dimensional fixed angle grid system for fibre direction determination into question. However, the angulation of the fibres of the multifidus and iliocostalis lumborum were found to be easily identifiable by the use of three surface anatomical landmarks: the caudal tip of the superior iliac spine, the lateral border of the iliocostalis at the twelfth rib and the L1-L2 interspinous space. No reliable index was found for the longissimus. Suggested electrode placement sites for the electromyographic study of the iliocostalis lumborum and the multifidus are at the levels of the L2-L3 and the L4-L5 interspinous spaces respectively. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2606776

  5. Anatomical study of spinal accessory nerve using ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canella, Clarissa [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Serviço de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universitadade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de janeiro (Brazil); Demondion, Xavier [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Laboratoire d’Anatomie, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, 59037, Lille (France); Abreu, Evandro [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Marchiori, Edson [Serviço de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universitadade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de janeiro (Brazil); Cotten, Hervé [Anatomie et cytologie pathologiques, Bd de la Liberté, 59000, Lille (France); Cotten, Anne, E-mail: anne.cotten@chru-lille.fr [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to demonstrate that ultrasonography may allow a precise assessment of the course and relationships of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN). Material and methods: This study, initially undertaken in 7 cadavers, was followed by high-resolution ultrasonographic study in 15 volunteers (30 nerves) by two radiologists in consensus. The location, course and relations to the adjacent anatomic structures of the SAN were analyzed. Results: The precise course of the SAN between the lateroposterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the anterior border of the trapezius muscle could be identified by high-resolution ultrasonography. In contrast, clinical bone landmarks were not found helpful for the identification of the nerve. Conclusion: The SAN can be clearly depicted by means of ultrasonography. Knowledge of the nerve's precise location, which may evidence individual variations, may have useful clinical applications.

  6. Anatomical study of spinal accessory nerve using ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to demonstrate that ultrasonography may allow a precise assessment of the course and relationships of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN). Material and methods: This study, initially undertaken in 7 cadavers, was followed by high-resolution ultrasonographic study in 15 volunteers (30 nerves) by two radiologists in consensus. The location, course and relations to the adjacent anatomic structures of the SAN were analyzed. Results: The precise course of the SAN between the lateroposterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the anterior border of the trapezius muscle could be identified by high-resolution ultrasonography. In contrast, clinical bone landmarks were not found helpful for the identification of the nerve. Conclusion: The SAN can be clearly depicted by means of ultrasonography. Knowledge of the nerve's precise location, which may evidence individual variations, may have useful clinical applications

  7. The complexity of anatomical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grizzi Fabio

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conception of anatomical entities as a hierarchy of infinitely graduated forms and the increase in the number of observed anatomical sub-entities and structural variables has generated a growing complexity, thus highlighting new properties of organised biological matter. Results (1 Complexity is so pervasive in the anatomical world that it has come to be considered as a primary characteristic of anatomical systems. (2 Anatomical entities, when viewed at microscopic as well as macroscopic level of observation, show a different degree of complexity. (3 Complexity can reside in the structure of the anatomical system (having many diverse parts with varying interactions or an intricate architecture or in its behaviour. Often complexity in structure and behaviour go together. (4 Complex systems admit many descriptions (ways of looking at the system each of which is only partially true. Each way of looking at a complex system requires its own description, its own mode of analysis and its own breaking down of the system in different parts; (5 Almost all the anatomical entities display hierarchical forms: their component structures at different spatial scales or their process at different time scales are related to each other. Conclusion The need to find a new way of observing and measuring anatomical entities, and objectively quantifying their different structural changes, prompted us to investigate the non-Euclidean geometries and the theories of complexity, and to apply their concepts to human anatomy. This attempt has led us to reflect upon the complex significance of the shape of an observed anatomical entity. Its changes have been defined in relation to variations in its status: from a normal (i.e. natural to a pathological or altered state introducing the concepts of kinematics and dynamics of anatomical forms, speed of their changes, and that of scale of their observation.

  8. Slice-based supine-to-standing posture deformation for chinese anatomical models and the dosimetric results with wide band frequency electromagnetic field exposure: Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standing Chinese adult anatomical models are obtained from supine-postured cadaver slices. This paper presents the dosimetric differences between the supine and the standing postures over wide band frequencies and various incident configurations. Both the body level and the tissue/organ level differences are reported for plane wave and the 3T magnetic resonance imaging radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure. The influence of posture on the whole body specific absorption rate and tissue specified specific absorption rate values is discussed. . (authors)

  9. PET image reconstruction with anatomical edge guided level set prior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Liao, Jinxiu; Qi, Jinyi

    2011-11-01

    Acquiring both anatomical and functional images during one scan, PET/CT systems improve the ability to detect and localize abnormal uptakes. In addition, CT images provide anatomical boundary information that can be used to regularize positron emission tomography (PET) images. Here we propose a new approach to maximum a posteriori reconstruction of PET images with a level set prior guided by anatomical edges. The image prior models both the smoothness of PET images and the similarity between functional boundaries in PET and anatomical boundaries in CT. Level set functions (LSFs) are used to represent smooth and closed functional boundaries. The proposed method does not assume an exact match between PET and CT boundaries. Instead, it encourages similarity between the two boundaries, while allowing different region definition in PET images to accommodate possible signal and position mismatch between functional and anatomical images. While the functional boundaries are guaranteed to be closed by the LSFs, the proposed method does not require closed anatomical boundaries and can utilize incomplete edges obtained from an automatic edge detection algorithm. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Two digital phantoms were constructed based on the Digimouse data and a human CT image, respectively. Anatomical edges were extracted automatically from the CT images. Tumors were simulated in the PET phantoms with different mismatched anatomical boundaries. Compared with existing methods, the new method achieved better bias-variance performance. The proposed method was also applied to real mouse data and achieved higher contrast than other methods.

  10. Maximized Posteriori Attributes Selection from Facial Salient Landmarks for Face Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Phalguni; Kisku, Dakshina Ranjan; Sing, Jamuna Kanta; Tistarelli, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a robust and dynamic face recognition technique based on the extraction and matching of devised probabilistic graphs drawn on SIFT features related to independent face areas. The face matching strategy is based on matching individual salient facial graph characterized by SIFT features as connected to facial landmarks such as the eyes and the mouth. In order to reduce the face matching errors, the Dempster-Shafer decision theory is applied to fuse the indi...

  11. The role of density functional theory in chemistry: Some historical landmarks and applications to zeolites

    OpenAIRE

    Corminboeuf, Anne-Clémence; Tran, Fabien; Weber, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has progressively emerged in the last 40 years as a leading methodology for the modelling and simulation of chemical systems. In this paper, some historical landmarks in the development of this method are outlined, emphasizing on its main characteristic being an electron density-based theory. This is in contrast with wavefunction-based methodologies which were exclusively employed previously. Interestingly, DFT has been first applied to solids, with a rather la...

  12. Review of the Historical Evolution of Anatomical Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algieri, Rubén D.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the medical terms of Greek origin are traditionally attributed to Hippocrates (460-370 BC. Claudius Galen of Pergamum (130-200 BC developed a classification of bones and joints and described different brain areas. His teachings have remained unchanged for over a thousand years. Andreas Vesalius of Brussels (1514-1564, through the systematic study of human body structure, changed many concepts. He published his work in his production "De humani corporis fabrica libri septem", where a special attention is evident to the discovery and description of new anatomical facts. From here there is a revolution in the morphological sciences, where the same anatomical structure passed to receive different names. In the nineteenth century, the different anatomists in the world decide to meet in order to unify criteria regarding the anatomical structures and determine a only one universal language in the anatomical sciences. In 1895, in Basel (Switzerland it’s approved a list of 5.573 terms, called Basle Nomina Anatomica (BNA and was written in Latin. Eponyms were deleted. In 1903, he founded the International Federation of Associations of anatomists (IFAA. In 1935, in Jena (Germany, approving the Jena Nomina Anatomica (JNA. In 1950, in Oxford, formed the Committee of the International Anatomical Nomenclature (IANC. In 1955, in Paris (France it is agreed to adopt a Latin nomenclature based on the BNA, the Paris Nomina Anatomica (PNA. In 1980, for the first time in Latin America, takes place on the 11th International Congress of Anatomists, Mexico. In 1989, the International Committee of Anatomical Nomenclature, published the sixth edition of the Nomina Anatomica, without review by the IFAA. The same year, the latter established a Federative International Committee of Anatomical Terminology (FICAT. In 1998, he published a new list FICAT: International Anatomical Terminology (TAI, with the structures named in Latin language and their equivalence in English, listing which updates and supersedes all previous nomenclatures. In September 2001, the Spanish Anatomical Society translated this International Anatomical Terminology into Spanish language.The study of the historical backgrounds in the worldwide development of Anatomical Terms, give us valuable data about the origin and foundation of the names. It is necessary to raise awareness about the implementation of a unified, updated and uniform anatomical terminology, when conducting scientific communications and publications. As specialists in this discipline, we must study and know the existence of the official list of anatomical terms of use worldwide (International Anatomical Terminology, its equivalence with previous classifications, keeping us updated about its changes to teach it to new generations of health professionals.

  13. Delineating anatomical boundaries using the boundary fragment model.

    OpenAIRE

    Stebbing, RV; Noble, JA

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to automatically isolate relevant anatomical boundary positions in an image using only the structure of edges. The purpose of this method is to facilitate model-based segmentation algorithms which rely on accurate initialisation and assume that the correct anatomical boundary positions are close to the current model surface. The method is built around a weak parts-based shape model - the Boundary Fragment Model (BFM) - which represents an object by sections o...

  14. The avascular plane of the Achilles tendon: A quantitative anatomic and angiographic approach and a base for a possible new treatment option after rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Achilles tendon ruptures, especially ruptures caused by pathologic conditions and also by achillotendinitis are often attributed to the alleged hypovascularisation of the Achilles tendon. Anatomic studies often mention an avascular plane. The purpose of this study was to re-investigate the arterial supply of the Achilles tendon. Material and methods: Lower legs of 28 anatomic specimen were injected with a radiologic contrast agent and subsequently an arterial angiography was performed. Afterwards the legs were embalmed and later anatomically dissected. The origin of arteries entering the paratenon of the tendo calcanei branching off from either the anterior (TA) or the posterior tibial artery (TP) was determined. The distance between the points of commencement of these nutrient arteries and a specific reference point, i.e. the insertion of the Achilles tendon into the tuber calcanei, was measured digitally on the radiographs and again with a slide-gauge on the dissected specimens. Results: As revealed by angiographic analysis, the TA gave off 5 vessels (v) at a frequency and median distance to the tuber calcanei (in cm) of v1: 50%, 6.01 cm; v2: 39.3%, 7.88 cm; v3: 35.7%, 9.71 cm; v4: 17.9%, 12.7 cm; v5: 10.7%, 14.6 cm. The TP contributed to the arterial supply of the Achilles tendon by means of 7 inserting arteries branching off at a frequency and mean distances of v1: 67.9%, 4.53 cm; v2: 60.7%, 6.97 cm, v3: 50%, 9.58 cm; v4: 35.7%, 10.89 cm; v5: 25%, 12.65 cm; v6: 10.7%, 16.94 cm; v7: 3.6%, 18.7 cm proximal to the tuber calcanei. However, due to the small diameter of these branches, by anatomic dissection no nutrient arteries commencing from the TA could be detected. On the other hand, a maximum of 7 vessels originating from the TP, larger than the former vessels, had been also revealed by anatomic dissection (frequency and mean distances, v1: 100%, 6.8 cm; v2: 82.1%, 7.7 cm; v3: 71.4%, 9.5 cm; v4: 35.7%, 11.3 cm; v5: 17.9%, 9.9 cm; v6: 7.1, 10.5 cm; v7: 3.6%, 12.0 cm). Conclusion: A dense net of small arteries inserts into the paratenon of the Achilles tendon in its lower 20 cm. The angiographic method was more specific and showed vessels that could not be identified as arteries originating from the TA by macroscopic anatomic dissection.

  15. 36 CFR 62.4 - Natural landmark designation and recognition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural landmark designation..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.4 Natural landmark designation and recognition process. (a) Identification. Potential national natural landmarks are identified in the...

  16. Motion estimation in cardiac fluorescence imaging with scale-space landmarks and optical flow: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M P; Nygren, A

    2015-02-01

    Motion artifacts are a major disadvantage of cardiac optical mapping studies. Pixel misalignment due to contraction is a main cause of the presence of gross motion artifacts in action potential recordings. This study is focused on methods for identifying landmarks and tracking the motion of cardiac tissue for preparations in optical mapping recordings. This is a first step toward our long-term goal to implement a landmark-based image registration technique to correct for pixel misalignment in cardiac optical mapping fluorescence videos and, hence, for gross motion artifacts. Preliminary results for the registration step are presented as an initial proof of concept. The characteristics of the optical mapping images are challenging, since their lack of contrast and well-defined features impose a limitation on the techniques than can be used for landmark selection and motion tracking. This paper compares results of motion estimation of the cardiac surface with two approaches that do not rely on high-contrast features: 1) Scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) detected "keypoints," to be used as landmarks for motion tracking, as well as 2) a classical global optical flow (OF) algorithm. Both are applied to low-contrast and low-resolution cardiac fluorescence images. We demonstrate that the performance of SIFT is superior to that of OF for pixel motion tracking in cardiac optical mapping images with simulated motion. Results for action potential recovery and action potential duration calculation after landmark-based image registration show that SIFT landmark-based registration yields superior performance in this regard as well. PMID:25350913

  17. Undecidability and temporal logic: some landmarks from Turing to the present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goranko, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    This is a selective survey and discussion of some of the landmark undecidability results in temporal logic, beginning with Turing's undecidability of the Halting problem which, in retrospect, can be regarded as the historically first undecidability result for a suitable temporal logic over configuration graphs of Turing machines. I will discuss some of the natural habitats of undecidable temporal logics, such as first-order, interval-based and real time temporal logics, as well as some extension...

  18. Delivering high-resolution landmarks using inkjet micropatterning for spatial monitoring of leaf expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Cronk Quentin CB; Beyer Simon T; Wang Lisheng; Walus Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Inkjet micropatterning is a versatile deposition technique with broad applications in numerous fields. However, its application in plant science is largely unexplored. Leaf expansion is one of the most important parameters in the field of plant science and many methods have been developed to examine differential expansion rates of different parts of the leaf lamina. Among them, methods based on the tracking of natural landmarks through digital imaging require a complicated...

  19. Modeling and matching of landmarks for automation of Mars Rover localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, begun in January 2004, has been extremely successful. However, decision-making for many operation tasks of the current MER mission and the 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission is performed on Earth through a predominantly manual, time-consuming process. Unmanned planetary rover navigation is ideally expected to reduce rover idle time, diminish the need for entering safe-mode, and dynamically handle opportunistic science events without required communication to Earth. Successful automation of rover navigation and localization during the extraterrestrial exploration requires that accurate position and attitude information can be received by a rover and that the rover has the support of simultaneous localization and mapping. An integrated approach with Bundle Adjustment (BA) and Visual Odometry (VO) can efficiently refine the rover position. However, during the MER mission, BA is done manually because of the difficulty in the automation of the cross-sitetie points selection. This dissertation proposes an automatic approach to select cross-site tie points from multiple rover sites based on the methods of landmark extraction, landmark modeling, and landmark matching. The first step in this approach is that important landmarks such as craters and rocks are defined. Methods of automatic feature extraction and landmark modeling are then introduced. Complex models with orientation angles and simple models without those angles are compared. The results have shown that simple models can provide reasonably good results. Next, the sensitivity of different modeling parameters is analyzed. Based on this analysis, cross-site rocks are matched through two complementary stages: rock distribution pattern matching and rock model matching. In addition, a preliminary experiment on orbital and ground landmark matching is also briefly introduced. Finally, the reliability of the cross-site tie points selection is validated by fault detection, which considers the mapping capability of MER cameras and the reason for mismatches. Fault detection strategies are applied in each step of the cross-site tie points selection to automatically verify the accuracy. The mismatches are excluded and localization errors are minimized. The method proposed in this dissertation is demonstrated with the datasets from the 2004 MER mission (traverse of 318 m) as well as the simulated test data at Silver Lake (traverse of 5.5 km), California. The accuracy analysis demonstrates that the algorithm is efficient at automatically selecting a sufficient number of well-distributed high-quality tie points to link the ground images into an image network for BA. The method worked successfully along with a continuous 1.1 km stretch. With the BA performed, highly accurate maps can be created to help the rover to navigate precisely and automatically. The method also enables autonomous long-range Mars rover localization.

  20. Route and landmark selection tool (RULST) : user's manual.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Route and Landmark Selection Tool (RULST) is a software program designed to assist military planners in defining geographical objects, such as routes, landmarks, spurs, and yards, at a given facility. Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a prototype of this tool for use by the Military Traffic Management Command Transportation Engineering Agency (MTMCTEA). The primary objective of RULST is to populate database tables of facility objects for use in MTMCTEA models. RULST defines facility data for use in models such as Port Simulation (PORTSIM) and Transportation System Capability (TRANSCAP), which simulate the transportation of equipment through ports and military installations. The main purpose of RULST is to allow you to specify the relationships between landmarks and routes. The nodes, links, and landmarks that describe a facility are often predefined on the basis of the layout of the physical site

  1. Hoffa's fat pad injuries and their relationship with anterior cruciate ligament tears: new observations based on MR imaging in patients and MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the normal anatomic relationships of Hoffa's fat pad with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and with the frequency of Hoffa's fat pad abnormalities in ACL-deficient knees. Retrospective clinical study on patients and observational anatomic study on cadavers. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. MR imaging studies of the knees of 100 patients (21-48 years old) with or without arthroscopically proven tears of the ACL, performed at a single institution, were reviewed by two readers for abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad. Ten cadaveric knee specimens were studied with MR imaging and Faxitron radiographs, and by inspection of sections and histology. Alterations in Hoffa's fat pad on MR imaging were present in 64% (32/50) of patients with torn ACLs, and in 24% (12/50) of patients without a tear of the ACL (P < 0.05). Hoffa's fat pad inserted into the intercondylar notch in 50% (5/10) of cadaveric specimens, four in conjunction with the ligamentum mucosum and in one in an isolated fashion. Histological study demonstrated the composition of the ligamentum mucosum and Hoffa's fat pad and their course and insertion sites in the intercondylar notch. Abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad, such as focal and diffuse edema, tears, scars and synovial proliferation, are more common in knees with torn ACLs than in knees with intact ACLs. (orig.)

  2. Landmarks of History of Soil Science in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapa, R.

    2012-04-01

    Sri Lanka is a tropical Island in the Southern tip of Indian subcontinent positioned at 50 55' to 90 50' N latitude and 790 42' to 810 53' E longitude surrounded by the Indian Ocean. It is an island 435 km in length and 224 km width consisting of a land are of 6.56 million ha with a population of 20 million. In area wise it is ranked as 118th in the world, where at present ranked as 47 in population wise and ranked 19th in population density. The country was under colonial rule under Portuguese, Dutch and British from 1505 to 1948. The majority of the people in the past and present earn their living from activities based on land, which indicates the important of the soil resource. The objective of this paper is to describe the landmarks of the history of Soil Science to highlight the achievements and failures, which is useful to enrich our present understanding of Sri Lankan soils. The landmarks of the history of Soil Science in Sri Lanka can be divided to three phases namely, the early period (prior to 1956), the middle period (1956 to 1972) and the present period (from 1972 onwards). During the early period, detailed analytical studies of coffee and tea soils were compiled, and these gave mainly information on up-country soils which led to fertilizer recommendations based on field trials. In addition, rice and forest soils were also studied in less detail. The first classification of Sri Lankan soils and a provisional soil map based on parent material was published by Joachim in 1945 which is a major landmark of history of Soil Science in Sri Lanka. In 1959 Ponnamperuma proposed a soil classification system for wetland rice soils. From 1963 to 1968 valuable information on the land resource was collected and documented by aerial resource surveys funded by Canada-Ceylon Colombo plan aid project. This covered 18 major river basins and about 1/4th of Sri Lanka, which resulted in producing excellent soil maps and information of the areas called the Kelani Aruvi Ara and Walawe basins. The provisional soil map was updated by many other workers as Moorman and Panabokke in 1961 and 1972 using this information. The soil map produced by De Alwis and Panabokke in 1972 at a scale of 1:500,000 was the soil maps mostly used during the past years During the present era, the need for classification of Soils of Sri Lanka according to international methods was felt. A major leap forward in Soil Survey, Classification leading to development of a soil data base was initiated in 1995 with the commencement of the "SRICANSOL" project which was a twining project between the Soil Science Societies of Sri Lanka and Canada. This project is now completed with detail soil maps at a scale of 1:250,000 and soil classified according to international methods for the Wet, Intermediate and Dry zones of Sri Lanka. A digital database consisting of soil profile description and physical and chemical data is under preparation for 28, 40 and 51 benchmark sites of the Wet, Intermediate and Dry zones respectively. The emphases on studies on Soil Science in the country at present is more towards environmental conservation related to soil erosion control, reducing of pollution of soil and water bodies from nitrates, pesticide residues and heavy metal accumulation. Key words: Sri Lanka, Provisional soil map

  3. Probabilistic anatomical labeling of brain structures using statistical probabilistic anatomical maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) program has increased for the analysis of brain PET and SPECT images. Montreal neurological institute (MNI) coordinate is used in SPM program as a standard anatomical framework. While the most researchers look up Talairach atlas to report the localization of the activations detected in SPM program, there is significant disparity between MNI templates and Talairach atlas. That disparity between Talairach and MNI coordinates makes the interpretation of SPM result time consuming, subjective and inaccurate. The purpose of this study was to develop a program to provide objective anatomical information of each x-y-z position in ICBM coordinate. Program was designed to provide the anatomical information for the given x-y-z position in MNI coordinate based on the statistical probabilistic anatomical map (SPAM) images of ICBM. When x-y-z position was given to the program, names of the anatomical structures with non-zero probability and the probabilities that the given position belongs to the structures were tabulated. The program was coded using IDL and JAVA language for the easy transplantation to any operating system or platform. Utility of this program was shown by comparing the results of this program to those of SPM program. Preliminary validation study was performed by applying this program to the analysis of PET brain activation study of human memory in which the anatomical information on the activated areas are previously known. Real time retrieval of probabilistic information with 1 mm spatial resolution was archived using the programs. Validation study showed the relevance of this program: probability that the activated area for memory belonged to hippocampal formation was more than 80%. These programs will be useful for the result interpretation of the image analysis performed on MNI coordinate, as done in SPM program

  4. Landmarking the Brain for Geometric Morphometric Analysis: An Error Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chollet, Madeleine B.; ALDRIDGE, KRISTINA; Pangborn, Nicole; Weinberg, Seth M; DeLeon, Valerie B.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanatomic phenotypes are often assessed using volumetric analysis. Although powerful and versatile, this approach is limited in that it is unable to quantify changes in shape, to describe how regions are interrelated, or to determine whether changes in size are global or local. Statistical shape analysis using coordinate data from biologically relevant landmarks is the preferred method for testing these aspects of phenotype. To date, approximately fifty landmarks have been used to study b...

  5. A Novel Hybrid Approach for Cephalometric Landmark Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Majd, Mahshid; Shoeleh, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Cephalometric analysis has an important role in dentistry and especially in orthodontics as a treatment planning tool to gauge the size and special relationships of the teeth, jaws and cranium. The first step of using such analyses is localizing some important landmarks known as cephalometric landmarks on craniofacial in x-ray image. The past decade has seen a growing interest in automating this process. In this paper, a novel hybrid approach is proposed for automatic detect...

  6. Potentiation and overshadowing between landmarks and environmental geometric cues

    OpenAIRE

    Horne, Murray R; PEARCE, JOHN M.

    2011-01-01

    Rats were required in three experiments to find one of two submerged platforms that were situated in diagonally opposite corners of a rectangular, grey swimming pool. The same corners were used throughout each experiment. Experimental groups were trained with landmarks, comprising A4 cards attached to the walls, located in the corners containing the platforms. For the control groups, the landmarks were situated in the corners containing the platforms for half the trials, and in the other corn...

  7. Measure of Landmark Semantic Salience through Geosocial Data Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teriitutea Quesnot

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in the area of spatial cognition demonstrated that references to landmarks are essential in the communication and the interpretation of wayfinding instructions for human being. In order to detect landmarks, a model for the assessment of their salience has been previously developed by Raubal and Winter. According to their model, landmark salience is divided into three categories: visual, structural, and semantic. Several solutions have been proposed to automatically detect landmarks on the basis of these categories. Due to a lack of relevant data, semantic salience has been frequently reduced to objects’ historical and cultural significance. Social dimension (i.e., the way an object is practiced and recognized by a person or a group of people is systematically excluded from the measure of landmark semantic salience even though it represents an important component. Since the advent of mobile Internet and smartphones, the production of geolocated content from social web platforms—also described as geosocial data—became commonplace. Actually, these data allow us to have a better understanding of the local geographic knowledge. Therefore, we argue that geosocial data, especially Social Location Sharing datasets, represent a reliable source of information to precisely measure landmark semantic salience in urban area.

  8. Landmark Detection in Orbital Images Using Salience Histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Panetta, Julian; Schorghofer, Norbert; Greeley, Ronald; PendletonHoffer, Mary; bunte, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's planetary missions have collected, and continue to collect, massive volumes of orbital imagery. The volume is such that it is difficult to manually review all of the data and determine its significance. As a result, images are indexed and searchable by location and date but generally not by their content. A new automated method analyzes images and identifies "landmarks," or visually salient features such as gullies, craters, dust devil tracks, and the like. This technique uses a statistical measure of salience derived from information theory, so it is not associated with any specific landmark type. It identifies regions that are unusual or that stand out from their surroundings, so the resulting landmarks are context-sensitive areas that can be used to recognize the same area when it is encountered again. A machine learning classifier is used to identify the type of each discovered landmark. Using a specified window size, an intensity histogram is computed for each such window within the larger image (sliding the window across the image). Next, a salience map is computed that specifies, for each pixel, the salience of the window centered at that pixel. The salience map is thresholded to identify landmark contours (polygons) using the upper quartile of salience values. Descriptive attributes are extracted for each landmark polygon: size, perimeter, mean intensity, standard deviation of intensity, and shape features derived from an ellipse fit.

  9. Some historical landmarks in nuclear and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of conduction of electricity through evacuated tubes led to the discovery of cathode rays by Plucker in 1858. No outstanding results were produced in the study of these rays until 1895-1896 when incisive minds of Roentgen and Thomson led, respectively, to the Nobel prize winning discoveries of x-rays and electron. Fortutious linking of phosphorescence with x-ray emission led Becquerel to discover uranic rays and his colleagues M. Curie an P. Curie to their research on radiation phenomenon. A gigantic forward wave of human knowledge ensued from these discoveries. The postulation of nuclear atom by Rutherford was an important landmark in this forward movement. Rutherford and Soddy postulated that the spontaneous emission of radiations (? and ?) by atoms is accompanied by chemical changes. Subsequent studies by Rutherford and his colleagues in England, Curie-Joliot team in France, Fermi et al. in Italy and Hahn et al. in Germany established transmutation of atomic nuclei by nuclear radiations (? and n). This article is an attempt to pay a humble tribute to the pioneers who opened the gates to the world of nuclear sciences. (author). 135 refs., 1 fig

  10. Slice-based supine to standing postured deformation for chinese anatomical models and the dosimetric results by wide band frequency electromagnetic field exposure: Morphing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital human models are frequently obtained from supine-postured medical images or cadaver slices, but many applications require standing models. This paper presents the work of reconstructing standing Chinese adult anatomical models from supine postured slices. Apart from the previous studies, the deformation works on 2-D segmented slices. The surface profile of the standing posture is adjusted by population measurement data. A non-uniform texture amplification approach is applied on the 2-D slices to recover the skin contour and to redistribute the internal tissues. Internal organ shift due to postures is taken into account. The feet are modified by matrix rotation. Then, the supine and standing models are utilised for the evaluation of electromagnetic field exposure over wide band frequency and different incident directions. . (authors)

  11. Quantifying anatomical shape variations in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nikhil; Fletcher, P Thomas; Preston, J Samuel; King, Richard D; Marron, J S; Weiner, Michael W; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-04-01

    We develop a multivariate analysis of brain anatomy to identify the relevant shape deformation patterns and quantify the shape changes that explain corresponding variations in clinical neuropsychological measures. We use kernel Partial Least Squares (PLS) and formulate a regression model in the tangent space of the manifold of diffeomorphisms characterized by deformation momenta. The scalar deformation momenta completely encode the diffeomorphic changes in anatomical shape. In this model, the clinical measures are the response variables, while the anatomical variability is treated as the independent variable. To better understand the "shape-clinical response" relationship, we also control for demographic confounders, such as age, gender, and years of education in our regression model. We evaluate the proposed methodology on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database using baseline structural MR imaging data and neuropsychological evaluation test scores. We demonstrate the ability of our model to quantify the anatomical deformations in units of clinical response. Our results also demonstrate that the proposed method is generic and generates reliable shape deformations both in terms of the extracted patterns and the amount of shape changes. We found that while the hippocampus and amygdala emerge as mainly responsible for changes in test scores for global measures of dementia and memory function, they are not a determinant factor for executive function. Another critical finding was the appearance of thalamus and putamen as most important regions that relate to executive function. These resulting anatomical regions were consistent with very high confidence irrespective of the size of the population used in the study. This data-driven global analysis of brain anatomy was able to reach similar conclusions as other studies in Alzheimer's disease based on predefined ROIs, together with the identification of other new patterns of deformation. The proposed methodology thus holds promise for discovering new patterns of shape changes in the human brain that could add to our understanding of disease progression in neurological disorders. PMID:24667299

  12. Gantzer muscle. An anatomical study

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Edie Benedito, Caetano; João José, Sabongi Neto; Luiz Ângelo, Vieira; Maurício Ferreira, Caetano; Daniel Vinhais, Moraes.

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship of Gantzer muscle to the median and anterior interosseous nerve is debated. METHODS: Ìn an anatomical study with 80 limbs from 40 cadavers the incidence, origin, insertion, nerve supply and relations of Gantzer muscle have been documented. RESULTS: The muscle was found i [...] n 54 forearms (68% of limbs) and was supplied by the anterior interosseous nerve. It arose from the deep surface of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, (42 limbs), coronoid process (eight limbs) and medial epicondyle (seven limbs). Its insertion was to the ulnar part of flexor pollicis longus muscle. The Gantzer muscle always lay posterior to both the median and anterior interosseous nerve. CONCLUSION: The Gantzer muscle may contribute to the median nerve and anterior interosseous nerve compression. The muscle was found in 68% of limbs and should be considered a normal anatomical pattern rather than an anatomical variation. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series .

  13. Blocking between landmarks during 2-D (touchscreen) and 3-D (ARENA) search tasks with pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leising, Kenneth J; Wong, Jared; Ruprecht, Chad M; Blaisdell, Aaron P

    2014-12-01

    Many studies investigating cue competition have focused on the blocking effect. We investigated the blocking effect with pigeons using a landmark-based spatial search task in both a touchscreen preparation (Exp. 1a) and an automated remote environmental navigation apparatus (Exp. 1b). In Phase 1, two landmarks (LMs: A and Z) appeared on separate trials as colored circles among a row of eight (touchscreen) or six (ARENA) identical response units. Subjects were rewarded for pecking at a target response unit to the right of LM A and to the left of an extraneous LM, Z. During the blocking trials in Phase 2, LM X was presented in compound with a second LM (A) that had been previously trained. On control trials, LM Y was presented in compound with LM B and a target in the same manner as in the trials of AX, except that neither landmark had previously been trained with the target. All subjects were then tested with separate trials of A, X, B, and Y. Testing revealed poor spatial control by X relative to A and Y. We report the first evidence for a spatial-blocking effect in pigeons and additional support for associative effects (e.g., blocking) occurring under similar conditions (e.g., training sessions, spatial relationships, etc.) in 3-D and 2-D search tasks. PMID:25209533

  14. Landmark learning by the Ozark zigzag salamander Plethodon angusticlavius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. CRANE, Alicia MATHIS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although salamanders have been shown to respond to classical conditioning, spatial learning has been largely unstudied. We tested whether salamanders could learn to locate foraging areas by using landmarks. We trained 10 salamanders Plethodon angusticlavius to use landmarks (small rocks to locate patches within the arena containing food (blackworms Lumbriculus variegatus. At the corners of each square testing arena were four plastic dishes, one containing blackworms and the other three empty. A rock was placed in front of the dish containing blackworms, and the location of the food-dish was randomly chosen for each training trial. A control group was also trained to feed on blackworms in the presence of a rock, but the rock was positioned randomly among the four dish locations so that the rock was not a reliable landmark for the worms. Although the length of the training period for individual salamanders varied (22–38 trainings per individual, the mean number of trainings for salamanders in the control and experimental groups was equal (30 training trials. During testing, no blackworms were present to eliminate any visual or chemical cues emanating directly from the prey. Individuals trained with the rock landmarks spent significantly more time in the area of the landmark than did control salamanders [Current Zoology 57 (4: 485–490, 2011].

  15. Anatomic study of the mandibular foramen, lingula and antilingula in dry mandibles, and its statistical relationship between the true lingula and the antilingula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnazzi, M S; Passeri, L A; Gabrielli, M F R; Bolini, P D A; de Carvalho, W R S; da Costa Machado, H

    2012-01-01

    The authors verified the anatomical location of the mandibular foramen, lingula and antilingula in dry mandibles, aiming to obtain information that could be used when performing mandibular osteotomies. Forty-four mandibles (88 sides) were evaluated. The distances were measured using a sliding calliper, with the mandibles fixed in a reproducible position. Results showed that the mandibular foramen is on average 5.82 mm below the lingula. Regarding the statistical comparison between the mandibular foramen entrance and the antilingula position, there is no correlation between the position of those two structures in the studied sample. The mandibular foramen is slightly posterior in relation to the centre of the ramus. The lingula is an important anatomic landmark for ramus surgery, and for determining the distance to the mandibular foramen entrance. The use of the antilingula as a landmark for the position of the vertical ramus osteotomy is not recommended. PMID:21955366

  16. Importance of the node of Calot in gallbladder neck dissection: an important landmark in the standardized approach to the laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferzli, George; Timoney, Michael; Nazir, Sharique; Swedler, David; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    The current rate of bile duct injury (BDI) after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is 0.4%, which is an unacceptable outcome. Several surgical approaches have been suggested to mitigate the occurrence of this dreaded complication. We propose a standardized approach, using Calot's node as a critical anatomical landmark to guide gallbladder dissection and avoid BDI. We retrospectively analyzed a prospectively gathered database of 907 laparoscopic cholecystectomies using this standardized approach in our practice over a 5-year period. To date we have had no BDI and no cystic duct leak. Therefore, we suggest identification of Calot's node as an additional method to avoid BDI during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:25559890

  17. Delivering high-resolution landmarks using inkjet micropatterning for spatial monitoring of leaf expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cronk Quentin CB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inkjet micropatterning is a versatile deposition technique with broad applications in numerous fields. However, its application in plant science is largely unexplored. Leaf expansion is one of the most important parameters in the field of plant science and many methods have been developed to examine differential expansion rates of different parts of the leaf lamina. Among them, methods based on the tracking of natural landmarks through digital imaging require a complicated setup in which the leaf must remain fixed and under tension. Furthermore, the resolution is limited to that of the natural landmarks, which are often difficult to find, particularly in young leaves. To study the fine scale expansion dynamics of the leaf lamina using artificial landmarks it is necessary to place small, noninvasive marks on a leaf surface and then recover the location of those marks after a period of time. Results To monitor leaf expansion in two dimensions, at very fine scales, we used a custom designed inkjet micropatterning system to print a grid composed of c. 0.19 mm2 cells on small developing leaves of ivy (Hedera helix using 40 ?m dots at a spacing of c. 91 ?m. The leaves in different growing stages were imaged under magnification to extract the coordinates of the marks which were then used in subsequent computer-assisted leaf expansion analyses. As an example we obtained quantified global and local expansion information and created expansion maps over the entire leaf surface. The results reveal a striking pattern of fine-scale expansion differences over short periods of time. In these experiments, the base of the leaf is a "cold spot" for expansion, while the leaf sinuses are "hot spots" for expansion. We have also measured a strong shading effect on leaf expansion. We discuss the features required to build an inkjet printing apparatus optimized for use in plant science, which will further maximize the range of tissues that can be printed at these scales. Conclusions To apply inkjet micropatterning to plant studies, we have successfully delivered landmarks on ivy leaf surfaces and achieved high-resolution, two-dimensional monitoring of leaf expansion at different growing stages. The measurement is capable of reliably identifying the fine scale changes during plant growth. As well as delivering landmarks, this technology may be used to deliver microscale targeted biological components such as growth hormones, and possibly be used to pattern sensors directly on the leaves.

  18. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: a method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Pyka; Sebastian Klatt

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomica...

  19. Anatomical structure of Polystichum Roth ferns rachises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana V. Tyshchenko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The morpho-anatomical characteristics of rachis cross sections of five Polystichum species is presented. The main and auxiliary anatomical features which help to distinguish investigated species are revealed.

  20. Proposal of anatomical terminology to call the arteries of the base of the encephalon in the monkey (Cebus paella L., 1766 Nomenclatura proposta para denominar as artérias da base do encéfalo do macaco-prego (Cebus apella L., 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Rocha Ferreira

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Arteries of the encephalon basis of 30 monkeys (Cebus paella were studied. Arteries were injected with colored latex, fixed in formaldehyde solution at 10% and dissected under magnifying lenses. Since the animals died from natural causes they had been previously used in other experiments. Human and veterinary anatomical terminology and literature were used as a reference for the determination of vessels studied in the primates. Arteries of the encephalon base represent division branches of three vascular pedicules: the right and left internal carotid arteries and the basilar system. Vessels in the basilar system of the animal were called vertebral arteries; anterior spinal artery; anterior and posterior cerebelar arteries; pontine arteries; satellite cerebelar arteries; caudal and cranial cerebelar arteries. The basilar artery bifurcates into two posterior cerebral arteries (100%. The caudal area of the encephalon’s arterial circuit is thus constituted. Linking between the vertebro-basilar and the carotid segments is done by the posterior communicating artery, that caudally anastomizes (100% with the posterior cerebral artery. The internal carotid artery gives origin to the posterior communicating artery. The right and left internal carotid artery (intracranial portion compounds the carotid system. The following vessels were identified: middle cerebral artery; anterior cerebral artery; interhemispheric artery; olfactory arteries. Results report that Cebus paella presents an arterial pattern of relative morphological stabilityEstudaram-se as artérias da base do encéfalo do Cebus apella em 30 animais, vindos a óbito por morte natural no Zoológico de São Paulo e coletados durante 10 anos. O material recebeu injeção de látex corado, fixado em formol a 10%, e foi dissecado sob lupa. Encontramos dificuldade e denominar estes vasos. As terminologias anatômicas humana e veterinária e a recuperação da literatura nos serviram de base para sugerirmos uma denominação que se adequasse ao modelo arterial desse primata. Os resultados nos permitiram verificar, no circuito arterial da base do encéfalo, segmento caudal ou vértebro-basilar as artérias (a: a. vertebral, suas partes (pé-vertebral, cervical, atlântica e intracraniana com ramos meníngeos e seus ramos (a. espinhal anterior, a. cerebelar inferior caudal, ramos para a medula oblonga; a. basilar e seus ramos (a. cerebelar inferior rostral, a. pontinas, a. cerebelar superior satélite, ilhas artérias, a. cerebelar anterior, a. cerebelar posterior; e no segmento rostral ou carótico os vasos: a. carótida interna (parte cerebral; a. comunicante posterior; a. coróidea; a. cerebral média; a. cerebral anterior; a. olfatória; a. inter-hemisférica. A análise dos resultados nos permitiu considerar que o Cebus apella apresentou um padrão arterial de relativa estabilidade morfológica em função das poucas variações encontradas nos vasos formadores dos circuitos arteriais considerados

  1. A New 2D Corner Detector for Extracting Landmarks from Brain MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Gelareh; Fatemizadeh, Emad

    2007-01-01

    Point-based registration of images strongly depends on the extraction of suitable landmarks. Recently, various 2D operators have been proposed for the detection of corner points but most of them are not effective for medical images that need a high accuracy. In this paper we have proposed a new automatic corner detector based on the covariance between the small region of support around a central pixel and its rotated one. The main goal of this paper is medical images so we especially focus on...

  2. Landmark NIH Study Shows Intensive Blood Pressure Management May Save Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Releases News Release Friday, September 11, 2015 Landmark NIH study shows intensive blood pressure management may ... is according to the initial results of a landmark clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of ...

  3. Quantification of organ motion based on an adaptive image-based scale invariant feature method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133 (Italy); Peroni, Marta [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133, Italy and Paul Scherrer Institut, Zentrum für Protonentherapie, WMSA/C15, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Italy); Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133, Italy and Bioengineering Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The availability of corresponding landmarks in IGRT image series allows quantifying the inter and intrafractional motion of internal organs. In this study, an approach for the automatic localization of anatomical landmarks is presented, with the aim of describing the nonrigid motion of anatomo-pathological structures in radiotherapy treatments according to local image contrast.Methods: An adaptive scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was developed from the integration of a standard 3D SIFT approach with a local image-based contrast definition. The robustness and invariance of the proposed method to shape-preserving and deformable transforms were analyzed in a CT phantom study. The application of contrast transforms to the phantom images was also tested, in order to verify the variation of the local adaptive measure in relation to the modification of image contrast. The method was also applied to a lung 4D CT dataset, relying on manual feature identification by an expert user as ground truth. The 3D residual distance between matches obtained in adaptive-SIFT was then computed to verify the internal motion quantification with respect to the expert user. Extracted corresponding features in the lungs were used as regularization landmarks in a multistage deformable image registration (DIR) mapping the inhale vs exhale phase. The residual distances between the warped manual landmarks and their reference position in the inhale phase were evaluated, in order to provide a quantitative indication of the registration performed with the three different point sets.Results: The phantom study confirmed the method invariance and robustness properties to shape-preserving and deformable transforms, showing residual matching errors below the voxel dimension. The adapted SIFT algorithm on the 4D CT dataset provided automated and accurate motion detection of peak to peak breathing motion. The proposed method resulted in reduced residual errors with respect to standard SIFT, providing a motion description comparable to expert manual identification, as confirmed by DIR.Conclusions: The application of the method to a 4D lung CT patient dataset demonstrated adaptive-SIFT potential as an automatic tool to detect landmarks for DIR regularization and internal motion quantification. Future works should include the optimization of the computational cost and the application of the method to other anatomical sites and image modalities.

  4. Quantification of organ motion based on an adaptive image-based scale invariant feature method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The availability of corresponding landmarks in IGRT image series allows quantifying the inter and intrafractional motion of internal organs. In this study, an approach for the automatic localization of anatomical landmarks is presented, with the aim of describing the nonrigid motion of anatomo-pathological structures in radiotherapy treatments according to local image contrast.Methods: An adaptive scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was developed from the integration of a standard 3D SIFT approach with a local image-based contrast definition. The robustness and invariance of the proposed method to shape-preserving and deformable transforms were analyzed in a CT phantom study. The application of contrast transforms to the phantom images was also tested, in order to verify the variation of the local adaptive measure in relation to the modification of image contrast. The method was also applied to a lung 4D CT dataset, relying on manual feature identification by an expert user as ground truth. The 3D residual distance between matches obtained in adaptive-SIFT was then computed to verify the internal motion quantification with respect to the expert user. Extracted corresponding features in the lungs were used as regularization landmarks in a multistage deformable image registration (DIR) mapping the inhale vs exhale phase. The residual distances between the warped manual landmarks and their reference position in the inhale phase were evaluated, in order to provide a quantitative indication of the registration performed with the three different point sets.Results: The phantom study confirmed the method invariance and robustness properties to shape-preserving and deformable transforms, showing residual matching errors below the voxel dimension. The adapted SIFT algorithm on the 4D CT dataset provided automated and accurate motion detection of peak to peak breathing motion. The proposed method resulted in reduced residual errors with respect to standard SIFT, providing a motion description comparable to expert manual identification, as confirmed by DIR.Conclusions: The application of the method to a 4D lung CT patient dataset demonstrated adaptive-SIFT potential as an automatic tool to detect landmarks for DIR regularization and internal motion quantification. Future works should include the optimization of the computational cost and the application of the method to other anatomical sites and image modalities

  5. Clinical study of quantitative analysis of the anatomical structure after canalicular laceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To quantitatively analyse the anatomical structure after canalicular laceration, to provide a basis for finding nasal ends of the canalicular and to evaluate the feasibility of taking the lacrimal caruncle as anatomic landmarks for finding the nasal ends of the inferior canalicular. METHODS: In this prospective case-control study, 100 cases(72 males and 28 femalesof traumatic inferior canalicular laceration were chosen. They were completely random divided into the experimental group(n=50, finding the nasal ends of the inferior canalicular by applying the method of lacrimal caruncle anatomic landmarks; the control group(n=50, finding the nasal ends of the inferior canalicular by applying the direct vision method. The distance of the lacrimal punctum and the temporal side of the stump, the vertical distance and quadrant between nasal ends of the canalicular and lacrimal caruncle were measured. The success rate of the two groups to find the nasa lends of the canalicular were recorded. The data were compared using ?2 test. RESULTS: The nasal ends of the inferior canalicular in the semi-quadrant of the lacrimal caruncle was 94%. The canalicular nasal ends from the lacrimal caruncle of the vertical distance was 2.34±0.68 mm,in which lacrimal punctums pitch temporal side of the stump7mm was 3.05±0.97mm. The success rate of surgery looking the inferior lacrimal duct nasal stump: experimental group: 49/50(98%, control group: 40/50(80%, the difference was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: Nasal ends of the inferior canalicular locates below the parallel lines of the lacrimal caruncle. The canalicular nasal ends locates in the deep side of the lacrimal caruncle within 2-3mm. The lacrimal punctum and the length of the temporal side can be used to clear the radius around the lacrimal caruncle. The success rate of finding the nasal ends of the experimental group is faster than the control group. The lacrimal caruncle as anatomic landmarks to find the nasal ends of the inferior canalicular is feasible, especially for patients whose inferior canalicular bitamporal side of the stump from inferior lacrimal punctum was 4-7mm.

  6. Learned predictiveness training modulates biases towards using boundary or landmark cues during navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Matthew G.; Smith, Alastair D; Haselgrove, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A number of navigational theories state that learning about landmark information should not interfere with learning about shape information provided by the boundary walls of an environment. A common test of such theories has been to assess whether landmark information will overshadow, or restrict, learning about shape information. Whilst a number of studies have shown that landmarks are not able to overshadow learning about shape information, some have shown that landmarks can, in fact, overs...

  7. A field study investigating effects of landmarks on territory size and shape

    OpenAIRE

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S.; Eason, Perri K.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined how landmarks affect territories' fundamental characteristics. In this field study, we investigated effects of landmarks on territory size, shape and location in a cichlid fish (Amatitlania siquia). We provided cans as breeding sites and used plastic plants as landmarks. During 10 min trials, we recorded locations where residents chased intruders and used those locations to outline and measure the territory. In two experiments, we observed pairs without landmarks and...

  8. Landmarks or panoramas: what do navigating ants attend to for guidance?

    OpenAIRE

    Beugnon Guy; Wystrach Antoine; Cheng Ken

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Insects are known to rely on terrestrial landmarks for navigation. Landmarks are used to chart a route or pinpoint a goal. The distant panorama, however, is often thought not to guide navigation directly during a familiar journey, but to act as a contextual cue that primes the correct memory of the landmarks. Results We provided Melophorus bagoti ants with a huge artificial landmark located right near the nest entrance to find out whether navigating ants focus on such a pr...

  9. Spinal cord localization in the treatment of lung cancer: use of radiographic landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the treatment of thoracic malignancies with radiotherapy, the critical dose-limiting structure is the spinal cord. Oblique fields typically are designed to exclude the spinal cord, and by convention, the field edge that shields the spinal cord is placed at the anterior border of the vertebral pedicles. Thus, the purpose of our study was to estimate the distance between the field edge and spinal cord in oblique fields that were designed by using the vertebral pedicle as a radiographic landmark. Methods and Materials: The spinal cord of a cadaver was wrapped in wire, and oblique fields were simulated at 15 deg. intervals. The distance from the spinal cord to a field edge placed at the anterior border of the pedicle was measured. In the second investigation, a three-dimensional treatment planning system was used to simulate hypothetical fields using actual patient data from computed tomography (n = 10), and measurements identical to those in the anatomical model were made (n = 1,100). Results: The results of the anatomical and computed tomographic models were in close agreement (mean difference, 0.6 mm). The computed tomographic model predicted a mean field edge to spinal cord distance of 8.7 mm (95% confidence interval, 5.6-11.8 mm) for (30 deg. (150 deg.)) oblique fields and 8.0 mm (95% confidence interval, 4.7-11.7 mm) for (45 deg. (135 deg.)) oblique fields. This distance was greatest at levels T-1, T-2, and T-11 (8 to 20% greater). Conclusions: The mean distance from a field edge placed at the anterior border of a vertebral pedicle to the spinal cord for commonly used oblique angles constitutes a sufficient margin to account for expected differences in daily positional variations and mechanical uncertainties

  10. 75 FR 49520 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act , that a meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National... 20036. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia Henry, National Historic Landmarks Program,...

  11. 76 FR 55701 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Act , that a meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National Park System... Landmarks Program, National Park Service; 1849 C Street, NW., (2280), Washington, DC 20240; Telephone...

  12. 76 FR 60079 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Act , that a meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National Park System... Landmarks Program, National Park Service; 1849 C Street, NW., (2280); Washington, DC 20240; Telephone...

  13. 36 CFR 65.8 - Alteration of National Historic Landmark boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Historic Landmark boundaries. 65.8 Section 65.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.8 Alteration of National Historic Landmark boundaries. (a) Two justifications exist for enlarging the boundary of a National...

  14. 77 FR 14420 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Act , that a meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National Park System... Historic Landmarks Program, National Park Service, 1849 C Street NW., (2280), Washington, DC...

  15. 36 CFR 800.10 - Special requirements for protecting National Historic Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... protecting National Historic Landmarks. 800.10 Section 800.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ADVISORY... Special requirements for protecting National Historic Landmarks. (a) Statutory requirement. Section 110(f... and actions as may be necessary to minimize harm to any National Historic Landmark that may...

  16. 78 FR 13377 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board will be held beginning at 1:00 p.m. on April... National Park System Advisory Board and its Landmarks Committee may consider the following...

  17. 76 FR 15338 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act , that a meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National... Henry, National Historic Landmarks Program, National Park Service; 1849 C Street, NW. (2280);...

  18. 77 FR 44670 - Information Collection Activities: National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... National Park Service Information Collection Activities: National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey....gov (email). Please reference Information Collection 1024-NEW, National Historic Landmarks (NHL... Historic Landmarks Program, 1201 Eye St. NW., Washington, DC 20005. You may send an email to...

  19. 77 FR 53230 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), that a meeting of the Landmarks... Park System Advisory Board and its Landmarks Committee may consider the following nominations:...

  20. Developmental Changes in Young Children's Spatial Memory and Language in Relation to Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, Alycia M.; Naroleski, Amber R.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments investigated how young children and adults understand whether objects are "by" a landmark and remember their locations. Three- and 4-year-old children and adults were asked to judge whether several blocks were "by" a landmark. The blocks were arranged so that their absolute and relative distances from the landmark varied. Later,…

  1. Solving small spaces: investigating the use of landmark cues in brown capuchins (Cebus apella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kelly D; Mullo, Enma; Santos, Laurie R

    2013-09-01

    Some researchers have recently argued that humans may be unusual among primates in preferring to use landmark information when reasoning about some kinds of spatial problems. Some have explained this phenomenon by positing that our species' tendency to prefer landmarks stems from a human-unique trait: language. Here, we test this hypothesis-that preferring to use landmarks to solve such tasks is related to language ability-by exploring landmark use in a spatial task in one non-human primate, the brown capuchin monkey (Cebus apella). We presented our subjects with the rotational displacement task, in which subjects attempt to relocate a reward hidden within an array of hiding locations which are subsequently rotated to a new position. Over several experiments, we varied the availability and the salience of a landmark cue within the array. Specifically, we varied (1) visual access to the array during rotation, (2) the type of landmark, (3) the consistency of the landmark qualities, and (4) the amount of exposure to the landmark. Across Experiments 1 through 4, capuchins did not successfully use landmarks cues, suggesting that non-linguistic primates may not spontaneously use landmarks to solve some spatial problems, as in this case of a small-scale dynamic spatial task. Importantly, we also observed that capuchins demonstrated some capacity to learn to use landmarks in Experiment 4, suggesting that non-linguistic creatures may be able to use some landmarks cues in similar spatial tasks with extensive training. PMID:23430144

  2. Brain Anatomical Network and Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yonghui; Liu, Yong; Li, Jun; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng; YU, CHUNSHUI; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-01-01

    Intuitively, higher intelligence might be assumed to correspond to more efficient information transfer in the brain, but no direct evidence has been reported from the perspective of brain networks. In this study, we performed extensive analyses to test the hypothesis that individual differences in intelligence are associated with brain structural organization, and in particular that higher scores on intelligence tests are related to greater global efficiency of the brain anatomical network. W...

  3. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: A method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pyka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM, to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: i the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, ii the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort.

  4. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: a method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyka, Martin; Klatt, Sebastian; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM), to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: (i) the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, (ii) the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort. PMID:25309338

  5. Robust Morphological Averages in Three Dimensions for Anatomical Atlas Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Jorge; Bloch, Isabelle; Schmitt, Francis

    2004-09-01

    We present original methods for obtaining robust, anatomical shape-based averages of features of the human head anatomy from a normal population. Our goals are computerized atlas construction with representative anatomical features and morphopometry for specific populations. A method for true-morphological averaging is proposed, consisting of a suitable blend of shape-related information for N objects to obtain a progressive average. It is made robust by penalizing, in a morphological sense, the contributions of features less similar to the current average. Morphological error and similarity, as well as penalization, are based on the same paradigm as the morphological averaging.

  6. An Adaptive Algorithm for Finding Frequent Sets in Landmark Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Xuan-Hong; Ong, Kok-Leong; Lee, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We consider a CPU constrained environment for finding approximation of frequent sets in data streams using the landmark window. Our algorithm can detect overload situations, i.e., breaching the CPU capacity, and sheds data in the stream to “keep up”. This is done within a controlled error threshold by exploiting the Chernoff-bound. Empirical evaluation of the algorithm confirms the feasibility.

  7. What Factors Shape "by" Ratings in Relation to Landmarks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, Alycia M.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments investigated how absolute and relative distance shape adults' and young children's ratings concerning the extent to which the term "by" describes the relation between locations. Three- and 4-year-old children and adults were asked to rate how well the word "by" described the relation between several blocks and a landmark. The…

  8. On-line SLAM using clustered landmarks with omnidirectional vision

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jun, Okamoto Jr.; Vitor Campanholo, Guizilini.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) is a fundamental problem in autonomous robotics. It arises when a robot must create a map of the regions it has navigated while localizing itself on it, using results from one step to increase precision in another by eliminating errors inhe [...] rent to the sensors. One common solution consists of establishing landmarks in the environment which are used as reference points for absolute localization estimates and form a sparse map that is iteratively refined as more information is obtained. This paper introduces a method of landmark selection and clustering in omnidirectional images for on-line SLAM, using the SIFT algorithm for initial feature extraction and assuming no prior knowledge of the environment. Visual sensors are an attractive way of collecting information from the environment, but tend to create an excessive amount of landmarks that are individually prone to false matches due to image noise and object similarities. By clustering several features in single objects, our approach eliminates landmarks that do not consistently represent the environment, decreasing computational cost and increasing the reliability of information incorporated. Tests conducted in real navigational situations show a significant improvement in performance without loss of quality.

  9. Agreement between anatomic and ultrasound measurements of femoral trochlear depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Westrup, Ulrik

    Assessments of trochlear depth for patients with medial patellar luxation have traditionally been estimated from skyline radiographs or visually during surgery. Ultrasound offers a non-invasive evaluation method which could avoid the need for arthrotomy. We compared anatomic, radiographic and ultrasonographic measurements of trochlear depth using the red fox hind limb as a canine surrogate, dividing the trochlea into five regions from the origin of the caudal cruciate ligament to the proximal aspect of the trochlea. We found reasonable agreement between anatomic and ultrasonographic measurements as assessed by Bland-Altman difference charting and limits of agreement (approximately ±0.7mm). Differences may be accounted for by ultrasound probe positioning errors, which should be taken into consideration during clinical investigations. Skyline views were difficult to standardise to a distinct position in the trochlea but appeared to centre around the middle of the trochlea: the proximal section of the trochlea has been suggested to be most critical in medial patellar luxation, and thus the usefulness of this view is questionable. Trochlear depth in this study population was approximately 30% of patellar depth over the five regions examined. Measurement reliability for the ultrasonographic examinations was markedly less that for the skyline views (repeatability coefficient of 0.5mm vs 0.25mm), but still adequate for clinical use. A likely reason is the relative amount of detail recorded in the respective DICOM files which restricts ultrasonographic landmark resolution. Further work on quantifying interobserver variation and repeat measurement variation is required to ensure confidence in this technique.

  10. IAEA Director General welcomes landmark convention to combat nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei welcomed the adoption of an International convention against nuclear terrorism. 'This is a landmark achievement which will bolster global efforts to combat nuclear terrorism,' Dr. ElBaradei said. 'It will be a key part of international efforts to prevent terrorists from gaining access to nuclear weapons'. The United Nations General Assembly adopted the convention, The International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism, on 13 April 2005. The Convention strengthens the global legal framework to counter terrorist threats. Based on a proposal by the Russian Federation in 1998, the Convention focuses on criminal offences related to nuclear terrorism and covers a broad range of possible targets, including nuclear reactors as well as nuclear material and radioactive substances. Under its provisions, alleged offenders - for example any individual or group that unlawfully and intentionally possesses or uses radioactive material with the intent to cause harm - must be either extradited or prosecuted. States are also encouraged to cooperate with each other in connection with criminal investigations and extradition proceedings. The Convention further requires that any seized nuclear or radiological material be held in accordance with IAEA safeguards, and handled in keeping with the IAEA's health, safety and physical protection standards. Dr. ElBaradei also recalled that the Agency is in the process of amending the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, in order to broaden its scope, and in so doing, strengthen the current legal framework for securing nuclear material against illicit uses. A conference will be held from 4 to 8 July in Vienna to consider and adopt the amendments. The Convention opens for signature in September this year. Dr ElBaradei urged all States to 'sign and ratify the Convention without delay so nuclear terrorism will have no chance'. (IAEA)

  11. Undecidability and temporal logic: some landmarks from Turing to the present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goranko, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    This is a selective survey and discussion of some of the landmark undecidability results in temporal logic, beginning with Turing's undecidability of the Halting problem which, in retrospect, can be regarded as the historically first undecidability result for a suitable temporal logic over configuration graphs of Turing machines. I will discuss some of the natural habitats of undecidable temporal logics, such as first-order, interval-based and real time temporal logics, as well as some extensions that often lead to undecidability, such as two-dimensional temporal logics and temporal-epistemic logics.

  12. Technical Note: Anatomic identification of isolated modern human molars: testing Procrustes aligned outlines as a standardization procedure for elliptic fourier analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corny, Julien; Détroit, Florent

    2014-02-01

    The determination of the precise position of permanent first and second modern human molars, following standard tooth identification criteria, is often difficult because of their morphological similarities. Here, we proposed to evaluate the suitability of two-dimensional crown contour shape analysis in achieving this objective. The method was tested separately on 180 first and second maxillary molars (UM) and 180 first and second mandibular molars (LM) securely identified (in anatomical position in their sockets). Generalized Procrustes superimposition is used to normalize the outlines prior to applying elliptic Fourier analyses ("EFAproc" method). Reliability and effectiveness of this morphometric procedure was evaluated by comparing the results obtained for the same dataset with four other morphometric methods of contour analysis. Cross-validated ("leave one individual out") percentages of misclassification yielded by linear discriminant analyses were used for determining the anatomic position of modern human molars. The percentages of misclassifications obtained from every method of contour analysis were low (1.67% to 3.33% for the UM, 5.56% to 6.67% for the LM) indicating the high suitability of crown contour analyses in correctly identifying molars. A reliable protocol, based on predictive linear discriminant analyses, was then proposed for identification of isolated molars. In addition, our results confirmed that the EFAproc method is suitable for normalizing outlines prior to undertaking elliptic Fourier analyses, especially in the case of nearly circular outlines: it obtained better classification than the classic method of normalization of Fourier descriptors for UM and provided also some advantages over the three landmarks-based methods tested here. PMID:24242977

  13. Anatomical study of the pigs temporal bone by microdissection

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Leandro de Borborema, Garcia; José Santos Cruz de, Andrade; José Ricardo Gurgel, Testa.

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Initial study of the pig`s temporal bone anatomy in order to enable a new experimental model in ear surgery. METHODS: Dissection of five temporal bones of Sus scrofa pigs obtained from UNIFESP - Surgical Skills Laboratory, removed with hole saw to avoid any injury and stored in formald [...] ehyde 10% for better conservation. The microdissection in all five temporal bone had the following steps: inspection of the outer part, external canal and tympanic membrane microscopy, mastoidectomy, removal of external ear canal and tympanic membrane, inspection of ossicular chain and middle ear. RESULTS: Anatomically it is located at the same position than in humans. Some landmarks usually found in humans are missing. The tympanic membrane of the pig showed to be very similar to the human, separating the external and the middle ear. The middle ear`s appearance is very similar than in humans. The ossicular chain is almost exactly the same, as well as the facial nerve, showing the same relationship with the lateral semicircular canal. CONCLUSION: The temporal bone of the pigs can be used as an alternative for training in ear surgery, especially due the facility to find it and its similarity with temporal bone of the humans.

  14. Anatomical study of the pigs temporal bone by microdissection

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Leandro de Borborema, Garcia; José Santos Cruz de, Andrade; José Ricardo Gurgel, Testa.

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Initial study of the pig`s temporal bone anatomy in order to enable a new experimental model in ear surgery. METHODS: Dissection of five temporal bones of Sus scrofa pigs obtained from UNIFESP - Surgical Skills Laboratory, removed with hole saw to avoid any injury and stored in formal [...] dehyde 10% for better conservation. The microdissection in all five temporal bone had the following steps: inspection of the outer part, external canal and tympanic membrane microscopy, mastoidectomy, removal of external ear canal and tympanic membrane, inspection of ossicular chain and middle ear. RESULTS: Anatomically it is located at the same position than in humans. Some landmarks usually found in humans are missing. The tympanic membrane of the pig showed to be very similar to the human, separating the external and the middle ear. The middle ear`s appearance is very similar than in humans. The ossicular chain is almost exactly the same, as well as the facial nerve, showing the same relationship with the lateral semicircular canal. CONCLUSION: The temporal bone of the pigs can be used as an alternative for training in ear surgery, especially due the facility to find it and its similarity with temporal bone of the humans.

  15. Fusion of WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks Using the Kalman Filter for Indoor Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services (LBS have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m.

  16. Fusion of WiFi, smartphone sensors and landmarks using the Kalman filter for indoor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenghua; Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Qingchang; Soh, Yeng Chai; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS) have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m. PMID:25569750

  17. Fusion of WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks Using the Kalman Filter for Indoor Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenghua; Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Qingchang; Soh, Yeng Chai; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS) have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m. PMID:25569750

  18. A FastSLAM-based algorithm for omnidirectional cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Gamallo; Manuel Mucientes; Regueiro, Carlos V.

    2013-01-01

    Environments with a low density of landmarks are difficult for vision-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) algorithms. The use of omnidirectional cameras, which have a wide field of view, is specially interesting in these environments as several landmarks are usually detected in each image. A typical example of this kind of situation happens in indoor environments when the lights placed on the ceiling are the landmarks. The use of omnivision combined with this type of landmarks ...

  19. Methylation profiles of genomic DNA of mouse developmental brain detected by restriction landmark genomic scanning (RLGS) method.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, J.; Hirotsune, S.; Hirose, K; Fushiki, S; Watanabe, S.; Hayashizaki, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Restriction landmark genomic scanning using methylation-sensitive endonucleases (RLGS-M) is a newly developed powerful method for systematic detection of DNA methylation. Using this method, we scanned mouse brain genomic DNAs from various developmental stages to detect the transcriptionally active regions. This approach is based on the assumption that CpG methylation, particularly of CpG islands, might be associated with gene transcriptional regulation. Genomic DNAs were prepared from telence...

  20. Anatomic variability of groin innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachul, P; Tomaszewski, K A; Kmiotek, E K; Kratochwil, M; Solecki, R; Walocha, J A

    2013-08-01

    Inguinal hernia repairs are very common yet fairly complex surgical procedures.Variations in the anatomical course of the inguinal nerves require that diligence is taken in their proper recognition. Inadvertent surgical injury to these nerves is associated with long term postoperative pain and complications. The aim of the present study was to highlight the complexity and variation in the innervation of the inguinal region in order to increase proper nerve identification during surgical interventions. Bilateral dissection of the inguinal and posterior abdominal regions in one human male cadaver revealed an atypical anatomic topography of the groin innervation. This unusual case was observed at the Jagiellonian University Anatomy Department during routine cadaveric preparations. The left ilioinguinal nerve was absent. The left genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve arose higher than expected from the lumbar plexus and supplied the groin region, which is typically innervated by the ilioinguinal nerve. Furthermore, the left lateral cutaneous femoral nerve and the right genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve also followed uncharacteristic courses. Awareness of topographical nerve variations during inguinal hernia repair will help surgeons identify and preserve important nerves, thus decreasing the incidence of chronic postoperative pain. PMID:24068690

  1. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography; Evaluation d'une methode de restitution de contraste basee sur le guidage anatomique de la reconstruction des images cerebrales en tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, F

    2007-04-15

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  2. On-line SLAM using clustered landmarks with omnidirectional vision

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Okamoto Jr.; Vitor Campanholo Guizilini

    2010-01-01

    The problem of SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) is a fundamental problem in autonomous robotics. It arises when a robot must create a map of the regions it has navigated while localizing itself on it, using results from one step to increase precision in another by eliminating errors inherent to the sensors. One common solution consists of establishing landmarks in the environment which are used as reference points for absolute localization estimates and form a sparse map that is i...

  3. Visual landmarks facilitate rodent spatial navigation in virtual reality environments

    OpenAIRE

    Youngstrom, Isaac A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    Because many different sensory modalities contribute to spatial learning in rodents, it has been difficult to determine whether spatial navigation can be guided solely by visual cues. Rodents moving within physical environments with visual cues engage a variety of nonvisual sensory systems that cannot be easily inhibited without lesioning brain areas. Virtual reality offers a unique approach to ask whether visual landmark cues alone are sufficient to improve performance in a spatial task. We ...

  4. AUTOMATIC DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF RETINAL VASCULAR LANDMARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of this paper is introducing a method to distinguish between different landmarks of the retina: bifurcations and crossings. The methodology may help in differentiating between arteries and veins and is useful in identifying diseases and other special pathologies, too. The method does not need any special skills, thus it can be assimilated to an automatic way for pinpointing landmarks; moreover it gives good responses for very small vessels. A skeletonized representation, taken out from the segmented binary image (obtained through a preprocessing step, is used to identify pixels with three or more neighbors. Then, the junction points are classified into bifurcations or crossovers depending on their geometrical and topological properties such as width, direction and connectivity of the surrounding segments. The proposed approach is applied to the public-domain DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with the state-of-the-art methods using proper validation parameters. The method was successful in identifying the majority of the landmarks; the average correctly identified bifurcations in both DRIVE and STARE datasets for the recall and precision values are: 95.4% and 87.1% respectively; also for the crossovers, the recall and precision values are: 87.6% and 90.5% respectively; thus outperforming other studies.

  5. Evolutionary-derived anatomical characteristics and universal attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, A M

    1999-02-01

    Hominid fossils illustrate how modern humans have evolved anatomically. Included in the fossils are traits no longer phenotypically prevalent in humans (primitive) and phenotypic traits that have become increasingly prevalent (derived). In this study, published paleontological information about the anatomical evolution of humans was used to create line drawings of human form. Survey data were accumulated by having 759 individuals evaluate more than 40 anatomical traits. Each anatomical trait was presented as a panel of three line drawings intended to express the trait in a primitive, intermediate, and derived form. For each panel of three drawings, subjects were instructed to select the drawing they considered most attractive and then select the drawing they considered least attractive. The survey data indicate that males and females of diverse ages, races, cultures, and from varied geographical regions show commonality in their judgements of beauty of human form. The individuals surveyed appeared to have a strong aversion to primitive traits, preferring proportions and characteristics that are intermediate or more derived. In many instances, the evaluators preferred drawings that were exaggeratedly derived. The data may have relevance to the ongoing debate of whether averageness or atypicality is the essence of human beauty. Also, there was high agreement in judging the attractiveness of shapes and proportions in line drawings that were not immediately recognized to be representations of human form. These data could indicate that our general aesthetic sense for art, architecture, and fashion may be based on a subliminal reference to derived anatomical shapes and proportions. Overall, the data support the hypothesis that derived traits that are universally shared by anatomically modern humans may be the standard for our innate sense of beauty of human form. PMID:10214640

  6. Patterns of Care - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  7. Health Policy: Colorectal Cancer - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  8. National Bladder Cancer Study - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  9. Agricultural Health Study - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  10. Gene for Melanoma - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  11. Genetic Susceptibility Sudies - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  12. Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  13. Registration now open for landmark CERN conference

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Journalist registration is now available for the Role of Science in the Information Society (RSIS) conference, to be held at CERN on 8-9 December....RSIS will explore future contributions of science to the information society based on past and present practice (1 page).

  14. Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  15. Diet and Cancer - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  16. Endometrial Cancer and Estrogen - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  17. AIDS-Related Cancers - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  18. Physical Activity and Cancer - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  19. Microarray data mining using landmark gene-guided clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho HyungJun

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clustering is a popular data exploration technique widely used in microarray data analysis. Most conventional clustering algorithms, however, generate only one set of clusters independent of the biological context of the analysis. This is often inadequate to explore data from different biological perspectives and gain new insights. We propose a new clustering model that can generate multiple versions of different clusters from a single dataset, each of which highlights a different aspect of the given dataset. Results By applying our SigCalc algorithm to three yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae datasets we show two results. First, we show that different sets of clusters can be generated from the same dataset using different sets of landmark genes. Each set of clusters groups genes differently and reveals new biological associations between genes that were not apparent from clustering the original microarray expression data. Second, we show that many of these new found biological associations are common across datasets. These results also provide strong evidence of a link between the choice of landmark genes and the new biological associations found in gene clusters. Conclusion We have used the SigCalc algorithm to project the microarray data onto a completely new subspace whose co-ordinates are genes (called landmark genes, known to belong to a Biological Process. The projected space is not a true vector space in mathematical terms. However, we use the term subspace to refer to one of virtually infinite numbers of projected spaces that our proposed method can produce. By changing the biological process and thus the landmark genes, we can change this subspace. We have shown how clustering on this subspace reveals new, biologically meaningful clusters which were not evident in the clusters generated by conventional methods. The R scripts (source code are freely available under the GPL license. The source code is available [see Additional File 1] as additional material, and the latest version can be obtained at http://www4.ncsu.edu/~pchopra/landmarks.html. The code is under active development to incorporate new clustering methods and analysis. Additional file 1 R source code file Click here for file

  20. APFiLoc: An Infrastructure-Free Indoor Localization Method Fusing Smartphone Inertial Sensors, Landmarks and Map Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianga Shang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The utility and adoption of indoor localization applications have been limited due to the complex nature of the physical environment combined with an increasing requirement for more robust localization performance. Existing solutions to this problem are either too expensive or too dependent on infrastructure such as Wi-Fi access points. To address this problem, we propose APFiLoc—a low cost, smartphone-based framework for indoor localization. The key idea behind this framework is to obtain landmarks within the environment and to use the augmented particle filter to fuse them with measurements from smartphone sensors and map information. A clustering method based on distance constraints is developed to detect organic landmarks in an unsupervised way, and the least square support vector machine is used to classify seed landmarks. A series of real-world experiments were conducted in complex environments including multiple floors and the results show APFiLoc can achieve 80% accuracy (phone in the hand and around 70% accuracy (phone in the pocket of the error less than 2 m error without the assistance of infrastructure like Wi-Fi access points.

  1. APFiLoc: An Infrastructure-Free Indoor Localization Method Fusing Smartphone Inertial Sensors, Landmarks and Map Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jianga; Gu, Fuqiang; Hu, Xuke; Kealy, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The utility and adoption of indoor localization applications have been limited due to the complex nature of the physical environment combined with an increasing requirement for more robust localization performance. Existing solutions to this problem are either too expensive or too dependent on infrastructure such as Wi-Fi access points. To address this problem, we propose APFiLoc-a low cost, smartphone-based framework for indoor localization. The key idea behind this framework is to obtain landmarks within the environment and to use the augmented particle filter to fuse them with measurements from smartphone sensors and map information. A clustering method based on distance constraints is developed to detect organic landmarks in an unsupervised way, and the least square support vector machine is used to classify seed landmarks. A series of real-world experiments were conducted in complex environments including multiple floors and the results show APFiLoc can achieve 80% accuracy (phone in the hand) and around 70% accuracy (phone in the pocket) of the error less than 2 m error without the assistance of infrastructure like Wi-Fi access points. PMID:26516858

  2. An anatomical and functional topography of human auditory cortical areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EliaFormisano

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI throughout the last decades have enabled the detailed anatomical and functional inspection of the human brain non-invasively, to date there is no consensus regarding the precise subdivision and topography of the areas forming the human auditory cortex. Here, we propose a topography of the human auditory areas based on insights on the anatomical and functional properties of human auditory areas as revealed by studies of cyto- and myelo-architecture and fMRI investigations at ultra-high magnetic field (7 Tesla. Importantly, we illustrate that - whereas a group-based approach to analyze functional (tonotopic maps is appropriate to highlight the main tonotopic axis - the examination of tonotopic maps at single subject level is required to detail the topography of primary and non-primary areas that may be more variable across subjects. Furthermore, we show that considering multiple maps indicative of anatomical (i.e. myelination as well as of functional properties (e.g. broadness of frequency tuning is helpful in identifying auditory cortical areas in individual human brains. We propose and discuss a topography of areas that is consistent with old and recent anatomical post mortem characterizations of the human auditory cortex and that may serve as a working model for neuroscience studies of auditory functions.

  3. Cascaded Collaborative Regression for Robust Facial Landmark Detection Trained Using a Mixture of Synthetic and Real Images With Dynamic Weighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen-Hua; Hu, Guosheng; Kittler, Josef; Christmas, William; Wu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-11-01

    A large amount of training data is usually crucial for successful supervised learning. However, the task of providing training samples is often time-consuming, involving a considerable amount of tedious manual work. In addition, the amount of training data available is often limited. As an alternative, in this paper, we discuss how best to augment the available data for the application of automatic facial landmark detection. We propose the use of a 3D morphable face model to generate synthesized faces for a regression-based detector training. Benefiting from the large synthetic training data, the learned detector is shown to exhibit a better capability to detect the landmarks of a face with pose variations. Furthermore, the synthesized training data set provides accurate and consistent landmarks automatically as compared to the landmarks annotated manually, especially for occluded facial parts. The synthetic data and real data are from different domains; hence the detector trained using only synthesized faces does not generalize well to real faces. To deal with this problem, we propose a cascaded collaborative regression algorithm, which generates a cascaded shape updater that has the ability to overcome the difficulties caused by pose variations, as well as achieving better accuracy when applied to real faces. The training is based on a mix of synthetic and real image data with the mixing controlled by a dynamic mixture weighting schedule. Initially, the training uses heavily the synthetic data, as this can model the gross variations between the various poses. As the training proceeds, progressively more of the natural images are incorporated, as these can model finer detail. To improve the performance of the proposed algorithm further, we designed a dynamic multi-scale local feature extraction method, which captures more informative local features for detector training. An extensive evaluation on both controlled and uncontrolled face data sets demonstrates the merit of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26087493

  4. Comparison of technical and anatomical noise in digital thorax X-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Former studies by Hoeschen and Buhr indicated a higher total noise in a thorax image than expected from technical noise, i.e. quantum and detector noise. This difference results from the overlay of many small anatomical structures along the X-ray beam, which leads to a noise-like appearance without distinguishable structures in the projected image. A method is proposed to quantitatively determine this 'anatomical noise' component, which is not to be confused with the anatomical background (e.g. ribs). This specific anatomical noise pattern in a radiograph changes completely when the imaging geometry changes because different small anatomical structures contribute to the projected image. Therefore, two images are taken using slightly different exposure geometry, and a correlation analysis based on wavelet transforms allows to determining the uncorrelated noise components. Since the technical noise also differs from image to image, which makes it difficult to separate the anatomical noise, images of a lung phantom were produced on a low-sensitive industrial X-ray film using high-exposure levels. From these results, the anatomical noise level in real clinical thorax radiographs using realistic exposure levels is predicted using the general dose dependence described in the paper text and compared with the quantum and detector noise level of an indirect flat-panel detector system. For consistency testing, the same lung phantom was imaged with the same digital flat-panel detector and the total image noise including anatomical noise is determined. The results show that the relative portion of anatomical noise may exceed the technical noise level. Anatomical noise is an important contributor to the total image noise and, therefore, impedes the recognition of anatomical structures. (authors)

  5. A method based on Monte Carlo simulations and voxelized anatomical atlases to evaluate and correct uncertainties on radiotracer accumulation quantitation in beta microprobe studies in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, F.; Dhenain, M.; Gurden, H.; Routier, A. L.; Lefebvre, F.; Mastrippolito, R.; Lanièce, P.

    2008-10-01

    The ?-microprobe is a simple and versatile technique complementary to small animal positron emission tomography (PET). It relies on local measurements of the concentration of positron-labeled molecules. So far, it has been successfully used in anesthetized rats for pharmacokinetics experiments and for the study of brain energetic metabolism. However, the ability of the technique to provide accurate quantitative measurements using 18F, 11C and 15O tracers is likely to suffer from the contribution of 511 keV gamma rays background to the signal and from the contribution of positrons from brain loci surrounding the locus of interest. The aim of the present paper is to provide a method of evaluating several parameters, which are supposed to affect the quantification of recordings performed in vivo with this methodology. We have developed realistic voxelized phantoms of the rat whole body and brain, and used them as input geometries for Monte Carlo simulations of previous ?-microprobe reports. In the context of realistic experiments (binding of 11C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; local glucose metabolic rate measurement with 18F-FDG and H2O15 blood flow measurements in the somatosensory cortex), we have calculated the detection efficiencies and corresponding contribution of 511 keV gammas from peripheral organs accumulation. We confirmed that the 511 keV gammas background does not impair quantification. To evaluate the contribution of positrons from adjacent structures, we have developed ?-Assistant, a program based on a rat brain voxelized atlas and matrices of local detection efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several probe geometries. This program was used to calculate the 'apparent sensitivity' of the probe for each brain structure included in the detection volume. For a given localization of a probe within the brain, this allows us to quantify the different sources of beta signal. Finally, since stereotaxic accuracy is crucial for quantification in most microprobe studies, the influence of stereotaxic positioning error was studied for several realistic experiments in favorable and unfavorable experimental situations (binding of 11C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; binding of 18F-MPPF to 5HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus).

  6. Bases anatômicas para utilização do músculo fibular terceiro em retalhos miocutâneos / Anatomical basis for the use of the fibularis tertius muscle in myocutaneous flaps

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de, Gusmão; Jacqueline Silva Brito, Lima; Felipe Henning Gaia, Duarte; Anderson Gonçalves de Farias, Souto; Bruno de Melo Veloso, Couto.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A utilização de retalhos miocutâneos é cada dia mais frequente nas cirurgias plásticas reconstrutoras de membros inferiores, tornando-se essencial a utilização de músculos que denotem menor prejuízo tanto funcional como estético. Foram estudados a frequência e os aspectos anatômicos do m [...] úsculo fibular terceiro, com o intuito de avaliar, sob esses aspectos, a possibilidade de seu uso nesses procedimentos. MÉTODO: Foram dissecados 64 membros inferiores de cadáveres fixados e verificadas as seguintes características: inserção proximal, inserção distal, sintopia, morfologia e morfometria. RESULTADOS: A presença do músculo foi constatada em 96,9% dos casos, sendo analisados os aspectos supracitados. A inserção proximal mais frequente (96,8%) ocorreu na membrana interóssea, na margem anterior da fíbula, e no septo intermuscular anterior. A inserção distal mais comum (77,4%) foi nas faces dorsal e lateral do 5º metatarsiano. O valor médio do comprimento e da largura do ventre muscular foi, respectivamente, de 17,89 cm e 1,95 cm, enquanto a média do comprimento do tendão distal livre de fibras musculares foi de 1,2 cm e a largura média do tendão distal, de 0,45 cm. CONCLUSÕES: O músculo fibular terceiro é frequente, de morfologia distinta, que, sob aspectos morfométricos, se constitui em opção viável para um estudo mais específico de seu uso no reparo de defeitos no segmento distal do membro inferior. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Myocutaneous flaps have been increasingly used in surgical reconstruction of the lower limbs, requiring the use of muscles that result in less functional and esthetic damage as flaps. This study aimed to evaluate the use of the fibularis tertius muscle (in terms of frequency and anatomy) [...] as flaps in this procedure. METHODS: Sixty-four lower limbs from preserved cadavers were dissected and evaluated based on the following parameters: proximal insertion, distal insertion, syntopy, morphology, and morphometry. RESULTS: The fibularis tertius muscle was detected in 96.9% of the study cases. Most proximal insertions (96.8%) were found at the interosseous membrane, anterior border of the fibula, and anterior intermuscular septum. Most distal insertions (77.4%) were found at the lateral and dorsal sides of the 5th metatarsal. Mean value of muscle belly length was 17.89 cm and width was 1.95 cm. The mean length of the distal tendon with no muscle fibers was 1.2 cm, and the mean width was 0.45 cm. CONCLUSIONS: The fibularis tertius muscle is frequent and has a distinct morphology, making it a viable option for the repair of lower limb (distal segment) defects.

  7. A method based on Monte Carlo simulations and voxelized anatomical atlases to evaluate and correct uncertainties on radiotracer accumulation quantitation in beta microprobe studies in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pain, F; Dhenain, M; Gurden, H; Routier, A L; Lefebvre, F; Mastrippolito, R; Laniece, P [UMR8165 Imagerie et Modelisation en Cancerologie et Neurobiologie, Universites Paris 11/Paris 7, Campus d' Orsay Bat 104/440 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2008-10-07

    The {beta}-microprobe is a simple and versatile technique complementary to small animal positron emission tomography (PET). It relies on local measurements of the concentration of positron-labeled molecules. So far, it has been successfully used in anesthetized rats for pharmacokinetics experiments and for the study of brain energetic metabolism. However, the ability of the technique to provide accurate quantitative measurements using {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O tracers is likely to suffer from the contribution of 511 keV gamma rays background to the signal and from the contribution of positrons from brain loci surrounding the locus of interest. The aim of the present paper is to provide a method of evaluating several parameters, which are supposed to affect the quantification of recordings performed in vivo with this methodology. We have developed realistic voxelized phantoms of the rat whole body and brain, and used them as input geometries for Monte Carlo simulations of previous {beta}-microprobe reports. In the context of realistic experiments (binding of {sup 11}C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; local glucose metabolic rate measurement with {sup 18}F-FDG and H{sub 2}O{sup 15} blood flow measurements in the somatosensory cortex), we have calculated the detection efficiencies and corresponding contribution of 511 keV gammas from peripheral organs accumulation. We confirmed that the 511 keV gammas background does not impair quantification. To evaluate the contribution of positrons from adjacent structures, we have developed {beta}-Assistant, a program based on a rat brain voxelized atlas and matrices of local detection efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several probe geometries. This program was used to calculate the 'apparent sensitivity' of the probe for each brain structure included in the detection volume. For a given localization of a probe within the brain, this allows us to quantify the different sources of beta signal. Finally, since stereotaxic accuracy is crucial for quantification in most microprobe studies, the influence of stereotaxic positioning error was studied for several realistic experiments in favorable and unfavorable experimental situations (binding of {sup 11}C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; binding of {sup 18}F-MPPF to 5HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus)

  8. Statistical analysis of shape through triangulation of landmarks: A study of sexual dimorphism in hominids

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Calyampudi R.; Suryawanshi, Shailaja

    1998-01-01

    Two objects with homologous landmarks are said to be of the same shape if the configuration of landmarks of one object can be exactly matched with that of the other by translation, rotation/reflection, and scaling. In an earlier paper, the authors proposed statistical analysis of shape by considering logarithmic differences of all possible Euclidean distances between landmarks. Tests of significance for differences in the shape of objects and methods of discrimination between populations were...

  9. 3D facial landmarks: Inter-operator variability of manual annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Harder, Stine; Rosengren, Anders; Møller, Christian; Werge, Thomas; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Hansen, Thomas Fritz

    2014-01-01

    Background Manual annotation of landmarks is a known source of variance, which exist in all fields of medical imaging, influencing the accuracy and interpretation of the results. However, the variability of human facial landmarks is only sparsely addressed in the current literature as opposed to e.g. the research fields of orthodontics and cephalometrics. We present a full facial 3D annotation procedure and a sparse set of manually annotated landmarks, in effort to reduce operator time and minim...

  10. From Objects to Landmarks: The Function of Visual Location Information in Spatial Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    OliverBaumann; MarkA.Bellgrove

    2012-01-01

    Landmarks play an important role in guiding navigational behavior. A host of studies in the last 15?years has demonstrated that environmental objects can act as landmarks for navigation in different ways. In this review, we propose a parsimonious four-part taxonomy for conceptualizing object location information during navigation. We begin by outlining object properties that appear to be important for a landmark to attain salience. We then systematically examine the different functions of obj...

  11. Dominance of the odometer over serial landmark learning in honeybee navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Randolf; Fuchs, Jacqueline; Nadler, Leonard; Weiss, Benjamin; Kumbischinski, Nicole; Adebiyi, Daniel; Hartfil, Sergej; Greggers, Uwe

    2010-08-01

    Honeybees use their visual flow field to measure flight distance. It has been suggested that the experience of serial landmarks encountered on the flight toward a feeding place contributes to distance estimation. Here, we address this question by tracing the flight paths of individual bees with a harmonic radar system. Bees were trained along an array of three landmarks (tents), and the distance between these landmarks was either increased or decreased under two test conditions. We find that absolute distance estimation dominates the search for the feeding place, but serial position effects are also found. In the latter case, bees search only or additionally at locations determined by serial experience of the landmarks.

  12. Pattern recognition of anatomical shapes in CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In medical image processing pattern recognition has become of major value in anatomical analysis and in computer aided information processing. Specifically, pattern recognition techniques simplify software development by means of which clinicians can manipulate anatomical relationships. As part of an overall CT pattern recognition system, a sequential edge tracking routine was devised together with a normalized Fourier descriptor analysis of identified shapes. A collection of shapes were extracted from CT scans of two patients and entered into an anatomic shape dictionary. This dictionary was employed in pattern matching experiments and in three-dimensional anatomical reconstruction. A sequential-edge tracking algorithm of high reliability, consistency, and image invariance, capable of utilizing heuristic and statistical rules, was demonstrated. Tests of pattern matching algorithms based on Fourier descriptors provided rapid and accurate body organ recognition of shapes extracted from de novo images using the shape dictionary. Results indicate that automated contour extraction and object recognition from cross-sectional images of human anatomy can be performed effectively, reliably, and rapidly. This abstract discusses an image processing environment that circumvents manual and subjective shape extraction, by substituting automatic and quantitative shape extraction, pattern matching and object recognition

  13. Based On Edge Extraction of ASM Automatic Landmark Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Liguo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Active Shape Model, the most time consuming and scientifically unsatisfactory part of building shape models is the labeling of the training images. Manually placing hundreds (in 2D of points on every image is both tedious and error prone. To reduce the burden, the combination of the image edge information and the traditional manual calibration methods have been developed. This method improves the calibration accuracy, and obtains more accurate statistical shape model and local texture model. Aiming at the characteristics of ASM modeling, this paper adopts a multiscale wavelet transform modulus maximum method of edge extraction, using the maximum variance method to obtain a threshold, after the use of connectivity judgment for each scale edge fusion. The simulation results show that, this algorithm can effectively reduce the burden, improve the modeling accuracy.

  14. Based On Edge Extraction of ASM Automatic Landmark Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Liguo; Li Xiaolin; Li Huijuan

    2012-01-01

    In the Active Shape Model, the most time consuming and scientifically unsatisfactory part of building shape models is the labeling of the training images. Manually placing hundreds (in 2D) of points on every image is both tedious and error prone. To reduce the burden, the combination of the image edge information and the traditional manual calibration methods have been developed. This method improves the calibration accuracy, and obtains more accurate statistical shape model and local texture...

  15. Use of deformed intensity distributions for on-line modification of image-guided IMRT to account for interfractional anatomic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent imaging studies have demonstrated that there can be significant changes in anatomy from day to day and over the course of radiotherapy as a result of daily positioning uncertainties and physiologic and clinical factors. There are a number of strategies to minimize such changes, reduce their impact, or correct for them. Measures to date have included improved immobilization of external and internal anatomy or adjustment of positions based on portal or ultrasound images. Perhaps the most accurate way is to use CT image-guided radiotherapy, for which the possibilities range from simple correction of setup based on daily CT images to on-line near real-time intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) replanning. In addition, there are numerous intermediate possibilities. In this paper, we report the development of one such intermediate method that takes into account anatomic changes by deforming the intensity distributions of each beam based on deformations of anatomy as seen in the beam's-eye-view. Methods and materials: The intensity distribution deformations are computed based on anatomy deformations discerned from the changes in the current image relative to a reference image (e.g., the pretreatment CT scan). First, a reference IMRT plan is generated based on the reference CT image. A new CT image is acquired using an in-room CT for every fraction. The anatomic structure contours are obtained for the new image. (For this article, these contours were manually drawn. When image guided IMRT methods are implemented, anatomic structure contours on subsequent images will likely be obtained with automatic or semiautomatic means. This could be achieved by, for example, first deforming the original CT image to match today's image, and then using the same deformation transformation to map original contours to today's image.) The reference intensity distributions for each beam are then deformed so that the projected geometric relationship within the beam's-eye-view between the anatomy (both target and normal tissues) extracted from the reference image and the reference intensity distribution is the same as (or as close as possible to) the corresponding relationship between anatomy derived from today's image and the newly deformed intensity distributions. To verify whether the dose distributions calculated using the deformed intensity distributions are acceptable for treatment as compared to the original intensity distributions, the deformed intensities are transformed into leaf sequences, which are then used to compute intensity and dose distributions expected to be delivered. The corresponding dose-volume histograms and dose-volume and dose-response indices are also computed. These data are compared with the corresponding data derived (a) from the original treatment plan applied to the original image, (b) from the original treatment plan applied to today's image, and (c) from a new full-fledged IMRT plan designed based on today's image. Results: Depending on the degree of anatomic changes, the use of an IMRT plan designed based on the original planning CT for the treatment of the current fraction could lead to significant differences compared to the intended dose distributions. CT-guided setup compared to the setup based on skin marks or bony landmarks may improve dose distributions somewhat. Replanning IMRT based on the current fraction's image yields the best physically deliverable plan (the 'gold standard'). For the prostate and head-and-neck examples studied as proof of principle, the results of deforming intensities within each beam based on the anatomy seen in the beam's-eye-view are a good approximation of full-fledged replanning compared with other alternatives. Conclusions: Our preliminary results encourage us to believe that deforming intensities taking into account deformation in the anatomy may be a rapid way to produce new treatment plans on-line in near real-time based on daily CT images. The methods we have developed need to be applied to a group of patients for both prostate and head-and-neck cases to co

  16. Maximized Posteriori Attributes Selection from Facial Salient Landmarks for Face Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Phalguni; Sing, Jamuna Kanta; Tistarelli, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a robust and dynamic face recognition technique based on the extraction and matching of devised probabilistic graphs drawn on SIFT features related to independent face areas. The face matching strategy is based on matching individual salient facial graph characterized by SIFT features as connected to facial landmarks such as the eyes and the mouth. In order to reduce the face matching errors, the Dempster-Shafer decision theory is applied to fuse the individual matching scores obtained from each pair of salient facial features. The proposed algorithm is evaluated with the ORL and the IITK face databases. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of the proposed face recognition technique also in case of partially occluded faces.

  17. Anatomical and Physiological Bases of Nociception

    OpenAIRE

    BENEDETTI, Fabrizio; POLLO, Antonella

    2007-01-01

    Il capitolo descrive le vie anatomiche che veicolano la sensibilità dolorifica, dai nocicettori alle aree corticali. Analizza le diverse componenti dell'esperienza dolorifica (discriminativa, emotiva...), mettendole in relazione all'anatomia. Descrive infine le vie discendenti che modulano negativamente le informazioni dolorifiche in entrata nel sistema nervoso centrale.

  18. Defining esophageal landmarks, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Kenneth; McMahon, Barry P; Celebi, Altay; Costamagna, Guido; Marchese, Michele; Clarke, John O; Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Savarino, Edoardo; Thomson, Mike; Souza, Rhonda F; Donohoe, Claire L; O'Farrell, Naoimh J; Reynolds, John V

    2013-10-01

    The following paper on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and Barrett's esophagus (BE) includes commentaries on defining esophageal landmarks; new techniques for evaluating upper esophageal sphincter (UES) tone; differential diagnosis of GERD, BE, and hiatal hernia (HH); the use of high-resolution manometry for evaluation of reflux; the role of fundic relaxation in reflux; the use of 24-h esophageal pH-impedance testing in differentiating acid from nonacid reflux and its potential inclusion in future Rome criteria; classification of endoscopic findings in GERD; the search for the cell origin that generates BE; and the relationship between BE, Barrett's carcinoma, and obesity. PMID:24117649

  19. Secondary Progressive and Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Leads to Motor-Related Decreased Anatomical Connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lyksborg, Mark; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Sørensen, Per S.; Blinkenberg, Morten; Parker, Geoff J. M.; Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Garde, Ellen; Larsen, Rasmus; Dyrby, Tim B

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) damages central white matter pathways which has considerable impact on disease-related disability. To identify disease-related alterations in anatomical connectivity, 34 patients (19 with relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS), 15 with secondary progressive MS (SP-MS) and 20 healthy subjects underwent diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) of the brain. Based on the dMRI, anatomical connectivity mapping (ACM) yielded a voxel-based metric reflecting the connectivity shared...

  20. Remote access to anatomical information: an integration between semantic knowledge and visual data.

    OpenAIRE

    Cerveri, P.; Masseroli, M.; Pinciroli, F

    2000-01-01

    A novel internet-based application is presented which provides access to anatomy knowledge through symbolic modality expressed by keywords taken from controlled or non-controlled terminology. The system is based on a database where anatomical concepts have been organized into a hierarchical framework. Along with term queries that allow retrieving concepts containing or exactly matching the used keyword, the system also provides semantic access to anatomical information. Queries can be setup, ...

  1. A hierarchical scheme for geodesic anatomical labeling of airway trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast and robust supervised algorithm for labeling anatomical airway trees, based on geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for a given tree are evaluated based on distances to a training set of labeled trees. In tree-space, the tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural way to automatically handle anatomical differences and noise. The algorithm is made efficient using a hierarchical approach, in which labels are assigned from the top down. We only use features of the airway centerline tree, which are relatively unaffected by pathology. A thorough leave-one-patient-out evaluation of the algorithm is made on 40 segmented airway trees from 20 subjects labeled by 2 medical experts. We evaluate accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Performance is statistically similar to the inter- and intra-expert agreement, and we found no significant correlation between COPD stage and labeling accuracy.

  2. Generalized metrics induced anatomical prior for MAP PET image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lijun; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Bian, Zhaoying; Chen, Wufan [Southern Medical Univ., Guangzhou (China). School of Biomedical Engineering; Ma, Jianhua [Southern Medical Univ., Guangzhou (China). School of Biomedical Engineering; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Liang, Zhengrong [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-07-01

    Information theoretic metrics, including mutual information (MI) and joint entropy (JE), have been investigated as priors to incorporate anatomical information in ill-posed positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. These metrics are generally based on the Shannon entropy. Meanwhile, in this paper, we proposed a generalized metrics induced anatomical prior for maximum a posteriori (MAP) PET reconstruction based on the generalized Shannon entropy metrics or Tsallis entropy. For the presented prior computation, a non-parametric method was used to estimate the joint probability density of the PET and MR image. Furthermore, we also developed an one-step-advance (OSA) MAP algorithm for PET image reconstruction with the presented prior regularization. Simulation results show that the presented novel prior has significantly improved the reconstructed PET image quality. (orig.)

  3. An anatomical signature for literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiras, Manuel; Seghier, Mohamed L; Baquero, Silvia; Estévez, Adelina; Lozano, Alfonso; Devlin, Joseph T; Price, Cathy J

    2009-10-15

    Language is a uniquely human ability that evolved at some point in the roughly 6,000,000 years since human and chimpanzee lines diverged. Even in the most linguistically impoverished environments, children naturally develop sophisticated language systems. In contrast, reading is a learnt skill that does not develop without intensive tuition and practice. Learning to read is likely to involve ontogenic structural brain changes, but these are nearly impossible to isolate in children owing to concurrent biological, environmental and social maturational changes. In Colombia, guerrillas are re-integrating into mainstream society and learning to read for the first time as adults. This presents a unique opportunity to investigate how literacy changes the brain, without the maturational complications present in children. Here we compare structural brain scans from those who learnt to read as adults (late-literates) with those from a carefully matched set of illiterates. Late-literates had more white matter in the splenium of the corpus callosum and more grey matter in bilateral angular, dorsal occipital, middle temporal, left supramarginal and superior temporal gyri. The importance of these brain regions for skilled reading was investigated in early literates, who learnt to read as children. We found anatomical connections linking the left and right angular and dorsal occipital gyri through the area of the corpus callosum where white matter was higher in late-literates than in illiterates; that reading, relative to object naming, increased the interhemispheric functional connectivity between the left and right angular gyri; and that activation in the left angular gyrus exerts top-down modulation on information flow from the left dorsal occipital gyrus to the left supramarginal gyrus. These findings demonstrate how the regions identified in late-literates interact during reading, relative to object naming, in early literates. PMID:19829380

  4. [The anatomical revolution and the transition of anatomical conception in late imperial china].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihn, Kyu Hwan

    2012-04-30

    This paper aimed to examine the anatomical revolution from Yilingaicuo (Correcting the Errors of Medicine) and Quantixinlun(Outline of Anatomy and Physiology) in late imperial China. As the cephalocentrism which the brain superintend human operation of the mind was diffused in China since 16th century, the cephalocentrism and the cardiocentrism had competed for the hegemony of anatomical conception. Because of the advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun, the cephalocentrism became the main stream in the anatomical conception. The supporters of the Wang Yangming's Xinxue(the Learning of Heart and Mind) argued that the heart was the central organ of perception, sensitivity, and morality of the human body in medicine since 16th century. Even reformist and revolutionary intellectuals like Tan sitong and Mao zedong who had supported the Wang Yangming's Xinxue embraced the cephalocentrism in the late 19th century and the early 20th century. May Fourth intellectuals had not obsessed metaphysical interpretation of human body any more in the New Culture Movement in 1910s. They regarded human body as the object of research and writing. The anatomy was transformed into the instrumental knowledge for mutilation of the body. Yilingaicuo challenged the traditional conception of body, and Chinese intellectuals drew interest in the anatomy knowledge based on real mutilation. Quantixinlun based on Western medicine fueled a controversy about anatomy. Though new knowledge of anatomy was criticized by traditional Chinese medical doctors from the usefulness and morality of anatomy, nobody disavowed new knowledge of anatomy from the institutionalization of Western medicine in medical school. The internal development of cephalocentrism and positivism had influence on anatomy in China since 16th century. The advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun provided the milestone of new anatomy, though both sides represented traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine respectively. They contributed to the development of new knowledge of anatomy, getting over the metaphysical system of knowledge. Based on the internal development of anatomy, Chinese anatomy was half century late than Japanese anatomy founded on Dutch anatomy. PMID:22739627

  5. Anatomic Correlates of Stereotypies in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Josephs, Keith A; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotypies are common in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) however the anatomical correlates of stereotypies are unknown. We therefore set out to compare patterns of grey matter volume loss in FTLD subjects with and without stereotypies. Subjects with a diagnosis of FTLD that met international consensus criteria were prospectively recruited and separated into those with and without stereotypies. MRI and cognitive measures were obtained and voxel-based morphometry was used to assess t...

  6. The aspects regarding Chrysanthemum vitro- and exvitroplantlets anatomical structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana PETRUS-VANCEA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was consecrate to observe the histoanatomical structure of roots stems and leafs of Chrysanthemum vitroplantlets, in their vitroculture period and of exvitroplantlets, at 30 days from their septic medium transfer. The registered observations were compared with those realized at similar organs level of greenhouse plants (control lot. The noted differences between vitroplantlets anatomical structure and that greenhouse plants had, in special, ontogenetic bases.

  7. Morphological and anatomical studies of Cyani herba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Chiru

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and anatomical investigation were carried out on stem, leaves, flowers and bracts of the species Centaurea cyanusL. The diagnostic parameters of vegetal product Cyani herbawere defined.

  8. An Evaluation of Cellular Neural Networks for the Automatic Identification of Cephalometric Landmarks on Digital Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Leonardi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several efforts have been made to completely automate cephalometric analysis by automatic landmark search. However, accuracy obtained was worse than manual identification in every study. The analogue-to-digital conversion of X-ray has been claimed to be the main problem. Therefore the aim of this investigation was to evaluate the accuracy of the Cellular Neural Networks approach for automatic location of cephalometric landmarks on softcopy of direct digital cephalometric X-rays. Forty-one, direct-digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained by a Siemens Orthophos DS Ceph and were used in this study and 10 landmarks (N, A Point, Ba, Po, Pt, B Point, Pg, PM, UIE, LIE were the object of automatic landmark identification. The mean errors and standard deviations from the best estimate of cephalometric points were calculated for each landmark. Differences in the mean errors of automatic and manual landmarking were compared with a 1-way analysis of variance. The analyses indicated that the differences were very small, and they were found at most within 0.59?mm. Furthermore, only few of these differences were statistically significant, but differences were so small to be in most instances clinically meaningless. Therefore the use of X-ray files with respect to scanned X-ray improved landmark accuracy of automatic detection. Investigations on softcopy of digital cephalometric X-rays, to search more landmarks in order to enable a complete automatic cephalometric analysis, are strongly encouraged.

  9. The Development of Landmark and Beacon Use in Young Children: Evidence from a Touchscreen Search Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jennifer E.

    2006-01-01

    Children ages 2, 3 and 4 years participated in a novel hide-and-seek search task presented on a touchscreen monitor. On beacon trials, the target hiding place could be located using a beacon cue, but on landmark trials, searching required the use of a nearby landmark cue. In Experiment 1, 2-year-olds performed less accurately than older children…

  10. 78 FR 69437 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Federal Regulations, that a meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board... Street NW., Washington, DC 20036. Agenda: The National Park System Advisory Board and its...

  11. Looking beyond the Boundaries: Time to Put Landmarks Back on the Cognitive Map?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Adina R.

    2011-01-01

    Since the proposal of Tolman (1948) that mammals form maplike representations of familiar environments, cognitive map theory has been at the core of debates on the fundamental mechanisms of animal learning and memory. Traditional formulations of cognitive map theory emphasize relations between landmarks and between landmarks and goal locations as…

  12. 36 CFR 13.1904 - Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark (KNHL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark (KNHL). 13.1904 Section 13.1904 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... National Park and Preserve § 13.1904 Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark (KNHL). A map showing...

  13. 36 CFR 65.9 - Withdrawal of National Historic Landmark designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... National Register criteria for evalution in 36 CFR 60.4, except if the property is redesignated on... Historic Landmark designation. 65.9 Section 65.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.9 Withdrawal of National...

  14. Posterior belly of the digastric muscle: An important landmark for various head and neck surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrinda Hari Ankolekar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: As the PBD muscle is an important surgical landmark, the present study adds to the existing knowledge about it. The present study has also included few newer landmarks, which were not given importance in the previous studies. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(2.000: 79-82

  15. Individualized Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Rabuck, Stephen J.; Middleton, Kellie K.; Maeda, Shugo; Fujimaki, Yoshimasa; Muller, Bart; Araujo, Paulo H.; Fu, Freddie H.

    2012-01-01

    Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) is a technique that continues to evolve. Good results have been established with respect to reducing anteroposterior laxity. However, these results have come into question because nonanatomic techniques have been ineffective at restoring knee kinematics and raised concerns that abnormal kinematics may impact long-term knee health. Anatomic ACL-R attempts to closely reproduce the patient's individual anatomic characteristics. Measu...

  16. Introducing International Journal of Anatomical Variations

    OpenAIRE

    Tunali S

    2008-01-01

    Welcome to International Journal of Anatomical Variations (IJAV) - an annual journal of anatomical variations and clinical anatomy case reports. After having a notable experience for eight years in NEUROANATOMY, we are pleased to introduce you IJAV. We are eventually announcing our new journal after three years of feasibility and background study period. We hope that IJAV will fill in the gap in anatomy journals’ bunch. IJAV is an annual, open access journal having electronic version only. De...

  17. Data Analysis and Publication of Landmark NIH Blood Pressure Study Confirm that Lower Blood Pressure Target Can Reduce ....

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... November 9, 2015 Data analysis and publication of landmark NIH blood pressure study confirm that lower blood ... supported researchers are reporting more details on a landmark study that announced preliminary findings in September showing ...

  18. Estimativas da composição anatômica da carcaça de frangos de corte com base no nível de proteína da ração e peso da carcaça / Estimation of the carcasses anatomical composition of broiler from diet quality and carcass weight

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    José Humberto Vilar da, Silva; Luís Fernando Teixeira, Albino; Adriana Helena do, Nascimento.

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de estimar as proporções dos cortes nobres da carcaça de frangos de corte pelo modelo linear. Foram utilizados 842 frangos machos da linhagem Avian Farms, de 22 a 42 dias de idade, distribuídos num delineamento inteiramente ao acaso em esquema fatorial [...] 3x4. Foram fornecidas rações formuladas à base de milho e farelo de soja para conter 2.900 kcal de EM e 15,43; 17,26; 19,60; e 22,60% de PB; 3.100 kcal de EM e 16,49; 18,45; 20,95; e 24,22% de PB; e 3300 kcal de EM e 17,55; 19,64; 22,30; e 25,78% de PB, totalizando doze tratamentos. Cada tratamento foi constituído por quatro repetições de 18 aves. Fortes correlações foram observadas entre o peso vivo aos 42 dias e o peso da carcaça (r = 0,958), o peso da carcaça e o peso de pernas (r = 0,991), peso de peito+osso+pele (r = 0,965) e peso de peito desossado (r = 0,950). A porcentagem de lipídio foi negativamente correlacionada com a porcentagem de umidade da carcaça (r = -0,880). A equação linear é recomendada para a predição dos componentes anatômicos da carcaça de frangos de corte. Abstract in english An experiment was carried out to estimate the relations between broiler carcass weight and thighs+drumsticks, breast+bone+skin, and breast meat by the linear model. Eight hundred and sixty and four male poultry of Arbor Acres strain, from 22 to 42 days of age, were assigned to a completely randomize [...] d design in 3x4factorial scheme. Corn and soybean meal based diets were prepared to contain 2900 kcal ME and 15.43; 17.26; 19.60; and 22.60% CP; 3,100 kcal ME and 16.49; 18.45; 20.95; and 24.22%CP; and 3300 kcal ME and 17.55; 19.64; 22.30; and 25.78% CP, resulting in twelve treatments. Each treatment was constituted of four replicates of 18 birds. High correlations were observed between live weight at 42 days old and carcass weight (r = 0.958), carcass weight and thighs+drumsticks (r = 0.991), breast+bone+skin (r = 0.965) and deboned breast meat weight (r = 0.950). The lipid percentage was negatively correlated to the moisture percentage (r = -0.880). The linear equation is recommended to estimate carcass anatomical components in broiler chickens.

  19. Estimativas da composição anatômica da carcaça de frangos de corte com base no nível de proteína da ração e peso da carcaça Estimation of the carcasses anatomical composition of broiler from diet quality and carcass weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Humberto Vilar da Silva

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de estimar as proporções dos cortes nobres da carcaça de frangos de corte pelo modelo linear. Foram utilizados 842 frangos machos da linhagem Avian Farms, de 22 a 42 dias de idade, distribuídos num delineamento inteiramente ao acaso em esquema fatorial 3x4. Foram fornecidas rações formuladas à base de milho e farelo de soja para conter 2.900 kcal de EM e 15,43; 17,26; 19,60; e 22,60% de PB; 3.100 kcal de EM e 16,49; 18,45; 20,95; e 24,22% de PB; e 3300 kcal de EM e 17,55; 19,64; 22,30; e 25,78% de PB, totalizando doze tratamentos. Cada tratamento foi constituído por quatro repetições de 18 aves. Fortes correlações foram observadas entre o peso vivo aos 42 dias e o peso da carcaça (r = 0,958, o peso da carcaça e o peso de pernas (r = 0,991, peso de peito+osso+pele (r = 0,965 e peso de peito desossado (r = 0,950. A porcentagem de lipídio foi negativamente correlacionada com a porcentagem de umidade da carcaça (r = -0,880. A equação linear é recomendada para a predição dos componentes anatômicos da carcaça de frangos de corte.An experiment was carried out to estimate the relations between broiler carcass weight and thighs+drumsticks, breast+bone+skin, and breast meat by the linear model. Eight hundred and sixty and four male poultry of Arbor Acres strain, from 22 to 42 days of age, were assigned to a completely randomized design in 3x4factorial scheme. Corn and soybean meal based diets were prepared to contain 2900 kcal ME and 15.43; 17.26; 19.60; and 22.60% CP; 3,100 kcal ME and 16.49; 18.45; 20.95; and 24.22%CP; and 3300 kcal ME and 17.55; 19.64; 22.30; and 25.78% CP, resulting in twelve treatments. Each treatment was constituted of four replicates of 18 birds. High correlations were observed between live weight at 42 days old and carcass weight (r = 0.958, carcass weight and thighs+drumsticks (r = 0.991, breast+bone+skin (r = 0.965 and deboned breast meat weight (r = 0.950. The lipid percentage was negatively correlated to the moisture percentage (r = -0.880. The linear equation is recommended to estimate carcass anatomical components in broiler chickens.

  20. Validation of simple quantification methods for {sup 18}F FP CIT PET Using Automatic Delineation of volumes of interest based on statistical probabilistic anatomical mapping and isocontour margin setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Il; Im, Hyung Jun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Jae Sung; Eo, Jae Seon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Euishin E.; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    {sup 18}F FP CIT positron emission tomography (PET) is an effective imaging for dopamine transporters. In usual clinical practice, {sup 18}F FP CIT PET is analyzed visually or quantified using manual delineation of a volume of interest (VOI) fir the stratum. in this study, we suggested and validated two simple quantitative methods based on automatic VOI delineation using statistical probabilistic anatomical mapping (SPAM) and isocontour margin setting. Seventy five {sup 18}F FP CIT images acquired in routine clinical practice were used for this study. A study-specific image template was made and the subject images were normalized to the template. afterwards, uptakes in the striatal regions and cerebellum were quantified using probabilistic VOI based on SPAM. A quantitative parameter, Q{sup SPAM,} was calculated to simulate binding potential. additionally, the functional volume of each striatal region and its uptake were measured in automatically delineated VOI using isocontour margin setting. Uptake volume product(Q{sup UVP)} was calculated for each striatal region. Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPw}as calculated for each visual grading and the influence of cerebral atrophy on the measurements was tested. Image analyses were successful in all the cases. Both the Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPw}ere significantly different according to visual grading (0.001). The agreements of Q{sup UVPa}nd Q{sup SPAMw}ith visual grading were slight to fair for the caudate nucleus (K= 0.421 and 0.291, respectively) and good to prefect to the putamen (K=0.663 and 0.607, respectively). Also, Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPh}ad a significant correlation with each other (0.001). Cerebral atrophy made a significant difference in Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPo}f the caudate nuclei regions with decreased {sup 18}F FP CIT uptake. Simple quantitative measurements of Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPs}howed acceptable agreement with visual grad-ing. although Q{sup SPAMi}n some group may be influenced by cerebral atrophy, these simple methods are expected to be effective in the quantitative analysis of F FP CIT PET in usual clinical practice.

  1. Landmark constrained registration of high-genus surfaces applied to vestibular system morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chengfeng; Wang, Defeng; Shi, Lin; Chu, Winnie C W; Cheng, Jack C Y; Lui, Lok Ming

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of the vestibular system (VS) is an important research topic in medical image analysis. VS is a sensory structure in the inner ear for the perception of spatial orientation. It is believed several diseases, such as the Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS), are due to the impairment of the VS function. The morphology of the VS is thus of great research significance. A major challenge is that the VS is a genus-3 surface. The high-genus topology of the VS poses great challenges to find accurate pointwise correspondences between the surfaces and whereby perform accurate shape analysis. In this paper, we present a method to obtain the landmark constrained diffeomorphic registration between the VS surfaces based on the quasi-conformal theory. Given a set of corresponding landmarks on the VS surfaces, a diffeomorphism between the VS surfaces that matches the features consistently can be obtained. The basic idea is to iteratively search for an admissible Beltrami coefficient, which is associated to our desired landmark matching registration. With the obtained surface registrations, vertex-wise morphometric analysis can be carried out. Two types of geometric features are used for shape comparison. One is the collection of homotopic loops on each canals of the VS, which can be used to measure the local thickness of the canals. From the homotopic loops, centerlines can be extracted. By examining the deviations of the centerlines from the best fit planes, bendings of the canals can be detected. The second geometric feature is the minimal surface enclosed by the homotopic loop. From the minimal surfaces of each homotopic loops, cross-sectional area of the canals can be evaluated. To study the local shape difference more comprehensively, a complete shape index, which is defined using the Beltrami coefficients and surface curvatures, is used. We test proposed registration method on 15 VS of normal control subjects and 12 VS of patients suffering from AIS. Experimental results show the efficacy and accuracy of the proposed algorithm to compute the VS surface registration. Shape analysis has also been carried out using the proposed geometric features and shape index, which reveals shape differences in the posterior canal between normal and diseased AIS groups. PMID:26069905

  2. Orbitozygomatic Approach: A Neurosurgical Approach Applied to the Anatomic Study of the Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available From an anatomical point of view, the orbit is usually approached by resecting its roof. In this paper, the authors introduced minor modifications to a widely used neurosurgical technique in order to study the anatomy of the orbit: that is, the orbitozygomatic approach. The orbitozygomatic approach was performed in 3 half-heads of adult formalin-fixed cadavers. Three skulls were used to identify anatomical landmarks. The approach must be performed on a half-head without calvaria. An incision to reaching the bone was made on the skin of the temporal region and a combined flap of skin and temporalis muscle was reclined. Finally, 3 osteotomies were performed with a saw: 1 at the level of the root of the zygoma and the temporal squama, 2 over the orbital rim, medial to the supraorbitalis foramen and 3 at the zygomatic-frontal junction. In this way, the superior and lateral walls of the orbit were exposed. The adaptation of the orbitozygomatic approach allowed a wide exposure of the orbit and constituted an example of cooperation between clinical and basic disciplines.

  3. The role of anatomic information in quantifying functional neuroimaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When using modern neuroimaging tools, such as CT, PET, SPECT, MRI and MEG, in brain research and brain diagnostics, there is a common need for including external anatomical information into the interpretation and analysis of data. This information may be used to aid the interpretation of structures in images from low resolution imaging tools. With high resolution tools it can help to identify resolved structures. It can also facilitate the merging of data from different modalities, or from different individuals. The anatomical information is often given as regions of interests (ROIs), which may be manually created from an anatomy rich image or automatically created from a standard template collection or from an atlas data base. Automatic methods will lead to a substantial reduction in bias and in size of the systematic errors. Functional ROIs can correspondingly be derived from functional images (usually PET or SPECT). Different aspects of these processes are discussed in the report. (authors)

  4. Marginal space learning for medical image analysis efficient detection and segmentation of anatomical structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yefeng

    2014-01-01

    Presents an award winning image analysis technology (Thomas Edison Patent Award, MICCAI Young Investigator Award) that achieves object detection and segmentation with state-of-the-art accuracy and efficiency Flexible, machine learning-based framework, applicable across multiple anatomical structures and imaging modalities Thirty five clinical applications on detecting and segmenting anatomical structures such as heart chambers and valves, blood vessels, liver, kidney, prostate, lymph nodes, and sub-cortical brain structures, in CT, MRI, X-Ray and Ultrasound.

  5. Conservation landmarks: bureau of biological survey and national biological service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, M.

    1995-01-01

    A century separates the recent development of the National Biological Service (NBS) and an early predecessor, the Bureau of Biological Survey (BBS). Both organizations were established at critical crossroads for the conservation of the nation's living biological resources and are conservation landmarks of their times. The BBS of the 192()'s was described as 'a government Bureau of the first rank, handling affairs of great scientific, educational, social, and above all, economic importance throughout the United States and its outlying possessions'' (Cameron 1929:144-145). This stature was achieved at a time of great social, economic, and ecological change. BBS had the vision to pioneer new approaches that led to enhanced understanding of the relation between people, other living things, and the environment. The NBS faces similar challenges to address the issues of the 1990's and beyond.

  6. Landmark constrained genus-one surface Teichmüller map applied to surface registration in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ka Chun; Gu, Xianfeng; Lui, Lok Ming

    2015-10-01

    We address the registration problem of genus-one surfaces (such as vertebrae bones) with prescribed landmark constraints. The high-genus topology of the surfaces makes it challenging to obtain a unique and bijective surface mapping that matches landmarks consistently. This work proposes to tackle this registration problem using a special class of quasi-conformal maps called Teichmüller maps (T-Maps). A landmark constrained T-Map is the unique mapping between genus-1 surfaces that minimizes the maximal conformality distortion while matching the prescribed feature landmarks. Existence and uniqueness of the landmark constrained T-Map are theoretically guaranteed. This work presents an iterative algorithm to compute the T-Map. The main idea is to represent the set of diffeomorphism using the Beltrami coefficients (BC). The BC is iteratively adjusted to an optimal one, which corresponds to our desired T-Map that matches the prescribed landmarks and satisfies the periodic boundary condition on the universal covering space. Numerical experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. The method has also been applied to register vertebrae bones with prescribed landmark points and curves, which gives accurate surface registrations. PMID:25977154

  7. Congenital neck masses: embryological and anatomical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahida Rasool

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neck masses are a common problem in paediatric age group. They tend to occur frequently and pose a diagnostic dilemma to the ENT surgeons. Although the midline and lateral neck masses differ considerably in their texture and presentation but the embryological perspective of these masses is not mostly understood along with the fundamental anatomical knowledge. The article tries to correlate the embryological, anatomical and clinical perspectives for the same. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 329-332

  8. Anatomical Volume Visualization with Weighted Distance Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwin, Thomas; Hittle, Brad; Shen, Han-Wei; Stredney, Don; Wiet, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    We describe the use of the weighted distance transform (WDT) to enhance applications designed for volume visualization of segmented anatomical datasets. The WDT is presented as a general technique to generate a derived characteristic of a scalar field that can be used in multiple ways during rendering. We obtain real-time interaction with the volume by calculating the WDT on the graphics card. Several examples of this technique as it applies to an application for teaching anatomical structures are detailed, including rendering embedded structures, fuzzy boundaries, outlining, and indirect lighting estimation. PMID:21841968

  9. Evaluation of association between mandibular crowding and some of anatomical indexes in skeletal Cl II 8-12 years old patient with mandibular deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirazi Mohsen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran ( mirahashemi@tums.ac.ir   Background and Aims: Nowadays patients refer to orthodontist for issue such as dental crowding and other aesthetic problems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the relationship between some of mandibular anatomical landmarks and dental crowding in the patient with skeletal Cl II due to mandibular deficiency.   Materials and Methods: 108 cases have been randomly selected out of patients with mandibular related Cl II problem associated with lower incisor crowding, out of orthodontic patient department of Tehran university of medical sciences. ANB, SNB, mandibular discrepancy, gonial angle, Sn-Go-Gn and IMPA was evaluated out of the data. Lateral cephalograms were used for this matter. The correlation between variables was evaluated by correlation test and after reviewing the data was analyzed using Normality test, the Pearson correlation coefficient was used for normally distributed variables.   Results: Corpus-ramus length ratio had a significant relationship with dental crowding (P?0.05 but there was no meaningful and significant relationship between other facial landmarks ( P = 0.26 .   Conclusion: there seems to be a slight relationship between facial landmarks and dental crowding in lower incisors. But further case control and clinical studies may be helpful in achieving more reliable data.

  10. 77 FR 44670 - Information Collection Activities: National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ...regarding the condition of designated landmarks. A questionnaire will be designed and used to collect information...condition data. Regional NPS staff contributed to the design of the questionnaire that is the subject of this request. II....

  11. Anatomical single bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Carmont, Michael R; Scheffler, Sven; Spalding, Tim; Brown, Jeremy; Sutton, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    We present a review of the literature looking at the anatomy of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament, the biomechanical aspects of ACL reconstruction, review the outcomes of single and double bundle ACL reconstruction and present the current techniques for anatomic single bundle reconstruction.

  12. Handbook of anatomical models for radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-01-01

    Covering the history of human model development, this title presents the major anatomical and physical models that have been developed for human body radiation protection, diagnostic imaging, and nuclear medicine therapy. It explores how these models have evolved and the role that modern technologies have played in this development.

  13. Hoffa's fat pad injuries and their relationship with anterior cruciate ligament tears: new observations based on MR imaging in patients and MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States); Chung, Christine B.; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States); Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    To determine the normal anatomic relationships of Hoffa's fat pad with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and with the frequency of Hoffa's fat pad abnormalities in ACL-deficient knees. Retrospective clinical study on patients and observational anatomic study on cadavers. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. MR imaging studies of the knees of 100 patients (21-48 years old) with or without arthroscopically proven tears of the ACL, performed at a single institution, were reviewed by two readers for abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad. Ten cadaveric knee specimens were studied with MR imaging and Faxitron radiographs, and by inspection of sections and histology. Alterations in Hoffa's fat pad on MR imaging were present in 64% (32/50) of patients with torn ACLs, and in 24% (12/50) of patients without a tear of the ACL (P < 0.05). Hoffa's fat pad inserted into the intercondylar notch in 50% (5/10) of cadaveric specimens, four in conjunction with the ligamentum mucosum and in one in an isolated fashion. Histological study demonstrated the composition of the ligamentum mucosum and Hoffa's fat pad and their course and insertion sites in the intercondylar notch. Abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad, such as focal and diffuse edema, tears, scars and synovial proliferation, are more common in knees with torn ACLs than in knees with intact ACLs. (orig.)

  14. Anatomical basis for sciatic nerve block at the knee level / Bases anatómicas para el bloqueo anestésico del nervio isquiático al nivel de la rodilla / Bases anatômicas para o bloqueio anestésico do nervo isquiático no nível do joelho

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fabiano Timbó, Barbosa; Tatiana Rosa Bezerra Wanderley, Barbosa; Rafael Martins da, Cunha; Amanda Karine Barros, Rodrigues; Fernando Wagner da Silva, Ramos; Célio Fernando de, Sousa-Rodrigues.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Recentemente a feitura de bloqueio do nervo isquiático tem sido revista devido ao potencial benéfico para analgesia pós-operatória e satisfação dos pacientes após o advento da ultrassonografia. O objetivo deste estudo foi descrever as relações anatômicas do nervo isquiáti [...] co na fossa poplítea para determinar a distância ideal em que a agulha deve ser posicionada para a feitura do bloqueio anestésico do nervo isquiático anterior a sua bifurcação em nervo tibial e fibular comum. MÉTODO: O trabalho foi feito por meio de dissecção de fossa poplítea de cadáveres humanos, fixados em formol a 10%, provenientes do Laboratório de Anatomia Humana dos departamentos de Morfologia da Universidade Federal de Alagoas e da Universidade de Ciências da Saúde de Alagoas. Obteve-se acesso ao nervo isquiático. RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas 44 fossas poplíteas. Observou-se a bifurcação do nervo isquiático em relação ao ápice da fossa. Houve bifurcação em 67,96% abaixo do ápice, 15,90% acima do ápice, 11,36% próxima ao ápice e 4,78% na região glútea. CONCLUSÕES: A bifurcação do nervo isquiático em seus ramos ocorre em vários níveis e a chance de se obter sucesso quando a agulha é usada entre 5 e 7 cm acima da fossa poplítea é de 95,22%. Abstract in spanish JUSTIFICACIÓN Y OBJETIVOS: Recientemente la realización de bloqueo del nervio isquiático ha sido nuevamente analizada debido al potencial beneficioso para la analgesia postoperatoria y por la satisfacción de los pacientes después del advenimiento de la ecografía. El objetivo de este estudio fue des [...] cribir las relaciones anatómicas del nervio isquiático en la fosa poplítea para determinar la distancia ideal en que la aguja debe ser posicionada para la realización del bloqueo anestésico del nervio isquiático anterior a su bifurcación en el nervio tibial y fibular común. MÉTODO: El trabajo se hizo por medio de la disección de la fosa poplítea de cadáveres humanos, empapados en formol al 10%, provenientes del Laboratorio de Anatomía Humana de los departamentos de Morfología de la Universidad Federal de Alagoas y de la Universidad de Ciencias de la Salud de Alagoas. Se obtuvo el acceso al nervio isquiático. RESULTADOS: Fueron analizadas 44 fosas poplíteas. Se observó la bifurcación del nervio isquiático con relación al ápice de la fosa. Hubo una bifurcación en un 67,96% por debajo del ápice, un 15,90% por encima del ápice, un 11,36% cercana al ápice y un 4,78% en la región glútea. CONCLUSIONES: La bifurcación del nervio isquiático en sus ramas se da en varios niveles y la probabilidad de que se obtenga éxito cuando la aguja se usa entre 5 y 7 cm por encima de la fosa poplítea es de un 95,22%. Abstract in english BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Recently, administration of sciatic nerve block has been revised due to the potential benefit for postoperative analgesia and patient satisfaction after the advent of ultrasound. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomical relations of the sciatic nerve in the po [...] pliteal fossa to determine the optimal distance the needle must be positioned in order to realize the sciatic nerve block anterior to its bifurcation into the tibial and common fibular nerve. METHOD: The study was conducted by dissection of human cadavers' popliteal fossa, fixed in 10% formalin, from the Laboratory of Human Anatomy and Morphology Departments of the Universidade Federal de Alagoas and Universidade de Ciências da Saúde de Alagoas. Access to the sciatic nerve was obtained. RESULTS: 44 popliteal fossa were analyzed. The bifurcation of the sciatic nerve in relation to the apex of the fossa was observed. There was bifurcation in: 67.96% below the apex, 15.90% above the apex, 11.36% near the apex, and 4.78% in the gluteal region. CONCLUSIONS: The sciatic nerve bifurcation to its branches occurs at various levels, and the chance to succeed when the needle is placed between 5 and 7 cm above the popliteal is 95.22%.

  15. Learning Compact Visual Descriptors for Low Bit Rate Mobile Landmark Search

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Ling-Yu; Peking University; Chen, Jie; Peking University; Ji, Rongrong; Peking University; Huang, Tiejun; Peking University; Gao, Wen; Peking University

    2013-01-01

    Coming with the ever growing computational power of mobile devices, mobile visual search have undergone an evolution in techniques and applications. A significant trend is low bit rate visual search, where compact visual descriptors are extracted directly over a mobile and delivered as queries rather than raw images to reduce the query transmission latency. In this article, we introduce our work on low bit rate mobile landmark search, in which a compact yet discriminative landmark image descr...

  16. Amarillo fish (Girardinichthys multiradiatus) use visual landmarks to orient in space

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, TB; Garcia, CM

    2003-01-01

    Fish responsiveness to visual stimuli has been studied extensively in contexts such as female mate choice, predator inspection and schooling, yet surprisingly little work has been conducted on visual orientation in space in fish. Here we report on an experiment designed to test whether Amarillo fish can learn to find a goal within a maze more effectively in the presence of local visual landmarks than otherwise. We found that: (a) Amarillo fish can use landmarks to locate a goal, (b) there was...

  17. Interspecific differences in response to novel landmarks in bumblebees (Bombus sp.)

    OpenAIRE

    Goulson, Dave; Darvill, Ben; Ellis, Jon; Knight, Mairi; Hanley, Mick

    2004-01-01

    We provide evidence for interspecific differences in the behaviour of bumblebees which suggests that there may be important differences in the way that they navigate. Bumblebees commonly investigate the novel landmark presented by a human standing in open countryside. When doing so they perform a characteristic flight similar to that observed when a naïve bee first leaves the nest, suggesting that they are memorising the location of an unfamiliar landmark. We compare the frequency with which ...

  18. Effects of image enhancement on reliability of landmark identification in digital cephalometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Oshagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although digital cephalometric radiography is gaining popularity in orthodontic practice, the most important source of error in its tracing is uncertainty in landmark identification. Therefore, efforts to improve accuracy in landmark identification were directed primarily toward the improvement in image quality. One of the more useful techniques of this process involves digital image enhancement which can increase overall visual quality of image, but this does not necessarily mean a better identification of landmarks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of digital image enhancements on reliability of landmark identification. Materials and Methods: Fifteen common landmarks including 10 skeletal and 5 soft tissues were selected on the cephalograms of 20 randomly selected patients, prepared in Natural Head Position (NHP. Two observers (orthodontists identified landmarks on the 20 original photostimulable phosphor (PSP digital cephalogram images and 20 enhanced digital images twice with an intervening time interval of at least 4 weeks. The x and y coordinates were further analyzed to evaluate the pattern of recording differences in horizontal and vertical directions. Reliability of landmarks identification was analyzed by paired t test. Results: There was a significant difference between original and enhanced digital images in terms of reliability of points Ar and N in vertical and horizontal dimensions, and enhanced images were significantly more reliable than original images. Identification of A point, Pogonion and Pronasal points, in vertical dimension of enhanced images was significantly more reliable than original ones. Reliability of Menton point identification in horizontal dimension was significantly more in enhanced images than original ones. Conclusion: Direct digital image enhancement by altering brightness and contrast can increase reliability of some landmark identification and this may lead to more accurate cephalometric analysis.

  19. An Evaluation of Cellular Neural Networks for the Automatic Identification of Cephalometric Landmarks on Digital Images

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalia Leonardi; Daniela Giordano; Francesco Maiorana

    2009-01-01

    Several efforts have been made to completely automate cephalometric analysis by automatic landmark search. However, accuracy obtained was worse than manual identification in every study. The analogue-to-digital conversion of X-ray has been claimed to be the main problem. Therefore the aim of this investigation was to evaluate the accuracy of the Cellular Neural Networks approach for automatic location of cephalometric landmarks on softcopy of direct digital cephalometric X-rays. Forty-one, di...

  20. Reliability and reproducibility of three-dimensional cephalometric landmarks using CBCT: a systematic review

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Cinthia de Oliveira, LISBOA; Daniele, MASTERSON; Andréa Fonseca Jardim, MOTTA; Alexandre Trindade, MOTTA.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim of this study was to review the reliability and reproducibility of 3D-CBCT (cone beam computed tomography) cephalometric landmark identification. Methods : Electronic databases (Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science) were searched for papers published from 1998 to October 2014. Specifi [...] c strategies were developed for each database, with the guidance of a librarian. Two reviewers independently analyzed the titles and abstracts for inclusion. The articles that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for full-text reading, and the selected articles went through methodological quality evaluation. After the exclusion of repeated articles, the titles of the remaining ones were read and 1,328 of them were excluded. The abstracts of 173 articles were read, of which 43 were selected, read in full and submitted to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Fourteen articles or studies with reliable methodology and reproducibility remained. The data were collected, organized into figures and analyzed for determination of the reliability and reproducibility of the three-dimensional cephalometric landmarks. Results : Overall, the landmarks on the median sagittal line and dental landmarks had the highest reliability, while the landmarks on the condyle, porion and the orbitale presented lower levels of reliability. Point S must be marked in the multiplanar views associated with visualization in 3D reconstruction. Further studies are necessary for evaluating soft tissue landmarks.

  1. An Effect of Landmarks on Territory Shape in a Convict Cichlid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Dai, Yao

    2015-12-01

    We determine size, shape and location for a territory that is optimal in the sense of minimizing defense costs, when a given proportion of the boundary is landmarked and its primary benefit in terms of fitness is greater ease of detecting intruders across it. Increasing the landmarked proportion of boundary causes the optimal configuration to be smaller and more elongated, and to be located with its center further from the nest, so that the nest is closer to the landmarked boundary. These predictions accord with observations in a recent study of the convict cichlid Amatitlania siquia. Our results thus confirm the consistency of the observed behavior with the hypothesis that A. siquia designs its territory to make intruders easier to spot. Our results also lead us to conjecture that moving the landmark proportionately closer to or further away from the nest would have yielded essentially the same outcome in this study, because the optimal configuration depends only on the angle subtended by the landmark at the nest and hence only on the length of the landmark relative to its distance from the nest, as opposed to its absolute value. PMID:26621358

  2. Ultrasound Guided Internal Jugular Venous Cannulation: Comparison with Land-Mark Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare real-time ultrasonography-guided technique versus the traditional land-mark technique for internal Jugular venous cannulation. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Anaesthesia, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from September 2013 to July 2014. Methodology:Atotal of 200 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned using either real-time ultrasound-guided technique or land-mark technique. Access time, number of attempts until successful cannulation, complications and the demographics of each patient were recorded. Results:Access time was significantly less in real-time ultrasound group (34.95 ± 11.47 vs. 146.59 ± 40.20 seconds, p < 0.001). Cannulation was performed in first attempt in 99 percentage of patients in ultrasound group as compared to 89 percentage of landmark group. Complication rate was significantly higher in the land-mark group than in the ultrasound-guided group. Carotid artery puncture rate (9 percentage vs. 1 percentage) and haematoma formation (7 percentage vs. 0 percentage) were more frequent in the land-mark group than in the ultrasound-guided group. Brachial plexus irritation was also more in land-mark group (6 percentage vs. 0 percentage). Conclusion:Access time, failure rate and procedure related complications are reduced when real-time ultrasonography is used to cannulate internal Jugular vein. (author)

  3. How you get there from here: interaction of visual landmarks and path integration in human navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mintao; Warren, William H

    2015-06-01

    How do people combine their sense of direction with their use of visual landmarks during navigation? Cue-integration theory predicts that such cues will be optimally integrated to reduce variability, whereas cue-competition theory predicts that one cue will dominate the response direction. We tested these theories by measuring both accuracy and variability in a homing task while manipulating information about path integration and visual landmarks. We found that the two cues were near-optimally integrated to reduce variability, even when landmarks were shifted up to 90°. Yet the homing direction was dominated by a single cue, which switched from landmarks to path integration when landmark shifts were greater than 90°. These findings suggest that cue integration and cue competition govern different aspects of the homing response: Cues are integrated to reduce response variability but compete to determine the response direction. The results are remarkably similar to data on animal navigation, which implies that visual landmarks reset the orientation, but not the precision, of the path-integration system. PMID:25944773

  4. Configurational salience of landmarks: an analysis of sketch maps using Space Syntax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stülpnagel, Rul; Frankenstein, Julia

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a visibility graph analysis (a Space Syntax method) of a virtual environment to examine how the configurational salience of global and local landmarks (i.e., their relative positions in the environment) as compared to their visual salience affects the probability of their depiction on sketch maps. Participants of two experimental conditions produced sketch maps from memory after exploration with a layout map or without a map, respectively. Participants of a third condition produced sketch maps in parallel to exploration. More detailed sketch maps were produced in the third condition, but landmarks with higher configurational salience were depicted more frequently across all experimental conditions. Whereas the inclusion of global landmarks onto sketch maps was best predicted by their size, both visual salience and isovist size (i.e., the area a landmark was visible from) predicted the frequency of depiction for local landmarks. Our findings imply that people determine the relevance of landmarks not only by their visual, but even more by their configurational salience. PMID:26239756

  5. 3D geometrical segmentation and reconstruction of anatomical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, G.; Flores, C.; Martinez, A.; Cosias, P.

    2005-04-01

    In this paper an improved method for 3D surface reconstruction from 2D images together with the 2D/3D segmentation method is presented. The method aims to model and parameterise anatomical structures previously segmented from medical images. The whole automatic method may be divided into segmentation and reconstruction, which is carried out in four steps: 1) Geodesic based segmentation of the anatomical structures under consideration, 2) Contour representation and simplification based on Douglas-Peucker algorithm, 3) Global 3D incremental Delaunay Triangulation and 4) a final sculpting process of the non-object tetrahedral. The sculpting process is based on the spatial information and contour parameterisation obtained in the segmentation stage. Our 3D reconstruction method is global and free of parameters, which is not the case of other 3D reconstruction techniques. Moreover, it allows to include at any time vertex and contour points information. Results for CT and MR images are presented. Geodesic 3D based segmentation is compared to the reconstruction result. A comparison between 3D reconstructions and 3D segmentation is presented.

  6. Landmark-free geometric methods in biological shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Patrice; Hass, Joel

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach for computing a distance between two shapes embedded in three-dimensional space. We take as input a pair of triangulated genus zero surfaces that are topologically equivalent to spheres with no holes or handles, and construct a discrete conformal map f between the surfaces. The conformal map is chosen to minimize a symmetric deformation energy Esd(f) which we introduce. This measures the distance of f from an isometry, i.e. a non-distorting correspondence. We show that the energy of the minimizing map gives a well-behaved metric on the space of genus zero surfaces. In contrast to most methods in this field, our approach does not rely on any assignment of landmarks on the two surfaces. We illustrate applications of our approach to geometric morphometrics using three datasets representing the bones and teeth of primates. Experiments on these datasets show that our approach performs remarkably well both in shape recognition and in identifying evolutionary patterns, with success rates similar to, and in some cases better than, those obtained by expert observers. PMID:26631331

  7. Computer tomographic imaging and anatomic correlation of the human brain: A comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is of the greatest importance to the radiologist, the neurologist and the neurosurgeon to be able to localize topographically a pathological brain process on the CT scan as precisely as possible. For that purpose, the identification of as many anatomical structures as possible on the CT scan image are necessary and indispensable. In this atlas a great number of detailed anatomical data on frontal horizontal CT scan sections, each being only 2 mm thick, are indicated, e.g. the cortical gyri, the basal ganglia, details of the white matter, extracranial muscles and blood vessels, parts of the base and the vault of the skull, etc. The very precise topographical description of the numerous CT scan images was realized by the author by confrontation of these images with the corresponding anatomical sections of the same brain specimen, performed by an original technique

  8. PAVA: Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics for Mapping of Tissue-Specific Concentration and Time-Course Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development and implementation of a Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics tool (PAVA), a web browser-based application, used to visualize experimental/simulated chemical time-course data (dosimetry), epidemiological data and Physiologically-Annotated Data ...

  9. Computer-assisted analysis of anatomical relationships of the ethmoidal foramina and optic canal along the medial orbital wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Servet; Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Kazak, Zuhal; Govsa, Figen

    2015-11-01

    Typically, the medial orbital wall contains an anterior ethmoidal foramen (EF) and a posterior EF, but may also have multiple EFs transmitting the arteries and nerves between the orbit and the anterior cranial fossa. The aim of this study is to determine a patient-friendly landmark of the medial orbital wall and to specify a precise location of the ethmoidal foramens (EF) in order to standardize certain anatomical marks as safe ethmoidal arteries. Orientation points on the anterior ethmoidal foramen (AEF), posterior ethmoidal foramen (PEF) and middle ethmoidal foramen (MEF) were investigated in 262 orbits. Using a software program, distances between each foramen and the midpoint of the anterior lacrimal crest (ALC), the optic canal (OC), and some important angles were measured. The EFs were identified as single in 0.8 %, double in 73.7 %, triple 24,4 % and quadruple in 1.1 % specimens. The mean distances between ALC and AEF, ALC and PEF and ALC and MEF were 27.7, 10.6, and 12.95 mm, respectively. The distances from ALC-AEF, AEF-PEF, and PEF-OC were 27.7 ± 2.8, 10.6 ± 3.3, 5.4 ± 1 mm. The angles from the plane of the EF to the medial border of the OC were calculated as 13.2° and 153°, respectively. The angle from the AEF to the medial border of the OC was based on the plane between the ALC and AEF was 132°. The occurrence of multiple EF with an incidence of 25 % narrows the borders of the safe region in the medial orbital wall. Safe distance of the ALC-EF was measured as 22.1 mm on medial wall. The line of the location of the EF was calculated 16.2 mm. In this study, it was possible to investigate the variability of the orbital orifice of the EF and the feasibility of the EA, to observe various angles of the orbital wall bones and to calculate the lengths of some parameters with the help of certain software. PMID:25367707

  10. Femoral arterial puncture: comparison of using the inguinal crease and bony landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tried to compare the accuracy of using bony landmarks and inguinal crease landmarks for performing femoral artery puncture and to determine an ideal puncture site. We studied ninety consecutive patients who underwent femoral arterial puncture for performing angiogram. For the evaluation of bony landmarks, the pelvis and inguinal areas were divided into 8 zones according to 7 lines that were drawn parallel to the line drawn between the anterior superior iliac spine and the pubic tubercle. For evaluation of the inguinal crease as a landmark, the 8 zones above and 4 zones below the inguinal crease were determined. The zones were divided by 11 lines drawn parallel to the inguinal crease, and the interval between each line was 1 cm. Locations of the inguinal ligament and femoral bifurcation were recorded for every patient according to the above zones, and an ideal zone for the femoral arterial puncture was decided upon. The ideal zone was considered if the locations of all of inguinal ligaments were above the zone and the least possibility to puncture was below the femoral bifurcation. On the bony landmark, the femoral bifurcations were located at zone 3 in 1 patient (1.1%), at zone 4 in 2 patients (2.2%), at zone 5 in 3 patients (3.3%), at zone 6 in 24 patients (26.7%), and at zone 7 in 44 patients (48.9%). Inguinal ligaments were at zone 1 in 2 patient (3.0%), at zone 2 in 34 patients (50.7%), at zone 3 in 25 patients (37.3%), and at zone 4 in 6 patients (8.9%). When the inguinal creases were used as a landmark, the femoral bifurcations were located at zone 4 in 4 patients (4.4%), at zone 3 in 19 patients (21.1%). at zone 2 in 30 patients (33.3%), at zone 1 in 19 patients (21.1%), at zone -1 in 13 patients (14.4%), at zone -2 in 3 patients (3.3%) and at zone -4 in 2 patients (2.2%). Inguinal ligaments were at zone 8 in 7 patients (10.4%), at zone 7 in 11 patients (16.4%), at zone 6 in 19 patients (28.4%), at zone 5 in 20 patients (29.9%), at zone 4 in 7 patients (10.4%), and at zone 3 in 3 patients (4.5%). Therefore, the best zone for femoral arterial puncture was zone 5 with using bony landmarks and zone 2 with using inguinal crease landmarks. In terms of zone 5 on the bony landmark, every locations of inguinal ligaments was above it and 84 patients (93.4%) had their femoral bifurcation below it, excluding the 6 patients who had their femoral bifurcations at zones 3, 4, and 5. Therefore, zone 5 with using the bony landmarks was a good indicator for femoral arterial puncture. In case of zone 2 on the inguinal crease landmark, although every location of the inguinal ligament was above it, 53 patients (58.8%) had their femoral bifurcation above it at zone 4, 3, and 2. So, it was not a good indicator for femoral arterial puncture. Bony landmarks are more accurate indicators for performing femoral arterial puncture than the inguinal crease landmark. Zone 5 on the bony landmark is an ideal location for femoral arterial puncture

  11. Individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eck, Carola F; Widhalm, Harrald; Murawski, Christopher; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often seen in young participants in sports such as soccer, football, and basketball. Treatment options include conservative management as well as surgical intervention, with the goal of enabling the patient to return to cutting and pivoting sports and activities. Individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction is a surgical technique that tailors the procedure to the individual patient using preoperative measurements on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative measurement to map the patients' native ACL anatomy in order to replicate it as closely as possible. Anatomic ACL reconstruction, therefore, is defined as reconstruction of the ACL to its native dimensions, collagen orientation, and insertion site. The surgical reconstruction is followed by a specific rehabilitation protocol that is designed to enable the patient to regain muscle strength and proprioception while facilitating healing of the reconstructed ACL prior to the patient's returning to sports activities. PMID:25684559

  12. Training models of anatomic shape variability

    OpenAIRE

    Merck, Derek; Tracton, Gregg; Saboo, Rohit; Levy, Joshua; Chaney, Edward; Pizer, Stephen; Joshi, Sarang

    2008-01-01

    Learning probability distributions of the shape of anatomic structures requires fitting shape representations to human expert segmentations from training sets of medical images. The quality of statistical segmentation and registration methods is directly related to the quality of this initial shape fitting, yet the subject is largely overlooked or described in an ad hoc way. This article presents a set of general principles to guide such training. Our novel method is to jointly estimate both ...

  13. Ipsilesional neglect: behavioural and anatomical features

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, M; NA, D.; Kim, G; ADAIR, J; Lee, K.; Heilman, K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To learn more about the behavioural and anatomical features of ipsilesional neglect.?METHODS—Thirty consecutive patients with spatial neglect were tested on cancellation and line bisection tasks. To learn if patients with ipsilesional neglect demonstrate the sensory-attentional or motor-intentional type of neglect, a video apparatus was used that dissociates these determinants.?RESULTS—Five patients showed evidence of ipsilesional neglect. This phenomenon was...

  14. Procedure Planning: Anatomical Determinants of Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Hanratty, Colm; Walsh, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary practice there are three main methods that can be employed when attempting to open a chronic total occlusion (CTO) of a coronary artery; antegrade or retrograde wire escalation, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde dissection re-entry. This editorial will attempt to clarify the anatomical features that can be identified to help when deciding which of these strategies to employ initially and help understand the reasons for this decision.

  15. Bifid Rib: Anatomical Considerations in Three Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Wu-Chul; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Dae-Kyoon; Koh, Ki-Seok

    2009-01-01

    The present study involved a detailed investigation of 3 cases of bifid rib, focusing on anatomical features, and classified them into 2 types. The bifid ribs were in the right fourth rib of all 3 male cadavers. The upper intercostal spaces of the fourth bifid rib were considerably narrowed, whereas the lower intercostal spaces were widened. Although the size and shape of the bifid space between the upper and lower divisions of the bifid rib were different, the intercostal muscles were presen...

  16. Altered Functional and Anatomical Connectivity in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Camchong, Jazmin; MacDonald, Angus W.; Bell, Christopher; Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is characterized by a lack of integration between thought, emotion, and behavior. A disruption in the connectivity between brain processes may underlie this schism. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were used to evaluate functional and anatomical brain connectivity in schizophrenia. Methods: In all, 29 chronic schizophrenia patients (11 females, age: mean = 41.3, SD = 9.28) and 29 controls (11 females, age: mean = 41.1, S...

  17. REPORT OF A RARE ANATOMIC VARIANT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Brucker, Y; Ilsen, B; Muylaert, C; Goethals, L; Nieboer, K; Fares, A; Jager, T; de Mey, J

    2015-01-01

    We report the CT findings in a case of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) from the left upper lobe in an adult. PAPVR is an anatomic variant in which one to three pulmonary veins drain into the right atrium or its tributaries, rather than into the left atrium. This results in a left-to-right shunt with varying clinical presentation. These can range from asymptomatic patients to advanced cardiac failure.

  18. 3-D Facial Landmark Localization With Asymmetry Patterns and Shape Regression from Incomplete Local Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukno, Federico M; Waddington, John L; Whelan, Paul F

    2015-09-01

    We present a method for the automatic localization of facial landmarks that integrates nonrigid deformation with the ability to handle missing points. The algorithm generates sets of candidate locations from feature detectors and performs combinatorial search constrained by a flexible shape model. A key assumption of our approach is that for some landmarks there might not be an accurate candidate in the input set. This is tackled by detecting partial subsets of landmarks and inferring those that are missing, so that the probability of the flexible model is maximized. The ability of the model to work with incomplete information makes it possible to limit the number of candidates that need to be retained, drastically reducing the number of combinations to be tested with respect to the alternative of trying to always detect the complete set of landmarks. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method in the face recognition grand challenge database, where we obtain average errors of approximately 3.5 mm when targeting 14 prominent facial landmarks. For the majority of these our method produces the most accurate results reported to date in this database. Handling of occlusions and surfaces with missing parts is demonstrated with tests on the Bosphorus database, where we achieve an overall error of 4.81 and 4.25 mm for data with and without occlusions, respectively. To investigate potential limits in the accuracy that could be reached, we also report experiments on a database of 144 facial scans acquired in the context of clinical research, with manual annotations performed by experts, where we obtain an overall error of 2.3 mm, with averages per landmark below 3.4 mm for all 14 targeted points and within 2 mm for half of them. The coordinates of automatically located landmarks are made available on-line. PMID:25314716

  19. Visual motion-sensitive neurons in the bumblebee brain convey information about landmarks during a navigational task

    OpenAIRE

    Mertes, Marcel; Dittmar, Laura; Egelhaaf, Martin; Boeddeker, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Bees use visual memories to find the spatial location of previously learnt food sites. Characteristic learning flights help acquiring these memories at newly discovered foraging locations where landmarks—salient objects in the vicinity of the goal location—can play an important role in guiding the animal's homing behavior. Although behavioral experiments have shown that bees can use a variety of visual cues to distinguish objects as landmarks, the question of how landmark features are encoded...

  20. Anatomical MRI with an atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Savukov, I

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI is a promising method for inexpensive medical imaging with various additional advantages over conventional instruments such as low weight, low power, portability, absence of artifacts from metals, and high contrast. Anatomical ULF MRI has been successfully implemented with SQUIDs, but SQUIDs have the drawback of cryogen requirement. Atomic magnetometers have sensitivity comparable to SQUIDs and can be in principle used for ULF MRI to replace SQUIDs. Unfortunately some problems exist due to the sensitivity of atomic magnetometers to magnetic field and gradients. At low frequency, noise is also substantial and a shielded room is needed for improving sensitivity. In this paper, we show that at 85 kHz, the atomic magnetometer can be used to obtain anatomical images. This is the first demonstration of any use of atomic magnetometers for anatomical MRI. The demonstrated resolution is 1.1x1.4 mm2 in about six minutes of acquisition with SNR of 10. Some applications of the method are discuss...

  1. Anatomic variation of cranial parasympathetic ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Siéssere

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Having broad knowledge of anatomy is essential for practicing dentistry. Certain anatomical structures call for detailed studies due to their anatomical and functional importance. Nevertheless, some structures are difficult to visualize and identify due to their small volume and complicated access. Such is the case of the parasympathetic ganglia located in the cranial part of the autonomic nervous system, which include: the ciliary ganglion (located deeply in the orbit, laterally to the optic nerve, the pterygopalatine ganglion (located in the pterygopalatine fossa, the submandibular ganglion (located laterally to the hyoglossus muscle, below the lingual nerve, and the otic ganglion (located medially to the mandibular nerve, right beneath the oval foramen. The aim of this study was to present these structures in dissected anatomic specimens and perform a comparative analysis regarding location and morphology. The proximity of the ganglia and associated nerves were also analyzed, as well as the number and volume of fibers connected to them. Human heads were dissected by planes, partially removing the adjacent structures to the point we could reach the parasympathetic ganglia. With this study, we concluded that there was no significant variation regarding the location of the studied ganglia. Morphologically, our observations concur with previous classical descriptions of the parasympathetic ganglia, but we observed variations regarding the proximity of the otic ganglion to the mandibular nerve. We also observed that there were variations regarding the number and volume of fiber bundles connected to the submandibular, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia.

  2. Anatomic variation of cranial parasympathetic ganglia

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Selma, Siéssere; Mathias, Vitti; Luiz Gustavo de, Sousa; Marisa, Semprini; Mamie Mizusaki, Iyomasa; Simone Cecílio Hallak, Regalo.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Having broad knowledge of anatomy is essential for practicing dentistry. Certain anatomical structures call for detailed studies due to their anatomical and functional importance. Nevertheless, some structures are difficult to visualize and identify due to their small volume and complicated access. [...] Such is the case of the parasympathetic ganglia located in the cranial part of the autonomic nervous system, which include: the ciliary ganglion (located deeply in the orbit, laterally to the optic nerve), the pterygopalatine ganglion (located in the pterygopalatine fossa), the submandibular ganglion (located laterally to the hyoglossus muscle, below the lingual nerve), and the otic ganglion (located medially to the mandibular nerve, right beneath the oval foramen). The aim of this study was to present these structures in dissected anatomic specimens and perform a comparative analysis regarding location and morphology. The proximity of the ganglia and associated nerves were also analyzed, as well as the number and volume of fibers connected to them. Human heads were dissected by planes, partially removing the adjacent structures to the point we could reach the parasympathetic ganglia. With this study, we concluded that there was no significant variation regarding the location of the studied ganglia. Morphologically, our observations concur with previous classical descriptions of the parasympathetic ganglia, but we observed variations regarding the proximity of the otic ganglion to the mandibular nerve. We also observed that there were variations regarding the number and volume of fiber bundles connected to the submandibular, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia.

  3. A rare anatomic variation of the chorda tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalc?o?lu, M Tayyar; Köse, Evren; Bay?nd?r, Tuba; Duman, Serdar

    2011-01-01

    The chorda tympani is an important anatomical structure in the tympanic cavity. It may have some anatomic variations. Its anatomic variations are of interest in certain otologic surgical procedures. There are limited reports in the literature about the variations of the chorda tympani. A 49-year-old female patient was refered to our clinic because of conductive hearing loss and tympanic membran perforation in the right ear. During the tympanoplasty surgery, when the tympanomastoid flap was elevated, the chorda tympani was seen between flap and bone as a non-described anatomic variation. This article present a non-described anatomic variation of the chorda tympani. PMID:21595623

  4. Anatomical relation between anterior ethmoidal sinus and lacrimal sac fossa on high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the anatomical relation between anterior ethmoidal sinus and the lacrimal sac fossa, and thus help prevent complications during dacryocystorhinostomy. Fifty three people without previous history of trauma, surgery, or paranasal sinus disease were randomly selected, and the 106 lacrimal sac fossas of these subjects were evaluated by high resolution CT. A series of three 2-mm thick axial sections at least 2mm from the inferior orbital wall were obtained. The bony landmarks of the lacrimal sac fossa were established and the location of the most anterior ethmoid sinus was classified as one of three types. In type 1, no sinuses were anterior to the posterior lacrimal crest. While in type 2, sinuses extended anterior to this crest but remained behind the suture at the anterior edge of the lacrimal bone. In type 3, sinuses extended into the frontal process of the maxilla, anterior to the lacrimal bone suture. In addition, the category of both orbits of the same patient was compared. Among the 106 orbits examined, only seven (6.6%) were classified as type 1, with no ethmoid air cells postioned under the lacrimal sac fossa. Seventy six (71.7%) qualified as type 2, while the remaining 23 (21.7%) were type 3, demonstration anterior ethmoid air cells within the nasal process of the maxilla. The position of the air cells was symmetric in 41 of the 53 subjects (77.4%) and asymmetric in 12 (22.6%). In cases involving surgery of the lacrimal sac fossa, such as dacryocystorhinostomy, a knowledge of the consistent anatomic relationship between the anterior ethmoidal sinus and the lacrimal sac fossa is invaluable

  5. Accuracy of three-dimensional, paper-based models generated using a low-cost, three-dimensional printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Raphael; Szymor, Piotr; Kozakiewicz, Marcin

    2014-12-01

    Our study aimed to determine the accuracy of a low-cost, paper-based 3D printer by comparing a dry human mandible to its corresponding three-dimensional (3D) model using a 3D measuring arm. One dry human mandible and its corresponding printed model were evaluated. The model was produced using DICOM data from cone beam computed tomography. The data were imported into Maxilim software, wherein automatic segmentation was performed, and the STL file was saved. These data were subsequently analysed, repaired, cut and prepared for printing with netfabb software. These prepared data were used to create a paper-based model of a mandible with an MCor Matrix 300 printer. Seventy-six anatomical landmarks were chosen and measured 20 times on the mandible and the model using a MicroScribe G2X 3D measuring arm. The distances between all the selected landmarks were measured and compared. Only landmarks with a point inaccuracy less than 30% were used in further analyses. The mean absolute difference for the selected 2016 measurements was 0.36 ± 0.29 mm. The mean relative difference was 1.87 ± 3.14%; however, the measurement length significantly influenced the relative difference. The accuracy of the 3D model printed using the paper-based, low-cost 3D Matrix 300 printer was acceptable. The average error was no greater than that measured with other types of 3D printers. The mean relative difference should not be considered the best way to compare studies. The point inaccuracy methodology proposed in this study may be helpful in future studies concerned with evaluating the accuracy of 3D rapid prototyping models. PMID:25176496

  6. Introducing International Journal of Anatomical Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunali S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to International Journal of Anatomical Variations (IJAV - an annual journal of anatomical variations and clinical anatomy case reports. After having a notable experience for eight years in NEUROANATOMY, we are pleased to introduce you IJAV. We are eventually announcing our new journal after three years of feasibility and background study period. We hope that IJAV will fill in the gap in anatomy journals’ bunch. IJAV is an annual, open access journal having electronic version only. Despite of unavailability of a budget for publishing IJAV, the evaluation of submissions and access to the full text articles is totally free of charge.Our vision for IJAV is to constitute an online compendium for anatomical variations in gross, radiological and surgical anatomy, neuroanatomy and case reports in clinical anatomy. We believe that cases have an important role in clinical anatomy education. In this aspect, we aim to serve as an open source of case reports. We hope that IJAV will be cited in most of the case reports related to clinical anatomy and anatomical variations in near future.In NEUROANATOMY, we encouraged the submission of case reports in the area of neuroanatomy. Whereas in IJAV, besides neuroanatomy, we will consider case reports in any area related to human anatomy. The scope of IJAV will encompass any anatomical variations in gross, radiological and surgical anatomy. Case reports in clinical anatomy are also welcome.All submitted articles will be peer-reviewed. No processing fee will be charged from authors. One of the most important features of IJAV will be speedy review and rapid publication. We strive to publish an accepted manuscript within three weeks of initial submission. Our young and dynamic Scientific Advisory Board will achieve this objective.A few remarks about our logo and page design: Prof. Dr. M. Mustafa ALDUR designed our logo, being inspired by a quadricuspid aortic valve case, reported by Francesco FORMICA et al. [Formica F, Sangalli F, Ferro O, Paolini G. A rare cause of severe aortic regurgitation: quadricuspid aortic valve. Interact. Cardiovasc. Thorac. Surg. 2004; 3: 672-674]. We appreciate their contribution to our journal. The typeface in our logo and index page is Papyrus. The irregular margins of this font symbolize the non-uniformity in anatomy. The background in the menu bar is parchment; with Papyrus typeface, they refer to the old medical books in the ancient Egypt.As we mentioned earlier, our aim is to constitute an online compendium for anatomical variations similar to the invaluable book written by Ronald A. BERGMAN, Adel K. AFIFI and Ryosuke MIYAUCHI [Bergman RA, Afifi AK, Miyauchi R. Compendium of human anatomical variation. Baltimore, Urban and Schwarzenberg. 1988]. To realize this vision, we need you to submit your case reports to IJAV and encourage your colleagues to do so. As we did in NEUROANATOMY, we hope to be indexed in international indexes beginning from our first issue.Last but not least, I would like to thank to Dr. M. Mustafa ALDUR for his superhuman efforts and everlasting support to IJAV. Moreover, I would like to voice my special gratitude to the members of Scientific Advisory Board, who have accepted to take the road with us in this arduous journey.We look forward to receiving your manuscripts.Yours sincerely,Selcuk TUNALI, MD, PhDEditor-in-Chief and Publisher, IJAV

  7. Visual landmark information gains control of the head direction signal at the lateral mammillary nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Ryan M; Peck, James R; Taube, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-28

    The neural representation of directional heading is conveyed by head direction (HD) cells located in an ascending circuit that includes projections from the lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) to the anterodorsal thalamus (ADN) to the postsubiculum (PoS). The PoS provides return projections to LMN and ADN and is responsible for the landmark control of HD cells in ADN. However, the functional role of the PoS projection to LMN has not been tested. The present study recorded HD cells from LMN after bilateral PoS lesions to determine whether the PoS provides landmark control to LMN HD cells. After the lesion and implantation of electrodes, HD cell activity was recorded while rats navigated within a cylindrical arena containing a single visual landmark or while they navigated between familiar and novel arenas of a dual-chamber apparatus. PoS lesions disrupted the landmark control of HD cells and also disrupted the stability of the preferred firing direction of the cells in darkness. Furthermore, PoS lesions impaired the stable HD cell representation maintained by path integration mechanisms when the rat walked between familiar and novel arenas. These results suggest that visual information first gains control of the HD cell signal in the LMN, presumably via the direct PoS ? LMN projection. This visual landmark information then controls HD cells throughout the HD cell circuit. PMID:25632114

  8. Anatomical description and clinical significance of unilateral triheaded sternocleidomastoid muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Goswami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this report is to observe and report unusual pattern of origin of sternal and clavicular heads of Sternocleidomastoid (SCM. An embryological insight into the possible causes for present anomaly is elucidated. The neck region of an adult male cadaver during gross anatomy teaching program. An abnormal Sternocleidomastoid (SCM was observed while dissecting the neck region of an adult. Additional clavicular head of SCM muscle were found on the right side. The accessory clavicular head coursed deep to the sternal head whereas the some fibres of main clavicular head joined the accessory belly and together they fused with the main sternal head of SCM. There was another slip arising from sternal head and merge with deep cervical fascia near base of mandible. The topographical anatomy of SCM is extremely important, particularly because it serves as a useful surgical landmark and its relation to crucial neuro-vascular structures of the neck. The usage of SCM in reconstruction operations for covering defects is discussed. A detailed knowledge of the anatomy of SCM proves vital for radiological studies of the neck. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 1161-1164

  9. The anatomical diaspora: evidence of early American anatomical traditions in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, Phoebe R

    2011-09-01

    The current focus in forensic anthropology on increasing scientific certainty in ancestry determination reinforces the need to examine the ancestry of skeletal remains used for osteology instruction. Human skeletal remains were discovered on the University of North Dakota campus in 2007. After recovery, the osteological examination resulted in a profile for a 33- to 46-year-old woman of African descent with stature ranging from 56.3 to 61.0 in. The pattern of postmortem damage indicated that the remains had been prepared for use as an anatomical teaching specimen. Review of the American history of anatomical teaching revealed a preference for Black subjects, which apparently extended to states like North Dakota despite extremely low resident populations of people of African descent. This study emphasizes the need to examine the ancestry of older teaching specimens that lack provenience, rather than assuming they are derived from typical (i.e., Indian) sources of anatomical material. PMID:21447074

  10. An anatomical study of the parasacral block using magnetic resonance imaging of healthy volunteers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Maeve

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The parasacral approach to sciatic blockade is reported to be easy to learn and perform, with a high success rate and few complications. METHODS: Using magnetic resonance imaging, we evaluated the accuracy of a simulated needle (perpendicular to skin) in contacting the sacral plexus with this approach in 10 volunteers. Intrapelvic structures encountered during the simulated parasacral blocks were also recorded. RESULTS: The sacral plexus was contacted by the simulated needle in 4 of the 10 volunteers, and the sciatic nerve itself in one volunteer. The plexus was accurately located adjacent to a variety of visceral structures, including small bowel, blood vessels, and ovary. In the remaining five volunteers (in whom the plexus was not contacted on first needle pass), small bowel, rectum, blood vessels, seminal vesicles, and bony structures were encountered. Historically, when plexus is not encountered, readjustment of the needle insertion point more caudally has been recommended. We found that such an adjustment resulted in simulated perforation of intrapelvic organs or the perianal fossa. CONCLUSIONS: These findings question the reliability of the anatomical landmarks of the parasacral block and raise the possibility of frequent visceral puncture using this technique.

  11. Virtual anatomical three-dimensional fit trial for intra-thoracically implanted medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Renée K; Haddad, Michel; Hendry, Paul J; Mussivand, Tofy

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose is to develop a system that converts computed tomography (CT) scans into an interactive three-dimensional (3-D) model of the thoracic cavity. This study will allow for the preoperative determination of optimal anatomical fit of intra-thoracically implanted medical equipment such as circulatory support devices. From the radiology data bank, we consecutively selected 34 cardiac and 42 noncardiac patients who had CT scans of the chest. Anatomical structures of the electronic CT scans were manually extracted using software. These structures included the thoracic cage, lungs, heart, and the great vessels. The information was converted into a 3-D surface mesh model, which was imported into a 3-D viewer to acquire direct anatomical measurements. The thoracic cage and intra-thoracic organs were measured for data analysis. A methodology was successfully developed to convert a patient's thoracic CT scans into interactive 3-D models, permitting the collection of key anatomical measurements to assess intra-thoracic device fit feasibility. Extensive measurements of the reconstructed thoracic cavity were recorded in a database format and analyzed. This study demonstrated the feasibility of implementing a rapid preoperative screening method based on anatomical fit for the selection or rejection of patients who are candidates for an intra-thoracic mechanical device. This new method will allow for the virtual preoperative implantation of such devices within a patient's chest cavity. PMID:15307547

  12. Internal jugular vein cannulation: an ultrasound-guided technique versus a landmark-guided technique

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gurkan, Turker; Fatma Nur, Kaya; Alp, Gurbet; Hale, Aksu; Cuneyt, Erdogan; Ahmet, Atlas.

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the landmark-guided technique versus the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in spontaneously breathing patients. METHODS: A total of 380 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned to receive internal jugular ve [...] in cannulation using either the landmark- or ultrasound-guided technique in Bursa, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, between April and November, 2008. Failed catheter placement, risk of complications from placement, risk of failure on first attempt at placement, number of attempts until successful catheterization, time to successful catheterization and the demographics of each patient were recorded. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p

  13. How to construct a linguistic landmark: language cues in the formation of hierarchical representations of space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Wiebke; Halfmann, Marc; Mallot, Hanspeter A

    2015-09-01

    The formation of a hierarchical representation of space can be induced by the spatial adjacency of places marked by landmark objects from the same semantic category, as was demonstrated by a route-planning experiment (Wiener and Mallot in Spat Cogn Comput 3(4):331-358, 2003). Using the same paradigm, we tested the efficiency of linguistic cues with various hierarchical categorization principles in regional structuring. In five different conditions, places of the experimental environment were characterized (1) by landmark objects, (2) by arbitrary proper names on region level, (3) by prototypical names on region level, (4) by nouns from different semantic categories, and (5) by groups of nouns with intrinsic whole-part relation. A region effect comparable to the landmark object condition was found only for the whole-part relations, which combine spatial proximity with a shared context. A linguistic analysis revealed a correspondence to the intended regional subdivision only for the cues of this condition. PMID:26259652

  14. Comparison of Image Registration Based Measures of Regional Lung Ventilation from Dynamic Spiral CT with Xe-CT

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Kai; Fuld, Matthew K; Du, Kaifang; Christensen, Gary E; Hoffman, Eric A; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Regional lung volume change as a function of lung inflation serves as an index of parenchymal and airway status as well as an index of regional ventilation and can be used to detect pathologic changes over time. In this article, we propose a new regional measure of lung mechanics --- the specific air volume change by corrected Jacobian. Methods: 4DCT and Xe-CT data sets from four adult sheep are used in this study. Nonlinear, 3D image registration is applied to register an image acquired near end inspiration to an image acquired near end expiration. Approximately 200 annotated anatomical points are used as landmarks to evaluate registration accuracy. Three different registration-based measures of regional lung mechanics are derived and compared: the specific air volume change calculated from the Jacobian (SAJ); the specific air volume change calculated by the corrected Jacobian (SACJ); and the specific air volume change by intensity change (SAI). Results: After registration, the mean registration err...

  15. MRI anatomical mapping and direct stereotactic targeting in the subthalamic region: functional and anatomical correspondence in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object Relationships between clinical effects, anatomy, and electrophysiology are not fully understood in DBS of the subthalamic region in Parkinson's disease. We proposed an anatomic study based on direct image-guided stereotactic surgery with a multiple source data analysis. Materials and Methods A manual anatomic mapping was realized on coronal 1.5-Tesla MRI of 15 patients. Biological data were collected under local anesthesia: the spontaneous neuron activities and the clinical efficiency and the appearance of adverse effects. They were related to relevant current values (mA), the benefit threshold (bt, minimal current leading an clear efficiency), the adverse effect threshold (at, minimal current leading an adverse effect) and the stimulation margin (sm = at - bt); they were matched with anatomy. Results We found consistent relationships between anatomy and biological data. The optimal stimulation parameters (low bt + high sm) were noted in the dorsolateral STN. The highest spontaneous neuron activity was found in the ventromedial STN. Dorsolateral (sensorimotor) STN seems the main DBS effector. The highest spontaneous neuron activity seems related to the anterior (rostral) ventromedial (limbic) STN. Conclusion 1.5 Tesla images provide sufficiently detailed subthalamic anatomy for image-guided stereotactic surgery and may aid in understanding DBS mechanisms. (orig.)

  16. The fate of the bodies of executed persons in the Anatomical Institute of Halle between 1933 and 1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultka, Rüdiger; Viebig, Michael

    2012-06-01

    In the period from 1933 to 1945 the Anatomical Institute in Halle (Saale) received bodies of persons, among them politically persecuted women and men, who had been sentenced to death and executed. In this article, we attempt to answer two important questions: (1) What happened to the bodies of those executed; i.e. which anatomical “purposes” did they serve? (2) Were anatomical specimens from these bodies added to the institute’s anatomical collection and are they still present today? If so, can they be traced back to the bodies of politically persecuted people? So far we have discovered that between 1933 and 1936 the institute received 30 bodies, among them the bodies of two politically motivated death sentences. From 1937 until the end of 1942, only a few bodies arrived at the institute, and from November 1942 until the end of the war in 1945 the institute documented the transfer of 64 bodies of executed people. The death sentences pronounced during those early years were usually based on severe criminal acts (e.g. murder). During the war, special courts sentenced people to death mostly because of theft, looting, etc. The bodies of those executed were used in anatomical education, anatomical research, and in preparations of anatomical specimens to be added to the anatomical collection. There are eight macroscopic preparations which can definitely be associated with the bodies of people executed during the Nazi regime. Trial by jury sentenced those people to the maximum penalty because of the severity of their criminal acts. Up to now we have found no evidence that specimens of the anatomical collection were removed from bodies of victims whose execution was politically motivated. PMID:21978794

  17. A landmark recognition and tracking experiment for flight on the Shuttle/Advanced Technology Laboratory (ATL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design of an experiment for landmark recognition and tracking from the Shuttle/Advanced Technology Laboratory is described. It makes use of parallel coherent optical processing to perform correlation tests between landmarks observed passively with a telescope and previously made holographic matched filters. The experimental equipment including the optics, the low power laser, the random access file of matched filters and the electro-optical readout device are described. A real time optically excited liquid crystal device is recommended for performing the input non-coherent optical to coherent optical interface function. A development program leading to a flight experiment in 1981 is outlined.

  18. Continence and micturition: an anatomical basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adarsh P; Mevcha, Amit; Wilby, Daniel; Alatsatianos, Anton; Hardman, John C; Jacques, Steven; Wilton, Joanne C

    2014-11-01

    Urinary incontinence remains an important clinical problem worldwide, having a significant socio-economic, psychological, and medical burden. Maintaining urinary continence and coordinating micturition are complex processes relying on interaction between somatic and visceral elements, moderated by learned behavior. Urinary viscera and pelvic floor must interact with higher centers to ensure a functionally competent system. This article aims to describe the relevant anatomy and neuronal pathways involved in the maintenance of urinary continence and micturition. Review of relevant literature focusing on pelvic floor and urinary sphincters anatomy, and neuroanatomy of urinary continence and micturition. Data obtained from both live and cadaveric human studies are included. The stretch during bladder filling is believed to cause release of urothelial chemical mediators, which in turn activates afferent nerves and myofibroblasts in the muscosal and submucosal layers respectively, thereby relaying sensation of bladder fullness. The internal urethral sphincter is continuous with detrusor muscle, but its arrangement is variable. The external urethral sphincter blends with fibers of levator ani muscle. Executive decisions about micturition in humans rely on a complex mechanism involving communication between several cerebral centers and primitive sacral spinal reflexes. The pudendal nerve is most commonly damaged in females at the level of sacrospinous ligament. We describe the pelvic anatomy and relevant neuroanatomy involved in maintaining urinary continence and during micturition, subsequently highlighting the anatomical basis of urinary incontinence. Comprehensive anatomical understanding is vital for appropriate medical and surgical management of affected patients, and helps guide development of future therapies. PMID:24615792

  19. ANATOMICAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMALLY COMPRESSED WOOD PANELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Dogu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of temperature and press pressure on the anatomical structure of solid-wood panels produced by using Pinus sylvestris L. (Scotch pine wood were evaluated. Solid wood panels with dimensions of 250 by 500 by 18 mm were hot-pressed using a laboratory hot press at a temperature of either 120°C or 150°C and pressure of either 5 or 7 MPa for 1 h. Microscopic investigations conducted by Light Microscopy (LM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM showed that the highest deformation occurred in earlywood regions of all growth rings for each process condition and the distribution of deformation was not uniform in growth rings. Cell-wall thickness was observed to be an important factor in wood behavior during thermal compressing processes. The results showed clearly that the impact of pressure in wood structure is promoted by increased temperature. Significant densification was observed at the maximum temperature and maximum pressure condition employed in the study, and almost all earlywood layers showed cell collapse. The study revealed that a homogenous structure of growth rings with the uniform earlywood and latewood widths throughout the wood samples plays a major role in prevention of cell collapse. The results indicated that both process conditions and anatomical structure of the wood have an interaction.

  20. The developmental trajectory of intramaze and extramaze landmark biases in spatial navigation: An unexpected journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew G; Haselgrove, Mark; Smith, Alastair D

    2015-06-01

    Adults learning to navigate to a hidden goal within an enclosed space have been found to prefer information provided by the distal cues of an environment, as opposed to proximal landmarks within the environment. Studies with children, however, have shown that 5- or 7-year-olds do not display any preference toward distal or proximal cues during navigation. This suggests that a bias toward learning about distal cues occurs somewhere between the age of 7 years and adulthood. We recruited 5- to 11-year-old children and an adult sample to explore the developmental profile of this putative change. Across a series of 3 experiments, participants were required to navigate to a hidden goal in a virtual environment, the location of which was signaled by both extramaze and intramaze landmark cues. During testing, these cues were placed into conflict to assess the search preferences of participants. Consistent with previously reported findings, adults were biased toward using extramaze information. However, analysis of the data from children, which incorporated age as a continuous variable, suggested that older children in our sample were, in fact, biased toward using the intramaze landmark in our task. These findings suggest the bias toward using distal cues in spatial navigation, frequently displayed by adults, may be a comparatively late developing trait, and one that could supersede an initial developmental preference for proximal landmarks. PMID:25844850