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Sample records for anatomic landmarks based

  1. Development of a New Software for Automatic Anatomical landmark Detection in Cephalometric X-ray Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nooranian

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: As a routine clinical procedure in orthodontics, there are many geometrical calcula-tions usually taken place on the lateral x-ray images of the head in order to develop an appropriate treatment plan. This is currently done manually by the expert radiologists and/or orthodontists. It can take an experi-enced orthodontist up to thirty minutes to analyze one x-ray image and the results are still influenced by both subjective and objective errors. Here a new software for automatic anatomical landmark detection in cepha-lometric x-ray images is presented. The software extracts ten commonly used main landmarks. Methods and Materials: In this research, a combination of various image processing techniques including Template Matching, Edge Walking, and Shape Registration is employed to develop an automatic cephalomet-ric landmark detection algorithm within the x-ray images of the head. Ten essential and commonly used landmarks were selected as the target points. Results: The accuracy of the automatic landmark detection algorithm was evaluated with comparing the re-sults obtained by the automatic algorithm to those manually identified by an expert orthodontist on a data base of 10 x-ray images. The statistical analysis showed that 92% of the landmarks were determined accurately within an acceptable region of 4 millimeters from the points an expert had defined.. Conclusions: A MATLAB-based software was developed accordingly to help an orthodontist automatically identify the most commonly used 10 main cephalometric landmarks. The method can be extended for more landmarks in the future.

  2. Reliability of a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks of the maxillofacial skeleton. An evaluation method for three-dimensional images obtained by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a method for evaluating the reliability of a coordinate system based on maxillofacial skeletal landmarks and use it to assess two coordinate systems. Scatter plots and 95% confidence ellipses of an objective landmark were defined as an index for demonstrating the stability of the coordinate system. A head phantom was positioned horizontally in reference to the Frankfurt horizontal and occlusal planes and subsequently scanned once in each position using cone-beam computed tomography. On the three-dimensional images created with a volume-rendering procedure, six dentists twice set two different coordinate systems: coordinate system 1 was defined by the nasion, sella, and basion, and coordinate system 2 was based on the left orbitale, bilateral porions, and basion. The menton was assigned as an objective landmark. The scatter plot and 95% ellipse of the menton indicated the high-level reliability of coordinate system 2. The patterns with the two coordinate systems were similar between data obtained in different head positions. The method presented here may be effective for evaluating the reliability (reproducibility) of coordinate systems based on skeletal landmarks. (author)

  3. The use of anatomical landmarks for percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Kaan Akbay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to describe the external anatomical landmarks and angles as a training guide for urologists in the performance of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL in the prone position. Materials and Methods: Between 2006 and 2008, 50 patients (including 10 resident cases undergoing PCNL met the study criteria. The inclusion criteria consisted of patients with renal stones scheduled for a lower calyceal puncture PCNL where the number of attempts to access the calyx ? 3, and clear urine was seen draining from the needle. The exclusion criteria consisted of previous ipsilateral kidney surgery, severe hydronephrosis, anomalies of the renal or skeletal systems, BMI>30 kg/m2, upper/middle calyceal puncture and age ?18. Several anatomical landmarks and angles were measured, recorded and analyzed. Results: The mean length of (Pi was 10.1±1.7 cm (range 7-14, (Pe was 9.9±1.7 cm (range 6-13, (a was 11.2±2.8 cm (range 5.5-17, (b was 5.3±2.3 cm (range 1.5-11 cm, (x was 5.1±1.9 cm (range 1-8, (x1 was 3.3±1.7 cm (range 1.5-8.2, (y was 7.1±1.7 cm (range 3.3-11.6, (y1 was 3.8±1.6 cm (range 1-9 and (t was 4.9±1.7 cm (range 3-9. The mean angle for (a was 49±13º (range 30-70º, (b was 41±13º (range 20-70º and (g was 61±13º (range 28-80º. In resident cases, the median number of attempts was 1 (range 1-3, the median overall time for successful access was 7.25 minutes (range 2-12 and the median fl uoroscopy time was 62.5 seconds (range 30-150. Conclusion: A knowledge of these anatomical landmarks and angles may increase the capacity of urologists to repetitively perform the precise task of percutaneous access of the lower calyceal during PCNL.

  4. Reproducibility of imaging skull anatomic landmarks utilizing three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study investigated the reproducibility of locating specific anatomic landmarks, utilizing computed tomography (CT), for the purpose of assigning accurate coordinates on the skull. Three-dimensional (3-D) CT data, obtained by scanning a dry adult skull, were processed using a multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) system. Each landmark was identified five times by the same technician, and the average distances between points identifying the same landmark were calculated. The 15 landmarks studied were the infra-orbital foramina, the external auditory meatus, the foramina rotundum, the foramina ovale, the optic canals, anterior crinoid processes, anterior nasal spine, crista galli, and the sella turcica. Three additional artificial markers placed in occlusal dental splints were also examined. The crinoid processes were identified with the highest degree of accuracy. The crista galli and optic canals were also located with reproducible results. The standard deviation calculated from the fine attempts to locate the artificial markers was smaller than that calculated from attempts to identify any of the landmarks. This implies that coordinates on the craniofacial bones should be defined using artificial markers rather than bony landmarks. Artificial markers placed in occlusal dental splints easily can be applied clinically. Complicated facial bone contours should be analyzed mathematically. In clinical setting, these points were found to be reproducible in 15 bony landmarks d to be reproducible in 15 bony landmarks on the skull. (N.K.)

  5. Detection and location of 127 anatomical landmarks in diverse CT datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbah, Mohammad A.; Murphy, Sean; Pello, Hippolyte; Courbon, Romain; Beveridge, Erin; Wiseman, Stewart; Wyeth, Daniel; Poole, Ian

    2014-03-01

    The automatic detection and localization of anatomical landmarks has wide application, including intra and interpatient registration, study location and navigation, and the targeting of specialized algorithms. In this paper, we demonstrate the automatic detection and localization of 127 anatomically defined landmarks distributed throughout the body, excluding arms. Landmarks are defined on the skeleton, vasculature and major organs. Our approach builds on the classification forests method,1 using this classifier with simple image features which can be efficiently computed. For the training and validation of the method we have used 369 CT volumes on which radiographers and anatomists have marked ground truth (GT) - that is the locations of all defined landmarks occurring in that volume. A particular challenge is to deal with the wide diversity of datasets encountered in radiology practice. These include data from all major scanner manufacturers, different extents covering single and multiple body compartments, truncated cardiac acquisitions, with and without contrast. Cases with stents and catheters are also represented. Validation is by a leave-one-out method, which we show can be efficiently implemented in the context of decision forest methods. Mean location accuracy of detected landmarks is 13.45mm overall; execution time averages 7s per volume on a modern server machine. We also present localization ROC analysis to characterize detection accuracy - that is to decide if a landmark is or is not present in a given dataset.

  6. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The use of landmarks for robot navigation is a popular alternative to having a geometrical model of the environment through which to navigate and monitor self-localization. If the landmarks are defined as special visual structures already in the environment then we have the possibility of fully autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally available environment features (natural landmarks). The goal is also to integrate techniques and algorithms (also related to other research field) in the same navigation system, in order to improve localization performance and system autonomy. The proposed localization strategy is based on a continuous update of the estimated robot position while the robot is moving. In order to make the system autonomous, both acquisition and observation of landmarks have to be carried out automatically. The thesis consequently proposes a method for learning and navigation of a working environment and it explores automatic acquisition and recognition of visual landmarks. In particular, a two-phase procedure is proposed: first phase is for an automatic acquisition of visual-landmarks, second phase is for estimating robot position during navigation (based on the acquired landmarks). The feasibility and applicability of the proposed method is based on a system with a simple setup. The novelty and potentiality, are in combining algorithms for panoramic view-synthesis, attention selection, stereo reconstruction, triangulation, optimal triplet selection, and image-based rendering. Experiments demonstrate that the system can automatically learn and store visual landmarks, and later recognize these landmarks from arbitrary positions and thus estimate robot position and heading.

  7. The Cystic Vein: The Significance of a Forgotten Anatomic Landmark

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, Fine

    1997-01-01

    The cystic vein, a portion of biliary anatomy whose insignificance in open gallbladder surgery led to its being relegated to mythology, has been rediscovered by the magnified view of laparoscopic surgery. Its presence is an important anatomic feature that helps distinguish between cystic duct and common hepatic duct, thus diminishing the risk of inadvertent bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  8. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average ±sd: gw 22 ± 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p=0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p<0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI beforrebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided. (orig.)

  9. Combination of 2 Three Point Articulators for Preclinical Work Demonstration of Teeth Arrangement and Anatomical Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Leoney, A.; Shastry, Y. M.

    2012-01-01

    The combination of 2 three point articulators was done to visualize and appreciate the various teeth setting principles and anatomical landmarks both in occlusion and out of occlusion. In other words this technique would give a simultaneous image of the various teeth arrangement principles at a glance. The various teeth arrangement principles highlighted in this article would be the following: individual tooth arrangement principles of anterior and posterior teeth, arch form, midline, incisiv...

  10. The accuracy of image registration for the brain and the nasopharynx using external anatomical landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the accuracy of 3D image registration using markers that are repeatedly applied to external anatomical landmarks on the head. The purpose of this study is to establish a lower limit of the errors that would occur in, for instance, MRI-SPECT matching, which in some situations can only be achieved using external landmarks. Marker matching was compared with (single-modality) volume matching for 20 MRI scans. The results were compared with a published expression for the target registration error (TRE) which gives the 3D distribution of the mismatch between both scans. It was found that the main error source is reapplying the external markers on the anatomical landmarks. The published expression describes the relative distribution of the TRE in space well, but tends to underestimate the actual registration error. This deviation is due to anisotropy in the error distribution of the marker position (errors in the direction perpendicular to the skin surface are in general much smaller than errors in other directions). A simulation of marker matching with anisotropy in the errors confirmed this finding. With four reapplied markers, the TRE is 6 mm or smaller in most regions of the head. (author)

  11. The secondary lobe as anatomic landmark for different pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to present the spectrum of pathological findings in the pulmonary parenchyma, based on the knowledge of the secondary lobe and its components. The evaluation was made using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and compared with the histopathological findings. By definition, the secondary lobe is the small portion of pulmonary tissue separated by septa of connective tissue and supplied by 2-5 or more terminal bronchioles according to their central or peripheral location. Different disorders may become evident as a consequence of : 1) Bronchiolar obstruction (transient or definitive); 2) Intra-alveolar or wall involvement; 3) Involvement of the support tissue; 4) Involvement of the vascular or lymphatic structures. The etiology may be idiopathic, infectious, due to inhalation, neoplastic, allergic, due to collagen diseases, secondary to drug administration and/or post-transplantation. The evaluation of the secondary lobe components, with fine section HRCT, is the dynamic method of choice for the characterisation of pulmonary diseases, and allows to perform earlier and more precise differential diagnoses, when correlated with the clinical findings. The addition of sections during expiration to the routine study is paramount to underscore perfusion disturbances, which may remain undiagnosed during deep inspiration. The goal of this study is to review some of these disorders in which HRCT may be very useful and to correlate our observat very useful and to correlate our observations with the histopathological findings. (author)

  12. An investigation on the facial midline distance to some anatomic landmarks of the jaws among people with natural dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosharraf R

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the dental midline is necessary in most dental procedures."nOne of the methods to fulfill this goal is to determine the facial midline based on the midpoints of the"nforehead, nose, upper lip and chin. However, for various reasons, this method has not always been"nproved successful. In such cases, different techniques, based on the investigations in the edentulous"npatients, have been suggested."nPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the conformity of some landmarks such as labial"nfrenum, incisive papilla and mid palatal suture with dental and facial midlines among people with natural"ndentition in order to obtain accurate anatomic landmarks for denture replacement."nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 96 dental students, having all their permanent teeth"nand without any orthognathic problem, were chosen. For each subject, Alginate impressions and dental"ncasts were prepared. Then, centric occlusion was recorded with a biting wax and the facial mid line was"ndetermined on the anterior part of it. The distances from the facial midline to the upper teeth midline,"nincisive papilla, labial frenum and mid palatal suture were determined with a special tool and were"nmeasured by a VERNIEH two times. In order to analyze the results, Chi- Square and t-student tests were"nused."nResults: The average of facial midline distance to the upper teeth midline, the labial frenum, the incisive"npapilla and the mid palatal suture were 0.83±0.60, 0.67±G.54, 0.83±00.63 and 0.81±0.62 mm,"nrespectively. There was no significant difference between males and females. Labial frenum showed the"nminimum distance to the facial midline, while the incisive papilla had the maximum. There was no"nsignificant difference between these anatomic landmarks, in conformity or unconformity with the facial"nmidline"nConclusion: Considering the low percentage of the subjects with complete conformity and the lack of"nsignificant differences between these three landmarks, it is suggested that there is no superiority among"nthese landmarks for the determination of facial midline. The similar distances from the facial midline to"nthe incisive papilla and upper teeth midline indicate that using incisive papilla to determine the upper"nteeth midline in edentulous patients lead to normal face.

  13. Geometric sensitivity of patient-specific finite element models of the spine to variability in user-selected anatomical landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, J P; Adam, C J

    2015-01-01

    Software to create individualised finite element (FE) models of the osseoligamentous spine using pre-operative computed tomography (CT) data-sets for spinal surgery patients has recently been developed. This study presents a geometric sensitivity analysis of this software to assess the effect of intra-observer variability in user-selected anatomical landmarks. User-selected landmarks on the osseous anatomy were defined from CT data-sets for three scoliosis patients and these landmarks were used to reconstruct patient-specific anatomy of the spine and ribcage using parametric descriptions. The intra-observer errors in landmark co-ordinates for these anatomical landmarks were calculated. FE models of the spine and ribcage were created using the reconstructed anatomy for each patient and these models were analysed for a loadcase simulating clinical flexibility assessment. The intra-observer error in the anatomical measurements was low in comparison to the initial dimensions, with the exception of the angular measurements for disc wedge and zygapophyseal joint (z-joint) orientation and disc height. This variability suggested that CT resolution may influence such angular measurements, particularly for small anatomical features, such as the z-joints, and may also affect disc height. The results of the FE analysis showed low variation in the model predictions for spinal curvature with the mean intra-observer variability substantially less than the accepted error in clinical measurement. These findings demonstrate that intra-observer variability in landmark point selection has minimal effect on the subsequent FE predictions for a clinical loadcase. PMID:24261987

  14. Arterial tree tracking from anatomical landmarks in magnetic resonance angiography scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Alison; Beveridge, Erin; Houston, Graeme; McCormick, Lynne; Poole, Ian

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on arterial tree tracking in fourteen Contrast Enhanced MRA volumetric scans, given the positions of a predefined set of vascular landmarks, by using the A* algorithm to find the optimal path for each vessel based on voxel intensity and a learnt vascular probability atlas. The algorithm is intended for use in conjunction with an automatic landmark detection step, to enable fully automatic arterial tree tracking. The scan is filtered to give two further images using the top-hat transform with 4mm and 8mm cubic structuring elements. Vessels are then tracked independently on the scan in which the vessel of interest is best enhanced, as determined from knowledge of typical vessel diameter and surrounding structures. A vascular probability atlas modelling expected vessel location and orientation is constructed by non-rigidly registering the training scans to the test scan using a 3D thin plate spline to match landmark correspondences, and employing kernel density estimation with the ground truth center line points to form a probability density distribution. Threshold estimation by histogram analysis is used to segment background from vessel intensities. The A* algorithm is run using a linear cost function constructed from the threshold and the vascular atlas prior. Tracking results are presented for all major arteries excluding those in the upper limbs. An improvement was observed when tracking was informed by contextual information, with particular benefit for peripheral vessels.

  15. Analysis of anatomical landmarks of the mandibular interforaminal region using CBCT in a Brazilian population

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Paloma Rodrigues, Genú; Ricardo José de Holanda, Vasconcellos; Bruna Paloma de, Oliveira; Bruna Caroline Gonçalves de, Vasconcelos; Nádia Cristina da Cruz, Delgado.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the position, presence, appearance and extent of various anatomical landmarks in the mandibular interforaminal region of Brazilian patients using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: A total of 142 CBCT examinations were analyzed to determine the most common location of th [...] e mental foramen (MF), the presence and extent of the anterior loop (AL) of the inferior alveolar nerve, and the appearance and length of the incisive canal (IC). The presence of sexual dimorphism and differences with relation to the left and right sides were also evaluated. Results: Most of the MF (45.5%) was located below the second premolar. The AL and the IC were observed in 18.9 and 96.5% of the images respectively. The average length of AL and IC was 3.14±1.25 mm and 13.68±5.94 mm respectively. No significant differences (p>0.05) between genders or left and right sides were observed for all evaluated parameters. Conclusions: The most common location of the MF, the high rate of visualization of the IC and the occasional presence of AL in the studied Brazilian population demonstrate the importance of using three-dimensional images of the mandibular anterior region, allowing proper surgical planning and preventing injury to the neurovascular bundle.

  16. A new method to validate thoracic CT-CT deformable image registration using auto-segmented 3D anatomical landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin S; Østergaard, Lasse R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deformable image registrations are prone to errors in aligning reliable anatomically features. Consequently, identification of registration inaccuracies is important. Particularly thoracic three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT)-CT image registration is challenging due to lack of contrast in lung tissue. This study aims for validation of thoracic CT-CT image registration using auto-segmented anatomically landmarks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five lymphoma patients were CT scanned three times within a period of 18 months, with the initial CT defined as the reference scan. For each patient the two successive CT scans were registered to the reference CT using three different image registration algorithms (Demons, B-spline and Affine). The image registrations were evaluated using auto-segmented anatomical landmarks (bronchial branch points) and Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC). Deviation of corresponding bronchial landmarks were used to quantify inaccuracies in respect of both misalignment and geometric location within lungs. RESULTS: The median bronchial branch point deviations were 1.6, 1.1 and 4.2 (mm) for the three tested algorithms (Demons, B-spline and Affine). The maximum deviations (> 15 mm) were found within both Demons and B-spline image registrations. In the upper part of the lungs the median deviation of 1.7 (mm) was significantly different (p 15 mm in both Demons and B-spline deformable algorithms.

  17. Automatic Evaluation of Landmarks for Image-Based Navigation Update

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Lang; Michael Kirchhof

    2009-01-01

    The successful mission of an autonomous airborne system like an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) strongly depends on its accurate navigation. While GPS is not always available and pose estimation based solely on Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) drifts, image-based navigation may become a cheap and robust additional pose measurement device. For the actual navigation update a landmark-based approach is used. It is essential that the used landmarks are well chosen. Therefore we introduce an approach...

  18. Automated Landmark Identification for Human Cortical Surface-Based Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Anticevic, Alan; Repovs, Grega; Dierker, Donna; Harwell, John; Coalson, Tim; Barch, Deanna M.; Essen, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Volume-based registration (VBR) is the predominant method used in human neuroimaging to compensate for individual variability. However, surface-based registration (SBR) techniques have an inherent advantage over VBR because they respect the topology of the convoluted cortical sheet. There is evidence that existing SBR methods indeed confer a registration advantage over affine VBR. Landmark-SBR constrains registration using explicit landmarks to represent corresponding geographical locations o...

  19. Automatic Evaluation of Landmarks for Image-Based Navigation Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Lang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful mission of an autonomous airborne system like an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV strongly depends on its accurate navigation. While GPS is not always available and pose estimation based solely on Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU drifts, image-based navigation may become a cheap and robust additional pose measurement device. For the actual navigation update a landmark-based approach is used. It is essential that the used landmarks are well chosen. Therefore we introduce an approach for evaluating landmarks in terms of the matching distance, which is the maximum misplacement in the position of the landmark that can be corrected. We validate the evaluations with our 3D reconstruction system working on data captured from a helicopter.

  20. An analysis of anatomic landmark mobility and setup errors in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify visible structures in the thorax which exhibit little internal motion during irradiation and, to determine random and systematic setup deviations in lung cancer patients with the use of these structures. Methods: Ten patients with lung cancer were set up in the supine position, and aligned using lasers. No immobilization devices were used. With an electronic portal imaging device (Siemens Beam ViewPLUS), 12 sequential images (exposure 0.54 sec.; processing time 1.5 sec.) were obtained during a single fraction of radiotherapy. These 'movie loops' were generated for the A-P fields during each of 3-5 fractions. In order to determine the mobility of internal structures during each fraction, visible structures such as the trachea, carina, the upper chest wall, aortic arch, clavicle and paraspinal line were contoured manually in each image and matched with the first image of the corresponding movie loop by means of a cross-correlation algorithm. Translations in the cranial and lateral directions and in-plane rotations were determined for each structure separately. As the reference image represents a random position, relative movements were determined by comparing the translations and rotation for every image to the calculated means per movie-loop. Standard deviations of the relative movements were determined for each structure and each patient. Patient setup was evaluated for 15 patients with lung cancer. Setup was not corrected at any time dcer. Setup was not corrected at any time during the treatment. The electronic portal images of each fraction were matched with the digitized simulator films by using a combination of the structures which had been determined to be relatively stable in the infra-fractional analysis. Results: In the infra-fractional analysis 120 to 380 matches were made per structure (a total of 1400). The standard deviation (SD) of translations in the lateral direction was small (?1 mm) for the trachea, thoracic wall, paraspinal line and aortic arch. This was also the case for the SD of the translations in the cranial direction of the clavicle, aortic arch and upper thoracic wall. The carina was found to be relatively mobile (up to 6 mm) in both directions. The SD for in-plane rotations was negligible (<0.5 deg.) for all structures. The interpatient variation was very small (SD < 0.5 mm). In a preliminary analysis of patient setup, the random errors for translations are 2.0 mm in the lateral direction and 2.4 mm in the cranial direction (1 SD). The standard deviations of systematic errors are about 3 mm in both directions. In plane rotations were found to be negligible. Conclusions: We have identified a number of structures which exhibit little internal motion in the frontal plane, and recommend that a combination of these structures be used as anatomic landmarks for setup verification during radiotherapy of thoracic tumors. Preliminary results indicate that setup errors of patients with lung cancer in our center appear to be acceptable, even though no specific immobilization devices were used

  1. Adaptive Landmark-Based Navigation System Using Learning Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidan, Bassel; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha

    2014-01-01

    The goal-directed navigational ability of animals is an essential prerequisite for them to survive. They can learn to navigate to a distal goal in a complex environment. During this long-distance navigation, they exploit environmental features, like landmarks, to guide them towards their goal. Inspired by this, we develop an adaptive landmark-based navigation system based on sequential reinforcement learning. In addition, correlation-based learning is also integrated into the system to improve learning performance. The proposed system has been applied to simulated simple wheeled and more complex hexapod robots. As a result, it allows the robots to successfully learn to navigate to distal goals in complex environments.

  2. Landmark-referenced Voxel-based Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Images of the Brainstem White Matter Tracts. Application in Patients with Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Weihong; Li, Xin; Zhang, Jiangyang; Luft, Andreas; Hanley, Daniel F.; van Zijl, Peter; Miller, Michael I; YOUNES, LAURENT; Mori, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Although DTI can provide detailed information about white matter anatomy, it is not yet straightforward enough to quantify the anatomical information it visualizes. In this study, we developed and tested a new tool to perform brain normalization and voxel-based analysis of DTI data. For the normalization part, manually placed landmarks ensured that the visualized white matter tracts were well-registered among the populations. A standard landmark set in ICBM-152 space and an interface to remap...

  3. Combining Speedup techniques based on Landmarks and Containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. KALPANA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Dijkstra’s algorithm [1] , which is applied in many real world problems like mobile routing, road maps, railway networks, etc,. is used to find the shortest path between source and destination. There are many techniques available to speedup the algorithm while guaranteeing the optimality of the solution. The main focus of the work is to implement landmark technique and Containers separately and compare the results with random graphs and planar graphs. The combined speedup technique which is based on landmarks and containers were also experimented with random graphs and planar graphs to improvethe speedup of the shortest path queries.

  4. Evolving a Multiagent System for Landmark-based Robot Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ambastha, Madhur; Busquets, Didac; Lopez Mantaras, Ramon; Sierra, Carles

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we build upon a multiagent architecture for landmark-based navigation in unknown environments. In this architecture, each of the agents in the navigation system has a bidding function that is controlled by a set of parameters. We show here the good results obtained by an evolutionary approach that tunes the parameter set values for two navigation tasks.

  5. Robust discriminative tracking via landmark-based label propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuwei; Pei, Mingtao; Yang, Min; Yuan, Junsong; Jia, Yunde

    2015-05-01

    The appearance of an object could be continuously changing during tracking, thereby being not independent identically distributed. A good discriminative tracker often needs a large number of training samples to fit the underlying data distribution, which is impractical for visual tracking. In this paper, we present a new discriminative tracker via landmark-based label propagation (LLP) that is nonparametric and makes no specific assumption about the sample distribution. With an undirected graph representation of samples, the LLP locally approximates the soft label of each sample by a linear combination of labels on its nearby landmarks. It is able to effectively propagate a limited amount of initial labels to a large amount of unlabeled samples. To this end, we introduce a local landmarks approximation method to compute the cross-similarity matrix between the whole data and landmarks. Moreover, a soft label prediction function incorporating the graph Laplacian regularizer is used to diffuse the known labels to all the unlabeled vertices in the graph, which explicitly considers the local geometrical structure of all samples. Tracking is then carried out within a Bayesian inference framework, where the soft label prediction value is used to construct the observation model. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations on the benchmark data set containing 51 challenging image sequences demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25706637

  6. Anatomical landmarks for positioning the head in preparation for the transsphenoidal approach: the spheno-sellar point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campero, Alvaro; Socolovsky, Mariano; Torino, Rafael; Martins, Carolina; Yasuda, Alexandre; Rhoton, Albert L

    2009-06-01

    The transnasal approach is the most utilized approach to the sellar region. This study was conducted to identify an anatomical landmark on the lateral surface of the head that corresponds to the midpoint of the sellar floor at the level of sphenoidal rostrum. This point, lined up with the nostril, simulates the surgical path and facilitates the transnasal access to the sella turcica. Four adult, formalin-fixed and silicon-injected cadaveric heads, and ten dried skulls were used for laboratory dissection. The heads and skulls were sectioned along the midline; and the spheno-sellar point, corresponding to the midpoint of the sellar floor at the level of sphenoid rostrum, was determined. The spheno-sellar point was plotted on the lateral surface of the skull, and its position measured relative to the external acoustic meatus. Linking the spheno-sellar point with the nostril created the spheno-nostril line. This line represents the surgical path to be taken for direct access to the sphenoid rostrum, and was used to align the cadaveric heads as in surgery. The endonasal transsphenoidal approach was then utilized in one hundred and two adult patients with sellar lesions, using the spheno-sellar point and the spheno-nostril line as the superficial landmarks to guide the approach. The results of this clinical experience are summarized. The spheno-sellar point was found to be located an average of 40.1 mm (SD+/-2.9 mm) anterior and 23.3 mm (SD+/-3.2 mm) superior to the external acoustic meatus. The spheno-nostril line represents the straight surgical path to the sphenoidal rostrum. This landmark was used in 102 correlative transnasal surgeries for sellar lesions of adult patients, and has allowed an easy and straightforward access to the sella. In only 3 cases with poor pneumatisation of the sphenoid sinus (presellar type), the actual location of the surgical instruments had to be confirmed by fluoroscopy. The application of the spheno-sellar point and the spheno-nostril line is a fast, reliable and very simple way to facilitate transsphenoidal surgery, and their use may avoid complications associated with misdirection of this approach. Its use may be limited in cases of poor pneumatisation of the sphenoid sinus, where fluoroscopic guidance could be necessary as a rule. PMID:19533460

  7. An anatomical landmark for the supplementary eye fields in human revealed with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbras, M H; Lobel, E; Van de Moortele, P F; LeBihan, D; Berthoz, A

    1999-01-01

    Together with the frontal and parietal eye fields, the supplementary eye field (SEF) is involved in the performance and control of voluntary and reflexive saccades and of ocular pursuit. This region was first described in non-human primates and is rather well localized on the dorsal surface of the medial frontal cortex. In humans the site of the SEF is still ill-defined. Functional imaging techniques have allowed investigation of the location and function of the SEF. However, there is great variability with regard to the published standardized coordinates of this area. We used here the spatial precision of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in order to better localize the SEF in individuals. We identified as the SEF a region on the medial wall that was significantly activated when subjects executed self-paced horizontal saccades in darkness as compared to rest. This region appeared to be predominantly activated in the left hemisphere. We found that, despite a discrepancy of >2 cm found in the standardized Talairach coordinates, the location of this SEF-region could be precisely and reliably described by referring to a sulcal landmark found in each individual: the upper part of the paracentral sulcus. PMID:10554993

  8. An analysis of anatomic landmark mobility and setup deviations in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify thoracic structures that exhibit little internal motion during irradiation and to determine setup variations in patients with lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional images were generated with an electronic portal-imaging device from the AP fields of 10 patients, during several fractions. To determine the intrafractional mobility of thoracic structures, visible structures were contoured in every image and matched with a reference image by means of a cross-correlation algorithm. Setup variations were determined by comparing portal images with the digitized simulator films using the stable structures as landmarks. Results: Mobility was limited in the lateral direction for the trachea, thoracic wall, paraspinal line, and aortic notch, and in the craniocaudal direction for the clavicle, aortic notch, and thoracic wall. Analysis of patient setup revealed random deviations of 2.0 mm (1 SD) in the lateral direction and 2.8 mm in the craniocaudal direction, while the systematic deviations were 2.5 and 2.0 mm (1 SD) respectively. Conclusions: We have identified thoracic structures that exhibit little internal motion in the frontal plane, and recommend that these structures be used for verifying patient setup during radiotherapy. The daily variation in the setup of lung cancer patients at our center appears to be acceptable

  9. Referências anatômicas na cirurgia do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral / Anatomical landmarks in auditory brainstem implant surgery

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rubens Vuono, Brito Neto; Ricardo Ferreira, Bento; Alexandre, Yasuda; Guilherme Carvalhal, Ribas; Aldo Junqueira, Rodrigues Jr..

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O implante auditivo de tronco cerebral é uma opção os pacientes surdos que não têm a integridade das vias auditivas preservada. A cirurgia, por sua complexidade anatômica e funcional, requer treinamento específico em laboratório de anatomia por parte do cirurgião. OBJETIVOS: Estudar a anatomia cirúr [...] gica da cirurgia do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo anatômico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Neste estudo dissecamos cadáver fresco preparado com solução corante injetada nas artérias e veias intra-cranianas. O local de inserção do eletrodo do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral foi estudado através do acesso translabiríntico. RESULTADOS: A técnica cirúrgica utilizada para a implantação do eletrodo de tronco cerebral é semelhante à utilizada na remoção do shwannoma vestibular. O complexo de núcleo coclear, composto pelo núcleo coclear ventral e dorsal, é o local para a colocação do eletrodo. O núcleo coclear ventral é o principal núcleo de transmissão de impulsos neurais do VIII par e seus axônios formam a principal via ascendente do nervo coclear. Tanto o núcleo ventral como o dorsal não são visíveis durante a cirurgia e sua localização depende de identificação de estruturas anatômicas adjacentes. CONCLUSÃO: A região de implantação do eletrodo do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral apresenta referências anatômicas que permitem sua fácil identificação durante a cirurgia. Abstract in english Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) is an option for deaf patients who do not have the whole auditory pathways preserved. The surgery, because of its anatomical and functional complexity, requires specific training of the surgeon in an anatomy lab. AIM: To study the surgical anatomy of the auditory bra [...] instem implant surgery. STUDY DESIGN: Anatomic study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: In the present study, we dissected a fresh cadaver prepared with a dye solution injected into the arteries and intracranial veins. The location of the insertion of the ABI electrode was studied through translabyrinthine access. RESULTS: The surgical technique used for implanting the brainstem electrode is similar to that used in the removal of vestibular schwannoma. The cochlear nucleus complex, comprising ventral and dorsal cochlear nuclei, is the optimal electrode site. The ventral cochlear nucleus is the principal nucleus for transmission of neural impulses from the 8th pair and form the main ascending route of the cochlear nerve. Neither the ventral nor the dorsal nuclei are visible during surgery and their location depends on the identification of adjacent anatomical structures. CONCLUSION: The region for the implantation of the electrode in the auditory brainstem implant presents anatomical landmarks that allow its easy identification during surgery.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral trochlea: evaluation of anatomical landmarks and grading articular cartilage in cadaveric knees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, Claus [Marienhospital Vechta, Department of Radiology, Vechta (Germany); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Mo Ahn, Joong [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to define magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings before and after contrast medium opacification of the knee joint in cadaveric specimens to demonstrate anatomical landmarks of the trochlear surface in relation to the neighboring structures, and to evaluate different MRI sequences in the detection of cartilage defects of the trochlear and patellar surface of the knee. The morphology and relationship of the proximal trochlear surface to the prefemoral fat of the distal femur were investigated by use of different MR sequences before and after intra-articular gadolinium administration into the knee joint in ten cadaveric knees. Anatomic sections were subsequently obtained. In addition, evaluation of the articular surface of the trochlea was performed by two independent observers. The cartilage surfaces were graded using a 2-point system, and results were compared with macroscopic findings. Of 40 cartilage surfaces evaluated, histopathologic findings showed 9 normal surfaces, 20 containing partial-thickness defects, and 11 containing full-thickness defects. Compared with macroscopic data, sensitivity of MR sequences for the two reviewers was between 17 and 90%; specificity, 75 and 100%; positive predictive value, 75 and 100%; negative predictive value, 20 and 100%, depending on patellar or trochlea lesions. Interobserver variability for the presence of disease, which was measured using the kappa statistic, was dependent on the MR sequence used between 0.243 and 0.851. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences can be used to evaluate the cartilage of the trochlear surface with less accuracy when compared with the results of grading the articular cartilage of the patella. (orig.)

  11. Infraorbital nerve block within the Pterygopalatine fossa of the horse: anatomical landmarks defined by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to provide anaesthesia of the equine maxillary cheek teeth, a local nerve block of the infraorbital nerve in the pterygopalatine fossa had been proposed, which is referred to as the 'Palatine Bone Insertion' (PBI). As several complications with this method were reported, our study was designed to recommend a modified injection technique which avoids the risk of puncturing of relevant anatomical structures. Five cadaver heads and two living horses were examined by contrast medium injections and subsequent computed tomography (CT). Spinal needles were inserted using two different insertion techniques: The above mentioned (PBI), and a modification called 'Extraperiorbital Fat Body Insertion' (EFBI). Both techniques (PBI and EFBI) provide a consistent distribution of contrast medium around the infraorbital nerve. However, only the EFBI technique is appropriate to minimize the risk of complications. This study is an example for the permanent challenge of anatomists to supply a basis for clinical and surgical procedures

  12. Automatic facial expression recognition based on features extracted from tracking of facial landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Deepak; Lee, Joonwhoan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automatic facial expression recognition system using support vector machines, with geometric features extracted from the tracking of facial landmarks. Facial landmark initialization and tracking is performed by using an elastic bunch graph matching algorithm. The facial expression recognition is performed based on the features extracted from the tracking of not only individual landmarks, but also pair of landmarks. The recognition accuracy on the Extended Kohn-Kanade (CK+) database shows that our proposed set of features produces better results, because it utilizes time-varying graph information, as well as the motion of individual facial landmarks.

  13. Interfraction Displacement of Primary Tumor and Involved Lymph Nodes Relative to Anatomic Landmarks in Image Guided Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze primary tumor (PT) and lymph node (LN) position changes relative to each other and relative to anatomic landmarks during conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In 12 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer PT, LN, carina, and 1 thoracic vertebra were manually contoured on weekly 4-dimensional fan-beam CT scans. Systematic and random interfraction displacements of all contoured structures were identified in the 3 cardinal directions, and resulting setup margins were calculated. Time trends and the effect of volume changes on displacements were analyzed. Results: Three-dimensional displacement vectors and systematic/random interfraction displacements were smaller for carina than for vertebra both for PT and LN. For PT, mean (SD) 3-dimensional displacement vectors with carina-based alignment were 7 (4) mm versus 9 (5) mm with bony anatomy (P.05). Displacements between PT and bone (P=.04) and between PT and LN (P=.01) were significantly correlated with PT volume regression. Displacements between LN and carina were correlated with LN volume change (P=.03). Conclusions: Carina-based setup results in a more reproducible PT and LN alignment than bony anatomy setup. Considering the independence of PT and LN displacement and the impact of volume regression on displacements over time, repeated CT imaging even with PT-based alignment is recommended in locally advanced disease

  14. Is peritoneal reflection the best anatomical repair landmark in experimental colorectal surgery on rats? A reflexão peritoneal é o melhor reparo anatômico na cirurgia experimental colorretal em ratos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Gonçalves Priolli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To validate Peyer's patch as an anatomical repair landmark for colorectal surgery in rats and to measure the collagen content in segments of the colon containing or not containing Peyer's patch. METHODS: The distance between Peyer's patch and the peritoneal reflection was measured in forty-five Wistar rats. The colon and rectum were resected for quantification of collagen content by means of computer-assisted image analysis in regions of the colon with and without Peyer's patch. RESULTS: There was great variation in the distance between Peyer's patch and the peritoneal reflection when the male and female rats were considered as a single group (p=0.04. Comparison between the genders showed that the distance between the patch and the peritoneal reflection was greater in female than in male rats (p=0.001. The colonic segment containing Peyer's patch was observed to have lower tissue collagen content than the segment in which this structure was not present (p=0.02. CONCLUSION: Peyer's patch can be indicated as an anatomical repair landmark, and there is a need to study the healing of colorectal anastomoses in rats based on differing quantities of tissue collagen existing in the colonic wall with or without this structure.OBJETIVO: Validar a placa de Peyer como reparo anatômico para a cirurgia colorretal em ratos e mensurar a quantidade de colágeno em segmentos da parede cólica que contém ou não a placa de Peyer. MÉTODOS: Foi aferida a distância entre a placa de Peyer e a reflexão peritoneal em 45 ratos Wistar. O cólon e o reto foram ressecados, para a quantificação do colágeno, por meio de análise de imagem assistida por computador, em regiões do cólon que continham ou não a placa de Peyer. RESULTADOS: Existe grande variação entre a distância da placa de Peyer e a reflexão peritoneal quando se consideraram os animais de ambos os gêneros como grupo único (p= 0.04, sendo a distância entre a placa e a reflexão peritoneal maior entre as fêmeas (p=0.001. Constatou-se que o segmento cólico que contém a placa de Peyer apresenta conteúdo menor de colágeno quando comparado ao segmento onde a estrutura não estava presente (p=0.02. CONCLUSÃO: A placa de Peyer pode ser indicada como reparo anatômico e no estudo da cicatrização de anastomoses colorretais em ratos, baseado nas diferentes quantidades de colágeno tecidual existente na parede cólica que contém ou não esta estrutura.

  15. Active shape models incorporating isolated landmarks for medical image annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norajitra, Tobias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Stieltjes, Bram; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2014-03-01

    Apart from their robustness in anatomic surface segmentation, purely surface based 3D Active Shape Models lack the ability to automatically detect and annotate non-surface key points of interest. However, annotation of anatomic landmarks is desirable, as it yields additional anatomic and functional information. Moreover, landmark detection might help to further improve accuracy during ASM segmentation. We present an extension of surface-based 3D Active Shape Models incorporating isolated non-surface landmarks. Positions of isolated and surface landmarks are modeled conjoint within a point distribution model (PDM). Isolated landmark appearance is described by a set of haar-like features, supporting local landmark detection on the PDM estimates using a kNN-Classi er. Landmark detection was evaluated in a leave-one-out cross validation on a reference dataset comprising 45 CT volumes of the human liver after shape space projection. Depending on the anatomical landmark to be detected, our experiments have shown in about 1/4 up to more than 1/2 of all test cases a signi cant improvement in detection accuracy compared to the position estimates delivered by the PDM. Our results encourage further research with regard to the combination of shape priors and machine learning for landmark detection within the Active Shape Model Framework.

  16. The Comparison of Learning Radiographic Extraoral Anatomic Landmarks through Lecture and blended method(Computer-Assisted teaching and Lecture:An interventional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T ahmine Razi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the main problems in learning extraoral radiographic anatomic indexes is the long interval between presentation of radiology and human anatomy courses, resulting in forgetting anatomic regions. Therefore, radiographic indexes are formed as complete abstract and transient images in students’ minds; as a result, their learning and retention decrease. The aim of this study was to compare lecture with combination of computer-assisted learning and lecture of extra-oral radiographic landmarks among dental students. Methods: This interventional study was carried out in 2009 on 51 dental students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Students were randomly allocated into two groups. The first group was taught through a teaching method which involved lectures in the classroom. In the second group, a CD was given to the students. The teaching was accomplished through presentation using skull. Six months after finishing the teaching, both groups took a similar test for evaluation of long term learning. The data was analyzed by SPSS 16 using U Mann-Whitney test. Results: There was no significant differences in the mean scores between the two groups in the first exam after teaching (P=0.13, yet it was significant in the second exam (regarding retention (P=0.006, and average of non-traditional teaching method group (20.89±10.23 was higher than that of lecture group (13.48±6.39. Conclusion: Based on the results, non-traditional technique of teaching was not more effective than the lecture in short-term learning but in longterm learning, non-traditional technique was more effective than the lecture.

  17. Computing Topology Preservation of RBF Transformations for Landmark-Based Image Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Cavoretto, R.; Rossi, A.; Qiao, H.; Quatember, B.; Recheis, W; M. Mayr

    2014-01-01

    In image registration, a proper transformation should be topology preserving. Especially for landmark-based image registration, if the displacement of one landmark is larger enough than those of neighbourhood landmarks, topology violation will be occurred. This paper aim to analyse the topology preservation of some Radial Basis Functions (RBFs) which are used to model deformations in image registration. Mat\\'{e}rn functions are quite common in the statistic literature (see, ...

  18. Common Carotid Artery Bifurcation Levels Related to Clinical Relevant Anatomical Landmarks Niveles de Bifurcación de la Arteria Carótida Común en Relación a Puntos de Referencia Anatómicos Relevantes en Clínica

    OpenAIRE

    Rogério Alves Ribeiro; João Alberto de Souza Ribeiro; Omar Andrade Rodrigues Filho; Abadio Gonçalves Caetano; Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2006-01-01

    In head and neck surgery, the common carotid arteries are important landmarks, defining dissection plane during radical neck surgeries. The objectives of the present study were to add information on the diameter of the carotid arteries and to correlate the common carotid artery (CCA) bifurcation level with important anatomical landmarks used regularly in clinical practice. Forty-six necks from male embalmed human cadavers were evaluated. The CCA as the external (ECA) and internal (ICA) caroti...

  19. Shape representation for efficient landmark-based segmentation in 3-d.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to landmark-based shape representation that is based on transportation theory, where landmarks are considered as sources and destinations, all possible landmark connections as roads, and established landmark connections as goods transported via these roads. Landmark connections, which are selectively established, are identified through their statistical properties describing the shape of the object of interest, and indicate the least costly roads for transporting goods from sources to destinations. From such a perspective, we introduce three novel shape representations that are combined with an existing landmark detection algorithm based on game theory. To reduce computational complexity, which results from the extension from 2-D to 3-D segmentation, landmark detection is augmented by a concept known in game theory as strategy dominance. The novel shape representations, game-theoretic landmark detection and strategy dominance are combined into a segmentation framework that was evaluated on 3-D computed tomography images of lumbar vertebrae and femoral heads. The best shape representation yielded symmetric surface distance of 0.75 mm and 1.11 mm, and Dice coefficient of 93.6% and 96.2% for lumbar vertebrae and femoral heads, respectively. By applying strategy dominance, the computational costs were further reduced for up to three times. PMID:24710155

  20. Reliability of Determination of Bony Landmarks of the Distal Femur on MR Images and MRI-Based 3D Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Esfandiarpour

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Consistent determination of the anatomical landmarks on image or image-based three dimensional (3D models is a basic requirement for reliable analysis of the human joint kinematics using imaging techniques. We examined the intra- and inter-observer reliability of determination of the medial and lateral epicondyle landmarks on 2D MR images and 3D MRI-based models of the knee. "n"n Materials and Methods: Sixteen coronal plane MRI recordings were taken from 18 healthy knees using a knee coil with T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence and 512×512 pixel size. They were then processed by the Mimics software to provide the coronal and axial plane views and to create a 3D image-based model of the femur. Each image was reviewed twice, at least one-day apart. The interclass correlation coefficient, standard error of measurement, and coefficient of variation were calculated to assess the intra- and inter-observer reliability of the landmark determination by six experienced radiologists. A mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA with two days of observation as the within-subject factor, and observers (six radiologists and methods (2D vs. 3D as between-subject factors were used to test the effect of observer, two days of observation and method of evaluation on landmark determination. Results: The results indicated that the interclass correlation coefficients for the intra-observer and inter-observer determination of landmarks on images and image-based 3D models were above 0.97. The standard error of measurement ranged between 0.41 and 0.78 mm for x; 1.35 and 3.43 mm for y; and 1.03 and 4.71 mm for z coordinates. Furthermore, the results showed no significant difference for within and between-subject comparisons of each coordinate of the lateral epicondyle as well as x and z coordinates of the medial epicondyle. For the y coordinate of the medial epicondyle, the p value of within-subject comparison was borderlinely significant (p=0.049. Conclusion: It was concluded that the intra- and inter-observer reliability of the bony landmark determination on both image and image-based 3D models were excellent.    

  1. A class of spline functions for landmark-based image registration

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Alessandra; Cavoretto, Roberto; Allasia, Giampietro

    2011-01-01

    A class of spline functions, called Lobachevsky splines, is proposed for landmark-based image registration. Analytic expressions of Lobachevsky splines and some of their properties are given, reasoning in the context of probability theory. Since these functions have simple analytic expressions and compact support, landmark-based transformations can be advantageously defined using them. Numerical results point out accuracy and stability of Lobachevsky splines, comparing them with Gaussians and...

  2. Anatomical landmarks for the localization of the greater palatine foramen--a study of 1200 head CTs, 150 dry skulls, systematic review of literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Kmiotek, Elizabeth K; Pena, Iwona Z; Urbanik, Andrzej; Nowakowski, Micha?; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of greater palatine foramen (GPF) anatomy is necessary when performing a variety of anaesthesiological, dental or surgical procedures. The first aim of this study was to localize the GPF in relation to multiple anatomical landmarks. The second aim was to perform a systematic review of literature, and to conduct a meta-analysis on the subject of GPF position to aid clinicians in their practice. One-hundred and fifty dry, adult, human skulls and 1200 archived head computed tomography scans were assessed and measured in terms of GPF relation to other anatomical reference points. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases, and a meta-analysis on the subject of GPF relation to the maxillary molars was conducted. On average, in the Polish population, the GPF was positioned 15.9?±?1.5?mm from the midline maxillary suture (MMS), 3.0?±?1.2?mm from the alveolar ridge (AR) and 17.0?±?1.5?mm from the posterior nasal spine (PNS); 74.7% of GPF were positioned opposite the third maxillary molar (M3). Twenty-seven studies were included in the systematic review and 23 in the meta-analysis (n?=?6927 GPF). The pooled prevalence of the GPF being positioned opposite the M3 was 63.9% (95% confidence interval?=?56.6-70.9%). Concluding, the GPF is most often located opposite the M3 in the majority of the world's populations. The maxillary molars are the best landmarks for locating the GPF. In edentulous patients the most useful points for approximating the position of the GPF are the AR, MMS and PNS. This study introduces an easy and repeatable classification to reference the GPF to the maxillary molars. PMID:25131842

  3. Salient anatomical landmarks of thyroid and their practical significance in thyroid surgery: a pictorial review of thyroid surgical anatomy (revisited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargav, P R K

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid surgery is a prototype of operations requiring thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy. There are many vital and delicate anatomical structures such as recurrent laryngeal nerve, superior laryngeal nerve, parathyroid glands, and distinct fascial planes surrounding the thyroid gland. A protean range of pathologies such as goiter, nodules, thyroiditis, and malignancy distort or alter the location and course of these structures and planes. The distinct vascular supply and high vascularity of thyroid region challenges the surgeon's expertise. Several pathologies like malignancy, multinodularity, toxicity, and retrosternal extension further compounds this vascular aspect of surgery. Several structures of embryological importance such as pyramidal lobe, tubercle of Zuckerkandl, and ligament of Berry have decisive clinical implications in the surgical management of thyroid disorders. Surgeons attempting thyroidectomy need to have thorough knowledge of embryology and surgical anatomy of the thyroid gland. In this context, we highlight through a pictorial assay the embryological and anatomical aspects of the thyroid gland emphasizing on their clinical and surgical importance. PMID:25177118

  4. Landmark Detection via Ann for a Web Based Autonomous Mobile Robot: Sunar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Y?lmaz

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a landmark detection method was developed for finding or position correction of a web based mobile robot designed and implemented for long term and regular scientific purposes. Colored numeric and alphanumeric character sticker in place of other artificial landmarks appropriate for robot is selected to be landmark for understanding of both human and robot. Statistical analysis of captured and segmented image part is used for feature vector extraction. Statistical properties of histogram, projections and image raw data are selectable components of feature vector. The feature vector is tested by previously trained multilayer perceptron feed forward neural network (ANN. For this aim, online programs required for robotic activities, image processing and neural network processes have been developed on web interface of web-robot. In this program, improved software libraries for SUNAR system are employed. Real time results and robot scenes are monitored online on web portal.

  5. Visual Homing in the Absence of Feature-Based Landmark Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillner, Sabine; Weiss, Anja M.; Mallot, Hanspeter A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite that fact that landmarks play a prominent role in human navigation, experimental evidence on how landmarks are selected and defined by human navigators remains elusive. Indeed, the concept of a "landmark" is itself not entirely clear. In everyday language, the term landmark refers to salient, distinguishable, and usually nameable objects,…

  6. LANDMARK-BASED SPEECH RECOGNITION: REPORT OF THE 2004 JOHNS HOPKINS SUMMER WORKSHOP

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa-johnson, Mark; Baker, James; Borys, Sarah; Chen, Ken; Coogan, Emily; Greenberg, Steven; Juneja, Amit; Kirchhoff, Katrin; Livescu, Karen; Mohan, Srividya; Muller, Jennifer; Sonmez, Kemal; Wang, Tianyu

    2005-01-01

    Three research prototype speech recognition systems are described, all of which use recently developed methods from artificial intelligence (specifically support vector machines, dynamic Bayesian networks, and maximum entropy classification) in order to implement, in the form of an automatic speech recognizer, current theories of human speech perception and phonology (specifically landmark-based speech perception, nonlinear phonology, and articulatory phonology). All three systems begin with ...

  7. Common Carotid Artery Bifurcation Levels Related to Clinical Relevant Anatomical Landmarks / Niveles de Bifurcación de la Arteria Carótida Común en Relación a Puntos de Referencia Anatómicos Relevantes en Clínica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rogério Alves, Ribeiro; João Alberto de Souza, Ribeiro; Omar Andrade, Rodrigues Filho; Abadio Gonçalves, Caetano; Valéria Paula Sassoli, Fazan.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available En cirugías de cabeza y cuello, las arterias carótidas comunes son importantes puntos de referencia, para defnir el plano de disección, durante cirugías radicales de cuello. Los objetivos del presente estudio fueron agregar información sobre el diámetro de las arterias carótidas y correlacionar el n [...] ivel de bifurcación de la arteria carótida común (ACC) con importantes puntos de referencia usados regularmente en la práctica clínica. Para la obtención de los objetivos planteados, fueron evaluados 46 cadáveres formolizados de individuos de sexo masculino. Se obtuvieron los diámetros de las arterias carótidas común, externa (ACE) e interna (ACI), con el auxilio de un caliper digital. No hubo diferencias entre lados derecho e izquierdo, ni tampoco en los niveles estudiados. El nivel de bifurcación de la ACC fue medido en relación a puntos de reparos anatómicos relevantes en clínica (margen superior del cartílago tiroides, ángulo de la mandíbula y lóbulo del pabellón auricular), como también en relación al nivel vertebral. Nuestro estudio mostró que el margen superior del cartílago tiroides fue el punto de referencia más estable para inferir el nivel de bifurcación de la ACC. Es importante mencionar que, de todos los puntos de referencia estudiados, la vértebra cervical fue la única que mostró diferencias entre los lados, siendo más variable el nivel de bifurcación en el lado izquierdo Abstract in english In head and neck surgery, the common carotid arteries are important landmarks, defining dissection plane during radical neck surgeries. The objectives of the present study were to add information on the diameter of the carotid arteries and to correlate the common carotid artery (CCA) bifurcation lev [...] el with important anatomical landmarks used regularly in clinical practice. Forty-six necks from male embalmed human cadavers were evaluated. The CCA as the external (ECA) and internal (ICA) carotid arteries diameters were studied with the aid of an electronic digital caliper. No differences were found between sides in any level studied. The CCA bifurcation level was measured in relation to clinically relevant anatomical landmarks (superior level of the thyroid cartilage, mandible angle and ear lobe) and the bifurcation level according to the cervical vertebra level was also investigated. Our study shows that the superior border of the thyroid cartilage was the most stable anatomical landmark for predicting the CCA bifurcation level. It is important to mention that from all the landmarks studied, the cervical vertebra was the only one to show differences between sides, with the left side bifurcation level more variable than the right side

  8. Knee joint secondary motion accuracy improved by quaternion-based optimizer with bony landmark constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongsheng; Zheng, Naiqaun Nigel

    2010-12-01

    Skin marker-based motion analysis has been widely used in biomechanical studies and clinical applications. Unfortunately, the accuracy of knee joint secondary motions is largely limited by the nonrigidity nature of human body segments. Numerous studies have investigated the characteristics of soft tissue movement. Utilizing these characteristics, we may improve the accuracy of knee joint motion measurement. An optimizer was developed by incorporating the soft tissue movement patterns at special bony landmarks into constraint functions. Bony landmark constraints were assigned to the skin markers at femur epicondyles, tibial plateau edges, and tibial tuberosity in a motion analysis algorithm by limiting their allowed position space relative to the underlying bone. The rotation matrix was represented by quaternion, and the constrained optimization problem was solved by Fletcher's version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization technique. The algorithm was validated by using motion data from both skin-based markers and bone-mounted markers attached to fresh cadavers. By comparing the results with the ground truth bone motion generated from the bone-mounted markers, the new algorithm had a significantly higher accuracy (root-mean-square (RMS) error: 0.7 ± 0.1 deg in axial rotation and 0.4 ± 0.1 deg in varus-valgus) in estimating the knee joint secondary rotations than algorithms without bony landmark constraints (RMS error: 1.7 ± 0.4 deg in axial rotation and 0.7 ± 0.1 deg in varus-valgus). Also, it predicts a more accurate medial-lateral translation (RMS error: 0.4 ± 0.1 mm) than the conventional techniques (RMS error: 1.2 ± 0.2 mm). The new algorithm, using bony landmark constrains, estimates more accurate secondary rotations and medial-lateral translation of the underlying bone. PMID:21142329

  9. Image-based dose planning of intracavitary brachytherapy: registration of serial-imaging studies using deformable anatomic templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate that high-dimensional voxel-to-voxel transformations, derived from continuum mechanics models of the underlying pelvic tissues, can be used to register computed tomography (CT) serial examinations into a single anatomic frame of reference for cumulative dose calculations. Methods and Materials: Three patients with locally advanced cervix cancer were treated with CT-compatible intracavitary (ICT) applicators. Each patient underwent five volumetric CT examinations: before initiating treatment, and immediately before and after the first and second ICT insertions, respectively. Each serial examination was rigidly registered to the patient's first ICT examination by aligning the bony anatomy. Detailed nonrigid alignment for organs (or targets) of interest was subsequently achieved by deforming the CT exams as a viscous-fluid, described by the Navier-Stokes equation, until the coincidence with the corresponding targets on CT image was maximized. In cases where ICT insertion induced very large and topologically complex rearrangements of pelvic organs, e.g., extreme uterine canal reorientation following tandem insertion, a viscous-fluid-landmark transformation was used to produce an initial registration. Results: For all three patients, reasonable registrations for organs (or targets) of interest were achieved. Fluid-landmark initialization was required in 4 of the 11 registrations. Relative to the best rigid bony landmark alignment, the viscous-fluid ony landmark alignment, the viscous-fluid registration resulted in average soft-tissue displacements from 2.8 to 28.1 mm, and improved organ coincidence from the range of 5.2% to 72.2% to the range of 90.6% to 100%. Compared to the viscous-fluid transformation, global registration of bony anatomy mismatched 5% or more of the contoured organ volumes by 15-25 mm. Conclusion: Pelvic soft-tissue structures undergo large deformations and displacements during the external-beam and multiple-ICT course of radiation therapy for locally advanced cervix cancer. These changes cannot be modeled by the conventional rigid landmark transformation method. In the current study, we found that the deformable anatomic template registration method, based on continuum-mechanics models of deformation, successfully described these large anatomic shape changes before and after ICT. These promising modeling results indicate that realistic registration of the cumulative dose distribution to the organs (or targets) of interest for radiation therapy of cervical cancers is achievable

  10. Combining Speedup Techniques based on Landmarks and Containers with parallelised preprocessing in Random and Planar Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kalpana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Dijkstra’s algorithm is applied in many real world problems like mobile routing, road maps,railway networks, etc,. There are many techniques available to speedup the algorithm while guaranteeingthe optimality of the solution. Almost all of the speedup techniques have a substantial amount of parallelism that can be exploited to decrease its running time. By suitably modifying portions of theexisting system various degrees of parallelism can be achieved. The rapidly growing field of multiprocessing systems and multi-core processors provide many opportunities for such improvements. Inthese techniques there’s always a demand for the running time and the time required for pre-processing.Space requirements for the pre-processing also have a major influence on the running time of thealgorithm. The main focus of the work is to implement landmark technique and to identify the segment of the code in landmark pre-processing which can be parallelized to obtain better speedup. The results are applied to the combined speedup technique which is based on landmarks and containers. The experimental results were compared and analysed for determining better performance improvements in random graphs and planar graphs.

  11. Fast, shape-directed, landmark-based deep gray matter segmentation for quantification of iron deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekin, Ahmet; Jasinschi, Radu; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Buchem, Mark A.; van Muiswinkel, Arianne

    2006-03-01

    This paper introduces image processing methods to automatically detect the 3D volume-of-interest (VOI) and 2D region-of-interest (ROI) for deep gray matter organs (thalamus, globus pallidus, putamen, and caudate nucleus) of patients with suspected iron deposition from MR dual echo images. Prior to the VOI and ROI detection, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) region is segmented by a clustering algorithm. For the segmentation, we automatically determine the cluster centers with the mean shift algorithm that can quickly identify the modes of a distribution. After the identification of the modes, we employ the K-Harmonic means clustering algorithm to segment the volumetric MR data into CSF and non-CSF. Having the CSF mask and observing that the frontal lobe of the lateral ventricle has more consistent shape accross age and pathological abnormalities, we propose a shape-directed landmark detection algorithm to detect the VOI in a speedy manner. The proposed landmark detection algorithm utilizes a novel shape model of the front lobe of the lateral ventricle for the slices where thalamus, globus pallidus, putamen, and caudate nucleus are expected to appear. After this step, for each slice in the VOI, we use horizontal and vertical projections of the CSF map to detect the approximate locations of the relevant organs to define the ROI. We demonstrate the robustness of the proposed VOI and ROI localization algorithms to pathologies, including severe amounts of iron accumulation as well as white matter lesions, and anatomical variations. The proposed algorithms achieved very high detection accuracy, 100% in the VOI detection , over a large set of a challenging MR dataset.

  12. Percutaneous Placement of Central Venous Catheters: Comparing the Anatomical Landmark Method with the Radiologically Guided Technique for Central Venous Catheterization Through the Internal Jugular Vein in Emergent Hemodialysis Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroglu, M.; Demir, M.; Koroglu, B.K.; Sezer, M.T.; Akhan, O.; Yildiz, H.; Yavuz, L.; Baykal, B.; Oyar, O. [Suleyman Demirel Univ., Isparta (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Internal Medicine and Anesthesiology

    2006-02-15

    Purpose: To compare the success and immediate complication rates of the anatomical landmark method (group 1) and the radiologically (combined real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy) guided technique (group 2) in the placement of central venous catheters in emergent hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: The study was performed prospectively in a randomized manner. The success and immediate complication rates of radiologically guided placement of central venous access catheters through the internal jugular vein (n = 40) were compared with those of the anatomical landmark method (n 40). The success of placement, the complications, the number of passes required, and whether a single or double-wall puncture occurred were also noted and compared. Results: The groups were comparable in age and sex. The indication for catheter placement was hemodialysis access in all patients. Catheter placement was successful in all patients in group 2 and unsuccessful in 1 (2.5%) patient in group 1. All catheters functioned adequately and immediately after the placement (0% initial failure rate) in group 2, but 3 catheters (7.5% initial failure rate) were non-functional just after placement in group 1. The total number of needle passes, double venous wall puncture, and complication rate were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusion: Percutaneous central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein can be performed by interventional radiologists with better technical success rates and lower immediate complications. In conclusion, central venous catheterization for emergent dialysis should be performed under both real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.

  13. Dorsolateral striatal lesions impair navigation based on landmark-goal vectors but facilitate spatial learning based on a "cognitive map".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Yutaka; Poulter, Steven L; Austen, Joe M; McGregor, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    In three experiments, the nature of the interaction between multiple memory systems in rats solving a variation of a spatial task in the water maze was investigated. Throughout training rats were able to find a submerged platform at a fixed distance and direction from an intramaze landmark by learning a landmark-goal vector. Extramaze cues were also available for standard place learning, or "cognitive mapping," but these cues were valid only within each session, as the position of the platform moved around the pool between sessions together with the intramaze landmark. Animals could therefore learn the position of the platform by taking the consistent vector from the landmark across sessions or by rapidly encoding the new platform position on each session with reference to the extramaze cues. Excitotoxic lesions of the dorsolateral striatum impaired vector-based learning but facilitated cognitive map-based rapid place learning when the extramaze cues were relatively poor (Experiment 1) but not when they were more salient (Experiments 2 and 3). The way the lesion effects interacted with cue availability is consistent with the idea that the memory systems involved in the current navigation task are functionally cooperative yet associatively competitive in nature. PMID:25691518

  14. Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernioplasty using two trocars: anatomical landmarks and surgical technique / Hernioplastia laparoscópica totalmente extraperitoneal (TEP) utilizando dois trocárteres: reparos anatômicos e técnica cirúrgica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Leandro Ryuchi, IUAMOTO; Juliana Mika, KATO; Alberto, MEYER; Pierre, BLANC.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Dentre as correções endoscópicas das hérnias, as abordagens totalmente extraperitoneal (TEP) e transabdominal pré-peritoneal (TAPP) são amplamente aceitas como alternativas à operação aberta, fornecendo menos dor no período pós-operatório, menor tempo de permanência hospitalar e retorno p [...] recoce ao trabalho. A técnica TEP clássica requer três incisões na pele para a colocação de três trocárteres na linha média ou em triangulação. OBJETIVO: Descrever uma técnica utilizando apenas dois trocárteres para hernioplastia laparoscópica totalmente extraperitoneal (TEP). MÉTODO: Acesso extraperitoneal: são inseridos dois trocárteres sobre a linha média; um de 10 mm é inserido no subcutâneo em direção horizontal após incisão infra-umbilical transversal e, em seguida, elevado ao ângulo de 60°; outro de 5 mm é inserido ao nível do pubis com visão direta. Tempos operatórios: 1) dissecção do espaço preperitoneal: introdução da ótica laparoscópica de 0º através da incisão infra-umbilical para visualização e dissecção pré-peritoneal; pressão de insuflação inferior a 12 mmHg; 2) Dissecção de alguns reparos anatômicos: pubis, linha arqueada e vasos epigástricos inferiores; 3) reconhecimento do "triângulo da dor" e "triângulo do desastre"; 4) Inserção através do trocáter de 10 mm de tela de polipropileno de 10x15 cm para cobrir o sitio da hérnia; 5) Reposicionamento do peritônio e da borda dorsal da tela para evitar dobras ou deslocamento da tela. Não é necessária a drenagem. RESULTADOS: Esta técnica foi utilizada em nove pacientes e apresentou bom resultado sem necessidade de um cirurgião auxiliar para executá-la, apenas dois trocáteres, menos material de sutura e de curativos. Além disso, exigiu apenas duas incisões, o que proporcionou melhor resultado estético e menor dor no período pós-operatório. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica proposta utilizando dois trocárteres é uma alternativa viável, com melhora dos resultados cosméticos e financeiros. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Among endoscopic hernioplasties, totally extraperitoneal (TEP) and transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach are widely accepted alternatives to open surgery, both providing less postoperative pain, hospital length of stay and early return to work. Classical TEP technique requires th [...] ree skin incisions for placement of three trocars in the midline or in triangulation. AIM: To describe a technique using only two trocars for laparoscopic total extraperitoneal for inguinal hernia repair. METHOD: Extraperitoneal access: place two regular trocars on the midline. The 10 mm is inserted into the subcutaneous in horizontal direction after a transverse infra-umbilical incision and then elevated at 60º angle. The 5 mm trocar is inserted at the same level of the pubis with direct vision. Preperitoneal space dissection: introduction 0º optical laparoscope through the infra-umbilical incision for visualization and preperitoneal dissection; insufflation pressure must be below 12 mmHg. Dissection of some anatomical landmarks: pubic bone, arcuate line and inferior epigastric vessels. Exposure of "triangle of pain" and "triangle of doom". Insertion through the 10 mm trocar polypropylene mesh of 10x15 cm to cover the hernia sites. Peritoneal sac and the dorsal edge of the mesh are repositioned in order to avoid bending or mesh displacement. It is also important to remember that the drainage is not necessary. RESULTS: The 2-port TEP required less financial costs than usual because it is not necessary an auxiliary surgeon to perform the technique. Trocars, suturing material and wound dressing were spared in comparison to the classical technique. Besides, there were only two incisions, which provides a better plastic result and less postoperative pain. CONCLUSION: The TEP technique using two trocars is an alternative technique which improves cosmetic and financial outcomes.

  15. BasemapLandmarks_CEMETERY

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The BasemapLandmarks_CEMETERY point layer contains cemeteries in the state of Vermont. The data is based on VTrans Town Highway Maps. Some points have been moved to...

  16. Software-guided standardization of manual landmark data in medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüm, Hermann; Gerigk, Lars; Hintze, Christian; Thieke, Christian; Floca, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    It is crucial to evaluate registration algorithms in order to make them available in clinical practice. Several evaluation strategies have been proposed in the past, and one approach is to evaluate these algorithms with intrinsic anatomical landmarks identified by a health professional. The acquisition and handling of large amounts of these landmark data is a time-consuming task for the health professional, and it is vulnerable to errors and inconsistencies. Additionally, limited access to appropriate tools makes dealing with landmark data considerably more difficult. We introduce a strategy for the acquisition of landmarks for the landmark-based evaluation of registration algorithms and we present an ontology-driven software tool that assists the different partners involved to act according to that strategy. This tool provides the user with intrinsic knowledge of the registration problems, the possibility to conveniently make the acquired data available to further processing, and an easy-to-use graphical interface. PMID:20888204

  17. Anatomical curve identification

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer express...

  18. Dissimilarity-based classification of anatomical tree structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SØrensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for classification of abnormality in anatomical tree structures is presented. A tree is classified based on direct comparisons with other trees in a dissimilarity-based classification scheme. The pair-wise dissimilarity measure between two trees is based on a linear assignment between the branch feature vectors representing those trees. Hereby, localized information in the branches is collectively used in classification and variations in feature values across the tree are taken into account. An approximate anatomical correspondence between matched branches can be achieved by including anatomical features in the branch feature vectors. The proposed approach is applied to classify airway trees in computed tomography images of subjects with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using the wall area percentage (WA%), a common measure of airway abnormality in COPD, as well as anatomical features to characterize each branch, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curveof 0.912 is achieved. This is significantly better than computing the average WA%.

  19. Dissimilarity-Based Classification of Anatomical Tree Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SØrensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for classification of abnormality in anatomical tree structures is presented. A tree is classified based on direct comparisons with other trees in a dissimilarity-based classification scheme. The pair-wise dissimilarity measure between two trees is based on a linear assignment between the branch feature vectors representing those trees. Hereby, localized information in the branches is collectively used in classification and variations in feature values across the tree are taken into account. An approximate anatomical correspondence between matched branches can be achieved by including anatomical features in the branch feature vectors. The proposed approach is applied to classify airway trees in computed tomography images of subjects with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using the wall area percentage (WA%), a common measure of airway abnormality in COPD, as well as anatomical features to characterize each branch, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.912 is achieved. This is significantly better than computing the average WA%.

  20. Percutaneous Placement of Central Venous Catheters: Comparing the Anatomical Landmark Method with the Radiologically Guided Technique for Central Venous Catheterization Through the Internal Jugular Vein in Emergent Hemodialysis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the success and immediate complication rates of the anatomical landmark method (group 1) and the radiologically (combined real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy) guided technique (group 2) in the placement of central venous catheters in emergent hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: The study was performed prospectively in a randomized manner. The success and immediate complication rates of radiologically guided placement of central venous access catheters through the internal jugular vein (n = 40) were compared with those of the anatomical landmark method (n 40). The success of placement, the complications, the number of passes required, and whether a single or double-wall puncture occurred were also noted and compared. Results: The groups were comparable in age and sex. The indication for catheter placement was hemodialysis access in all patients. Catheter placement was successful in all patients in group 2 and unsuccessful in 1 (2.5%) patient in group 1. All catheters functioned adequately and immediately after the placement (0% initial failure rate) in group 2, but 3 catheters (7.5% initial failure rate) were non-functional just after placement in group 1. The total number of needle passes, double venous wall puncture, and complication rate were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusion: Percutaneous central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein can be performed by interventional radiologists with better technical success rdiologists with better technical success rates and lower immediate complications. In conclusion, central venous catheterization for emergent dialysis should be performed under both real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance

  1. A landmark-based method for the geometrical 3D calibration of scanning microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, M.

    2007-04-27

    This thesis presents a new strategy and a spatial method for the geometric calibration of 3D measurement devices at the micro-range, based on spatial reference structures with nanometersized landmarks (nanomarkers). The new method was successfully applied for the 3D calibration of scanning probe microscopes (SPM) and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). Moreover, the spatial method was also used for the photogrammetric self-calibration of scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In order to implement the calibration strategy to all scanning microscopes used, the landmark-based principle of reference points often applied at land survey or at close-range applications has been transferred to the nano- and micro-range in the form of nanomarker. In order to function as a support to the nanomarkers, slope-shaped step pyramids have been developed and fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) induced metal deposition. These FIB produced 3D microstructures have been sized to embrace most of the measurement volume of the scanning microscopes. Additionally, their special design allows the homogenous distribution of the nanomarkers. The nanomarkers were applied onto the support and the plateaus of the slope-step pyramids by FIB etching (milling) as landmarks with as little as several hundreds of nanometers in diameter. The nanomarkers are either of point-, or ring-shaped design. They are optimized so that they can be spatially measured by SPM and CLSM, and, imaged and photogrammetrically analyzed on the basis of SEM data. The centre of the each nanomarker serves as reference point in the measurement data or images. By applying image processing routines, the image (2D) or object (3D) coordinates of each nanomarker has been determined with subpixel accuracy. The correlative analysis of the SPM, CLSM and photogrammetric SEM measurement data after 3D calibration resulted in mean residues in the measured coordinates of as little as 13 nm. Without the coupling factors the mean residues are up to 6 times higher. By taking into account the orthogonality of the measurement coordinate axes when performing a 3D calibration, a comparative and quantitative analysis of 3D scanning microscopy has been made possible. (orig.)

  2. Knowledge-based recognition of man-made landmarks in a simulated control cycle using a virtual-globe system

    OpenAIRE

    Michaelsen, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    Automatic knowledge-based recognition of landmarks in aerial images for UAV navigation is an alternative to GNSS navigation. It provides absolute position estimates thus complementing INS navigation. Relying on knowledge instead of template images or training samples is advantageous because the first may be out-of-date and the latter not representative. The robustness and precision of the method can be assessed using internet-based virtual globe systems such as Google Earth as camera simulato...

  3. Reliability of lower limb alignment measures using an established landmark-based method with a customized computer software program

    OpenAIRE

    Sled, Elizabeth A.; Sheehy, Lisa M.; Felson, David T.; Costigan, Patrick A.; Lam, Miu; Cooke, T. Derek V.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the reliability of frontal plane lower limb alignment measures using a landmark-based method by (1) comparing inter- and intra-reader reliability between measurements of alignment obtained manually with those using a computer program, and (2) determining inter- and intra-reader reliability of computer-assisted alignment measures from full-limb radiographs. An established method for measuring alignment was used, involving selection of 10 femoral and t...

  4. Anatomically based lower limb nerve model for electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soboleva Tanya K

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES is a technique that aims to rehabilitate or restore functionality of skeletal muscles using external electrical stimulation. Despite the success achieved within the field of FES, there are still a number of questions that remain unanswered. One way of providing input to the answers is through the use of computational models. Methods This paper describes the development of an anatomically based computer model of the motor neurons in the lower limb of the human leg and shows how it can be used to simulate electrical signal propagation from the beginning of the sciatic nerve to a skeletal muscle. One-dimensional cubic Hermite finite elements were used to represent the major portions of the lower limb nerves. These elements were fit to data that had been digitised using images from the Visible Man project. Nerves smaller than approximately 1 mm could not be seen in the images, and thus a tree-branching algorithm was used to connect the ends of the fitted nerve model to the respective skeletal muscle. To simulate electrical propagation, a previously published mammalian nerve model was implemented and solved on the anatomically based nerve mesh using a finite difference method. The grid points for the finite difference method were derived from the fitted finite element mesh. By adjusting the tree-branching algorithm, it is possible to represent different levels of motor-unit recruitment. Results To illustrate the process of a propagating nerve stimulus to a muscle in detail, the above method was applied to the nerve tree that connects to the human semitendinosus muscle. A conduction velocity of 89.8 m/s was obtained for a 15 ?m diameter nerve fibre. This signal was successfully propagated down the motor neurons to a selected group of motor units in the muscle. Conclusion An anatomically and physiologically based model of the posterior motor neurons in the human lower limb was developed. This model can be used to examine the effect of external stimulation on nerve and muscle activity, as may occur, for example, in the field of FES.

  5. The Jugular Dural Fold—A Helpful Skull Base Landmark to the Cranial Nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Silverstein, Herbert; Willcox, Thomas O.; Rosenberg, Seth I.; Seidman, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    During a retrosigmoid (or combined retrolabyrinthine-retrosigmoid) approach to the posterior fossa for vestibular neurectomy or removal of small acoustic neuromas, a white dural fold is a consistent landmark to cranial nerves VII through XII. This fold of dura appears as a white linear structure extending from the foramen magnum across the sigmoid sinus, attaching to the posterior aspect of the temporal bone, anterior to the vestibular aqueduct. The name “jugular dural fold” is suggested for ...

  6. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Meiberdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight parameters were determined for the weighted S-TPS-RPM. Results: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with optimal parameters significantly improved the anatomical accuracy as compared to S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder alone and reduced the range of the anatomical errors by half as compared with the simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. The weighted algorithm reduced the RDE range of lipiodol markers from 0.9-14 mm after rigid bone match to 0.9-4.0 mm, compared to a range of 1.1-9.1 mm with S-TPS-RPM of bladder alone and 0.9-9.4 mm for simultaneous nonweighted registration. All registration methods resulted in good geometric accuracy on the bladder; average error values were all below 1.2 mm. Conclusions: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with additional weight parameter allowed indirect control over structure-specific flexibility in multistructure registrations of bladder and bladder tumor, enabling anatomically coherent registrations. The availability of an anatomically validated deformable registration method opens up the horizon for improvements in IGART for bladder cancer.

  7. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors’ unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RP with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight parameters were determined for the weighted S-TPS-RPM. Results: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with optimal parameters significantly improved the anatomical accuracy as compared to S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder alone and reduced the range of the anatomical errors by half as compared with the simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. The weighted algorithm reduced the RDE range of lipiodol markers from 0.9–14 mm after rigid bone match to 0.9–4.0 mm, compared to a range of 1.1–9.1 mm with S-TPS-RPM of bladder alone and 0.9–9.4 mm for simultaneous nonweighted registration. All registration methods resulted in good geometric accuracy on the bladder; average error values were all below 1.2 mm. Conclusions: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with additional weight parameter allowed indirect control over structure-specific flexibility in multistructure registrations of bladder and bladder tumor, enabling anatomically coherent registrations. The availability of an anatomically validated deformable registration method opens up the horizon for improvements in IGART for bladder cancer.

  8. Sartorial Branch of Saphenous Nerve: Anatomical Relationship with Bony Landmarks and Great Saphenous Vein / Ramo Sartorial del Nervio Safeno Safeno: Relación Anatómica con Puntos de Referencia Óseos y de la vena Safena Magna

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Amornrat, Tothonglor; Sithiporn, Agthong; Thanasil, Huanmanop; Vilai, Chentanez.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El ramo sartorial del nervio safeno (nervio cutáneo medial de la pierna) se origina en el lado medial de la rodilla y desciende a lo largo de la vena safena magna (VSM) para inervar la cara medial de la pierna. Su anatomía es motivo de preocupación en los procedimientos quirúrgicos y en el bloqueo a [...] nestésico. Sin embargo, los datos de medición relacionados con puntos de referencia óseos palpables y la comparación entre los lados y en ambos sexos son escasas. Se realizó la disección en 95 miembros inferiores de ambos sexos. Se encontró que el nervio perforó la fascia profunda en la mayoría de los casos (92,6%). Esta punta de perforación fue siempre distal al tubérculo del músculo aductor magno a una distancia de 5-6 cm, que representaba el 15% del largo de la pierna (la distancia entre el tubérculo del aductor magno y el maléolo medial). El nervio se localizaba 7 cm medial a la tuberosidad tibial. Al nivel del tercio medio en ambas piernas, el nervio estaba a una distancia un poco mayor a 4 cm medial al margen anterior de la tibia. El nervio se dividía 7 cm proximal al maléolo medial. Por otra parte, la relación anatómica entre el nervio y la VSM fue muy variable. El nervio era constantemente anterior, posterior o profundo a la VSM en 8,4%, 15,8% y 2,1%, respectivamente. Cruce entre las dos estructuras anatómicas se observó en el 57,9% de las muestras y la distancia hasta el maléolo medial fue de 18 cm. La simetría se encuentra en la mayoría de los parámetros y diferencias de sexo significativas se observaron en algunas distancias. Estos resultados son importantes para evitar la lesión del nervio sartorial y localizar el nervio durante los procedimientos pertinentes. Abstract in english Sartorial branch of saphenous nerve (medial crural cutaneous nerve) originates at the medial side of the knee and descends along the great saphenous vein (GSV) to innervate the medial aspect of the leg. Its anatomy is of concern in surgical procedures and anesthetic block. However, the measurement d [...] ata related to palpable bony landmarks with comparison between sexes and sides are lacking. Dissection was done in 95 lower limbs from both sexes. We found that the nerve pierced the deep fascia alone in most cases (92.6%). This piercing point was always distal to the adductor tubercle with the distance of 5-6 cm which was 15% of the leg length (the distance between the adductor tubercle and medial malleolus). The nerve was 7 cm medial to the tibial tuberosity. At the mid-level of leg length, the nerve was slightly over 4 cm medial to the anterior tibial margin. The nerve terminally divided 7 cm proximal to the medial malleolus. Furthermore, the anatomical relationship between the nerve and the GSV was highly variable. The nerve was constantly anterior, posterior or deep to the GSV in 8.4%, 15.8% and 2.1%, respectively. Crossing between the two structures was observed in 57.9% of specimens and the distance to the medial malleolus was 18 cm. Symmetry was found in most parameters and significant gender differences were observed in some distances. These results are important for avoiding the sartorial nerve injury and locating the nerve during relevant procedures.

  9. Establishing Cephalometric Landmarks for the Translational Study of Le Fort-based Facial Transplantation in Swine: Enhanced applications using computer-assisted surgery and custom cutting guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Gabriel F.; Susarla, Srinivas M.; Al Rakan, Mohammed; Coon, Devin; Rada, Erin M.; Sarhane, Karim; Shores, Jamie T.; Bonawitz, Steven C.; Cooney, Damon; Sacks, Justin; Murphy, Ryan J.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Brandacher, Gerald; Lee, WP Andrew; Liacouras, Peter; Grant, Gerald; Armand, Mehran; Gordon, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Le Fort-based, maxillofacial allotransplantation is a reconstructive alternative gaining clinical acceptance. However, the vast majority of single-jaw transplant recipients demonstrate less-than-ideal skeletal and dental relationships with suboptimal aesthetic harmony. The purpose of this study was to investigate reproducible cephalometric landmarks in a large animal model, where refinement of computer-assisted planning, intra-operative navigational guidance, translational bone osteotomies, and comparative surgical techniques could be performed. Methods Cephalometric landmarks that could be translated into the human craniomaxillofacial skeleton, and would remain reliable following maxillofacial osteotomies with mid-facial alloflap inset, were sought on six miniature swine. Le Fort I-and Le Fort III-based alloflaps were harvested in swine with osteotomies, and all alloflaps were either auto-replanted or transplanted. Cephalometric analyses were performed on lateral cephalograms pre- and post-operatively. Critical cephalometric data sets were identified with the assistance of surgical planning and virtual prediction software, and evaluated for reliability and translational predictability. Results Several pertinent landmarks and human analogues were identified including pronasale (PRN), zygion (Zy), parietale (PA), gonion (GO), gnathion (GN), lower incisior base (LIB), and alveolare (ALV). PA-PRN-ALV and PA-PRN-LIB were found to be reliable correlates of SNA and SNB measurements in humans, respectively. Conclusions There is a set of reliable cephalometric landmarks and measurement angles pertinent for utilization within a translational large animal model. These craniomaxillofacial landmarks will allow us to develop novel navigational software technology, improve our cutting guide designs, and explore new avenues for investigation and collaboration. Level of Evidence N/A (Large Animal Study) PMID:24445879

  10. Automatic anatomical structures location based on dynamic shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Rapp, Walter; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Vander Sloten, Jos; Haex, Bart; Bogaert, Nico; Heitmann, Kjell

    2005-09-01

    New image processing methods and active photonics apparatus have made possible the development of relatively inexpensive optical systems for complex shape and object measurements. We present dynamic 360° scanning method for analysis of human lower body biomechanics, with an emphasis on the analysis of the knee joint. The anatomical structure (of high medical interest) that is possible to scan and analyze, is patella. Tracking of patella position and orientation under dynamic conditions may lead to detect pathological patella movements and help in knee joint disease diagnosis. The processed data is obtained from a dynamic laser triangulation surface measurement system, able to capture slow to normal movements with a scan frequency between 15 and 30 Hz. These frequency rates are enough to capture controlled movements used e.g. for medical examination purposes. The purpose of the work presented is to develop surface analysis methods that may be used as support of diagnosis of motoric abilities of lower limbs. The paper presents algorithms used to process acquired lower limbs surface data in order to find the position and orientation of patella. The algorithms implemented include input data preparation, curvature description methods, knee region discrimination and patella assumed position/orientation calculation. Additionally, a method of 4D (3D + time) medical data visualization is proposed. Also some exemplary results are presented.

  11. Knowledge-based extraction of cerebral vasculature from anatomical MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestergaard, Lasse R.; Larsen, Ole V.; Haase, Jens; Van Meer, Frederick; Evans, Alan C.; Collins, D. Louis

    2001-07-01

    A vessel extraction approach is presented that permits visualization of the cerebral vasculature in 3D from anatomical proton density (PD) weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes. The approach presented utilizes general knowledge about the shape and size of the cerebral vasculature and is divided into multi-scale vessel enhancement filtering, centre-line extraction, and surface modeling. To improve the discrimination between blood vessels and other tissue a multi-scale filtering method that enhances tubular structures is used as a pre-processing step. Centre-line extraction is applied to roughly estimate the centre-line of the vasculature involving both segmentation and skeletonization. The centre-line is used to initialize an active contour modeling process where cylinders are used to model the 3D surface of the blood vessels. The accuracy and robustness of the vessel extraction approach have been demonstrated on both simulated and real data (1mm3 voxels). On simulated data, the mean error of the estimated radii was found to be less than 0.4mm. On real data, the vasculature was successfully extracted from 20 MRI data sets using the same input parameters. An expert found the extracted vessel surfaces to coincide with the vessel walls in the data. Results from CTA data indicate that the approach will work successfully with other imaging modalities as well.

  12. Hierarchical scale-based multiobject recognition of 3-D anatomical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Ulas; Chen, Xinjian; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2012-03-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures from medical images is a challenging problem, which depends on the accurate recognition (localization) of anatomical structures prior to delineation. This study generalizes anatomy segmentation problem via attacking two major challenges: 1) automatically locating anatomical structures without doing search or optimization, and 2) automatically delineating the anatomical structures based on the located model assembly. For 1), we propose intensity weighted ball-scale object extraction concept to build a hierarchical transfer function from image space to object (shape) space such that anatomical structures in 3-D medical images can be recognized without the need to perform search or optimization. For 2), we integrate the graph-cut (GC) segmentation algorithm with prior shape model. This integrated segmentation framework is evaluated on clinical 3-D images consisting of a set of 20 abdominal CT scans. In addition, we use a set of 11 foot MR images to test the generalizability of our method to the different imaging modalities as well as robustness and accuracy of the proposed methodology. Since MR image intensities do not possess a tissue specific numeric meaning, we also explore the effects of intensity nonstandardness on anatomical object recognition. Experimental results indicate that: 1) effective recognition can make the delineation more accurate; 2) incorporating a large number of anatomical structures via a model assembly in the shape model improves the recognition and delineation accuracy dramatically; 3) ball-scale yields useful information about the relationship between the objects and the image; 4) intensity variation among scenes in an ensemble degrades object recognition performance. PMID:22203704

  13. Automatic Insall-Salvati ratio measurement on lateral knee x-ray images using model-guided landmark localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) is important for detecting two common clinical signs of knee disease: patella alta and patella baja. Furthermore, large inter-operator differences in ISR measurement make an objective measurement system necessary for better clinical evaluation. In this paper, we define three specific bony landmarks for determining the ISR and then propose an x-ray image analysis system to localize these landmarks and measure the ISR. Due to inherent artifacts in x-ray images, such as unevenly distributed intensities, which make landmark localization difficult, we hence propose a registration-assisted active-shape model (RAASM) to localize these landmarks. We first construct a statistical model from a set of training images based on x-ray image intensity and patella shape. Since a knee x-ray image contains specific anatomical structures, we then design an algorithm, based on edge tracing, for patella feature extraction in order to automatically align the model to the patella image. We can estimate the landmark locations as well as the ISR after registration-assisted model fitting. Our proposed method successfully overcomes drawbacks caused by x-ray image artifacts. Experimental results show great agreement between the ISRs measured by the proposed method and by orthopedic clinicians.

  14. Automatic Insall-Salvati ratio measurement on lateral knee x-ray images using model-guided landmark localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Wu, Chia-Hsing; Sun, Yung-Nien [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chii-Jeng [Department of Orthopedics, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chien-Kuo, E-mail: ynsun@mail.ncku.edu.t, E-mail: wale1212@gmail.co, E-mail: btmage@gmail.co, E-mail: mark@mail.ncku.edu.t, E-mail: n044206@mail.hosp.ncku.edu.t [Department of Radiology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-21

    The Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) is important for detecting two common clinical signs of knee disease: patella alta and patella baja. Furthermore, large inter-operator differences in ISR measurement make an objective measurement system necessary for better clinical evaluation. In this paper, we define three specific bony landmarks for determining the ISR and then propose an x-ray image analysis system to localize these landmarks and measure the ISR. Due to inherent artifacts in x-ray images, such as unevenly distributed intensities, which make landmark localization difficult, we hence propose a registration-assisted active-shape model (RAASM) to localize these landmarks. We first construct a statistical model from a set of training images based on x-ray image intensity and patella shape. Since a knee x-ray image contains specific anatomical structures, we then design an algorithm, based on edge tracing, for patella feature extraction in order to automatically align the model to the patella image. We can estimate the landmark locations as well as the ISR after registration-assisted model fitting. Our proposed method successfully overcomes drawbacks caused by x-ray image artifacts. Experimental results show great agreement between the ISRs measured by the proposed method and by orthopedic clinicians.

  15. Automatic Insall-Salvati ratio measurement on lateral knee x-ray images using model-guided landmark localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Wu, Chia-Hsing; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2010-11-01

    The Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) is important for detecting two common clinical signs of knee disease: patella alta and patella baja. Furthermore, large inter-operator differences in ISR measurement make an objective measurement system necessary for better clinical evaluation. In this paper, we define three specific bony landmarks for determining the ISR and then propose an x-ray image analysis system to localize these landmarks and measure the ISR. Due to inherent artifacts in x-ray images, such as unevenly distributed intensities, which make landmark localization difficult, we hence propose a registration-assisted active-shape model (RAASM) to localize these landmarks. We first construct a statistical model from a set of training images based on x-ray image intensity and patella shape. Since a knee x-ray image contains specific anatomical structures, we then design an algorithm, based on edge tracing, for patella feature extraction in order to automatically align the model to the patella image. We can estimate the landmark locations as well as the ISR after registration-assisted model fitting. Our proposed method successfully overcomes drawbacks caused by x-ray image artifacts. Experimental results show great agreement between the ISRs measured by the proposed method and by orthopedic clinicians.

  16. Landmarks in Hybrid Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elkawkagy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although planning techniques achieved a significant progress during recent years, solving many planning problem still difficult even for modern planners. In this paper, we will adopt landmark concept to hybrid planning setting - a method that combines reasoning about procedural knowledge and causalities. Land-marks are a well-known concept in the realm of classical planning. Recently, they have been adapted to hierarchical approaches. Such landmarks can be extracted in a pre-processing step from a declarative hierarchical planning domain and problem description. It was shown how this technique allows for a considerable reduction of the search space by eliminating futile plan development options before the actual planning. Therefore, we will present a new approach to in¬tegrate landmark pre-processing technique in the context of hierarchical planning with landmark technique in the classical planning. This integration allows to incorporate the ability of using extracted landmark tasks from hierarchical domain knowledge in the form of HTN and using landmark literals from classical planning. To this end, we will construct a transformation technique to transform the hybrid planning domain into a classical domain model. The method¬ologies in this paper have been implemented successfully, and we will present some experimental results that give evidence for the consid-erable performance increase gained through planning system.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging based rectal cancer classification: landmarks and technical standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasari, Sami; Lim, Daero; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-14

    Rectal cancer classification is important to determine the preoperative chemoradiation therapy and to select appropriate surgical technique. We reviewed the Western and Japanese rectal cancer classification and we propose our new classification based of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We determine the relation of the tumor to fixed parameters in MRI, which are peritoneal reflection and levator ani muscle. Then, we classify the rectal cancer into four levels based on tumor distal margin and invasion to MRI parameters. We applied all three classifications to 60 retrospectively collected patients of different rectal cancer distance and we compared our classifications to the others. Based on each level we standardize our surgical approach. For stages?I-III, We found that level?I?where tumor distal margin is located above the peritoneal reflection and all of them were received low anterior resection (LAR) without chemoradiation. Level II where tumor distal margin is located from the peritoneal reflection and above the levator ani insertion on the rectum. 90% of them were received LAR ± chemoradiation. Level III where tumor distal margin is located at the level of levator ani insertion or invading any part of the levator ani. 60% of them had ULAR + coloanal anastomosis ± chemoradiation. Level IV where the tumor distal margin is located below the levator ani insertion; 77% were received APR ± chemoradiation. The overall kappa for all levels between surgeons and radiologist was 0.93 (95%CI: 0.87-0.99), which is indicating almost perfect agreement. We concluded that the management of rectal tumors differed among each tumor level and our new MRI based classification might facilitate the prediction of surgical and chemoradiation management with better communication among a multidisciplinary team comparing to other classifications. PMID:25593457

  18. SmartLoc: Sensing Landmarks Silently for Smartphone Based Metropolitan Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Bo, Cheng; Li, Xiang-yang; Jung, Taeho; Mao, Xufei

    2013-01-01

    We present \\emph{SmartLoc}, a localization system to estimate the location and the traveling distance by leveraging the lower-power inertial sensors embedded in smartphones as a supplementary to GPS. To minimize the negative impact of sensor noises, \\emph{SmartLoc} exploits the intermittent strong GPS signals and uses the linear regression to build a prediction model which is based on the trace estimated from inertial sensors and the one computed from the GPS. Furthermore, w...

  19. Optimal landmarks selection and fiducial marker placement for minimal target registration error in image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Joskowicz, Leo; Shoshan, Yigal

    2009-02-01

    We describe a new framework and method for the optimal selection of anatomical landmarks and optimal placement of fiducial markers in image-guided neurosurgery. The method allows the surgeon to optimally plan the markers locations on routine diagnostic images before preoperative imaging and to intraoperatively select the fiducial markers and the anatomical landmarks that minimize the Target Registration Error (TRE). The optimal fiducial marker configuration selection is performed by the surgeon on the diagnostic image following the target selection based on a visual Estimated TRE (E-TRE) map. The E-TRE map is automatically updated when the surgeon interactively adds and deletes candidate markers and targets. The method takes the guesswork out of the registration process, provides a reliable localization uncertainty error for navigation, and can reduce the localization error without additional imaging and hardware. Our clinical experiments on five patients who underwent brain surgery with a navigation system show that optimizing one marker location and the anatomical landmarks configuration reduces the average TRE from 4.7mm to 3.2mm, with a maximum improvement of 4mm. The reduction of the target registration error has the potential to support safer and more accurate minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures.

  20. Anatomical curve identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer expression of shape. This is explored in the context of identifying the boundary of breasts from an image of the female torso and the boundary of the lips from a facial image. The curves of interest are characterised by ridges or valleys. Key issues in estimation are the ability to navigate across the anatomical surface in three-dimensions, the ability to recognise the relevant boundary and the need to assess the evidence for the presence of the surface feature of interest. The first issue is addressed by the use of principal curves, as an extension of principal components, the second by suitable assessment of curvature and the third by change-point detection. P-spline smoothing is used as an integral part of the methods but adaptations are made to the specific anatomical features of interest. After estimation of the boundary curves, the intermediate surfaces of the anatomical feature of interest can be characterised by surface interpolation. This allows shape variation to be explored using standard methods such as principal components. These tools are applied to a collection of images of women where one breast has been reconstructed after mastectomy and where interest lies in shape differences between the reconstructed and unreconstructed breasts. They are also applied to a collection of lip images where possible differences in shape between males and females are of interest. PMID:26041943

  1. Non-rigid landmark-based large-scale image registration in 3-D reconstruction of mouse and rat kidney nephrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yan-Ling; Chang, Shi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serial histological sections are suffering from mechanical distortions that disturb the reconstruction of 3-D objects. We have corrected such artifacts with a non-rigid landmark-based method that respects the original geometry in the tissue block. The method is exemplified on a large scale in the registration of semi-thin serial sections of the mouse and rat kidneys, and has been tested on FFPE-sections. AIM: In this study of mouse and rat kidneys, we have measured and characterized the deformations introduced in the preparation of 2.5-?m-thick Epon sections and then eliminated them by a landmark-based non-rigid transformation (NRT). METHODS: We obtained 2.5-?m-thick serial Epon sections from three mouse kidneys and three rat kidneys for 3-D reconstruction of the nephron tubules. First, the images from 3000 serial mouse and 13,000 serial rat sections underwent a classic rigid registration (CRR), and the distortions were measured and indexed. The section images underwent a further NRT in order tocompensate for the deformations. The NRT used is a classic interactive landmark-based approach. The quality of the NRT was verified by comparing the geometry of the transformed images with corresponding block images. RESULTS: After CRR, the 2.5-?m-thick sections had a linear deformation of up to 2%, the tubular lengths were overestimated with up to 1.5×, and it was most difficult to trace the tubules from section to section. After the additional NRT, the geometry of the images reflected the original geometry in the block, the tubular lengths were no longer overestimated, and the NRT highly facilitated the tracing of the tubular system. CONCLUSIONS: NRT has facilitated the tracing of the tubular system in kidneys, a tracing, which would otherwise have been most difficult to perform. NRT has yielded substantial new knowledge to segmental and spatial nephron organization in the mouse and rat kidneys.

  2. City of Chicago Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The city of Chicago has many hundreds of wonderful architectural landmarks and this helpful website is a great resource for anyone with an interest in such matters. On the site, visitors can start by checking out the Landmarks Tours to get started. There over a dozen tours here, including Mansions Tour, Art Deco Tour, and Pre-Fire Chicago Tour. Moving on, visitors may also wish to look over the Architects area. Here they will encounter some of the usual suspects (Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, etc.) and learn about some lesser-known architects, such as Solon S. Beman and William W. Boyington, who designed the wonderful entrance to Rosehill Cemetery. The Style Guide offers a great primer for those who'd like to know more about two dozen architectural styles, including Craftsman, International, and Tudor Revival. Finally, the site also includes a Listings area, complete with information about all of the buildings on the city's official landmarks list.

  3. Co-registration and distortion correction of diffusion and anatomical images based on inverse contrast normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Haldar, Justin P; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A; Shattuck, David W; Leahy, Richard M

    2015-07-15

    Diffusion MRI provides quantitative information about microstructural properties which can be useful in neuroimaging studies of the human brain. Echo planar imaging (EPI) sequences, which are frequently used for acquisition of diffusion images, are sensitive to inhomogeneities in the primary magnetic (B0) field that cause localized distortions in the reconstructed images. We describe and evaluate a new method for correction of susceptibility-induced distortion in diffusion images in the absence of an accurate B0 fieldmap. In our method, the distortion field is estimated using a constrained non-rigid registration between an undistorted T1-weighted anatomical image and one of the distorted EPI images from diffusion acquisition. Our registration framework is based on a new approach, INVERSION (Inverse contrast Normalization for VERy Simple registratION), which exploits the inverted contrast relationship between T1- and T2-weighted brain images to define a simple and robust similarity measure. We also describe how INVERSION can be used for rigid alignment of diffusion images and T1-weighted anatomical images. Our approach is evaluated with multiple in vivo datasets acquired with different acquisition parameters. Compared to other methods, INVERSION shows robust and consistent performance in rigid registration and shows improved alignment of diffusion and anatomical images relative to normalized mutual information for non-rigid distortion correction. PMID:25827811

  4. Coexistence of the suprascapular notch and the suprascapular foramen--a rare anatomical variation and a new hypothesis on its formation based on anatomical and radiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polguj, Micha?; J?drzejewski, Kazimierz; Majos, Agata; Topol, Miros?aw

    2013-06-01

    The suprascapular notch is the most common site of suprascapular nerve entrapment, which can manifest in disability and pain of the upper limb. Here, we present three cases of a very rare anatomical variation in the suprascapular region: the coexistence of the suprascapular notch and the suprascapular foramen. The variation was found during radiological and anatomical investigations. The suprascapular foramen was situated inferior to the suprascapular notch. A bony bridge lay between them, likely created by an ossified anterior coracoscapular ligament (ACSL). This anatomical variation probably increased the risk of suprascapular nerve entrapment by nerve irritation of the bony margins during passsage through the foramen and by a lack of the elasticity that the ACSL normally demonstrates. Also, a bony bridge passing through the middle part of the suprascapular notch reduces the space available for nerve passage (bony bridge decreases the space by about 36.5-38.6 %). One patient who underwent the radiological study had typical symptoms of suprascapular nerve entrapment. Based on his medical history and the presence of this rare variation of the suprascapular notch at the suprascapular region we suspect this neuropathy. PMID:23208271

  5. Early fetal anatomical sonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Jennifer C

    2012-10-01

    Over the past decade, prenatal screening and diagnosis has moved from the second into the first trimester, with aneuploidy screening becoming both feasible and effective. With vast improvements in ultrasound technology, sonologists can now image the fetus in greater detail at all gestational ages. In the hands of experienced sonographers, anatomic surveys between 11 and 14 weeks can be carried out with good visualisation rates of many structures. It is important to be familiar with the normal development of the embryo and fetus, and to be aware of the major anatomical landmarks whose absence or presence may be deemed normal or abnormal depending on the gestational age. Some structural abnormalities will nearly always be detected, some will never be and some are potentially detectable depending on a number of factors.

  6. Is it possible to treat the axillary nodes in the same radiation fields covering the breast? - A study to locate the limits of the axillary dissection relative to anatomic landmarks in the tangential fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Following breast cancer surgery, radiation of the axillary contents may be considered in lieu of axillary dissection or to reduce potential failure in high risk patients. Tangential breast fields often include a portion of the axilla. This review was undertaken to locate the typical location of the axillary contents in a tangential plane. Surgical clips in the axilla were identified in patients treated with breast radiation and were related to bony landmarks in the vicinity of the tangential fields. The presumption was made that the clips, although often used for hemostasis, were contained in the surgical bed and therefore identified the general location of the axillary nodes. Materials and Methods: 111 patients with surgical clips in the axilla were identified. All patients had undergone 'lumpectomy' and axillary dissection for breast cancer. Simulation films of the breast were analyzed to determine the number and location of axillary clips relative to the tangential fields and bony landmarks. All patients were treated with an SSD technique using custom half-beam blocks designed along midline from the suprasternal notch to the xyphoid process. A 1 to 1.5 cm margin around the breast was targeted. The lateral border was placed at the midaxillary line unless accommodation was required to reduce lung volume or to cover the breast. The treatment table was angled in 22 patients along the divergence of the superior field edge if the lateral field angled ir field edge if the lateral field angled into the neck or if a supraclavicular field was used (7 pts). There was no intent to include the axilla in any field. Extent of axillary dissection was not normally dictated in operative reports. Results: Two to 48 clips were identified in the axilla. The median number of clips was 10 (mean 12.4). The median number of dissected nodes was 16 (range 4 to 40). 81 patients had negative nodes. The average number of positive nodes was 3.7 (range 1 to 20). Field lengths ranged from 14 to 21.5 cm, with a median length of 18 cm. The median width of lung in the central axis was 2.0 cm (range 0.6 to 3.2 cm). The median percentage of clips covered in the medial field was 75% and in the lateral field 63%. Only 26 patients (23.4%) had all clips included in both tangential fields. The location of clips is as follows: These measurements did not significantly differ between patients with positive or negative nodes. Divergence accounts for the disparity between the medial and lateral fields. The superior clips were in 95% of medial and lateral fields when 0.7 cm and 0.3 cm, respectively, of the humeral head was included. The most medial clips were included in 95% of patients when 2 cm of lung was seen on the portal films in the region of the axilla. Conclusions: These results suggest that tangential fields do not always include the entirety of the axillary surgical bed. To include the axilla with a 0.5 cm margin in most patients, the following should be seen in the simulation films of the tangential fields: 1) 1.2 cm of the humeral head and 2) 2.5 cm of lung in the region of the axilla. A hanging block or table rotation may compensate for divergence. When the axilla is not dissected or if an insufficient axillary sample is obtained, these guidelines may allow treatment of the axilla with tangential fields, obviating the need for supraclavicular or separate axillary fields

  7. Relative warps meet cladistics: A contribution to the phylogenetic relationships ofbaleen whales based on landmark analyses of mysticete crania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampe O Baszio S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years research on fossil baleen whales experienced a renaissance. Several important fossils weredescribed, and new and extended cladistic analyses were performed, partly including molecular data from living species.Despite the progress in our knowledge of their phylogeny, many questions have still not been resolved. A different attemptto illustrate mysticete relationships is presented here using landmark analyses. For the present analysis, 38 dorsalviews of mysticete skulls and skull reconstructions were scanned and thirteen landmarks were defined. The method usedis the relative warp analysis. This method allows a clustering of elements according to their similarity in shape. The calculatedrelative warps explain main shape variations in the sample. As in parsimony analyses the toothed mysticetes areclearly distinguishable. Representatives of the Aetocetoidea are grouped very closely together and therefore their classificationin this family is strongly supported. The performed analysis shows that the crania of the Balaenidae have developedsimilarities to the cranium of Janjucetus hunderi. The restriction of the Cetotheriidae to a small group of taxa isconfirmed here and includes in this analysis Cetotherium, Mixocetus, Piscobalaena, and Titanocetus with a close relationshipto the living gray whale. The stem-balaenopterids do not show any clear signals in the present analysis. There isno support for a subdivision into further families. The structure of the dorsal cranium of Protororqualus andPraemegaptera is very similar to that of Balaenoptera

  8. Anatomical parameterization for volumetric meshing of the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Sergio; González Ballester, Miguel A.; Gil, Debora

    2014-03-01

    A coordinate system describing the interior of organs is a powerful tool for a systematic localization of injured tissue. If the same coordinate values are assigned to specific anatomical landmarks, the coordinate system allows integration of data across different medical image modalities. Harmonic mappings have been used to produce parametric coordinate systems over the surface of anatomical shapes, given their flexibility to set values at specific locations through boundary conditions. However, most of the existing implementations in medical imaging restrict to either anatomical surfaces, or the depth coordinate with boundary conditions is given at sites of limited geometric diversity. In this paper we present a method for anatomical volumetric parameterization that extends current harmonic parameterizations to the interior anatomy using information provided by the volume medial surface. We have applied the methodology to define a common reference system for the liver shape and functional anatomy. This reference system sets a solid base for creating anatomical models of the patient's liver, and allows comparing livers from several patients in a common framework of reference.

  9. Ordered Landmarks in Planning

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, J; Sebastia, L; 10.1613/jair.1492

    2011-01-01

    Many known planning tasks have inherent constraints concerning the best order in which to achieve the goals. A number of research efforts have been made to detect such constraints and to use them for guiding search, in the hope of speeding up the planning process. We go beyond the previous approaches by considering ordering constraints not only over the (top-level) goals, but also over the sub-goals that will necessarily arise during planning. Landmarks are facts that must be true at some point in every valid solution plan. We extend Koehler and Hoffmann's definition of reasonable orders between top level goals to the more general case of landmarks. We show how landmarks can be found, how their reasonable orders can be approximated, and how this information can be used to decompose a given planning task into several smaller sub-tasks. Our methodology is completely domain- and planner-independent. The implementation demonstrates that the approach can yield significant runtime performance improvements when used...

  10. Integrating an adaptive region-based appearance model with a landmark-free statistical shape model: application to prostate MRI segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Robert; Bulman, Julie; Patel, Amish D.; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present a system for segmenting medical images using statistical shape models (SSM's) which is landmark free, fully 3D, and accurate. To overcome the limitations associated with previous 3D landmark-based SSM's, our system creates a levelset-based SSM which uses the minimum distance from each voxel in the image to the object's surface to define a shape. Subsequently, an advanced statistical appearance model (SAM) is generated to model the object of interest. This SAM is based on a series of statistical texture features calculated from each image, modeled by a Gaussian Mixture Model. In order to segment the object of interest on a new image, a Bayesian classifier is first employed to pre-classify the image voxels as belonging to the foreground object of interest or the background. The result of the Bayesian classifier is then employed for optimally fitting the SSM so there is maximum agreement between the SAM and the SSM. The SAM is then able to adaptively learn the statistics of the textures of the foreground and background voxels on the new image. The fitting of the SSM, and the adaptive updating of the SAM is repeated until convergence. We have tested our system on 36 T2-w, 3.0 Tesla, in vivo, endorectal prostate images. The results showed that our system achieves a Dice similarity coefficient of .84+/-.04, with a median Dice value of .86, which is comparable (and in most cases superior) to other state of the art prostate segmentation systems. Further, unlike most other state of the art prostate segmentation schemes, our scheme is fully automated requiring no user intervention.

  11. National Historic Chemical Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) displays the key roles chemists played in "expanding the frontiers of knowledge, advancing medicine and industry, and creating products from aspirin to zippers" at this website. Users can find clear summaries and images of the places, discoveries, and achievements that have been designated landmarks by ACS members and an international committee. Within many of the biographies, educators can find links to teaching guides and activities. Individuals that know of an unrecognized important element of the chemical heritage can learn how to nominate the site, artifact, or collection.

  12. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved landmark-only registration provided the noise in the surface points is not excessively high. Increased variability on the landmark fiducials resulted in increased registration errors; however, refinement of the initial landmark registration by the surface-based algorithm can compensate for small initial misalignments. The surface-based registration algorithm is quite robust to noise on the surface points and continues to improve landmark registration even at high levels of noise on the surface points. Both the canine and patient studies also demonstrate that combined landmark and surface registration has lower errors than landmark registration alone. Conclusions: In this work, we describe a model for evaluating the impact of noise variability on the input parameters of a registration algorithm in the context of cardiac ablation therapy. The model can be used to predict both registration error as well as assess which inputs have the largest effect on registration accuracy

  13. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettmann, Maryam E., E-mail: rettmann.maryam@mayo.edu; Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A. [Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Kwartowitz, David M. [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Gunawan, Mia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. 20057 (United States); Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L. [Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Dalegrave, Charles [Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology, Cardiology Division Hospital Sao Paulo, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04024-002 Brazil (Brazil); Kolasa, Mark W. [David Grant Medical Center, Fairfield, California 94535 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved landmark-only registration provided the noise in the surface points is not excessively high. Increased variability on the landmark fiducials resulted in increased registration errors; however, refinement of the initial landmark registration by the surface-based algorithm can compensate for small initial misalignments. The surface-based registration algorithm is quite robust to noise on the surface points and continues to improve landmark registration even at high levels of noise on the surface points. Both the canine and patient studies also demonstrate that combined landmark and surface registration has lower errors than landmark registration alone. Conclusions: In this work, we describe a model for evaluating the impact of noise variability on the input parameters of a registration algorithm in the context of cardiac ablation therapy. The model can be used to predict both registration error as well as assess which inputs have the largest effect on registration accuracy.

  14. 75 FR 69120 - National Natural Landmark Designations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ...currently lists 586 National Natural Landmarks nationwide. Of the...private parties. National Natural Landmark designation is not...activity, and does not imply a right of public access. However...use implications. National Natural Landmark preservation is...

  15. 3D facial landmarks : Inter-operator variability of manual annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Harder, Stine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manual annotation of landmarks is a known source of variance, which exist in all fields of medical imaging, influencing the accuracy and interpretation of the results. However, the variability of human facial landmarks is only sparsely addressed in the current literature as opposed to e.g. the research fields of orthodontics and cephalometrics. We present a full facial 3D annotation procedure and a sparse set of manually annotated landmarks, in effort to reduce operator time and minimize the variance. METHOD: Facial scans from 36 voluntary unrelated blood donors from the Danish Blood Donor Study was randomly chosen. Six operators twice manually annotated 73 anatomical and pseudo-landmarks, using a three-step scheme producing a dense point correspondence map. We analyzed both the intra- and inter-operator variability, using mixed-model ANOVA. We then compared four sparse sets of landmarks in order to construct a dense correspondence map of the 3D scans with a minimum point variance. RESULTS: The anatomical landmarks of the eye were associated with the lowest variance, particularly the center of the pupils. Whereas points of the jaw and eyebrows have the highest variation. We see marginal variability in regards to intra-operator and portraits. Using a sparse set of landmarks (n=14), that capture the whole face, the dense point mean variance was reduced from 1.92 to 0.54 mm. CONCLUSION: The inter-operator variability was primarily associated with particular landmarks, where more leniently landmarks had the highest variability. The variables embedded in the portray and the reliability of a trained operator did only have marginal influence on the variability. Further, using 14 of the annotated landmarks we were able to reduced the variability and create a dense correspondences mesh to capture all facial features.

  16. 3D facial landmarks: Inter-operator variability of manual annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Harder, Stine

    2014-01-01

    Background Manual annotation of landmarks is a known source of variance, which exist in all fields of medical imaging, influencing the accuracy and interpretation of the results. However, the variability of human facial landmarks is only sparsely addressed in the current literature as opposed to e.g. the research fields of orthodontics and cephalometrics. We present a full facial 3D annotation procedure and a sparse set of manually annotated landmarks, in effort to reduce operator time and minimize the variance. Method Facial scans from 36 voluntary unrelated blood donors from the Danish Blood Donor Study was randomly chosen. Six operators twice manually annotated 73 anatomical and pseudo-landmarks, using a three-step scheme producing a dense point correspondence map. We analyzed both the intra- and inter-operator variability, using mixed-model ANOVA. We then compared four sparse sets of landmarks in order to construct a dense correspondence map of the 3D scans with a minimum point variance. Results The anatomical landmarks of the eye were associated with the lowest variance, particularly the center of the pupils. Whereas points of the jaw and eyebrows have the highest variation. We see marginal variability in regards to intra-operator and portraits. Using a sparse set of landmarks (n=14), that capture the whole face, the dense point mean variance was reduced from 1.92 to 0.54 mm. Conclusion The inter-operator variability was primarily associated with particular landmarks, where more leniently landmarks had the highest variability. The variables embedded in the portray and the reliability of a trained operator did only have marginal influence on the variability. Further, using 14 of the annotated landmarks we were able to reduced the variability and create a dense correspondences mesh to capture all facial features.

  17. Anatomical basis for the intrahepatic glissonian approach during hepatectomies / Bases anatômicas para o acesso intra-hepático aos pedículos glissonianos durante hepatectomias

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rodrigo Cañada Trofo, SURJAN; Fábio Ferrari, MAKDISSI; Marcel Autran Cesar, MACHADO.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Ressecções hepáticas anatômicas são baseadas em alguns princípios técnicos básicos, como o controle vascular, delimitação de área isquêmica a ser ressecada e máxima preservação do parênquima. Isto pode ser obtido pelo acesso intra-hepático aos pedículos glissonianos, que consiste em contr [...] ole dos pedículos dos segmentos dentro do parênquima hepático. Pequenas incisões ao redor da placa hilar, em marcos anatômicos bem definidos, são utilizadas para acesso aos pedículos, tornando desnecessária a dissecção do hilo hepático. OBJETIVO: Analisar parâmetros da anatomia do fígado relacionada com a técnica cirúrgica da abordagem intra-hepática aos pedículos glissonianos, para definir a anatomia normal relacionada ao procedimento e, assim, facilitar a realização desta técnica. MÉTODOS: Parâmetros anatômicos relacionados à abordagem intra-hepática aos pedículos glissonianos foram estudados em 37 cadáveres. As medições foram realizadas com instrumentos de precisão. Os dados foram expressos em média±desvio-padrão. Os indivíduos foram divididos em grupos de acordo com o sexo e peso do fígado e os grupos foram comparados estatisticamente. RESULTADOS: Vinte e cinco cadáveres eram do sexo masculino e 12 do feminino. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa em praticamente todos os parâmetros quando os grupos foram comparados. Isto demonstra a consistência dos parâmetros anatômicos relacionadas com a técnica intra-hepática de acesso glissoniano. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados obtidos neste estudo possibilitaram grandes avanços técnicos na realização de hepatectomias abertas e laparoscópicas com abordagem intra-hepática aos pedículos glissonianos, e pode ajudar cirurgiões a realizar procedimentos seguros e eficazes por este método. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Anatomical liver resections are based on some basic technical principles such as vascular control, ischemic area delineation to be resected and maximum parenchymal preservation. These aspects are achieved by the intrahepatic glissonian approach, which consists in accessing the pedicles [...] of hepatic segments within the hepatic parenchyma. Small incisions on well-defined anatomical landmarks are performed to approach the pedicles, making dissection of the hilar plate unnecessary. AIM: Analyze parameters in liver anatomy related to intrahepatic surgical technique to glissonians pedicles, to set the normal anatomy related to the procedure and thereby facilitate the attainment of this technique. METHODS: Anatomical parameters related to the intrahepatic glissonian approach were studied in 37 cadavers. Measurements were performed with precision instruments. Data were expressed as mean±standard deviation. The subjects were divided into groups according to gender and liver weight and groups were compared statistically. RESULTS: Twenty-five cadavers were male and 12 female. No statistically significant difference was observed in virtually all parameters when groups were compared. This demonstrates the consistency of the anatomical parameters related to the intrahepatic glissonian approach. CONCLUSION: The results obtained in this study made possible major technical advances in the realization of open and laparoscopic hepatectomies with intrahepatic glissonian approach, and can help surgeons to perform liver resections by this method.

  18. ANATOMICAL PRINCIPLES BEHIND PRESERVATION OF LARYNGEAL NERVES DURING THYROIDECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Fabian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the anatomical principles behind preservation of inferior laryngeal nerve and of the external branch of superior laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy. The embryological development of thyroid and recurrent laryngeal nerves explains the constant relationship between Zuckerkandl’s tuberculum and the recurrent laryngeal nerve, while anomalies in development of the aortic arches explain the presence of rare anatomical variants, with a high risk of nerve injury, of non-recurrent course of the inferior laryngeal nerve. Good knowledge of the relationship between the external branch of superior laryngeal nerve and the superior thyroid artery makes possible to avoid transection of this branch during ligature around superior thyroid artery and vein. Anatomical landmarks used to identify the recurrent laryngeal nerve (tracheo-oesophageal sulcus, the cross-over with the inferior thyroid artery, Berry’s ligament, Zuckerkandl’s tuberculum and variations in the extra-laryngeal branching of the nerve are discussed based on data from the literature. The anatomical variants when the inferior laryngeal nerve doesn’t have a recurrent course are also discussed

  19. Segmentation of anatomical branching structures based on texture features and conditional random field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzhnaya, Tatyana; Bakic, Predrag; Kontos, Despina; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Ling, Haibin

    2012-02-01

    This work is a part of our ongoing study aimed at understanding a relation between the topology of anatomical branching structures with the underlying image texture. Morphological variability of the breast ductal network is associated with subsequent development of abnormalities in patients with nipple discharge such as papilloma, breast cancer and atypia. In this work, we investigate complex dependence among ductal components to perform segmentation, the first step for analyzing topology of ductal lobes. Our automated framework is based on incorporating a conditional random field with texture descriptors of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy and fractal dimension. These features are selected to capture the architectural variability of the enhanced ducts by encoding spatial variations between pixel patches in galactographic image. The segmentation algorithm was applied to a dataset of 20 x-ray galactograms obtained at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. We compared the performance of the proposed approach with fully and semi automated segmentation algorithms based on neural network classification, fuzzy-connectedness, vesselness filter and graph cuts. Global consistency error and confusion matrix analysis were used as accuracy measurements. For the proposed approach, the true positive rate was higher and the false negative rate was significantly lower compared to other fully automated methods. This indicates that segmentation based on CRF incorporated with texture descriptors has potential to efficiently support the analysis of complex topology of the ducts and aid in development of realistic breast anatomy phantoms.

  20. Support vector machine-based classification of Alzheimer's disease from whole-brain anatomical MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present and evaluate a new automated method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification of whole-brain anatomical magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly control subjects. We studied 16 patients with AD [mean age ± standard deviation (SD)=74.1 ±5.2 years, mini-mental score examination (MMSE) = 23.1 ± 2.9] and 22 elderly controls (72.3±5.0 years, MMSE=28.5± 1.3). Three-dimensional T1-weighted MR images of each subject were automatically parcellated into regions of interest (ROIs). Based upon the characteristics of gray matter extracted from each ROI, we used an SVM algorithm to classify the subjects and statistical procedures based on bootstrap resampling to ensure the robustness of the results. We obtained 94.5% mean correct classification for AD and control subjects (mean specificity, 96.6%; mean sensitivity, 91.5%). Our method has the potential in distinguishing patients with AD from elderly controls and therefore may help in the early diagnosis of AD. (orig.)

  1. Synchrotron-based phase-contrast images of zebrafish and its anatomical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Donepudi, Venkateswara; Melumai, Bhaskaraiah; Thallapaka, Balasaidulu; Sandeep, Konam; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Zhong, Zhong; Akatsuka, Takao; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tohoru; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2014-08-01

    Images of vertebrates (zebrafish and zebrafish eye) have been obtained by using an X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, namely, synchrotron-based diffraction-enhanced imaging (SY-DEI) (or analyzer based imaging) and synchrotron-based diffraction imaging in tomography mode (SY-DEI-CT). Due to the limitations of the conventional radiographic imaging in visualizing the internal complex feature of the sample, we utilized the upgraded SY-DEI and SY-DEI-CT systems to acquire the images at 20, 30 and 40 keV, to observe the enhanced contrast. SY-DEI and SY-DEI-CT techniques exploits the refraction properties, and have great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, in particular for low (Z) elements, such as, C, H, O and N, which constitutes the soft tissue. Recently, these techniques are characterized by its extraordinary image quality, with improved contrast, by imaging invertebrates. We have chosen the vertebrate sample of zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism widely used in developmental biology and oncology. For biological imaging, these techniques are most sensitive to enhance the contrast. For the present study, images of the sample, in planar and tomography modes offer more clarity on the contrast enhancement of anatomical features of the eye, especially the nerve bundle, swim bladder, grills and some internal organs in gut with more visibility.

  2. Alignment of CT images of skull dysmorphology using anatomy-based perpendicular axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sun K.; Kim, Yong O.; Kim, Hee-Joung; Kim, Nam H.; Jang, Young Beom; Kim, Kee-Deog; Lee, Hye-Yeon

    2003-08-01

    Rigid body registration of 3D CT scans, based on manual identification of homologous landmarks, is useful for the visual analysis of skull dysmorphology. In this paper, a robust and simple alignment method was proposed to allow for the comparison of skull morphologies, within and between individuals with craniofacial anomalies, based on 3D CT scans, and the minimum number of anatomical landmarks, under rigidity and uniqueness constraints. Three perpendicular axes, extracted from anatomical landmarks, define the absolute coordinate system, through a rigid body transformation, to align multiple CT images for different patients and acquisition times. The accuracy of the alignment method depends on the accuracy of the localized landmarks and target points. The numerical simulation generalizes the accuracy requirements of the alignment method. Experiments using a human dried skull specimen, and ten sets of skull CT images (the pre- and post-operative CT scans of four plagiocephaly, and one fibrous dysplasia patients), demonstrated the feasibility of the technique in clinical practice.

  3. Alignment of CT images of skull dysmorphology using anatomy-based perpendicular axes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigid body registration of 3D CT scans, based on manual identification of homologous landmarks, is useful for the visual analysis of skull dysmorphology. In this paper, a robust and simple alignment method was proposed to allow for the comparison of skull morphologies, within and between individuals with craniofacial anomalies, based on 3D CT scans, and the minimum number of anatomical landmarks, under rigidity and uniqueness constraints. Three perpendicular axes, extracted from anatomical landmarks, define the absolute coordinate system, through a rigid body transformation, to align multiple CT images for different patients and acquisition times. The accuracy of the alignment method depends on the accuracy of the localized landmarks and target points. The numerical simulation generalizes the accuracy requirements of the alignment method. Experiments using a human dried skull specimen, and ten sets of skull CT images (the pre- and post-operative CT scans of four plagiocephaly, and one fibrous dysplasia patients), demonstrated the feasibility of the technique in clinical practice

  4. A contribution to taxonomy of Centaurea including Psephellus (Asteraceae) based on anatomical and molecular data

    OpenAIRE

    AYD?N, Özhan; ÇO?KUNÇELEB?, Kamil; GÜLTEPE, Mutlu; GÜZEL, Murat Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Seven Centaurea L. s.l (Asteraceae) taxa endemic to Turkey were examined in terms of anatomical and molecular aspects to contribute to their taxonomic positions. Numerical analysis of the 13 anatomical traits showed that average row number of collenchyma and the arrangements of the vascular bundles in the stem, leaf type, and abaxial surface of leaf epidermal tissue were important to determine the investigated taxa. It was also found that the 7 investigated taxa were grouped into 2 distinct c...

  5. Anatomic feature-based registration for patient set-up in head and neck cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern radiotherapy equipment is capable of delivering high precision conformal dose distributions relative to isocentre. One of the barriers to precise treatments is accurate patient re-positioning before each fraction of treatment. At Massachusetts General Hospital, we perform daily patient alignment using radiographs, which are captured by flat panel imaging devices and sent to an analysis program. A trained therapist manually selects anatomically significant features in the skeleton, and couch movement is computed based on the image coordinates of the features. The current procedure takes about 5 to 10 min and significantly affects the efficiency requirement in a busy clinic. This work presents our effort to develop an improved, semi-automatic procedure that uses the manually selected features from the first treatment fraction to automatically locate the same features on the second and subsequent fractions. An implementation of this semi-automatic procedure is currently in clinical use for head and neck tumour sites. Radiographs collected from 510 patient set-ups were used to test this algorithm. A mean difference of 1.5 mm between manual and automatic localization of individual features and a mean difference of 0.8 mm for overall set-up were seen

  6. Anatomical bases for the radiological delineation of lymph node areas. Upper limbs, chest and abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer spreads locally through direct infiltration into soft tissues, or at distance by invading vascular structures, then migrating through the lymphatic or blood flow. Although cancer cells carried in the blood can end in virtually any corner of the body, lymphatic migration is usually stepwise, through successive nodal stops, which can temporarily delay further progression. In radiotherapy, irradiation of lymphatic paths relevant to the localisation of the primary has been common practice for decades. Similarly, excision of cancer is often completed by lymphatic dissection. Both in radiotherapy and in surgery, advanced knowledge of the lymphatic pathways relevant to any tumour location is an important information for treatment preparation and execution. This second part describes the lymphatics of the upper limb, of the thorax and of the upper abdomen. Providing anatomical bases for the radiological delineation of lymph nodes areas in the axilla, in the chest and in the abdomen, it also offers a simplified classification for labeling the mediastinal and intra-abdominal nodal levels, grouped in each location inside three major functional areas (called I, II and III) which are all divided into three sublevels (named a, b or c)

  7. Describing head shapes of white stem borers (Schirpophaga innotata Walker that are able to survive on different rice types using Landmark based geometric morphometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queenilyn B. Albutra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice stem borers are considered as the most serious insect pest of rice in Asia. It infects itsplant host by burrowing into the stem using its mandible. However, apart from the mandible, the head ofrice stem borers is also associated in the incursion process since it facilitates the entry of larvae to the riceplant. Differences in the head capsules have a direct effect on the ability of the insects to ingest hardfoods rapidly. Different rice varieties in the Philippines serve as plant host for this pest and infestationoccurred in different geographical location. Variations in habitat and plant host were thought to generateenvironmental variation in morphometric traits and host adapted herbivore phenotype respectively.Landmark based geometric morphometric analysis was used to assess the hypothesis that the head shapeof white stem borer differ between populations with respect to different rice varieties and geographicallocation where it was obtained. Relative warp analysis showed variation in the head shape betweendifferent white stem borer (Schirpophaga innotata Walker populations infesting different varieties of rice.Non-significant head shape variations were obtained between geographically separated populations. Theseresults indicate that the rice host varieties play an important role in the selection of individuals that areable to counteract the resistance factors in plants.

  8. Landmarks or panoramas: what do navigating ants attend to for guidance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnon Guy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects are known to rely on terrestrial landmarks for navigation. Landmarks are used to chart a route or pinpoint a goal. The distant panorama, however, is often thought not to guide navigation directly during a familiar journey, but to act as a contextual cue that primes the correct memory of the landmarks. Results We provided Melophorus bagoti ants with a huge artificial landmark located right near the nest entrance to find out whether navigating ants focus on such a prominent visual landmark for homing guidance. When the landmark was displaced by small or large distances, ant routes were affected differently. Certain behaviours appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that guidance was based on the landmark only. Instead, comparisons of panoramic images recorded on the field, encompassing both landmark and distal panorama, could explain most aspects of the ant behaviours. Conclusion Ants navigating along a familiar route do not focus on obvious landmarks or filter out distal panoramic cues, but appear to be guided by cues covering a large area of their panoramic visual field, including both landmarks and distal panorama. Using panoramic views seems an appropriate strategy to cope with the complexity of natural scenes and the poor resolution of insects' eyes. The ability to isolate landmarks from the rest of a scene may be beyond the capacity of animals that do not possess a dedicated object-perception visual stream like primates.

  9. Landmarks GIScience for intelligent services

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Kai-Florian

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the latest research on landmarks in GIS, including practical applications. It addresses perceptual and cognitive aspects of natural and artificial cognitive systems, computational aspects with respect to identifying or selecting landmarks for various purposes, and communication aspects of human-computer interaction for spatial information provision. Concise and organized, the book equips readers to handle complex conceptual aspects of trying to define and formally model these situations. The book provides a thorough review of the cognitive, conceptual, computational and commun

  10. Detection of point landmarks in multidimensional tensor data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Alzola, J.; Kikinis, R.; Westin, C.-F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a unified approach to the detection of point landmarks—whose neighborhoods convey discriminant information—including multidimensional scalar, vector, and higher-order tensor data. The method is based on the interpretation of generalized correlation matrices derived from the gradient of tensor functions, a probabilistic interpretation of point landmarks, and the application of tensor algebra. Results on both synthetic and real tensor data are presented.

  11. Geodesic atlas-based labeling of anatomical trees : application and evaluation on airways extracted from CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast and robust atlas-based algorithm for labeling airway trees, using geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for an unlabeled airway tree are evaluated using distances to a training set of labeled airway trees. In tree-space, airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural automatic handling of anatomical differences and noise. A hierarchical approach makes the algorithm efficient, assigning labels from the trachea and downwards. Only the airway centerline tree is used, which is relatively unaffected by pathology. The algorithm is evaluated on 80 segmented airway trees from 40 subjects at two time points, labeled by 3 medical experts each, testing accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The accuracy of the algorithm is statistically similar to that of the experts and not significantly correlated with COPD severity. The reproducibility of the algorithm is significantly better than that of the experts, and negatively correlated with COPD severity. Evaluation of the algorithm on a longitudinal set of 8724 trees from a lung cancer screening trial shows that the algorithm can be used in large scale studies with high reproducibility, and that the negative correlation of reproducibility with COPD severity can be explained by missing branches, for instance due to segmentation problems in COPD patients. We conclude that the algorithm is robust to COPD severity given equally complete airway trees, and comparable in performance to that of experts in pulmonary medicine, emphasizing the suitability of the labeling algorithm for clinical use.

  12. Geodesic atlas-based labeling of anatomical trees : Application and evaluation on airways extracted from CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast and robust atlas-based algorithm for labeling airway trees, using geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for an unlabeled airway tree are evaluated using distances to a training set of labeled airway trees. In tree-space, airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural automatic handling of anatomical differences and noise. A hierarchical approach makes the algorithm efficient, assigning labels from the trachea and downwards. Only the airway centerline tree is used, which is relatively unaffected by pathology. The algorithm is evaluated on 80 segmented airway trees from 40 subjects at two time points, labeled by 3 medical experts each, testing accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The accuracy of the algorithm is statistically similar to that of the experts and not significantly correlated with COPD severity. The reproducibility of the algorithm is significantly better than that of the experts, and negatively correlated with COPD severity. Evaluation of the algorithm on a longitudinal set of 8724 trees from a lung cancer screening trial shows that the algorithm can be used in large scale studies with high reproducibility, and that the negative correlation of reproducibility with COPD severity can be explained by missing branches, for instance due to segmentation problems in COPD patients. We conclude that the algorithm is robust to COPD severity given equally complete airway trees, and comparable in performance to that of experts in pulmonary medicine, emphasizing the suitability of the labeling algorithm for clinical use.

  13. Bases anatómicas vasculares de los colgajos perforantes cutáneos / Vascular anatomical basis of perforator skin flaps

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    S., Morris; M., Tang; C.R., Geddes.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En las ultimas dos décadas, el uso de colgajos perforantes musculocutaneos se ha incrementado a medida que los microcirujanos se han familiarizado con la técnica y estos colgajos se han convertido en una parte de la evolución de la Microcirugía. Como se basan en perforantes musculocutaneas o septocu [...] taneas individuales, el microcirujano reconstructivodebe tener la información anatómica detallada para planificar la transferencia de colgajos perforantes. El fin de este trabajo es la revisión de las diversas técnicas angiográficas disponibles para estudiar la anatomía vascular del cuerpo humano y presentar nuestra técnica habitual de inyección vascular. Exhibiremos ejemplos ilustrativos utilizando la técnica de la inyección de gelatina de oxido de plomo para visualizar la anatomía relevante de los sitios donantes de colgajos perforantes. La técnica de la inyección de gelatina de óxido descrita por Salmon y Rees y Taylor, puede ser utilizada para inyecciones arteriales o venosas, pero la hemos utilizado primariamente para inyección arterial. Los pasos para la inyección se describen detalladamente en el trabajo. En los pasados 5 años hemos disecado un total de 21 cadáveres frescos tras estudios de inyección arterial de gelatina de oxido de plomo. Se han revisado un total de 7000 radiografías. Presentamos los resultados de la búsqueda anatómica en las áreas de cabeza, cuello, miembros superiores, torso y miembros inferiores. La técnica de la inyección de gelatina de oxido de plomo es simple y económica a su vez; la técnica de análisis computarizado es barata y las técnicas de análisis informático son directas y proveen excelente visualización de la arquitectura de la piel humana. Los delicados detalles identificados utilizando esta técnica de inyección proveen información útil a los cirujanos para planificar transferencias de piel, músculo, hueso y nervio, y por tanto favorecen nuestra comprensión de la anatomía vascular clínicamente relacionada de los colgajos perforantes. Abstract in english Over the past 2 decades the use of musculocutaneous perforator flaps has increased worldwide as microsurgeons have become more comfortable with the technique. Perforator flaps have now become well established as a part of the evolution of microsurgery. Since perforator flaps are based on individual [...] musculocutaneous or septocutaneous perforators, it is imperative that the reconstructive microsurgeon has the detailed anatomical information necessary to plan perforator flap transfers. The goal of this paper is to review the various angiographic techniques which are available to study the vascular anatomy of the human body and to present our current vascular injection technique. We will show illustrative examples using the lead oxide gelatin injection technique to elucidate the relevant anatomy of perforator flap donor sites. The lead oxide gelatin injection technique has been previously reported by Salmon and Rees and Taylor. The injection technique may be used for arterial or venous injections but we have primarily used it for arterial injections. The injection steps are detailed in the paper. Over the past five years we have dissected a total of 21 human fresh cadavers after lead oxide gelatin arterial injection studies. A total of over 7000 radiographs have been reviewed and summarized. We present summarized results of the anatomical research in the areas of head and neck, upper limb, torso and lower limb regions. The lead oxide gelatin injection technique is simple and inexpensive and the computer analysis technique is straight forward and provides excellent visualization of the architecture of the human skin. The fine details identified using this injection technique provides useful information to surgeons planning transfers of skin, muscle, bone and nerve and therefore our understandingly of clinically related vascular anatomy of perforator flaps can be improved.

  14. Bases anatómicas vasculares de los colgajos perforantes cutáneos Vascular anatomical basis of perforator skin flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Morris

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En las ultimas dos décadas, el uso de colgajos perforantes musculocutaneos se ha incrementado a medida que los microcirujanos se han familiarizado con la técnica y estos colgajos se han convertido en una parte de la evolución de la Microcirugía. Como se basan en perforantes musculocutaneas o septocutaneas individuales, el microcirujano reconstructivodebe tener la información anatómica detallada para planificar la transferencia de colgajos perforantes. El fin de este trabajo es la revisión de las diversas técnicas angiográficas disponibles para estudiar la anatomía vascular del cuerpo humano y presentar nuestra técnica habitual de inyección vascular. Exhibiremos ejemplos ilustrativos utilizando la técnica de la inyección de gelatina de oxido de plomo para visualizar la anatomía relevante de los sitios donantes de colgajos perforantes. La técnica de la inyección de gelatina de óxido descrita por Salmon y Rees y Taylor, puede ser utilizada para inyecciones arteriales o venosas, pero la hemos utilizado primariamente para inyección arterial. Los pasos para la inyección se describen detalladamente en el trabajo. En los pasados 5 años hemos disecado un total de 21 cadáveres frescos tras estudios de inyección arterial de gelatina de oxido de plomo. Se han revisado un total de 7000 radiografías. Presentamos los resultados de la búsqueda anatómica en las áreas de cabeza, cuello, miembros superiores, torso y miembros inferiores. La técnica de la inyección de gelatina de oxido de plomo es simple y económica a su vez; la técnica de análisis computarizado es barata y las técnicas de análisis informático son directas y proveen excelente visualización de la arquitectura de la piel humana. Los delicados detalles identificados utilizando esta técnica de inyección proveen información útil a los cirujanos para planificar transferencias de piel, músculo, hueso y nervio, y por tanto favorecen nuestra comprensión de la anatomía vascular clínicamente relacionada de los colgajos perforantes.Over the past 2 decades the use of musculocutaneous perforator flaps has increased worldwide as microsurgeons have become more comfortable with the technique. Perforator flaps have now become well established as a part of the evolution of microsurgery. Since perforator flaps are based on individual musculocutaneous or septocutaneous perforators, it is imperative that the reconstructive microsurgeon has the detailed anatomical information necessary to plan perforator flap transfers. The goal of this paper is to review the various angiographic techniques which are available to study the vascular anatomy of the human body and to present our current vascular injection technique. We will show illustrative examples using the lead oxide gelatin injection technique to elucidate the relevant anatomy of perforator flap donor sites. The lead oxide gelatin injection technique has been previously reported by Salmon and Rees and Taylor. The injection technique may be used for arterial or venous injections but we have primarily used it for arterial injections. The injection steps are detailed in the paper. Over the past five years we have dissected a total of 21 human fresh cadavers after lead oxide gelatin arterial injection studies. A total of over 7000 radiographs have been reviewed and summarized. We present summarized results of the anatomical research in the areas of head and neck, upper limb, torso and lower limb regions. The lead oxide gelatin injection technique is simple and inexpensive and the computer analysis technique is straight forward and provides excellent visualization of the architecture of the human skin. The fine details identified using this injection technique provides useful information to surgeons planning transfers of skin, muscle, bone and nerve and therefore our understandingly of clinically related vascular anatomy of perforator flaps can be improved.

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Small Vessel Cannulation: Long-Axis Approach Is Equivalent to Short-Axis in Novice Sonographers Experienced with Landmark-Based Cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Erickson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our primary objective was to describe the time to vessel penetration and difficulty of long-axis and short-axis approaches for ultrasound-guided small vessel penetration in novice sonographers experienced with landmark-based small vessel penetration. Methods: This was a prospective, observational study of experienced certified emergency nurses attempting ultrasound-guided small vessel cannulation on a vascular access phantom. We conducted a standardized training, practice, and experiment session for each participant. Five long-axis and five short-axis approaches were attempted in alternating sequence. The primary outcome was time to vessel penetration. Secondary outcomes were number of skin penetrations and number of catheter redirections. We compared long-axis and short-axis approaches using multivariable regression adjusting for repeated measures, vessel depth, and vessel caliber. Results: Each of 10 novice sonographers made 10 attempts for a total of 100 attempts. Median time to vessel penetration in the long-axis and short-axis was 11 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7-12 and 10 (95% CI 6-13 seconds, respectively. Skin penetrations and catheter redirections were equivalent and near optimal between approaches. The median caliber of cannulated vessels in the long-axis and short-axis was 4.6 (95% CI 4.1-5.5 and 5.6 (95% CI 5.1-6.2 millimeters, respectively. Both axes had equal success rates of 100% for all 50 attempts. In multivariable regression analysis, long-axis attempts were 32% (95% CI 11%-48%; p=0.009 faster than short-axis attempts. Conclusion: Novice sonographers, highly proficient with peripheral IV cannulation, can perform after instruction ultrasound-guided small vessel penetration successfully with similar time to vessel penetration in either the long-axis or short-axis approach on phantom models. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  16. 3D facial landmark detection under large yaw and expression variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, Panagiotis; Passalis, Georgios; Theoharis, Theoharis; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2013-07-01

    A 3D landmark detection method for 3D facial scans is presented and thoroughly evaluated. The main contribution of the presented method is the automatic and pose-invariant detection of landmarks on 3D facial scans under large yaw variations (that often result in missing facial data), and its robustness against large facial expressions. Three-dimensional information is exploited by using 3D local shape descriptors to extract candidate landmark points. The shape descriptors include the shape index, a continuous map of principal curvature values of a 3D object's surface, and spin images, local descriptors of the object's 3D point distribution. The candidate landmarks are identified and labeled by matching them with a Facial Landmark Model (FLM) of facial anatomical landmarks. The presented method is extensively evaluated against a variety of 3D facial databases and achieves state-of-the-art accuracy (4.5-6.3 mm mean landmark localization error), considerably outperforming previous methods, even when tested with the most challenging data. PMID:23681986

  17. Diversity analysis of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana irradiated by gamma-ray based on morphological and anatomical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUH RAHMAD SUHARTANTO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Widiastuti A, Sobir, Suhartanto MR. 2010. Diversity analysis of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. irradiated by gamma-ray based on morphological and anatomical characteristics. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 23-33. The aim of this research was to increase genetic variability of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. irradiated by gamma rays dosage of 0 Gy, 20 Gy, 25 Gy, 30 Gy,35 Gy and 40 Gy. Plant materials used were seeds collected from Cegal Sub-village, Karacak Village, Leuwiliang Sub-district, Bogor District, West Java. Data was generated from morphological and anatomical characteristics. The result indicated that increasing of gamma ray dosage had inhibited ability of seed to growth, which needed longer time and decreased seed viability. Morphologically, it also decreased plant heigh, stem diameter, leaf seizure, and amount of leaf. Anatomically, stomatal density had positive correlation with plant height by correlation was 90% and 74%. Gamma rays irradiation successfully increase morphological variability until 30%. Seed creavage after irradiation increased variability and survival rate of mangosteen.

  18. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  19. Anatomically guided voxel-based partial volume effect correction in brain PET: impact of MRI segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez Rios, Daniel Fernando; Montandon Zaidi, Marie-louise; Assal, Fre?de?ric; Allaoua, Mohamed Ghoulem; Ratib, Osman; Lo?vblad, Karl-olof; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Partial volume effect is still considered one of the main limitations in brain PET imaging given the limited spatial resolution of current generation PET scanners. The accuracy of anatomically guided partial volume effect correction (PVC) algorithms in brain PET is largely dependent on the performance of MRI segmentation algorithms partitioning the brain into its main classes, namely gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A comparative evaluation of four brain MRI...

  20. Cortical organization: a description and interpretation of anatomical findings based on systems theory

    OpenAIRE

    Casanova, Manuel F.

    2010-01-01

    The organization of the cortex can be understood as a complex system comprised of interconnected modules called minicolumns. Comparative anatomical studies suggest that evolution has prompted a scale free world network of connectivity within the white matter while simultaneously increasing the complexity of minicolumnar composition. It is this author’s opinion that this complex system is poised to collapse under the weight of environmental exigencies. Some mental disorders may be the manifest...

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of some Turkish Crocus (Iridaceae) taxa based on morphological and anatomical characters

    OpenAIRE

    CO?KUN, Fatih; SELV?, Selami; Satil, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    In this study, relationships among the 15 taxa of the genus Crocus L. distributed in Turkey were analysed using 29 morphological and 4 anatomical characters. Analysis of the data set utilising maximum parsimony criterion with Branch-and-Bound search algorithm yielded 32 most parsimonious trees. Bootstrap analysis with the majority rule consensus algorithm generated a consensus tree supporting some branches. Our data mostly did not agree with the previous sectional and serial treatments. The m...

  2. Knowledge-Based, Interactive, Custom Anatomical Scene Creation for Medical Education: The Biolucida System

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Wayne; Brinkley, James F

    2005-01-01

    Few biomedical subjects of study are as resource-intensive to teach as gross anatomy. Medical education stands to benefit greatly from applications which deliver virtual representations of human anatomical structures. While many applications have been created to achieve this goal, their utility to the student is limited because of a lack of interactivity or customizability by expert authors. Here we describe the first version of the Biolucida system, which allows an expert a...

  3. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with125I, 103Pd, or 131Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model simulations, the average dose to the lens is larger by 7%–9% than the dose to the center of the lens, and the maximum dose to the optic nerve is 17%–22% higher than the dose to the optic disk for all radionuclides. In general, when normalized to the same prescription dose at the tumor apex, doses delivered to all structures of interest in the full eye model are lowest for103Pd and highest for 131Cs, except for the tumor where the average dose is highest for 103Pd and lowest for 131Cs. Conclusions : The eye is not radiologically water-equivalent, as doses from simulations of the plaque in the full eye model differ considerably from doses for the plaque in a water phantom and from simulated TG-43 calculated doses. This demonstrates the importance of model-based dose calculations for eye plaque brachytherapy, for which accurate elemental compositions of ocular media are necessary

  4. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M.; Thomson, R. M., E-mail: rthomson@physics.carleton.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, or {sup 131}Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model simulations, the average dose to the lens is larger by 7%–9% than the dose to the center of the lens, and the maximum dose to the optic nerve is 17%–22% higher than the dose to the optic disk for all radionuclides. In general, when normalized to the same prescription dose at the tumor apex, doses delivered to all structures of interest in the full eye model are lowest for{sup 103}Pd and highest for {sup 131}Cs, except for the tumor where the average dose is highest for {sup 103}Pd and lowest for {sup 131}Cs. Conclusions : The eye is not radiologically water-equivalent, as doses from simulations of the plaque in the full eye model differ considerably from doses for the plaque in a water phantom and from simulated TG-43 calculated doses. This demonstrates the importance of model-based dose calculations for eye plaque brachytherapy, for which accurate elemental compositions of ocular media are necessary.

  5. Distance Landmarks Revisited for Road Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Shuai; Feng, Kaiyu; Wang, Haixun; Li, Jianxin; Huai, Jinpeng

    2014-01-01

    Computing shortest distances is one of the fundamental problems on graphs, and remains a {\\em challenging} task today. {\\em Distance} {\\em landmarks} have been recently studied for shortest distance queries with an auxiliary data structure, referred to as {\\em landmark} {\\em covers}. This paper studies how to apply distance landmarks for fast {\\em exact} shortest distance query answering on large road graphs. However, the {\\em direct} application of distance landmarks is {\\e...

  6. Prognostic classification of Hodgkin disease in pathologic stage III, based on anatomic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desser, R.K.; Golomb, H.M.; Ultmann, J.E.; Ferguson, D.J.; Moran, E.M.; Griem, M.L.; Vardiman, J.; Miller, B.; Oetzel, N.; Sweet, D.

    1977-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with pathologic stage III Hodgkin's disease were studied in an effort to determine whether location of involved abdominal nodes influenced survival. Treatment consisted of total nodal radiotherapy with or without subsequent combination chemotherapy. The initial radiation field was the ''extended mantle,'' which included supradiaphragmatic nodes, the splenic hilar area, and paraaortic nodes to the level of L2-L4. Subsequently, lower paraaortic and iliac regions were treated (''lower inverted Y''). Patients with disease limited to the spleen and/or splenic, celiac, or portal nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 1/) had a more favorable 5-yr survival than did patients with involvement of paraaortic, iliac, or mesenteric nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 2/) : 93% versus 57%, respectively (p < 0.05). The addition of combination chemotherapy to total nodal irradiation was associated with improved survival of patients in stage III/sub 2/, but not of those in stage III/sub 1/.

  7. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle; GAIA, Bruno Felipe; CHENG, Cheong Kuo; TRINDADE, Paulo Alceu Kiemle; BASTOS, José Carlos da Cunha; MATTOS, Beatriz Silva Câmara

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2) to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3) to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate. PMID:22437689

  8. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ivy Kiemle, Trindade-Suedam; Bruno Felipe, Gaia; Cheong Kuo, Cheng; Paulo Alceu Kiemle, Trindade; José Carlos da Cunha, Bastos; Beatriz Silva Câmara, Mattos.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and [...] that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2) to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3) to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  9. Detection, visualization and animation of abnormal anatomic structure with a deformable probabilistic brain atlas based on random vector field transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P M; Toga, A W

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation and preliminary results of a technique for creating a comprehensive probabilistic atlas of the human brain based on high-dimensional vector field transformations. The goal of the atlas is to detect and quantify distributed patterns of deviation from normal anatomy, in a 3-D brain image from any given subject. The algorithm analyzes a reference population of normal scans and automatically generates color-coded probability maps of the anatomy of new subjects. Given a 3-D brain image of a new subject, the algorithm calculates a set of high-dimensional volumetric maps (with typically 384(2) x 256 x 3 approximately 10(8) degrees of freedom) elastically deforming this scan into structural correspondence with other scans, selected one by one from an anatomic image database. The family of volumetric warps thus constructed encodes statistical properties and directional biases of local anatomical variation throughout the architecture of the brain. A probability space of random transformations, based on the theory of anisotropic Gaussian random fields, is then developed to reflect the observed variability in stereotaxic space of the points whose correspondences are found by the warping algorithm. A complete system of 384(2) x 256 probability density functions is computed, yielding confidence limits in stereotaxic space for the location of every point represented in the 3-D image lattice of the new subject's brain. Color-coded probability maps are generated, densely defined throughout the anatomy of the new subject. These indicate locally the probability of each anatomic point being unusually situated, given the distributions of corresponding points in the scans of normal subjects. 3-D MRI and high-resolution cryosection volumes are analyzed from subjects with metastatic tumors and Alzheimer's disease. Gradual variations and continuous deformations of the underlying anatomy are simulated and their dynamic effects on regional probability maps are animated in video format (on the accompanying CD-ROM). Applications of the deformable probabilistic atlas include the transfer of multi-subject 3-D functional, vascular and histologic maps onto a single anatomic template, the mapping of 3-D atlases onto the scans of new subjects, and the rapid detection, quantification and mapping of local shape changes in 3-D medical images in disease and during normal or abnormal growth and development. PMID:9873911

  10. Radiobiological model-based bio-anatomical quality assurance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bio-anatomical quality assurance (QA) method employing tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is described that can integrate radiobiological effects into intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We evaluated the variations in the radiobiological effects caused by random errors (r-errors) and systematic errors (s-errors) by evaluating TCP and NTCP in two groups: patients with an intact prostate (Gintact) and those who have undergone prostatectomy (Gtectomy). The r-errors were generated using an isocenter shift of ±1 mm to simulate a misaligned patient set-up. The s-errors were generated using individual leaves that were displaced inwardly and outwardly by 1 mm on multileaf collimator field files. Subvolume-based TCP and NTCP were visualized on computed tomography (CT) images to determine the radiobiological effects on the principal structures. The bio-anatomical QA using the TCP and NTCP maps differentiated the critical radiobiological effects on specific volumes, particularly at the anterior rectal walls and planning target volumes. The s-errors showed a TCP variation of -40-25% in Gtectomy and -30-10% in Gintact, while the r-errors were less than 1.5% in both groups. The r-errors for the rectum and bladder showed higher NTCP variations at ±20% and ±10%, respectively, and the s-errors were greater than ±65% for both. This bio-anatomical method, as a patient-specific IMRTcal method, as a patient-specific IMRT QA, can provide distinct indications of clinically significant radiobiological effects beyond the minimization of probable physical dose errors in phantoms. (author)

  11. An anatomically based finite element model of the lower limbs in the seated posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah L; Mithraratne, Kumar; Smith, Nicolas P

    2007-01-01

    In this study an anatomically accurate 3D Finite Element (FE) model of the lower limbs was developed from axial cryosection images of the Visible Man (VM). The relative position of the lower limbs of a subject in standing and sitting positions was acquired with a laser scanner. A subset of these data points were used as control points in a novel application of the Host Mesh Fitting (HMF) technique, where the generic model geometry was morphed to subject data in the standing position, and then this subject-specific model was articulated to the seated posture. The gluteus maximus muscle and a portion of the skin mesh of the customised model were selected to provide a framework with which to examine the mechanics of sitting. Passive material properties were taken from the literature and were implemented in two two-parameter Mooney-Rivlin models to assess the response of the anatomical models to applied forces and pressures. The average deformation of the skin mesh was 0.77+/-1.525 mm which resulted in a maximum von Mises stress of 3.98 kPa. The average deformation of the gluteus maximus mesh was 2.69+/-0.6 mm which produced a maximum von Mises stress of 43 kPa. The results of the von Mises stress distribution support the theory that the highest stress occurs in the region immediately beneath the ischial tuberosities. The results of this research confirm previous conclusions reached using geometrically less complex models and the application of customisation to nonlinear mechanics provides a novel avenue to quantitatively assess office chair design and to analyse the mechanics of sitting. PMID:18003468

  12. Discriminative BoW framework for mobile landmark recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Yap, Kim-Hui

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a new soft bag-of-words (BoW) method for mobile landmark recognition based on discriminative learning of image patches. Conventional BoW methods often consider the patches/regions in the images as equally important for learning. Amongst the few existing works that consider the discriminative information of the patches, they mainly focus on selecting the representative patches for training, and discard the others. This binary hard selection approach results in underutilization of the information available, as some discarded patches may still contain useful discriminative information. Further, not all the selected patches will contribute equally to the learning process. In view of this, this paper presents a new discriminative soft BoW approach for mobile landmark recognition. The main contribution of the method is that the representative and discriminative information of the landmark is learned at three levels: patches, images, and codewords. The patch discriminative information for each landmark is first learned and incorporated through vector quantization to generate soft BoW histograms. Coupled with the learned representative information of the images and codewords, these histograms are used to train an ensemble of classifiers using fuzzy support vector machine. Experimental results on two different datasets show that the proposed method is effective in mobile landmark recognition. PMID:23846513

  13. Brain mapping in stereotactic surgery: a brief overview from the probabilistic targeting to the patient-based anatomic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Coste, Jérôme; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Caire, François; Nuti, Christophe; Derost, Philippe; Cristini, Vittorio; Gabrillargues, Jean; Hemm, Simone; Durif, Franck; Chazal, Jean

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we briefly review the concept of brain mapping in stereotactic surgery taking into account recent advances in stereotactic imaging. The gold standard continues to rely on probabilistic and indirect targeting, relative to a stereotactic reference, i.e., mostly the anterior (AC) and the posterior (PC) commissures. The theoretical position of a target defined on an atlas is transposed into the stereotactic space of a patient's brain; final positioning depends on electrophysiological analysis. The method is also used to analyze final electrode or lesion position for a patient or group of patients, by projection on an atlas. Limitations are precision of definition of the AC-PC line, probabilistic location and reliability of the electrophysiological guidance. Advances in MR imaging, as from 1.5-T machines, make stereotactic references no longer mandatory and allow an anatomic mapping based on an individual patient's brain. Direct targeting is enabled by high-quality images, an advanced anatomic knowledge and dedicated surgical software. Labeling associated with manual segmentation can help for the position analysis along non-conventional, interpolated planes. Analysis of final electrode or lesion position, for a patient or group of patients, could benefit from the concept of membership, the attribution of a weighted membership degree to a contact or a structure according to its level of involvement. In the future, more powerful MRI machines, diffusion tensor imaging, tractography and computational modeling will further the understanding of anatomy and deep brain stimulation effects. PMID:17644002

  14. Population-based evaluation of a suggested anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart defects based on the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of the overall spectrum of congenital heart defects (CHD has always been challenging, in part because of the diversity of the cardiac phenotypes, but also because of the oft-complex associations. The purpose of our study was to establish a comprehensive and easy-to-use classification of CHD for clinical and epidemiological studies based on the long list of the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC. Methods We coded each individual malformation using six-digit codes from the long list of IPCCC. We then regrouped all lesions into 10 categories and 23 subcategories according to a multi-dimensional approach encompassing anatomic, diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. This anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart disease (ACC-CHD was then applied to data acquired from a population-based cohort of patients with CHD in France, made up of 2867 cases (82% live births, 1.8% stillbirths and 16.2% pregnancy terminations. Results The majority of cases (79.5% could be identified with a single IPCCC code. The category "Heterotaxy, including isomerism and mirror-imagery" was the only one that typically required more than one code for identification of cases. The two largest categories were "ventricular septal defects" (52% and "anomalies of the outflow tracts and arterial valves" (20% of cases. Conclusion Our proposed classification is not new, but rather a regrouping of the known spectrum of CHD into a manageable number of categories based on anatomic and clinical criteria. The classification is designed to use the code numbers of the long list of IPCCC but can accommodate ICD-10 codes. Its exhaustiveness, simplicity, and anatomic basis make it useful for clinical and epidemiologic studies, including those aimed at assessment of risk factors and outcomes.

  15. MEG source reconstruction based on identification of directed source interactions on whole-brain anatomical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Makoto; Yamashita, Okito; Knösche, Thomas R; Sato, Masa-aki

    2015-01-15

    We present an MEG source reconstruction method that simultaneously reconstructs source amplitudes and identifies source interactions across the whole brain. In the proposed method, a full multivariate autoregressive (MAR) model formulates directed interactions (i.e., effective connectivity) between sources. The MAR coefficients (the entries of the MAR matrix) are constrained by the prior knowledge of whole-brain anatomical networks inferred from diffusion MRI. Moreover, to increase the accuracy and robustness of our method, we apply an fMRI prior on the spatial activity patterns and a sparse prior on the MAR coefficients. The observation process of MEG data, the source dynamics, and a series of the priors are combined into a Bayesian framework using a state-space representation. The parameters, such as the source amplitudes and the MAR coefficients, are jointly estimated from a variational Bayesian learning algorithm. By formulating the source dynamics in the context of MEG source reconstruction, and unifying the estimations of source amplitudes and interactions, we can identify the effective connectivity without requiring the selection of regions of interest. Our method is quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated on simulated and experimental data, respectively. Compared with non-dynamic methods, in which the interactions are estimated after source reconstruction with no dynamic constraints, the proposed dynamic method improves most of the performance measures in simulations, and provides better physiological interpretation and inter-subject consistency in real data applications. PMID:25290887

  16. Wavelet-based resolution recovery using an anatomical prior provides quantitative recovery for human population phantom PET [11C]raclopride data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a resolution recovery (RR) method using a variety of simulated human brain [11C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) images. Simulated datasets of 15 numerical human phantoms were processed by a wavelet-based RR method using an anatomical prior. The anatomical prior was in the form of a hybrid segmented atlas, which combined an atlas for anatomical labelling and a PET image for functional labelling of each anatomical structure. We applied RR to both 60 min static and dynamic PET images. Recovery was quantified in 84 regions, comparing the typical ‘true’ value for the simulation, as obtained in normal subjects, simulated and RR PET images. The radioactivity concentration in the white matter, striatum and other cortical regions was successfully recovered for the 60 min static image of all 15 human phantoms; the dependence of the solution on accurate anatomical information was demonstrated by the difficulty of the technique to retrieve the subthalamic nuclei due to mismatch between the two atlases used for data simulation and recovery. Structural and functional synergy for resolution recovery (SFS-RR) improved quantification in the caudate and putamen, the main regions of interest, from??30.1% and??26.2% to??17.6% and??15.1%, respectively, for the 60 min static image and from??51.4% and??38.3% to??27.6% and??20.3% for the binding potential (BPND) image, respectispectively. The proposed methodology proved effective in the RR of small structures from brain [11C]raclopride PET images. The improvement is consistent across the anatomical variability of a simulated population as long as accurate anatomical segmentations are provided. (paper)

  17. Anatomically guided voxel-based partial volume effect correction in brain PET: impact of MRI segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Assal, Frédéric; Allaoua, Mohamed; Ratib, Osman; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-12-01

    Partial volume effect is still considered one of the main limitations in brain PET imaging given the limited spatial resolution of current generation PET scanners. The accuracy of anatomically guided partial volume effect correction (PVC) algorithms in brain PET is largely dependent on the performance of MRI segmentation algorithms partitioning the brain into its main classes, namely gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A comparative evaluation of four brain MRI segmentation algorithms bundled in the successive releases of Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) package (SPM99, SPM2, SPM5, SPM8) using clinical neurological examinations was performed. Subsequently, their impact on PVC in (18)F-FDG brain PET imaging was assessed. The principle of the different variants of the image segmentation algorithm is to spatially normalize the subject's MR images to a corresponding template. PET images were corrected for partial volume effect using GM volume segmented from coregistered MR images. The PVC approach aims to compensate for signal dilution in non-active tissues such as CSF, which becomes an important issue in the case of tissue atrophy to prevent a misinterpretation of decrease of metabolism owing to PVE. The study population consisted of 19 patients suffering from neurodegenerative dementia. Image segmentation performed using SPM5 was used as reference. The comparison showed that previous releases of SPM (SPM99 and SPM2) result in larger gray matter regions (~20%) and smaller white matter regions (between -17% and -6%), thus introducing non-negligible bias in PVC PET activity estimates (between 30% and 90%). In contrary, the more recent release (SPM8) results in similar results (<1%). It was concluded that the choice of the segmentation algorithm for MRI-guided PVC in PET plays a crucial role for the accurate estimation of PET activity concentration. The segmentation algorithm embedded within the latest release of SPM satisfies the requirement of robust and accurate segmentation for MRI-guided PVC in brain PET imaging. PMID:23046730

  18. Bases Anatómicas de la Gluteoplastía Dinámica / Anatomical Basis of the Dinamic Gluteoplaty

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Laura, Borgno; Varinia, Scanniello; Omar, Rompani; Alejandra, Laxague; Sofía, Páez.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available La disrupción anatómica del esfínter es el mecanismo más común de incontinencia fecal. La creación de un mecanismo esfinteriano con control voluntario permite mantener la contracción en el reposo o durante los movimientos y es uno de los principios fisiológicos y quirúrgicos para la continencia. Est [...] a corrección puede realizarse mediante la transposición de músculo glúteo mayor alrededor del ano y recrear así un esfínter voluntario. La gluteoplastía dinámica consiste en la colocación de un marcapasos que permite la estimulación eléctrica crónica intermitente del músculo esquelético, resultando en la adaptación de la contractilidad basal. El objetivo del trabajo consiste en el estudio anatómico de la longitud in situ y esqueletizado del fascículo inferior del músculo glúteo máximo, de su principal pedículo nervioso, la altura en la cual penetra al músculo desde el cóccix, y la longitud de su rama más distal para finalmente, proponer variantes técnicas para este procedimiento. Se disecaron 21 regiones glúteas de ambos lados de cadáveres frescos y formolizados al 10% de ambos sexos. La longitud del fascículo muscular sin esqueletizar osciló entre 17,8 y 19,65 cm, y esqueletizado entre 23,9 y 20.7 cm. La distancia de penetración del nervio principal fue entre 11,25 10,2 cm y la del nervio más medial se situó promedialmente entre 8,72 y 5,97 cm. La máxima longitud adquirida por el nervio principal hasta su rama más distal, osciló entre 10,4 y 9,2 cm. El fascículo inferior posee una longitud final que permite rodear completamente al ano e incluso, llegar al isquion contralateral hechos que apoyan el uso de este músculo en las transposiciones para la corrección de las incontinencias anales, sin la necesidad de realizar abordajes desmedidos y lejanos, permitiendo a su vez, el uso de un músculo de la región, evitando tracciones del pedículo neurovascular y la consiguiente isquemia luego del procedimiento quirúrgico. Se proponen tres técnicas para la rotación del colgajo Abstract in english The anatomical disruption of the sphincter is the most common mechanism of fecal incontinence. The creation of an sphincter mechanism with voluntary control allows to maintain the contraction during rest or movements and is one of the physiological and surgical principles of continence. This correct [...] ion can be made by the gluteus maximus muscle transposition around the anus recreating a voluntary sphincter. The dynamic gluteoplasty consists in the positioning of a nerve stimulator that allows the intermittent chronic electrical stimulation of the skeletal muscle resulting in the adaptation of the basal contractility. The objective of the work is the anatomic study of the inferior fascicle of the gluteus maximus muscle (its length in situ and squeletized) and of its main nervous pedicle (the height in which penetrates the muscle from coccyx, and the length of its distal branch) so as to propose technical changes for the procedure. Twenty and one gluteus regions of both sides from fresh and formalized cadavers of both sexes were dissected. The length of muscular fascicle without squeletized oscillated between 17.8 and 19.65 cm, and squeletized between 23.9 and 20.7 cm. The distance of penetration of the main nerve was between 11.25 and 10.2 cm and the one of the most internal nerve was located promedially between 8.72 and 5.97 cm. The maximun length acquired by the main nerve until its distal branch oscillated between 10.4 and 9.2 cm. The inferior fascicle has a final length that allows to surround completely the anus or even to reach the contralateral isquion, facts which support the use of this muscle in the transpositions for the correction of the anal incontinence, without making excessive or distant boardings, allowing as well the use of a muscle from the region, avoiding tractions of neurovascular pedicle and the consequent isquemia after the surgical procedure. Three technical changes for the rotation of flap are proposed

  19. Statistical 3D prostate imaging atlas construction via anatomically constrained registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Feleppa, Ernest; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Statistical imaging atlases allow for integration of information from multiple patient studies collected across different image scales and modalities, such as multi-parametric (MP) MRI and histology, providing population statistics regarding a specific pathology within a single canonical representation. Such atlases are particularly valuable in the identification and validation of meaningful imaging signatures for disease characterization in vivo within a population. Despite the high incidence of prostate cancer, an imaging atlas focused on different anatomic structures of the prostate, i.e. an anatomic atlas, has yet to be constructed. In this work we introduce a novel framework for MRI atlas construction that uses an iterative, anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme to enable the proper alignment of the prostate (Pr) and central gland (CG) boundaries. Our current implementation uses endorectal, 1.5T or 3T, T2-weighted MRI from 51 patients with biopsy confirmed cancer; however, the prostate atlas is seamlessly extensible to include additional MRI parameters. In our cohort, radical prostatectomy is performed following MP-MR image acquisition; thus ground truth annotations for prostate cancer are available from the histological specimens. Once mapped onto MP-MRI through elastic registration of histological slices to corresponding T2-w MRI slices, the annotations are utilized by the AnCoR framework to characterize the 3D statistical distribution of cancer per anatomic structure. Such distributions are useful for guiding biopsies toward regions of higher cancer likelihood and understanding imaging profiles for disease extent in vivo. We evaluate our approach via the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for different anatomic structures (delineated by expert radiologists): Pr, CG and peripheral zone (PZ). The AnCoR-based atlas had a CG DSC of 90.36%, and Pr DSC of 89.37%. Moreover, we evaluated the deviation of anatomic landmarks, the urethra and veromontanum, and found 3.64 mm and respectively 4.31 mm. Alternative strategies that use only the T2-w MRI or the prostate surface to drive the registration were implemented as comparative approaches. The AnCoR framework outperformed the alternative strategies by providing the lowest landmark deviations.

  20. The periodization of wheat embryogenesis on the base of anatomical, morphological and time criterions

    OpenAIRE

    Kruglova, Natalia N.

    2013-01-01

    The periodization of wheat embryogenesis on the base of anatomy-morphological and temporal criterions has been proposed. The stages of non-differentiated embryo, embryo differentiation and differentiated embryo were described.

  1. Functional and anatomical properties of human visual cortical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouyu; Cate, Anthony D; Herron, Timothy J; Kang, Xiaojian; Yund, E William; Bao, Shanglian; Woods, David L

    2015-04-01

    Human visual cortical fields (VCFs) vary in size and anatomical location across individual subjects. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with retinotopic stimulation to identify VCFs on the cortical surface. We found that aligning and averaging VCF activations across the two hemispheres provided clear delineation of multiple retinotopic fields in visual cortex. The results show that VCFs have consistent locations and extents in different subjects that provide stable and accurate landmarks for functional and anatomical mapping. Interhemispheric comparisons revealed minor differences in polar angle and eccentricity tuning in comparable VCFs in the left and right hemisphere, and somewhat greater intersubject variability in the right than left hemisphere. We then used the functional boundaries to characterize the anatomical properties of VCFs, including fractional anisotropy (FA), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and the ratio of T1W and T2W images and found significant anatomical differences between VCFs and between hemispheres. PMID:25661165

  2. Three-dimensional segmentation of anatomical structures in MR images on large data bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, G; Musse, O; Heitz, F; Armspach, J P

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an image-based method founded on mathematical morphology is presented in order to facilitate the segmentation of cerebral structures over large data bases of 3D magnetic resonance images (MRIs). The segmentation is described as an immersion simulation, applied to the modified gradient image, modeled by a generated 3D-region adjacency graph (RAG). The segmentation relies on two main processes: homotopy modification and contour decision. The first one is achieved by a marker extraction stage where homogeneous 3D-regions are identified. This stage uses contrasted regions from morphological reconstruction and labeled flat regions constrained by the RAG. Then, the decision stage intends to precisely locate the contours of regions detected by the marker extraction. This decision is performed by a 3D extension of the watershed transform. The method has been applied on a data base of 3D brain MRIs composed of fifty patients. Results are illustrated by segmenting the ventricles, corpus callosum, cerebellum, hippocampus, pons, medulla and midbrain on our data base and the approach is validated on two phantom 3D MRIs. PMID:11295349

  3. A pose-independent method for 3D face landmark formalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzetti, Enrico; Moos, Sandro; Marcolin, Federica; Stola, Vincenzo

    2012-12-01

    Recently, 3D landmark extraction has been widely researched and experimented in medical field, for both corrective and aesthetic purposes. Automation of these procedures on three-dimensional face renderings is something desirable for the specialists who work in this field. In this work we propose a new method for accurate landmark localization on facial scans. The method relies on geometrical descriptors, such as curvatures and Shape Index, for computing candidate and initial points, and on a statistical model based on Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis, which is fitted to candidate points, for extracting the final landmarks. The elaborated method is independent on face pose. PMID:22939737

  4. Evaluation of sexual history-based screening of anatomic sites for chlamydia trachomatis and neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in men having sex with men in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Casper L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually transmitted infection (STI screening programmes are implemented in many countries to decrease burden of STI and to improve sexual health. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae has a prominent role in these protocols. Most of the screening programmes concerning men having sex with men (MSM are based on opportunistic urethral testing. In The Netherlands, a history-based approach is used. The aim of this study is to evaluate the protocol of screening anatomic sites for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infection based on sexual history in MSM in routine practice in The Netherlands. Methods All MSM visiting the clinic for STI in The Hague are routinely asked about their sexual practice during consulting. As per protocol, tests for urogenital, oropharyngeal and anorectal infection are obtained based on reported site(s of sexual contact. All consultations are entered into a database as part of the national STI monitoring system. Data of an 18 months period were retrieved from this database and analysed. Results A total of 1455 consultations in MSM were registered during the study period. The prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae per anatomic site was: urethral infection 4.0% respectively and 2.8%, oropharynx 1.5% and 4.2%, and anorectum 8.2% and 6.0%. The majority of chlamydia cases (72% involved a single anatomic site, which was especially manifest for anorectal infections (79%, while 42% of gonorrhoea cases were single site. Twenty-six percent of MSM with anorectal chlamydia and 17% with anorectal gonorrhoea reported symptoms of proctitis; none of the oropharyngeal infections were symptomatic. Most cases of anorectal infection (83% and oropharyngeal infection (100% would have remained undiagnosed with a symptom-based protocol. Conclusions The current strategy of sexual-history based screening of multiple anatomic sites for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in MSM is a useful and valid guideline which is to be preferred over a symptom-based screening protocol.

  5. Repeatability and reproducibility of landmarks--a three-dimensional computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titiz, Irem; Laubinger, Michala; Keller, Thomas; Hertrich, Klaus; Hirschfelder, Ursula

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the repeatability and reproducibility of the placement of anthropological cephalometric landmarks on three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) cranial reconstructions derived from volume data sets. In addition, the influence of the observer's experience on the repeatability of landmark setting was also explored. Twenty patients without any craniofacial deformity (11 females and 9 males; age range 6.1-16 years) were selected retrospectively from CT volume data sets already available from 695 patients of Dental Clinic 3, Orthodontics of Erlangen University Hospital. The CT examination was performed with the SOMATOM Sensation64 (Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). The program VoXim6.1 (IVS Solutions AG, Chemnitz, Germany) was used for 3D reconstruction of the volume data sets. A total of 28 landmarks were examined in the skeleton module of the program VoXim6.1. The randomly sorted data sets were analysed by two orthodontists and two postgraduate students. Each data set was analysed twice by each observer at an interval of 3 weeks. The analysis of variance regarding random effects was used to calculate the intraobserver and interobserver components of standard deviation (SD) of depiction of individual landmarks as measures of repeatability and reproducibility, respectively. Median intraserial SD and interserial SD of 0.46 mm (range: 0.14-2.00 mm) and 0.20 mm (range: 0.02-2.47 mm), respectively, were obtained depending on the landmark and plane. This study included systematic analysis of extreme values (outliers) in the assessment of the quality of measurements obtained. Descriptive statistics revealed qualitative differences in the depiction of different landmarks. The landmarks nasion and infradentale revealed a minor SD in all three spatial coordinates with the smallest SD for infradentale (SD = 0.18 mm) in the transverse plane. However, no systematic trend was identified with regard to the influence of the observer's level of experience affecting the repeatability of landmark positioning. Thus, the repeatability and reproducibility of placements of landmarks with 3D CT were found to be acceptable for a majority of anatomical positions. PMID:21566086

  6. Anatomic region-based dynamic range compression for chest radiographs using warping transformation of correlated distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, O; Freedman, M T; Mun, S K

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of our novel dynamic range compression (DRC) for chest radiographs. The purpose of DRC is to compress the gray scale range of the image when using narrow dynamic range viewing systems such as monitors. First, an automated segmentation method was used to detect the lung region. The combined region of mediastinum, heart, and subdiaphragm was defined based on the lung region. The correlated distributions, between a pixel value and its neighboring averaged pixel value, for the lung region and the combined region were calculated. According to the appearance of overlapping of two distributions, the warping function was decided. After pixel values were warped, the pixel value range of the lung region was compressed while preserving the detail information, because the warping function compressed the range of the averaged pixel values while preserving the pixel value range for the pixels which had had the same averaged pixel value. The performance was evaluated with our criterion function which was the contrast divided by the moment, where the contrast and the moment represent the sum of the differences between the pixel values and the averaged values of eight pixels surrounding that pixel, and the sum of the differences between the pixel values and the averaged value of all pixels in the region-of-interest, respectively. For 71 screening chest images from Johns Hopkins University Hospital (Baltimore, MD), this method improved our criterion function at 11.7% on average. The warping transformation algorithm based on the correlated distribution was effective in compressing the dynamic range while simultaneously preserving the detail information. PMID:9735904

  7. Dosimetric intercomparison for multicenter clinical trials using a patient-based anatomic pelvic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess dose delivery accuracy to clinically significant points in a realistic patient geometry for two separate pelvic radiotherapy scenarios. Methods: An inhomogeneous pelvic phantom was transported to 36 radiotherapy centers in Australia and New Zealand. The phantom was treated according to Phase III rectal and prostate trial protocols. Point dose measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an ionisation chamber. Comprehensive site-demographic, treatment planning, and physical data were collected for correlation with measurement outcomes. Results: Dose delivery to the prescription point for the rectal treatment was consistent with planned dose (mean difference between planned and measured dose - 0.1 ± 0.3% std err). Dose delivery in the region of the sacral hollow was consistently higher than planned (+1.2 ± 0.2%). For the prostate treatment, dose delivery to the prostate volume was consistent with planned doses (-0.49 ± 0.2%) and planned dose uniformity, though with a tendency to underdose the PTV at the prostate-rectal border. Measured out-of-field doses were significantly higher than planned. Conclusions: A phantom based on realistic anatomy and heterogeneity can be used to comprehensively assess the influence of multiple aspects of the radiotherapy treatment process on dose delivery. The ability to verify dose delivery for two trials with a single phantom was advantageous.

  8. Anatomical correlates of quality of life: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Nagase, Tomomi; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-05-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has been defined in many ways, and these definitions usually emphasize happiness and satisfaction with life. Health-related problems are known to cause lower QOL. However, the neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in QOL measured by questionnaire (QOLMQ) in young healthy subjects are unknown. QOL is essential to our well-being, and investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying QOL in uncompromised subjects is obviously of great scientific and social interest. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the association between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and QOLMQ across the brain in healthy young adults (age, 21.4 ± 1.8 years) men (n = 88) and women (n = 68) in humans. We found significant negative relationships between QOLMQ and rGMV in a region in the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex and regions in the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate gyrus and contingent cingulate regions. These findings show that structural variations in regions associated with processing of negative emotions such as fear and anger as well as those associated with evaluation of internally generated information are associated with QOLMQ. These findings suggest that these processes might be related to QOLMQ in healthy young adults. PMID:23671021

  9. An anatomically realistic lung model for Monte Carlo-based dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment planning for disease sites with large variations of electron density in neighboring tissues requires an accurate description of the geometry. This self-evident statement is especially true for the lung, a highly complex organ having structures with a wide range of sizes that range from about 10-4 to 1 cm. In treatment planning, the lung is commonly modeled by a voxelized geometry obtained using computed tomography (CT) data at various resolutions. The simplest such model, which is often used for QA and validation work, is the atomic mix or mean density model, in which the entire lung is homogenized and given a mean (volume-averaged) density. The purpose of this paper is (i) to describe a new heterogeneous random lung model, which is based on morphological data of the human lung, and (ii) use this model to assess the differences in dose calculations between an actual lung (as represented by our model) and a mean density (homogenized) lung. Eventually, we plan to use the random lung model to assess the accuracy of CT-based treatment plans of the lung. For this paper, we have used Monte Carlo methods to make accurate comparisons between dose calculations for the random lung model and the mean density model. For four realizations of the random lung model, we used a single photon beam, with two different energies (6 and 18 MV) and four field sizes (1x1, 5x5, 10x10, and 20x20 cm2). We found a maximum difference of 34% of Dmax with difference of 34% of Dmax with the 1x1, 18 MV beam along the central axis (CAX). A ''shadow'' region distal to the lung, with dose reduction up to 7% of Dmax, exists for the same realization. The dose perturbations decrease for larger field sizes, but the magnitude of the differences in the shadow region is nearly independent of the field size. We also observe that, compared to the mean density model, the random structures inside the heterogeneous lung can alter the shape of the isodose lines, leading to a broadening or shrinking of the penumbra region. For small field sizes, the mean lung doses significantly depend on the structures' relative locations to the beam. In addition to these comparisons between the random lung and mean density models, we also provide a preliminary comparison between dose calculations for the random lung model and a voxelized version of this model at 0.4x0.4x0.4 cm3 resolution. Overall, this study is relevant to treatment planning for lung tumors, especially in situations where small field sizes are used. Our results show that for such situations, the mean density model of the lung is inadequate, and a more accurate CT model of the lung is required. Future work with our model will involve patient motion, setup errors, and recommendations for the resolution of CT models

  10. Atlas-Based Knee Cartilage Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Carballido-gamio, Julio; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of knee cartilage properties at corresponding anatomic locations could be a valuable tool in studies of knee osteoarthritis by enabling accurate comparisons at practically any region. A technique of this kind is presented in this study. The proposed technique is based on gray-level bone matching using affine transformations and free-form deformations thus eliminating the need of bone segmentations and landmark matching. Sixteen subjects of the osteoarthriti...

  11. Automatic landmarking for building biological shape models

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, Y.; Marshall, D.; Martin, R. R.; Rosin, P. L.; Bayer, M. M.; Manning, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a new method for automatic landmark extraction from the contours of biological specimens. Our ultimate goal is to enable automatic identification of biological specimens in photographs and drawings held in a database. We propose to use active appearance models for visual indexing of both photographs and drawings. Automatic landmark extraction will assist us in building the models. We describe the results of using our method on drawings and photographs of examples of diatoms, and pr...

  12. Large Sample Group Independent Component Analysis of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Anatomical Atlas-Based Reduction and Bootstrapped Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ariana; Bramen, Jennifer; Douglas, Pamela K.; Lenartowicz, Agatha; Cho, Andrew; Culbertson, Chris; Brody, Arthur L.; Yuille, Alan L.; Cohen, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a popular method for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals that is capable of revealing connected brain systems of functional significance. To be computationally tractable, estimating the independent components (ICs) inevitably requires one or more dimension reduction steps. Whereas most algorithms perform such reductions in the time domain, the input data are much more extensive in the spatial domain, and there is broad consensus that the brain obeys rules of localization of function into regions that are smaller in number than the number of voxels in a brain image. These functional units apparently reorganize dynamically into networks under different task conditions. Here we develop a new approach to ICA, producing group results by bagging and clustering over hundreds of pooled single-subject ICA results that have been projected to a lower-dimensional subspace. Averages of anatomically based regions are used to compress the single subject-ICA results prior to clustering and resampling via bagging. The computational advantages of this approach make it possible to perform group-level analyses on datasets consisting of hundreds of scan sessions by combining the results of within-subject analysis, while retaining the theoretical advantage of mimicking what is known of the functional organization of the brain. The result is a compact set of spatial activity patterns that are common and stable across scan sessions and across individuals. Such representations may be used in the context of statistical pattern recognition supporting real-time state classification. PMID:22049263

  13. The importance of accurate anatomic assessment for the volumetric analysis of the amygdala

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    L., Bonilha; E., Kobayashi; F., Cendes; L.M., Li.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide range of values reported in volumetric studies of the amygdala. The use of single plane thick magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may prevent the correct visualization of anatomic landmarks and yield imprecise results. To assess whether there is a difference between volumetric analysis [...] of the amygdala performed with single plane MRI 3-mm slices and with multiplanar analysis of MRI 1-mm slices, we studied healthy subjects and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We performed manual delineation of the amygdala on T1-weighted inversion recovery, 3-mm coronal slices and manual delineation of the amygdala on three-dimensional volumetric T1-weighted images with 1-mm slice thickness. The data were compared using a dependent t-test. There was a significant difference between the volumes obtained by the coronal plane-based measurements and the volumes obtained by three-dimensional analysis (P

  14. Quality-Aware Estimation of Facial Landmarks in Video Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Face alignment in video is a primitive step for facial image analysis. The accuracy of the alignment greatly depends on the quality of the face image in the video frames and low quality faces are proven to cause erroneous alignment. Thus, this paper proposes a system for quality aware face alignment by using a Supervised Decent Method (SDM) along with a motion based forward extrapolation method. The proposed system first extracts faces from video frames. Then, it employs a face quality assessment technique to measure the face quality. If the face quality is high, the proposed system uses SDM for facial landmark detection. If the face quality is low the proposed system corrects the facial landmarks that are detected by SDM. Depending upon the face velocity in consecutive video frames and face quality measure, two algorithms are proposed for correction of landmarks in low quality faces by using an extrapolation polynomial. Experimental results illustrate the competency of the proposed method while comparing with the state-of-theart methods including an SDM-based method (from CVPR-2013) and a very recent method (from CVPR-2014) that uses parallel cascade of linear regression (Par-CLR).

  15. Sparse decomposition and modeling of anatomical shape variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Rostrup, Egill

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in statistics have spawned powerful methods for regression and data decomposition that promote sparsity, a property that facilitates interpretation of the results. Sparse models use a small subset of the available variables and may perform as well or better than their full counterparts if constructed carefully. In most medical applications, models are required to have both good statistical performance and a relevant clinical interpretation to be of value. Morphometry of the corpus callosum is one illustrative example. This paper presents a method for relating spatial features to clinical outcome data. A set of parsimonious variables is extracted using sparse principal component analysis, producing simple yet characteristic features. The relation of these variables with clinical data is then established using a regression model. The result may be visualized as patterns of anatomical variation related to clinical outcome. In the present application, landmark-based shape data of the corpus callosum is analyzed in relation to age, gender, and clinical tests of walking speed and verbal fluency. To put the data-driven sparse principal component method into perspective, we consider two alternative techniques, one where features are derived using a model-based wavelet approach, and one where the original variables are regressed directly on the outcome. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec

  16. Sparse Decomposition and Modeling of Anatomical Shape Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Rostrup, Egill

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in statistics have spawned powerful methods for regression and data decomposition that promote sparsity, a property that facilitates interpretation of the results. Sparse models use a small subset of the available variables and may perform as well or better than their full counterparts if constructed carefully. In most medical applications, models are required to have both good statistical performance and a relevant clinical interpretation to be of value. Morphometry of the corpus callosum is one illustrative example. This paper presents a method for relating spatial features to clinical outcome data. A set of parsimonious variables is extracted using sparse principal component analysis, producing simple yet characteristic features. The relation of these variables with clinical data is then established using a regression model. The result may be visualized as patterns of anatomical variation related to clinical outcome. In the present application, landmark-based shape data of the corpus callosum is analyzed in relation to age, gender, and clinical tests of walking speed and verbal fluency. To put the data-driven sparse principal component method into perspective, we consider two alternative techniques, one where features are derived using a model-based wavelet approach, and one where the original variables are regressed directly on the outcome.

  17. Locating landmarks on high-dimensional free energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Yu, Tang-Qing; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2015-03-17

    Coarse graining of complex systems possessing many degrees of freedom can often be a useful approach for analyzing and understanding key features of these systems in terms of just a few variables. The relevant energy landscape in a coarse-grained description is the free energy surface as a function of the coarse-grained variables, which, despite the dimensional reduction, can still be an object of high dimension. Consequently, navigating and exploring this high-dimensional free energy surface is a nontrivial task. In this paper, we use techniques from multiscale modeling, stochastic optimization, and machine learning to devise a strategy for locating minima and saddle points (termed "landmarks") on a high-dimensional free energy surface "on the fly" and without requiring prior knowledge of or an explicit form for the surface. In addition, we propose a compact graph representation of the landmarks and connections between them, and we show that the graph nodes can be subsequently analyzed and clustered based on key attributes that elucidate important properties of the system. Finally, we show that knowledge of landmark locations allows for the efficient determination of their relative free energies via enhanced sampling techniques. PMID:25737545

  18. Perceptual organization and artificial attention for visual landmarks detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antúnez, Esther; Palomino, Antonio J; Marfil, Rebeca; Bandera, Juan P

    2013-03-01

    In biological vision systems, attention mechanisms are responsible for selecting the relevant information from the sensed field of view, so that the complete scene can be analyzed using a sequence of rapid eye saccades. In recent years, efforts have been made to imitate such attention behavior in artificial vision systems, because it allows optimizing the computational resources as they can be focused on the processing of a set of selected regions. In the framework of mobile robotics navigation, this work proposes an artificial model where attention is deployed at the level of objects (visual landmarks) and where new processes for estimating bottom-up and top-down (target-based) saliency maps are employed. Bottom-up attention is implemented through a hierarchical process, whose final result is the perceptual grouping of the image content. The hierarchical grouping is applied using a Combinatorial Pyramid that represents each level of the hierarchy by a combinatorial map. The process takes into account both image regions (faces in the map) and edges (arcs in the map). Top-down attention searches for previously detected landmarks, enabling their re-detection when the robot presumes that it is revisiting a known location. Landmarks are described by a combinatorial submap; thus, this search is conducted through an error-tolerant submap isomorphism procedure. PMID:23328946

  19. 4D measurement system for automatic location of anatomical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawi?ska, Ma?gorzata; Rapp, Walter; Kowalski, Marcin; Haex, Bart; Mooshake, Sven

    2006-04-01

    Orthopedics and neurosciences are fields of medicine where the analysis of objective movement parameters is extremely important for clinical diagnosis. Moreover, as there are significant differences between static and dynamic parameters, there is a strong need of analyzing the anatomical structures under functional conditions. In clinical gait analysis the benefits of kinematical methods are undoubted. In this paper we present a 4D (3D + time) measurement system capable of automatic location of selected anatomical structures by locating and tracing the structures' position and orientation in time. The presented system is designed to help a general practitioner in diagnosing selected lower limbs' dysfunctions (e.g. knee injuries) and also determine if a patient should be directed for further examination (e.g. x-ray or MRI). The measurement system components are hardware and software. For the hardware part we adapt the laser triangulation method. In this way we can evaluate functional and dynamic movements in a contact-free, non-invasive way, without the use of potentially harmful radiation. Furthermore, opposite to marker-based video-tracking systems, no preparation time is required. The software part consists of a data acquisition module, an image processing and point clouds (point cloud, set of points described by coordinates (x, y, z)) calculation module, a preliminary processing module, a feature-searching module and an external biomechanical module. The paper briefly presents the modules mentioned above with the focus on the feature-searching module. Also we present some measurement and analysis results. These include: parameters maps, landmarks trajectories in time sequence and animation of a simplified model of lower limbs.

  20. The importance of accurate anatomic assessment for the volumetric analysis of the amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bonilha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide range of values reported in volumetric studies of the amygdala. The use of single plane thick magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may prevent the correct visualization of anatomic landmarks and yield imprecise results. To assess whether there is a difference between volumetric analysis of the amygdala performed with single plane MRI 3-mm slices and with multiplanar analysis of MRI 1-mm slices, we studied healthy subjects and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We performed manual delineation of the amygdala on T1-weighted inversion recovery, 3-mm coronal slices and manual delineation of the amygdala on three-dimensional volumetric T1-weighted images with 1-mm slice thickness. The data were compared using a dependent t-test. There was a significant difference between the volumes obtained by the coronal plane-based measurements and the volumes obtained by three-dimensional analysis (P < 0.001. An incorrect estimate of the amygdala volume may preclude a correct analysis of the biological effects of alterations in amygdala volume. Three-dimensional analysis is preferred because it is based on more extensive anatomical assessment and the results are similar to those obtained in post-mortem studies.

  1. Ultrasound of the elbow: A systematic approach using bony landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of bony landmarks can be helpful in performing an ultrasound study of the elbow. We discuss bony landmarks that can be used for evaluation of the common extensor tendon, ulnar collateral ligament and common flexor tendon, coronoid and olecranon fossa, ulnar nerve, and biceps tendon. We discuss bony landmarks for each of these structures.

  2. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency.

  3. Landmark papers on photorefractive nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Pochi

    1995-01-01

    This book, intended for students, researchers and engineers, is a collection of classic papers on photorefractive nonlinear optics. Included are landmark papers on fundamental photorefractive phenomena, two-wave mixing, four-wave mixing, phase conjugators and resonators, material growth and physics, and applications in image processing, optical storage and optical computing.

  4. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency. PMID:25479095

  5. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to mark the anatomic neck. You can see up here, this is where the anatomic neck starts. We're going to follow this all the ... put it is wherever the osteotomy surface winds up being parallel to ... that's where we're going to start off with glenoid exposure. So now we're ...

  6. Algorithms to automatically quantify the geometric similarity of anatomical surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, D; Clair, E St; Puente, J; Funkhouser, T; Patel, B; Jernvall, J; Daubechies, I

    2011-01-01

    We describe new approaches for distances between pairs of 2-dimensional surfaces (embedded in 3-dimensional space) that use local structures and global information contained in inter-structure geometric relationships. We present algorithms to automatically determine these distances as well as geometric correspondences. This is motivated by the aspiration of students of natural science to understand the continuity of form that unites the diversity of life. At present, scientists using physical traits to study evolutionary relationships among living and extinct animals analyze data extracted from carefully defined anatomical correspondence points (landmarks). Identifying and recording these landmarks is time consuming and can be done accurately only by trained morphologists. This renders these studies inaccessible to non-morphologists, and causes phenomics to lag behind genomics in elucidating evolutionary patterns. Unlike other algorithms presented for morphological correspondences our approach does not requir...

  7. Anatomical variations of the clavicle and main vascular structures in two pediatric patients: subclavicular vein cannulation with supraclavicular approach

    OpenAIRE

    Oksuz H; Senoglu N; Yildiz H; Demirkiran H

    2009-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a routine application in the management of patients in critical condition. However, the placement of central venous catheters is not without risk. The standard technique for central venous cannulation includes the use of anatomical landmarks. However, an ultrasound-guided method is recommended for catheterization in high-risk patients. In this report, we present two pediatric cases which had anatomical variations of the clavicles and main vascular structures ...

  8. Including anatomical and functional information in MC simulation of PET and SPECT brain studies. Brain-VISET: a voxel-based iterative method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti-Fuster, Berta; Esteban, Oscar; Thielemans, Kris; Setoain, Xavier; Santos, Andres; Ros, Domenec; Pavia, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation provides a flexible and robust framework to efficiently evaluate and optimize image processing methods in emission tomography. In this work we present Brain-VISET (Voxel-based Iterative Simulation for Emission Tomography), a method that aims to simulate realistic [ (99m) Tc]-SPECT and [ (18) F]-PET brain databases by including anatomical and functional information. To this end, activity and attenuation maps generated using high-resolution anatomical images from patients were used as input maps in a MC projector to simulate SPECT or PET sinograms. The reconstructed images were compared with the corresponding real SPECT or PET studies in an iterative process where the activity inputs maps were being modified at each iteration. Datasets of 30 refractory epileptic patients were used to assess the new method. Each set consisted of structural images (MRI and CT) and functional studies (SPECT and PET), thereby allowing the inclusion of anatomical and functional variability in the simulation input models. SPECT and PET sinograms were obtained using the SimSET package and were reconstructed with the same protocols as those employed for the clinical studies. The convergence of Brain-VISET was evaluated by studying the behavior throughout iterations of the correlation coefficient, the quotient image histogram and a ROI analysis comparing simulated with real studies. The realism of generated maps was also evaluated. Our findings show that Brain-VISET is able to generate realistic SPECT and PET studies and that four iterations is a suitable number of iterations to guarantee a good agreement between simulated and real studies. PMID:24876110

  9. Iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block in inguinal hernia repair for postoperative pain management: comparison of the anatomical landmark and ultrasound guided techniques / Bloqueo de los nervios ileohipogástrico/ilioinguinal en corrección de hernia inguinal para el tratamiento del dolor en el postoperatorio: comparación entre la técnica de marcas anatómicas y la guiada por ultrasonido / Bloqueio dos nervos ílio-hipogástrico/ilioinguinal em correção de hérnia inguinal para tratamento da dor no pós-operatório: comparação entre a técnica de marcos anatômicos e a guiada por ultrassom

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Abdurrahman, Demirci; Esra Mercanoglu, Efe; Gürkan, Türker; Alp, Gurbet; Fatma Nur, Kaya; Ali, Anil; & #304; lker, Çimen.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar a eficácia de bloqueios dos nervos ílio-hipogástrico/ilioinguinal feitos com a técnica guiada por ultrassom e a de marcos anatômicos para o manejo da dor no pós-operatório em casos de herniorrafia inguinal em adultos. Métodos: Foram randomicamente divididos 40 pacientes, estado f [...] ísico ASA I-II, em dois grupos iguais: nos grupos AN (técnica de marcos anatômicos) e US (técnica guiada por ultrassom), o bloqueio dos nervos ílio-hipogástrico/ilioinguinal foi feito com 20 mL de levobupivacaína a 0,5% antes da cirurgia com as técnicas especificadas. Escore de dor na avaliação pós-operatória, tempo de primeira mobilização, tempo de internação hospitalar, escore de satisfação com a analgesia no pós-operatório, efeitos colaterais induzidos por opiáceos e complicações relacionadas ao bloqueio foram avaliados durante 24 horas de pós-operatório. Resultados: Escores EVAem repouso na sala de recuperação e todos os valores clínicos durante o acompanhamento foram significativamente menores no grupo ultrassom (p Abstract in spanish Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar la eficacia de bloqueos de los nervios ileohipogástrico/ilioinguinal realizados con la técnica guiada por ultrasonido y la de marca anatómicas para el manejo del dolor en el postoperatorio en casos de herniorrafia inguinal en adultos. Métodos: 40 p [...] acientes, estado físico ASA I-II, fueron aleatoriamente divididos en 2 grupos iguales: grupos con técnica de marcas anatómicas) y grupo con técnica guiada por ultrasonido. El bloqueo de los nervios iliohipogástrico/ilioinguinal fue realizado con 20 mL de levobupivacaína al 0,5% antes de la cirugía con las técnicas especificadas. La puntuación de dolor en la evaluación postoperatoria, tiempo de primera movilización, tiempo de ingreso hospitalario, puntuación de satisfacción con la analgesia en el postoperatorio, efectos colaterales inducidos por opiáceos y complicaciones relacionadas con el bloqueo fueron evaluados durante 24 h de postoperatorio. Resultados: Las puntuaciones EVA en reposo en la sala de recuperación y todos los valores clínicos durante el seguimiento fueron significativamente menores en el grupo con técnica guiada por ultrasonido (p Abstract in english Objectives: The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve blocks performed with the ultrasound guided and the anatomical landmark techniques for postoperative pain management in cases of adult inguinal herniorrhaphy. Methods: 40 patients, ASA I-II status [...] were randomized into two groups equally: in Group AN (anatomical landmark technique) and in Group ultrasound (ultrasound guided technique), iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block was performed with 20 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine prior to surgery with the specified techniques. Pain score in postoperative assessment, first mobilization time, duration of hospital stay, score of postoperative analgesia satisfaction, opioid induced side effects and complications related to block were assessed for 24 h postoperatively. Results: VAS scores at rest in the recovery room and all the clinical follow-up points were found significantly less in Group ultrasound (p

  10. Computer-aided diagnostic scheme for the detection of lung nodules on chest radiographs: Localized search method based on anatomical classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed an advanced computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for the detection of various types of lung nodules on chest radiographs intended for implementation in clinical situations. We used 924 digitized chest images (992 noncalcified nodules) which had a 500x500 matrix size with a 1024 gray scale. The images were divided randomly into two sets which were used for training and testing of the computerized scheme. In this scheme, the lung field was first segmented by use of a ribcage detection technique, and then a large search area (448x448 matrix size) within the chest image was automatically determined by taking into account the locations of a midline and a top edge of the segmented ribcage. In order to detect lung nodule candidates based on a localized search method, we divided the entire search area into 7x7 regions of interest (ROIs: 64x64 matrix size). In the next step, each ROI was classified anatomically into apical, peripheral, hilar, and diaphragm/heart regions by use of its image features. Identification of lung nodule candidates and extraction of image features were applied for each localized region (128x128 matrix size), each having its central part (64x64 matrix size) located at a position corresponding to a ROI that was classified anatomically in the previous step. Initial candidates were identified by use of the nodule-enhanced image obtained with the average radial-gradient filtering technique, in which the filter size was varied adaptively depenhe filter size was varied adaptively depending on the location and the anatomical classification of the ROI. We extracted 57 image features from the original and nodule-enhanced images based on geometric, gray-level, background structure, and edge-gradient features. In addition, 14 image features were obtained from the corresponding locations in the contralateral subtraction image. A total of 71 image features were employed for three sequential artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to reduce the number of false-positive candidates. All parameters for ANNs, i.e., the number of iterations, slope of sigmoid functions, learning rate, and threshold values for removing the false positives, were determined automatically by use of a bootstrap technique with training cases. We employed four different combinations of training and test image data sets which was selected randomly from the 924 cases. By use of our localized search method based on anatomical classification, the average sensitivity was increased to 92.5% with 59.3 false positives per image at the level of initial detection for four different sets of test cases, whereas our previous technique achieved an 82.8% of sensitivity with 56.8 false positives per image. The computer performance in the final step obtained from four different data sets indicated that the average sensitivity in detecting lung nodules was 70.1% with 5.0 false positives per image for testing cases and 70.4% sensitivity with 4.2 false positives per image for training cases. The advanced CAD scheme involving the localized search method with anatomical classification provided improved detection of pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs for 924 lung nodule cases

  11. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available GLOBAL AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient ...

  12. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a patient's unique anatomical makeup. Dr. Gerald R. Williams, Jr., a shoulder specialist from the Rothman ... That might help. Could you raise the O.R. table, please? 00:28:35 WOMAN: Can you ...

  13. Landmark risk prediction of residual life for breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parast, Layla; Cai, Tianxi

    2013-09-10

    The importance of developing personalized risk prediction estimates has become increasingly evident in recent years. In general, patient populations may be heterogenous and represent a mixture of different unknown subtypes of disease. When the source of this heterogeneity and resulting subtypes of disease are unknown, accurate prediction of survival may be difficult. However, in certain disease settings, the onset time of an observable short-term event may be highly associated with these unknown subtypes of disease and thus may be useful in predicting long-term survival. One approach to incorporate short-term event information along with baseline markers for the prediction of long-term survival is through a landmark Cox model, which assumes a proportional hazards model for the residual life at a given landmark point. In this paper, we use this modeling framework to develop procedures to assess how a patient's long-term survival trajectory may change over time given good short-term outcome indications along with prognosis on the basis of baseline markers. We first propose time-varying accuracy measures to quantify the predictive performance of landmark prediction rules for residual life and provide resampling-based procedures to make inference about such accuracy measures. Simulation studies show that the proposed procedures perform well in finite samples. Throughout, we illustrate our proposed procedures by using a breast cancer dataset with information on time to metastasis and time to death. In addition to baseline clinical markers available for each patient, a chromosome instability genetic score, denoted by CIN25, is also available for each patient and has been shown to be predictive of survival for various types of cancer. We provide procedures to evaluate the incremental value of CIN25 for the prediction of residual life and examine how the residual life profile changes over time. This allows us to identify an informative landmark point, t(0) , such that accurate risk predictions of the residual life could be made for patients who survive past t(0) without metastasis. PMID:23494768

  14. The behavioural relevance of landmark texture for honeybee homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LauraDittmar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Honeybees visually pinpoint the location of a food source using landmarks. Studies on the role of visual memories have suggested that bees approach the goal by finding a close match between their current view and a memorized view of the goal location. The most relevant landmark features for this matching process seem to be their retinal positions, the size as defined by their edges, and their colour. Recently, we showed that honeybees can use landmarks that are statically camouflaged, suggesting that motion cues are relevant as well. Currently it is unclear how bees weight these different landmark features when accomplishing navigational tasks, and whether this depends on their saliency. Since natural objects are often distinguished by their texture, we investigate the behavioural relevance and the interplay of the spatial configuration and the texture of landmarks. We show that landmark texture is a feature that bees memorise, and being given the opportunity to identify landmarks by their texture improves the bees’ navigational performance. Landmark texture is weighted more strongly than landmark configuration when it provides the bees with positional information and when the texture is salient. In the vicinity of the landmark honeybees changed their flight behaviour according to its texture.

  15. Tracking in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Sinard, John H

    2013-12-01

    Bar code-based tracking solutions, long present in clinical pathology laboratories, have recently made an appearance in anatomic pathology (AP) laboratories. Tracking of AP "assets" (specimens, blocks, slides) can enhance laboratory efficiency, promote patient safety, and improve patient care. Routing of excess clinical material into research laboratories and biorepositories are other avenues that can benefit from tracking of AP assets. Implementing tracking is not as simple as installing software and turning it on. Not all tracking solutions are alike. Careful analysis of laboratory workflow is needed before implementing tracking to assure that this solution will meet the needs of the laboratory. Such analysis will likely uncover practices that may need to be modified before a tracking system can be deployed. Costs that go beyond simply that of purchasing software will be incurred and need to be considered in the budgeting process. Finally, people, not technology, are the key to assuring quality. Tracking will require significant changes in workflow and an overall change in the culture of the laboratory. Preparation, training, buy-in, and accountability of the people involved are crucial to the success of this process. This article reviews the benefits, available technology, underlying principles, and implementation of tracking solutions for the AP and research laboratory. PMID:23634908

  16. Segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images based on multi-atlas likelihood fusion: testing using data with a broad range of anatomical and photometric profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoying; Crocetti, Deana; Kutten, Kwame; Ceritoglu, Can; Albert, Marilyn S; Mori, Susumu; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Miller, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    We propose a hierarchical pipeline for skull-stripping and segmentation of anatomical structures of interest from T1-weighted images of the human brain. The pipeline is constructed based on a two-level Bayesian parameter estimation algorithm called multi-atlas likelihood fusion (MALF). In MALF, estimation of the parameter of interest is performed via maximum a posteriori estimation using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The likelihoods of multiple atlases are fused in the E-step while the optimal estimator, a single maximizer of the fused likelihoods, is then obtained in the M-step. There are two stages in the proposed pipeline; first the input T1-weighted image is automatically skull-stripped via a fast MALF, then internal brain structures of interest are automatically extracted using a regular MALF. We assess the performance of each of the two modules in the pipeline based on two sets of images with markedly different anatomical and photometric contrasts; 3T MPRAGE scans of pediatric subjects with developmental disorders vs. 1.5T SPGR scans of elderly subjects with dementia. Evaluation is performed quantitatively using the Dice overlap as well as qualitatively via visual inspections. As a result, we demonstrate subject-level differences in the performance of the proposed pipeline, which may be accounted for by age, diagnosis, or the imaging parameters (particularly the field strength). For the subcortical and ventricular structures of the two datasets, the hierarchical pipeline is capable of producing automated segmentations with Dice overlaps ranging from 0.8 to 0.964 when compared with the gold standard. Comparisons with other representative segmentation algorithms are presented, relative to which the proposed hierarchical pipeline demonstrates comparative or superior accuracy. PMID:25784852

  17. Segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images based on multi-atlas likelihood fusion: testing using data with a broad range of anatomical and photometric profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoying; Crocetti, Deana; Kutten, Kwame; Ceritoglu, Can; Albert, Marilyn S.; Mori, Susumu; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Miller, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a hierarchical pipeline for skull-stripping and segmentation of anatomical structures of interest from T1-weighted images of the human brain. The pipeline is constructed based on a two-level Bayesian parameter estimation algorithm called multi-atlas likelihood fusion (MALF). In MALF, estimation of the parameter of interest is performed via maximum a posteriori estimation using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The likelihoods of multiple atlases are fused in the E-step while the optimal estimator, a single maximizer of the fused likelihoods, is then obtained in the M-step. There are two stages in the proposed pipeline; first the input T1-weighted image is automatically skull-stripped via a fast MALF, then internal brain structures of interest are automatically extracted using a regular MALF. We assess the performance of each of the two modules in the pipeline based on two sets of images with markedly different anatomical and photometric contrasts; 3T MPRAGE scans of pediatric subjects with developmental disorders vs. 1.5T SPGR scans of elderly subjects with dementia. Evaluation is performed quantitatively using the Dice overlap as well as qualitatively via visual inspections. As a result, we demonstrate subject-level differences in the performance of the proposed pipeline, which may be accounted for by age, diagnosis, or the imaging parameters (particularly the field strength). For the subcortical and ventricular structures of the two datasets, the hierarchical pipeline is capable of producing automated segmentations with Dice overlaps ranging from 0.8 to 0.964 when compared with the gold standard. Comparisons with other representative segmentation algorithms are presented, relative to which the proposed hierarchical pipeline demonstrates comparative or superior accuracy. PMID:25784852

  18. Quantifying Agreement between Anatomical and Functional Interhemispheric Correspondences in the Resting Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang Joon; Saad, Ziad S.; Gotts, Stephen J.; Martin, Alex; Cox, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The human brain is composed of two broadly symmetric cerebral hemispheres, with an abundance of reciprocal anatomical connections between homotopic locations. However, to date, studies of hemispheric symmetries have not identified correspondency precisely due to variable cortical folding patterns. Here we present a method to establish accurate correspondency using position on the unfolded cortical surface relative to gyral and sulcal landmarks. The landmark method is shown to outperform the method of reversing standard volume coordinates, and it is used to quantify the functional symmetry in resting fMRI data throughout the cortex. Resting brain activity was found to be maximally correlated with locations less than 1 cm away on the cortical surface from the corresponding anatomical location in nearly half of the cortex. While select locations exhibited asymmetric patterns, precise symmetric relationships were found to be the norm, with fine-grained symmetric functional maps demonstrated in motor, occipital, and inferior frontal cortex. PMID:23144995

  19. EXPLOITING 3D ULTRASOUND FOR FETAL DIAGNOSTIC PURPOSE THROUGH FACIAL LANDMARKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Vezzetti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, three-dimensional landmarking has gained attention for different applications, such as face recognition for both identification of suspects and authentication, facial expression recognition, corrective and aesthetic surgery, syndrome study and diagnosis. This work focuses on the last one by proposing a geometrically-based landmark extraction algorithm aimed at diagnosing syndromes on babies before their birth. Pivotal role in this activity is the support provided by physicians and 3D ultrasound tools for working on real faces. In particular, the landmarking algorithm here proposed only relies on descriptors coming from Differential Geometry (Gaussian, mean, and principal curvatures, derivatives, coefficients of first and second fundamental forms, Shape and Curvedness indexes and is tested on nine facial point clouds referred to nine babies taken by a three-dimensional ultrasound tool at different weeks' gestation. The results obtained, validated with the support of four practitioners, show that the localization is quite accurate. All errors lie in the range between 0 and 3.5 mm and the mean distance for each shell is in the range between 0.6 and 1.6 mm. The landmarks showing the highest errors are the ones belonging to the mouth region. Instead, the most precise landmark is the pronasal, on the nose tip, with a mean distance of 0.55 mm. Relying on current literature, this study is something missing in the state-of-the-art of the field, as present facial studies on 3D ultrasound do not work on automatic landmarking yet.

  20. Precision landmark location for machine vision and photogrammetry finding and achieving the maximum possible accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, José A

    2007-01-01

    Shows the reader how to derive theoretical limits to the precision of landmark identification in electronic imagesMATLAB® package assists the reader with applying theoretical results in real engineering systemsSteps outside the usual earth-sciences and civil-engineering base of photogrammetry to improve animation, medical imaging and robotic vision applications

  1. Anatomical mapping of the nasal muscles and application to cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konschake, Marko; Fritsch, Helga

    2014-11-01

    We present an anatomical mapping of the most important muscles influencing the nose, incorporating constant anatomical structures, and their spatial correlations. At our disposal were the midfaces of 18 bodies of both sexes, obtained by informed consent from body donors aged between 60 and 80 years. Macroscopically, we dissected the nasal regions of eight corpses, six midfaces were prepared according to plastination histology, four by creating plastinated slices. On their way from their periosteal origin to the edge of the skin, the muscles of the nose cross the subcutaneous adipose tissue, dividing it into superficial and deep layers. The individual muscle fibers insert into the skin directly at the reticular corium. Sometimes, they reach the border of the epidermis which represents a special arrangement of corial muscle attachments. The course of the anatomical fibers of individual nasal muscles presented macroscopically and microscopically in this study offers surgeons a detailed overview of the anatomically important muscular landmarks of the midface. PMID:24863980

  2. Detection of natural landmarks through multiscale opponent features

    OpenAIRE

    Todt, Eduardo; Torras Geni?s, Carme

    2000-01-01

    This work presents a landmark detection system for the walking robot operating in unknown unstructured outdoor environments. Most landmark detection approaches are not adequate for this application, since they rely on either structured information or a priori knowledge about the landmarks. Instead, the proposed system makes use of visual saliency concepts stemming from studies of animal and human perception. Thus, biologically inspired opponent features (in color and orientation) are searched...

  3. Concurrent map building and localization with landmark validation

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade Cetto, Juan; Sanfeliu Cortés, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    This communication addresses the issue of concurrent map building and localization (CML) for a mobile robot in an unknown environment. The proposed solution extends over previous contributions in that the environment must not be static, nor the landmarks be uniquely identifiable. To this aim we introduce a map model that includes not only the robot and landmark locations in a reference frame, but also a model for landmark quality assessment. Convergence of the map covariance is preserved in t...

  4. Three-dimensional study of pelvic asymmetry on anatomical specimens and its clinical perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Boulay, C.; Tardieu, C.; Benaim, C.; Hecquet, J.; Marty, C.; Prat-pradal, D.; Legaye, Jean; Duval-beaupe?re, Ginette; Pelissier, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess pelvic asymmetry (i.e. to determine whether the right iliac bone and the right part of the sacrum are mirror images of the left), both quantitatively and qualitatively, using three-dimensional measurements. Pelvic symmetry was described osteologically using a common reference coordinate system for a large sample of pelvises. Landmarks were established on 12 anatomical specimens with an electromagnetic Fastrak system. Seventy-one paired variables were tested...

  5. The importance of accurate anatomic assessment for the volumetric analysis of the amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilha, L.; Kobayashi, E.; Cendes, F.; Li, L. M.

    2005-01-01

    There is a wide range of values reported in volumetric studies of the amygdala. The use of single plane thick magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may prevent the correct visualization of anatomic landmarks and yield imprecise results. To assess whether there is a difference between volumetric analysis of the amygdala performed with single plane MRI 3-mm slices and with multiplanar analysis of MRI 1-mm slices, we studied healthy subjects and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We performed manu...

  6. Anatomic Motor Point Localization of the Biceps Brachii and Brachialis Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Byung Kyu; Shin, Yong Beom; Ko, Hyun-Yoon; Park, Jae Heung; Baek, Sun-Yong

    2007-01-01

    Injection of the neurolytic agents into motor points of the biceps brachii or brachialis muscles is an effective treatment of spasticity of the elbow flexors in many stroke survivors. Accurate localization of the motor points of each muscle is necessary for enhancing the efficacy of motor point blocks. To identify the precise locations of the motor points (terminal nerve endings) of the biceps brachii and brachialis muscles in relation to anatomic surface landmarks for motor point blocks, we ...

  7. An anatomically oriented breast model for MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutra, Dominik; Bergtholdt, Martin; Sabczynski, Jörg; Dössel, Olaf; Buelow, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the western world. In the breast cancer care-cycle, MRIis e.g. employed in lesion characterization and therapy assessment. Reading of a single three dimensional image or comparing a multitude of such images in a time series is a time consuming task. Radiological reporting is done manually by translating the spatial position of a finding in an image to a generic representation in the form of a breast diagram, outlining quadrants or clock positions. Currently, registration algorithms are employed to aid with the reading and interpretation of longitudinal studies by providing positional correspondence. To aid with the reporting of findings, knowledge about the breast anatomy has to be introduced to translate from patient specific positions to a generic representation. In our approach we fit a geometric primitive, the semi-super-ellipsoid to patient data. Anatomical knowledge is incorporated by fixing the tip of the super-ellipsoid to the mammilla position and constraining its center-point to a reference plane defined by landmarks on the sternum. A coordinate system is then constructed by linearly scaling the fitted super-ellipsoid, defining a unique set of parameters to each point in the image volume. By fitting such a coordinate system to a different image of the same patient, positional correspondence can be generated. We have validated our method on eight pairs of baseline and follow-up scans (16 breasts) that were acquired for the assessment of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. On average, the location predicted and the actual location of manually set landmarks are within a distance of 5.6 mm. Our proposed method allows for automatic reporting simply by uniformly dividing the super-ellipsoid around its main axis.

  8. Visual motion-sensitive neurons in the bumblebee brain convey information about landmarks during a navigational task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Egelhaaf

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bees use visual memories to find the spatial location of previously learnt food sites. Characteristic learning flights help acquiring these memories at newly discovered foraging locations where landmarks - salient objects in the vicinity of the goal location - can play an important role in guiding the animal’s homing behavior. Although behavioral experiments have shown that bees can use a variety of visual cues to distinguish objects as landmarks, the question of how landmark features are encoded by the visual system is still open. Recently, it could be shown that motion cues are sufficient to allow bees localizing their goal using landmarks that can hardly be discriminated from the background texture. Here, we tested the hypothesis that motion sensitive neurons in the bee’s visual pathway provide information about such landmarks during a learning flight and might, thus, play a role for goal localization. We tracked learning flights of free-flying bumblebees (Bombus terrestris in an arena with distinct visual landmarks, reconstructed the visual input during these flights, and replayed ego-perspective movies to tethered bumblebees while recording the activity of direction-selective wide-field neurons in their optic lobe. By comparing neuronal responses during a typical learning flight and targeted modifications of landmark properties in this movie we demonstrate that these objects are indeed represented in the bee’s visual motion pathway. We find that object-induced responses vary little with object texture, which is in agreement with behavioral evidence. These neurons thus convey information about landmark properties that are useful for view-based homing.

  9. Landmark experiments in twentieth-century physics

    CERN Document Server

    Trigg, George L

    2011-01-01

    Physics is very much an experimental science, but too often, students at the undergraduate level are not exposed to the reality of experimental physics ? i.e., what was done in a given experiment, why it was done, the background of physics against which the experiment was carried out and the changes in theory and knowledge that resulted. In this hook, the author helps to remedy the situation by presenting a variety of ""landmark"" experiments that have brought about significant alterations in our ideas about some aspect of nature. Among these scientific milestones are discoveries about the wa

  10. Cochlear implant electrode insertion: Jacobson’s nerve, a useful anatomical landmark

    OpenAIRE

    Goravalingappa, Ravi

    2002-01-01

    The classical technique in approaching the scala tympani through the round window niche by way of facial recess has not always been successful. There have been recent reports on false insertion of the electrode array into the hypotympanic cells tracts or infralabrynithine cells tracts. In these cases the round window niche are situated posterior, or obliterated due to bony growth, or sclerosed at the basal turn of the cochlea. Therefore, successful intubation of the scala tympani much depends...

  11. An Anatomically Oriented Breast Coordinate System for Mammogram Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Sami; Karemore, Gopal Raghunath

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a breast coordinate system that is based on breast anatomy to register female breasts into a common coordinate frame in 2D mediolateral (ML) or mediolateral oblique (MLO) view mammograms. The breasts are registered according to the location of the pectoral muscle and the nipple and the shape of the breast boundary because these are the most robust features independent of the breast size and shape. On the basis of these landmarks, we have constructed a nonlinear mapping between the parameter frame and the breast region in the mammogram. This mapping makes it possible to identify the corresponding positions and orientations among all of the ML or MLO mammograms, which facilitates an implicit use of the registration, i.e., no explicit image warping is needed. We additionally show how the coordinate transform can be used to extract Gaussian derivative features so that the feature positions and orientations are registered and extracted without non-linearly deforming the images. We use the proposed breast coordinate transform in a cross-sectional breast cancer risk assessment study of 490 women, in which we attempt to learn breast cancer risk factors from mammograms that were taken prior to when the breast cancer became visible to a radiologist. The coordinate system provides both the relative position and orientation information on the breast region from which the features are derived. In addition, the coordinate system can be used in temporal studies to pin-point anatomically equivalent locations between the mammograms of each woman and among the mammograms of all of the women in the study. The results of the cross-sectional study show that the classification into cancer and control groups can be improved by using the new coordinate system, compared to other systems evaluated. Comparisons were performed using the area-under-the-receiveroperating- characteristic-curve (AUC) score. In general, the new coordinate system makes an accurate anatomical registration of breasts possible, which suggests its wide applicability wherever 2D mammogram registration is required.

  12. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masami; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Osamu [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Naoto [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki [Kanazawa University, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Takao, Hidemasa; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiology and Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iwatsubo, Takeshi [University of Tokyo, Department of Neuropathology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Fumio [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Yahaba, Iwate (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Integrative Brain Imaging Center National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Collaboration: Japanese Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2013-07-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: ''Frontal Lobe,'' ''Hippocampus,'' ''Occipital Lobe,'' ''Orbital Gyrus,'' ''Parietal Lobe,'' ''Putamen,'' and ''Temporal Lobe.'' Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies. (orig.)

  13. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: ''Frontal Lobe,'' ''Hippocampus,'' ''Occipital Lobe,'' ''Orbital Gyrus,'' ''Parietal Lobe,'' ''Putamen,'' and ''Temporal Lobe.'' Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies. (orig.)

  14. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anatomic Total Shoulder surgery, which featured the latest innovation in shoulder surgery from DePuy Orthopedics. OR-Live makes it easy for you to learn more. Just click on the "Request Information" button on your webcast screen and open the ...

  15. Pedro Ara anatomic museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, V A; Trefilio, D E; Borghino, V N; Páez, R E; Aranega, C I

    2006-03-01

    Museums where anatomical pieces are exhibited are disappearing. The advance of the computer together with the advance of conventional and three-dimensional radiology makes the organs to be exposed without practicing dissection and the virtual images replace the real ones in the educational process. Some current laws that restrict the use of corpses and fetuses for obituary and exhibition studies have also contributed to the tendency. The anatomical museum, today named Pedro Ara, was founded in December 1920 and it exhibits anatomic works from the embryonic stage to old age, contributing unbeatable teachings to the medical sciences and the general public. The museum is located in the Angel Roque Suarez Anatomic Institute in the Clinical National Hospital which depends on the National University of Cordoba. It is visited daily by hundreds of people from all over the world. The museum owns 1211 pieces that combine ethical, scientific, aesthetical and educational values achieving a realization that received international acknowledgement. The most valuable exhibited work is 'Old man's head' made by Professor Pedro Ara in 1928-1929 (Figure 1), which, owing to its high quality, is in an impeccable and unharmed condition despite being exhibited for 80 years. Other authors, such as Professor Humberto Fracassi, also enriched the museum with their work and we, convinced that it favors and will favor our human formation and professional training, have the privilege of being their heirs and the responsibility of being their followers. PMID:16551427

  16. Elections and landmark policies in Tanzania and Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Therkildsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Much of the relevant literature on Africa downplays the salience of elections for policy-making and implementation. Instead, the importance of factors such as clientelism, ethnicity, organized interest group and donor influence, is emphasized. We argue that, in addition, elections now motivate political elites to focus on policies they perceive to be able to gain votes. This is based on analyses of six landmark decisions made during the last fifteen years in the social, productive and public finance sectors in Tanzania and Uganda. Such policies share a number of key characteristics: they are clearly identifiable with the party in power; citizens country-wide are targeted; and policy implementation aim at immediate, visible results. The influence of elections on policy making and implementation could therefore be more significant in countries where elections are more competitive than in Tanzania and Uganda.

  17. Manejo actual de la microtia: redefinición anátomo-quirúrgica / Management of microtia based on a redefinition of its anatomical-surgical classification

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan Pablo, Sorolla P; Douglas, Arbulo L; Miguel, Obaid G; Carla, Ibarra M; Montserrat, Fontbona; Rodrigo, Cabello P; Pamela, Wisnia C; Ángela, Bautista S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Reportar y evaluar la efectividad de una técnica quirúrgica, previamente descrita para el tratamiento de microtias, basado en un nuevo concepto de clasificación anátomo-quirúrgica. Material y Método: Estudio retrospectivo de pacientes tratados en el Hospital Militar y Clínica Alemana de S [...] antiago en el Servicio de Cirugía Plástica desde enero de 2008 hasta diciembre de 2010. Se reclutaron a un total de 15 pacientes, 13 (87%) de los cuales eran unilaterales y 2 (13%) bilaterales. A todos los pacientes se les realizó la reconstrucción mediante técnica quirúrgica de Firmin. Resultados: Se operó a 15 pacientes de rango de edad entre 9 y 25 años, con una mediana de 11 años. De los casos unilaterales; 7 correspondían a tipo I de Firmin, 5 casos a tipo II Firmin y un caso tipo IIIa. De los casos bilaterales, ambos tenían microtia tipo IIIb. Se logró en la totalidad de los casos unilaterales una buena proyección inicial del marco cartilaginoso durante el primer tiempo quirúrgico. Seis casos fueron sometidos a un segundo tiempo quirúrgico. Durante el seguimiento mínimo de 18 meses, se observaron complicaciones en 4 (16%) pacientes. Conclusiones: Se comprueba que mediante una técnica basada en la clasificación anátomo-quirúrgica, los resultados a corto plazo fueron favorables y satisfactorios. Abstract in english Background: Incomplete development and growth of the pinna can lead to a small or deformed pinna, called microtia. Aim: To report and evaluate the effectiveness of a surgical technique previously described for the treatment of microtia, based on a new anatomical-surgical classification. Materials an [...] d Methods: Retrospective study of patients treated at two plastic surgery departments from January 2008 to December 2010. We recruited a total of 15 patients aged 9 to 25 years. Thirteen (87%) had unilateral and 2 (13%) bilateral microtia. All patients underwent the surgical reconstructive technique described by Firmin. Results: Among patients with unilateral microtia, seven belonged to Firmin type I, five to type II and one to type IIIa. Both patients with bilateral microtia, were classified as type IIIb. In all cases with unilateral microtia, a good initial projection of the cartilage frame was achieved during the first surgical procedure. Six patients were subjected to a second operation. During 18 months follow up, four patients (16%) had complications. Conclusions: This surgical technique that is based on an anatomical surgical classification, achieves favorable and satisfactory results.

  18. Application of landmark morphometrics to skulls representing the orders of living mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Marcus

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Statistical analyses of geometric morphometric data have been generally restricted to the Euclidean space tangent to curved shape space. This approach is based on the knowledge that such an approximation does not affect statistical and biological conclusions, when differences among specimens' shapes are not too large. We examined the wide variation of shapes within the vertebrate class Mammalia to determine the tangent space approximation by comparing Procrustes distances in Kendall shape space to tangent space distances among 53 mammal skulls and articulated jaws belonging to almost all of the living orders. Previous studies have been restricted to relatively low taxonomic levels, implying a narrower range of shapes. Thirty-five three-dimensional (3D landmarks on the sagittal plane and right side of each specimen were digitized using a MicroScribe 3DX. Procrustes and tangent space distances between all specimens were compared using the program TPSSMALL (Rohlf, 1998b. The correlations between these distances were always greater than 0.99. Lower jaw and brain subsets of the landmarks gave similar results, while the face subset had more scatter, but nearly the same correlation. The 3D shapes, as summarized by the landmarks, were clustered and the dendrogram was compared to a currently hypothesized phylogeny. We also point out that data from landmark morphometrics are as appropriate as morphological and molecular data for cladistic analysis.

  19. Anatomical consideration of Dhamani marma in Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhan Pratap Yadaw

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is an ancient health science devoted to the cure on human suffering and for the care of the health of the people. Injuries involving various types of the structures in the body like dhamanis (arteries, muscles, nerves, bones and the visceral organs in general and when in combination specifying marma. Among the hidden sciences of India, marma science is the most important. Marmas are not superficial landmarks on the body surface but these are deep-seated important physio-anatomical structures. Marma in Ayurvedic classics is illustrated as the vital point in human body, the injury of which leads to termination of life. Descriptions of 107 marmas given by all acharyas being classified into five varieties on the basis of structure involved; five on the basis of effect of injury and five on the basis of location on the body. According to anatomical consideration marmas can be divided into mansa-marma, sira-marma, snayu-marma, sandhi-marma, and asthi-marma (respectively, marma of muscle, blood vessel, ligament, joint and bone. According to Vagabhatta there are six types of marma. He has enumerated a sixth group of marma known as dhamani marma. Dhamani marma is one such vital region in human anatomy which falls under the classification on the basis of structure involved. This study is aimed to emphasize on why Ashtanga Hridaya has considered a separate group called dhamani marmas of which other acharyas have considered under different groups & finally to conclude with clearing out the controversy & thereby to fulfill the lacuna in the subject.

  20. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.; Beyer, Thomas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Lauze, François

    2014-03-01

    In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume in the bottom part of a maxillary sinus in two patients without any artifacts, due to their abnormal location, it succeeded in filling all dental artifact regions in all patients. In conclusion, we propose a method, which combines ASM and kNN into a simple approach which, as the results show, succeeds to find and correct the dental artifacts within the anatomical surface.

  1. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using Active Shape Models and k-Nearest-Neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.

    2014-01-01

    n combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume in the bottom part of a maxillary sinus in two patients without any artifacts, due to their abnormal location, it succeeded in filling all dental artifact regions in all patients. In conclusion, we propose a method, which combines ASM and kNN into a simple approach which, as the results show, succeeds to find and correct the dental artifacts within the anatomical surface.

  2. Anatomical Basis of the Myofascial Trigger Points of the Trapezius Muscle / Bases Anatómicas de los Puntos de Gatillo Miofasciales del Músculo Trapecio

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Flávia Emi, Akamatsu; Samir, Saleh; Henrique Trombini, Pinesi; Katarina Reichmann, Rodrigues; Cintia Benedicto, Zandoná; Mauro, Andrade; Alfredo Luiz, Jacomo.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue correlacionar los sitios de entrada de los ramos del nervio accesorio en el músculo trapecio con placas motoras y los puntos de gatillo miofasciales. A pesar de las correlaciones anatomoclínicas se constituyeren en la principal característica de los puntos de gatillo, [...] no hay informes en la literatura describiendo sobre la distribución de los ramos del nervio accesorio y su relación anatómica con los puntos de gatillo. Ambos músculos trapecio de doce cadáveres adultos fueron disecados por los autores (profesores de anatomía y estudiantes de postgrado en Medicina) para observar el punto exacto donde los ramos del nervio accesorio espinal penetraban en el vientre muscular. La disección se llevó a cabo respetando las capas estratigráficas para preservar la inervación del músculo ubicada profundamente a éste. Ocho puntos fueron identificados: En todos los casos correspondieron a la descripción clínica de los puntos gatillo miofasciales y eran comunes a todos los cadáveres. Esta correlación anatomoclínica entre la ramificación del nervio espinal accesorio y los puntos de gatillo miofascial es útil para una mejor comprensión de la fisiopatología de los puntos gatillo y puede proporcionar una base para un abordaje diagnóstico y terapéutico racional para estos trastornos. Abstract in english This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle, knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTP, no previous reports des [...] cribing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Eight points were identified: In all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTPs. The eight points where common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MPT is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, providing useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches.

  3. Reference Man anatomical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  4. Pilot study: Computer-based virtual anatomical interactivity for rehabilitation of individuals with chronic acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Douglas Simmons, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in upper-limb motor function and executive functioning can compromise an affected individual’s ability to complete everyday activities. Impaired motor and executive functioning therefore pose a risk to increasing numbers of veterans who have been diagnosed with acquired brain injury. This article reports on changes in upper-limb motor function and executive functioning of 12 adult participants with chronic acquired brain injury using a novel, computer-based, motor and cognitive rehabilitation program called PreMotor Exercise Games (PEGs. Manual muscle, goniometric range of motion, and dynamometer assessments were used to determine motor functioning while the Executive Function Performance Test measured cognitive functioning. A three-level repeated measures design was conducted to determine changes pre- and postintervention. Participants demonstrated significant improvement in shoulder (p = 0.01 and wrist (p = 0.01 range of motion and clinically relevant improvement for elbow range of motion. Participants demonstrated clinically relevant improvement in shoulder, elbow, and wrist strength. Finally, participants demonstrated significant improvement in executive functioning (p < 0.05. Using PEGs as a modality for both motor and cognitive intervention is a potentially beneficial adjunct to rehabilitation and warrants further study.

  5. Anatomical variations of the saphenous vein arc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ciucci

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There are many anatomical variations presented by the tributaries of the saphenous vein at the saphenous – femoral junction .In anatomical texts, they are plotted as usual tributaries to the femoral vein, presentations that are not found during routine surgical practice. Knowledge of the sapheno- femoral vein junction is imperative for the surgeon when operating the venous system of lower limbs, in order to avoid accidents and prevent intraoperative varicose recurrences. The aim of the present paper is to demonstrate which of the anatomical variations of the arc of the great saphenous vein is shown more often, contributing to the description of the anatomy of the region and its name in the anatomical terminology. The present work is based on experience of one hundred dissections (n = 100 of the femoral inguinal region in human cadavers fixed with formol aqueous solution of 5% v / v, twenty (n = 20 of which were filled with latex via endovascular before its fixation. The basic scheme of the arc of the great saphenous vein receives the following tributaries: the superficial circumflex iliac vein, superficial epigastric vein [subcutaneous abdominal vein], external pudendal veins, accessory vein of the thigh [dorsal thigh], inter saphenous vein [Giacomini vein]. Inter saphenous vein was observed [Giacomini vein] in a large percentage of the sample (66%. On 77% of the cases, a single saphenous trunk was found, 22% of duplication and triplication 1%. Exceptionally small caliber veins reach the common femoral vein on its inner side, draining the pudendal region, may correspond to the third vein pudendal described by Vilanova, or a tributary of the arc that ends in isolation while the rest of the arc remains on the basic disposition. Successful surgery of the saphenous vein arc is based on an optimal anatomical knowledge of the sapheno - femoral junction, its anatomical variations and relationships.

  6. Anatomical and functional imaging in endocrine hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    In endocrine hypertension, hormonal excess results in clinically significant hypertension. The functional imaging (such as radionuclide imaging) complements anatomy-based imaging (such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) to facilitate diagnostic localization of a lesion causing endocrine hypertension. The aim of this review article is to familiarize general radiologists, endocrinologists, and clinicians with various anatomical and functional imaging techniques ...

  7. Automated anatomical labeling of MRI brain data using spatial atlas warping in a finite-element framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Dominik S.; Fisher, Elizabeth; Tkach, Jean A.; Masaryk, Thomas J.; Cohen, Jeffrey A.; Cornhill, J. Fredrick

    1998-06-01

    Identification of anatomical structures in magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain is achieved either by manual delineation of by applying coordinate system transformations to map the brain to a pre-labeled atlas. Manual segmentation of 3D MR data is a tedious task made additionally difficult by limitations in visualization. Affine transforms, like the Talairach stereotaxic space, perform a linear scaling of the brain based on manually selected landmarks. This often results in unsatisfactory accuracy for structures further away from the selected landmarks, particularly in pathological cases. It is also based on the trivializing assumption that the brain can be represented as a linearly scalable structure. In the effort to achieve a more accurate and consistent labeling, an algorithm has been designed for the automated alignment of a pre-labeled 3D brain atlas with a sample MRI volume. Alignment is achieved by elastically warping a finite element model of the atlas. The deformation is driven by a set of displacement constraints on the surface of individual brain structures. Solving this model results in a 3D displacement field for the entire atlas brain that aligns the segmented brain structure while extrapolating the deformation field to neighboring structures. The use of finite element modeling assures that this extrapolation occurs in a physically meaningful manner. The algorithm's performance was tested by matching the atlas image to warped versions of itself and to an individual sample brain. The amount of structural overlap achieved by a linear Talairach transform is also given for comparison. Elastic warping showed better performance compared to an affine transform alone or the Talairach method. Overlap increases with subsequent iterations with improvement directly related to the amount of model deformation.

  8. Validation of a Model-Based Segmentation Approach to Propagating Normal Anatomic Regions of Interest Through the 10 Phases of Respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To validate a model-based segmentation (MBS) algorithm in a commercial radiation treatment planning system for use in propagating the contours of normal anatomic regions of interest (ROIs) through the respiratory phases that constitute a four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image data set. Methods and Materials: The 4D CT data sets for 12 patients treated for non-small-cell lung cancer were acquired. Five ROIs were selected for delineation: right and left lungs, spinal cord, heart, and esophagus. These ROIs were manually delineated on the CT data set corresponding to the end-inspiration respiratory phase (0%). An MBS algorithm implemented on the treatment planning system propagated the ROIs sequentially through the respiratory phases that constituted the 4D CT data sets, concluding with the 0% phase data set, which was propagated from the 90% phase data set. The propagated ROIs on the 0% phase were compared with the original ROIs on that phase by using visual assessment and a quantitative measure of coincidence. Results: Acceptable propagation accuracy within 1 mm of uncertainty was achieved for lungs and spinal cord. Propagation of the heart produced slightly larger contours that were similar to interphysician variations in contouring the heart. The esophagus was poorly propagated because of lack of tissue contrast and definitive shape. Conclusions: The MBS propagation is a promising tool for efficiently propagating contours through the different popagating contours through the different phases of respiration. However, propagating the esophagus through this technique may be difficult because of the lack of definitive shape and clearer boundaries from surrounding tissue

  9. Anatomical changes in the pharyngeal constrictors after chemo-irradiation of head and neck cancer and their dose-effect relationships: MRI-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Dysfunction of pharyngeal constrictors (PCs) after chemo-irradiation of head and neck (HN) cancer has been proposed as major cause of dysphagia. We conducted prospective MRI study to evaluate anatomical changes in the PCs after chemo-irradiation, to gain insight of the mechanism of their dysfunction and their dose-effect relationships. The PCs were compared to the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCMs), which receive high doses but do not relate to swallowing. Patients and methods: Twelve patients with stage III-IV HN cancer underwent MRI before and 3 months after completing chemo-irradiation. T1- and T2-weighted signals and muscle thickness were evaluated for PCs (superior, middle, and inferior), and SCMs. Mean muscle doses were determined after registration with the planning CT. Results: T1-weighted signals decreased in both PCs and SCMs receiving >50 Gy (p 2 = 0.34, p = 0.01). The T2 signal changes in the PCs were significantly higher than the T2 changes in the SCMs (p 50 Gy gaining significantly more thickness than PCs receiving lesser doses (p = 0.02). In contrast, the SCM thickness decreased post-therapy (p = 0.002). Conclusions: These MRI-based findings, notably the differences between PCs and SCMs, suggest that underlying causes of PC dysfuncggest that underlying causes of PC dysfunction are inflammation and edema, likely consequential to acute mucositis affecting the submucosa-lying PCs. These results support reducing mean PC doses to ?50 Gy, as well as reducing acute mucositis, to improve long-term dysphagia.

  10. A clinical test and application research of IMRT dose verification system based on patient's anatomical structure and on-line dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To test a three-dimensional dose verification system, which reconstructing dose to anatomy based on modeling and online measurements (RDBMOM), and to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of its application in clinical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance. Methods: Phantom plans of regular and irregular fields were selected for the testing. All test plans were implemented and the dose distributions were measured using the thimble ion-chamber and two-dimensional ion-chamber array, the accuracy of RDBMOM were then evaluated by comparing the corresponding results.Two practical treated nasopharyngeal carcinoma IMRT plans were verified with RDBMOM and the clinic significance were valued. Results: Compared with measurements of the thimble ion-chamber, deviations of RDBMOM were within 1% in all tested cases except small field of 3 cm x 3 cm. The largest deviation of reconstructed dose in IMRT cases was 2.12%. The dose profile reconstructed by RDBMOM coincided with the measurement using two-dimensional ion-chamber array. The ? rates (3%/3 mm) were 94.56% - 100%. The RDBMOM verification of IMRT cases shown that the ? rate > 99% in total and > 98% in planning target volume,deviation in D95 <0.4%, but the largest deviations in mean dose of the parotids and lens were 2.97% and 59.58% respectively. Conclusions: Accuracy of the tested system satisfies the demand of IMRT dose verification. RDBMOM is able to provide information of volumetric dosimetry and anatomical location of dose error, which is benefit for evaluating the clinical value of verification results. (authors)

  11. Understanding anatomical terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, L A; Natrajan, M; Kothari, M L

    1996-01-01

    Words are our masters and words are our slaves, all depending on how we use them. The whole of medical science owes its origin to Greco-Roman culture and is replete with terms whose high sound is not necessarily accompanied by sound meaning. This is even more the case in the initial, pre-clinical years. Anatomical terminology seems bewildering to the initiate; and maybe that is a reason why love of anatomy as a subject does not always spill over through later years. Employing certain classifications of the origin of the anatomical terms, we have prepared an anthology that we hope will ease the student's task and also heighten the student's appreciation of the new terms. This centers on revealing the Kiplingian "how, why, when, where, what, and who" of a given term. This presentation should empower students to independently formulate a wide network of correlations once they understand a particular term. The article thus hopes to stimulate students' analytic and synthetic faculties as well. A small effort can reap large rewards in terms of enjoyment of the study of anatomy and the related subjects of histology, embryology, and genetics. It is helpful to teachers and students alike. This exercise in semantics and etymology does not demand of the student or his teacher any background in linguistics, grammar, Greek, Latin, Sanskrit, anatomy, or medicine. PMID:8842540

  12. Some historical landmarks in nuclear and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of conduction of electricity through evacuated tubes led to the discovery of cathode rays by Plucker in 1858. No outstanding results were produced in the study of these rays until 1895-1896 when incisive minds of Roentgen and Thomson led, respectively, to the Nobel prize winning discoveries of x-rays and electron. Fortutious linking of phosphorescence with x-ray emission led Becquerel to discover uranic rays and his colleagues M. Curie an P. Curie to their research on radiation phenomenon. A gigantic forward wave of human knowledge ensued from these discoveries. The postulation of nuclear atom by Rutherford was an important landmark in this forward movement. Rutherford and Soddy postulated that the spontaneous emission of radiations (? and ?) by atoms is accompanied by chemical changes. Subsequent studies by Rutherford and his colleagues in England, Curie-Joliot team in France, Fermi et al. in Italy and Hahn et al. in Germany established transmutation of atomic nuclei by nuclear radiations (? and n). This article is an attempt to pay a humble tribute to the pioneers who opened the gates to the world of nuclear sciences. (author). 135 refs., 1 fig

  13. Anatomical organization of aortic arch variations in the India: embryological basis and review / Organização anatômica das variações do arco aórtico na população indiana: base e revisão embriológica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Soubhagya R., Nayak; Mangala M., Pai; Latha V., Prabhu; Sujatha, D' Costa; Prakash, Shetty.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar a porcentagem e o tipo de variações do arco aórtico em indivíduos indianos, bem como sua importância clínica e cirúrgica e base embriológica. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Em nossa investigação, os padrões de ramificação do arco aórtico foram estudados em 62 cadáveres fixados em formali [...] na de ambos os sexos, de origem indiana e com idade entre 45 e 79 anos. As dissecações foram realizadas em cadáveres preservados em formalina, e as variações do arco aórtico foram observadas após a exposição das regiões torácica e cervical durante a dissecação de rotina de alunos da graduação do Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Índia. RESULTADOS: O arco aórtico normal de três ramificações foi encontrado em 56 cadáveres (91,4%); as variações foram encontradas em seis cadáveres (9,6%); 4,8% apresentavam origem comum das artérias carótidas; 1,6% tinham seqüência binominada, e o mesmo espécime tinha a origem da artéria coronária esquerda diretamente no arco aórtico; 1,6% apresentavam a origem da artéria subclávia direita diretamente na aorta; 1,6% tinham como ramificação do arco aórtico uma artéria vertebral esquerda. Cinco de seis cadáveres com padrão de ramificação anômalo do arco aórtico eram do sexo feminino. Um cadáver do sexo masculino apresentou origem anômala da artéria vertebral esquerda diretamente no arco. CONCLUSÃO: O amplo espectro de variações nos padrões anatômicos das ramificações do arco aórtico na população indiana estava em concordância com outras populações mundiais. Embora as origens anômalas das ramificações do arco aórtico sejam meramente variações anatômicas, informações precisas sobre elas é essencial para a cirurgia vascular na região do tórax, cabeça e pescoço. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: To determine the percentage and type of aortic arch variations in Indian subjects and their clinical and surgical importance and embryological basis. PATIENTS AND METHOD: In our investigation, branching patterns of the aortic arch were studied in 62 formalin-fixed cadavers of both sexes [...] of Indian origin, aged 45-79. The dissections were carried out in formalin-preserved cadavers and the aortic arch variations were observed after exposing the thoracic and cervical region during routine dissection of undergraduate students of Indian origin in Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. RESULTS: The usual three-branched aortic arch was found in 56 cadavers (91.4%); variations were found in six cadavers (9.6%); 4.8% presented common origin of the carotid arteries; 1.6% had bi-innominate sequence, and the same specimen had left coronary artery arising from arch of aorta directly; 1.6% presented right subclavian artery arising directly from the aorta; 1.6% had left vertebral artery a branch of aortic arch. Five out of six cadavers with anomalous aortic arch branching pattern were females. One male cadaver presented anomalous origin of left vertebral artery directly from the arch. CONCLUSION: The wide spectrum of variations in the anatomical arrangements of the aortic arch branches in the Indian population was at par with other populations of the world. Although anomalous origins of the aortic arch branches are merely anatomic variants, accurate information about them is vital for vascular surgery in the thorax, head and neck region.

  14. Measure of Landmark Semantic Salience through Geosocial Data Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teriitutea Quesnot

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in the area of spatial cognition demonstrated that references to landmarks are essential in the communication and the interpretation of wayfinding instructions for human being. In order to detect landmarks, a model for the assessment of their salience has been previously developed by Raubal and Winter. According to their model, landmark salience is divided into three categories: visual, structural, and semantic. Several solutions have been proposed to automatically detect landmarks on the basis of these categories. Due to a lack of relevant data, semantic salience has been frequently reduced to objects’ historical and cultural significance. Social dimension (i.e., the way an object is practiced and recognized by a person or a group of people is systematically excluded from the measure of landmark semantic salience even though it represents an important component. Since the advent of mobile Internet and smartphones, the production of geolocated content from social web platforms—also described as geosocial data—became commonplace. Actually, these data allow us to have a better understanding of the local geographic knowledge. Therefore, we argue that geosocial data, especially Social Location Sharing datasets, represent a reliable source of information to precisely measure landmark semantic salience in urban area.

  15. Anatomical study of spinal accessory nerve using ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to demonstrate that ultrasonography may allow a precise assessment of the course and relationships of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN). Material and methods: This study, initially undertaken in 7 cadavers, was followed by high-resolution ultrasonographic study in 15 volunteers (30 nerves) by two radiologists in consensus. The location, course and relations to the adjacent anatomic structures of the SAN were analyzed. Results: The precise course of the SAN between the lateroposterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the anterior border of the trapezius muscle could be identified by high-resolution ultrasonography. In contrast, clinical bone landmarks were not found helpful for the identification of the nerve. Conclusion: The SAN can be clearly depicted by means of ultrasonography. Knowledge of the nerve's precise location, which may evidence individual variations, may have useful clinical applications

  16. Landmark-free statistical analysis of the shape of plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laga, Hamid; Kurtek, Sebastian; Srivastava, Anuj; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2014-12-21

    The shapes of plant leaves are important features to biologists, as they can help in distinguishing plant species, measuring their health, analyzing their growth patterns, and understanding relations between various species. Most of the methods that have been developed in the past focus on comparing the shape of individual leaves using either descriptors or finite sets of landmarks. However, descriptor-based representations are not invertible and thus it is often hard to map descriptor variability into shape variability. On the other hand, landmark-based techniques require automatic detection and registration of the landmarks, which is very challenging in the case of plant leaves that exhibit high variability within and across species. In this paper, we propose a statistical model based on the Squared Root Velocity Function (SRVF) representation and the Riemannian elastic metric of Srivastava et al. (2011) to model the observed continuous variability in the shape of plant leaves. We treat plant species as random variables on a non-linear shape manifold and thus statistical summaries, such as means and covariances, can be computed. One can then study the principal modes of variations and characterize the observed shapes using probability density models, such as Gaussians or Mixture of Gaussians. We demonstrate the usage of such statistical model for (1) efficient classification of individual leaves, (2) the exploration of the space of plant leaf shapes, which is important in the study of population-specific variations, and (3) comparing entire plant species, which is fundamental to the study of evolutionary relationships in plants. Our approach does not require descriptors or landmarks but automatically solves for the optimal registration that aligns a pair of shapes. We evaluate the performance of the proposed framework on publicly available benchmarks such as the Flavia, the Swedish, and the ImageCLEF2011 plant leaf datasets. PMID:25123432

  17. Recent advances in standards for collaborative Digital Anatomic Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckwith Bruce A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context Collaborative Digital Anatomic Pathology refers to the use of information technology that supports the creation and sharing or exchange of information, including data and images, during the complex workflow performed in an Anatomic Pathology department from specimen reception to report transmission and exploitation. Collaborative Digital Anatomic Pathology can only be fully achieved using medical informatics standards. The goal of the international integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE initiative is precisely specifying how medical informatics standards should be implemented to meet specific health care needs and making systems integration more efficient and less expensive. Objective To define the best use of medical informatics standards in order to share and exchange machine-readable structured reports and their evidences (including whole slide images within hospitals and across healthcare facilities. Methods Specific working groups dedicated to Anatomy Pathology within multiple standards organizations defined standard-based data structures for Anatomic Pathology reports and images as well as informatic transactions in order to integrate Anatomic Pathology information into the electronic healthcare enterprise. Results The DICOM supplements 122 and 145 provide flexible object information definitions dedicated respectively to specimen description and Whole Slide Image acquisition, storage and display. The content profile “Anatomic Pathology Structured Report” (APSR provides standard templates for structured reports in which textual observations may be bound to digital images or regions of interest. Anatomic Pathology observations are encoded using an international controlled vocabulary defined by the IHE Anatomic Pathology domain that is currently being mapped to SNOMED CT concepts. Conclusion Recent advances in standards for Collaborative Digital Anatomic Pathology are a unique opportunity to share or exchange Anatomic Pathology structured reports that are interoperable at an international level. The use of machine-readable format of APSR supports the development of decision support as well as secondary use of Anatomic Pathology information for epidemiology or clinical research.

  18. MR neurography with multiplanar reconstruction of 3D MRI datasets: an anatomical study and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracranial MR neurography has so far mainly been used with 2D datasets. We investigated the use of 3D datasets for peripheral neurography of the sciatic nerve. A total of 40 thighs (20 healthy volunteers) were examined with a coronally oriented magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence with isotropic voxels of 1 x 1 x 1 mm and a field of view of 500 mm. Anatomical landmarks were palpated and marked with MRI markers. After MR scanning, the sciatic nerve was identified by two readers independently in the resulting 3D dataset. In every volunteer, the sciatic nerve could be identified bilaterally over the whole length of the thigh, even in areas of close contact to isointense muscles. The landmark of the greater trochanter was falsely palpated by 2.2 cm, and the knee joint by 1 cm. The mean distance between the bifurcation of the sciatic nerve and the knee-joint gap was 6 cm (±1.8 cm). The mean results of the two readers differed by 1-6%. With the described method of MR neurography, the sciatic nerve was depicted reliably and objectively in great anatomical detail over the whole length of the thigh. Important anatomical information can be obtained. The clinical applications of MR neurography for the brachial plexus and lumbosacral plexus/sciatic nerve are discussed. (orig.)

  19. MR neurography with multiplanar reconstruction of 3D MRI datasets: an anatomical study and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Wolfgang; Aschoff, Andrik J.; Stuber, Gregor; Schmitz, Bernd [University Hospitals Ulm, Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany); Brinkmann, Alexander; Wagner, Florian; Dinse, Alexander [University Hospitals Ulm, Department of Anesthesiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Extracranial MR neurography has so far mainly been used with 2D datasets. We investigated the use of 3D datasets for peripheral neurography of the sciatic nerve. A total of 40 thighs (20 healthy volunteers) were examined with a coronally oriented magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence with isotropic voxels of 1 x 1 x 1 mm and a field of view of 500 mm. Anatomical landmarks were palpated and marked with MRI markers. After MR scanning, the sciatic nerve was identified by two readers independently in the resulting 3D dataset. In every volunteer, the sciatic nerve could be identified bilaterally over the whole length of the thigh, even in areas of close contact to isointense muscles. The landmark of the greater trochanter was falsely palpated by 2.2 cm, and the knee joint by 1 cm. The mean distance between the bifurcation of the sciatic nerve and the knee-joint gap was 6 cm ({+-}1.8 cm). The mean results of the two readers differed by 1-6%. With the described method of MR neurography, the sciatic nerve was depicted reliably and objectively in great anatomical detail over the whole length of the thigh. Important anatomical information can be obtained. The clinical applications of MR neurography for the brachial plexus and lumbosacral plexus/sciatic nerve are discussed. (orig.)

  20. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-01

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg-1 with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings were confirmed for seven models, including models of a child and a pregnant female. Thus, the current basic restriction for whole-body exposure in the international guidelines is conservative. Peak spatial-averaged SAR can be used as a metric for estimating local temperature elevation even for whole-body exposure. Our computational results also support the description in the IEEE standard about the reduction of the upper applicable frequency of whole-body-averaged SAR from 6 and 3 GHz the power density reference level is more conservative than the basic restriction limit for the whole-body averaged SAR from the standpoint of temperature elevation.

  1. Slice-based supine-to-standing posture deformation for chinese anatomical models and the dosimetric results with wide band frequency electromagnetic field exposure: Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standing Chinese adult anatomical models are obtained from supine-postured cadaver slices. This paper presents the dosimetric differences between the supine and the standing postures over wide band frequencies and various incident configurations. Both the body level and the tissue/organ level differences are reported for plane wave and the 3T magnetic resonance imaging radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure. The influence of posture on the whole body specific absorption rate and tissue specified specific absorption rate values is discussed. . (authors)

  2. Precise visual navigation using multi-stereo vision and landmark matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Oskiper, Taragay; Samarasekera, Supun; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-04-01

    Traditional vision-based navigation system often drifts over time during navigation. In this paper, we propose a set of techniques which greatly reduce the long term drift and also improve its robustness to many failure conditions. In our approach, two pairs of stereo cameras are integrated to form a forward/backward multi-stereo camera system. As a result, the Field-Of-View of the system is extended significantly to capture more natural landmarks from the scene. This helps to increase the pose estimation accuracy as well as reduce the failure situations. Secondly, a global landmark matching technique is used to recognize the previously visited locations during navigation. Using the matched landmarks, a pose correction technique is used to eliminate the accumulated navigation drift. Finally, in order to further improve the robustness of the system, measurements from low-cost Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and Global Positioning System (GPS) sensors are integrated with the visual odometry in an extended Kalman Filtering framework. Our system is significantly more accurate and robust than previously published techniques (1~5% localization error) over long-distance navigation both indoors and outdoors. Real world experiments on a human worn system show that the location can be estimated within 1 meter over 500 meters (around 0.1% localization error averagely) without the use of GPS information.

  3. Desert ants benefit from combining visual and olfactory landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Kathrin; Hansson, Bill S; Knaden, Markus

    2011-04-15

    The desert ant, Cataglyphis fortis, uses both visual and olfactory cues to guide its return to the nest. The ants use vision-based path integration for long-distance navigation and memorize the visual and olfactory surrounding of the nest to finally locate the entrance. In the present study we investigated how the visual and the olfactory navigation systems interact. In field experiments ants were trained to associate the nest with a visual cue, an olfactory cue or a combination of both cues. We tested ants after one, five and 15 training runs, to investigate whether the ants would make use of the training cues to pinpoint the nest. We found that they were slow to learn the location of the nest when it was specified by just an olfactory or a visual cue. However, the ants focused their nest search after the first training run with the combined cue. Equally experienced ants responded to the individually presented visual or olfactory cues with the same high accuracy as they did to the combined cue. After 15 training runs, the combined cue still evoked an accurate response in the test, whereas the individually presented cues no longer did. Apparently, C. fortis benefit from combining their visual and olfactory navigational tools, because the bimodal sensory input accelerates the acquisition of landmark information. PMID:21430208

  4. Review of the Historical Evolution of Anatomical Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algieri, Rubén D.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the medical terms of Greek origin are traditionally attributed to Hippocrates (460-370 BC. Claudius Galen of Pergamum (130-200 BC developed a classification of bones and joints and described different brain areas. His teachings have remained unchanged for over a thousand years. Andreas Vesalius of Brussels (1514-1564, through the systematic study of human body structure, changed many concepts. He published his work in his production "De humani corporis fabrica libri septem", where a special attention is evident to the discovery and description of new anatomical facts. From here there is a revolution in the morphological sciences, where the same anatomical structure passed to receive different names. In the nineteenth century, the different anatomists in the world decide to meet in order to unify criteria regarding the anatomical structures and determine a only one universal language in the anatomical sciences. In 1895, in Basel (Switzerland it’s approved a list of 5.573 terms, called Basle Nomina Anatomica (BNA and was written in Latin. Eponyms were deleted. In 1903, he founded the International Federation of Associations of anatomists (IFAA. In 1935, in Jena (Germany, approving the Jena Nomina Anatomica (JNA. In 1950, in Oxford, formed the Committee of the International Anatomical Nomenclature (IANC. In 1955, in Paris (France it is agreed to adopt a Latin nomenclature based on the BNA, the Paris Nomina Anatomica (PNA. In 1980, for the first time in Latin America, takes place on the 11th International Congress of Anatomists, Mexico. In 1989, the International Committee of Anatomical Nomenclature, published the sixth edition of the Nomina Anatomica, without review by the IFAA. The same year, the latter established a Federative International Committee of Anatomical Terminology (FICAT. In 1998, he published a new list FICAT: International Anatomical Terminology (TAI, with the structures named in Latin language and their equivalence in English, listing which updates and supersedes all previous nomenclatures. In September 2001, the Spanish Anatomical Society translated this International Anatomical Terminology into Spanish language.The study of the historical backgrounds in the worldwide development of Anatomical Terms, give us valuable data about the origin and foundation of the names. It is necessary to raise awareness about the implementation of a unified, updated and uniform anatomical terminology, when conducting scientific communications and publications. As specialists in this discipline, we must study and know the existence of the official list of anatomical terms of use worldwide (International Anatomical Terminology, its equivalence with previous classifications, keeping us updated about its changes to teach it to new generations of health professionals.

  5. Proposed European anatomical collections network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Corradini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Universities, colleges, medical institutions and professional societies in the past used their museums as tools to establish themselves as the rightful producers of anatomical knowledge. Anatomical and medical museums, nearly ubiquitous in the cities of Europe and the United States, exhibited and preserved anatomical specimens as well as models and sculptures – some displaying great artistic and technical finesse – which depicted human anatomy in graphic detail. A European anatomical collection network proposes to obtain, collect, and analyze a wide range of information about anatomical collections in Europe. For our proposal it is important to focus the attention on ‘how’ as well as ‘what’ has been collected, to the strategies adopted for showing the collections, to the people who had access to the collections and the degree to which their prior experiences and expectations may have shaped their responses to it. It is also important to consider the geographical location and origins of anatomical collections, their anatomical models and specimens, the contents of lectures, the audiences targeted and also the questions raised in historical, sociological and anthropological literature about anatomy.

  6. A cubic B-spline-based hybrid registration of lung CT images for a dynamic airway geometric model with large deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study is to develop a matching algorithm that can handle large geometric changes in x-ray computed tomography (CT)-derived lung geometry occurring during deep breath maneuvers. These geometric relationships are further utilized to build a dynamic lung airway model for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of pulmonary air flow. The proposed algorithm is based on a cubic B-spline-based hybrid registration framework that incorporates anatomic landmark information with intensity patterns. A sequence of invertible B-splines is composed in a multiresolution framework to ensure local invertibility of the large deformation transformation and a physiologically meaningful similarity measure is adopted to compensate for changes in voxel intensity due to inflation. Registrations are performed using the proposed approach to match six pairs of 3D CT human lung datasets. Results show that the proposed approach has the ability to match the intensity pattern and the anatomical landmarks, and ensure local invertibility for large deformation transformations. Statistical results also show that the proposed hybrid approach yields significantly improved results as compared with approaches using either landmarks or intensity alone.

  7. Delivering high-resolution landmarks using inkjet micropatterning for spatial monitoring of leaf expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cronk Quentin CB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inkjet micropatterning is a versatile deposition technique with broad applications in numerous fields. However, its application in plant science is largely unexplored. Leaf expansion is one of the most important parameters in the field of plant science and many methods have been developed to examine differential expansion rates of different parts of the leaf lamina. Among them, methods based on the tracking of natural landmarks through digital imaging require a complicated setup in which the leaf must remain fixed and under tension. Furthermore, the resolution is limited to that of the natural landmarks, which are often difficult to find, particularly in young leaves. To study the fine scale expansion dynamics of the leaf lamina using artificial landmarks it is necessary to place small, noninvasive marks on a leaf surface and then recover the location of those marks after a period of time. Results To monitor leaf expansion in two dimensions, at very fine scales, we used a custom designed inkjet micropatterning system to print a grid composed of c. 0.19 mm2 cells on small developing leaves of ivy (Hedera helix using 40 ?m dots at a spacing of c. 91 ?m. The leaves in different growing stages were imaged under magnification to extract the coordinates of the marks which were then used in subsequent computer-assisted leaf expansion analyses. As an example we obtained quantified global and local expansion information and created expansion maps over the entire leaf surface. The results reveal a striking pattern of fine-scale expansion differences over short periods of time. In these experiments, the base of the leaf is a "cold spot" for expansion, while the leaf sinuses are "hot spots" for expansion. We have also measured a strong shading effect on leaf expansion. We discuss the features required to build an inkjet printing apparatus optimized for use in plant science, which will further maximize the range of tissues that can be printed at these scales. Conclusions To apply inkjet micropatterning to plant studies, we have successfully delivered landmarks on ivy leaf surfaces and achieved high-resolution, two-dimensional monitoring of leaf expansion at different growing stages. The measurement is capable of reliably identifying the fine scale changes during plant growth. As well as delivering landmarks, this technology may be used to deliver microscale targeted biological components such as growth hormones, and possibly be used to pattern sensors directly on the leaves.

  8. ROLE OF ANATOMICAL OBSTRUCTION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF CHRONIC SINUSITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sinusitis is a commonly diagnosed condition in the general population.This article is a study to asses the role of anatomical obstruction in the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis,based on symptomatology and radiological findings of the patients.The frequency of major anatomical variants like deviated nasal septum,concha bullosa and paradoxical middle turbinate leading to chronic sinusitis have been analyzed.Most of the time the obstruction at osteomeatal complex leading to chronic sinusitis is caused by more than one anatomical factor.

  9. Probabilistic anatomical labeling of brain structures using statistical probabilistic anatomical maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) program has increased for the analysis of brain PET and SPECT images. Montreal neurological institute (MNI) coordinate is used in SPM program as a standard anatomical framework. While the most researchers look up Talairach atlas to report the localization of the activations detected in SPM program, there is significant disparity between MNI templates and Talairach atlas. That disparity between Talairach and MNI coordinates makes the interpretation of SPM result time consuming, subjective and inaccurate. The purpose of this study was to develop a program to provide objective anatomical information of each x-y-z position in ICBM coordinate. Program was designed to provide the anatomical information for the given x-y-z position in MNI coordinate based on the statistical probabilistic anatomical map (SPAM) images of ICBM. When x-y-z position was given to the program, names of the anatomical structures with non-zero probability and the probabilities that the given position belongs to the structures were tabulated. The program was coded using IDL and JAVA language for the easy transplantation to any operating system or platform. Utility of this program was shown by comparing the results of this program to those of SPM program. Preliminary validation study was performed by applying this program to the analysis of PET brain activation study of human memory in which the anatomical information on the activated areas are previouslytion on the activated areas are previously known. Real time retrieval of probabilistic information with 1 mm spatial resolution was archived using the programs. Validation study showed the relevance of this program: probability that the activated area for memory belonged to hippocampal formation was more than 80%. These programs will be useful for the result interpretation of the image analysis performed on MNI coordinate, as done in SPM program

  10. Clinically Significant Anatomical Variants of the Paranasal Sinuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Bhargava

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anatomic structural variations of the paranasal sinuses have a practical significance during surgical procedures conducted on the sinuses by otolaryngologists. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of clinically significant anatomical variations of the paranasal sinuses. Methods: A prospective analysis of 435 computed tomography (CT examinations of adult Omani patients was conducted to determine the prevalence of clinically significant anatomical variations of the paranasal sinuses. A total of 360 CT scans were included from January 2009 to January 2010. Results: The findings showed abnormal Agger nasi cells in 49% of cases (95% CI: 44-54%, concha bullosa in 49% (95% CI: 44-54%, Haller cells in 24% (95% CI: 18-31%, asymmetry in anterior ethmoidal roof 32% (CI: 29-37%, Onodi cells in 8% (CI: 5%-10%. The type of skull base were as follows; Type 1 was 30% (n=107; 95% CI: 25-35%, Type 2 was 34% (n=123; 95% CI: 29-39, and Type 3 was 36% (n=130; 95% CI: 31-41%. Many other surgically significant anatomical variations in small numbers (1-3 were incidentally identified. Conclusion: Knowledge of the presence of anatomical variations of the sinuses has a clinical significance as it minimizes the potential for surgical complications. There is an ethnical difference in the prevalence of anatomical variations. Further studies of anatomical variations with clinical disease correlations are needed.

  11. ROLE OF ANATOMICAL OBSTRUCTION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF CHRONIC SINUSITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan; Yahia Abdul Basith

    2012-01-01

    Sinusitis is a commonly diagnosed condition in the general population.This article is a study to asses the role of anatomical obstruction in the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis,based on symptomatology and radiological findings of the patients.The frequency of major anatomical variants like deviated nasal septum,concha bullosa and paradoxical middle turbinate leading to chronic sinusitis have been analyzed.Most of the time the obstruction at osteomeatal complex leading to chronic sinusitis i...

  12. Landmarks or panoramas: what do navigating ants attend to for guidance?

    OpenAIRE

    Beugnon Guy; Wystrach Antoine; Cheng Ken

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Insects are known to rely on terrestrial landmarks for navigation. Landmarks are used to chart a route or pinpoint a goal. The distant panorama, however, is often thought not to guide navigation directly during a familiar journey, but to act as a contextual cue that primes the correct memory of the landmarks. Results We provided Melophorus bagoti ants with a huge artificial landmark located right near the nest entrance to find out whether navigating ants focus on such a pr...

  13. Differentiating the impact of anatomic and non-anatomic liver resection on early recurrence in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovinazzo Francesco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC treated with hepatectomy, the extent of the resection margin remains controversial and data available on its effect on early tumor recurrence are very few and contradictory. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of the type of resection (anatomic versus non-anatomic on early intra-hepatic HCC recurrence in patients with solitary HCC and preserved liver function. Methods Among 53 patients with similar clinico-pathologic data who underwent curative liver resection for HCC between 2000 and 2006, 28 patients underwent anatomic resection of at least one liver segment and 25 patients underwent limited resection with a margin of at least 1 cm. Results After a close follow-up period of 24 months, no difference was detected in recurrence rates between the anatomic (35.7% and the non-anatomic (40% groups in either univariate (p = 0.74 and multivariate (p = 0.65 analysis. Factors contributing to early recurrence were tumor size (p = 0.012 and tumor stage including vascular invasion (p = 0.009. Conclusion The choice of the type of resection for HCC should be based on the maintenance of adequate hepatic reserve. The type of resection (anatomic vs non-anatomic was found not to be a risk factor for early tumor recurrence.

  14. Anatomical variations of the clavicle and main vascular structures in two pediatric patients: subclavicular vein cannulation with supraclavicular approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksuz H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization is a routine application in the management of patients in critical condition. However, the placement of central venous catheters is not without risk. The standard technique for central venous cannulation includes the use of anatomical landmarks. However, an ultrasound-guided method is recommended for catheterization in high-risk patients. In this report, we present two pediatric cases which had anatomical variations of the clavicles and main vascular structures due to cerebral palsy and were treated with mechanical ventilation because of pneumonia. The subclavian vein cannulation was performed using a supraclavicular approach under ultrasound guidance in both cases. We conclude that central venous catheterization of critical patients who have anatomical variations must be performed under ultrasound guidance as it provides greater safety and a higher success rate.

  15. An Adaptive Algorithm for Finding Frequent Sets in Landmark Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Xuan-Hong; Ong, Kok-Leong

    2012-01-01

    We consider a CPU constrained environment for finding approximation of frequent sets in data streams using the landmark window. Our algorithm can detect overload situations, i.e., breaching the CPU capacity, and sheds data in the stream to “keep up”. This is done within a controlled error threshold by exploiting the Chernoff-bound. Empirical evaluation of the algorithm confirms the feasibility.

  16. On-line SLAM using clustered landmarks with omnidirectional vision

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jun, Okamoto Jr.; Vitor Campanholo, Guizilini.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) is a fundamental problem in autonomous robotics. It arises when a robot must create a map of the regions it has navigated while localizing itself on it, using results from one step to increase precision in another by eliminating errors inhe [...] rent to the sensors. One common solution consists of establishing landmarks in the environment which are used as reference points for absolute localization estimates and form a sparse map that is iteratively refined as more information is obtained. This paper introduces a method of landmark selection and clustering in omnidirectional images for on-line SLAM, using the SIFT algorithm for initial feature extraction and assuming no prior knowledge of the environment. Visual sensors are an attractive way of collecting information from the environment, but tend to create an excessive amount of landmarks that are individually prone to false matches due to image noise and object similarities. By clustering several features in single objects, our approach eliminates landmarks that do not consistently represent the environment, decreasing computational cost and increasing the reliability of information incorporated. Tests conducted in real navigational situations show a significant improvement in performance without loss of quality.

  17. Spinal cord localization in the treatment of lung cancer: use of radiographic landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the treatment of thoracic malignancies with radiotherapy, the critical dose-limiting structure is the spinal cord. Oblique fields typically are designed to exclude the spinal cord, and by convention, the field edge that shields the spinal cord is placed at the anterior border of the vertebral pedicles. Thus, the purpose of our study was to estimate the distance between the field edge and spinal cord in oblique fields that were designed by using the vertebral pedicle as a radiographic landmark. Methods and Materials: The spinal cord of a cadaver was wrapped in wire, and oblique fields were simulated at 15 deg. intervals. The distance from the spinal cord to a field edge placed at the anterior border of the pedicle was measured. In the second investigation, a three-dimensional treatment planning system was used to simulate hypothetical fields using actual patient data from computed tomography (n = 10), and measurements identical to those in the anatomical model were made (n = 1,100). Results: The results of the anatomical and computed tomographic models were in close agreement (mean difference, 0.6 mm). The computed tomographic model predicted a mean field edge to spinal cord distance of 8.7 mm (95% confidence interval, 5.6-11.8 mm) for (30 deg. (150 deg.)) oblique fields and 8.0 mm (95% confidence interval, 4.7-11.7 mm) for (45 deg. (135 deg.)) oblique fields. This distance was greatest at levels T-1, T-2, and T-11 (8 to 20% greater). Conclusions: The mean (8 to 20% greater). Conclusions: The mean distance from a field edge placed at the anterior border of a vertebral pedicle to the spinal cord for commonly used oblique angles constitutes a sufficient margin to account for expected differences in daily positional variations and mechanical uncertainties

  18. Exploring brain function from anatomical connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GorkaZamora-López

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic relationship between the architecture of the brain and the range of sensory and behavioral phenomena it produces is a relevant question in neuroscience. Here, we review recent knowledge gained on the architecture of the anatomical connectivity by means of complex network analysis. It has been found that corticocortical networks display a few prominent characteristics: (i modular organization, (ii abundant alternative processing paths and (iii the presence of highly connected hubs. Additionally, we present a novel classification of cortical areas of the cat according to the role they play in multisensory connectivity. All these properties represent an ideal anatomical substrate supporting rich dynamical behaviors, as-well-as facilitating the capacity of the brain to process sensory information of different modalities segregated and to integrate them towards a comprehensive perception of the real world. The result here exposed are mainly based in anatomical data of cats’ brain, but we show how further observations suggest that, from worms to humans, the nervous system of all animals might share fundamental principles of organization.

  19. Shape analysis of simulated breast anatomical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contijoch, Francisco; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution 3D breast imaging, namely, digital breast tomosynthesis and dedicated breast CT, have enabled detailed analysis of the shape and distribution of anatomical structures in the breast. Such analysis is critically important, since the projections of breast anatomical structures make up the parenchymal pattern in clinical images which can mask the existing abnormalities or introduce false alarms; the parenchymal pattern is also correlated with the risk of cancer. As a first step towards the shape analysis of anatomical structures in the breast, we have analyzed an anthropomorphic software breast phantom. The phantom generation is based upon the recursive splitting of the phantom volume using octrees, which produces irregularly shaped tissue compartments, qualitatively mimicking the breast anatomy. The shape analysis was performed by fitting ellipsoids to the simulated tissue compartments. The ellipsoidal semi-axes were calculated by matching the moments of inertia of each individual compartment and of an ellipsoid. The distribution of Dice coefficients, measuring volumetric overlap between the compartment and the corresponding ellipsoid, as well as the distribution of aspect ratios, measuring relative orientations of the ellipsoids, were used to characterize various classes of phantoms with qualitatively distinctive appearance. A comparison between input parameters for phantom generation and the properties of fitted ellipsoids indicated the high level of user control in the design of software breast phantoms. The proposed shape analysis could be extended to clinical breast images, and used to inform the selection of simulation parameters for improved realism.

  20. Slice-based supine to standing postured deformation for chinese anatomical models and the dosimetric results by wide band frequency electromagnetic field exposure: Morphing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital human models are frequently obtained from supine-postured medical images or cadaver slices, but many applications require standing models. This paper presents the work of reconstructing standing Chinese adult anatomical models from supine postured slices. Apart from the previous studies, the deformation works on 2-D segmented slices. The surface profile of the standing posture is adjusted by population measurement data. A non-uniform texture amplification approach is applied on the 2-D slices to recover the skin contour and to redistribute the internal tissues. Internal organ shift due to postures is taken into account. The feet are modified by matrix rotation. Then, the supine and standing models are utilised for the evaluation of electromagnetic field exposure over wide band frequency and different incident directions. . (authors)

  1. Gantzer muscle. An anatomical study

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Edie Benedito, Caetano; João José, Sabongi Neto; Luiz Ângelo, Vieira; Maurício Ferreira, Caetano; Daniel Vinhais, Moraes.

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship of Gantzer muscle to the median and anterior interosseous nerve is debated. METHODS: Ìn an anatomical study with 80 limbs from 40 cadavers the incidence, origin, insertion, nerve supply and relations of Gantzer muscle have been documented. RESULTS: The muscle was found i [...] n 54 forearms (68% of limbs) and was supplied by the anterior interosseous nerve. It arose from the deep surface of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, (42 limbs), coronoid process (eight limbs) and medial epicondyle (seven limbs). Its insertion was to the ulnar part of flexor pollicis longus muscle. The Gantzer muscle always lay posterior to both the median and anterior interosseous nerve. CONCLUSION: The Gantzer muscle may contribute to the median nerve and anterior interosseous nerve compression. The muscle was found in 68% of limbs and should be considered a normal anatomical pattern rather than an anatomical variation. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series .

  2. Identification of greater occipital nerve landmarks for the treatment of occipital neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, M; El-Sedfy, A; Tubbs, R S; Louis, R G; Wartmann, C H T; Curry, B; Jordan, R

    2006-11-01

    Important structures involved in the pathogenesis of occipital headache include the aponeurotic attachments of the trapezius and semispinalis capitis muscles to the occipital bone. The greater occipital nerve (GON) can become entrapped as it passes through these aponeuroses, causing symptoms of occipital neuralgia. The aim of this study was to identify topographic landmarks for accurate identification of GON, which might facilitate its anaesthetic blockade. The course and distribution of GON and its relation to the aponeuroses of the trapezius and semispinalis capitis were examined in 100 formalin-fixed adult cadavers. In addition, the relative position of the nerve on a horizontal line between the external occipital protuberance and the mastoid process, as well as between the mastoid processes was measured. The greater occipital nerve was found bilaterally in all specimens. It was located at a mean distance of 3.8 cm (range 1.5-7.5 cm) lateral to a vertical line through the external occipital protuberance and the spinous processes of the cervical vertebrae 2-7. It was also located approximately 41% of the distance along the intermastoid line (medial to a mastoid process) and 22% of the distance between the external occipital protuberance and the mastoid process. The location of GON for anaesthesia or any other neurosurgical procedure has been established as one thumb's breadth lateral to the external occipital protuberance (2 cm laterally) and approximately at the base of the thumb nail (2 cm inferior). This is the first study proposing the use of landmarks in relation to anthropometric measurements. On the basis of these observations we propose a target zone for local anaesthetic injection that is based on easily identifiable landmarks and suggest that injection at this target point could be of benefit in the relief of occipital neuralgia. PMID:17171613

  3. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... base of the bicipital groove but not quite. I think it's important to have a wide osteotome so ... make it a bunch of small pieces. And I think it's important for it to be curved so ...

  4. PET image reconstruction with anatomical edge guided level set prior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquiring both anatomical and functional images during one scan, PET/CT systems improve the ability to detect and localize abnormal uptakes. In addition, CT images provide anatomical boundary information that can be used to regularize positron emission tomography (PET) images. Here we propose a new approach to maximum a posteriori reconstruction of PET images with a level set prior guided by anatomical edges. The image prior models both the smoothness of PET images and the similarity between functional boundaries in PET and anatomical boundaries in CT. Level set functions (LSFs) are used to represent smooth and closed functional boundaries. The proposed method does not assume an exact match between PET and CT boundaries. Instead, it encourages similarity between the two boundaries, while allowing different region definition in PET images to accommodate possible signal and position mismatch between functional and anatomical images. While the functional boundaries are guaranteed to be closed by the LSFs, the proposed method does not require closed anatomical boundaries and can utilize incomplete edges obtained from an automatic edge detection algorithm. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Two digital phantoms were constructed based on the Digimouse data and a human CT image, respectively. Anatomical edges were extracted automatically from the CT images. Tumors were simulated in the PET phantoms with different mismatched he PET phantoms with different mismatched anatomical boundaries. Compared with existing methods, the new method achieved better bias-variance performance. The proposed method was also applied to real mouse data and achieved higher contrast than other methods.

  5. Study on the Construction of a High-definition Whole-body Voxel Model based on Cadaver's Color Photographic Anatomical Slice Images and Monte Carlo Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajou University School of Medicine made the serially sectioned anatomical images from the Visible Korean Human (VKH) Project in Korea. The VKH images, which are the high-resolution color photographic images, show the organs and tissues in the human body very clearly at 0.2 mm intervals. In this study, we constructed a high-quality voxel model (VKH-Man) with a total of 30 organs and tissues by manual and automatic segmentation method using the serially sectioned anatomical image data from the Visible Korean Human (VKH) project in Korea. The height and weight of VKH-Man voxel model is 164 cm and 57.6 kg, respectively, and the voxel resolution is 1.875 x 1.875 x 2 mm3. However, this voxel phantom can be used to calculate the organ and tissue doses of only one person. Therefore, in this study, we adjusted the voxel phantom to the 'Reference Korean' data to construct the voxel phantom that represents the radiation workers in Korea. The height and weight of the voxel model (HDRK-Man) that is finally developed are 171 cm and 68 kg, respectively, and the voxel resolution is 1.981 x 1.981 x 2.0854 mm3. VKH-Man and HDRK-Man voxel model were implemented in a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code for calculation of the organ and tissue doses in various irradiation geometries. The calculated values were compared with each other to see the effect of the adjustment and also compared with other computational models (KTMAN-2, ICRP-74 and VIP-Man). According to the results, the adjustment of the voxel model was found hardly affect the dose calculations and most of the organ and tissue equivalent doses showed some differences among the models. These results shows that the difference in figure, and organ topology affects the organ doses more than the organ size. The calculated values of the effective dose from VKH-Man and HDRK-Man according to the ICRP-60 and upcoming ICRP recommendation were compared. For the other radiation geometries (AP, LLAT, RLAT) except for PA radiation geometry, the effective dose according to the upcoming ICRP recommendation was somewhat larger than that according to the ICRP-60. This seems due to change of the tissue weighting factor in the upcoming ICRP recommendation. The developed phantoms (VKH-Man and HDRK-Man) are expected to be used to estimate the radiation risk of only Korean in external and internal dosimetry. Dose conversion coefficients calculated in this study are also expected to be used in radiation protection assessment of Korean since those were distinguished from those of the western

  6. Fusion of WiFi, smartphone sensors and landmarks using the Kalman filter for indoor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenghua; Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Qingchang; Soh, Yeng Chai; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS) have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m. PMID:25569750

  7. Fusion of WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks Using the Kalman Filter for Indoor Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenghua; Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Qingchang; Soh, Yeng Chai; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS) have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m. PMID:25569750

  8. Fusion of WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks Using the Kalman Filter for Indoor Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services (LBS have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m.

  9. Resultados funcionales y anatómicos en la facoemulsificación coaxial estándar mediante la técnica de multichop Functional and anatomical results of standard coaxial phacoemulsification based on the multichop technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neisy Bernal Reyes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Describir los resultados funcionales y anatómicos obtenidos con la facoemulsificación coaxial estándar por la técnica de multichop en la cirugía de catarata. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo, longitudinal y prospectivo en el período comprendido entre septiembre de 2005 y mayo de 2007, de pacientes operados de catarata en el Instituto Cubano de Oftalmología "Ramón Pando Ferrer". RESULTADOS: El poder del ultrasonido promedio fue de 20,7 %, el tiempo de ultrasonido medio fue de 46 segundos y el tiempo efectivo de facoemulsificación promedio fue de 10,2 s; existió relación significativa entre la dureza del núcleo y el tiempo de ultrasonido empleado (p OBJECTIVES: To describe the functional and anatomical results achieved in standard coaxial phacoemulsification using multichop technique in the cataract surgery. METHODS: Prospective longitudinal and descriptive study of patients operated on from cataract at "Ramón Pando Ferrer" Cuban Institute of Ophthalmology, conducted from September 2005 to May 2007. RESULTS: The average ultrasound power was 20,7 %, the average ultrasound time was 46 seconds and the average effective phaco time was 10,3 seconds; there was significant relation between nucleus hardness and time of ultrasound (p < 0.05. Postoperative best corrected average visual acuity was 0,8 with significant relation (p = 0.00 as well as induced astigmatism of 0,37 dioptres. Significant relation was observed between loss of endothelial cells and nucleus hardness (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The used phacodynamic parameters were low, postoperative visual acuity improved and induced astigmatism was also low.

  10. Resultados funcionales y anatómicos en la facoemulsificación coaxial estándar mediante la técnica de multichop / Functional and anatomical results of standard coaxial phacoemulsification based on the multichop technique

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Neisy, Bernal Reyes; Luis, Curbelo Cunill; Alejandro, Arias Díaz.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Describir los resultados funcionales y anatómicos obtenidos con la facoemulsificación coaxial estándar por la técnica de multichop en la cirugía de catarata. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo, longitudinal y prospectivo en el período comprendido entre septiembre de 2005 y mayo de 2007, de paci [...] entes operados de catarata en el Instituto Cubano de Oftalmología "Ramón Pando Ferrer". RESULTADOS: El poder del ultrasonido promedio fue de 20,7 %, el tiempo de ultrasonido medio fue de 46 segundos y el tiempo efectivo de facoemulsificación promedio fue de 10,2 s; existió relación significativa entre la dureza del núcleo y el tiempo de ultrasonido empleado (p Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: To describe the functional and anatomical results achieved in standard coaxial phacoemulsification using multichop technique in the cataract surgery. METHODS: Prospective longitudinal and descriptive study of patients operated on from cataract at "Ramón Pando Ferrer" Cuban Institute of O [...] phthalmology, conducted from September 2005 to May 2007. RESULTS: The average ultrasound power was 20,7 %, the average ultrasound time was 46 seconds and the average effective phaco time was 10,3 seconds; there was significant relation between nucleus hardness and time of ultrasound (p

  11. Combining Anatomical Manifold Information via Diffeomorphic Metric Mappings for Studying Cortical Thinning of the Cingulate Gyrus in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Anqi; Younes, Laurent; Wang, Lei; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Gillepsie, Sarah K.; Kaplan, Gillian; Csernansky, John; Miller, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial normalization is a crucial step in assessing patterns of neuroanatomical structure and function associated with health and disease. Errors that occur during spatial normalization can influence hypothesis testing due to the dimensionalities of mapping algorithms and anatomical manifolds (landmarks, curves, surfaces, volumes) used to drive the mapping algorithms. The primary aim of this paper is to improve statistical inference using multiple anatomical manifolds and Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM) algorithms. We propose that combining information generated by the various manifolds and algorithms improves the reliability of hypothesis testing. We used this unified approach to assess variation in the thickness of the cingulate gyrus in subjects with schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. Three different LDDMM algorithms for mapping landmarks, curves and triangulated meshes were used to transform thickness maps of the cingulate surfaces into an atlas coordinate system. We then tested for group differences by combining the information from the three types of anatomical manifolds and LDDMM mapping algorithms. The unified approach provided reliable statistical results and eliminated ambiguous results due to surface mismatches. Subjects with schizophrenia had non-uniform cortical thinning over the left and right cingulate gyri, especially in the anterior portion, as compared to healthy comparison subjects. PMID:17613251

  12. The influence of off-screen landmarks on user orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Korda, Amichai

    2014-01-01

    Maps displayed on hand held devices, such as smartphones; provide limited visibility due to their small screen display. In order to overcome display limitations, researchers have developed new techniques that point users to objects and landmarks located off-screen, which is known as an “off-screen interface”. Since this is a new type of map interface, there is little information regarding the effect it has on the user’s perception of the environment and spatial orientation abilities. ...

  13. Anatomical structure of Polystichum Roth ferns rachises

    OpenAIRE

    Tyshchenko, Oksana V.; Vasheka, Olena V.; Polyshchuk, Iryna O.

    2012-01-01

    The morpho-anatomical characteristics of rachis cross sections of five Polystichum species is presented. The main and auxiliary anatomical features which help to distinguish investigated species are revealed.

  14. Anatomical structure of Polystichum Roth ferns rachises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana V. Tyshchenko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The morpho-anatomical characteristics of rachis cross sections of five Polystichum species is presented. The main and auxiliary anatomical features which help to distinguish investigated species are revealed.

  15. AUTOMATIC DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF RETINAL VASCULAR LANDMARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of this paper is introducing a method to distinguish between different landmarks of the retina: bifurcations and crossings. The methodology may help in differentiating between arteries and veins and is useful in identifying diseases and other special pathologies, too. The method does not need any special skills, thus it can be assimilated to an automatic way for pinpointing landmarks; moreover it gives good responses for very small vessels. A skeletonized representation, taken out from the segmented binary image (obtained through a preprocessing step, is used to identify pixels with three or more neighbors. Then, the junction points are classified into bifurcations or crossovers depending on their geometrical and topological properties such as width, direction and connectivity of the surrounding segments. The proposed approach is applied to the public-domain DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with the state-of-the-art methods using proper validation parameters. The method was successful in identifying the majority of the landmarks; the average correctly identified bifurcations in both DRIVE and STARE datasets for the recall and precision values are: 95.4% and 87.1% respectively; also for the crossovers, the recall and precision values are: 87.6% and 90.5% respectively; thus outperforming other studies.

  16. Agricultural Health Study - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  17. AIDS-Related Cancers - SEER Landmark Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  18. Proposal of anatomical terminology to call the arteries of the base of the encephalon in the monkey (Cebus paella L., 1766 Nomenclatura proposta para denominar as artérias da base do encéfalo do macaco-prego (Cebus apella L., 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Rocha Ferreira

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Arteries of the encephalon basis of 30 monkeys (Cebus paella were studied. Arteries were injected with colored latex, fixed in formaldehyde solution at 10% and dissected under magnifying lenses. Since the animals died from natural causes they had been previously used in other experiments. Human and veterinary anatomical terminology and literature were used as a reference for the determination of vessels studied in the primates. Arteries of the encephalon base represent division branches of three vascular pedicules: the right and left internal carotid arteries and the basilar system. Vessels in the basilar system of the animal were called vertebral arteries; anterior spinal artery; anterior and posterior cerebelar arteries; pontine arteries; satellite cerebelar arteries; caudal and cranial cerebelar arteries. The basilar artery bifurcates into two posterior cerebral arteries (100%. The caudal area of the encephalon’s arterial circuit is thus constituted. Linking between the vertebro-basilar and the carotid segments is done by the posterior communicating artery, that caudally anastomizes (100% with the posterior cerebral artery. The internal carotid artery gives origin to the posterior communicating artery. The right and left internal carotid artery (intracranial portion compounds the carotid system. The following vessels were identified: middle cerebral artery; anterior cerebral artery; interhemispheric artery; olfactory arteries. Results report that Cebus paella presents an arterial pattern of relative morphological stabilityEstudaram-se as artérias da base do encéfalo do Cebus apella em 30 animais, vindos a óbito por morte natural no Zoológico de São Paulo e coletados durante 10 anos. O material recebeu injeção de látex corado, fixado em formol a 10%, e foi dissecado sob lupa. Encontramos dificuldade e denominar estes vasos. As terminologias anatômicas humana e veterinária e a recuperação da literatura nos serviram de base para sugerirmos uma denominação que se adequasse ao modelo arterial desse primata. Os resultados nos permitiram verificar, no circuito arterial da base do encéfalo, segmento caudal ou vértebro-basilar as artérias (a: a. vertebral, suas partes (pé-vertebral, cervical, atlântica e intracraniana com ramos meníngeos e seus ramos (a. espinhal anterior, a. cerebelar inferior caudal, ramos para a medula oblonga; a. basilar e seus ramos (a. cerebelar inferior rostral, a. pontinas, a. cerebelar superior satélite, ilhas artérias, a. cerebelar anterior, a. cerebelar posterior; e no segmento rostral ou carótico os vasos: a. carótida interna (parte cerebral; a. comunicante posterior; a. coróidea; a. cerebral média; a. cerebral anterior; a. olfatória; a. inter-hemisférica. A análise dos resultados nos permitiu considerar que o Cebus apella apresentou um padrão arterial de relativa estabilidade morfológica em função das poucas variações encontradas nos vasos formadores dos circuitos arteriais considerados

  19. The post-birthday world: consequences of temporal landmarks for temporal self-appraisal and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetz, Johanna; Wilson, Anne E

    2013-02-01

    Much as physical landmarks help structure our representation of space, temporal landmarks such as birthdays and significant calendar dates structure our perception of time, such that people may organize or categorize their lives into "chunks" separated by these markers. Categories on the temporal landscape may vary depending on what landmarks are salient at a given time. We suggest these landmarks have implications for identity and motivation. The present research examined consequences of salient temporal landmarks for perceptions of the self across time and motivation to pursue successful future selves. Studies 1 and 2 show that temporally extended selves are perceived as less connected to, and more dissimilar from, the current self when an intervening landmark event has been made salient. Study 3 addresses the proposed mechanism, demonstrating that intervening landmarks lead people to categorize pre- and postlandmark selves into separate categories more often than when the same time period contains no salient landmarks. Finally, we examined whether landmark-induced mental contrasting of present state and future desired state could increase goal-pursuit motivation (in an effort to bridge the gap between inferior present and better future states). Studies 4-6 demonstrate that landmark-induced discrepancies between current health and hoped-for future health increased participants' motivation to exercise and increased the likelihood that they acted in line with their future-oriented goals. PMID:23066883

  20. Microarray data mining using landmark gene-guided clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho HyungJun

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clustering is a popular data exploration technique widely used in microarray data analysis. Most conventional clustering algorithms, however, generate only one set of clusters independent of the biological context of the analysis. This is often inadequate to explore data from different biological perspectives and gain new insights. We propose a new clustering model that can generate multiple versions of different clusters from a single dataset, each of which highlights a different aspect of the given dataset. Results By applying our SigCalc algorithm to three yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae datasets we show two results. First, we show that different sets of clusters can be generated from the same dataset using different sets of landmark genes. Each set of clusters groups genes differently and reveals new biological associations between genes that were not apparent from clustering the original microarray expression data. Second, we show that many of these new found biological associations are common across datasets. These results also provide strong evidence of a link between the choice of landmark genes and the new biological associations found in gene clusters. Conclusion We have used the SigCalc algorithm to project the microarray data onto a completely new subspace whose co-ordinates are genes (called landmark genes, known to belong to a Biological Process. The projected space is not a true vector space in mathematical terms. However, we use the term subspace to refer to one of virtually infinite numbers of projected spaces that our proposed method can produce. By changing the biological process and thus the landmark genes, we can change this subspace. We have shown how clustering on this subspace reveals new, biologically meaningful clusters which were not evident in the clusters generated by conventional methods. The R scripts (source code are freely available under the GPL license. The source code is available [see Additional File 1] as additional material, and the latest version can be obtained at http://www4.ncsu.edu/~pchopra/landmarks.html. The code is under active development to incorporate new clustering methods and analysis. Additional file 1 R source code file Click here for file

  1. Agreement between anatomic and ultrasound measurements of femoral trochlear depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Westrup, Ulrik

    Assessments of trochlear depth for patients with medial patellar luxation have traditionally been estimated from skyline radiographs or visually during surgery. Ultrasound offers a non-invasive evaluation method which could avoid the need for arthrotomy. We compared anatomic, radiographic and ultrasonographic measurements of trochlear depth using the red fox hind limb as a canine surrogate, dividing the trochlea into five regions from the origin of the caudal cruciate ligament to the proximal aspect of the trochlea. We found reasonable agreement between anatomic and ultrasonographic measurements as assessed by Bland-Altman difference charting and limits of agreement (approximately ±0.7mm). Differences may be accounted for by ultrasound probe positioning errors, which should be taken into consideration during clinical investigations. Skyline views were difficult to standardise to a distinct position in the trochlea but appeared to centre around the middle of the trochlea: the proximal section of the trochlea has been suggested to be most critical in medial patellar luxation, and thus the usefulness of this view is questionable. Trochlear depth in this study population was approximately 30% of patellar depth over the five regions examined. Measurement reliability for the ultrasonographic examinations was markedly less that for the skyline views (repeatability coefficient of 0.5mm vs 0.25mm), but still adequate for clinical use. A likely reason is the relative amount of detail recorded in the respective DICOM files which restricts ultrasonographic landmark resolution. Further work on quantifying interobserver variation and repeat measurement variation is required to ensure confidence in this technique.

  2. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: A method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pyka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM, to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: i the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, ii the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort.

  3. Extracción de puntos característicos del rostro para medidas antropométricas Face landmarks extraction for anthropometric measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro González

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available En este documento se propone una técnica para la extracción de 22 puntos característicos del rostro, orientada a aplicaciones de antropometría. La técnica se fundamenta en la transformada wavelets-Gabor y el uso del algoritmo EBGM (del término en inglés: Elastic Bunch Graph Matching. Este último algoritmo fue modificado para que los puntos extraídos correspondan a puntos característicos del rostro, los cuales se utilizan comúnmente en medidas antropométricas faciales. Las modificaciones consisten en un conjunto de restricciones geométricas para ajustar inicialmente la ubicación de los centros de búsqueda, y posteriormente para la definición de la región de esta búsqueda. Los resultados mostraron que los puntos centrales del rostro presentan errores de ubicación inferiores al milímetro, lo cual es consistente con las medidas en antropometría facial directa.In this research, a technique for the extraction of a 22 face landmarks set oriented to anthropometry applications has been proposed. The technique is based on wavelets Gabor transformation and the Elastic Bunch Graph Matching (EBGM algorithm. The EBGM algorithm was modified so that the extracted points correspond to face landmarks which are commonly used in face anthropometric measures. Modifications were: some geometric restrictions to initially fit the centers location of the region search, and later for the definition of the region. Results show that the face central points present location errors smaller than a millimeter, which is consistent with the measures in direct face anthropometry.

  4. Extracción de puntos característicos del rostro para medidas antropométricas / Face landmarks extraction for anthropometric measures

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alejandro, González; Flavio, Prieto.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available En este documento se propone una técnica para la extracción de 22 puntos característicos del rostro, orientada a aplicaciones de antropometría. La técnica se fundamenta en la transformada wavelets-Gabor y el uso del algoritmo EBGM (del término en inglés: Elastic Bunch Graph Matching). Este último al [...] goritmo fue modificado para que los puntos extraídos correspondan a puntos característicos del rostro, los cuales se utilizan comúnmente en medidas antropométricas faciales. Las modificaciones consisten en un conjunto de restricciones geométricas para ajustar inicialmente la ubicación de los centros de búsqueda, y posteriormente para la definición de la región de esta búsqueda. Los resultados mostraron que los puntos centrales del rostro presentan errores de ubicación inferiores al milímetro, lo cual es consistente con las medidas en antropometría facial directa. Abstract in english In this research, a technique for the extraction of a 22 face landmarks set oriented to anthropometry applications has been proposed. The technique is based on wavelets Gabor transformation and the Elastic Bunch Graph Matching (EBGM) algorithm. The EBGM algorithm was modified so that the extracted p [...] oints correspond to face landmarks which are commonly used in face anthropometric measures. Modifications were: some geometric restrictions to initially fit the centers location of the region search, and later for the definition of the region. Results show that the face central points present location errors smaller than a millimeter, which is consistent with the measures in direct face anthropometry.

  5. Anatomic variations on PNS CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To illustrate frequently encountered anatomic variations on PNS computed tomography(CT) and to assess their clinical significance. CT findings of 1523 patients, who underwent PNS CT with no history of sinus surgery, were reviewed, and prevalence of each anatomic variation and its relationship with mucociliary clearance pathway was evaluated. Two categories of anatomic variations were encountered. The first group included variations of the turbinates, such as concha bullosa(28.6%), paradoxical middle turbinate(31.5%), of the uncinate process, such as medially bent or folded(36.3%), laterally bent(3.7%) or uncinate bulla(0.5%), of the ethmoidal sinus, such as Haller's cell(28.2%), large agger nasi cell(9.6%) or large ethmoidal bulla(23.5%) and nasal septal deviation(24.1%), which might cause obstruction of mucociliary clearance pathway and thus give rise to secondary obstructive sinusitis. The second group included Onodi cell(1.4%) and medial depression of the lamina papyracea(3.5%), which were not related with obstructive sinusitis. 87 cases of large agger nasi cell were associated with obstruction of nasofrontal recess. Large ethmoidal bulla(452 cases), Haller's cell(245 case) and true concha bullosa(25 cases) contributed to narrowing of the infundibulum. Medially bent uncinate process(220 cases), concha bullosa(157 cases), paradoxical middle turbinate(126 cases) and nasal septal deviation(93 case) were observed in middle meatal obstruction and supreme concha(3 case) al obstruction and supreme concha(3 case) accompanied sphenoethmoidal recess obstruction. Recognition of anatomic variations on PNS CT is important to build a treatment plan in patients with obstructive sinusitis as they may represent causes of the disease, and to avoid critical complications during functional endoscopic sinus surgery

  6. Anatomical study of the pigs temporal bone by microdissection

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Leandro de Borborema, Garcia; José Santos Cruz de, Andrade; José Ricardo Gurgel, Testa.

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Initial study of the pig`s temporal bone anatomy in order to enable a new experimental model in ear surgery. METHODS: Dissection of five temporal bones of Sus scrofa pigs obtained from UNIFESP - Surgical Skills Laboratory, removed with hole saw to avoid any injury and stored in formald [...] ehyde 10% for better conservation. The microdissection in all five temporal bone had the following steps: inspection of the outer part, external canal and tympanic membrane microscopy, mastoidectomy, removal of external ear canal and tympanic membrane, inspection of ossicular chain and middle ear. RESULTS: Anatomically it is located at the same position than in humans. Some landmarks usually found in humans are missing. The tympanic membrane of the pig showed to be very similar to the human, separating the external and the middle ear. The middle ear`s appearance is very similar than in humans. The ossicular chain is almost exactly the same, as well as the facial nerve, showing the same relationship with the lateral semicircular canal. CONCLUSION: The temporal bone of the pigs can be used as an alternative for training in ear surgery, especially due the facility to find it and its similarity with temporal bone of the humans.

  7. Anatomical study of the pigs temporal bone by microdissection

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Leandro de Borborema, Garcia; José Santos Cruz de, Andrade; José Ricardo Gurgel, Testa.

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Initial study of the pig`s temporal bone anatomy in order to enable a new experimental model in ear surgery. METHODS: Dissection of five temporal bones of Sus scrofa pigs obtained from UNIFESP - Surgical Skills Laboratory, removed with hole saw to avoid any injury and stored in formal [...] dehyde 10% for better conservation. The microdissection in all five temporal bone had the following steps: inspection of the outer part, external canal and tympanic membrane microscopy, mastoidectomy, removal of external ear canal and tympanic membrane, inspection of ossicular chain and middle ear. RESULTS: Anatomically it is located at the same position than in humans. Some landmarks usually found in humans are missing. The tympanic membrane of the pig showed to be very similar to the human, separating the external and the middle ear. The middle ear`s appearance is very similar than in humans. The ossicular chain is almost exactly the same, as well as the facial nerve, showing the same relationship with the lateral semicircular canal. CONCLUSION: The temporal bone of the pigs can be used as an alternative for training in ear surgery, especially due the facility to find it and its similarity with temporal bone of the humans.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of scans is taken on different days. Both allow planning to account for variability intrinsic to the patient. Treatment verification has been carried out using a variety of technologies including: MV portal imaging, kV portal/fluoroscopy, MVCT, conebeam kVCT, ultrasound and optical surface imaging. The various methods have their pros and cons. The four x-ray methods involve an extra radiation dose to normal tissue. The portal methods may not generally be used to visualize soft tissue, consequently they are often used in conjunction with implanted fiducial markers. The two CT-based methods allow measurement of inter-fraction variation only. Ultrasound allows soft-tissue measurement with zero dose but requires skilled interpretation, and there is evidence of systematic differences between ultrasound and other data sources, perhaps due to the effects of the probe pressure. Optical imaging also involves zero dose but requires good correlation between the target and the external measurement and thus is often used in conjunction with an x-ray method. The use of anatomical imaging in radiotherapy allows treatment uncertainties to be determined. These include errors between the mean position at treatment and that at planning (the systematic error) and the day-to-day variation in treatment set-up (the random error). Positional variations may also be categorized in terms of inter- and intra-fraction errors. Various empirical treatment margin formulae and intervention approaches exist to determine the optimum strategies for treatment in the presence of these known errors. Other methods exist to try to minimize error margins drastically including the currently available breath-hold techniques and the tracking methods which are largely in development. This paper will review anatomical imaging techniques in radiotherapy and how they are used to boost the therapeutic benefit of the treatment.

  9. Diverse Landmark Sampling from Determinantal Point Processes for Scalable Manifold Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Wachinger, Christian; Golland, Polina

    2015-01-01

    High computational costs of manifold learning prohibit its application for large point sets. A common strategy to overcome this problem is to perform dimensionality reduction on selected landmarks and to successively embed the entire dataset with the Nystr\\"om method. The two main challenges that arise are: (i) the landmarks selected in non-Euclidean geometries must result in a low reconstruction error, (ii) the graph constructed from sparsely sampled landmarks must approxim...

  10. Orbit and attitude state recoveries from Landmark data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, A. F.; Velez, C. E.; Goad, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    The navigation of earth-referenced satellites with imaging data rather than, or in addition to, conventional radio tracking and attitude sensor telemetry is gaining increased popularity. Driving forces include a trend towards spacecraft autonomy, a need for timely and highly accurate gridding information, and a growing awareness of the presence of high quality navigation information contained in such data. This paper describes the techniques used and the results obtained in an experiment to determine the orbit and attitude state of the geosynchronous SMS-1 spacecraft from Landmark observations extracted from earth images generated by the on-board Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer (VISSR).

  11. Angiosomes of the brachial plexus: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Sidney M; Taylor, G Ian; Baudet, Jacques; Guérin, Jean; Casoli, Vincent; Pan, Wei-Ren; Houseman, Nicholas D

    2003-12-01

    This anatomical study analyzed the neurovascular relationships of the brachial plexus. Ten fresh cadaveric brachial plexuses were examined after injection of the arterial system. The vascular anatomical features of the brachial plexus were documented with microdissection after lead oxide/gelatin injection. The specimens were analyzed by using radiography (including digital subtraction techniques) and light-microscopic, macroscopic, and digital photography. Four angiosomes, based on the subclavian, axillary, vertebral, and dorsal scapular arteries, were observed. As noted in previous angiosome studies, connections between angiosome territories lay within tissues, in this case, nerve trunks. Nutrient vessels penetrated nerve trunks at points of branching within the brachial plexus, with a Y-shaped mode of division on entry. The vascular supply was markedly rich, often with true anastomotic connections occurring within the nerves. There was much variation in supply, depending on the vascular anatomical features of the subclavian artery. PMID:14663223

  12. Maximized Posteriori Attributes Selection from Facial Salient Landmarks for Face Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Phalguni; Sing, Jamuna Kanta; Tistarelli, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a robust and dynamic face recognition technique based on the extraction and matching of devised probabilistic graphs drawn on SIFT features related to independent face areas. The face matching strategy is based on matching individual salient facial graph characterized by SIFT features as connected to facial landmarks such as the eyes and the mouth. In order to reduce the face matching errors, the Dempster-Shafer decision theory is applied to fuse the individual matching scores obtained from each pair of salient facial features. The proposed algorithm is evaluated with the ORL and the IITK face databases. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of the proposed face recognition technique also in case of partially occluded faces.

  13. Anatomic reference for computed tomography of paranasal sinuses and their communication in the Egyptian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsafy, M A M; El-Gendy, S A A; El Sharaby, A A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to present an anatomic reference for computed tomography (CT) for the paranasal sinuses of adult buffalo fit the use of anatomists, radiologists, clinicians and veterinary students. CT images with the most closely corresponding cross sections of the head were selected and studied serially in a rostral to caudal progression from the level of the interdental space to the level of the nuchal line. The anatomical features were compared with the dissected heads and skulls. The paranasal sinuses of buffalo comprise dorsal conchal, middle conchal, maxillary, frontal, palatine, sphenoidal (inconstant, small and shallow when present), lacrimal and ethmoidal that were identified and labelled according to the premolar and molar teeth as landmarks. The topographic description of all the compartments, diverticula, septa and communication of the paranasal sinuses in buffalo has been presented. The relationship between the various air cavities and paranasal sinuses was easily visualized. PMID:22994483

  14. Based On Edge Extraction of ASM Automatic Landmark Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Liguo; Li Xiaolin; Li Huijuan

    2012-01-01

    In the Active Shape Model, the most time consuming and scientifically unsatisfactory part of building shape models is the labeling of the training images. Manually placing hundreds (in 2D) of points on every image is both tedious and error prone. To reduce the burden, the combination of the image edge information and the traditional manual calibration methods have been developed. This method improves the calibration accuracy, and obtains more accurate statistical shape model and local texture...

  15. Anatomical studies of some medicinal plants of family polygonaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatomical studies of the 6 different species of family Polygonaceae viz., Rumex hastatus D. Don, Rumex dentatus Linn, Rumex nepalensis Spreng, Rheum australe D. Don, Polygonum plebejum R. Br and Persicaria maculosa S.F. Gay are presented. The study is based on the presence and absence of epidermis, parenchyma, collenchyma, sclerenchyma, endodermis, pericycle, xylem, phloem, pith, mesophyll cells and stone cells. (author)

  16. Learned predictiveness training modulates biases towards using boundary or landmark cues during navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew G; Smith, Alastair D; Haselgrove, Mark

    2015-06-01

    A number of navigational theories state that learning about landmark information should not interfere with learning about shape information provided by the boundary walls of an environment. A common test of such theories has been to assess whether landmark information will overshadow, or restrict, learning about shape information. Whilst a number of studies have shown that landmarks are not able to overshadow learning about shape information, some have shown that landmarks can, in fact, overshadow learning about shape information. Given the continued importance of theories that grant the shape information that is provided by the boundary of an environment a special status during learning, the experiments presented here were designed to assess whether the relative salience of shape and landmark information could account for the discrepant results of overshadowing studies. In Experiment 1, participants were first trained that either the landmarks within an arena (landmark-relevant), or the shape information provided by the boundary walls of an arena (shape-relevant), were relevant to finding a hidden goal. In a subsequent stage, when novel landmark and shape information were made relevant to finding the hidden goal, landmarks dominated behaviour for those given landmark-relevant training, whereas shape information dominated behaviour for those given shape-relevant training. Experiment 2, which was conducted without prior relevance training, revealed that the landmark cues, unconditionally, dominated behaviour in our task. The results of the present experiments, and the conflicting results from previous overshadowing experiments, are explained in terms of associative models that incorporate an attention variant. PMID:25409751

  17. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography; Evaluation d'une methode de restitution de contraste basee sur le guidage anatomique de la reconstruction des images cerebrales en tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, F

    2007-04-15

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  18. An Evaluation of Cellular Neural Networks for the Automatic Identification of Cephalometric Landmarks on Digital Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Leonardi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several efforts have been made to completely automate cephalometric analysis by automatic landmark search. However, accuracy obtained was worse than manual identification in every study. The analogue-to-digital conversion of X-ray has been claimed to be the main problem. Therefore the aim of this investigation was to evaluate the accuracy of the Cellular Neural Networks approach for automatic location of cephalometric landmarks on softcopy of direct digital cephalometric X-rays. Forty-one, direct-digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained by a Siemens Orthophos DS Ceph and were used in this study and 10 landmarks (N, A Point, Ba, Po, Pt, B Point, Pg, PM, UIE, LIE were the object of automatic landmark identification. The mean errors and standard deviations from the best estimate of cephalometric points were calculated for each landmark. Differences in the mean errors of automatic and manual landmarking were compared with a 1-way analysis of variance. The analyses indicated that the differences were very small, and they were found at most within 0.59?mm. Furthermore, only few of these differences were statistically significant, but differences were so small to be in most instances clinically meaningless. Therefore the use of X-ray files with respect to scanned X-ray improved landmark accuracy of automatic detection. Investigations on softcopy of digital cephalometric X-rays, to search more landmarks in order to enable a complete automatic cephalometric analysis, are strongly encouraged.

  19. Marking time: selective use of temporal landmarks as barriers between current and future selves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetz, Johanna; Wilson, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Temporal landmarks such as birthdays and significant calendar dates structure our perception of time. People might highlight temporal landmarks spontaneously in an effort to regulate connections between temporal selves. Five studies demonstrated that landmarks are used spontaneously to induce psychological separation from undesirable temporal selves. Participants were more likely to think of events that fell in between the current and the future self if an imagined future self was negative than if it was positive (Studies 1a, 1b, and 2). Furthermore, when a self-enhancement mindset was activated, participants were more likely to call to mind intervening temporal landmarks to protect themselves from a negative future self than when this mindset was not activated (Study 3). Finally, when psychological separations between the current self and a negative future self were introduced through alternate means, participants no longer selectively used landmarks to separate themselves from this future self (Study 4). PMID:23969622

  20. An anatomical and functional topography of human auditory cortical areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EliaFormisano

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI throughout the last decades have enabled the detailed anatomical and functional inspection of the human brain non-invasively, to date there is no consensus regarding the precise subdivision and topography of the areas forming the human auditory cortex. Here, we propose a topography of the human auditory areas based on insights on the anatomical and functional properties of human auditory areas as revealed by studies of cyto- and myelo-architecture and fMRI investigations at ultra-high magnetic field (7 Tesla. Importantly, we illustrate that - whereas a group-based approach to analyze functional (tonotopic maps is appropriate to highlight the main tonotopic axis - the examination of tonotopic maps at single subject level is required to detail the topography of primary and non-primary areas that may be more variable across subjects. Furthermore, we show that considering multiple maps indicative of anatomical (i.e. myelination as well as of functional properties (e.g. broadness of frequency tuning is helpful in identifying auditory cortical areas in individual human brains. We propose and discuss a topography of areas that is consistent with old and recent anatomical post mortem characterizations of the human auditory cortex and that may serve as a working model for neuroscience studies of auditory functions.

  1. Comparison of technical and anatomical noise in digital thorax X-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Former studies by Hoeschen and Buhr indicated a higher total noise in a thorax image than expected from technical noise, i.e. quantum and detector noise. This difference results from the overlay of many small anatomical structures along the X-ray beam, which leads to a noise-like appearance without distinguishable structures in the projected image. A method is proposed to quantitatively determine this 'anatomical noise' component, which is not to be confused with the anatomical background (e.g. ribs). This specific anatomical noise pattern in a radiograph changes completely when the imaging geometry changes because different small anatomical structures contribute to the projected image. Therefore, two images are taken using slightly different exposure geometry, and a correlation analysis based on wavelet transforms allows to determining the uncorrelated noise components. Since the technical noise also differs from image to image, which makes it difficult to separate the anatomical noise, images of a lung phantom were produced on a low-sensitive industrial X-ray film using high-exposure levels. From these results, the anatomical noise level in real clinical thorax radiographs using realistic exposure levels is predicted using the general dose dependence described in the paper text and compared with the quantum and detector noise level of an indirect flat-panel detector system. For consistency testing, the same lung phantom was imaged with the same digital flat-panel deimaged with the same digital flat-panel detector and the total image noise including anatomical noise is determined. The results show that the relative portion of anatomical noise may exceed the technical noise level. Anatomical noise is an important contributor to the total image noise and, therefore, impedes the recognition of anatomical structures. (authors)

  2. Use of deformed intensity distributions for on-line modification of image-guided IMRT to account for interfractional anatomic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent imaging studies have demonstrated that there can be significant changes in anatomy from day to day and over the course of radiotherapy as a result of daily positioning uncertainties and physiologic and clinical factors. There are a number of strategies to minimize such changes, reduce their impact, or correct for them. Measures to date have included improved immobilization of external and internal anatomy or adjustment of positions based on portal or ultrasound images. Perhaps the most accurate way is to use CT image-guided radiotherapy, for which the possibilities range from simple correction of setup based on daily CT images to on-line near real-time intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) replanning. In addition, there are numerous intermediate possibilities. In this paper, we report the development of one such intermediate method that takes into account anatomic changes by deforming the intensity distributions of each beam based on deformations of anatomy as seen in the beam's-eye-view. Methods and materials: The intensity distribution deformations are computed based on anatomy deformations discerned from the changes in the current image relative to a reference image (e.g., the pretreatment CT scan). First, a reference IMRT plan is generated based on the reference CT image. A new CT image is acquired using an in-room CT for every fraction. The anatomic structure contours are obtained for the new image. (For this article, these contours were manuall this article, these contours were manually drawn. When image guided IMRT methods are implemented, anatomic structure contours on subsequent images will likely be obtained with automatic or semiautomatic means. This could be achieved by, for example, first deforming the original CT image to match today's image, and then using the same deformation transformation to map original contours to today's image.) The reference intensity distributions for each beam are then deformed so that the projected geometric relationship within the beam's-eye-view between the anatomy (both target and normal tissues) extracted from the reference image and the reference intensity distribution is the same as (or as close as possible to) the corresponding relationship between anatomy derived from today's image and the newly deformed intensity distributions. To verify whether the dose distributions calculated using the deformed intensity distributions are acceptable for treatment as compared to the original intensity distributions, the deformed intensities are transformed into leaf sequences, which are then used to compute intensity and dose distributions expected to be delivered. The corresponding dose-volume histograms and dose-volume and dose-response indices are also computed. These data are compared with the corresponding data derived (a) from the original treatment plan applied to the original image, (b) from the original treatment plan applied to today's image, and (c) from a new full-fledged IMRT plan designed based on today's image. Results: Depending on the degree of anatomic changes, the use of an IMRT plan designed based on the original planning CT for the treatment of the current fraction could lead to significant differences compared to the intended dose distributions. CT-guided setup compared to the setup based on skin marks or bony landmarks may improve dose distributions somewhat. Replanning IMRT based on the current fraction's image yields the best physically deliverable plan (the 'gold standard'). For the prostate and head-and-neck examples studied as proof of principle, the results of deforming intensities within each beam based on the anatomy seen in the beam's-eye-view are a good approximation of full-fledged replanning compared with other alternatives. Conclusions: Our preliminary results encourage us to believe that deforming intensities taking into account deformation in the anatomy may be a rapid way to produce new treatment plans on-line in near real-time based on daily CT images. The methods we have developed need to be applied to a group of patients for b

  3. Germ band retraction as a landmark in glucose metabolism during Aedes aegypti embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logullo Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mosquito A. aegypti is vector of dengue and other viruses. New methods of vector control are needed and can be achieved by a better understanding of the life cycle of this insect. Embryogenesis is a part of A. aegypty life cycle that is poorly understood. In insects in general and in mosquitoes in particular energetic metabolism is well studied during oogenesis, when the oocyte exhibits fast growth, accumulating carbohydrates, lipids and proteins that will meet the regulatory and metabolic needs of the developing embryo. On the other hand, events related with energetic metabolism during A. aegypti embryogenesis are unknown. Results Glucose metabolism was investigated throughout Aedes aegypti (Diptera embryonic development. Both cellular blastoderm formation (CBf, 5 h after egg laying - HAE and germ band retraction (GBr, 24 HAE may be considered landmarks regarding glucose 6-phosphate (G6P destination. We observed high levels of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH activity at the very beginning of embryogenesis, which nevertheless decreased up to 5 HAE. This activity is correlated with the need for nucleotide precursors generated by the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, of which G6PDH is the key enzyme. We suggest the synchronism of egg metabolism with carbohydrate distribution based on the decreasing levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK activity and on the elevation observed in protein content up to 24 HAE. Concomitantly, increasing levels of hexokinase (HK and pyruvate kinase (PK activity were observed, and PEPCK reached a peak around 48 HAE. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3 activity was also monitored and shown to be inversely correlated with glycogen distribution during embryogenesis. Conclusions The results herein support the hypothesis that glucose metabolic fate changes according to developmental embryonic stages. Germ band retraction is a moment that was characterized as a landmark in glucose metabolism during Aedes aegypti embryogenesis. Furthermore, the results also suggest a role for GSK3 in glycogen balance/distribution during morphological modifications.

  4. Early Effects of Combretastatin A4 Phosphate Assessed by Anatomic and Carbogen-Based Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Rat Bladder Tumors Implanted in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole D. Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P causes rapid disruption of the tumor vasculature and is currently being evaluated for antivascular therapy. We describe the initial results obtained with a noninvasive multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI approach to assess the early effects of CA4P on rat bladder tumors implanted on nude mice. MRI (4.7 T comprised a fast spin-echo sequence for growth curve assessment; a multislice multiecho sequence for T2 measurement before, 15 minutes after, 24 hours after CA4P (100 mg/kg; and a fast T2W* gradient-echo sequence to assess MR signal modification under carbogen breathing before, 35 minutes after, 24 hours after CA4P. The tumor fraction with increased T2W* signal intensity under carbogen (T+ was used to quantify CA4P effect on functional vasculature. CA4P slowed tumor growth over 24 hours and accelerated necrosis development. T+ decrease was observed already at 35 minutes post-CA4P. Early T2 increase was observed in regions becoming necrotic at 24 hours post-CA4P, as confirmed by high T2 and histology. These regions exhibited, under carbogen, a switch from T2W* signal increase before CA4P to a decrease postCA4P. The combination of carbogen-based functional MRI and T2 measurement may be useful for the early follow-up of antivascular therapy without the administration of contrast agents.

  5. Frontal sinus depth at four landmarks in breeds of dog typically affected by sinonasal aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, R; McCarroll, D; Baker, M; Darby, P; McConnell, F; Cripps, P

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the frontal sinuses in dogs with aspergillosis and of breeds typically affected by this condition were deeper at a more caudal location. CT scans of the head performed at the Small Animal Teaching Hospital, University of Liverpool, between April 2007 and March 2009 for dogs diagnosed with aspergillosis (group 1) and unaffected dogs of similar breeds (group 2) were selected for study. Sinus depth was measured at four standardised locations from reconstructed images of these CT scans. Data were compared for differences in sinus depth between groups and between landmarks. No significant difference was found between measurements within individual dogs or for each of the various landmarks between groups. Difference in depth of the sinuses between landmarks was significant (P<0.001). Sinus depth was significantly greater at the more caudal landmarks and was shallowest at the previously recommended landmark for sinus entry. In 54 per cent of dogs, the frontal sinus depth measured less than or equal to 2 cm at one or more of the landmarks. Sinus entry at the deepest point will reduce the risk of accidentally damaging underlying structures. This may be approximately 1 cm caudal, in breeds of dog that typically develop aspergillosis, to a previously suggested landmark. PMID:22016511

  6. A method based on Monte Carlo simulations and voxelized anatomical atlases to evaluate and correct uncertainties on radiotracer accumulation quantitation in beta microprobe studies in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ?-microprobe is a simple and versatile technique complementary to small animal positron emission tomography (PET). It relies on local measurements of the concentration of positron-labeled molecules. So far, it has been successfully used in anesthetized rats for pharmacokinetics experiments and for the study of brain energetic metabolism. However, the ability of the technique to provide accurate quantitative measurements using 18F, 11C and 15O tracers is likely to suffer from the contribution of 511 keV gamma rays background to the signal and from the contribution of positrons from brain loci surrounding the locus of interest. The aim of the present paper is to provide a method of evaluating several parameters, which are supposed to affect the quantification of recordings performed in vivo with this methodology. We have developed realistic voxelized phantoms of the rat whole body and brain, and used them as input geometries for Monte Carlo simulations of previous ?-microprobe reports. In the context of realistic experiments (binding of 11C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; local glucose metabolic rate measurement with 18F-FDG and H2O15 blood flow measurements in the somatosensory cortex), we have calculated the detection efficiencies and corresponding contribution of 511 keV gammas from peripheral organs accumulation. We confirmed that the 511 keV gammas backgroundirmed that the 511 keV gammas background does not impair quantification. To evaluate the contribution of positrons from adjacent structures, we have developed ?-Assistant, a program based on a rat brain voxelized atlas and matrices of local detection efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several probe geometries. This program was used to calculate the 'apparent sensitivity' of the probe for each brain structure included in the detection volume. For a given localization of a probe within the brain, this allows us to quantify the different sources of beta signal. Finally, since stereotaxic accuracy is crucial for quantification in most microprobe studies, the influence of stereotaxic positioning error was studied for several realistic experiments in favorable and unfavorable experimental situations (binding of 11C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; binding of 18F-MPPF to 5HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus)

  7. Bases anatômicas para utilização do músculo fibular terceiro em retalhos miocutâneos / Anatomical basis for the use of the fibularis tertius muscle in myocutaneous flaps

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de, Gusmão; Jacqueline Silva Brito, Lima; Felipe Henning Gaia, Duarte; Anderson Gonçalves de Farias, Souto; Bruno de Melo Veloso, Couto.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A utilização de retalhos miocutâneos é cada dia mais frequente nas cirurgias plásticas reconstrutoras de membros inferiores, tornando-se essencial a utilização de músculos que denotem menor prejuízo tanto funcional como estético. Foram estudados a frequência e os aspectos anatômicos do m [...] úsculo fibular terceiro, com o intuito de avaliar, sob esses aspectos, a possibilidade de seu uso nesses procedimentos. MÉTODO: Foram dissecados 64 membros inferiores de cadáveres fixados e verificadas as seguintes características: inserção proximal, inserção distal, sintopia, morfologia e morfometria. RESULTADOS: A presença do músculo foi constatada em 96,9% dos casos, sendo analisados os aspectos supracitados. A inserção proximal mais frequente (96,8%) ocorreu na membrana interóssea, na margem anterior da fíbula, e no septo intermuscular anterior. A inserção distal mais comum (77,4%) foi nas faces dorsal e lateral do 5º metatarsiano. O valor médio do comprimento e da largura do ventre muscular foi, respectivamente, de 17,89 cm e 1,95 cm, enquanto a média do comprimento do tendão distal livre de fibras musculares foi de 1,2 cm e a largura média do tendão distal, de 0,45 cm. CONCLUSÕES: O músculo fibular terceiro é frequente, de morfologia distinta, que, sob aspectos morfométricos, se constitui em opção viável para um estudo mais específico de seu uso no reparo de defeitos no segmento distal do membro inferior. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Myocutaneous flaps have been increasingly used in surgical reconstruction of the lower limbs, requiring the use of muscles that result in less functional and esthetic damage as flaps. This study aimed to evaluate the use of the fibularis tertius muscle (in terms of frequency and anatomy) [...] as flaps in this procedure. METHODS: Sixty-four lower limbs from preserved cadavers were dissected and evaluated based on the following parameters: proximal insertion, distal insertion, syntopy, morphology, and morphometry. RESULTS: The fibularis tertius muscle was detected in 96.9% of the study cases. Most proximal insertions (96.8%) were found at the interosseous membrane, anterior border of the fibula, and anterior intermuscular septum. Most distal insertions (77.4%) were found at the lateral and dorsal sides of the 5th metatarsal. Mean value of muscle belly length was 17.89 cm and width was 1.95 cm. The mean length of the distal tendon with no muscle fibers was 1.2 cm, and the mean width was 0.45 cm. CONCLUSIONS: The fibularis tertius muscle is frequent and has a distinct morphology, making it a viable option for the repair of lower limb (distal segment) defects.

  8. Precise anatomical resection of the ventral part of Segment VIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Canhong; Liu, Zhe; Dong, Jiahong; Sano, Keiji; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Anatomical resection of the ventral part of Segment VIII (S8vent) is demanding and there are no accurate methods to identify the demarcation line inside the liver. The current authors have proposed a method to solve the problem. PRESENTATION OF CASE The tumor was located in the S8vent and was 4 cm in size. One tributary of the middle hepatic vein (MHV), designated V8i, was running between S8vent and the dorsal part of Segment VIII (S8dor). Another tributary of the MHV, designated V8-5i, was running between S8vent and the ventral part of S5 (S5vent). About 5 ml of indigo carmine dye was injected into the proximal part of P8vent. After the small tributary of V8-5i was exposed, it was followed all the way to the main trunk of the MHV. The portal pedicle of S8vent was then ligated and divided. Next, the V8i was gradually exposed from the distal MHV to its trunk. DISCUSSION A recent study showed that the subsegmental border visualized between the ventral and dorsal region always coincided with the plane of V8i, so the subsegmental plane can be divided along with V8i by preserving the very small tributaries near the liver surface and following them to determine where they meet as they run into V8i. Also, the landmark vein of V8-5i in the transverse S8–S5 intersegmental plane was determined for the first time. CONCLUSION Proposed here is a more accurate method of dividing the liver parenchyma along the intersegmental and intersubsegmental demarcation. PMID:25460437

  9. A MULTICORE BASED PARALLEL IMAGE REGISTRATION METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Lin; Gong, Leiguang; Zhang, Hong; John L Nosher; David J. Foran

    2009-01-01

    Image registration is a crucial step for many image-assisted clinical applications such as surgery planning and treatment evaluation. In this paper we proposed a landmark based nonlinear image registration algorithm for matching 2D image pairs. The algorithm was shown to be effective and robust under conditions of large deformations. In landmark based registration, the most important step is establishing the correspondence among the selected landmark points. This usually requires an extensive...

  10. A review of the tragal pointer: anatomy and its importance as a landmark in surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleman, M A; Wartmann, C T; Hage, R; Matusz, P; Shoja, M M; Tubbs, R S; Loukas, M

    2012-05-01

    The tragal pointer has long been used as a surgical landmark for the identification of the facial nerve trunk and the maxillary artery in such procedures as parotidectomy, internal fixation of subcondylar and condylar fractures, mandibular osteotomy, temporomandibular joint arthroplasty, and percutaneous blocks of branches of the trigeminal nerve and pterygopalatine ganglion. Aside from its use as an external landmark, it has also been implicated as a contributor to crease formation in the presence of peripheral arterial disease. This article will review the available literature on the tragal pointer's use as an external landmark. PMID:22648581

  11. A high-resolution anatomical framework of the neonatal mouse brain for managing gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JylBoline

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide a high-resolution atlas and use it as an anatomical framework to localize the gene expression data for mouse brain on postnatal day 0 (P0. A color Nissl-stained volume with a resolution of 13.3×50×13.3 µm3 was constructed and co-registered to a standard anatomical space defined by an averaged geometry of C57BL/6J P0 mouse brains. A 145 anatomical structures were delineated based on the histological images. Anatomical relationships of delineated structures were established based on the hierarchical relations defined in the atlas of adult mouse brain (MacKenzie-Graham et al., 2004 so the P0 atlas can be related to the database associated with the adult atlas. The co-registered multimodal atlas as well as the original anatomical delineations is available for download at http://www.loni.ucla.edu/Atlases/. The region-specific anatomical framework based on the neonatal atlas allows for the analysis of gene activity within a high-resolution anatomical space at an early developmental stage. We demonstrated the potential application of this framework by incorporating gene expression data generated using in situ hybridization to the atlas space. By normalizing the gene expression patterns revealed by different images, experimental results from separate studies can be compared and summarized in an anatomical context. Co-displaying multiple registered datasets in the atlas space allows for 3D reconstruction of the co-expression patterns of the different genes in the atlas space, hence providing better insight into the relationship between the differentiated distribution pattern of gene products and specific anatomical systems.

  12. Generalized metrics induced anatomical prior for MAP PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information theoretic metrics, including mutual information (MI) and joint entropy (JE), have been investigated as priors to incorporate anatomical information in ill-posed positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. These metrics are generally based on the Shannon entropy. Meanwhile, in this paper, we proposed a generalized metrics induced anatomical prior for maximum a posteriori (MAP) PET reconstruction based on the generalized Shannon entropy metrics or Tsallis entropy. For the presented prior computation, a non-parametric method was used to estimate the joint probability density of the PET and MR image. Furthermore, we also developed an one-step-advance (OSA) MAP algorithm for PET image reconstruction with the presented prior regularization. Simulation results show that the presented novel prior has significantly improved the reconstructed PET image quality. (orig.)

  13. Analysis of anatomic variability in children with low mathematical skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaoying; Fuchs, Lynn; Davis, Nikki; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2008-03-01

    Mathematical difficulty affects approximately 5-9% of the population. Studies on individuals with dyscalculia, a neurologically based math disorder, provide important insight into the neural correlates of mathematical ability. For example, cognitive theories, neuropsychological studies, and functional neuroimaging studies in individuals with dyscalculia suggest that the bilateral parietal lobes and intraparietal sulcus are central to mathematical performance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate morphological differences in a group of third grade children with poor math skills. We compare population averages of children with low math skill (MD) to gender and age matched controls with average math ability. Anatomical data were gathered with high resolution MRI and four different population averaging methods were used to study the effect of the normalization technique on the results. Statistical results based on the deformation fields between the two groups show anatomical differences in the bilateral parietal lobes, right frontal lobe, and left occipital/parietal lobe.

  14. [The anatomical revolution and the transition of anatomical conception in late imperial china].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihn, Kyu Hwan

    2012-04-30

    This paper aimed to examine the anatomical revolution from Yilingaicuo (Correcting the Errors of Medicine) and Quantixinlun(Outline of Anatomy and Physiology) in late imperial China. As the cephalocentrism which the brain superintend human operation of the mind was diffused in China since 16th century, the cephalocentrism and the cardiocentrism had competed for the hegemony of anatomical conception. Because of the advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun, the cephalocentrism became the main stream in the anatomical conception. The supporters of the Wang Yangming's Xinxue(the Learning of Heart and Mind) argued that the heart was the central organ of perception, sensitivity, and morality of the human body in medicine since 16th century. Even reformist and revolutionary intellectuals like Tan sitong and Mao zedong who had supported the Wang Yangming's Xinxue embraced the cephalocentrism in the late 19th century and the early 20th century. May Fourth intellectuals had not obsessed metaphysical interpretation of human body any more in the New Culture Movement in 1910s. They regarded human body as the object of research and writing. The anatomy was transformed into the instrumental knowledge for mutilation of the body. Yilingaicuo challenged the traditional conception of body, and Chinese intellectuals drew interest in the anatomy knowledge based on real mutilation. Quantixinlun based on Western medicine fueled a controversy about anatomy. Though new knowledge of anatomy was criticized by traditional Chinese medical doctors from the usefulness and morality of anatomy, nobody disavowed new knowledge of anatomy from the institutionalization of Western medicine in medical school. The internal development of cephalocentrism and positivism had influence on anatomy in China since 16th century. The advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun provided the milestone of new anatomy, though both sides represented traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine respectively. They contributed to the development of new knowledge of anatomy, getting over the metaphysical system of knowledge. Based on the internal development of anatomy, Chinese anatomy was half century late than Japanese anatomy founded on Dutch anatomy. PMID:22739627

  15. Orbitozygomatic Approach: A Neurosurgical Approach Applied to the Anatomic Study of the Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available From an anatomical point of view, the orbit is usually approached by resecting its roof. In this paper, the authors introduced minor modifications to a widely used neurosurgical technique in order to study the anatomy of the orbit: that is, the orbitozygomatic approach. The orbitozygomatic approach was performed in 3 half-heads of adult formalin-fixed cadavers. Three skulls were used to identify anatomical landmarks. The approach must be performed on a half-head without calvaria. An incision to reaching the bone was made on the skin of the temporal region and a combined flap of skin and temporalis muscle was reclined. Finally, 3 osteotomies were performed with a saw: 1 at the level of the root of the zygoma and the temporal squama, 2 over the orbital rim, medial to the supraorbitalis foramen and 3 at the zygomatic-frontal junction. In this way, the superior and lateral walls of the orbit were exposed. The adaptation of the orbitozygomatic approach allowed a wide exposure of the orbit and constituted an example of cooperation between clinical and basic disciplines.

  16. A time-saving and facilitating approach for segmentation of anatomically defined cortical regions: MRI volumetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronenschild, Ed H B M; Burgmans, Saartje; Smeets, Floortje; Vuurman, Eric F P M; Uylings, Harry B M; Jolles, Jelle

    2010-03-30

    In this study, we present an accurate, reliable, robust, and time-efficient technique for a semi-automatic segmentation of neuroanatomically defined cortical structures in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans. It involves manual drawing of the border of a region of interest (ROI), supported by three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques (rendering), and a subsequent automatic tracing of the gray matter voxels inside the ROI by means of an automatic tissue classifier. The approach has been evaluated on a set of MRI scans of 75 participants selected from the Maastricht Aging Study (MAAS) and applied to cortical brain structures for both the left and right hemispheres, viz., the inferior prefrontal cortex (PFC); the orbital PFC; the dorsolateral PFC; the anterior cingulate cortex; and the posterior cingulate cortex. The use of a 3D surface-rendered brain can be rotated in any direction was invaluable in identifying anatomical landmarks on the basis of gyral and sulcal topography. This resulted in a high accuracy (anatomical correctness) and reliability: the intra-rater intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was between 0.96 and 0.99. Furthermore, the obtained time savings were substantial, i.e., up to a factor of 7.5 compared with fully manual segmentations. PMID:20153147

  17. 77 FR 44670 - Information Collection Activities: National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ...regarding the condition of designated landmarks. A questionnaire will be designed and used to collect information...condition data. Regional NPS staff contributed to the design of the questionnaire that is the subject of this request. II....

  18. Morphological and anatomical studies of Cyani herba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Chiru

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and anatomical investigation were carried out on stem, leaves, flowers and bracts of the species Centaurea cyanusL. The diagnostic parameters of vegetal product Cyani herbawere defined.

  19. Learning Compact Visual Descriptors for Low Bit Rate Mobile Landmark Search

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Ling-yu Peking University; Chen, Jie Peking University; Ji, Rongrong Peking University; Huang, Tiejun Peking University; Gao, Wen Peking University

    2013-01-01

    Coming with the ever growing computational power of mobile devices, mobile visual search have undergone an evolution in techniques and applications. A significant trend is low bit rate visual search, where compact visual descriptors are extracted directly over a mobile and delivered as queries rather than raw images to reduce the query transmission latency. In this article, we introduce our work on low bit rate mobile landmark search, in which a compact yet discriminative landmark image descr...

  20. Introducing International Journal of Anatomical Variations

    OpenAIRE

    Tunali S

    2008-01-01

    Welcome to International Journal of Anatomical Variations (IJAV) - an annual journal of anatomical variations and clinical anatomy case reports. After having a notable experience for eight years in NEUROANATOMY, we are pleased to introduce you IJAV. We are eventually announcing our new journal after three years of feasibility and background study period. We hope that IJAV will fill in the gap in anatomy journals’ bunch. IJAV is an annual, open access journal having electronic version only. ...

  1. UpdatIng Course on Anatomic Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Chp, Servic?o Anatomia Patolo?gica Do

    2012-01-01

    Course Description: We are pleased to announce the 1st edition of our course entitled “Curso de Actualização em Anatomia Patológica Centro Hospitalar do Porto 2012”. The course is organized by Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Porto [Portugal] and shall provide the highest level of subspecialty instruction by a distinguished faculty recognized in the fields of Anatomic Pathology. The educational event shall include 3 days of anatomic pathology theoretical and practical sessio...

  2. Learning of landmark stability and instability by hippocampal place cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, K J

    1998-01-01

    Place cells in the rat hippocampus fire whenever the animal is in a particular location. In a symmetrical environment, their receptive fields (place fields) are oriented by visual cues, and if these are unavailable they are oriented by movement-generated (idiothetic) cues. The present study tested the hypothesis that the cells would learn not to 'trust' a visual cue if the rat experienced it to be unstable (Knierim et al., 1995. Place cells, head direction cells and the learning of landmark stability. J. Neurosci. 15, 1648-1659). In an otherwise symmetrical environment, a visual cue was moved with respect to the idiothetic cues, either in sight or out-of-sight of the rat. When the visual cue was moved out-of-sight of the rat, place fields were initially oriented by this cue in preference to the idiothetic cues. However, if the cue was seen by the rat to be mobile, place fields ceased following the visual cue and became oriented by the idiothetic cues instead. If the cue was not seen to be mobile until the rat had had several days of experience in the environment, then the fields continued to be oriented by the (now visibly mobile) visual cue. It thus appears that the orienting influence of a visual cue on place fields can be either strengthened or weakened relative to the idiothetic cues, depending on the experience of the rat. PMID:9705005

  3. Reliability and reproducibility of three-dimensional cephalometric landmarks using CBCT: a systematic review

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Cinthia de Oliveira, LISBOA; Daniele, MASTERSON; Andréa Fonseca Jardim, MOTTA; Alexandre Trindade, MOTTA.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim of this study was to review the reliability and reproducibility of 3D-CBCT (cone beam computed tomography) cephalometric landmark identification. Methods : Electronic databases (Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science) were searched for papers published from 1998 to October 2014. Specifi [...] c strategies were developed for each database, with the guidance of a librarian. Two reviewers independently analyzed the titles and abstracts for inclusion. The articles that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for full-text reading, and the selected articles went through methodological quality evaluation. After the exclusion of repeated articles, the titles of the remaining ones were read and 1,328 of them were excluded. The abstracts of 173 articles were read, of which 43 were selected, read in full and submitted to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Fourteen articles or studies with reliable methodology and reproducibility remained. The data were collected, organized into figures and analyzed for determination of the reliability and reproducibility of the three-dimensional cephalometric landmarks. Results : Overall, the landmarks on the median sagittal line and dental landmarks had the highest reliability, while the landmarks on the condyle, porion and the orbitale presented lower levels of reliability. Point S must be marked in the multiplanar views associated with visualization in 3D reconstruction. Further studies are necessary for evaluating soft tissue landmarks.

  4. Estimativas da composição anatômica da carcaça de frangos de corte com base no nível de proteína da ração e peso da carcaça / Estimation of the carcasses anatomical composition of broiler from diet quality and carcass weight

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    José Humberto Vilar da, Silva; Luís Fernando Teixeira, Albino; Adriana Helena do, Nascimento.

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de estimar as proporções dos cortes nobres da carcaça de frangos de corte pelo modelo linear. Foram utilizados 842 frangos machos da linhagem Avian Farms, de 22 a 42 dias de idade, distribuídos num delineamento inteiramente ao acaso em esquema fatorial [...] 3x4. Foram fornecidas rações formuladas à base de milho e farelo de soja para conter 2.900 kcal de EM e 15,43; 17,26; 19,60; e 22,60% de PB; 3.100 kcal de EM e 16,49; 18,45; 20,95; e 24,22% de PB; e 3300 kcal de EM e 17,55; 19,64; 22,30; e 25,78% de PB, totalizando doze tratamentos. Cada tratamento foi constituído por quatro repetições de 18 aves. Fortes correlações foram observadas entre o peso vivo aos 42 dias e o peso da carcaça (r = 0,958), o peso da carcaça e o peso de pernas (r = 0,991), peso de peito+osso+pele (r = 0,965) e peso de peito desossado (r = 0,950). A porcentagem de lipídio foi negativamente correlacionada com a porcentagem de umidade da carcaça (r = -0,880). A equação linear é recomendada para a predição dos componentes anatômicos da carcaça de frangos de corte. Abstract in english An experiment was carried out to estimate the relations between broiler carcass weight and thighs+drumsticks, breast+bone+skin, and breast meat by the linear model. Eight hundred and sixty and four male poultry of Arbor Acres strain, from 22 to 42 days of age, were assigned to a completely randomize [...] d design in 3x4factorial scheme. Corn and soybean meal based diets were prepared to contain 2900 kcal ME and 15.43; 17.26; 19.60; and 22.60% CP; 3,100 kcal ME and 16.49; 18.45; 20.95; and 24.22%CP; and 3300 kcal ME and 17.55; 19.64; 22.30; and 25.78% CP, resulting in twelve treatments. Each treatment was constituted of four replicates of 18 birds. High correlations were observed between live weight at 42 days old and carcass weight (r = 0.958), carcass weight and thighs+drumsticks (r = 0.991), breast+bone+skin (r = 0.965) and deboned breast meat weight (r = 0.950). The lipid percentage was negatively correlated to the moisture percentage (r = -0.880). The linear equation is recommended to estimate carcass anatomical components in broiler chickens.

  5. Validation of simple quantification methods for {sup 18}F FP CIT PET Using Automatic Delineation of volumes of interest based on statistical probabilistic anatomical mapping and isocontour margin setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Il; Im, Hyung Jun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Jae Sung; Eo, Jae Seon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Euishin E.; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    {sup 18}F FP CIT positron emission tomography (PET) is an effective imaging for dopamine transporters. In usual clinical practice, {sup 18}F FP CIT PET is analyzed visually or quantified using manual delineation of a volume of interest (VOI) fir the stratum. in this study, we suggested and validated two simple quantitative methods based on automatic VOI delineation using statistical probabilistic anatomical mapping (SPAM) and isocontour margin setting. Seventy five {sup 18}F FP CIT images acquired in routine clinical practice were used for this study. A study-specific image template was made and the subject images were normalized to the template. afterwards, uptakes in the striatal regions and cerebellum were quantified using probabilistic VOI based on SPAM. A quantitative parameter, Q{sup SPAM,} was calculated to simulate binding potential. additionally, the functional volume of each striatal region and its uptake were measured in automatically delineated VOI using isocontour margin setting. Uptake volume product(Q{sup UVP)} was calculated for each striatal region. Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPw}as calculated for each visual grading and the influence of cerebral atrophy on the measurements was tested. Image analyses were successful in all the cases. Both the Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPw}ere significantly different according to visual grading (0.001). The agreements of Q{sup UVPa}nd Q{sup SPAMw}ith visual grading were slight to fair for the caudate nucleus (K= 0.421 and 0.291, respectively) and good to prefect to the putamen (K=0.663 and 0.607, respectively). Also, Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPh}ad a significant correlation with each other (0.001). Cerebral atrophy made a significant difference in Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPo}f the caudate nuclei regions with decreased {sup 18}F FP CIT uptake. Simple quantitative measurements of Q{sup SPAMa}nd Q{sup UVPs}howed acceptable agreement with visual grad-ing. although Q{sup SPAMi}n some group may be influenced by cerebral atrophy, these simple methods are expected to be effective in the quantitative analysis of F FP CIT PET in usual clinical practice.

  6. Anatomic variants of the aortic arch and its collateral branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisc Grigorescu Sido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the study of 749 anatomic specimens, obtained from 366 male cadavers and 383 female cadavers, with ages between 56 and 89 years, dissected at the Department of Anatomy and Embriology, UMF „Iuliu Ha?ieganu” Cluj-Napoca bet-ween 1971 and 1998, the authors identified 132 anatomic variants of the aortic arches and its collateral branches (17,62 % and 617 (82,37% considered mophologically “normal” specimens. The embryological features and some data concerning the his-tory of research and scientific literature are reviewed; the results and interpretations of the articles’ authors are also added. The progress in imaging and cardiovascular surgery in the last 50-60 years evolved together with the permanent update and revision of anatomy, to which several completions were added.

  7. Marginal space learning for medical image analysis efficient detection and segmentation of anatomical structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yefeng

    2014-01-01

    Presents an award winning image analysis technology (Thomas Edison Patent Award, MICCAI Young Investigator Award) that achieves object detection and segmentation with state-of-the-art accuracy and efficiency Flexible, machine learning-based framework, applicable across multiple anatomical structures and imaging modalities Thirty five clinical applications on detecting and segmenting anatomical structures such as heart chambers and valves, blood vessels, liver, kidney, prostate, lymph nodes, and sub-cortical brain structures, in CT, MRI, X-Ray and Ultrasound.

  8. Indexing Anatomical Phrases in Neuro-Radiology Reports to the UMLS 2005AA

    OpenAIRE

    Bashyam, Vijayaraghavan; Taira, Ricky K.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes a methodology to index anatomical phrases to the 2005AA release of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). A phrase chunking tool based on Natural Language Processing (NLP) was developed to identify semantically coherent phrases within medical reports. Using this phrase chunker, a set of 2,551 unique anatomical phrases was extracted from brain radiology reports. These phrases were mapped to the 2005AA release of the UMLS using a vector space model. Pr...

  9. A hybrid biomechanical model-based image registration method for sliding objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lianghao; Hawkes, David; Barratt, Dean

    2014-03-01

    The sliding motion between two anatomic structures, such as lung against chest wall, liver against surrounding tissues, produces a discontinuous displacement field between their boundaries. Capturing the sliding motion is quite challenging for intensity-based image registration methods in which a smoothness condition has commonly been applied to ensure the deformation consistency of neighborhood voxels. Such a smoothness constraint contradicts motion physiology at the boundaries of these anatomic structures. Although various regularisation schemes have been developed to handle sliding motion under the framework of non-rigid intensity-based image registration, the recovered displacement field may still not be physically plausible. In this study, a new framework that incorporates a patient-specific biomechanical model with a non-rigid image registration scheme for motion estimation of sliding objects has been developed. The patient-specific model provides the motion estimation with an explicit simulation of sliding motion, while the subsequent non-rigid image registration compensates for smaller residuals of the deformation due to the inaccuracy of the physical model. The algorithm was tested against the results of the published literature using 4D CT data from 10 lung cancer patients. The target registration error (TRE) of 3000 landmarks with the proposed method (1.37+/-0.89 mm) was significantly lower than that with the popular B-spline based free form deformation (FFD) registration (4.5+/-3.9 mm), and was smaller than that using the B-spline based FFD registration with the sliding constraint (1.66+/-1.14 mm) or using the B-spline based FFD registration on segmented lungs (1.47+/-1.1 mm). A paired t-test showed that the improvement of registration performance with the proposed method was significant (p<0.01). The propose method also achieved the best registration performance on the landmarks near lung surfaces. Since biomechanical models captured most of the lung deformation, the final estimated deformation field was more physically plausible.

  10. Atlas-based segmentation for globus pallidus internus targeting on low-resolution MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Maria I; Makris, Nikos; Mainardi, Luca; Gale, John; van der Kouwe, Andre; Mareyam, Azma; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Wald, Lawrence L; Fischl, Bruce; Eskandar, Emad N; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report a method to automatically segment the internal part of globus pallidus (GPi) on the pre-operative low-resolution magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Herein we used an ultra-high resolution human brain dataset as electronic atlas of reference on which we segmented the GPi. First, we registered the ultra-high resolution dataset on the low-resolution dataset using a landmarks-based rigid registration. Then an affine and a non-rigid surface-based registration guided by the structures that surround the target was applied in order to propagate the labels of the GPi on the low-resolution un-segmented dataset and to accurately outline the target. The mapping of the atlas on the low-resolution MRI provided a highly accurate anatomical detail that can be useful for localizing the target. PMID:22255635

  11. PolyAlign: A Versatile LC-MS Data Alignment Tool for Landmark-Selected and -Automated Use

    OpenAIRE

    Heidi Vähämaa; Ville R. Koskinen; Waltteri Hosia; Robert Moulder; Nevalainen, Olli S.; Riitta Lahesmaa; Tero Aittokallio; Jussi Salmi

    2011-01-01

    We present a versatile user-friendly software tool, PolyAlign, for the alignment of multiple LC-MS signal maps with the option of manual landmark setting or automated alignment. One of the spectral images is selected as a reference map, and after manually setting the landmarks, the program warps the images using either polynomial or Hermite transformation. The software provides an option for automated landmark finding. The software includes a very fast zoom-in function synchronized between th...

  12. Visual motion-sensitive neurons in the bumblebee brain convey information about landmarks during a navigational task

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Egelhaaf

    2014-01-01

    Bees use visual memories to find the spatial location of previously learnt food sites. Characteristic learning flights help acquiring these memories at newly discovered foraging locations where landmarks - salient objects in the vicinity of the goal location - can play an important role in guiding the animal’s homing behavior. Although behavioral experiments have shown that bees can use a variety of visual cues to distinguish objects as landmarks, the question of how landmark features are e...

  13. Visual landmark information gains control of the head direction signal at the lateral mammillary nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Ryan M; Peck, James R; Taube, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-28

    The neural representation of directional heading is conveyed by head direction (HD) cells located in an ascending circuit that includes projections from the lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) to the anterodorsal thalamus (ADN) to the postsubiculum (PoS). The PoS provides return projections to LMN and ADN and is responsible for the landmark control of HD cells in ADN. However, the functional role of the PoS projection to LMN has not been tested. The present study recorded HD cells from LMN after bilateral PoS lesions to determine whether the PoS provides landmark control to LMN HD cells. After the lesion and implantation of electrodes, HD cell activity was recorded while rats navigated within a cylindrical arena containing a single visual landmark or while they navigated between familiar and novel arenas of a dual-chamber apparatus. PoS lesions disrupted the landmark control of HD cells and also disrupted the stability of the preferred firing direction of the cells in darkness. Furthermore, PoS lesions impaired the stable HD cell representation maintained by path integration mechanisms when the rat walked between familiar and novel arenas. These results suggest that visual information first gains control of the HD cell signal in the LMN, presumably via the direct PoS ? LMN projection. This visual landmark information then controls HD cells throughout the HD cell circuit. PMID:25632114

  14. [Anatomic terminology from the historical aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanová, A

    1990-02-01

    The author analyzes the work Onomatologia anatomica by J. Hyrtl describing and evaluating the changes and development in anatomical terminology. On assessing anatomical terminology from the historical point of view, this microsystem exhibits a vocabulary whose components are derived from different stages of the development of the Latin language. Along with words which have been part of the vocabulary for centuries there appear also neologisms. Several terms are pointed out as having been taken over from the common language and adapted by broadening or narrowing the meaning, metaphorically or otherwise altering the significance. PMID:2334861

  15. Anatomical basis for Wilms tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trobs R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor surgery requires meticulous planning and sophisticated surgical technique. Detailed anatomical knowledge can facilitate the uneventful performance of tumor nephrectomy and cannot be replaced by advanced and sophisticated imaging techniques. We can define two main goals for surgery: (1 exact staging as well as (2 safe and complete resection of tumor without spillage. This review aims to review the anatomical basis for Wilms tumor surgery. It focuses on the surgical anatomy of retroperitoneal space, aorta, vena cava and their large branches with lymphatics. Types and management of vascular injuries are discussed.

  16. Congenital neck masses: embryological and anatomical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahida Rasool

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neck masses are a common problem in paediatric age group. They tend to occur frequently and pose a diagnostic dilemma to the ENT surgeons. Although the midline and lateral neck masses differ considerably in their texture and presentation but the embryological perspective of these masses is not mostly understood along with the fundamental anatomical knowledge. The article tries to correlate the embryological, anatomical and clinical perspectives for the same. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 329-332

  17. A study on the anatomical morphology of the minor fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The minor fissure is an important anatomical landmark in the localization of the pulmonary disease. For the evaluation of the normal feature of the minor fissure, we analyzed the high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scans in 51 normal patients. The purpose of this study are to evaluate the normal appearance of the minor fissure on high-resolution CT scans and to compare it with that on the conventional CT and radiographys. We analyzed the morphologic feature of the minor fissure on the high-resolution CT scans in 51 normal patients, and compared it with that on the conventional CT scans. On the high-resolution CT scans, we particularly paid attention to the completeness and types according to Berkmen classification. And finally, we compared the types determined by the high-resolution CT scans with those by the plain radiographys. In most patients (n=47), the minor fissure was seen as a hyperattenuating line or band on the high resolution CT scans. In contrast, it was mostly seen as a lucent zone on the conventional CT scans (n=44). Of 47 patient having a hyperattenuating line or band on the high-resolution CT scans, the minor fissure was considered to be complete in 17 patients (36%), and incomplete in 30 patients (64%), who had a defeat at medial portion of the minor fissure. The most common type of the minor fissure seen on the high-resolution CT scans was type I variety (n=23), followed by tape IIa (n=8). We could not determined the type in six patients. The tyetermined the type in six patients. The type determined by the high-resolution CT scans was highly well correlated with that determined by the plain radiographys (p<0.05). In conclusion, the minor fissure was seen CT studies as variable appearances and high-resolution CT scans were superior to the conventional CT scans in the evaluation of the minor fissure. The types of the minor fissure determined by the high-resolution CT scans were well correlated with those seen on the radiographys

  18. A study on the anatomical morphology of the minor fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeong Gon; Kim, Hyung Jin; You, Jin Jong; Ahn, In Oak; Chung, Sung Hoon [Gyeongsang University College of Medicine, Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    The minor fissure is an important anatomical landmark in the localization of the pulmonary disease. For the evaluation of the normal feature of the minor fissure, we analyzed the high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scans in 51 normal patients. The purpose of this study are to evaluate the normal appearance of the minor fissure on high-resolution CT scans and to compare it with that on the conventional CT and radiographys. We analyzed the morphologic feature of the minor fissure on the high-resolution CT scans in 51 normal patients, and compared it with that on the conventional CT scans. On the high-resolution CT scans, we particularly paid attention to the completeness and types according to Berkmen classification. And finally, we compared the types determined by the high-resolution CT scans with those by the plain radiographys. In most patients (n=47), the minor fissure was seen as a hyperattenuating line or band on the high resolution CT scans. In contrast, it was mostly seen as a lucent zone on the conventional CT scans (n=44). Of 47 patient having a hyperattenuating line or band on the high-resolution CT scans, the minor fissure was considered to be complete in 17 patients (36%), and incomplete in 30 patients (64%), who had a defeat at medial portion of the minor fissure. The most common type of the minor fissure seen on the high-resolution CT scans was type I variety (n=23), followed by tape IIa (n=8). We could not determined the type in six patients. The type determined by the high-resolution CT scans was highly well correlated with that determined by the plain radiographys (p<0.05). In conclusion, the minor fissure was seen CT studies as variable appearances and high-resolution CT scans were superior to the conventional CT scans in the evaluation of the minor fissure. The types of the minor fissure determined by the high-resolution CT scans were well correlated with those seen on the radiographys.

  19. Internal jugular vein cannulation: an ultrasound-guided technique versus a landmark-guided technique

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gurkan, Turker; Fatma Nur, Kaya; Alp, Gurbet; Hale, Aksu; Cuneyt, Erdogan; Ahmet, Atlas.

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the landmark-guided technique versus the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in spontaneously breathing patients. METHODS: A total of 380 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned to receive internal jugular ve [...] in cannulation using either the landmark- or ultrasound-guided technique in Bursa, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, between April and November, 2008. Failed catheter placement, risk of complications from placement, risk of failure on first attempt at placement, number of attempts until successful catheterization, time to successful catheterization and the demographics of each patient were recorded. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p

  20. Handbook of anatomical models for radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-01-01

    Covering the history of human model development, this title presents the major anatomical and physical models that have been developed for human body radiation protection, diagnostic imaging, and nuclear medicine therapy. It explores how these models have evolved and the role that modern technologies have played in this development.

  1. A Sensorimotor Analysis of Melanesian Anatomical Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Charles F.

    1976-01-01

    This article is concerned with the possible existence of a verbal anatomical representation comparable to that deriving from neural relationships concerned with somatic functions on the sensorimotor cortex of the brain, as seen in linguistic evidence available from Melanesian languages. (CLK)

  2. Cranial allometry, phylogeography, and systematics of large-bodied papionins (primates: Cercopithecinae) inferred from geometric morphometric analysis of landmark data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Stephen R; Marcus, Leslie F; Bookstein, Fred L; Reddy, David P; Delson, Eric

    2003-12-01

    The cranial morphology of the African Old World monkeys Mandrillus, Papio, and Theropithecus (i.e., baboons) has been the subject of a number of studies investigating their systematic relationships, patterns of scaling, and growth. In this study, we use landmark-based geometric morphometrics and multivariate analysis to assess the effects of size, sex, taxonomy, and geographic location on cranial shape. Forty-five landmarks were digitized in three dimensions on 452 baboon crania and subjected to generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA), which standardizes geometric size but leaves scaling-based shape differences in the data. The resulting shape coordinates were submitted to regression analysis, principal components analysis (PCA), partial least-squares (PLS) analysis, and various clustering techniques. Scaling (shape differences correlated with size) was the largest single factor explaining cranial shape variation. For instance, most (but not all) of the shape differences between the sexes were explained by size dimorphism. However, central tendencies of shape clearly varied by taxon (both specific and subspecific) even after variations in size and sex were adjusted out. Within Papio, about 60% of the size- and sex-adjusted shape variations were explained by the geographic coordinates of the specimen's provenance, revealing a stepped cline in cranial morphology, with the greatest separation between northern and southern populations. Based on evidence from genetic studies, and the presence of at least two major hybrid/interbreeding zones, we interpret the phylogeographic pattern of cranial variation as indicating that these populations are best ranked as subspecies of a single species, rather than as two or more distinct biological species. This objective approach can be applied to other vertebrate species or species groups to help determine the taxonomic rank of problematic taxa. PMID:14613306

  3. Computer tomographic imaging and anatomic correlation of the human brain: A comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plets, C.; Baert, A.L.; Nijs, G.L.; Wilms, G.

    1986-01-01

    It is of the greatest importance to the radiologist, the neurologist and the neurosurgeon to be able to localize topographically a pathological brain process on the CT scan as precisely as possible. For that purpose, the identification of as many anatomical structures as possible on the CT scan image are necessary and indispensable. In this atlas a great number of detailed anatomical data on frontal horizontal CT scan sections, each being only 2 mm thick, are indicated, e.g. the cortical gyri, the basal ganglia, details of the white matter, extracranial muscles and blood vessels, parts of the base and the vault of the skull, etc. The very precise topographical description of the numerous CT scan images was realized by the author by confrontation of these images with the corresponding anatomical sections of the same brain specimen, performed by an original technique.

  4. Computer tomographic imaging and anatomic correlation of the human brain: A comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is of the greatest importance to the radiologist, the neurologist and the neurosurgeon to be able to localize topographically a pathological brain process on the CT scan as precisely as possible. For that purpose, the identification of as many anatomical structures as possible on the CT scan image are necessary and indispensable. In this atlas a great number of detailed anatomical data on frontal horizontal CT scan sections, each being only 2 mm thick, are indicated, e.g. the cortical gyri, the basal ganglia, details of the white matter, extracranial muscles and blood vessels, parts of the base and the vault of the skull, etc. The very precise topographical description of the numerous CT scan images was realized by the author by confrontation of these images with the corresponding anatomical sections of the same brain specimen, performed by an original technique

  5. Accuracy of three-dimensional, paper-based models generated using a low-cost, three-dimensional printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Raphael; Szymor, Piotr; Kozakiewicz, Marcin

    2014-12-01

    Our study aimed to determine the accuracy of a low-cost, paper-based 3D printer by comparing a dry human mandible to its corresponding three-dimensional (3D) model using a 3D measuring arm. One dry human mandible and its corresponding printed model were evaluated. The model was produced using DICOM data from cone beam computed tomography. The data were imported into Maxilim software, wherein automatic segmentation was performed, and the STL file was saved. These data were subsequently analysed, repaired, cut and prepared for printing with netfabb software. These prepared data were used to create a paper-based model of a mandible with an MCor Matrix 300 printer. Seventy-six anatomical landmarks were chosen and measured 20 times on the mandible and the model using a MicroScribe G2X 3D measuring arm. The distances between all the selected landmarks were measured and compared. Only landmarks with a point inaccuracy less than 30% were used in further analyses. The mean absolute difference for the selected 2016 measurements was 0.36 ± 0.29 mm. The mean relative difference was 1.87 ± 3.14%; however, the measurement length significantly influenced the relative difference. The accuracy of the 3D model printed using the paper-based, low-cost 3D Matrix 300 printer was acceptable. The average error was no greater than that measured with other types of 3D printers. The mean relative difference should not be considered the best way to compare studies. The point inaccuracy methodology proposed in this study may be helpful in future studies concerned with evaluating the accuracy of 3D rapid prototyping models. PMID:25176496

  6. Anatomical basis for sciatic nerve block at the knee level / Bases anatómicas para el bloqueo anestésico del nervio isquiático al nivel de la rodilla / Bases anatômicas para o bloqueio anestésico do nervo isquiático no nível do joelho

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fabiano Timbó, Barbosa; Tatiana Rosa Bezerra Wanderley, Barbosa; Rafael Martins da, Cunha; Amanda Karine Barros, Rodrigues; Fernando Wagner da Silva, Ramos; Célio Fernando de, Sousa-Rodrigues.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Recentemente a feitura de bloqueio do nervo isquiático tem sido revista devido ao potencial benéfico para analgesia pós-operatória e satisfação dos pacientes após o advento da ultrassonografia. O objetivo deste estudo foi descrever as relações anatômicas do nervo isquiáti [...] co na fossa poplítea para determinar a distância ideal em que a agulha deve ser posicionada para a feitura do bloqueio anestésico do nervo isquiático anterior a sua bifurcação em nervo tibial e fibular comum. MÉTODO: O trabalho foi feito por meio de dissecção de fossa poplítea de cadáveres humanos, fixados em formol a 10%, provenientes do Laboratório de Anatomia Humana dos departamentos de Morfologia da Universidade Federal de Alagoas e da Universidade de Ciências da Saúde de Alagoas. Obteve-se acesso ao nervo isquiático. RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas 44 fossas poplíteas. Observou-se a bifurcação do nervo isquiático em relação ao ápice da fossa. Houve bifurcação em 67,96% abaixo do ápice, 15,90% acima do ápice, 11,36% próxima ao ápice e 4,78% na região glútea. CONCLUSÕES: A bifurcação do nervo isquiático em seus ramos ocorre em vários níveis e a chance de se obter sucesso quando a agulha é usada entre 5 e 7 cm acima da fossa poplítea é de 95,22%. Abstract in spanish JUSTIFICACIÓN Y OBJETIVOS: Recientemente la realización de bloqueo del nervio isquiático ha sido nuevamente analizada debido al potencial beneficioso para la analgesia postoperatoria y por la satisfacción de los pacientes después del advenimiento de la ecografía. El objetivo de este estudio fue des [...] cribir las relaciones anatómicas del nervio isquiático en la fosa poplítea para determinar la distancia ideal en que la aguja debe ser posicionada para la realización del bloqueo anestésico del nervio isquiático anterior a su bifurcación en el nervio tibial y fibular común. MÉTODO: El trabajo se hizo por medio de la disección de la fosa poplítea de cadáveres humanos, empapados en formol al 10%, provenientes del Laboratorio de Anatomía Humana de los departamentos de Morfología de la Universidad Federal de Alagoas y de la Universidad de Ciencias de la Salud de Alagoas. Se obtuvo el acceso al nervio isquiático. RESULTADOS: Fueron analizadas 44 fosas poplíteas. Se observó la bifurcación del nervio isquiático con relación al ápice de la fosa. Hubo una bifurcación en un 67,96% por debajo del ápice, un 15,90% por encima del ápice, un 11,36% cercana al ápice y un 4,78% en la región glútea. CONCLUSIONES: La bifurcación del nervio isquiático en sus ramas se da en varios niveles y la probabilidad de que se obtenga éxito cuando la aguja se usa entre 5 y 7 cm por encima de la fosa poplítea es de un 95,22%. Abstract in english BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Recently, administration of sciatic nerve block has been revised due to the potential benefit for postoperative analgesia and patient satisfaction after the advent of ultrasound. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomical relations of the sciatic nerve in the po [...] pliteal fossa to determine the optimal distance the needle must be positioned in order to realize the sciatic nerve block anterior to its bifurcation into the tibial and common fibular nerve. METHOD: The study was conducted by dissection of human cadavers' popliteal fossa, fixed in 10% formalin, from the Laboratory of Human Anatomy and Morphology Departments of the Universidade Federal de Alagoas and Universidade de Ciências da Saúde de Alagoas. Access to the sciatic nerve was obtained. RESULTS: 44 popliteal fossa were analyzed. The bifurcation of the sciatic nerve in relation to the apex of the fossa was observed. There was bifurcation in: 67.96% below the apex, 15.90% above the apex, 11.36% near the apex, and 4.78% in the gluteal region. CONCLUSIONS: The sciatic nerve bifurcation to its branches occurs at various levels, and the chance to succeed when the needle is placed between 5 and 7 cm above the popliteal is 95.22%.

  7. Animals' Use of Landmarks and Metric Information to Reorient: Effects of the Size of the Experimental Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovrano, Valeria Anna; Bisazza, Angelo; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Disoriented children could use geometric information in combination with landmark information to reorient themselves in large but not in small experimental spaces. We tested fish in the same task and found that they were able to conjoin geometric and non-geometric (landmark) information to reorient themselves in both the large and the small space…

  8. Variantes anatómicas relevantes en tomografía computarizada de cavidades perinasales / Remarkable anatomic variations on paranasal CT scans

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rodrigo, Cabezón A; Ricardo, Vaidés S; Hayo, Breinbauer K; Constanza, Ramírez R; Carolina, Grau L; Rodrigo, Iñíguez C.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La anatomía ósea de las cavidades perinasales (CPN) es altamente variable, pudiendo ser causa o factor predisponente de patología rinosinusal, o servir de reparo anatómico para la cirugía endoscópica nasal (CEN). Objetivos: Conocer la frecuencia de variaciones anatómicas en pacientes q [...] ue consultan en nuestra Red de Salud. Material y método: Revisión retrospectiva de todas las tomog rafias computarizadas (TC) de CPN, realizadas en el Servicio de Radiología de la Red de Salud UC entre abril y junio de 2009. Resultados: Se encontraron las distintas variantes anatómicas en frecuencias similares a las descritas en la literatura internacional. Se estudió también la trayectoria de la arteria etmoidal anterior (AEA), y la configuración del techo etmoidal, utilizando la clasificación de Keros. Conclusiones: La frecuencia de variaciones anatómicas encontrada en nuestra revisión es similar a la descrita en la literatura internacional. La mayoría de nuestros pacientes presenta configuración de techo etmoidal tipo Keros I, hallazgo diferente al reportado en otras series. El estudio metódico de las variantes anatómicas en TC de CPN nos permitiría evitar complicaciones quirúrgicas. Abstract in english Introduction: Paranasal sinus anatomy is quite variable. Some variations are involved in rinosinusal pathology, others are landmarks ofFESS (functional endoscopic sinus surgery). Aim: To determine the frecuency of paranasal anatomic variations in our consulting population. Material and method: Retro [...] spective revision of all paranasal CT scans achieved in our Radiology Service during a two month period during 2009. Results: We found most of ethmoid anatomic variations, with similar frecuencies as described in literature. We also studied anterior ethmoidal artery anatomy, and ethmoid roof configuration, using Keros classification Conclusions: We found, in general, similar frecuencies as described in foreign series. More than half of our patients had Keros I ethmoid roof configuration type, a differing result from most of other series. Every ENT surgeon should be trained in routine search of these variations, helping to avoid possible surgical complications.

  9. Anatomical relation between anterior ethmoidal sinus and lacrimal sac fossa on high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the anatomical relation between anterior ethmoidal sinus and the lacrimal sac fossa, and thus help prevent complications during dacryocystorhinostomy. Fifty three people without previous history of trauma, surgery, or paranasal sinus disease were randomly selected, and the 106 lacrimal sac fossas of these subjects were evaluated by high resolution CT. A series of three 2-mm thick axial sections at least 2mm from the inferior orbital wall were obtained. The bony landmarks of the lacrimal sac fossa were established and the location of the most anterior ethmoid sinus was classified as one of three types. In type 1, no sinuses were anterior to the posterior lacrimal crest. While in type 2, sinuses extended anterior to this crest but remained behind the suture at the anterior edge of the lacrimal bone. In type 3, sinuses extended into the frontal process of the maxilla, anterior to the lacrimal bone suture. In addition, the category of both orbits of the same patient was compared. Among the 106 orbits examined, only seven (6.6%) were classified as type 1, with no ethmoid air cells postioned under the lacrimal sac fossa. Seventy six (71.7%) qualified as type 2, while the remaining 23 (21.7%) were type 3, demonstration anterior ethmoid air cells within the nasal process of the maxilla. The position of the air cells was symmetric in 41 of the 53 subjects (77.4%) and asymmetric in 12 (22.6%). In cases involving surgery of the lacrimal sac fossa, such as dacryocystohe lacrimal sac fossa, such as dacryocystorhinostomy, a knowledge of the consistent anatomic relationship between the anterior ethmoidal sinus and the lacrimal sac fossa is invaluable

  10. The developmental trajectory of intramaze and extramaze landmark biases in spatial navigation: An unexpected journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew G; Haselgrove, Mark; Smith, Alastair D

    2015-06-01

    Adults learning to navigate to a hidden goal within an enclosed space have been found to prefer information provided by the distal cues of an environment, as opposed to proximal landmarks within the environment. Studies with children, however, have shown that 5- or 7-year-olds do not display any preference toward distal or proximal cues during navigation. This suggests that a bias toward learning about distal cues occurs somewhere between the age of 7 years and adulthood. We recruited 5- to 11-year-old children and an adult sample to explore the developmental profile of this putative change. Across a series of 3 experiments, participants were required to navigate to a hidden goal in a virtual environment, the location of which was signaled by both extramaze and intramaze landmark cues. During testing, these cues were placed into conflict to assess the search preferences of participants. Consistent with previously reported findings, adults were biased toward using extramaze information. However, analysis of the data from children, which incorporated age as a continuous variable, suggested that older children in our sample were, in fact, biased toward using the intramaze landmark in our task. These findings suggest the bias toward using distal cues in spatial navigation, frequently displayed by adults, may be a comparatively late developing trait, and one that could supersede an initial developmental preference for proximal landmarks. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25844850

  11. Individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eck, Carola F; Widhalm, Harrald; Murawski, Christopher; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often seen in young participants in sports such as soccer, football, and basketball. Treatment options include conservative management as well as surgical intervention, with the goal of enabling the patient to return to cutting and pivoting sports and activities. Individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction is a surgical technique that tailors the procedure to the individual patient using preoperative measurements on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative measurement to map the patients' native ACL anatomy in order to replicate it as closely as possible. Anatomic ACL reconstruction, therefore, is defined as reconstruction of the ACL to its native dimensions, collagen orientation, and insertion site. The surgical reconstruction is followed by a specific rehabilitation protocol that is designed to enable the patient to regain muscle strength and proprioception while facilitating healing of the reconstructed ACL prior to the patient's returning to sports activities. PMID:25684559

  12. Anatomic variations of the human semicircular canals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anatomic variations of the semicircular canals were investigated in a series of 95 plastic temporal bone preparations. The results showed a wider range of variability than has been assumed previously. An intraindividual correlation was found between the sizes of the superior and lateral semicircular canals. Observations indicate why a semicircular canal is not invariably delineated on one tomographic plane despite correct positioning for its optimum reproduction. (orig.)

  13. A hierarchical scheme for geodesic anatomical labeling of airway trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast and robust supervised algorithm for label- ing anatomical airway trees, based on geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for a given unlabeled air- way tree are evaluated based on the distances to a training set of labeled airway trees. In tree-space, the airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural way to automatically handle anatomical differences and noise. The algorithm is made efficient using a hierarchical approach, in which labels are assigned from the top down. We only use features of the airway centerline tree, which is relatively unaffected by pathology. A thorough leave-one-patient-out evaluation of the algorithm is made on 40 segmented airway trees from 20 subjects labeled by 2 medical experts. We evaluate accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Performance is statis- tically similar to the inter- and intra-expert agreement, and we found no significant correlation between COPD stage and labeling accuracy.

  14. [Anatomical and water physiological plasticity of Grewia biloba var. parviflora leaf and secondary xylem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Gangrong; Cheng, Xuelian; Liu, Lei; Ma, Chengcang

    2006-10-01

    Based on the anatomical observations of leaf and secondary xylem as well as the measurements of leaf water physiological parameters, this paper studied the anatomical and water physiological plasticity of Grewia biloba var. parviflora growing in different succession stage communities. The results showed that G. biloba var. parviflora leaf was characterized by thin bifacial with thin cuticle and few stoma, indicating that it was mesophyte anatomically, while the secondary xylem had typical xeromorphic traits, such as short and thin vessel, high vessel frequency, low percentage single pores, and short fibers and rays. G. biloba var. parviflora had high plasticity in the anatomical structure and water physiological features of leaf and secondary xylem, and the plasticity index was in the order of secondary xylem anatomical structure (0. 24) > water physiological traits (0. 19) > leaf anatomical structure (0. 18). Compared with those growing in mixed forest and Platycladus orientalis forest, the individuals of G. biloba var. parviflora in shrub communities had the xeromorphic traits in the aspects of (1) their secondary xylem had shorter vessel elements, higher vessel frequency, less single porous percentage, lower rays, higher relative conductivity and lower vulnerability index, and (2) their leaf had lower water potential, lower water content and free water content, higher bound water content, high ratio of bound to free water content, and less specific leaf area. The phenotypic plasticity, both anatomical and physiological, made G. biloba var. parviflora tolerate to the drought at earlier succession stages and better adapt to the mesophytic condition at later stages, and consequently, become a widely distributed and dominant species in mixed forests. PMID:17209373

  15. Anatomic variation of cranial parasympathetic ganglia

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Selma, Siéssere; Mathias, Vitti; Luiz Gustavo de, Sousa; Marisa, Semprini; Mamie Mizusaki, Iyomasa; Simone Cecílio Hallak, Regalo.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Having broad knowledge of anatomy is essential for practicing dentistry. Certain anatomical structures call for detailed studies due to their anatomical and functional importance. Nevertheless, some structures are difficult to visualize and identify due to their small volume and complicated access. [...] Such is the case of the parasympathetic ganglia located in the cranial part of the autonomic nervous system, which include: the ciliary ganglion (located deeply in the orbit, laterally to the optic nerve), the pterygopalatine ganglion (located in the pterygopalatine fossa), the submandibular ganglion (located laterally to the hyoglossus muscle, below the lingual nerve), and the otic ganglion (located medially to the mandibular nerve, right beneath the oval foramen). The aim of this study was to present these structures in dissected anatomic specimens and perform a comparative analysis regarding location and morphology. The proximity of the ganglia and associated nerves were also analyzed, as well as the number and volume of fibers connected to them. Human heads were dissected by planes, partially removing the adjacent structures to the point we could reach the parasympathetic ganglia. With this study, we concluded that there was no significant variation regarding the location of the studied ganglia. Morphologically, our observations concur with previous classical descriptions of the parasympathetic ganglia, but we observed variations regarding the proximity of the otic ganglion to the mandibular nerve. We also observed that there were variations regarding the number and volume of fiber bundles connected to the submandibular, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia.

  16. Computed tomography and gross anatomical studies on the head of one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsafy, Mohamed A M; El-Gendy, Samir A A; Abumandour, Mohamed M A

    2014-04-01

    The current study aimed to document by computed tomography (CT) the anatomical structures of the one-Humped camel head relative to their adaptability to living environments. Seven adult one-Humped camels' heads were used in this study. The structures of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, oral cavity, orbit, and cranium were investigated using computed tomographic scans, cross, and sagittal sections of the head cadavers, and skulls. The study showed the nasal conchae had special properties where the dorsal nasal concha contained the dorsal conchal sinus, the middle nasal concha contained the middle conchal sinus, while the ventral nasal concha did not contain a sinus. The middle nasal concha was large and extended rostral between the dorsal and ventral nasal concha. The nasal meatuses were narrow spaces that suggested adaptability to a desert environment. The paranasal sinuses comprised maxillary, frontal, sphenoidal, lacrimal, and ethmoidal that were identified and labeled according to cheek teeth landmarks. The topographic description and relationship between nasal, oral, orbital, cranial cavities, pharynx, larynx, and paranasal sinuses were demonstrated. The articular disc, articular surface, and joint capsule of the temporomandibular joint were described by CT and cross sectional images. The current CT, cross, and sagittal sections images provide a reference for normal camel head anatomy. PMID:24639077

  17. An anatomical study of the parasacral block using magnetic resonance imaging of healthy volunteers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Maeve

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The parasacral approach to sciatic blockade is reported to be easy to learn and perform, with a high success rate and few complications. METHODS: Using magnetic resonance imaging, we evaluated the accuracy of a simulated needle (perpendicular to skin) in contacting the sacral plexus with this approach in 10 volunteers. Intrapelvic structures encountered during the simulated parasacral blocks were also recorded. RESULTS: The sacral plexus was contacted by the simulated needle in 4 of the 10 volunteers, and the sciatic nerve itself in one volunteer. The plexus was accurately located adjacent to a variety of visceral structures, including small bowel, blood vessels, and ovary. In the remaining five volunteers (in whom the plexus was not contacted on first needle pass), small bowel, rectum, blood vessels, seminal vesicles, and bony structures were encountered. Historically, when plexus is not encountered, readjustment of the needle insertion point more caudally has been recommended. We found that such an adjustment resulted in simulated perforation of intrapelvic organs or the perianal fossa. CONCLUSIONS: These findings question the reliability of the anatomical landmarks of the parasacral block and raise the possibility of frequent visceral puncture using this technique.

  18. Anatomical description and clinical significance of unilateral triheaded sternocleidomastoid muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Goswami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this report is to observe and report unusual pattern of origin of sternal and clavicular heads of Sternocleidomastoid (SCM. An embryological insight into the possible causes for present anomaly is elucidated. The neck region of an adult male cadaver during gross anatomy teaching program. An abnormal Sternocleidomastoid (SCM was observed while dissecting the neck region of an adult. Additional clavicular head of SCM muscle were found on the right side. The accessory clavicular head coursed deep to the sternal head whereas the some fibres of main clavicular head joined the accessory belly and together they fused with the main sternal head of SCM. There was another slip arising from sternal head and merge with deep cervical fascia near base of mandible. The topographical anatomy of SCM is extremely important, particularly because it serves as a useful surgical landmark and its relation to crucial neuro-vascular structures of the neck. The usage of SCM in reconstruction operations for covering defects is discussed. A detailed knowledge of the anatomy of SCM proves vital for radiological studies of the neck. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 1161-1164

  19. Cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point as a reliable landmark to place the corticectomy and reach the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus approach / Projeção cortical do ponto coroideo inferior como uma referência anatômica confiável para a realização da corticectomia e abordagem do corno temporal através do giro temporal médio.

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Thomas, Frigeri; Albert, Rhoton; Eliseu, Paglioli; Ney, Azambuja.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo Estabelecer a projeção cortical do ponto coiroideo inferior e usá-la como referência para realizar a corticectomia e a abordagem do corno temporal do ventrículo lateral em cirurgias para o tratamento da epilepsia temporal mesial. Método A projeção cortical do ponto coroideo inferior foi [...] utilizada por um dos autores seniors em mais de 300 casos de epilepsia temporal mesial para atingir o corno temporal do ventrículo lateral. Conclusão A projeção cortical do ponto coroideo inferior foi útil e confiável na abordagem do corno temporal do ventrículo lateral e ela está geralmente localizada na margem inferior do giro temporal médio, em média, a 4,52 cm posterior ao polo temporal. Abstract in english Objective To establish preoperatively the localization of the cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point (ICP) and use it as a reliable landmark when approaching the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus access. To review relevant anatomical features regarding selective amigdalohip [...] pocampectomy (AH) for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Method The cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point was used in more than 300 surgeries by one authors as a reliable landmark to reach the temporal horn. In the laboratory, forty cerebral hemispheres were examined. Conclusion The cortical projection of the ICP is a reliable landmark for reaching the temporal horn.

  20. Introducing International Journal of Anatomical Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunali S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to International Journal of Anatomical Variations (IJAV - an annual journal of anatomical variations and clinical anatomy case reports. After having a notable experience for eight years in NEUROANATOMY, we are pleased to introduce you IJAV. We are eventually announcing our new journal after three years of feasibility and background study period. We hope that IJAV will fill in the gap in anatomy journals’ bunch. IJAV is an annual, open access journal having electronic version only. Despite of unavailability of a budget for publishing IJAV, the evaluation of submissions and access to the full text articles is totally free of charge.Our vision for IJAV is to constitute an online compendium for anatomical variations in gross, radiological and surgical anatomy, neuroanatomy and case reports in clinical anatomy. We believe that cases have an important role in clinical anatomy education. In this aspect, we aim to serve as an open source of case reports. We hope that IJAV will be cited in most of the case reports related to clinical anatomy and anatomical variations in near future.In NEUROANATOMY, we encouraged the submission of case reports in the area of neuroanatomy. Whereas in IJAV, besides neuroanatomy, we will consider case reports in any area related to human anatomy. The scope of IJAV will encompass any anatomical variations in gross, radiological and surgical anatomy. Case reports in clinical anatomy are also welcome.All submitted articles will be peer-reviewed. No processing fee will be charged from authors. One of the most important features of IJAV will be speedy review and rapid publication. We strive to publish an accepted manuscript within three weeks of initial submission. Our young and dynamic Scientific Advisory Board will achieve this objective.A few remarks about our logo and page design: Prof. Dr. M. Mustafa ALDUR designed our logo, being inspired by a quadricuspid aortic valve case, reported by Francesco FORMICA et al. [Formica F, Sangalli F, Ferro O, Paolini G. A rare cause of severe aortic regurgitation: quadricuspid aortic valve. Interact. Cardiovasc. Thorac. Surg. 2004; 3: 672-674]. We appreciate their contribution to our journal. The typeface in our logo and index page is Papyrus. The irregular margins of this font symbolize the non-uniformity in anatomy. The background in the menu bar is parchment; with Papyrus typeface, they refer to the old medical books in the ancient Egypt.As we mentioned earlier, our aim is to constitute an online compendium for anatomical variations similar to the invaluable book written by Ronald A. BERGMAN, Adel K. AFIFI and Ryosuke MIYAUCHI [Bergman RA, Afifi AK, Miyauchi R. Compendium of human anatomical variation. Baltimore, Urban and Schwarzenberg. 1988]. To realize this vision, we need you to submit your case reports to IJAV and encourage your colleagues to do so. As we did in NEUROANATOMY, we hope to be indexed in international indexes beginning from our first issue.Last but not least, I would like to thank to Dr. M. Mustafa ALDUR for his superhuman efforts and everlasting support to IJAV. Moreover, I would like to voice my special gratitude to the members of Scientific Advisory Board, who have accepted to take the road with us in this arduous journey.We look forward to receiving your manuscripts.Yours sincerely,Selcuk TUNALI, MD, PhDEditor-in-Chief and Publisher, IJAV

  1. Anatomic-pathophysiologic approach to hemodynamics: complementary roles of noninvasive and invasive diagnostic modalities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Goldstein, James A

    2012-02-01

    Symptoms and physical signs reflect distinct pathophysiologic derangements of anatomic components and mechanics, a construct that serves as the foundation for clinical evaluation of the cardiovascular system. Evaluation of hemodynamic derangements should be based on interrogation of a cardiac anatomic-physiologic approach to circulatory pathophysiology. This article illustrates a pragmatic problem-solving approach to 3 cardinal hemodynamic symptoms and clinical syndromes: right heart failure, dyspnea, and low-output hypotension. This treatise focuses primarily on the complementary roles of noninvasive and invasive diagnostic studies in clinical hemodynamic assessment.

  2. The double suprascapular foramen: unique anatomical variation and the new hypothesis of its formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polguj, Micha?; Podgórski, Micha?; J?drzejewski, Kazimierz; Topol, Miros?aw

    2012-12-01

    A unique anatomical variation of the suprascapular notch was discovered in one scapula from 610 analyzed by three-dimensional CT reconstruction. Two bony bridges were found, converting it into a double suprascapular foramen, in the left upper extremity of an 56-year-old Caucasian female. This variation might be a risk factor for suprascapular nerve entrapment. Suprascapular nerve running through inferior suprascapular foramen was discovered. Suprascapular vessels passed through superior suprascapular foramen (artery lay medially and vein laterally). A new hypothesis of double suprascapular foramen formation (mechanism of creation) is presented based on recent anatomical findings (e.g., the discovery in 2002 of the anterior coracoscapular ligament). Knowledge of the anatomical variations described in this study should be helpful in arthroscopic and open procedures at the suprascapular region and also confirms the safety of operative decompression for the suprascapular nerve. PMID:22722309

  3. Anatomical Observations on Nutlets of Some Salvia Species (Lamiaceae) from West Azarbaijan in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Nejad Habibvash; Mohammad Ali Rajamand; Siavash Hosseini Sarghein; Reza Heidari; Mahnaz Heidari Ricani

    2007-01-01

    Present survey was performed on thirteen species of Salvia from West Azarbaijan in Iran with the aim of illustrating species interrelationships. It includes comparative anatomy of the species based on nutlets transverse sections. These sections were examined using light microscope and detailed description of nutlet anatomical feature for all examined taxa is provided. In this study its found that the nutlets showed a considerable uniformity from anatomical point of view. However these species...

  4. Anatomical Responses of Roots in Trifoliate Orange Budded with Satsuma Mandarin to Aerated and Stagnant Culture Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Pear Mohammad; Masaya Shiraishi

    1999-01-01

    Anatomical responses of roots in trifoliate orange budded with satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc. cv. Okitsu Wase) to aerated and stagnant culture solutions were investigated. Roots, under aerated condition, had sharply pointed tips and showed intact anatomical features having a few starch grains on the rootcap and cortical cells. The cortical cells were smaller close to the root tip and gradually became elongated towards the base. All these characteristics maintained the same level even u...

  5. Not one extrastriate body area: Using anatomical landmarks, hMT+, and visual field maps to parcellate limb-selective activations in human lateral occipitotemporal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Weiner, Kevin S.; Grill-spector, Kalanit

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing view of human lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) organization suggests a single area selective for images of the human body (extrastriate body area, EBA) that highly overlaps with the human motion-selective complex (hMT+). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging with higher resolution (1.5mm voxels) than past studies (3–4mm voxels), we examined the fine-scale spatial organization of these activations relative to each other, as well as to visual field maps in LOTC. Rat...

  6. Anatomic ACL reconstruction: rectangular tunnel/bone-patellar tendon-bone or triple-bundle/semitendinosus tendon grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shino, Konsei; Mae, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Yuta

    2015-05-01

    Anatomic ACL reconstruction is the reasonable approach to restore stability without loss of motion after ACL tear. To mimic the normal ACL like a ribbon, our preferred procedures is the anatomic rectangular tunnel (ART) technique with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft or the anatomic triple bundle (ATB) procedure with a hamstring (HS) tendon graft. It is important to create tunnel apertures inside the attachment areas to lessen the tunnel widening. To identify the crescent-shaped ACL femoral attachment area, the upper cartilage margin, the posterior cartilage margin and the resident's ridge are used as landmarks. To delineate the C-shaped tibial insertion, medial intercondylar ridge, Parson's knob and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus are helpful. In ART-BTB procedure which is suitable for male patients engaged in contact sports, the parallelepiped tunnels with rectangular apertures are made within the femoral and tibial attachment areas. In ATB-HS technique which is mainly applied to female athletes engaged in non-contact sports including skiing or basketball, 2 femoral and 3 tibial round tunnels are created inside the attachment areas. These techniques make it possible for the grafts to run as the native ACL without impingement to the notch or PCL. After femoral fixation with an interference screw or cortical fixation devices including Endobutton, the graft is pretensioned in situ by repetitive manual pulls at 15-20° of flexion, monitoring the graft tension with tensioners on a tensioning boot installed on the calf. Tibial fixation with pullout sutures is achieved using Double Spike Plate and a screw at the pre-determined amount of tension of 10-20N. While better outcomes with less failure rate are being obtained compared to those in the past, higher graft tear rate remains a problem. Improved preventive training may be required to avoid secondary ACL injuries. PMID:25753837

  7. An interactive three-dimensional virtual body structures system for anatomical training over the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Bharti; Acosta, Eric; Malvankar, Ameya; Vaidyanath, Sreeram

    2006-04-01

    The Visible Human digital datasets make it possible to develop computer-based anatomical training systems that use virtual anatomical models (virtual body structures-VBS). Medical schools are combining these virtual training systems and classical anatomy teaching methods that use labeled images and cadaver dissection. In this paper we present a customizable web-based three-dimensional anatomy training system, W3D-VBS. W3D-VBS uses National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Visible Human Male datasets to interactively locate, explore, select, extract, highlight, label, and visualize, realistic 2D (using axial, coronal, and sagittal views) and 3D virtual structures. A real-time self-guided virtual tour of the entire body is designed to provide detailed anatomical information about structures, substructures, and proximal structures. The system thus facilitates learning of visuospatial relationships at a level of detail that may not be possible by any other means. The use of volumetric structures allows for repeated real-time virtual dissections, from any angle, at the convenience of the user. Volumetric (3D) virtual dissections are performed by adding, removing, highlighting, and labeling individual structures (and/or entire anatomical systems). The resultant virtual explorations (consisting of anatomical 2D/3D illustrations and animations), with user selected highlighting colors and label positions, can be saved and used for generating lesson plans and evaluation systems. Tracking users' progress using the evaluation system helps customize the curriculum, making W3D-VBS a powerful learning tool. Our plan is to incorporate other Visible Human segmented datasets, especially datasets with higher resolutions, that make it possible to include finer anatomical structures such as nerves and small vessels. PMID:16506202

  8. Jugular foramen: anatomic and computed tomographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the jugular foramen was examined in detail, and anatomic and CT sections were correlated. The pars nervosa and pars vascularis were identified, and, with intravenous contrast enhancement, a rapid sequence of scans at a gantry angle of +300 to the canthomeatal line demonstrated cranial nerves IX, X, and XI. The osseous margins of the jugular foramen were best shown by CT at planes of sections parallel and positive (00-300) to the canthomeatal line. CT can be used to evaluate osseous anatomy and the jugular foramen with precision sufficient to confidently exclude an intracanalicular mass

  9. FDG-PET-based radiotherapy planning in lung cancer. Optimum breathing protocol and patient positioning - an intraindividual comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG-PET and PET / CT is increasingly used for radiotherapy (RT) planning in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The planning process is often based on separately-acquired FDG-PET / CT and planning CT. We compared intraindividual differences between PET acquired in diagnostic and radiotherapy treatment position coregistered with planning CTs acquired using different breathing protocols. Sixteen patients with NSCLC underwent two PET acquisitions (diagnostic position-D-PET, radiotherapy position-RT-PET) and three planning-CT acquisitions (expiration-EXP, inspiration-INS, mid-breathhold-MID) on the same day. All scans were rigidly coregistered resulting in six fused datasets: D-INS, D-EXP, D-MID, RT-INS, RT-EXP and RT-MID. Fusion accuracy was assessed by three readers at eight anatomical landmarks: lung apices, aortic arch, heart, spine, sternum, carina, diaphragm and tumor using an alignment score ranging from 1 (no alignment) to 5 (exact alignment). RT-PET showed better alignment with any CT than D-PET (p < 0.001). With regard to breathing, RT-MID showed the best mean alignment score (3.7 ± 1.0) followed by RT-EXP (3.5 ± 0.9) and RT-INS (3.0 ± 0.8), all differences being significant (p < 0.001). Comparing the alignment scores with regard to anatomical landmarks, the largest deviations were found at diaphragm, heart and apices. Overall, there was a fair agreement (? = 0.48; p < 0.001) among the three readers. Significantly better fusion of PET and planning-CT can bter fusion of PET and planning-CT can be reached with PET acquired in RT-position. The best intraindividual fusion results are obtained with the planning-CT performed during mid-breathhold. Our data justify the acquisition of a separate planning-PET in RT-treatment position if only a diagnostic PET-scan is available. (orig.)

  10. Objectively identifying landmark use and predicting flight trajectories of the homing pigeon using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Richard; Freeman, Robin; Osborne, Michael; Garnett, Roman; Armstrong, Chris; Meade, Jessica; Biro, Dora; Guilford, Tim; Roberts, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Pigeons home along idiosyncratic habitual routes from familiar locations. It has been suggested that memorized visual landmarks underpin this route learning. However, the inability to experimentally alter the landscape on large scales has hindered the discovery of the particular features to which birds attend. Here, we present a method for objectively classifying the most informative regions of animal paths. We apply this method to flight trajectories from homing pigeons to identify probable locations of salient visual landmarks. We construct and apply a Gaussian process model of flight trajectory generation for pigeons trained to home from specific release sites. The model shows increasing predictive power as the birds become familiar with the sites, mirroring the animal's learning process. We subsequently find that the most informative elements of the flight trajectories coincide with landscape features that have previously been suggested as important components of the homing task. PMID:20656739

  11. Landmark clinical trials influencing surgical management of non-invasive and invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Thomas B; Venditti, Charis A; Duggal, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has changed considerably since the use of the Halstedian radical mastectomy early in the 20th century. Over the last 50 years, several landmark clinical trials from the USA and Europe have resulted in a paradigm shift in the management of breast cancer toward less radical forms of surgery with the combined use of multi-modality treatments including systemic chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and radiotherapy. Advances in such research have established a new worldwide standard of care for breast cancer surgical management and treatment, which has become more patient centric and which places a higher emphasis on cosmesis and improved patient quality of life. In this chapter, we review the landmark clinical trials that have influenced surgical management for non-invasive and invasive breast cancer and that serve to guide current clinical practices to date. PMID:25521007

  12. Development of a landmark recognition system for the posture measurement of mobile robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A landmark recognition system, consisting of retroreflective landmarks, a CCD camera, a strobe unit, an image processing board, and processing software, has been developed to solve the problem of the posture (position and orientation) identification of mobile robots in manufacturing environments. The binary image processing technique instead of gray image technique has been adapted in this system to perform the fast posture measurement of the robots. The experimental results demonstrated real-time measurement capability of this system while maintaining good reliability and reasonable accuracy. A camera calibration technique has been described to reduce the effects of unwanted measurement error sources. The system after camera calibration procedure has demonstrated enhanced performance in terms of error component in posture measurement. (Author)

  13. Exploiting context information to aid landmark detection in SenseCam images

    OpenAIRE

    Blighe, Michael; Le Borgne, Herve?; O Connor, Noel E.; Smeaton, Alan F.; Jones, Gareth J. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach designed to exploit context information in order to aid the detection of landmark images from a large collection of photographs. The photographs were generated using Microsoft’s SenseCam, a device designed to passively record a visual diary and cover a typical day of the user wearing the camera. The proliferation of digital photos along with the associated problems of managing and organising these collections provide the background motivati...

  14. The effect of providing a USB syllabus on resident reading of landmark articles

    OpenAIRE

    Mayy Chahla; Michael Eberlein; Scott Wright

    2010-01-01

    Background: The acquisition of new knowledge is a primary goal of residency training. Retrieving and retaining influential primary and secondary medical literature can be challenging for house officers. We set out to investigate the effect of a Universal Serial Bus (USB) drive loaded with landmark scientific articles on housestaff education in a pilot study. Methods: We created a USB syllabus that contains 187 primary scientific research articles. The electronic syllabus had links to the full...

  15. ACS National Historic Chemical Landmark: Charles Martin Hall's Discovery of the Electrochemical Process for Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Norman C.

    1997-11-01

    On September 17, 1997 in Oberlin, OH, Oberlin College and the Cleveland Section of the American Chemical Society hosted a celebration in which Charles Martin Hall's discovery of the electrochemical process for extracting aluminum metal from the ore was designated as a National Historic Chemical Landmark by the ACS. Woodshed laboratory with mannequins of Charles Martin Hall and his sister Julia. Photograph used with permission from Oberlin News-Tribune

  16. Anatomical and Visual Outcomes of Three Different Scleral Buckling Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To compare the anatomical and visual outcomes of three different scleral buckling techniques and to explore the effect of cryotherapy and subretinal fluid drainage (SRFD on outcomes of surgery. METHODS: This retrospective study was performed on 111 eyes of 109 patients undergoing scleral buckling for rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (RRDs by a single surgeon. Pre-, intra- and postoperative data were retrieved from hospital records. RESULTS: Buckles were radial in 27 (24.3%, circumferential (segmental in 16 (14.4% and encircling in 68 (61.3% eyes. Anatomical and visual results were comparable with all three buckling techniques. Application of cryotherapy, the spot number, and SRFD did not affect anatomical and visual results. The only preoperative factor associated with poorer anatomical results was the presence of multiple retinal breaks (P=0.006. The following preoperative factors affected visual outcomes on univariate analysis: extent of retinal detachment (r=0.417, P=0.011 and relative afferent pupillary defect (r=0.423, P=0.02. Preoperative macular status (attached vs detached also had a significant effect on visual outcomes (P < 0.001. Based on multivariate analysis however, only preoperative macular status was significantly correlated with visual results (P=0.022. Silicone sponges placed for non-encircling surgery were removed due to ocular dysmotility in 4 (3.6% eyes, cosmetic reasons in 3 (2.7% cases and extrusion in 2 (1.8% eyes. One encircling tire was also removed due to extrusion. CONCLUSION: Surgical technique and performing cryotherapy or SRFD do not seem to influence the anatomical and visual outcomes of scleral buckling. Postoperative complications seem to be more prevalent with non-encircling techniques.

  17. Superior laryngeal nerve block: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, M; Lozanoff, S; Lang, S A; Nyssen, J

    1995-01-01

    Superior laryngeal nerve anaesthesia is frequently used to facilitate endotracheal intubation in the awake patient. We have modified the transcutaneous approach to this nerve block to employ a short bevel needle. This improves tactile perception in performing the procedure thus simplifying identification of the correct depth of injection. This study was designed to determine the anatomical basis of superior laryngeal nerve anaesthesia and to estimate the success rate using our modified technique. At autopsy, 20 cadavers had nerve block performed substituting 0.02% methylene blue for local anaesthetic. Dissection was then performed to identify the anatomical structures stained by the simulated local anaesthetic. Additional dissections were performed in formalin-fixed cadavers. We found that the dye was injected into the paraglottic space bounded laterally by the thyrohyoid membrane and thyroid cartilage, medially by the laryngeal submucosa, caudad by the conus elasticus, cephalad by the hyoid bone, and anteriorly and posteriorly by the anterior and posterior thyrohyoid ligaments, respectively. The internal laryngeal nerve, the sensory branch of the superior laryngeal nerve, passed through this compartment and was heavily stained with simulated local anaesthetic. Resistance to the passage of the short bevel needle was provided by the lateral glossoepiglottic fold, not the thyrohyoid membrane as we had expected. Of 40 injections, 39 were deemed successful for a success rate of 97.5%. We conclude that this is a simple and highly successful technique for performing superior laryngeal nerve anaesthesia. PMID:7712327

  18. Reproducibility of lateral cephalometric landmarks on conventional radiographs and spatial frequency-processed digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed radiography (CR) has been used in cephalometric radiography and many studies have been carried out to improve image quality using various digital enhancement and filtering techniques. During CR image acquisition, the frequency rank and type affect to the image quality. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic quality of conventional cephalometric radiographs to those of computed radiography. The diagnostic quality of conventional cephalometric radiographs (M0) and their digital image counterparts were compared, and at the same time, six modalities (M1-M6) of spatial frequency-processed digital images were compared by evaluating the reproducibility of 23 cephalometric landmark locations. Reproducibility was defined as an observer's deviation (in mm) from the mean between all observers. In comparison with the conventional cephalometric radiograph (M0), M1 showed statistically significant differences in 8 locations, M2 in 9, M3 12, M4 in 7, M5 in 12, and M6 showed significant differences in 14 of 23 landmark locations (p<0.05). The number of reproducible landmarks that each modality possesses were 7 in M6, 6 in M5, 5 in M3, 4 in M4, 3 in M2, 2 in M1, and 1 location in M0. The image modality that observers selected as having the best image quality was M5.

  19. A low-cost test-bed for real-time landmark tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Ambrus; Hanan, Jay C.; Moreels, Pierre; Assad, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    A low-cost vehicle test-bed system was developed to iteratively test, refine and demonstrate navigation algorithms before attempting to transfer the algorithms to more advanced rover prototypes. The platform used here was a modified radio controlled (RC) car. A microcontroller board and onboard laptop computer allow for either autonomous or remote operation via a computer workstation. The sensors onboard the vehicle represent the types currently used on NASA-JPL rover prototypes. For dead-reckoning navigation, optical wheel encoders, a single axis gyroscope, and 2-axis accelerometer were used. An ultrasound ranger is available to calculate distance as a substitute for the stereo vision systems presently used on rovers. The prototype also carries a small laptop computer with a USB camera and wireless transmitter to send real time video to an off-board computer. A real-time user interface was implemented that combines an automatic image feature selector, tracking parameter controls, streaming video viewer, and user generated or autonomous driving commands. Using the test-bed, real-time landmark tracking was demonstrated by autonomously driving the vehicle through the JPL Mars yard. The algorithms tracked rocks as waypoints. This generated coordinates calculating relative motion and visually servoing to science targets. A limitation for the current system is serial computing-each additional landmark is tracked in order-but since each landmark is tracked independently, if transferred to appropriate parallel hardware, adding targets would not significantly diminish system speed.

  20. Anatomic correlations in radiogallium imaging of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiogallium (67Ga) imaging of the abdomen and pelvis has been useful not only in detecting inflammations in these regions, but in pointing out their precise anatomic localization. Once the anatomic site is determined, it is often possible to infer the source of origin of the problem (such as ruptured viscus or pancreatitis). Interpretation of the images depends on recognition of patterns that define known anatomic boundaries such as the transverse mesocolon, root of the small mesentery, perirenal space, and pararenal space, or else show diffuse peritoneal uptake. The anatomic patterns may have continued usefulness in future studies, such as when radiolabeled leukocytes are employed to localize inflammations

  1. Deviation of landmarks in accordance with methods of establishing reference planes in three-dimensional facial CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to investigate the deviation of landmarks from horizontal or midsagittal reference planes according to the methods of establishing reference planes. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 18 patients who received orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment were reviewed. Each CT scan was reconstructed by three methods for establishing three orthogonal reference planes (namely, the horizontal, midsagittal, and coronal reference planes). The horizontal (bilateral porions and bilateral orbitales) and midsagittal (crista galli, nasion, prechiasmatic point, opisthion, and anterior nasal spine) landmarks were identified on each CT scan. Vertical deviation of the horizontal landmarks and horizontal deviation of the midsagittal landmarks were measured. The porion and orbitale, which were not involved in establishing the horizontal reference plane, were found to deviate vertically from the horizontal reference plane in the three methods. The midsagittal landmarks, which were not used for the midsagittal reference plane, deviated horizontally from the midsagittal reference plane in the three methods. In a three-dimensional facial analysis, the vertical and horizontal deviations of the landmarks from the horizontal and midsagittal reference planes could vary depending on the methods of establishing reference planes.

  2. Deviation of landmarks in accordance with methods of establishing reference planes in three-dimensional facial CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kaeng Won; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol; Kook, Min Suk; Lee, Jae Seo [School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hee [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Palomo, Juan Martin [Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the deviation of landmarks from horizontal or midsagittal reference planes according to the methods of establishing reference planes. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 18 patients who received orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment were reviewed. Each CT scan was reconstructed by three methods for establishing three orthogonal reference planes (namely, the horizontal, midsagittal, and coronal reference planes). The horizontal (bilateral porions and bilateral orbitales) and midsagittal (crista galli, nasion, prechiasmatic point, opisthion, and anterior nasal spine) landmarks were identified on each CT scan. Vertical deviation of the horizontal landmarks and horizontal deviation of the midsagittal landmarks were measured. The porion and orbitale, which were not involved in establishing the horizontal reference plane, were found to deviate vertically from the horizontal reference plane in the three methods. The midsagittal landmarks, which were not used for the midsagittal reference plane, deviated horizontally from the midsagittal reference plane in the three methods. In a three-dimensional facial analysis, the vertical and horizontal deviations of the landmarks from the horizontal and midsagittal reference planes could vary depending on the methods of establishing reference planes.

  3. Brain anatomical substrates of mirror movements in Kallmann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, R; Salvalaggio, A; Citton, V; Palumbo, V; D'Errico, A; Elefante, A; Briani, C; Cantone, E; Ottaviano, G; Pellecchia, M T; Greggio, N A; Weis, L; D'Agosto, G; Rossato, M; De Carlo, E; Napoli, E; Coppola, G; Di Salle, F; Brunetti, A; Bonanni, G; Sinisi, A A; Favaro, A

    2015-01-01

    Among male patients affected by Kallmann syndrome, a genetically determined disease due to defective neural migration leading to hypogonadropic hypogonadism and hypo/anosmia, about 40% present the peculiar phenomenon of mirror movements, i.e. involuntary movements mirroring contralateral voluntary hand movements. Several pathogenic hypotheses have been proposed, but the ultimate neurological mechanisms are still elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate brain anatomical substrates of mirror movements in Kallmann syndrome by means of a panel of quantitative MRI analyses. Forty-nine male Kallmann syndrome patients underwent brain MRI. The study protocol included 3D-T1-weighted gradient echo, fluid attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion tensor imaging. Voxel-based morphometry, sulcation, curvature and cortical thickness analyses and tract based spatial statistics were performed using SPM8, Freesurfer and FSL. All patients underwent a complete physical and neurological examination including the evaluation of mirror movements (according to the Woods and Teuber criteria). Kallmann syndrome patients presenting with mirror movements (16/49, 32%) displayed the following brain changes: 1) increased gray matter density in the depth of the left precentral sulcus behind the middle frontal gyrus; 2) decreased cortical thickness in the precentral gyrus bilaterally, in the depth of right precentral sulcus and in the posterior portion of the right superior frontal gyrus; and 3) decreased fractional anisotropy in the left hemisphere involving the temporal lobe and peritrigonal white matter. No differences were shown by cortical curvature and sulcation analyses. The composite array of brain changes observed in Kallmann syndrome patients with mirror movements likely represents the anatomical-structural underpinnings leading to the peculiar derangement of the complex circuitry committed to unilateral hand voluntary movements. PMID:25300200

  4. Fleck, anatomical drawings and early modern history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowy, Ilana

    2008-01-01

    In 2003, the historian of medicine Michael Stolberg, contested the argument--developed by Thomas Laqueur and Londa Schiebinger--that in the XVIII century, anatomists shifted from a one-sex to a two-sexes model. Laqueur and Schiebinger linked the new focus on anatomical differences between the sexes to the rise of egalitarian aspirations during the Enlightenment, and a consecutive need to ground male domination in invariable "laws of nature". Stolberg claimed that the shift to the two sexes model occurred in the early modern period, and was mainly motivated by developments within medicine. This article examines the 2003 debate on the origin of "two sexes" model in the light of a 1939 controversy that opposed the historian of medicine Tadeusz Bilikiewicz, who advocated a focus on a "spirit" of an earlier epoch, and the pioneer of sociology of science Ludwik Fleck, who promoted the study of the "thought styles" of specific scientific communities. PMID:19848216

  5. Evaluating Different Landmark Positioning Systems Within the RIDE Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín López Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Mobile robots operating in the real world need a very reliable localization system to navigate autonomously for long periods of time. Numerous methods for indoor mobile robot localization have been developed. However, an affordable system covering all environments and situations is not yet available. Therefore, it is very important for mobile robot application developers to be aware of the operation and limitations of the different localization systems in order to obtain the best performance for each case. This paper evaluates two indoor localization systems that are integrated in the RIDE architecture: a commercial (Hagisonic StarGazer and a low cost localization system based on the popular Wii remote control (WiiMote with different tag distributions were evaluated. Characteristics that were tested include precision, accuracy, reliability, cost and immunity to interference.

  6. [Use of roentgenography for roentgeno-anatomic research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyskin, E A; Kishkovski?, A N; Tiutin, L A; Beliakova, L N

    1976-06-01

    The three-year-long experience of the use of electroroentgenography for anatomical investigations has shown that the details of the picture of anatomical objects which are insufficiently contrast in conventional roentgenograms may be revealed in electroroentgenograms. The obtained data speak of good prospects of application of electroentgenography in rentgenoanatomical studies. PMID:962590

  7. Anatomically Realistic Three-Dimensional Meshes of the Pelvic Floor & Anal Canal for Finite Element Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Noakes, Kimberley F.; Bissett, Ian P.; Pullan, Andrew J.; Cheng, Leo K.

    2008-01-01

    Three anatomically realistic meshes, suitable for finite element analysis, of the pelvic floor and anal canal regions have been developed to provide a framework with which to examine the mechanics, via finite element analysis of normal function within the pelvic floor. Two cadaver-based meshes were produced using the Visible Human Project (male and female) cryosection data sets, and a third mesh was produced based on MR image data from a live subject. The Visible Man (VM) me...

  8. Auxiliary anatomical labels for joint segmentation and atlas registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Tobias; Szekely, Gabor; Goksel, Orcun

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies improving joint segmentation and registration by introducing auxiliary labels for anatomy that has similar appearance to the target anatomy while not being part of that target. Such auxiliary labels help avoid false positive labelling of non-target anatomy by resolving ambiguity. A known registration of a segmented atlas can help identify where a target segmentation should lie. Conversely, segmentations of anatomy in two images can help them be better registered. Joint segmentation and registration is then a method that can leverage information from both registration and segmentation to help one another. It has received increasing attention recently in the literature. Often, merely a single organ of interest is labelled in the atlas. In the presense of other anatomical structures with similar appearance, this leads to ambiguity in intensity based segmentation; for example, when segmenting individual bones in CT images where other bones share the same intensity profile. To alleviate this problem, we introduce automatic generation of additional labels in atlas segmentations, by marking similar-appearance non-target anatomy with an auxiliary label. Information from the auxiliary-labeled atlas segmentation is then incorporated by using a novel coherence potential, which penalizes differences between the deformed atlas segmentation and the target segmentation estimate. We validated this on a joint segmentation-registration approach that iteratively alternates between registering an atlas and segmenting the target image to find a final anatomical segmentation. The results show that automatic auxiliary labelling outperforms the same approach using a single label atlasses, for both mandibular bone segmentation in 3D-CT and corpus callosum segmentation in 2D-MRI.

  9. Design and use of numerical anatomical atlases for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide radio-oncology specialists with automatic tools for delineating organs at risk of a patient undergoing a radiotherapy treatment of cerebral or head and neck tumors. To achieve this goal, we use an anatomical atlas, i.e. a representative anatomy associated to a clinical image representing it. The registration of this atlas allows us to segment automatically the patient structures and to accelerate this process. Contributions in this method are presented on three axes. First, we want to obtain a registration method which is as independent as possible from the setting of its parameters. This setting, done by the clinician, indeed needs to be minimal while guaranteeing a robust result. We therefore propose registration methods allowing a better control of the obtained transformation, using rejection techniques of inadequate matching or locally affine transformations. The second axis is dedicated to the consideration of structures associated with the presence of the tumor. These structures, not present in the atlas, indeed lead to local errors in the atlas-based segmentation. We therefore propose methods to delineate these structures and take them into account in the registration. Finally, we present the construction of an anatomical atlas of the head and neck region and its evaluation on a database of patients. We show in this part the feasibility of the use of an atlas for this region, as well as a simple method to evaluate the registration methods used to build an atlas. All this research work has been implemented in a commercial software (Imago from DOSIsoft), allowing us to validate our results in clinical conditions. (author)

  10. An anatomical review of spinal cord blood supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissano, G; Bertoglio, L; Rinaldi, E; Leopardi, M; Chiesa, R

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the spinal cord (SC) vascular supply is important in patients undergoing procedures that involve the thoracic and thoracoabdominal aorta. However, the SC vasculature has a complex anatomy, and teaching is often based only on anatomical sketches with highly variable accuracy; historically, this has required a "leap of faith" on the part of aortic surgeons. Fortunately, this "leap of faith" is no longer necessary given recent breakthroughs in imaging technologies and postprocessing software. Imaging methods have expanded the non-invasive diagnostic ability to determine a patient's SC vascular pattern, particularly in detecting the presence and location of the artery of Adamkiewicz. CT is the imaging modality of choice for most patients with thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic disease, proving especially useful in the determination of feasibility and planning of endovascular treatment. Thus the data set required for analysis of SC vascular anatomy is usually already available. We have concentrated our efforts on CT angiography, which offers particularly good imaging capabilities with state-of-the-art multidetector scanners. Multidetector row helical CT provides examinations of an extensive range in the craniocaudal direction with thin collimation in a short time interval, giving excellent temporal and spatial resolution. This paper provides examples of the SC vasculature imaging quality that can be obtained with 64 row scanners and appropriate postprocessing. Knowledge of the principal anatomical features of the SC blood supply of individual patients undergoing open or endovascular thoracoabdominal procedures has several potential benefits. For open surgery, analysis of the SC vasculature could tell us the aortic region that feeds the Adamkiewicz artery and thus needs to be reimplanted. For endovascular procedures, we can determine whether the stent-graft will cover the Adamkiewicz artery, thus avoiding unnecessary coverage. CT data can also be used to stratify risk of SC ischemia and guide the selective use of spinal cord injury prevention strategies. PMID:25881616

  11. Veias soleares: bases anatômicas e seu papel na origem da trombose venosa profunda em membro inferior / Soleus veins: anatomic basis and their role in the origin of deep venous lower limb thrombosis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carlos Miguel Gomes, Sequeira; Yara, Juliano; Neil Ferreira, Novo; Rubens Carlos, Mayall; Fausto, Miranda Junior.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar o número, a setorização e a terminação das veias soleares. MÉTODOS: Em 100 pernas de 50 cadáveres, excluídos aqueles com alterações congênitas ou adquiridas dos membros inferiores, foram realizadas, a fresco, na região crural posterior, dissecções anatômicas minuciosas, estratigráf [...] icas. Após o rebatimento da pele, foram realizadas a individualização das veias superficiais e perfurantes, rebatimento da tela subcutânea e da fáscia, individualização e rebatimento dos músculos gastrocnêmio e plantar, desinserção tibial do músculo sóleo, individualização das veias soleares e o estudo morfométrico. A região foi dividida em seis setores: súpero-medial, súpero-lateral, médio-medial, médio-lateral, ínfero-medial e ínfero-lateral. No estudo estatístico utilizaram-se os testes não-paramétricos Wilcoxon e Friedman. RESULTADOS: Foram encontradas 4.679 veias soleares. O setor com maior número de veias soleares foi o súpero-lateral com 1.529 veias (32,7%), seguido do médio-medial com 1.256 veias (26,8%) e do médio-lateral com 975 veias (20,8%). As terminações ocorreram em veias comunicantes (1.207 veias - 25,8%), veias tibiais posteriores (964 veias - 20,6%), veias fibulares (709 veias - 15,2%) e em mais 32 tipos (1799 veias - 38,4%). CONCLUSÃO: A drenagem venosa do músculo sóleo é realizada por um grande número de veias soleares, freqüentemente localizadas nos setores súpero-lateral, médio-medial e médio-lateral, terminando comumente em veias tibiais posteriores e fibulares e, em veias comunicantes. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: Study of the number, sectorization and termination of the soleus veins. METHODS: Meticulous, stratigraphical, anatomical dissections were carried out in the posterior crural region of 100 legs of 50 fresh cadavers. Those belonging to subjects with congenital or acquired pathologies in the [...] lower limbs were disregarded. After the skin was reflected on both sides, dissection of superficial and perforating veins, was performed. Then reflection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia, detachment and reflection of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles, detachment of the tibial origin of the soleus muscle, differentiation of the soleus veins and study of morphometric parameters were carried out. The region was divided into six sectors: superior-medial, superior-lateral, medio-medial, medio-lateral, inferior-medial and inferior-lateral. Data obtained from Wilcoxon and Friedman nonparametric tests were utilized for statistical analysis. RESULTS: In the dissected legs 4679 soleus veins were found. The sector with the greatest number of soleus veins was the superior-lateral (1529 veins - 32.7%), followed by the mediomedial (1.256 veins - 26.8%) and the mediolateral sectors (975 veins - 20.8%). The extremities drained into communicant veins (1.207 veins - 25.8%), posterior tibial veins (964 veins - 20.6%), peroneal veins (709 veins - 15.2%) and into 32 other types (1.799 veins 38.4%). CONCLUSION: The venous drainage of the soleus muscle is carried out by a great number of soleus veins which are frequently located in the superior-lateral, mediomedial and mediolateral sectors, more often going into the posterior tibial, peroneal and communicant veins.

  12. Reprint of "Quantitative evaluation of brain development using anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Yoshida, Shoko; Chang, Linda; Mori, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    The development of the brain is structure-specific, and the growth rate of each structure differs depending on the age of the subject. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to evaluate brain development because of the high spatial resolution and contrast that enable the observation of structure-specific developmental status. Currently, most clinical MRIs are evaluated qualitatively to assist in the clinical decision-making and diagnosis. The clinical MRI report usually does not provide quantitative values that can be used to monitor developmental status. Recently, the importance of image quantification to detect and evaluate mild-to-moderate anatomical abnormalities has been emphasized because these alterations are possibly related to several psychiatric disorders and learning disabilities. In the research arena, structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely applied to quantify brain development of the pediatric population. To interpret the values from these MR modalities, a "growth percentile chart," which describes the mean and standard deviation of the normal developmental curve for each anatomical structure, is required. Although efforts have been made to create such a growth percentile chart based on MRI and DTI, one of the greatest challenges is to standardize the anatomical boundaries of the measured anatomical structures. To avoid inter- and intra-reader variability about the anatomical boundary definition, and hence, to increase the precision of quantitative measurements, an automated structure parcellation method, customized for the neonatal and pediatric population, has been developed. This method enables quantification of multiple MR modalities using a common analytic framework. In this paper, the attempt to create an MRI- and a DTI-based growth percentile chart, followed by an application to investigate developmental abnormalities related to cerebral palsy, Williams syndrome, and Rett syndrome, have been introduced. Future directions include multimodal image analysis and personalization for clinical application. PMID:24295553

  13. Quantitative evaluation of brain development using anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Yoshida, Shoko; Chang, Linda; Mori, Susumu

    2013-11-01

    The development of the brain is structure-specific, and the growth rate of each structure differs depending on the age of the subject. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to evaluate brain development because of the high spatial resolution and contrast that enable the observation of structure-specific developmental status. Currently, most clinical MRIs are evaluated qualitatively to assist in the clinical decision-making and diagnosis. The clinical MRI report usually does not provide quantitative values that can be used to monitor developmental status. Recently, the importance of image quantification to detect and evaluate mild-to-moderate anatomical abnormalities has been emphasized because these alterations are possibly related to several psychiatric disorders and learning disabilities. In the research arena, structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely applied to quantify brain development of the pediatric population. To interpret the values from these MR modalities, a "growth percentile chart," which describes the mean and standard deviation of the normal developmental curve for each anatomical structure, is required. Although efforts have been made to create such a growth percentile chart based on MRI and DTI, one of the greatest challenges is to standardize the anatomical boundaries of the measured anatomical structures. To avoid inter- and intra-reader variability about the anatomical boundary definition, and hence, to increase the precision of quantitative measurements, an automated structure parcellation method, customized for the neonatal and pediatric population, has been developed. This method enables quantification of multiple MR modalities using a common analytic framework. In this paper, the attempt to create an MRI- and a DTI-based growth percentile chart, followed by an application to investigate developmental abnormalities related to cerebral palsy, Williams syndrome, and Rett syndrome, have been introduced. Future directions include multimodal image analysis and personalization for clinical application. PMID:23796902

  14. Quantitative evaluation of brain development using anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V.; Yoshida, Shoko; Chang, Linda; Mori, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    The development of the brain is structure-specific, and the growth rate of each structure differs depending on the age of the subject. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to evaluate brain development because of the high spatial resolution and contrast that enable the observation of structure-specific developmental status. Currently, most clinical MRIs are evaluated qualitatively to assist in the clinical decision-making and diagnosis. The clinical MRI report usually does not provide quantitative values that can be used to monitor developmental status. Recently, the importance of image quantification to detect and evaluate mild-to-moderate anatomical abnormalities has been emphasized because these alterations are possibly related to several psychiatric disorders and learning disabilities. In the research arena, structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely applied to quantify brain development of the pediatric population. To interpret the values from these MR modalities, a “growth percentile chart,” which describes the mean and standard deviation of the normal developmental curve for each anatomical structure, is required. Although efforts have been made to create such a growth percentile chart based on MRI and DTI, one of the greatest challenges is to standardize the anatomical boundaries of the measured anatomical structures. To avoid inter- and intra-reader variability about the anatomical boundary definition, and hence, to increase the precision of quantitative measurements, an automated structure parcellation method, customized for the neonatal and pediatric population, has been developed. This method enables quantification of multiple MR modalities using a common analytic framework. In this paper, the attempt to create an MRI- and a DTI-based growth percentile chart, followed by an application to investigate developmental abnormalities related to cerebral palsy, Williams syndrome, and Rett syndrome, have been introduced. Future directions include multimodal image analysis and personalization for clinical application. PMID:23796902

  15. The clinical utilization of intracranial aneurysmal anatomic characteristics in predicting the degree of primary aneurysm occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the anatomic factors that could help to predict the degree of primary endovascular occlusion of cerebral aneurysms by 3D-DSA and to use a simple scoring system to predict the difficulty of achieving complete occlusion of cerebral aneurysm. Methods: 119 patients with 129 intracranial aneurysms underwent 3D-DSA and were subsequently treated by endovascular packing with coils. All patients underwent 2D-DSA after the primary embolization so that we could assess the degree of aneurysmal occlusion. The following aneurysm-related anatomic parameters were measured on 3D-DSA including the largest diameter, neck size, dome-to-neck ratio and shape. The relationship between each parameter and the rate of successful treatment was determined in order to reveal the anatomic factors and a score used to demonstrate difficulty of attaining occlusion was developed on the basis of the identified predictors of successful treatment. Subsequently, we assessed the correlation between the score and the rate of successful occlusion. Results: Three anatomic parameters influenced significantly the rate of successful occlusion: neck size (P=0.02), shape (P<0.01) and dome-to-neck ratio (P=0.04). The difficult score based on the three parameters (neck size, shape, dome-to-neck ratio) was significantly correlated with the occlusion rate (P<0.01). Conclusions: Several anatomic parameters (neck size, shape, dome-to-neck ratio) of aneurysms are correlated with the immediate outcsms are correlated with the immediate outcome of aneurysmal occlusion. The difficult score based on 3D-DSA findings provides useful information for predicting successful endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. (authors)

  16. SU-E-J-191: Automated Detection of Anatomic Changes in H'N Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a novel statistics-based method for automated detection of anatomical changes using cone-beam CT data. A method was developed that can provide a reliable and automated early warning system that enables a “just-in-time” adaptation of the treatment plan. Methods: Anatomical changes were evaluated by comparing the original treatment planning CT with daily CBCT images taken prior treatment delivery. The external body contour was computed on a given CT slice and compared against the corresponding contour on the daily CBCT. In contrast to threshold-based techniques, a statistical approach was employed to evaluate the difference between the contours using a given confidence level. The detection tool used the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, which is a non-parametric technique that compares two samples drawn from arbitrary probability distributions. 11 H'N patients were retrospectively selected from a clinical imaging database with a total of 186 CBCT images. Six patients in the database were confirmed to have anatomic changes during the course of radiotherapy. Five of the H'N patients did not have significant changes. The KS test was applied to the contour data using a sliding window analysis. The confidence level of 0.99 was used to moderate false detection. Results: The algorithm was able to correctly detect anatomical changes in 6 out of 6 patients with an excellent spatial accuracy as early as at the 14th elapsed day. The algorithm provided a consistent and accurate delineation of the detected changes. The output of the anatomical change tool is easy interpretable, and can be shown overlaid on a 3D rendering of the patient's anatomy. Conclusion: The detection method provides the basis for one of the key components of Adaptive Radiation Therapy. The method uses tools that are readily available in the clinic, including daily CBCT imaging, and image co-registration facilities

  17. An anatomically driven anisotropic diffusion filtering method for 3D SPECT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we aim to reconstruct single-photon emission computed tomography images using anatomical information from magnetic resonance imaging as a priori knowledge about the activity distribution. The trade-off between anatomical and emission data is one of the main concerns for such studies. In this work, we propose an anatomically driven anisotropic diffusion filter (ADADF) as a penalized maximum likelihood expectation maximization optimization framework. The ADADF method has improved edge-preserving denoising characteristics compared to other smoothing penalty terms based on quadratic and non-quadratic functions. The proposed method has an important ability to retain information which is absent in the anatomy. To make our approach more stable to the noise-edge classification problem, robust statistics have been employed. Comparison of the ADADF method is performed with a successful anatomically driven technique, namely, the Bowsher prior (BP). Quantitative assessment using simulated and clinical neuroreceptor volumetric data show the advantage of the ADADF over the BP. For the modelled data, the overall image resolution, the contrast, the signal-to-noise ratio and the ability to preserve important features in the data are all improved by using the proposed method. For clinical data, the contrast in the region of interest is significantly improved using the ADADF compared to the BP, while successfully eliminating noise. (paper). (paper)

  18. Integration of tomato reproductive developmental landmarks and expression profiles, and the effect of SUN on fruit shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dongmei

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universally accepted landmark stages are necessary to highlight key events in plant reproductive development and to facilitate comparisons among species. Domestication and selection of tomato resulted in many varieties that differ in fruit shape and size. This diversity is useful to unravel underlying molecular and developmental mechanisms that control organ morphology and patterning. The tomato fruit shape gene SUN controls fruit elongation. The most dramatic effect of SUN on fruit shape occurs after pollination and fertilization although a detailed investigation into the timing of the fruit shape change as well as gene expression profiles during critical developmental stages has not been conducted. Results We provide a description of floral and fruit development in a red-fruited closely related wild relative of tomato, Solanum pimpinellifolium accession LA1589. We use established and propose new floral and fruit landmarks to present a framework for tomato developmental studies. In addition, gene expression profiles of three key stages in floral and fruit development are presented, namely floral buds 10 days before anthesis (floral landmark 7, anthesis-stage flowers (floral landmark 10 and fruit landmark 1, and 5 days post anthesis fruit (fruit landmark 3. To demonstrate the utility of the landmarks, we characterize the tomato shape gene SUN in fruit development. SUN controls fruit shape predominantly after fertilization and its effect reaches a maximum at 8 days post-anthesis coinciding with fruit landmark 4 representing the globular embryo stage of seed development. The expression profiles of the NILs that differ at sun show that only 34 genes were differentially expressed and most of them at a less than 2-fold difference. Conclusion The landmarks for flower and fruit development in tomato were outlined and integrated with the effect of SUN on fruit shape. Although we did not identify many genes differentially expressed in the NILs that differ at the sun locus, higher or lower transcript levels for many genes involved in phytohormone biosynthesis or signaling as well as organ identity and patterning of tomato fruit were found between developmental time points.

  19. CBCT with specification of imaging dose and CNR by anatomical volume of interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A novel method has been developed for volume of interest (VOI) cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging using a 2.35 MV/Carbon target linac imaging beam line combined with dynamic multileaf collimator sequences. Methods: The authors demonstrate the concept of acquisition of multiple, separate imaging volumes, where volumes can be either completely separated or nested, and are associated with predetermined imaging dose and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) characteristics. Two individual MLC sequences were established in the planning system (Eclipse, Varian Medical) to collimate the beam according to a defined inner VOI (e.g., containing a target volume under image guidance) and an outer VOI (e.g., including surrounding landmarks or organs-at-risk). MLC sequences were interleaved as a function of gantry angle to produce a reconstructed CBCT image with nested VOIs. By controlling the ratio of inner-to-outer ratio of MLC segments (and thus Monitor Units) during acquisition, the relative dose and CNR in the two volumes can be controlled. Inner-to-outer ratios of 2:1 to 6:1 were examined. Results: The concept was explored using an anatomical head phantom to assess image quality. A geometric phantom was used to quantify absolute dose and CNR values for the various sequences. The authors found that the dose in the outer VOI decreased by a functional relationship dependent on the inner-to-outer sequence ratio, while the CNR varied by the square root of dose, as expected. Conclusions: In this study the authors demonstrate flexibility in VOI CBCT by tailoring the imaging dose and CNR distribution in separate volumes within the patient anatomy. This would allow for high quality imaging of a target volume for alignment purposes, with simultaneous low dose imaging of the surrounding anatomy (e.g., for coregistration)

  20. Menopausa: marco biopsicossocial do envelhecimento feminino / Menopause: biopsychossocial landmark of female aging

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Vanessa Nolasco, Ferreira; Renata Silva de Carvalho, Chinelato; Marcela Rodrigues, Castro; Maria Elisa Caputo, Ferreira.

    Full Text Available O presente estudo é derivado da pesquisa "Gênero, Corpo e Envelhecimento em Mulheres de Meia-Idade" e versa sobre a emersão da categoria menopausa como marco biopsicossocial do envelhecimento feminino, apontada através das entrevistas realizadas pelo estudo qualitativo exploratório em questão. Tal c [...] ategoria deriva da utilização da Análise de Conteúdo como metodologia para o tratamento dos dados obtidos através de um painel amostral de 47 participantes de uma mesma realidade social e cadastradas na Unidade Básica de Saúde utilizada como referência. Foi constatado que 41 das 47 entrevistadas citaram a menopausa como marcador determinante do envelhecimento, sendo que 37 o fizeram diretamente. Dessa forma, o artigo proporciona uma discussão entre o que é proposto na literatura e marcador apontado pelas participantes da pesquisa. Abstract in english The present study is derived from the research "Gender, Body and Aging in Women at Middle Age" and deals with the emergence of the category menopause as a biopsychossocial landmark of female aging, indicated through the interviews conducted by the qualitative exploratory study in question. This clas [...] s comes from the use of content analysis as a methodology for processing data obtained from a panel sample of 47 participants from the same social reality and registered in the Basic Health Unit used as reference. It was noted that 41 of the 47 interviewed cited the menopause as determinant landmark of aging process, and 37 did it directly. Thus, the article provides a discussion between what is proposed by the literature and the landmark pointed by the participants of the research.

  1. Simultaneous segmentation and grading of anatomical structures for patient's classification : application to Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coupé, Pierrick; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative approach to robustly and accurately detect Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on the distinction of specific atrophic patterns of anatomical structures such as hippocampus (HC) and entorhinal cortex (EC). The proposed method simultaneously performs segmentation and grading of structures to efficiently capture the anatomical alterations caused by AD. Known as SNIPE (Scoring by Non-local Image Patch Estimator), the novel proposed grading measure is based on a nonlocal patch-based frame-work and estimates the similarity of the patch surrounding the voxel under study with all the patches present in different training populations. In this study, the training library was composed of two populations: 50 cognitively normal subjects (CN) and 50 patients with AD, randomly selected from the ADNI database. During our experiments, the classification accuracy of patients (CN vs. AD) using several biomarkers was compared: HC and EC volumes, the grade of these structures and finally the combination of their volume and their grade. Tests were completed in a leave-one-out framework using discriminant analysis. First, we showed that biomarkers based on HC provide better classification accuracy than biomarkers based on EC. Second, we demonstrated that structure grading is a more powerful measure than structure volume to distinguish both populations with a classification accuracy of 90%. Finally, by adding the ages of subjects in order to better separate age-related structural changes from disease-related anatomical alterations, SNIPE obtained a classification accuracy of 93%.

  2. PolyAlign: A Versatile LC-MS Data Alignment Tool for Landmark-Selected and -Automated Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähämaa, Heidi; Koskinen, Ville R; Hosia, Waltteri; Moulder, Robert; Nevalainen, Olli S; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Aittokallio, Tero; Salmi, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    We present a versatile user-friendly software tool, PolyAlign, for the alignment of multiple LC-MS signal maps with the option of manual landmark setting or automated alignment. One of the spectral images is selected as a reference map, and after manually setting the landmarks, the program warps the images using either polynomial or Hermite transformation. The software provides an option for automated landmark finding. The software includes a very fast zoom-in function synchronized between the images, which facilitate detecting correspondences between the adjacent images. Such an interactive visual process enables the analyst to decide when the alignment is satisfactory and to correct known irregularities. We demonstrate that the software provides significant improvements in the alignment of LC-MALDI data, with 10-15 landmark pairs, and it is also applicable to correcting electrospray LC-MS data. The results with practical data show substantial improvement in peak alignment compared to MZmine, which was among the best analysis packages in a recent assessment. The PolyAlign software is freely available and easily accessible as an integrated component of the popular MZmine software, and also as a simpler stand-alone Perl implementation to preview data and apply landmark directed polynomial transformation. PMID:22084688

  3. Historic landmarks in radiation chemistry since early observations by Marie Sklodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin of the radiation chemistry history is contemporary with the X-rays and uranic rays discoveries. The complexity of the phenomena induced by the radiation effects, which involve electrons, ions and free radicals and a specific spatial distribution of the energy deposit along the tracks, was progressively understood, particularly when pulse radiolysis and time-resolved detection permitted to observe the short-lived transient species and to explain the chemical or biochemical mechanism. This short review summarizes the most important landmarks of the concepts and their applications. (author)

  4. Ontology-based image navigation: exploring 3.0-T MR neurography of the brachial plexus using AIM and RadLex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kenneth C; Salunkhe, Aditya R; Morrison, James J; Lee, Pearlene P; Mejino, José L V; Detwiler, Landon T; Brinkley, James F; Siegel, Eliot L; Rubin, Daniel L; Carrino, John A

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nervous system have traditionally been evaluated using clinical history, physical examination, and electrodiagnostic testing. In selected cases, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance (MR) neurography may help further localize or characterize abnormalities associated with peripheral neuropathies, and the clinical importance of such techniques is increasing. However, MR image interpretation with respect to peripheral nerve anatomy and disease often presents a diagnostic challenge because the relevant knowledge base remains relatively specialized. Using the radiology knowledge resource RadLex®, a series of RadLex queries, the Annotation and Image Markup standard for image annotation, and a Web services-based software architecture, the authors developed an application that allows ontology-assisted image navigation. The application provides an image browsing interface, allowing users to visually inspect the imaging appearance of anatomic structures. By interacting directly with the images, users can access additional structure-related information that is derived from RadLex (eg, muscle innervation, muscle attachment sites). These data also serve as conceptual links to navigate from one portion of the imaging atlas to another. With 3.0-T MR neurography of the brachial plexus as the initial area of interest, the resulting application provides support to radiologists in the image interpretation process by allowing efficient exploration of the MR imaging appearance of relevant nerve segments, muscles, bone structures, vascular landmarks, anatomic spaces, and entrapment sites, and the investigation of neuromuscular relationships. PMID:25590394

  5. A multicore based parallel image registration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Gong, Leiguang; Zhang, Hong; Nosher, John L; Foran, David J

    2009-01-01

    Image registration is a crucial step for many image-assisted clinical applications such as surgery planning and treatment evaluation. In this paper we proposed a landmark based nonlinear image registration algorithm for matching 2D image pairs. The algorithm was shown to be effective and robust under conditions of large deformations. In landmark based registration, the most important step is establishing the correspondence among the selected landmark points. This usually requires an extensive search which is often computationally expensive. We introduced a nonregular data partition algorithm using the K-means clustering algorithm to group the landmarks based on the number of available processing cores. The step optimizes the memory usage and data transfer. We have tested our method using IBM Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/B.E.) platform. PMID:19964921

  6. Evaluation of Four Volume-Based Image Registration Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated 4 volume-based automatic image registration algorithms from 2 commercially available treatment planning systems (Philips Syntegra and BrainScan). The algorithms based on cross correlation (CC), local correlation (LC), normalized mutual information (NMI), and BrainScan mutual information (BSMI) were evaluated with: (1) the synthetic computed tomography (CT) images, (2) the CT and magnetic resonance (MR) phantom images, and (3) the CT and MR head image pairs from 12 patients with brain tumors. For the synthetic images, the registration results were compared with known transformation parameters, and all algorithms achieved accuracy of submillimeter in translation and subdegree in rotation. For the phantom images, the registration results were compared with those provided by frame and marker-based manual registration. For the patient images, the results were compared with anatomical landmark-based manual registration to qualitatively determine how the results were close to a clinically acceptable registration. NMI and LC outperformed CC and BSMI, with the sense of being closer to a clinically acceptable result. As for the robustness, NMI and BSMI outperformed CC and LC. A guideline of image registration in our institution was given, and final visual assessment is necessary to guarantee reasonable results.

  7. Gene Expression Data to Mouse Atlas Registration Using a Nonlinear Elasticity Smoother and Landmark Points Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tungyou; Guyader, Carole Le; Dinov, Ivo; Thompson, Paul; Toga, Arthur; Vese, Luminita

    2012-03-01

    This paper proposes a numerical algorithm for image registration using energy minimization and nonlinear elasticity regularization. Application to the registration of gene expression data to a neuroanatomical mouse atlas in two dimensions is shown. We apply a nonlinear elasticity regularization to allow larger and smoother deformations, and further enforce optimality constraints on the landmark points distance for better feature matching. To overcome the difficulty of minimizing the nonlinear elasticity functional due to the nonlinearity in the derivatives of the displacement vector field, we introduce a matrix variable to approximate the Jacobian matrix and solve for the simplified Euler-Lagrange equations. By comparison with image registration using linear regularization, experimental results show that the proposed nonlinear elasticity model also needs fewer numerical corrections such as regridding steps for binary image registration, it renders better ground truth, and produces larger mutual information; most importantly, the landmark points distance and L (2) dissimilarity measure between the gene expression data and corresponding mouse atlas are smaller compared with the registration model with biharmonic regularization. PMID:24273381

  8. The contribution of obstruent consonants and acoustic landmarks to speech recognition in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Loizou, Philipos C

    2008-12-01

    The obstruent consonants (e.g., stops) are more susceptible to noise than vowels, raising the question whether the degradation of speech intelligibility in noise can be attributed, at least partially, to the loss of information carried by obstruent consonants. Experiment 1 assesses the contribution of obstruent consonants to speech recognition in noise by presenting sentences containing clean obstruent consonants but noise-corrupted voiced sounds (e.g., vowels). Results indicated substantial (threefold) improvement in speech recognition, particularly at low signal-to-noise ratio levels (-5 dB). Experiment 2 assessed the importance of providing partial information, within a frequency region, of the obstruent-consonant spectra while leaving the remaining spectral region unaltered (i.e., noise corrupted). Access to the low-frequency (0-1000 Hz) region of the clean obstruent-consonant spectra was found to be sufficient to realize significant improvements in performance and that was attributed to improvement in transmission of voicing information. The outcomes from the two experiments suggest that much of the improvement in performance must be due to the enhanced access to acoustic landmarks, evident in spectral discontinuities signaling the onsets of obstruent consonants. These landmarks, often blurred in noisy conditions, are critically important for understanding speech in noise for better determination of the syllable structure and word boundaries. PMID:19206819

  9. Automated diffeomorphic registration of anatomical structures with rigid parts: application to dynamic cervical MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Commowick, Olivier; Wiest-daessle?, Nicolas; Prima, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    We propose an iterative two-step method to compute a diffeomorphic non-rigid transformation between images of anatomical structures with rigid parts, without any user intervention or prior knowledge on the image intensities. First we compute spatially sparse, locally optimal rigid transformations between the two images using a new block matching strategy and an efficient numerical optimiser (BOBYQA). Then we derive a dense, regularised velocity field based on these local transformations using...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Newborn Brain: Automatic Segmentation of Brain Images into 50 Anatomical Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Gousias, Ioannis S.; Hammers, Alexander; Counsell, Serena J.; Srinivasan, Latha; Rutherford, Mary A; Heckemann, Rolf A; Hajnal, Jo V; Rueckert, Daniel; Edwards, A David

    2013-01-01

    We studied methods for the automatic segmentation of neonatal and developing brain images into 50 anatomical regions, utilizing a new set of manually segmented magnetic resonance (MR) images from 5 term-born and 15 preterm infants imaged at term corrected age called ALBERTs. Two methods were compared: individual registrations with label propagation and fusion; and template based registration with propagation of a maximum probability neonatal ALBERT (MPNA). In both cases we evaluated the perfo...

  11. Construction of patient specific atlases from locally most similar anatomical pieces

    OpenAIRE

    Ramus, Liliane; Commowick, Olivier; Malandain, Gre?goire

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy planning requires accurate delineations of the critical structures. To avoid manual contouring, atlas-based segmentation can be used to get automatic delineations. However, the results strongly depend on the chosen atlas, especially for the head and neck region where the anatomical variability is high. To address this problem, atlases adapted to the patient's anatomy may allow for a better registration, and already showed an improvement in segmentation accuracy. However, building...

  12. Three-dimensional analysis of the anatomical growth response of European conifers to mechanical disturbance

    OpenAIRE

    Schneuwly, Dominique M.; Stoffel, Markus; Dorren, Luuk K. A.; Berger, Fre?de?ric

    2009-01-01

    Studies on tree reaction after wounding were so far based on artificial wounding or chemical treatment. For the first time, type, spread and intensity of anatomical responses were analyzed and quantified in naturally disturbed Larix decidua Mill., Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Abies alba Mill. trees. The consequences of rockfall impacts on increment growth were assessed at the height of the wounds, as well as above and below the injuries. A total of 16 trees were selected on rockfall slopes, an...

  13. Hierarchical organisation of neuro-anatomical constraints in interlimb coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, Stephan; Woolley, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Based on the observation that bimanual finger tapping movements tend toward mirror symmetry with respect to the body midline, despite the synchronous activation of non-homologous muscles, F. Mechsner, D. Kerzel, G. Knoblich, and W. Prinz (2001) [Perceptual basis of bimanual coordination. Nature, 414, 69-73] suggested that the basis of rhythmic coordination is purely spatial/perceptual in nature, and independent of the neuro-anatomical constraints of the motor system. To investigate this issue further, we employed a four finger tapping task similar to that used by F. Mechsner and G. Knoblich (2004) [Do muscle matter in bimanual coordination? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 30, 490-503] in which six male participants were required to alternately tap combinations of adjacent pairs of index (I), middle (M) and ring (R) fingers of each hand in time with an auditory metronome. The metronome pace increased continuously from 1 Hz to 3 Hz over the course of a 30-s trial. Each participant performed three blocks of trials in which finger combination for each hand (IM or MR) and mode of coordination (mirror or parallel) were presented in random order. Within each block, the right hand was placed in one of three orientations; prone, neutral and supine. The order of blocks was counterbalanced across the six participants. The left hand maintained a prone position throughout the experiment. On the basis of discrete relative phase analyses between synchronised taps, the time at which the initial mode of coordination was lost was determined for each trial. When the right hand was prone, transitions occurred only from parallel symmetry to mirror symmetry, regardless of finger combination. In contrast, when the right hand was supine, transitions occurred only from mirror symmetry to parallel but no transitions were observed in the opposite direction. In the right hand neutral condition, mirror and parallel symmetry are insufficient to describe the modes of coordination since the hands are oriented orthogonally. When defined anatomically, however, the results in each of the three right hand orientations are consistent. That is, synchronisation of finger tapping is determined by a hierarchy of control of individual fingers based on their intrinsic neuro-mechanical properties rather than on the basis of their spatial orientation. PMID:16330121

  14. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes...

  15. Evaluation of knowledge-based reconstruction for magnetic resonance volumetry of the right ventricle in tetralogy of Fallot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyns, Emile Christian Arie; Dragulescu, Andreea [University of Toronto, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Yoo, Shi-Joon; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars [University of Toronto, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance using the Simpson method is the gold standard for right ventricular volumetry. However, this method is time-consuming and not without sources of error. Knowledge-based reconstruction is a novel post-processing approach that reconstructs the right ventricular endocardial shape based on anatomical landmarks and a database of various right ventricular configurations. To assess the feasibility, accuracy and labor intensity of knowledge-based reconstruction in repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). The short-axis cine cardiac MR datasets of 35 children and young adults (mean age 14.4 ± 2.5 years) after TOF repair were studied using both knowledge-based reconstruction and the Simpson method. Intraobserver, interobserver and inter-method variability were assessed using Bland-Altman analyses. Knowledge-based reconstruction was feasible and highly accurate as compared to the Simpson method. Intra- and inter-method variability for knowledge-based reconstruction measurements showed good agreement. Volumetric assessment using knowledge-based reconstruction was faster when compared with the Simpson method (10.9 ± 2.0 vs. 7.1 ± 2.4 min, P < 0.001). In patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot, knowledge-based reconstruction is a feasible, accurate and reproducible method for measuring right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. The post-processing time of right ventricular volumetry using knowledge-based reconstruction was significantly shorter when compared with the routine Simpson method. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of knowledge-based reconstruction for magnetic resonance volumetry of the right ventricle in tetralogy of Fallot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac magnetic resonance using the Simpson method is the gold standard for right ventricular volumetry. However, this method is time-consuming and not without sources of error. Knowledge-based reconstruction is a novel post-processing approach that reconstructs the right ventricular endocardial shape based on anatomical landmarks and a database of various right ventricular configurations. To assess the feasibility, accuracy and labor intensity of knowledge-based reconstruction in repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). The short-axis cine cardiac MR datasets of 35 children and young adults (mean age 14.4 ± 2.5 years) after TOF repair were studied using both knowledge-based reconstruction and the Simpson method. Intraobserver, interobserver and inter-method variability were assessed using Bland-Altman analyses. Knowledge-based reconstruction was feasible and highly accurate as compared to the Simpson method. Intra- and inter-method variability for knowledge-based reconstruction measurements showed good agreement. Volumetric assessment using knowledge-based reconstruction was faster when compared with the Simpson method (10.9 ± 2.0 vs. 7.1 ± 2.4 min, P < 0.001). In patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot, knowledge-based reconstruction is a feasible, accurate and reproducible method for measuring right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. The post-processing time of right ventricular volumetry using knowledge-based reconstruction was significantly shorter when compared with the routine Simpson method. (orig.)

  17. Superior phrenic artery: an anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; Louis, Robert G; Wartmann, Christopher T; Tubbs, R Shane; Esmaeili, Ehsan; Bagenholm, Allyson C; Merbs, William; Curry, Brian; Jordan, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The majority of anatomical textbooks offer very little information concerning the anatomy and distribution of the superior phrenic artery (SPA). However, in the last decade, a number of reports have appeared with reference to the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization of the collateral arterial supply of hepatic carcinoma (HC). Considering the potential role of the SPA as a source of collateral blood supply to HC, the aim of this study was to identify the origin and distribution of the SPA. One hundred formalin-fixed adult cadavers with no evidence of significant gross diaphragmatic pathology were examined. The right SPA originated from the aorta (R1) in 42%, as a branch of the proximal segment of the 10th intercostal artery (R2) in 33%, and as a branch of the distal segment of the 10th intercostal artery (R3) in 25%, of the specimens. The left SPA originated from the aorta (L1) in 51%, from proximal segment of the left 10th intercostal artery (L2) in 40%, and from the distal segment of the left 10th intercostal artery (L3) in 9%, of the specimens. In types R1, R2, L1 and L2 the SPA terminated, after a short course, within the medial and posterosuperior surfaces of the thoracic diaphragm and diaphragmatic crura. Conversely, in types R3 and L3 the lateral origin of the SPAs confined the ultimate distribution of the vessels to the posterior surface of the diaphragm. These findings could provide a better understanding of the anatomy and distribution of the arterial supply of the diaphragm and the potential involvement of the right SPA as an extrahepatic collateral artery developed in HC. PMID:17180633

  18. Anatomical study of vestibulospinal neurons in lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, N; Pflieger, J F; Dubuc, R

    1999-05-17

    The present study was carried out to characterize anatomically the vestibulospinal (VS) system of lampreys. Cobalt-lysine or Texas Red dextran amines were applied in vitro to the rostral spinal cord. Two distinct populations of VS neurons were labeled in the ventral nucleus of the area octavolateralis. The rostral group, comprising the intermediate octavomotor nucleus (ION), contained between 100 and 150 neurons, having somata of variable size and morphology. Intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in single neurons revealed ION VS neurons with dendrites extending in the ventrolateral alar plate as well as medially in the basal plate. The caudal group, comprising the posterior octavomotor nucleus (PON), contained approximately 65 neurons, most of which were unipolar with round or oval somata. To study the projections of VS axons, cobalt-lysine was injected into the ION or PON regions in the brainstem. Axons from the ION projected to the ipsilateral spinal cord, whereas PON axons decussated within the basal plate giving out descending and ascending branches. The descending branch projected to the contralateral spinal cord. Injections of two fluorescent dextran-amines, each restricted to one side of the spinal cord, did not double-label VS cells in either octavomotor nuclei, indicating that the projections of each nucleus are restricted to one side. Injections of horseradish peroxidase further caudally in the spinal cord revealed that VS axons from the ION reached past the gill region. Our results indicate that the organization of the VS system of lampreys is similar to that observed in other vertebrates. PMID:10235642

  19. Double auricles of the right atrium: a unique anatomic deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Lampoura Stefania S; Karantzis Ioannis; Koufakis Theocharis; Papadopoulos Dimitrios; Daskalopoulos Marios E; Karangelis Dimos; Tagarakis Georgios I; Chlapoutakis Serapheim; Tsilimingas Nikolaos B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Anatomic deviations, especially those detected during the course of an operation, are medically intriguing, as they raise concerns about their clinical significance and putative complications. Case presentation We present, to our knowledge, for the first time a case of an anatomic deviation in the form of a second right atrial auricle in a 70 year-old, coronary bypass-operated male Caucasian patient of Greek origin. No complications were noted intra-or postoperatively. Con...

  20. Ultrasound of the rotator cuff with MRI and anatomic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution ultrasound (US) are frequently used for the detection of rotator cuff tears. The diagnostic yield of US is influenced by several factors as technique, knowledge of the imaging characteristics of anatomic and pathologic findings and of pitfalls. The purpose of this article is to illustrates that the standardized high-resolution US examination of the shoulder covers the entire rotator cuff and correlates with MR imaging and anatomic sections

  1. Tubular Surface Segmentation for Extracting Anatomical Structures From Medical Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Vandana; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    This work provides a model for tubular structures, and devises an algorithm to automatically extract tubular anatomical structures from medical imagery. Our model fits many anatomical structures in medical imagery, in particular, various fiber bundles in the brain (imaged through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (DW-MRI)) such as the cingulum bundle, and blood vessel trees in computed tomography angiograms (CTAs). Extraction of the cingulum bundle is of interest because of possible ties ...

  2. The Morphological, Anatomical and Karyological Properties of Salvia sclarea L.

    OpenAIRE

    O?zdemi?r, Canan

    1999-01-01

    The morphological, anatomical and karyological properties of Salvia sclarea L. were investigated. In addition, glandular and eglandular hairs were examined and classified. In the morphological study it was observed that the species have a perennial root system. The herbaceous stem is rectangular. Leaves are simple. Glandular and eglandular hairs are present on both surfaces of the leaves. Inflorescence is compound raceme. In anatomical studies, the internal morphological features of root, ...

  3. Toledo School of Translators and their influence on anatomical terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Bueno-López, José-L; Raio, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Translation facilitates transmission of knowledge between cultures. The fundamental transfer of anatomic terminology from the Ancient Greek and Islamic Golden Age cultures, to medieval Latin Christendom took place in the so-called Toledo School of Translators in the 12th-13th centuries. Translations made in Toledo circulated widely across Europe. They were the foundation of scientific thinking that was born in the boards of first universities. In Toledo, Gerard of Cremona translated Avicenna's Canon of Medicine, the key work of Islamic Golden Age of medicine. Albertus Magnus, Mondino de Luzzi and Guy de Chauliac, the leading authors of anatomical Latin words in the Middle Ages, founded their books on Gerard's translations. The anatomical terms of the Canon retain auctoritas up to the Renaissance. Thus, terms coined by Gerard such as diaphragm, orbit, pupil or sagittal remain relevant in the current official anatomical terminology. The aim of the present paper is to bring new attention to the highly significant influence that the Toledo School of Translators had in anatomical terminology. For this, we shall review here the onomastic origins of a number of anatomical terms (additamentum; coracoid process; coxal; false ribs; femur; panniculus; spondylus; squamous sutures; thorax; xiphoid process, etc.) which are still used today. PMID:25667112

  4. The linguistic roots of Modern English anatomical terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, Tom D

    2012-11-01

    Previous research focusing on Classical Latin and Greek roots has shown that understanding the etymology of English anatomical terms may be beneficial for students of human anatomy. However, not all anatomical terms are derived from Classical origins. This study aims to explore the linguistic roots of the Modern English terminology used in human gross anatomy. By reference to the Oxford English Dictionary, etymologies were determined for a lexicon of 798 Modern English gross anatomical terms from the 40(th) edition of Gray's Anatomy. Earliest traceable language of origin was determined for all 798 terms; language of acquisition was determined for 747 terms. Earliest traceable languages of origin were: Classical Latin (62%), Classical Greek (24%), Old English (7%), Post-Classical Latin (3%), and other (4%). Languages of acquisition were: Classical Latin (42%), Post-Classical Latin (29%), Old English (8%), Modern French (6%), Classical Greek (5%), Middle English (3%), and other (7%). While the roots of Modern English anatomical terminology mostly lie in Classical languages (accounting for the origin of 86% of terms), the anatomical lexicon of Modern English is actually much more diverse. Interesting and perhaps less familiar examples from these languages and the methods by which such terms have been created and absorbed are discussed. The author suggests that awareness of anatomical etymologies may enhance the enjoyment and understanding of human anatomy for students and teachers alike. PMID:22461143

  5. Comparison of Pap Smear Quality With Anatomical Spatula Method and the Common Method (Spatula? Cytobrush: A Single Blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women in the world. Papanicolaou smear is known as a standard test for cervical cancer screening; however, the most important challenge is high rates of false negative results. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of smears obtained by anatomical spatula and spatula-cytobrush. The most important factor in false negative result is inappropriate tool of sampling. Methods: One hundred married women participated in this single blind clinical trial. All participants were interviewed; two samples were obtained from every participant: one with spatula-cytobrush and another one with anatomical spatula. All slides were encoded and were assessed by two pathologists. Then, data were analyzed by means of kappa coefficient. Results: Cell adequacy was 96.1 % in anatomical spatula method and 91.2 % in spatula-cytobrush method (p= 0.016. The rates for endocervical cells and metaplasia cells in anatomical spatula method were 70.6% and 24.5% respectively and these amounts were 69.6% and 24.5% respectively in the spatula-cytobrush method (p 0.05. Regarding infection and inflammatory reactions there was no statistically significant difference between two methods (p>0.05. Conclusion: Based on our findings in this study, results of sampling with anatomical spatula method were more acceptable and better than those with spatulacytobrush sampling.

  6. ANATOMIC VARIATIONS OF PARANASAL SINUSES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC SINUSITIS AND THEIR CORRELATION WITH CT SCAN STAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Baradaranfar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of anatomic variations of paranasal sinuses must be noted in order to attain a full understanding and accurate diagnosis of chronic sinusitis. The frequency of anatomic variations in chronic sinusitis is different in various studies. The purpose of this study is to assess the frequency of anatomic variations in chronic sinusitis patients admitted to Otolaryngology ward of Shahid Sadoughi hospital in the year 2004 and underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Based on preoperative paranasal sinus CT scan the extent of patients diseases on a scale of 0-IV and the presence of anatomic variations was determined. A total of 120 patients were included. We found Agger Nasi cells in 43(36%, Haller cells in 5 (4.17% conchae bullosa in 15(12.5%, paradoxical middle turbinate in 2 (1.67% and septal deviation in 54 patients (45%. Patients with Agger Nasi (P.value : 0.015 and conchae bullosa (P.Value : 0.024 demonstrated significantly higher scores on sinus CT scan compared with patients without Agger Nasi cells and conchae bullosa respectively. Three months postoperatively we observed significantly less resolution of nasal congestion (P.Value : 0.006 in patients with septal deviation than patients without it. No significant difference was seen among patients with and without other anatomic variations with regard to resolution of rhinorrhea and nasal congestion three months postoperatively.

  7. Reconstrução anatômica da cicatriz umbilical / Anatomical reconstruction of the umbilicus

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alfredo, Donnabella.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A ausência da cicatriz umbilical causa alteração importante na forma do abdome, tornando-se, desse modo, imprescindível na anatomia do mesmo. Sua reconstrução deve seguir seus aspectos anatômicos, conferindo aspecto natural ao final do tratamento. A nova cicatriz umbilical deve ter boa f [...] orma, bom posicionamento, não apresentar cicatriz estigmatizante, estenose ou alargamentos, e ter aspecto natural. MÉTODO: Foram operados 162 pacientes submetidos previamente a gastroplastia aberta para tratamento de obesidade mórbida e 2 pacientes submetidos a cirurgia videolaparoscópica. Foram utilizados 2 retalhos retangulares paralelos, medindo 2 cm x 1,5 cm, que foram suturados entre si e fixados à aponeurose dos músculos reto abdominais. Os retalhos apresentavam a transição com a pele em forma curvilínea. A fixação dos retalhos foi realizada com 2 pontos paralelos, que atingiam a derme do retalho de um lado, a derme do retalho do lado oposto e a aponeurose. Desse modo, foi obtida a união dos 2 retalhos, comprimindo-se levemente a porção distal dos mesmos. Em seguida, foi realizada aproximação do tecido gorduroso ao redor da nova cicatriz umbilical. RESULTADOS: Com a técnica apresentada, obteve-se a formação de todas as unidades anatômicas (mamelão, sulco e rodete), além de profundidade adequada em todas as cicatrizes umbilicais reconstruídas. Não foi observado nenhum caso de estenose umbilical, cicatriz hipertrófica ou queloide nas novas cicatrizes umbilicais. CONCLUSÕES: A técnica apresentada para reconstrução da cicatriz umbilical, respeitando as unidades anatômicas, proporciona forma bem natural e, com o passar do tempo, ocorre uma sobra de pele em sua porção superior, conferindo graciosidade à mesma. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: The absence of the umbilicus causes significant changes in the appearance of the abdomen, thus making it an essential part of anatomy. The reconstruction procedures should account of the anatomical position to ensure a natural appearance after treatment. The new umbilicus should have a g [...] ood shape and appropriate position, but should not have an unaesthetic appearance, stenosis, or enlargement. METHODS: This study included 162 patients who previously underwent open gastroplasty for the treatment of morbid obesity and 2 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery. We used 2 parallel rectangular flaps measuring 2 × 1.5 cm that were sutured together and fixed to the aponeurosis of the rectus abdominis muscles. The flaps exhibited a curvilinear-shaped skin transition. The attachment flaps were created with 2 parallel points that reached the dermis on both sides of the flap and aponeurosis. Thus, the union of 2 flaps was obtained, which were slightly compressed at their distal portion. Thereafter, the fat tissue around the new umbilicus was approximated. RESULTS: The technique described produced all anatomical units including a base, groove, and impeller as well as adequate depth of the umbilical scar in all cases. There were no cases of umbilical stenosis, hypertrophic scars, or keloid scars in the new umbilici. CONCLUSIONS: This technique for the reconstruction of the umbilicus takes into account the anatomical units and provides a very natural appearance, eventually resulting in a slight excess of skin in the upper portion, thus giving a graceful appearance.

  8. A Topographically and anatomically unified phantom model for organ dose determination in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective dose equivalent is used as a risk-related factor for assessing radiation impact on patients. In order to assess the effective dose equivalent, data on organ doses in several organs are needed. For calculation of the collective effective dose equivalent, data on the sex and size distribution of the exposed population are also needed. A realistic phantom model based on the Alderson-Rando anatomical phantom has been developed for these purposes. The phantom model includes 22 organs and takes into account the deflections due to sex, height, weight and other anatomical features. Coordinates of the outer contours of inner organs are given in different slabs of the phantom. The images of cross sections of different slabs realistically depict the distribution of the organs in the phantom. Statistics about height and weight distribution as a function of the age of the Finnish population are also given. (orig.)

  9. Computed tomography of the retroperitoneum: an anatomical and pathological atlas with emphasis on the fascial planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a descriptive clinical pathological CT atlas of a range of conditions involving retroperitoneum and neighbouring organs and structures (excluding the pelvic part of the retroperitoneum). Chapter 1 describes the patient material studied, some aspects of CT techniques and patient handling. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy of the renal fascia based upon reports derived from the literature and is followed by our CT observations in more than 5000 abdominal CT examinations. In short it is an anatomical CT atlas. Chapters 3, 4 and 5 deal with reactions of the fascial structures in different pathological conditions caused by major disease entities. The patients were scanned for these diseases, of which anatomical topographical appearances and spread are described in the general considerations, followed by CT findings and illustrative cases, combined with abstracted experience from other workers. (Auth.)

  10. Descripción anatómica de la irrigación del colgajo sural a pedículo distal en piezas cadavéricas Anatomical description of the blood supply of the distally based sural flap in eight lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Quinteros P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available El colgajo sural fasciomiocutáneo es ampliamente utilizado en la reparación de defectos profundos de tejidos blandos del miembro inferior distal. Este estudio describe su base anatómica mediante la morfometría de las arterias perforantes en una muestra de nuestra población chilena. Material y Método: Se utilizaron 8 miembros inferiores de amputaciones supracondileas. Previa repleción con látex coloreado vía poplítea, se procedió a disecar los miembros inferiores para así obtener un colgajo fasciomiocutáneo sural de pedículo distal. Una vez obtenida la isla, se procedió a elevar el colgajo y disecar su pedículo. Luego se realizó la mor-fometría de las arterias perforantes tanto por lateral como por medial al pedículo, desde el punto pívot definido a 5 cm cefálico al maléolo lateral, hasta la base de la isla fasciomiocutánea. Se describió la distribución de la irrigación y se realizó registro fotográfico de los hallazgos. Resultados: El paquete vasculonervioso sural con un nervio fue identificado en todas las disecciones. La morfología arterial predominante fue la distribución como plexo perineural. Se reconocen tres arterias surales (lateral, mediana y medial. Fueron identificadas 3 a 6 perforantes hacia medial y 4 a 5 hacia lateral del pedículo. Conclusiones: La distribución de la arteria sural es variable y en la mayoría de los casos se presenta como plexo perineural. Dados los hallazgos de las perforantes, consideramos que el punto de giro del colgajo se encuentra aproximadamente a 5,5 cm del maleolo lateral, lo cual coincide con el punto ideal para la viabilidad del colgajo informado en otras series.Background: The distally based sural fasciomyocutaneous flap is widely used in the coverage of deep soft tissue defects on the distal third of lower limbs. Aim: To perform a morphometric description of the perforating arteries that supplies the flap. Material and Methods: We used eight lower limbs from amputations performed above the knee. The limbs were injected through the popliteal artery with red colored latex. After the injection, the limbs were dissected to obtain a distally based sural fasciomyocutaneous flap. Once the fasciomyocutaneous island was obtained, the flap was elevated dissecting its pedicle. Once the whole flap was dissected, a morphometric registry of the lateral and medial perforating arteries was performed. The pivot point for the flap was set 5 cm above the upper border of the lateral malleolus. The distance between the upper border of the lateral malleolus and the emergence of each perforating artery was measured. Results: The sural nerve was identified in all eight dissections. A perineural plexus was the source of the blood supply of the flap, in three of the eight dissections. In two dissections, three sural arteries were identified (medial, median and lateral. The lateral sural artery was identified in two dissections and the medial and lateral arteries in one. Three to six perforating arteries were identified in the medial part of the pedicle and four to five perforating arteries in the lateral part of the pedicle. Conclusions: The distribution of the sural artery along the flap's pedicle is very variable. The most common distribution in these dissections was in the form of a perineural plexus. Considering the distance from the lateral malleolus to the emergence of the perforating arteries, the pivot point of the flap, should be set approximately at 5.5 centimeters above the lateral malleolus.

  11. Descripción anatómica de la irrigación del colgajo sural a pedículo distal en piezas cadavéricas / Anatomical description of the blood supply of the distally based sural flap in eight lower limbs

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan Pablo, Quinteros P; Jussara, Sousa R; Andrea, Rapiman G; Fabio, Valdés G.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available El colgajo sural fasciomiocutáneo es ampliamente utilizado en la reparación de defectos profundos de tejidos blandos del miembro inferior distal. Este estudio describe su base anatómica mediante la morfometría de las arterias perforantes en una muestra de nuestra población chilena. Material y Método [...] : Se utilizaron 8 miembros inferiores de amputaciones supracondileas. Previa repleción con látex coloreado vía poplítea, se procedió a disecar los miembros inferiores para así obtener un colgajo fasciomiocutáneo sural de pedículo distal. Una vez obtenida la isla, se procedió a elevar el colgajo y disecar su pedículo. Luego se realizó la mor-fometría de las arterias perforantes tanto por lateral como por medial al pedículo, desde el punto pívot definido a 5 cm cefálico al maléolo lateral, hasta la base de la isla fasciomiocutánea. Se describió la distribución de la irrigación y se realizó registro fotográfico de los hallazgos. Resultados: El paquete vasculonervioso sural con un nervio fue identificado en todas las disecciones. La morfología arterial predominante fue la distribución como plexo perineural. Se reconocen tres arterias surales (lateral, mediana y medial). Fueron identificadas 3 a 6 perforantes hacia medial y 4 a 5 hacia lateral del pedículo. Conclusiones: La distribución de la arteria sural es variable y en la mayoría de los casos se presenta como plexo perineural. Dados los hallazgos de las perforantes, consideramos que el punto de giro del colgajo se encuentra aproximadamente a 5,5 cm del maleolo lateral, lo cual coincide con el punto ideal para la viabilidad del colgajo informado en otras series. Abstract in english Background: The distally based sural fasciomyocutaneous flap is widely used in the coverage of deep soft tissue defects on the distal third of lower limbs. Aim: To perform a morphometric description of the perforating arteries that supplies the flap. Material and Methods: We used eight lower limbs f [...] rom amputations performed above the knee. The limbs were injected through the popliteal artery with red colored latex. After the injection, the limbs were dissected to obtain a distally based sural fasciomyocutaneous flap. Once the fasciomyocutaneous island was obtained, the flap was elevated dissecting its pedicle. Once the whole flap was dissected, a morphometric registry of the lateral and medial perforating arteries was performed. The pivot point for the flap was set 5 cm above the upper border of the lateral malleolus. The distance between the upper border of the lateral malleolus and the emergence of each perforating artery was measured. Results: The sural nerve was identified in all eight dissections. A perineural plexus was the source of the blood supply of the flap, in three of the eight dissections. In two dissections, three sural arteries were identified (medial, median and lateral). The lateral sural artery was identified in two dissections and the medial and lateral arteries in one. Three to six perforating arteries were identified in the medial part of the pedicle and four to five perforating arteries in the lateral part of the pedicle. Conclusions: The distribution of the sural artery along the flap's pedicle is very variable. The most common distribution in these dissections was in the form of a perineural plexus. Considering the distance from the lateral malleolus to the emergence of the perforating arteries, the pivot point of the flap, should be set approximately at 5.5 centimeters above the lateral malleolus.

  12. Comparative Anatomical Description of Forearm and Hand Arteries of Cebus libidinosus Descripción Anatómica Comparativa de las Arterias del Antebrazo y de la Mano del Cebus libidinosus

    OpenAIRE

    Tales Alexandre Aversi-Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Recent data justify the insertion of Cebus on behavioral and evolutionary studies in relation to the human specie, reason why researches on behavior, memory, use of tools and encephalic index demonstrate that Cebus and chimpanzees are similar. Comparative anatomical studies between Cebus and chimpanzees based on anatomical data corroborate these data on evolutionary convergence associated to muscles, nerves and vessels of the thoracic members; however, the anatomy of the forearm and hand vess...

  13. A new method of producing casts for anatomical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sordi, Nadia; Bombardi, Cristiano; Chiocchetti, Roberto; Clavenzani, Paolo; Trerè, Claudio; Canova, Marco; Grandis, Annamaria

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to verify if polyurethane foam is a suitable material to make accurate casts of vessels and viscera, and to develop a method based on its use for anatomical studies. This new technique has been tested primarily on the lungs of different animals, but also on the renal, intestinal and equine digital vessels. It consisted of three steps: specimen preparation, injection of the foam and corrosion of the cast. All structures injected with foam were properly filled. The bronchial tree and the vessels could be observed up to their finer branches. The method is inexpensive, simple and requires no special equipment. The pre-casting procedure does not require perfusion of the specimens with formalin, or prolonged flushing with carbon dioxide gas or air for drying. The polyurethane foam does not need a catalyst. It is simply diluted with acetone, which does not cause shrinkage of the cast due to evaporation during hardening. The foam naturally expands into the cavities without high pressure of the inoculum, and hardens in just 2 or 3 h at room temperature. Only two drawbacks were observed. The first is the fact that multiple injections cannot be made in the same cavity since the foam solidifies quickly; the second is the slight brittleness of the cast, due to the low elasticity of polyurethane foam. In conclusion, polyurethane foam was a suitable material for producing accurate casts of vessels and viscera. PMID:24788383

  14. Anatomical patterns of dermatitis in adult filaggrin mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common filaggrin (FLG) null mutations are associated with severe and early onset of atopic dermatitis (AD). To date, few studies have investigated anatomical patterns of dermatitis and none has been conducted in the general population. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated patterns of dermatitis in an adult general population stratified by FLG genotype. METHODS: Data from a population-based cohort study with a 5-year follow-up were used. This study included 2143 participants aged 18 to 72 years. Information about dermatitis on the hands; feet; face; axillae; and abdomen, chest, or back was obtained by use of questionnaires. Participants were genotyped for common FLG mutations. A history of AD was defined by the United Kingdom Working Party's diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The frequency of foot dermatitis in the general population was associated with FLG genotype (P = .014). However, when stratification of FLG genotype and AD was performed, we found that FLG mutations increased the prevalence (odds ratios) of foot dermatitis (odds ratio 10.41; 95% confidence interval 5.27-20.60) and persistent hand dermatitis (odds ratio 17.57; 95% confidence interval 8.60-35.89) only in participants with AD. LIMITATIONS: Potential misclassification and recall bias are study limitations. CONCLUSION: FLG mutations affected the lifetime prevalence of hand and foot dermatitis in participants with a history of AD.

  15. La Región del Cuello del Caballo: Connotaciones Anátomo-Aplicativas: Una Revisión / The Region of the Neck of the Horse: Anatomic Applicative Connotations: A Review

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Abelardo, Morales Briceño; Aniceto, Méndez Sánchez; José, Pérez Arévalo.

    1212-12-01

    Full Text Available La anatomía topográfica veterinaria es el estudio de las relaciones entre las diferentes partes del organismo y es uno de los métodos de estudio anatómico de los animales, es subsiguiente, al otro tipo de estudio, que es de carácter descriptivo, referido a la forma y estructura orgánica mediante una [...] clasificación de órganos por aparatos y sistemas. La región anatómica del cuello es una importante área anatómica y fisiológica por sus múltiples connotaciones anatomo-clínicas. Se plantea como objetivo una revisión anatómica de la región del cuello del caballo y sus connotaciones anatomo-aplicadas. Se realizó una extensa revisión de la literatura de la anatomía del cuello del caballo así como sus connotaciones anatomo-aplicativas, las cuales se describen detalladamente. En la actualidad la región dorsal del cuello ha sido ampliamente estudiada en los caballos debido a su correlación con el síndrome metabólico equino y obesidad en el caballo. En conclusión la región topográfica del cuello representa anatómicamente una gran significación clínica en el caballo por las estructuras y accidentes anatómicos. Abstract in english Veterinary topographic anatomy is the study of relationships between different parts of the body and is one of the methods of anatomical study of animals; it is subsequent to the other study, which is descriptive based on the shape and structure rated by organic organs organ systems. The anatomical [...] neck region is an important anatomical and physiological area because of its many anatomical and clinical implications. The aim of this study was to a review of an anatomical region of the horse's neck and applied anatomical connotations. An extensive literature review of the anatomy of the horse's neck and its applicative anatomical connotations, which are described in detail, was conducted. Currently the dorsal neck region has been extensively studied in horses due to their correlation with equine metabolic syndrome and obesity in the horse. In conclusion topographic anatomical neck region represents a great clinical significance in the horse by accident and anatomical structures.

  16. Comparison of work-related fear-avoidance beliefs across different anatomical locations with musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon CB

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Corey B Simon¹, Sandra E Stryker², Steven Z George³1Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA; 2Life’s Work Physical Therapy, Portland, Oregon, USA; 3Department of Physical Therapy and Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USABackground: The influence of work-related fear-avoidance on pain and function has been consistently reported for patients with musculoskeletal low back pain. Emerging evidence suggests similar influences exist for other anatomical locations of musculoskeletal pain, such as the cervical spine and extremities. However, research is limited in comparing work-related fear-avoidance and associations with clinical outcomes across different anatomical locations. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between work-related fear-avoidance, gender, and clinical outcomes across four different musculoskeletal pain locations for patients being treated in an outpatient physical therapy setting.Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of data obtained prospectively from a cohort of 313 participants receiving physical therapy from an outpatient clinic.Results: No interaction was found between gender and anatomical location of musculoskeletal pain on work-related fear-avoidance scores. Work-related fear-avoidance scores were higher in the cervical group versus the lower extremity group; however, there were no other differences across anatomical locations. Work-related fear-avoidance influenced intake pain intensity in patients with spine pain but not extremity pain. Conversely, work-related fear-avoidance influenced intake function for participants with extremity pain but not spine pain. Similar results were observed for change scores, with higher work-related fear-avoidance being associated with more, not less, change in pain and function for certain anatomical locations.Conclusion: These findings suggest that work-related fear-avoidance is similar for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain. However, associations between work-related fear-avoidance and clinical outcomes may differ based on the anatomical location of that pain. Further, increased work-related fear-avoidance may not be indicative of poor clinical outcomes for this type of patient population.Keywords: gender, fear, avoidance, spine pain, pain intensity, function, musculoskeletal

  17. Alzheimer's centennial legacy: origins, landmarks and the current status of knowledge concerning cognitive aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, John R

    2006-11-01

    This review commemorates 100 years of research into Alzheimer's disease and, by happy coincidence, the publication of 100 papers in Brain on the topic. The first part of the review traces the evolution of concepts and landmarks in the modern history of Alzheimer's disease. It highlights the continuing role of careful clinico-pathological studies which have set the stage for each major leap forwards, such as the emergence of the cholinergic hypothesis, and the realistation that subjects pass through an amnestic prodrome which is thought to reflect dysfunction of the hippocampal formation before the onset of full blown dementia. The contribution of structural and functional imaging is briefly described. The important contribution of publications in Brain is illustrated throughout the first section. The second part attempts to review the current status of our knowledge concerning behavioural, neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric aspects of the disease, emphasizing areas of continuing controversy. PMID:17071920

  18. Landmarks in particle physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Brookhaven Lecture Series, Number 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert Adair's lecture on Landmarks in Particle Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Adair describes ten researches in elementary particle physics at Brookhaven that had a revolutionary impact on the understanding of elementary particles. Two of the discoveries were made in 1952 and 1956 at the Cosmotron, BNL's first proton accelerator. Four were made in 1962 and 1964 at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, the Cosmotron's replacement. Two other discoveries in 1954 and 1956 were theoretical, and strong focusing (1952) is the only technical discovery. One discovery (1958) happened in an old barrack. Four of the discoveries were awarded the Nobel prize in Physics. Adair believes that all of the discoveries are worthy of the Nobel prize. 14 figs

  19. Volume rendering and bicolour scale in double isotope studies: Application to immunoscintigraphy and bone landmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining the volume rendering and bicolour visualization techniques is proposed as an aird in interpreting single photon emission tomography (SPET) immunoscintigraphy (IS) recorded simultaneously with SPECT bone landmarking (BL). The combination helps in localizing abnormal monoclonal uptake and in differentiating it from a physiological radioactivity distribution. The so-called rendered images (RIs) are obtained in both IS and BL studies according to a depth-weighted maximum activity projection algorithm. Fused BL and IS RIs are constructed by a simple, pixel by pixel addition. They are displayed using a bicolour grey-red scale, which makes it possible to visualize both studies by a transparency effect. This method was applied to patients suspected of suffering colorectal or ovarian cancer recurrences, in whom monoclonal antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen, B72-3 or OC125 labelled with indium-111 were used. (orig.)

  20. Global polity in adult education and UNESCO: landmarking, brokering, and framing policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and multidimensionality of local-global interconnections, the author argues for the adoption of a global polity perspective in adult education, which is applied to study mobilization processes that occur through UNESCO. The findings point to three processes, neither within nor outside, but across geo-political borders and professional interests: ‘landmarking’, by which a shared sense of a common past in adult education is created; ‘brokering’, which helps shape a common future direction in adult education; and ‘framing’, which is used to convert ideational landscapes into material government-led actions. Both the theoretical perspectives and the analytical insights presented here could be used in analogous studies in other areas of education or with a focus on different political actors.

  1. Asynchrony of the early maturation of white matter bundles in healthy infants: Quantitative landmarks revealed noninvasively by diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal cognitive development in infants follows a well-known temporal sequence, which is assumed to be correlated with the structural maturation of underlying functional networks. Postmortem studies and, more recently, structural MR imaging studies have described qualitatively the heterogeneous spatio-temporal progression of white matter myelination. However, in vivo quantification of the maturation phases of fiber bundles is still lacking. We used noninvasive diffusion tensor MR imaging and tractography in twenty-three 1-4-month-old healthy infants to quantify the early maturation of the main cerebral fascicles. A specific maturation model, based on the respective roles of different maturational processes on the diffusion phenomena, was designed to highlight asynchronous maturation across bundles by evaluating the time-course of mean diffusivity and anisotropy changes over the considered developmental period. Using an original approach, a progression of maturation in four relative stages was determined in each tract by estimating the maturation state and speed, from the diffusion indices over the infants group compared with an adults group on one hand, and in each tract compared with the average over bundles on the other hand. Results were coherent with, and extended previous findings in 8 of 11 bundles, showing the anterior limb of the internal capsule and cingulum as the most immature, followed by the optic radiations, arcuate and inferior longitudinal fascicles, tate and inferior longitudinal fascicles, then the spino-thalamic tract and fornix, and finally the cortico-spinal tract as the most mature bundle. Thus, this approach provides new quantitative landmarks for further noninvasive research on brain-behavior relationships during normal and abnormal development. (authors)

  2. Volumetric Image Guidance Using Carina vs Spine as Registration Landmarks for Conventionally Fractionated Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the relative accuracy of 2 image guided radiation therapy methods using carina vs spine as landmarks and then to identify which landmark is superior relative to tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: For 98 lung patients, 2596 daily image-guidance cone-beam computed tomography scans were analyzed. Tattoos were used for initial patient alignment; then, spine and carina registrations were performed independently. A separate analysis assessed the adequacy of gross tumor volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume coverage on cone-beam computed tomography using the initial, middle, and final fractions of radiation therapy. Coverage was recorded for primary tumor (T), nodes (N), and combined target (T+N). Three scenarios were compared: tattoos alignment, spine registration, and carina registration. Results: Spine and carina registrations identified setup errors ?5 mm in 35% and 46% of fractions, respectively. The mean vector difference between spine and carina matching had a magnitude of 3.3 mm. Spine and carina improved combined target coverage, compared with tattoos, in 50% and 34% (spine) to 54% and 46% (carina) of the first and final fractions, respectively. Carina matching showed greater combined target coverage in 17% and 23% of fractions for the first and final fractions, respectively; with spine matching, this was only observed in 4% (first) and 6% (final) of fractions. Carina matching provided superior nodes coverage at the endvided superior nodes coverage at the end of radiation compared with spine matching (P=.0006), without compromising primary tumor coverage. Conclusion: Frequent patient setup errors occur in locally advanced lung cancer patients. Spine and carina registrations improved combined target coverage throughout the treatment course, but carina matching provided superior combined target coverage.

  3. IMU-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Gait Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Seel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is concerned with joint angle calculation based on inertial measurement data in the context of human motion analysis. Unlike most robotic devices, the human body lacks even surfaces and right angles. Therefore, we focus on methods that avoid assuming certain orientations in which the sensors are mounted with respect to the body segments. After a review of available methods that may cope with this challenge, we present a set of new methods for: (1 joint axis and position identification; and (2 flexion/extension joint angle measurement. In particular, we propose methods that use only gyroscopes and accelerometers and, therefore, do not rely on a homogeneous magnetic field. We provide results from gait trials of a transfemoral amputee in which we compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU-based methods to an optical 3D motion capture system. Unlike most authors, we place the optical markers on anatomical landmarks instead of attaching them to the IMUs. Root mean square errors of the knee flexion/extension angles are found to be less than 1° on the prosthesis and about 3° on the human leg. For the plantar/dorsiflexion of the ankle, both deviations are about 1°.

  4. Anatomical Disregard as a Risk Factor in Thoracic Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arribalzaga, Eduardo B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The anatomy plays a significant role in medical education, allowing a progressive appropriate professional development. Because of different factors adverse events (AE occur, where patient’s safety is achieved by surgical knowledge, prevention and elimination of risk factors. Absence or incorrect knowledge of the anatomical basis at the beginning of the graduate studies specialization are factors that alter the surgical patient’s safety, risking his life. The safety checklist in surgery is used to reduce avoidable risks for the patient in the operating room.Objectives: 1. Analyze the anatomic disregard as a risk factor in surgical anatomical processes of the thorax. 2. Evaluate actions to provide greater safety for the patient with thoracic surgical pathology. 3. Evaluate the importance of implementing register systems to improve the quality of care and patient’s safety with thoracic surgical pathology.Retrospective statistical analysis of anatomic disregard as a risk factor contributing to adverse events (AEs in anatomical and surgical procedures of the thorax was performed in the General Surgery Service of the Hospital Aeronáutico Central of Buenos Aires Air (HAC, from October 2009 to April 2011; and a case of anatomical disregard and its clinical-surgical implications was reported, in General Surgery Service of Hospital de Clínicas of Buenos Aires.In the General Surgery Service of HAC, 21 patients (17.64% had AE all (100% preventable. 100% were due to human factors, corresponding to 12 (57.14%, because of ignorance of anatomical region and the rest by other factors: absence of checklist in 7 (58.33% of which 5 (71.43% correspond to the first 9 months of the studied period and 2 (28.57% in the next 9 months. A case of anatomical disregard was reported in the surgical practice of General Surgery Service of Hospital de Clínicas, Buenos Aires where it was because of complications that endangered the patient’s life.The registration systems are a starting point to improve a system of quality and patient’s safety. The analysis of contributing factors (such as ignorance of thorax anatomy by the surgeon, register or report adverse events occurred in thoracic surgical procedures are used to prevent and reduce risk. The reduction of preventable risks is present using the checklist, however some more detailed items about the need for knowledge of the anatomy of the thorax could be added to further improve efficiency. The continuing medical education about anatomical knowledge for the surgeons, must be stimulated and promoted during their training.

  5. Tendons in the plantar aspect of the foot: MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this anatomic imaging study was to illustrate the normal complex anatomy of tendons of the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with anatomic correlation in cadavers. Seven fresh cadaveric feet (obtained and used according to institutional guidelines, with informed consent from relatives of the deceased) were studied with intermediate-weighted fast-spin-echo MR imaging. For anatomic analysis, cadaveric specimens were sectioned in 3-mm-thick slices in the coronal and axial planes that approximated the sections acquired at MR imaging. The entire courses of the tendons into the plantar aspect of the foot were analyzed. The tibialis posterior tendon has a complex distal insertion. The insertions in the navicular, second, and third cuneiforms bones were identify in all cases using axial and coronal planes. A tendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons was identified in five of our specimens (71%). The coronal plane provided the best evaluation. The peroneus longus tendon changes its direction at three points then obliquely crosses the sole and inserts in the base of the first metatarsal bone and the plantar aspect of the first cuneiform. MR imaging provides detailed information about the anatomy of tendons in the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot. It allows analysis of their insertions and the intertendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexon the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons. (orig.)

  6. Influence of anatomic reference on the buccal contour of prosthetic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Sabrina Queirós Vasconcelos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During clinical practice, when performing prosthetic rehabilitation with single crowns, improper reproduction of the dental contour by the dental laboratory is a common occurrence. Therefore, the present study evaluated the fidelity of the reproduction of the buccal contour in an upper left canine performed by three Dental Prosthesis Technicians (DPT using the indirect laminate veneer technique. First, the DPTs confected the veneers based on a model obtained from the upper arch of a dental dummy, containing a replica of an upper left canine with a prosthetic preparation for a laminate veneer. Then, the same DPTs received other identical models, now with the replica of the upper left canine with no preparation, to be used as an anatomical reference for confecting the laminate veneers. The laminate veneers were then bonded to the plaster models and had their buccal contour individually measured. Measurements were also made of the buccal contour of the reference canine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and the t-test (p = 0.05. Results showed 100% of buccal overcontour when the laminate veneers were compared to the reference canine, regardless of which DPT confected the veneer and regardless of using or not the anatomical reference. The DPTs who participated in the present study were unable to acomplish a faithful anatomical reproduction of the buccal contour, creating an overcontour in all samples. This situation may be responsible for increasing the probability of periodontal and esthetic harm in clinical practice.

  7. The method to make the three dimensional anatomical pattern of hepatic vessels by stereo angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the Past few years, there has been a big advance in the hepatic surgery. Now, small resection, such as segmentectomy or subsegmentectomy, is performed routinely. Based on this tendency, hepatic surgeons request more details, more stereographic findings of hepatic vessels to heaptic angiography. Especially three dimensional combined anatomical pattern of the hepatic artery, portal vein and hepatic vein is strongly needed. We have tried three dimensional computer graphic of hepatic vessels since few years ago, using the personal computer, digitizer with clear screen, commercially available 3D software and my own program. We use three groups of angiographic films, that is the hepatic artery, portal vein and hepatic vein with IVC, which were taken by stereoangiography. The depth of each poits of vessels are calculated by the way described in Fig 3. Using these points, the 3D software, '3DPROGATS', can make the anatomical pattern of combined hepatic vessels on TV display. And then we can also perform rotation, heading, bank, zooming, hidden line elimination freely for this picture. Out of necessity as hepatic surgeons, we make a simple system for 3D computer graphic of heptic vessels. At present, the image is somewhat rough, but clinically it is relatively effective. In this report we want to explain our method and to show the anatomical pattern of hepatic vessels of case of hepatoma. (author)

  8. Effects of Interfractional Motion and Anatomic Changes on Proton Therapy Dose Distribution in Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Proton doses are sensitive to intra- and interfractional anatomic changes. We analyzed the effects of interfractional anatomic changes in doses to lung tumors treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Weekly four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans were acquired for 8 patients with mobile Stage III non-small cell lung cancer who were actually treated with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy. A conformal proton therapy passive scattering plan was designed for each patient. Dose distributions were recalculated at end-inspiration and end-expiration breathing phases on each weekly 4D-CT data set using the same plans with alignment based on bone registration. Results: Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was compromised (from 99% to 90.9%) in 1 patient because of anatomic changes and motion pattern variation. For the rest of the patients, the mean CTV coverage on the repeated weekly 4D-CT data sets was 98.4%, compared with 99% for the original plans. For all 8 patients, however, a mean 4% increase in the volume of the contralateral lung receiving a dose of at least 5 Gy (V5) and a mean 4.4-Gy increase in the spinal cord maximum dose was observed in the repeated 4D-CT data sets. A strong correlation between the CTV density change resulting from tumor shrinkage or anatomic variations and mean contralateral lung dose was observed. Conclusions: Adaptive re-planning during proton therapy may be indicated in selected patients with non-small celld in selected patients with non-small cell lung cancer. For most patients, however, CTV coverage is adequate if tumor motion is taken into consideration in the original simulation and planning processes

  9. Consequences of the Mechanical Action of Excessive Adipose Tissue on the Neighboring Anatomical Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisc Grigorescu Sido

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is characterized by excess adipose tissue and exerts many negative effects on the health status: increased mechanical pressure on the bone, muscle and joints, distention of the abdominal wall, expansion of the thoracic base, endocrine, cardiovascular and homeostatic dysfunctions etc. There are very scarce data in the literature regarding the mechanical effects of excess adipose tissue on the neighboring anatomical structures. The anatomical alterations of the anterior part of the diaphragm, due to the preperitoneal fat accumulation around the preperitoneal vessels and the biological modulation of the iliac muscle fascia due to mechanical pressure from retroperitoneal fat are only two examples of such an interaction between fat tissue and neighboring anatomical structures. The relationship between preperitoneal fat and anterior part of the diaphragm, analyzed according to age and nutritional status contributes to the understanding of the formation of anterior diaphragmatic arcades, of structural anterior part of the diaphragm alterations and explain the occurrence of acquired non-traumatic anterior diaphragmatic hernias, which are entities not well defined in the literature until now. The consecutive steps in the generation of anterior diaphragmatic hernia could be: accumulation of preperitoneal fat around preperitoneal blood vessels; repeated mechanical pressure on anterior part of the diaphragm, caused by movements, digestive repletion, respiration; induction of anterior arcade formation and fat extension in the mediastinum; progressive enlargement of communication corridors with the mediastinum; weight variations (e.g. rapid weight loss and passage opening; involvement of the greater omentum and finally the transverse colon on which the greater omentum is inserted. There is no anatomic direct communication between the preperitoneal and the mediastinal fat, the two compartments are separated by a depressed and atrophied zone of the anterior part of the diaphragm.

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of the anatomical growth response of European conifers to mechanical disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneuwly, Dominique M; Stoffel, Markus; Dorren, Luuk K A; Berger, Frédéric

    2009-10-01

    Studies on tree reaction after wounding were so far based on artificial wounding or chemical treatment. For the first time, type, spread and intensity of anatomical responses were analyzed and quantified in naturally disturbed Larix decidua Mill., Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Abies alba Mill. trees. The consequences of rockfall impacts on increment growth were assessed at the height of the wounds, as well as above and below the injuries. A total of 16 trees were selected on rockfall slopes, and growth responses following 54 wounding events were analyzed on 820 cross-sections. Anatomical analysis focused on the occurrence of tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts (TRD) and on the formation of reaction wood. Following mechanical disturbance, TRD production was observed in 100% of L. decidua and P. abies wounds. The radial extension of TRD was largest at wound height, and they occurred more commonly above, rather than below, the wounds. For all species, an intra-annual radial shift of TRD was observed with increasing axial distance from wounds. Reaction wood was formed in 87.5% of A. alba following wounding, but such cases occurred only in 7.7% of L. decidua. The results demonstrate that anatomical growth responses following natural mechanical disturbance differ significantly from the reactions induced by artificial stimuli or by decapitation. While the types of reactions remain comparable between the species, their intensity, spread and persistence disagree considerably. We also illustrate that the external appearance of wounds does not reflect an internal response intensity. This study reveals that disturbance induced under natural conditions triggers more intense and more widespread anatomical responses than that induced under artificial stimuli, and that experimental laboratory tests considerably underestimate tree response. PMID:19696053

  11. Precise Anatomic Localization of Accumulated Lipids in Mfp2 Deficient Murine Brains Through Automated Registration of SIMS Images to the Allen Brain Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrášková, Karolina; Khmelinskii, Artem; Abdelmoula, Walid M.; De Munter, Stephanie; Baes, Myriam; McDonnell, Liam; Dijkstra, Jouke; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2015-06-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool for the molecular characterization of specific tissue regions. Histochemical staining provides anatomic information complementary to MSI data. The combination of both modalities has been proven to be beneficial. However, direct comparison of histology based and mass spectrometry-based molecular images can become problematic because of potential tissue damages or changes caused by different sample preparation. Curated atlases such as the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) offer a collection of highly detailed and standardized anatomic information. Direct comparison of MSI brain data to the ABA allows for conclusions to be drawn on precise anatomic localization of the molecular signal. Here we applied secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging at high spatial resolution to study brains of knock-out mouse models with impaired peroxisomal ?-oxidation. Murine models were lacking D-multifunctional protein (MFP2), which is involved in degradation of very long chain fatty acids. SIMS imaging revealed deposits of fatty acids within distinct brain regions. Manual comparison of the MSI data with the histologic stains did not allow for an unequivocal anatomic identification of the fatty acids rich regions. We further employed an automated pipeline for co-registration of the SIMS data to the ABA. The registration enabled precise anatomic annotation of the brain structures with the revealed lipid deposits. The precise anatomic localization allowed for a deeper insight into the pathology of Mfp2 deficient mouse models.

  12. Precise Anatomic Localization of Accumulated Lipids in Mfp2 Deficient Murine Brains Through Automated Registration of SIMS Images to the Allen Brain Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrášková, Karolina; Khmelinskii, Artem; Abdelmoula, Walid M.; De Munter, Stephanie; Baes, Myriam; McDonnell, Liam; Dijkstra, Jouke; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool for the molecular characterization of specific tissue regions. Histochemical staining provides anatomic information complementary to MSI data. The combination of both modalities has been proven to be beneficial. However, direct comparison of histology based and mass spectrometry-based molecular images can become problematic because of potential tissue damages or changes caused by different sample preparation. Curated atlases such as the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) offer a collection of highly detailed and standardized anatomic information. Direct comparison of MSI brain data to the ABA allows for conclusions to be drawn on precise anatomic localization of the molecular signal. Here we applied secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging at high spatial resolution to study brains of knock-out mouse models with impaired peroxisomal ?-oxidation. Murine models were lacking D-multifunctional protein (MFP2), which is involved in degradation of very long chain fatty acids. SIMS imaging revealed deposits of fatty acids within distinct brain regions. Manual comparison of the MSI data with the histologic stains did not allow for an unequivocal anatomic identification of the fatty acids rich regions. We further employed an automated pipeline for co-registration of the SIMS data to the ABA. The registration enabled precise anatomic annotation of the brain structures with the revealed lipid deposits. The precise anatomic localization allowed for a deeper insight into the pathology of Mfp2 deficient mouse models.

  13. LANDMARK BASED SHORTEST PATH DETECTION BY USING A* AND HAVERSINE FORMULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PROF. NITIN R.CHOPDE

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1900, less than 20 percent of the world population lived in cities, in 2007, just more than 50 percent of the world population lived in cities. In 2050, it has been predicted that more than 70 percent of the global population (about 6.4 billion people will be city inhabitants. There is more pressure being placed on cities through this increase in population [1]. With advent of smart cities, information and communication technology is increasingly transforming the way city municipalities and city residents organize and operate in response to urban growth. In this paper, we create a generic scheme for navigating a route through out city. A requested route is provided by using combination of A* Algorithm and Haversine formula. Haversine Formula gives minimum distance between any two points on spherical body by using latitude and longitude. This minimum distance is then provided to A* algorithm to calculate minimum distance. The process for detecting the shortest path is mention in this paper.

  14. Atlas-Based Semiautomatic Target Volume Definition (CTV) for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a new semiautomatic method to improve target delineation in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We implemented an atlas-based software program using fourteen anatomic landmarks as well as the most superior and inferior computerd tomography slices for automatic target delineation, using an advanced laryngeal carcinoma as an example. Registration was made by an affine transformation. Evaluation was performed with manually drawn contours for comparison. Three physicians sampled and further applied a target volume atlas to ten other computer tomography data sets. In addition, a rapid three-dimensional (3D) correction program was developed. Results: The mean time to the first semiautomatic target delineation proposal was 2.7 minutes. Manual contouring required 20.2 minutes per target, whereas semiautomatic target volume definition with the rapid 3D correction was completed in only 9.7 minutes. The net calculation time for image registration of the target volume atlas was negligible (approximately 0.6 seconds). Our method depicted a sufficient adaptation of the target volume atlas on the new data sets, with a mean similarity index of 77.2%. The similarity index increased up to 85% after 3D correction performed by the physicians. Conclusions: We have developed a new, feasible method for semiautomatic contouring that saves a significant amount (51.8%) of target delineation time for head-and-neck cancer patients. This approach uses a target volume ients. This approach uses a target volume atlas and a landmark model. The software was evaluated by means of laryngeal cancer but has important implications for various tumor types whereby target volumes remain constant in form and do not move with respiration.

  15. A three-dimensional CT-based target definition for elective irradiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Elective treatment of the clinically node-negative neck by radiation results in excellent control rates. However, radiation therapy with its organ-preserving properties is not without morbidity. Side effects of elective neck irradiation are mainly due to damage of the major and minor salivary glands, resulting in the dry mouth syndrome. Given that RT is the preferred treatment modality in case of elective treatment of the neck in many institutions, it is of utmost importance to try and reduce the associated sequelae of RT. Material and Methods: With the introduction of CT-planning systems and the development of 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) techniques, it has become feasible to deliver adequate doses of radiation to the target (neck) and at the same time saving (parts of) the salivary glands from doses beyond tolerance. A prerequisite for these techniques is that they require a precise knowledge of the target (i.e., of the elective neck) on CT. To be able to correlate borders of the surgical levels in the neck (I-VI) with structures seen on CT, an anatomical study, using two fixed (phenol, formaldehyde) human cadavers, was performed. Subsequently, the 6 potential lymph node regions in the neck on CT were defined. Results and Discussion: The reference for the current 3D CT-based definition of the lymph node regions in the neck is the official report of the American Academy of Otolaryngology, describing, based on surgical anatomy, the lymph node based on surgical anatomy, the lymph node groups in the neck by Levels I-VI. The present investigation depicts reproducible landmarks on transversal CT images, corresponding to anatomical reference structures known from surgical levels (I-VI) and, this way, CT-based lymph node regions (1-6) were constructed

  16. Identification of Salicornia population: Anatomical characterization and RAPD fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mili? Dubravka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis of two typical populations of Salicornia europaea from Montenegro and Greece (Lesvos, one typical population of S. ramosissima from Spain and one population that belongs to the Salicornia genus from Serbia, was undertaken to develop a new strategy for identifying Salicornia plants. Anatomical variability and differentiation were examined using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Multivariate Discriminant Function Analysis (MDA. On the basis of the anatomical measurements, the four populations were classified into three groups: one joining the plants from Serbia and Spain, one comprising the Montenegrin group and one comprising the Lesvos group. RAPD analysis indicated that populations from Spain and Serbia were closely related to each other and the Lesvos group was quite different from all the other investigated populations. These results opened up the possibility that the specimens from Serbia belonged to S. ramosissima and not to S. europaea, as reported previously.

  17. Influence of anatomic variations of the middle nasal meathus on sinonasal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulj?ik-?upi? Maja M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The most common anatomic variations of the structures of the middle nasal meatus are variations of agger nasi cells, variations of the middle turbinate, variations of uncinate process, variations of the ethmoidal bulla, deviations and deformations of nasal septum in the region of the middle nasal meatus, Haller's cell (orbitoethmoidal and Onodi's cell(sphenoethmoidal cell. In 1997, the Otorhinolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Tasc Force on Chronic Rhinosinusitis defined chronic sinusitis and nasal disease initially by including sinusitis and rhinitis with one term-chronic rhinosinusitis. This was done because it was apparent to many that nasal disoders often affected the sinuses, and vice versa. Also they established baseline parameters, major and minor signs and symptoms, for definition of rhinosinusitis. Two major factors or one major factor and two minor factors constitute a strong history for rhinosinusitis. Material and methods The following methods were used in the study: 1. Anamnestic data processing about: disease symptoms that were recognired by American Academy for ENT as major and minor criteria in diagnosing nosinusitis; the duration of symptoms; the kind of sinonasal disorder and the secondary disorders. 2. Data processing obtained by anterior/posterior rhinoscopy. 3. Data processing obtained by endoscopic examination. 4. Data processing obtained by CT of paranasal cavities and the nose. The data about anatomic variations were statistically processed by Eives's correlation coefficient that indicates the degree of correlation between sinonasal disorders and anatomic variation. Results By analyzing the obtained data in the examined patients with sinonasal disorders, anatomic variations were present in over 50% of the patients and are defined by percentage. I. The deviation of nasal septum in 83.33% patients. 2. The variations of the form of the middle nasal chonha in 58.92% patients. 3. The presence of agger nasi cells in 50% patients. 4. Variations of the form of ethomoidal bulla in 50% patients. Eives's correlation coefficient i.e. the degree of correlation between sinonasal disorders and the presence of anatomic variation statistically significantly correlate at r >/= ft 05 of anatomic variation of the middle nasal chonha (r =0.23 and the presence of deviation/deformation of nasal septum (r = 0.6 with sinonasal disorders. Discussion and conclusion Anatomic variations of the structures of the middle nasal meatus can additionally complicate the anatomy of the lateral nasal wall and the conditions of the ostiomeatal unit. Therefore we must view these variations as factors predisposing to more rapid and frequent appearance and persistence of chronic inflammations. Also, familiary with the variations in sinonasal anatomy is a prerequisite to safe and effective surgical treatment of sinonasal disease. Recognition of this anatomic variation should minimize catastrophic violation of vital structures such as orbit or skull base.

  18. Bases anatómicas del sueño / Anatomical basis of sleep

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J. L., Velayos; F. J., Moleres; A. M., Irujo; D., Yllanes; B., Paternain.

    Full Text Available El sueño es un estado biológico activo, periódico, en el que se distinguen las etapas NREM y REM, que se alternan sucesivamente durante la noche. Intervienen los relojes biológicos en la modulación del sistema, así como neurotransmisores específicos. Se trata de una red neuronal compleja, en la que [...] intervienen diversas zonas del sistema nervioso central. Los procesos oníricos están controlados además de forma neural. Se resume la historia de las investigaciones sobre el tema, desde el siglo XIX hasta nuestra época. Hay que destacar los recientes descubrimientos de Lugaresi y su equipo, que, al describir el insomnio familiar grave, dieron importancia al núcleo dorsomedial del tálamo en la instauración de la fase de sueño profundo. Al grupo de Reinoso se debe el hallazgo de que el "director de orquesta" en la instauración del sueño REM es la zona ventral paramediana del núcleo reticular pontino oral Abstract in english Sleep is an active and periodic biological state composed of NREM and REM phases, which alternate during the night. Both biological clocks and specific neurotransmitters are involved in the modulation of this system. It is a complex neuronal network in which several areas of the central nervous syst [...] em are involved. The oneiric processes are also controlled neurally. This work summarises the history of the investigations on this topic from the 19th century to date. It is worth mentioning the recent findings of Lugaresi and colleages who described fatal familial insomnia, a disease that helped to show the importance of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus in the genesis of slow-wave sleep. Reinoso´s group found out that the paramedian ventral area of the oral pontine reticular nucleus is the conductor in the establishment of REM sleep.

  19. Bases anatómicas del sueño Anatomical basis of sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Velayos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El sueño es un estado biológico activo, periódico, en el que se distinguen las etapas NREM y REM, que se alternan sucesivamente durante la noche. Intervienen los relojes biológicos en la modulación del sistema, así como neurotransmisores específicos. Se trata de una red neuronal compleja, en la que intervienen diversas zonas del sistema nervioso central. Los procesos oníricos están controlados además de forma neural. Se resume la historia de las investigaciones sobre el tema, desde el siglo XIX hasta nuestra época. Hay que destacar los recientes descubrimientos de Lugaresi y su equipo, que, al describir el insomnio familiar grave, dieron importancia al núcleo dorsomedial del tálamo en la instauración de la fase de sueño profundo. Al grupo de Reinoso se debe el hallazgo de que el "director de orquesta" en la instauración del sueño REM es la zona ventral paramediana del núcleo reticular pontino oralSleep is an active and periodic biological state composed of NREM and REM phases, which alternate during the night. Both biological clocks and specific neurotransmitters are involved in the modulation of this system. It is a complex neuronal network in which several areas of the central nervous system are involved. The oneiric processes are also controlled neurally. This work summarises the history of the investigations on this topic from the 19th century to date. It is worth mentioning the recent findings of Lugaresi and colleages who described fatal familial insomnia, a disease that helped to show the importance of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus in the genesis of slow-wave sleep. Reinoso´s group found out that the paramedian ventral area of the oral pontine reticular nucleus is the conductor in the establishment of REM sleep.

  20. HISTO-ANATOMICAL ASPECTS OF SOME AZALEA SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. TOMA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors investigate the structure of the aerial vegetative organs of 2 species and 7 varieties of Rhododendron. The anatomical features of the analyzed taxons which could be useful in determination of the unflowered plants are underlined. The histo-anatomical featured with taxonomical value are: the shape, dimension and frequency of the hairs (tector and secretor, the presence or the absence of the crystalliferous cells, the thickness of the palisade parenchyma. Between the histoanatomical features with ecological signification - the xylem vessels diameter, the vesicular cells from leaf epidermis and thick cuticle, covered by wax - could be mentioned.

  1. Distinct anatomical correlates of discriminability and criterion setting in verbal recognition memory revealed by lesion-symptom mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroek, J Matthijs; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Kappelle, L Jaap; Schoo, Linda; Kuijf, Hugo J; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Biessels, Geert Jan; Postma, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Recognition memory, that is, the ability to judge whether an item has been previously encountered in a particular context, depends on two factors: discriminability and criterion setting. Discriminability draws on memory processes while criterion setting (i.e., the application of a threshold resulting in a yes/no response) is regarded as a process of cognitive control. Discriminability and criterion setting are assumed to draw on distinct anatomical structures, but definite evidence for this assumption is lacking. We applied voxel-based and region of interest-based lesion-symptom mapping to 83 patients in the acute phase of ischemic stroke to determine the anatomical correlates of discriminability and criterion setting in verbal recognition memory. Recognition memory was measured with the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Signal-detection theory was used to calculate measures for discriminability and criterion setting. Lesion-symptom mapping revealed that discriminability draws on left medial temporal and temporo-occipital structures, both thalami and the right hippocampus, while criterion setting draws on the right inferior frontal gyrus. Lesions in the right inferior frontal gyrus were associated with liberal response bias. These findings indicate that discriminability and criterion setting indeed depend on distinct anatomical structures and provide new insights in the anatomical correlates of these cognitive processes that underlie verbal recognition memory. Hum Brain Mapp 36:1292-1303, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25423892

  2. Skull base tumors; Tumoren der Schaedelbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Naumann, N.; Grunwald, I.; Reith, W. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie des Universitaetsklinikums des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Nabhan, A.; Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgische Klinik des Universitaetsklinikums des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Modern imaging techniques have great importance in the diagnosis and therapy of skull-base pathologies. Many of these lesions, especially in relation to their specific location, can be evaluated using CT and MR imaging. Tumors commonly found in the anterior skull base include carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, esthesioneuroblastoma and meningioma. In the central cranial fossa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, metastases, meningioma, pituitary adenoma and neurinoma have to be considered. The most common neoplasms of the posterior skull base, including the CP angle, are neurinoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, chordoma and paraganglioma. One major task of imaging is the evaluation of the exact tumor extent as well as its relationship to the neighboring neurovascular structures. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate the most important anatomical landmarks of the skull base. The typical imaging findings of the most common tumors involving the skull base are also presented. (orig.) [German] Die moderne Bildgebung hat einen besonderen Stellenwert bei der Diagnostik und Therapie von Schaedelbasispathologien. Zahlreiche Laesionen koennen anhand ihrer CT- und MRT-Befunde, insbesondere unter Beruecksichtigung ihrer genauen Lokalisation, artdiagnostisch eingeordnet werden. Im Bereich der vorderen Schaedelbasis sind v. a. Karzinome, Rhabdomyosarkome, Aesthesioneuroblastome und Meningeome vorzufinden. Im Bereich der mittleren Schaedelbasis ist in erster Linie an nasopharyngeale Karzinome, Karzinommetastasen, Meningeome, Hypophysenadenome und Neurinome zu denken. Zu den haeufigsten Tumoren der hinteren Schaedelgrube, unter Einschluss des Kleinhirnbrueckenwinkels, gehoeren Neurinome, Meningeome, nasopharyngeale Karzinome, Karzinommetastasen, Chordome und Paragangliome. Eine wichtige Aufgabe der Schnittbildgebung liegt in der Bestimmung der exakten Tumorausdehnung und in der Beurteilung der Lagebeziehung des Tumors zu den komplexen anatomischen Strukturen wie Hirnnerven und Blutgefaessen. Im Rahmen dieses Uebersichtsartikels werden die wesentlichen anatomischen Landmarken im Bereich der Schaedelbasis wiederholt und typische Befunde der haeufigsten Schaedelbasistumoren vorgestellt. (orig.)

  3. Using Anatomical Dolls in HIV/AIDS Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that the correct and consistent use of the male latex condom is the single most efficient, cost-effective way to reduce the sexual transmission of HIV and other infections. Yet information must be communicated in a way that is clearly understood and actually contributes to behavior change for both women and men. Anatomical

  4. Ritidom of willows as a source of anatomical information

    OpenAIRE

    Shkuratova, Natalya V.

    2012-01-01

    The data of comparative study of an anatomic structure of ritidom of ten species of willows are represented in this article. The features of distinction in structure of ritidom of willows are revealed; the opportunities of their use with the purposes of diagnostics are shown.

  5. ANATOMICAL RESEARCH ON ARTEMISIA SANTONICA AND ARTEMISIA SCOPARIA (ASTERACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA-MAGDALENA ZAMFIRACHE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The species subjected to the study belong to Asteraceae family, Artemisia genus found in Romania’s spontaneous flora. This work presents an anatomic study of petiole from Artemisia santonica and Artemisia scoparia plants. The petiole secretory structures are represented by hairs and ducts.

  6. ANATOMICAL RESEARCH ON ARTEMISIA SANTONICA AND ARTEMISIA SCOPARIA (ASTERACEAE)

    OpenAIRE

    MARIA-MAGDALENA ZAMFIRACHE; MONICA LUMINI?A BADEA

    2011-01-01

    The species subjected to the study belong to Asteraceae family, Artemisia genus found in Romania’s spontaneous flora. This work presents an anatomic study of petiole from Artemisia santonica and Artemisia scoparia plants. The petiole secretory structures are represented by hairs and ducts.

  7. Thyroidectomy under local analgesia: the anatomical basis of cervical blocks.

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, R.; Zorab, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the anatomical compartments of the neck and their innervation, followed by details of superficial, deep and modified cervical blocks which can be performed during thyroidectomy. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. Superficial and deep cervical blocks leave some structures unaffected. A modified cervical block is described which can be used to overcome these difficulties.

  8. Homing in the wolf spider Lycosa tarantula (Araneae, Lycosidae): the role of active locomotion and visual landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Alcubilla, Carmen; Ruiz, Miguel A.; Ortega-Escobar, Joaquín

    2009-04-01

    Previous studies on the homing of the wolf spider Lycosa tarantula have shown that it is carried out by path integration. Animals using this mechanism must measure the distance walked and the angles turned. This study aims to understand if wolf spider L. tarantula is able to estimate the walked distance in an outward path. As this information is more likely obtained by proprioceptive mechanisms, active or passive displacements have been performed. An active locomotion was found essential to estimate distances. During passive locomotion, spiders searched for their burrows near the release point while when displaced actively the inbound journey was longer than the outbound one. The possible use of visual landmarks near the burrow was also tested as a cue to complete the inbound journey. Our results did not show that L. tarantula used these visual landmarks to find the burrow. L. tarantula seems to use only proprioceptive information obtained during the outbound path to estimate the distance traveled.

  9. Medial calcar of proximal humeral fracture as landmark in restoration of humeral length in case of hemiarthroplasty.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hromádka, R.; Kub?na, Aleš Antonín; Šmíd, Martin; Popelka, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 35, ?. 5 (2014), s. 473-479. ISSN 0930-1038 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Fracture of proximal humerus * Calcar of humeral fracture * Reconstruction of proximal humerus * Reconstruction of humeral length * Shoulder arthroplasty * Shoulder hemiarthroplasty Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 1.333, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/smid-medial calcar of proximal humeral fracture as landmark in restoration of humeral length in case of hemiarthroplasty.pdf

  10. Radiographic and Anatomic Basis for Prostate Contouring Errors and Methods to Improve Prostate Contouring Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Use of highly conformal radiation for prostate cancer can lead to both overtreatment of surrounding normal tissues and undertreatment of the prostate itself. In this retrospective study we analyzed the radiographic and anatomic basis of common errors in computed tomography (CT) contouring and suggest methods to correct them. Methods and Materials: Three hundred patients with prostate cancer underwent CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prostate was delineated independently on the data sets. CT and MRI contours were compared by use of deformable registration. Errors in target delineation were analyzed and methods to avoid such errors detailed. Results: Contouring errors were identified at the prostatic apex, mid gland, and base on CT. At the apex, the genitourinary diaphragm, rectum, and anterior fascia contribute to overestimation. At the mid prostate, the anterior and lateral fasciae contribute to overestimation. At the base, the bladder and anterior fascia contribute to anterior overestimation. Transition zone hypertrophy and bladder neck variability contribute to errors of overestimation and underestimation at the superior base, whereas variable prostate-to-seminal vesicle relationships with prostate hypertrophy contribute to contouring errors at the posterior base. Conclusions: Most CT contouring errors can be detected by (1) inspection of a lateral view of prostate contours to detect projection from the expected globular form and (2) recognitionexpected globular form and (2) recognition of anatomic structures (genitourinary diaphragm) on the CT scans that are clearly visible on MRI. This study shows that many CT prostate contouring errors can be improved without direct incorporation of MRI data.

  11. Paracentetic Access to Sensory Root of Tri-geminus: Anatomic and Topographic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekhonatsky A.A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

     

    Anatomic and topographic features of middle cranial fossa which should be taken into account during paracentetic access to sensory root of trigeminus are examined in the article. It is substantiated that treatment of trigeminus neuralgia needs bounded influence on sensory root of trigeminus. The authors based the idea of paracentetic access to sensory root of trigeminus through for. ovale. Such possible complexities and specific features as: probable confluence of for. ovale with other holes, calcification of ligamentous apparatus, and presence of holes due to this process should be considered during surgery.

  12. The Vesta gravity field, spin pole and rotation period, landmark positions, and ephemeris from the Dawn tracking and optical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopliv, A. S.; Asmar, S. W.; Park, R. S.; Bills, B. G.; Centinello, F.; Chamberlin, A. B.; Ermakov, A.; Gaskell, R. W.; Rambaux, N.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Smith, D. E.; Tricarico, P.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-09-01

    The Vesta gravity field and related physical parameters have been precisely measured using 10-months of radiometric Doppler and range data and optical landmark tracking from the Dawn spacecraft. The gravity field, orientation parameters, landmark locations, and Vesta’s orbit are jointly e