WorldWideScience

Sample records for adiabatic cosmic rays

  1. Buoyancy Instabilities in Galaxy Clusters: Convection Due to Adiabatic Cosmic Rays and Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    Sharma, P; Quataert, E; Parrish, I J

    2009-01-01

    Using a linear stability analysis and two and three-dimensional nonlinear simulations, we study the physics of buoyancy instabilities in a combined thermal and relativistic (cosmic ray) plasma, motivated by the application to clusters of galaxies. We argue that cosmic ray diffusion is likely to be slow compared to the buoyancy time on large length scales, so that cosmic rays are effectively adiabatic. If the cosmic ray pressure $p_{cr}$ is $\\gtrsim 25 %$ of the thermal pressure, and the cosmic ray entropy ($p_{\\rm cr}/\\rho^{4/3}$; $\\rho$ is the thermal plasma density) decreases outwards, cosmic rays drive an adiabatic convective instability analogous to Schwarzschild convection in stars. Global simulations of galaxy cluster cores show that this instability saturates by reducing the cosmic ray entropy gradient and driving efficient convection and turbulent mixing. At larger radii in cluster cores, the thermal plasma is unstable to the heat flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI), a convective instability genera...

  2. Modification of the parallel scattering mean free path of cosmic rays in the presence of adiabatic focusing

    The cosmic ray mean free path in a large-scale nonuniform guide magnetic field with superposed magnetostatic turbulence is calculated to clarify some conflicting results in the literature. A new, exact integro-differential equation for the cosmic-ray anisotropy is derived from the Fokker-Planck transport equation. A perturbation analysis of this integro-differential equation leads to an analytical expression for the cosmic ray anisotropy and the focused transport equation for the isotropic part of the cosmic ray distribution function. The derived parallel spatial diffusion coefficient and the associated cosmic ray mean free path include the effect of adiabatic focusing and reduce to the standard forms in the limit of a uniform guide magnetic field. For the illustrative case of isotropic pitch angle scattering, the derived mean free path agrees with the earlier expressions of Beeck and Wibberenz, Bieber and Burger, Kota, and Litvinenko, but disagrees with the result of Shalchi. The disagreement with the expression of Shalchi is particularly strong in the limit of strong adiabatic focusing.

  3. ALICE Cosmic Ray Detector

    Fernandez Tellez, A; Martinez Hernandez, M; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE underground cavern provides an ideal place for the detection of high energy atmospheric muons coming from cosmic ray showers. ACORDE detects cosmic ray showers by triggering the arrival of muons to the top of the ALICE magnet.

  4. Adiabatic fluctuations from cosmic strings in a contracting universe

    We show that adiabatic, super-Hubble, and almost scale invariant density fluctuations are produced by cosmic strings in a contracting universe. An essential point is that isocurvature perturbations produced by topological defects such as cosmic strings on super-Hubble scales lead to a source term which seeds the growth of curvature fluctuations on these scales. Once the symmetry has been restored at high temperatures, the isocurvature seeds disappear, and the fluctuations evolve as adiabatic ones in the expanding phase. Thus, cosmic strings may be resurrected as a mechanism for generating the primordial density fluctuations observed today

  5. Cosmic rays

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration was further developed with particular emphasis on the effects of time-dependence and wave-dissipation. Acceleration by pulsars and the production of gamma-ray bursts was also considered. (orig.)

  6. High energy cosmic rays

    I review here some of the physics we are learning and expect to learn in the near future through the observation of cosmic rays. The study of cosmic rays involves a combination of data from accelerators, ground arrays, atmospheric fluorescence detectors and balloon and satellite experiments. I will discuss the data of the Pierre Auger Observatory, PAMELA, ATIC and FST among other experiments.

  7. Cosmic rays at Bangalore

    With collision energies in particle physics experiments beginning to probe the region hitherto accessible only through cosmic ray studies, there is a new impetus to the exchange of information and ideas between the two fields. The 18th International Cosmic Ray Conference was held in Bangalore, India, from 22 August to 3 September 1983. About 425 delegates from all over the world presented over a thousand papers on various aspects of cosmic rays. A unique feature of this Conference series is that bound volumes of all contributed papers are given to the delegates at registration and the first two days are left free for digesting the papers and private discussions

  8. Blast waves with cosmic-ray pressure

    The effects of cosmic-ray pressure on the dynamics of self-similar, spherical blast waves and driven waves are investigated on the assumptions that the ratio of relativistic cosmic-ray pressure to total pressure at the shock front is a constant w and the the cosmic rays and thermal gas evolve as independent adiabatic fluids in the postshock flow. For blast waves from a point explosion in a uniform medium, the cosmic rays dominate the pressure near r = 0 if w>0. The solutions show that, if w is small, the ratio of cosmic-ray energy to total energy in the blast wave is several times w. The solutions are used to make specific predictions of the pion-decay γ-ray flux from a blast wave as a function of w. If w is large, the predicted fluxes from supernova remnants are close to the current observational limits. It is also noted that cosmic rays may limit the compression in the radiative shock waves of supernova remnants. The addition of cosmic pressure does not change the geneal nature of the driven wave self-similar solutions. The solutions are used to predict the pion-decay γ-ray flux from a young Type II supernova interacting with circumstellar material. Observations these γ-rays from extragalactic supernovae are not promising, but a galactic supernova could be very bright in γ-rays

  9. 11. European cosmic ray symposium

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific programme was organized under three main headings: Cosmic rays in the heliosphere, Cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, Properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Seven invited talks were indexed seprately for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  10. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  11. Cosmic rays in astrospheres

    Scherer, Klaus; Bomans, Dominik; Ferreira, Stefan; Fichtner, Horst; Kleimann, Jens; Strauss, Dutoit; Weis, Kerstin; Wiengarten, Tobias; Wodzinski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic rays passing through large astrospheres can be efficiently cooled inside these "cavities" in the interstellar medium. Moreover, the energy spectra of these energetic particles are already modulated in front of the astrospherical bow shocks. We study the cosmic ray flux in and around lambda Cephei as an example for an astrosphere. The large-scale plasma flow is modeled hydrodynamically with radiative cooling. We studied the cosmic ray flux in a stellar wind cavity using a transport model based on stochastic differential equations. The required parameters, most importantly, the elements of the diffusion tensor, are based on the heliospheric parameters. The magnetic field required for the diffusion coefficients is calculated kinematically. We discuss the transport in an astrospheric scenario with varying parameters for the transport coefficients. We show that large stellar wind cavities can act as sinks for the galactic cosmic ray flux and thus can give rise to small-scale anisotropies in the direction to...

  12. Cosmic rays in space

    Cosmos is a mysterious space by which many researchers are fascinated for many years. But, going into space means that we will receive extra exposure due to existence of cosmic rays. Cosmic rays are mainly composed of highly energetic protons. It was born in the last stage of stellar life. Understanding of cosmos will certainly bring right understanding of radiation energy, or energy itself. As no one could see the very early stage of cosmic rays, there is only a speculation. But it is better to speculate something based on certain side evidences, than to give up the whole. Such attitude shall be welcomed in the space researches. Anyway, cosmic rays were born in the last explosion of a star, which is called as Super Nova. After cosmic rays are emitted from the Super Nova, it will reach to the human surroundings. To indicate its intensity, special unit of ''dose rate'' is used. When a man climbs a mountain, cosmic ray intensity surely increases. It doubles as he goes up every 1500m elevation. It was ascertained by our own measurements. Then what happens when the goes up more? At aviation altitude, where airplanes fly, the dose rate will be increased up to 100times the high mountain cases. And what is expected when he goes up further more, up to space orbit altitude? In this case, the dose rate increases up to 10times the airplane cases. Geomagnetism affects the dose rate very much. As primary cosmic ray particles are charged particles, they cannot do well with existence of the magnetic field. In effect, cosmic rays can penetrate into the polar atmosphere along geomagnetic lines of forces which stand almost vertical, but penetration of low energy cosmic rays will be banned when they intend to penetrate crossing the geomagnetic lines of forces in equatorial region. Therefore, exposure due to cosmic rays will become large in polar region, while it remains small in equatorial region. In effect, airplanes which fly over the equator. Only, we have to know that the cosmos

  13. Cosmic Ray Feedback

    Mathews, William G

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic rays produced or deposited at sites in hot cluster gas are thought to provide the pressure that forms X-ray cavities. While cavities have a net cooling effect on cluster gas, young, expanding cavities drive shocks that increase the local entropy. Cavities also produce radial filaments of thermal gas and are sources of cluster cosmic rays that diffuse through cavity walls, as in Virgo where a radio lobe surrounds a radial thermal filament. Cosmic rays also make the hot gas locally buoyant, allowing large masses of low entropy gas to be transported out beyond the cooling radius. Successive cavities maintain a buoyant outflow that preserves the cluster gas temperature and gas fraction profiles and dramatically reduces the cooling rate onto the central black hole.

  14. Can Cosmic Rays Heat the Intergalactic Medium?

    Samui, S; Srianand, R; Samui, Saumyadip; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Srianand, Raghunathan

    2005-01-01

    Supernova explosions in the early star forming galaxies will accelerate cosmic rays (CRs). CRs are typically confined in the collapsed objects for a short period before escaping into the intergalactic medium (IGM). Galactic outflows can facilitate this escape by advecting CRs into the IGM. An outflow that results in a termination shock can also generate more CRs. We show that the CR protons from the above processes can significantly affect the thermal history of the IGM. Within plausible range of parameters, cosmic ray heating can compensate for adiabatic cooling and explain the measured IGM temperature at redshifts z between 2 to 4, even with early reionization.

  15. Cosmic Rays and Climate

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2007-01-01

    Among the most puzzling questions in climate change is that of solar-climate variability, which has attracted the attention of scientists for more than two centuries. Until recently, even the existence of solar-climate variability has been controversial—perhaps because the observations had largely involved correlations between climate and the sunspot cycle that had persisted for only a few decades. Over the last few years, however, diverse reconstructions of past climate change have revealed clear associations with cosmic ray variations recorded in cosmogenic isotope archives, providing persuasive evidence for solar or cosmic ray forcing of the climate. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Although this remains a mystery, observations suggest that cloud cover may be influenced by cosmic rays, which are modulated by the solar wind and, on longer time scales, by the geomagnetic fiel...

  16. Galactic cosmic rays

    Blasi Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The multi-facet nature of the origin of cosmic rays is such that some of the problems currently met in our path to describing available data are due to oversimplified models of CR acceleration and transport, and others to lack of knowledge of the physical processes at work in certain conditions. On the other hand, the phenomenology of cosmic rays, as arising from better observations, is getting so rich that it makes sense to try to distinguish the problems that derive from too simple views of Nature and those that are challenging the very foundations of the existing paradigms. Here I will briefly discuss some of these issues.

  17. The interplanetary transport of solar cosmic rays

    Numerical solutions are presented for the propagation of solar cosmic rays in interplanetary space, including the effects of pitch-angle scattering and adiabatic focusing. The intensity-time profiles can be well fitted by a simple radial spatial diffusion equation with scattering mean-free path lambdasub(fit). The radial mean-free path so obtained is significantly larger than the true scattering mean-free path for low-rigidity particles due to both adiabatic focusing and the inapplicability of the diffusive approximation early in the event. The well-known discrepancy between lambdasub(fit) and the theoretical predictions may be resolved by these calculations. (author)

  18. Cosmic reionization by primordial cosmic rays

    Tueros, Matias; Romero, Gustavo Esteban

    2014-01-01

    After the so-called cosmic recombination, the expanding universe entered into a period of darkness since most of the matter was in a neutral state. About a billion years later, however, the intergalactic space was once again ionized. The process, known as the cosmic reionization, required the operation of mechanisms that are not well understood. Among other ionizing sources, Population III stars, mini-quasars, and X-ray emitting microquasars have been invoked. In this article we propose that primordial cosmic rays, accelerated at the termination points of the jets of the first microquasars, may have contributed to the reionization of the intergalactic space as well. For this we quantify the ionization power of cosmic rays (electrons and protons) in the primordial intergalactic medium using extensive particle cascade simulations. We establish that, depending on the fraction of electrons to protons accelerated in the microquasar jets, cosmic rays should have contributed to the reionization of the primordial int...

  19. Cosmic ray antiprotons from nearby cosmic accelerators

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Gupta, Nayantara

    2015-05-01

    The antiproton flux measured by PAMELA experiment might have originated from Galactic sources of cosmic rays. These antiprotons are expected to be produced in the interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei with cold protons. Gamma rays are also produced in similar interactions inside some of the cosmic accelerators. We consider a few nearby supernova remnants observed by Fermi LAT. Many of them are associated with molecular clouds. Gamma rays have been detected from these sources which most likely originate in decay of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions. The observed gamma ray fluxes from these SNRs are used to find out their contributions to the observed diffuse cosmic ray antiproton flux near the earth.

  20. Cosmic ray: Studying the origin

    Investigations of the origin of cosmic rays are presented. Different methods are discussed: studies of cosmic gamma rays of energy from 30 MeV to about 1015 eV (since photons point to their places of origin), studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays (because it reflects source morphology), and studies of cosmic rays with energy above 1O19 eV (for these are the highest energies observed in nature). (author)

  1. Cosmic rays and climate

    2009-01-01

    Inside the new chamber the CLOUD team will be able to recreate the conditions of any part of the atmosphere, from the polar stratosphere to the low level tropics (top). The new chamber safely in position in the East hall. Once carefully cleaned the chamber will be turned sideways onto its legs ready for the beam of 'cosmic rays' (bottom).

  2. Dual Phase Cosmic Rays

    Shurtleff, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A calculation based on flat spacetime symmetries shows how there can be two quantum phases. For one, extreme phase change determines a conventional classical trajectory and four-momentum, i.e. mass times four-velocity. The other phase occurs in an effective particle state, with the effective energy and momentum being the rate of change of the phase with respect to time and distance. A cosmic ray proton moves along a classical trajectory, but exists in an effective particle state with an effective energy that depends on the local gravitational potential. Assumptions are made so that a cosmic ray proton in an ultra-high energy state detected near the Earth was in a much less energetic state in interstellar space. A 300 EeV proton incident on the Earth was a 2 PeV proton in interstellar space. The model predicts such protons are in states with even more energy near the Sun than when near the Earth.

  3. Origin of Cosmic Rays

    Drury, Luke O'C

    2012-01-01

    It is argued that there are three `origins' of cosmic rays; the origin of the particles, the origin of the energy, and the site of the acceleration. The evidence for each origin is discussed and a plausible synthesis outlined for the particles of Galactic origin where the energy comes mainly (but not exclusively) from supernova explosions, the site of the acceleration is at strong collisionless shock waves, and the accelerated particles come from the interstellar and circumstellar material swept over by these shocks. If these shocks are capable (as indicated by recent observations and theoretical work) of significantly amplifying magnetic fields this picture appears capable of explaining the cosmic ray particles at all energies below the `ankle' at $3\\times10^{18}\\,\\rm eV$. The particles above this energy are generally taken to be of extra-galactic origin and possible acceleration sites for these UHE particles are briefly discussed.

  4. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The current understanding of climate change in the industrial age is that it is predominantly caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, with relatively small natural contributions due to solar irradiance and volcanoes. However, palaeoclimatic reconstructions show that the climate has frequently varied on 100-year time scales during the Holocene (last 10 kyr) by amounts comparable to the present warming - and yet the mechanism or mechanisms are not understood. Some of these reconstructions show clear associations with solar variability, which is recorded in the light radio-isotope archives that measure past variations of cosmic ray intensity. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Estimated changes of solar irradiance on these time scales appear to be too small to account for the climate observations. This raises the question of whether cosmic rays may directly affect the climate, provi...

  5. Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms

    Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; van den Berg, Ad; Ebert, Ute

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms Cosmic rays are protons and heavier nuclei that constantly bombard the Earth's atmosphere with energies spanning a vast range from 109 to 1021 eV. At typical altitudes up to 10-20 km they initiate large particle cascades, called extensive air showers, that contain millions to billions of secondary particles depending on their initial energy. These particles include electrons, positrons, hadrons and muons, and are concentrated in a compact particle front that propagates at relativistic speed. In addition, the shower leaves behind a trail of lower energy electrons from ionization of air molecules. Under thunderstorm conditions these electrons contribute to the electrical and ionization processes in the cloud. When the local electric field is strong enough the secondary electrons can create relativistic electron run-away avalanches [1] or even non-relativistic avalanches. Cosmic rays could even trigger lightning inception. Conversely, strong electric fields also influence the development of the air shower [2]. Extensive air showers emit a short (tens of nanoseconds) radio pulse due to deflection of the shower particles in the Earth's magnetic field [3]. Antenna arrays, such as AERA, LOFAR and LOPES detect these pulses in a frequency window of roughly 10-100 MHz. These systems are also sensitive to the radiation from discharges associated to thunderstorms, and provide a means to study the interaction of cosmic ray air showers and the electrical processes in thunderstorms [4]. In this presentation we discuss the involved radiation mechanisms and present analyses of thunderstorm data from air shower arrays [1] A. Gurevich et al., Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992) [2] S. Buitink et al., Astropart. Phys. 33, 1 (2010) [3] H. Falcke et al., Nature 435, 313 (2005) [4] S. Buitink et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 467, 385 (2007)

  6. Cosmic rays: direct measurements

    Maestro, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on the rapporteur talk given at the 34$^{th}$ International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC), on August 6$^{th}$, 2015. The purpose of the talk and paper is to provide a summary of the most recent results from balloon-borne and space-based experiments presented at the conference, and give an overview of the future missions and developments foreseen in this field.

  7. Cosmic ray intensity pulses

    Pulse variations in the galactic cosmic ray intensity, extending over intervals of several hours, have often been observed during cosmic ray storms as well as during other periods. On some occasions, these pulses appear in the data recorded at polar stations during epochs characterized by enhanced diurnal anisotropy at low latitudes. The short-term intensity increase at polar stations cannot be ascribed solely to the azimuthal anisotropy, and it is demonstrated that the cosmic ray transport during a pulse displays both azimuthal and north-south anisotropies. Furthermore, it is found that the magnetude of the pulse height recorded by a station i is proportional to /sup j/u where μ/sub i/=cos theta, and theta/sub i/ is the angular separation between the mean asymptotic direction of viewing of station i and the direction of anisotropy in three dimentional space. The relationship between pulse modulations and transient disturbances in the interplanetary magnetic field, and especially their location, remain to be investigated

  8. Studies in cosmic rays

    The investigation of the diurnal variation in the cosmic ray intensity on individual days has revealed a new class of diurnal variation showing a maximum around 09 hour direction in the interplanetary space. It is shown to occur during the recovery phase of Forbush decreases as well as during quiet periods. The rigidity spectrum of the anomalous diurnal variation has an exponent around zero, the same as that for the average diurnal variation exhibiting maximum around 18 hours in the interplanetary space. It is shown that the Forbush decreases associated with the diurnal variation exhibiting morning maximum, are 27 day recurrent in nature and are preceded by east limb solar flares on most of the occasions. A qualitative model of the transient modulation by solar corotating corpuscular streams of enhanced solar wind velocity, emanating from the active regions on the solar disc, is proposed to explain the anomalous diurnal anisotropy in the recovery phase of 27 day recurrent Forbush decreases. From this model, the cosmic ray diffusion coefficients, parallel and perpendicular to the interplanetary magnetic field inside the corotating stream, are derived and compared with the average values. To investigate the possibility of determining the energy spectra of cosmic ray intensity variations from a single station, a continuous record of neutron multiplicity spectrum has been obtained for the period October, 1967 - October, 1971, using the Gulmarg neutron monitor. The average multiplicity spectrum in the Gulmarg neutron monitor shows a mean multiplicity approximately equal to 1.4 for 12 Boron-tri-fluoride counters and is an increasing function of the number of counters used. The mean multiplicity measured in various other neutron monitors, when normalized to the cutoff rigidity of Gulmurg (11.91 GV), shows a systematic increase with the altitude of the station. (author)

  9. Cosmic ray: Studying the origin

    Szabelski, J. [Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Lodz (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations of the origin of cosmic rays are presented. Different methods are discussed: studies of cosmic gamma rays of energy from 30 MeV to about 10{sup 15} eV (since photons point to their places of origin), studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays (because it reflects source morphology), and studies of cosmic rays with energy above 1O{sup 19} eV (for these are the highest energies observed in nature). (author) 101 refs, 19 figs, 7 tabs

  10. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    Recchia, S.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Morlino, G.

    2016-01-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the...

  11. Dual Phase Cosmic Rays

    Shurtleff, Richard

    2007-01-01

    A calculation based on flat spacetime symmetries shows how there can be two quantum phases. For one, extreme phase change determines a conventional classical trajectory and four-momentum, i.e. mass times four-velocity. The other phase occurs in an effective particle state, with the effective energy and momentum being the rate of change of the phase with respect to time and distance. A cosmic ray proton moves along a classical trajectory, but exists in an effective particle state with an effec...

  12. The Origin of Cosmic Rays

    Cosmic Rays reach the Earth from space with energies of up to more than 1020 eV, carrying information on the most powerful particle accelerators that Nature has been able to assemble. Understanding where and how cosmic rays originate has required almost one century of investigations, and, although the last word is not written yet, recent observations and theory seem now to fit together to provide us with a global picture of the origin of cosmic rays of unprecedented clarity. Here we will describe what we learned from recent observations of astrophysical sources (such as supernova remnants and active galaxies) and we will illustrate what these observations tell us about the physics of particle acceleration and transport. We will also discuss the 'end' of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum, which bridges out attention towards the so called ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). At ∼1020 eV the gyration scale of cosmic rays in cosmic magnetic fields becomes large enough to allow us to point back to their sources, thereby allowing us to perform 'cosmic ray astronomy', as confirmed by the recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory. We will discuss the implications of these observations for the understanding of UHECRs, as well as some questions which will likely remain unanswered and will be the target of the next generation of cosmic ray experiments.

  13. Cosmic-Rays and Gamma Ray Bursts

    Meli, A.

    2013-07-01

    Cosmic-rays are subatomic particles of energies ranging between a few eV to hundreds of TeV. These particles register a power-law spectrum, and it seems that most of them originate from astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The shock acceleration in superalfvenic astrophysical plasmas, is believed to be the main mechanism responsible for the production of the non-thermal cosmic-rays. Especially, the importance of the very high energy cosmic-ray acceleration, with its consequent gamma-ray radiation and neutrino production in the shocks of the relativistic jets of Gamma Ray Bursts, is a favourable theme of study. I will discuss the cosmic-ray shock acceleration mechanism particularly focusing on simulation studies of cosmic-ray acceleration occurring in the relativistic shocks of GRB jets.

  14. Direct cosmic-ray detection

    One century after the discovery of cosmic rays, many questions remain open on their origin, nature, and transport. Experiments to detect them directly have constantly improved, and are today of highly diversified designs. Indeed, precise measurements of cosmic rays in an energy range from ∼104 to ∼1015 eV allow one to study the mechanism of acceleration of primary cosmic rays up to very high energy, to characterise their possible sources, and to clarify their interactions with the interstellar medium. Such measurements of elemental cosmic-ray spectra require complementary and redundant charge- and energy-identification detectors, such as the balloon-borne Cosmic-Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment, which measures cosmic rays from 1012 to 1015 eV for all elements up to and including iron. Here I present the current status of direct cosmic-ray measurements, with the focus on the latest CREAM results. Finally, I briefly discuss the cosmic-ray identification above the knee.

  15. Galactic origin of cosmic rays I

    Colgate, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical basis for the supernova envelope shock origin of cosmic rays is reviewed. The theoretical explanation of the SN Type I light curve requires the ejection of a relativistic mass fraction. The criterion of the adiabatic decelleration by Alfven wave trapping neither applies in theory, when ..beta.. > 1, or practice, the Starfish high altitude nuclear explosion experiment. Arguments of delayed acceleration due to K-capture are not applicable to SN ejecta because a period of prompt recombination exists before subsequent stripping in propagation.

  16. Solar Cosmic Rays

    Miroshnichenko, Leonty I.

    2001-05-01

    The book summarizes the results of solar cosmic-ray (SCR) investigations since 1942. The present monograph, unlike the reviews published earlier, treats the problem in self-contained form, in all its associations - from fundamental astrophysical aspects to geophysical and astronautical applications. It includes a large amount of new data, accumulated during the last two or three decades of space research. As a result of the `information burst' in space physics, there are a lot of new interesting theoretical concepts, models, and ideas that deserve attention. The author gives an extensive bibliography which covers incompartially the main achievements and failures in this field. The book will be helpful for a wide audience of space physicists and it will be relevant to graduate and postgraduate courses.

  17. Cosmic ray synergies

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    In laboratories, cosmic rays have been the subject of scientific research for many years. A more recent development is their appearance in schools, as educational tools. A recent workshop at CERN, organised by ASPERA in collaboration with EPPOG and EPPCN, had the goal of bringing together ideas and initiatives with a view to setting up a future common project.   Presentation at the workshop on 15 October. In research, as in education, you can sometimes get things done more rapidly and easily by joining forces. For roughly the past decade, physicists have been taking their particle detectors to secondary schools. “The challenge now is to bring all of these existing projects together in a network,” says Arnaud Marsollier, in charge of communication for the ASPERA network and organiser of the workshop. The workshop held on Friday, 15 October was attended by representatives of major European educational projects and members of the European Particle Physics Communication Network...

  18. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    Recchia, S; Morlino, G

    2016-01-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfven waves, that in turn determine the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the impli...

  19. Numerical Cosmic-Ray Hydrodynamics

    Miniati, F.

    2009-04-01

    We present a numerical method for integrating the equations describing a system made of a fluid and cosmic-rays. We work out the modified characteristic equations that include the CR dynamical effects in smooth flows. We model the energy exchange between cosmic-rays and the fluid, due to diffusive processes in configuration and momentum space, with a flux conserving method. For a specified shock acceleration efficiency as a function of the upstream conditions and shock Mach number, we modify the Riemann solver to take into account the cosmic-ray mediation at shocks without resolving the cosmic-ray induced substructure. A self-consistent time-dependent shock solution is obtained by using our modified solver with Glimm's method. Godunov's method is applied in smooth parts of the flow.

  20. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate.

    Carslaw, K S; Harrison, R G; Kirkby, J

    2002-11-29

    It has been proposed that Earth's climate could be affected by changes in cloudiness caused by variations in the intensity of galactic cosmic rays in the atmosphere. This proposal stems from an observed correlation between cosmic ray intensity and Earth's average cloud cover over the course of one solar cycle. Some scientists question the reliability of the observations, whereas others, who accept them as reliable, suggest that the correlation may be caused by other physical phenomena with decadal periods or by a response to volcanic activity or El Niño. Nevertheless, the observation has raised the intriguing possibility that a cosmic ray-cloud interaction may help explain how a relatively small change in solar output can produce much larger changes in Earth's climate. Physical mechanisms have been proposed to explain how cosmic rays could affect clouds, but they need to be investigated further if the observation is to become more than just another correlation among geophysical variables. PMID:12459578

  1. Cosmic ray driven outflows

    Hanasz, Michal; Naab, Thorsten; Gawryszczak, Artur; Kowalik, Kacper; Wóltański, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star forming (40 Msun / yr) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (~100 Msun / pc^2) similar to observed star forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10 per cent of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3e28 cm^2 / s) we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid the wind speed can exceed 1000 km/s, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e. the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated i...

  2. Cosmic rays from thermal sources

    Wlodarczyk, Z

    2007-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays (CR) exhibits very characteristic power-like behavior with the "knee" structure. We consider a generalized statistical model for the production process of cosmic rays which accounts for such behavior in a natural way either by assuming the existence of temperature fluctuations in the source of CR, or by assuming specific temperature distribution of the CR sources. Both possibilities yield the so called Tsallis statistics and lead to the power-like distribution.

  3. Protostars: Forges of cosmic rays?

    Padovani, M.; Marcowith, A.; Hennebelle, P.; Ferrière, K.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Galactic cosmic rays are particles presumably accelerated in supernova remnant shocks that propagate in the interstellar medium up to the densest parts of molecular clouds, losing energy and their ionisation efficiency because of the presence of magnetic fields and collisions with molecular hydrogen. Recent observations hint at high levels of ionisation and at the presence of synchrotron emission in protostellar systems, which leads to an apparent contradiction. Aims: We want to explain the origin of these cosmic rays accelerated within young protostars as suggested by observations. Methods: Our modelling consists of a set of conditions that has to be satisfied in order to have an efficient cosmic-ray acceleration through diffusive shock acceleration. We analyse three main acceleration sites (shocks in accretion flows, along the jets, and on protostellar surfaces), then we follow the propagation of these particles through the protostellar system up to the hot spot region. Results: We find that jet shocks can be strong accelerators of cosmic-ray protons, which can be boosted up to relativistic energies. Other promising acceleration sites are protostellar surfaces, where shocks caused by impacting material during the collapse phase are strong enough to accelerate cosmic-ray protons. In contrast, accretion flow shocks are too weak to efficiently accelerate cosmic rays. Though cosmic-ray electrons are weakly accelerated, they can gain a strong boost to relativistic energies through re-acceleration in successive shocks. Conclusions: We suggest a mechanism able to accelerate both cosmic-ray protons and electrons through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, which can be used to explain the high ionisation rate and the synchrotron emission observed towards protostellar sources. The existence of an internal source of energetic particles can have a strong and unforeseen impact on the ionisation of the protostellar disc, on the star and planet formation

  4. Cosmic rays and Earth's climate

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    During the last solar cycle the Earth's cloud cover underwent a modulation in phase with the cosmic ray flux. Assuming that there is a causal relationship between the two, it is expected and found that the Earth's temperature follows more closely decade variations in cosmic ray flux than other...... solar activity parameters. If the relationship is real the state of the Heliosphere affects the Earth's climate....

  5. Cosmic rays and Earth's climate

    Svensmark, Henrik

    During the last solar cycle the Earth's cloud cover underwent a modulation in phase with the cosmic ray flux. Assuming that there is a causal relationship between the two, it is expected and found that the Earth's temperature follows more closely decade variations in cosmic ray flux than other...... solar activity parameters. If the relationship is real the state of the Heliosphere affects the Earth's climate....

  6. Cosmic Rays and Their Radiative Processes in Numerical Cosmology

    Ryu, Dongsu; Miniati, Francesco; Jones, Tom W.; Kang, Hyesung

    2000-01-01

    A cosmological hydrodynamic code is described, which includes a routine to compute cosmic ray acceleration and transport in a simplified way. The routine was designed to follow explicitly diffusive, acceleration at shocks, and second-order Fermi acceleration and adiabatic loss in smooth flows. Synchrotron cooling of the electron population can also be followed. The updated code is intended to be used to study the properties of nonthermal synchrotron emission and inverse Compton scattering from electron cosmic rays in clusters of galaxies, in addition to the properties of thermal bremsstrahlung emission from hot gas. The results of a test simulation using a grid of 128 (exp 3) cells are presented, where cosmic rays and magnetic field have been treated passively and synchrotron cooling of cosmic ray electrons has not been included.

  7. Cosmic Rays and Their Radiative Processes in Numerical Cosmology

    Ryu, D; Jones, T W; Kang, H; Ryu, Dongsu; Miniati, Francesco; Jones, Tom W.; Kang, Hyesung

    1999-01-01

    A cosmological hydrodynamic code is described, which includes a routine tocompute cosmic ray acceleration and transport in a simplified way. The routinewas designed to follow explicitly diffusive acceleration at shocks, andsecond-order Fermi acceleration and adiabatic loss in smooth flows. Synchrotroncooling of the electron population can also be followed. The updated code isintended to be used to study the properties of nonthermal synchrotron emissionand inverse Compton scattering from electron cosmic rays in clusters ofgalaxies, in addition to the properties of thermal bremsstrahlung emission fromhot gas. The results of a test simulation using a grid of $128^3$ cells arepresented, where cosmic rays and magnetic field have been treated passively andsynchrotron cooling of cosmic ray electrons has not been included.

  8. The highest energy cosmic rays

    In this paper three topics are discussed concerning cosmic rays with energies ≥ 1014 eV. Recent data on astrophysical point sources of γ-rays is presented showing no evidence for the sources Cygnus X-3, Hercules X-1, and the Crab Nebula. A discussion is given concerning the prospects of finding diffuse γ-rays from the galactic plane. Finally a brief review is given on the very highest energy cosmic rays that have been observed by the Fly's Eye and giant air shower arrays. (author)

  9. Pulsars and cosmic rays in the dense supernova shells

    Cosmic rays (c.r.) injected by a young pulsar in the dense supernova shell are considered. The maintenance of the Galactic c.r. pool by pulsar production is shown to have a difficulty: adiabatic energy losses of c.r. in the expanding shell demand a high initial c.r. luminosity of pulsar, which results in too high flux of γ-radiation produced through π0-decays (in excess over diffuse γ-ray background). (author)

  10. Cosmic Ray Origins: An Introduction

    Blandford, Roger; Yuan, Yajie

    2014-01-01

    Physicists have pondered the origin of cosmic rays for over a hundred years. However the last few years have seen an upsurge in the observation, progress in the theory and a genuine increase in the importance attached to the topic due to its intimate connection to the indirect detection of evidence for dark matter. The intent of this talk is to set the stage for the meeting by reviewing some of the basic features of the entire cosmic ray spectrum from GeV to ZeV energy and some of the models that have been developed. The connection will also be made to recent developments in understanding general astrophysical particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, relativistic jets and gamma ray bursts. The prospects for future discoveries, which may elucidate the origin of cosmic rays, are bright.

  11. Cosmic Ray Origins: An Introduction

    Blandford, Roger; Simeon, Paul; Yuan, Yajie

    2014-11-15

    Physicists have pondered the origin of cosmic rays for over a hundred years. However the last few years have seen an upsurge in the observation, progress in the theory and a genuine increase in the importance attached to the topic due to its intimate connection to the indirect detection of evidence for dark matter. The intent of this talk is to set the stage for the meeting by reviewing some of the basic features of the entire cosmic ray spectrum from GeV to ZeV energy and some of the models that have been developed. The connection will also be made to recent developments in understanding general astrophysical particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, relativistic jets and gamma ray bursts. The prospects for future discoveries, which may elucidate the origin of cosmic rays, are bright.

  12. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    cloud radiative properties. Thus, a moderate influence on atmospheric aerosol distributions from cosmic ray ionisation would have a strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. Historical evidence over the past 1000 years indicates that changes in climate have occurred in accord with variability in......A correlation between a global average of low cloud cover and the flux of cosmic rays incident in the atmosphere has been observed during the last solar cycle. The ionising potential of Earth bound cosmic rays are modulated by the state of the heliosphere, while clouds play an important role in the...... Earth's radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation. If a physical link between these two features can be established, it would provide a mechanism linking solar activity and Earth's climate. Recent satellite observations have further revealed a correlation...

  13. Radio astronomy and cosmic rays

    It is generally accepted that the electronic component of cosmic rays must be of galactic origin, is the source of the galactic radio background, and possibly, or even probably, originates in supernovae and/or supernova remnants. Therefore, in consideration of this electronic component, we review the general history and observed properties of supernovae with concentration on the more recent results on radio supernovae, the observed properties of supernova remnants of both the centrally driven and shock driven subclasses, and the general properties of the galactic non-thermal radio background. These results are then compared with the measured properties of the e- component of cosmic rays in the solar neighborhood. It is found that even though this component of the cosmic rays is a rather minor one in terms of either number or energetics, it is the component which appears best explained by known phenomena at the present time

  14. Interpreting the cosmic ray composition

    The detailed pattern of elemental abundances in the Galactic Cosmic Rays is well determined at energies of a few GeV per nucleon. After correction for propagation effects the inferred source composition shows significant deviations from the standard pattern of Galactic elemental abundances. These deviations, surprisingly overabundances of the heavy elements relative to Hydrogen, are clearly a significant clue to the origin of the cosmic rays, but one which has proven very difficult to interpret. We have recently shown that the 'standard' model for the origin of the bulk of the Galactic cosmic rays, namely acceleration by the diffusive shock acceleration process at the strong shocks associated with supernova remnants, can quantitatively explain all features of the source composition if the acceleration occurs from a dusty interstellar medium. This success must be regarded as one of the stronger pieces of evidence in favour of the standard model

  15. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  16. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass

    Baylon cardiel, J L; Wallace, K C; Anderson, T B; Copley, M

    The cosmic-ray energetics and mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to measure cosmic-ray composition to the supernova energy scale of 10$^{15}$ eV in a series of ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) flights. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004. The goal is to observe cosmic-ray spectral features and/or abundance changes that might signify a limit to supernova acceleration. The particle ($\\{Z}$) measurements will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector to minimize the effect of backscatter from the calorimeter. The particle energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector (TRD) for $\\{Z}$ > 3 and a sampling tungsten/scintillator calorimeter for $\\{Z}$ $\\geq$1 particles, allowing inflight cross calibration of the two detectors. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation are reported in this paper.

  17. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    A correlation between a global average of low cloud cover and the flux of cosmic rays incident in the atmosphere has been observed during the last solar cycle. The ionising potential of Earth bound cosmic rays are modulated by the state of the heliosphere, while clouds play an important role in the...... between cosmic ray flux and low cloud top temperature. The temperature of a cloud depends on the radiation properties determined by its droplet distribution. Low clouds are warm (> 273 K) and therefore consist of liquid water droplets. At typical atmospheric supersaturations (similar to1%) a liquid cloud...... drop will only form in the presence of an aerosol, which acts as a condensation site. The droplet distribution of a cloud will then depend on the number of aerosols activated as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the level of super saturation. Based on observational evidence it is argued that a...

  18. Asymmetric diffusion of cosmic rays

    Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic ray propagation is diffusive because of pitch angle scattering by waves. We demonstrate that if the high-amplitude magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with $\\tilde B/\\langle B\\rangle \\sim 1$ is present on top of the mean field gradient, the diffusion becomes asymmetric. As an example, we consider the vertical transport of cosmic rays in our Galaxy propagating away from a point-like source. We solve this diffusion problem analytically using a one-dimensional Markov chain analysis. We obtained that the cosmic ray density markedly differs from the standard diffusion prediction and has a sizable effect on their distribution throughout the galaxy. The equation for the continuous limit is also derived, which shows limitations of the convection-diffusion equation.

  19. Fun Times with Cosmic Rays

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Who would have thought cosmic rays could be so hip? Although discovered 90 years ago on death-defying manned balloon flights hip even by twenty-first-century extremesport standards cosmic rays quickly lost popularity as way-cool telescopes were finding way-too-cool phenomena across the electromagnetic spectrum. Yet cosmic rays are back in vogue, boasting their own set of superlatives. Scientists are tracking them down with new resolve from the Arctic to Antarctica and even on the high western plains of Argentina. Theorists, too, now see cosmic rays as harbingers of funky physics. Cosmic rays are atomic and subatomic particles - the fastest moving bits of matter in the universe and the only sample of matter we have from outside the solar system (with the exception of interstellar dust grains). Lower-energy cosmic rays come from the Sun. Mid-energy particles come from stellar explosions - either spewed directly from the star like shrapnel, or perhaps accelerated to nearly the speed of light by shock waves. The highest-energy cosmic rays, whose unequivocal existence remains one of astronomy's greatest mysteries, clock in at a staggering 10(exp 19) to 10(exp 22) electron volts. This is the energy carried in a baseball pitch; seeing as how there are as many atomic particles in a baseball as there are baseballs in the Moon, that s one powerful toss. No simple stellar explosion could produce them. At a recent conference in Albuquerque, scientists presented the first observational evidence of a possible origin for the highest-energy variety. A team led by Elihu Boldt at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center found that five of these very rare cosmic rays (there are only a few dozen confirmed events) come from the direction of four 'retired' quasar host galaxies just above the arm of the Big Dipper, all visible with backyard telescopes: NGC 3610, NGC 3613, NGC 4589, and NGC 5322. These galaxies are billions of years past their glory days as the brightest beacons in the universe

  20. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    Kempa, J.

    2015-12-01

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  1. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    Kempa, J., E-mail: kempa@pw.plock.pl [Warsaw University of Technology Branch Plock (Poland)

    2015-12-15

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  2. Cosmic Rays and Climate

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2008-01-01

    Among the most puzzling questions in climate change is that of solar-climate variability, which has attracted the attention of scientists for more than two centuries. Until recently, even the existence of solar-climate variability has been controversial - perhaps because the observations had largely involved temporary correlations between climate and the sunspot cycle. Over the last few years, however, diverse reconstructions of past climate change have revealed clear associations with cosmic...

  3. Observing cosmic rays in space

    Direct measurement of the charged cosmic radiation (cosmic ray) impinging on Earth, play an essential role to get information of the acceleration and propagation mechanism by providing the relative abundance and the energy spectra. Observations, using balloon-borne detector, in Japan were historically achieved especially in field of the high energy electrons and hadrons. Since 2000, the cosmic ray observation in worldwide has done a remarkable progress by development of the detectors with high-technology electronics system and by success of the long duration ballooning, such as, in Antarctica. Further space observations planned at International Space Station will challenge to resolve the puzzles of the dark matter and the anti-matter in universe. The achievements of the direct observations by present days and the future prospect will briefly be reviewed in this article. (author)

  4. Evaluation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Heiblim, Samuel; Malott, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Models of the galactic cosmic ray spectra have been tested by comparing their predictions to an evaluated database containing more than 380 measured cosmic ray spectra extending from 1960 to the present.

  5. Cosmic rays and hadronic interactions

    Lipari, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The study of cosmic rays, and more in general of the "high energy universe" is at the moment a vibrant field that, thanks to the observations by several innovative detectors for relativistic charged particles, gamma-rays, and neutrinos continue to generate surprising and exciting results. The progress in the field is rapid but many fundamental problems remain open. There is an intimate relation between the study of the high energy universe and the study of the properties of hadronic interactions. High energy cosmic rays can only be studied detecting the showers they generate in the atmosphere, and for the interpretation of the data one needs an accurate modeling of the collisions between hadrons. Also the study of cosmic rays inside their sources and in the Galaxy requires a precise description of hadronic interactions. A program of experimental studies at the LHC and at lower energy, designed to address the most pressing problems, could significantly reduce the existing uncertainties and is very desirable. Such an experimental program would also have a strong intrinsic scientific interest, allowing the broadening and deepening of our understanding of Quantum Chromo Dynamics in the non-perturbative regime, the least understood sector of the Standard Model of particle physics. It should also be noted that the cosmic ray spectrum extends to particles with energy E ˜ 1020 eV, or a nucleon-nucleon c.m. energy √s ≃ 430 TeV, 30 times higher than the current LHC energy. Cosmic ray experiments therefore offer the possibility to perform studies on the properties of hadronic interactions that are impossible at accelerators.

  6. Galactic cosmic ray propagation models using Picard

    Kissmann, Ralf; Strong, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from our newly developed Galactic cosmic-ray transport code PICARD, that solves the cosmic-ray transport equation. This code allows for the computation of cosmic-ray spectra and the resulting gamma-ray emission. Relying on contemporary numerical solvers allows for efficient computation of models with deca-parsec resolution. PICARD can handle locally anisotropic spatial diffusion acknowledging a full diffusion tensor. We used this framework to investigate the transition from axisymmetric to spiral-arm cosmic-ray source distributions. Wherever possible we compare model predictions with constraining observables in cosmic-ray astrophysics.

  7. Cosmic Ray Small Scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    López-Barquero, Vanessa; Xu, S; Desiati, P; Lazarian, A

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic ray anisotropy is observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments. However, a comprehensive and satisfactory explanation has been elusive for over a decade now. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays on Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium and small angular scale structure could be an effect of non diffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation of the observed small scale anisotropy observed at TeV energy scale, may come from the effect of particle scattering in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-$\\beta$ compressible mag...

  8. Global diffusion of cosmic rays

    Snodin, A P; Sarson, G R; Bushby, P J; Rodrigues, L F S

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of charged particles, including cosmic rays, in a partially ordered magnetic field is characterized by a diffusion tensor whose components depend on the particle's Larmor radius $R_L$ and the degree of order in the magnetic field. This prescription relies explicitly on the assumption of a scale separation between random and mean magnetic fields, which usually applies in laboratory plasmas, but not in most astrophysical environments such as the interstellar medium (ISM). Direct estimates of the cosmic-ray diffusion tensor from test particle simulations have explored the range of particle energies corresponding to $10^{-2} \\lesssim R_L/l_c \\lesssim 10^{3}$, where $l_c$ is the magnetic correlation length. Modern simulations of the ISM have numerical resolution of order 1 pc, so the Larmor radius of the cosmic ray particles that dominate in their energy density is at least $10^{6}$ times smaller than the numerically resolved scales of the random magnetic field. Large-scale simulations of cosmic ra...

  9. Cosmic rays and particle physics

    Gaisser, Thomas K; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Fully updated for the second edition, this book introduces the growing and dynamic field of particle astrophysics. It provides an overview of high-energy nuclei, photons and neutrinos, including their origins, their propagation in the cosmos, their detection on Earth and their relation to each other. Coverage is expanded to include new content on high energy physics, the propagation of protons and nuclei in cosmic background radiation, neutrino astronomy, high-energy and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, sources and acceleration mechanisms, and atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Readers are able to master the fundamentals of particle astrophysics within the context of the most recent developments in the field. This book will benefit graduate students and established researchers alike, equipping them with the knowledge and tools needed to design and interpret their own experiments and, ultimately, to address a number of questions concerning the nature and origins of cosmic particles that have arisen in recent resea...

  10. On the cosmic ray bound for models of extragalactic neutrino production

    Mannheim, K; Rachen, J P

    2001-01-01

    We obtain the maximum diffuse neutrino intensity predicted by hadronic photoproduction models of active galactic nuclei, and other sources such as gamma ray bursts, that is consistent with the observed cosmic ray spectrum and diffuse extragalactic gamma ray background. For this, we compare the contributions to the cosmic ray intensity of extragalactic neutrino sources with the experimental data at energies above 10^15 eV, employing a transport calculation of energetic protons traversing cosmic photon backgrounds. We take into account source evolution, optical depth effects in the sources, and adiabatic losses of protons in magnetic fields on scales of galaxy clusters. The strongest cosmic ray bound applies to photoproduction sources which are optically thin for the emission of neutrons, and for which adiabatic losses of the protons resulting from neutron decay can be neglected. We find that our upper bound is strongly energy dependent, and is much higher than the bound obtained by Waxman and Bahcall at most e...

  11. Aerosols Produced by Cosmic Rays

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    our investigation at the smallest scales, namely the role of cosmic ray produced ions on atmospheric aerosol nucleation and growth processes. Aerosol theory suggests that this is one of the most promising areas to search for an effect. However, guided by the nature of our initial results, it will be...... mechanism linking cosmic rays to clouds and climate is currently speculative, there have been various suggestions of the role atmospheric ions may play; these involve any one of a number of processes from the nucleation of aerosols up to the collection processes of cloud droplets. We have chosen to start...... applied to control the number of ions present. This will enable experiments to be performed both with and without the presence of ions, thus providing information as to the potential role of ions in aerosol processes....

  12. Antiprotons in the Cosmic Rays

    Nutter, Scott

    1999-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration flew in May 1999 a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton/proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates. A description of the instrument, details of the flight and instrument performance, and status of the data analysis will be given.

  13. Galactic cosmic ray iron composition

    Scherzer, R.; Enge, W.; Beaujean, R.; Hertzman, S.; Kristansson, K.; Soederstroem, K.

    1980-11-01

    The isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray iron was studied in the energy interval 500-750 MeV/nucleon with a visual track detector system consisting of nuclear emulsion and cellulose nitrate plastic. Stopping iron nuclei were identified from ionization range measurements in the two detector parts. Cone lengths were measured in the plastic sheets and the residual ranges of the particles were measured in plastic and in emulsion. The mass of iron-17 nuclei was determined with an uncertainty of about 0.3 amu. The isotopic composition at the detector level was found to be Fe-52:Fe-53:Fe-54:Fe-55:Fe-56:Fe-57:Fe-58 = 0:1:4:3:8:1:0. These numbers are not in conflict with the assumption that the isotopic composition of cosmic ray iron at the source is similar to the solar system composition.

  14. Cosmic ray test for supersymmetry

    The photino can be the lightest supersymmetric particle and may be produced copiously in the stellar objects. We investigate the interactions of a light-photino with the matter and find that the production cross sections in resonance regions are the largest and that the production of fermions with their superpartners is important at higher energies. However the photino flux in cosmic ray is too small to be detected. (author)

  15. Elemental composition of cosmic ray

    The report first summarizes some data that have been obtained so far from observation of isotopes and elements in cosmic rays in the low energy region. Then, objectives of studies planned to be carried out with Astromag are outlined and the number of incident particles expected to be measured by baloon observation is estimated. Heavy elements with atomic numbers of greater than 30 are considered to be formed through neutron absorption reactions by the s- or r-process. Observations show that products of the r-process is abundant in cosmic ray sources. The escape length depends on energy. In relation to this, it has been reported that the ratios Ar-Fe and Ca-Fe increase above 200 GeV-n while such a tendency is not observed for K, Sc, Ti or V. Thus, no satisfactory models are available at present which can fully explain the changes in the escape length. The ratio 3He-4He in the range of 5 - 10 GeV-n is inconsistent with the general theory that interprets the escape length of heavy elements. Some models, including the supermetallicity model and Wolf Rayet theory, have been proposed to explain unusual ratios of isotopes in cosmic rays, but more measurements are required to verify them. It is expected that Astromag can serve to make observations that can clarify these points. (Nogami, K.)

  16. High energy cosmic ray astronomy

    A brief introduction to High Energy Cosmic Ray Astronomy is presented. This field covers a 17 decade energy range (2.104-1020) eV. Recent discoveries done with gamma-ray detectors on-board satellites and ground-based Cherenkov devices are pushing for a fast development of new and innovative techniques, specially in the low energy region which includes the overlapping of satellite and ground-based measurements in the yet unexplored energy range 20 keV-250 GeV. Detection of unexpected extremely high energy events have triggered the interest of the international scientific community. (orig.)

  17. Closing CMS to hunt cosmic rays

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Every second the Earth is bombarded by billions of cosmic rays and occasionally one of these cosmic particles will collide with the Earth's atmosphere generating a shower of particles known as an 'air shower'. This is similiar to the collisions and subsequent particle showers observed in accelerators such as the LHC. Here the CMS detector is closed so that systems can be tested using muon cosmic rays in the 'Cosmic Challenge'.

  18. Ionisation as indicator for cosmic ray acceleration

    Schuppan, F.; Röken, C.; Fedrau, N.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2014-06-01

    Astrospheres and wind bubbles of massive stars are believed to be sources of cosmic rays with energies E ≲ 1 TeV. These particles are not directly detectable, but their impact on surrounding matter, in particular ionisation of atomic and molecular hydrogen, can lead to observable signatures. A correlation study of both gamma ray emission, induced by proton-proton interactions of cosmic ray protons with kinetic energies Ep ≥ 280 MeV with ambient hydrogen, and ionisation induced by cosmic ray protons of kinetic energies Ep sub)TeV cosmic rays.

  19. Cosmic ray physics goes to school

    2002-01-01

    With the help of a CERN physicist, German Schools bring the Largest Cosmic Ray Detector in Europe one step closer to reality   Eric Berthier and Robert Porret (CERN, ST/HM), Frej Torp and Christian Antfolk from the Polytechnics Arcada in Finland, and Karsten Eggert, physicist at CERN who initiated this project, during the installation of cosmic ray detectors in the Pays de Gex, at point 4. Niina Patrikainen and Frej Torp, Finnish students from Rovaniemi and Arcada Polytechnics, installing cosmic ray counters at the Fachhochschule in Duesseldorf. The science of cosmic ray detection is growing, literally. Cosmic rays, energetic particles from space, strike our planet all the time. They collide with the air molecules in our upper atmosphere and initiate large showers of elementary particles (mainly electrons, photons, hadrons and muons) which rain down upon the earth. The shower size and the particle density in the showers reflect the initial energy of the cosmic ray particle, a detail which makes d...

  20. JUPITER AS A GIANT COSMIC RAY DETECTOR

    Rimmer, P. B.; Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.

    2014-01-01

    All authors highlight financial support of the European Community under the FP7 by an ERC starting grant. We explore the feasibility of using the atmosphere of Jupiter to detect ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). The large surface area of Jupiter allows us to probe cosmic rays of higher energies than previously accessible. Cosmic ray extensive air showers in Jupiter's atmosphere could in principle be detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi observatory. In order to be o...

  1. Underground measurements on secondary cosmic rays

    Measurements made at the Poatina cosmic ray station (41.8 S 149.9 E, 347 m.w.e.) from August 1983 to July 1984 are summarized. The cosmic ray primary particles responsible for events detected at the station have a median primary energy of 1.2 TeV. The motivation for part of this work came from the reported detection of narrow angle anisotropies in the arrival direction of cosmic rays

  2. Time variability of high energy cosmic rays

    Erlykin, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2009-01-01

    Our model involving cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants has been used to predict cosmic ray intensities over long periods of time on a statistical basis. If, as is highly probable, extensive air showers caused by PeV cosmic rays are needed to initiate terrestrial lightning then past dramatic changes in PeV intensities may have had important biological effects. The model has been used to estimate the manner in which the PeV cosmic ray intensity at Earth has varied over the past tens ...

  3. Time variability of high energy cosmic rays

    Erlykin, A D

    2009-01-01

    Our model involving cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants has been used to predict cosmic ray intensities over long periods of time on a statistical basis. If, as is highly probable, extensive air showers caused by PeV cosmic rays are needed to initiate terrestrial lightning then past dramatic changes in PeV intensities may have had important biological effects. The model has been used to estimate the manner in which the PeV cosmic ray intensity at Earth has varied over the past tens of thousand years.

  4. International Conference on Cosmic Rays

    W.O. LOCK

    1964-01-01

    Towards the end of last year the 8th International conference on cosmic rays, held under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (I.U.P.A.P.) and the Department of Atomic Energy of the Government of India, was held at Jaipur, India. Among the participants was W.O. Lock, head of CERN's Emulsion Group, who gave an invited talk on recent work in the field of what is normally known as high-energy physics — though in the context of this conference such energies seem quite low. In this article, Dr. Lock gives a general review of the conference and of the subjects discussed.

  5. Solar Modulation of Cosmic Rays

    Marius S. Potgieter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This is an overview of the solar modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere. It is a broad topic with numerous intriguing aspects so that a research framework has to be chosen to concentrate on. The review focuses on the basic paradigms and departure points without presenting advanced theoretical or observational details for which there exists a large number of comprehensive reviews. Instead, emphasis is placed on numerical modeling which has played an increasingly significant role as computational resources have become more abundant. A main theme is the progress that has been made over the years. The emphasis is on the global features of CR modulation and on the causes of the observed 11-year and 22-year cycles and charge-sign dependent modulation. Illustrative examples of some of the theoretical and observational milestones are presented, without attempting to review all details or every contribution made in this field of research. Controversial aspects are discussed where appropriate, with accompanying challenges and future prospects. The year 2012 was the centennial celebration of the discovery of cosmic rays so that several general reviews were dedicated to historical aspects so that such developments are briefly presented only in a few cases.

  6. Propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays

    Stanev, Todor

    2008-01-01

    We briefly describe the energy loss processes of ultrahigh energy protons, heavier nuclei and gamma rays in interactions with the universal photon fields of the Universe. We then discuss the modification of the accelerated cosmic ray energy spectrum in propagation by the energy loss processes and the charged cosmic ray scattering in the extragalactic magnetic fields. The energy lost by the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays goes into gamma rays and neutrinos that carry additional information about the sources of highest energy particles. The new experimental results of the HiRes and the Auger collaborations are discussed in view of the predictions from propagation calculations.

  7. From Accelerators to Cosmic Ray Physics

    In the present paper, we discuss the interplay between Collider Physics and Cosmic Ray Physics. In particular we outline the impact of present and future collider measurements and searches in the understanding of several aspects, related with Cosmic Ray Physics problematics. Then, particular attention will be devoted both, on non-perturbative QCD measurements, both on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  8. Cosmic ray anisotropy and its time variations

    Cosmic ray anisotropy is analysed on the base of the data of the worldwide network of neutron monitors for the period of 1958-1972. 11-year variation of anisotropy phase and amplitude is investigated. Three-dimensional cosmic ray anisotropy in interplanetary space is calculated. (orig./WBU)

  9. Sealed drift tube cosmic ray veto counters

    We describe a simple drift tube counter that has been used as a cosmic ray veto for the UCNA experiment, a first-ever measurement of the neutron beta-asymmetry using ultra-cold neutrons. These detectors provide an inexpensive alternative to more conventional scintillation detectors for large area cosmic ray anticoincidence detectors.

  10. Maximum entropy analysis of cosmic ray composition

    Nosek, D.; Ebr, Jan; Vícha, Jakub; Trávníček, Petr; Nosková, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 76, Mar (2016), 9-18. ISSN 0927-6505 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-17501S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ultra-high energy cosmic rays * extensive air showers * cosmic ray composition Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.584, year: 2014

  11. Precision measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    Huege, T.; Bray, J. D.; Buitink, S.; Dallier, R.; Ekers, R. D.; Falcke, H.; James, C. W.; Martin, L.; Revenu, B.; Scholten, O.; Schröder, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Supplemented with suitable buffering techniques, the low-frequency part of the SKA can be used as an ultra-precise detector for cosmic-ray air showers at very high energies. This would enable a wealth of scientific applications: the physics of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic ray

  12. History of cosmic ray research in Finland

    Usoskin, I. G.; Valtonen, E.; Vainio, R.; Tanskanen, P. J.; Aurela, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    The history of cosmic ray research in Finland can be traced back to the end of 1950s, when first ground-based cosmic ray measurements started in Turku. The first cosmic ray station was founded in Oulu in 1964 performing measurements of cosmic rays by a muon telescope, which was later complemented by a neutron monitor. Since the 1990s, several research centers and universities, such as The Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki University of Technology, University of Oulu, University of Turku and University of Helsinki have been involved in space science projects, such as SOHO, AMS, Cluster, Cassini, BepiColombo, etc. At the same time, ground-based cosmic ray measurements have reached a new level, including a fully automatic on-line database in Oulu and a new muon measuring underground site in Pyhäsalmi. Research groups in Helsinki, Oulu and Turku have also extensive experience in theoretical investigations of different aspects of cosmic ray physics. Cosmic ray research has a 50-year long history in Finland, covering a wide range from basic long-running ground-based observations to high-technology space-borne instrumentation and sophisticated theoretical studies. Several generations of researchers have been involved in the study ensuring transfer of experience and building the recognized Finnish research school of cosmic ray studies.

  13. Origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2013-06-15

    The origin of the bulk of cosmic rays (CRs) observed at Earth is the topic of a century long investigation, paved with successes and failures. From the energetic point of view, supernova remnants (SNRs) remain the most plausible sources of CRs up to rigidity ∼10{sup 6}–10{sup 7}GV. This confidence somehow resulted in the construction of a paradigm, the so-called SNR paradigm: CRs are accelerated through diffusive shock acceleration in SNRs and propagate diffusively in the Galaxy in an energy dependent way. Qualitative confirmation of the SNR acceleration scenario has recently been provided by gamma ray and X-ray observations. Diffusive propagation in the Galaxy is probed observationally through measurement of the secondary to primary nuclei flux ratios (such as B/C). There are however some weak points in the paradigm, which suggest that we are probably missing some physical ingredients in our models. The theory of diffusive shock acceleration at SNR shocks predicts spectra of accelerated particles which are systematically too hard compared with the ones inferred from gamma ray observations. Moreover, hard injection spectra indirectly imply a steep energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the Galaxy, which in turn leads to anisotropy larger than the observed one. Moreover recent measurements of the flux of nuclei suggest that the spectra have a break at rigidity ∼200GV, which does not sit well with the common wisdom in acceleration and propagation. In this paper I will review these new developments and suggest some possible implications.

  14. Heavy precipitation episodes and cosmic rays variation

    A. Mavrakis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt is made to investigate the possible temporal correlation between heavy precipitation episodes and cosmic rays' activity, on various time scales. Cosmic rays measurements are sparse and cover less extended periods than those of precipitation. Precipitation is largely influenced by local climatic and even physiographic conditions, while cosmic rays' distribution is far more uniform over an area. Thus, in an effort to cover a larger range of climatic characteristics, each cosmic rays station was correlated with several nearby precipitation stations. Selected statistical methods were employed for the data processing. The analysis was preformed on annual, seasonal, monthly and daily basis whenever possible. Wet and dry regions and/or seasons seem to present a different response of precipitation to cosmic rays variations. Also Forbush decreases in most cases will not lead to heavy precipitation, yet this might be sensitive to precipitable water availability.

  15. Status of cosmic-ray antideuteron searches

    von Doetinchem, P; Boggs, S; Bufalino, S; Dal, L; Donato, F; Fornengo, N; Fuke, H; Grefe, M; Hailey, C; Hamilton, B; Ibarra, A; Mitchell, J; Mognet, I; Ong, R A; Pereira, R; Perez, K; Putze, A; Raklev, A; Salati, P; Sasaki, M; Tarle, G; Urbano, A; Vittino, A; Wild, S; Xue, W; Yoshimura, K

    2015-01-01

    The precise measurement of cosmic-ray antiparticles serves as important means for identifying the nature of dark matter. Recent years showed that identifying the nature of dark matter with cosmic-ray positrons and higher energy antiprotons is difficult, and has lead to a significantly increased interest in cosmic-ray antideuteron searches. Antideuterons may also be generated in dark matter annihilations or decays, offering a potential breakthrough in unexplored phase space for dark matter. Low-energy antideuterons are an important approach because the flux from dark matter interactions exceeds the background flux by more than two orders of magnitude in the low-energy range for a wide variety of models. This review is based on the "dbar14 - dedicated cosmic-ray antideuteron workshop", which brought together theorists and experimentalists in the field to discuss the current status, perspectives, and challenges for cosmic-ray antideuteron searches and discusses the motivation for antideuteron searches, the theor...

  16. Investigation of Reacceleration on Cosmic Ray

    Lu, Yuxi; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2016-03-01

    Cosmic rays are high energy charged particles, originating from outer space, that travel at nearly the speed of light and strike the Earth from all directions. One century after the discovery of cosmic rays, their origin and propagation processes remain obscure. GALPROP is a numerical code for calculating the propagation of relativistic charged particles and the diffuse emissions produced during their propagation in the Galaxy. I performed a preliminary study using two different propagation models with the GALPROP code in order to reproduce latest cosmic-ray nuclei measurements. I analyzed multiple propagation parameters for each model, studied their effect on cosmic-ray spectra, optimized and tried a preliminary modification of the code to fit cosmic-ray data such as BESS-Polar, AMS, CREAM, etc.

  17. Protostars: forge of cosmic rays?

    Padovani, M; Hennebelle, P; Ferrière, K

    2016-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (CR) are particles presumably accelerated in supernova remnant shocks that propagate in the interstellar medium up to the densest parts of molecular clouds, losing energy as well as their ionisation efficiency because of the presence of magnetic fields and collisions with molecular hydrogen. Recent observations hint at high levels of ionisation and to the presence of synchrotron emission in protostellar systems, therefore leading to an apparent contradiction. We want to explain the origin of these CRs accelerated within young protostars as suggested by observations. Our modelling consists of a set of conditions that has to be satisfied in order to have an efficient CR acceleration through diffusive shock acceleration. We analyse three main acceleration sites, then we follow the propagation of these particles through the protostellar system up to the hot spot region. We find that jet shocks can be strong accelerators of CR protons, which can be boosted up to relativistic energies. Another ...

  18. Educational cosmic ray experiments with Geiger counters

    Blanco, F; Rocca, P L; Librizzi, F; Parasole, O; Riggi, F

    2006-01-01

    Experiments concerning the physics of cosmic rays offer to high-school teachers and students a relatively easy approach to the field of research in high energy physics. The detection of cosmic rays does not necessarily require the use of sophisticated equipment, and various properties of the cosmic radiation can be observed and analysed even by the use of a single Geiger counter. Nevertheless, the variety of such kind of experiments and the results obtained are limited because of the inclusive nature of these measurements. A significant improvement may be obtained when two or more Geiger counters are operated in coincidence. In this paper we discuss the potential of performing educational cosmic ray experiments with Geiger counters. In order to show also the educational value of coincidence techniques, preliminary results of cosmic ray experiments carried out by the use of a simple coincidence circuit are briefly discussed.

  19. Acceleration of cosmic rays by shock waves

    In recent years there has been renewed interest in the possibility that the acceleration of cosmic rays should occur, not in discrete sources, but in the diffuse interstellar medium, as a consequence of shock waves associated with supernova remnants. Since the supernova remnants concerned are rather large and indeed tend to dominate the whole interstellar medium it is becoming clear that the problems of acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays cannot be so easily separated. A further difficulty is concerned with the escape of cosmic rays from the galaxy which may be associated with a galactic wind which is partly driven by cosmic ray pressure and therefore not an independent process. These complexities give added interest and significance to the role of cosmic rays in the dynamics of the interstellar medium but of course also make the traditional problems of cosmic ray physics much more difficult to treat. We attempt here to review the current status of investigations into various aspects of the problem of shock acceleration of cosmic rays

  20. Cosmic-ray propagation in molecular clouds

    Padovani, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic-rays constitute the main ionising and heating agent in dense, starless, molecular cloud cores. We reexamine the physical quantities necessary to determine the cosmic-ray ionisation rate (especially the cosmic ray spectrum at E < 1 GeV and the ionisation cross sections), and calculate the ionisation rate as a function of the column density of molecular hydrogen. Available data support the existence of a low-energy component (below about 100 MeV) of cosmic-ray electrons or protons responsible for the ionisation of diffuse and dense clouds. We also compute the attenuation of the cosmic-ray flux rate in a cloud core taking into account magnetic focusing and magnetic mirroring, following the propagation of cosmic rays along flux tubes enclosing different amount of mass and mass-to-flux ratios. We find that mirroring always dominates over focusing, implying a reduction of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate by a factor of 3-4 depending on the position inside the core and the magnetisation of the core.

  1. Ionisation as indicator for cosmic ray acceleration

    Schuppan, Florian; Fedrau, Natalie; Tjus, Julia Becker

    2014-01-01

    Astrospheres and wind bubbles of massive stars are believed to be sources of cosmic rays with energies $E\\lesssim 1\\,$TeV. These particles are not directly detectable, but their impact on surrounding matter, in particular ionisation of atomic and molecular hydrogen, can lead to observable signatures. A correlation study of both gamma ray emission, induced by proton-proton interactions of cosmic ray protons with kinetic energies $E_\\mathrm{p}\\ge 280\\,$MeV with ambient hydrogen, and ionisation induced by cosmic ray protons of kinetic energies $E_\\mathrm{p}< 280\\,$MeV can be performed in order to study potential sources of (sub)TeV cosmic rays.

  2. Cosmic ray transport in astrophysical plasmas

    Schlickeiser, R. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- & Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität, Bochum (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Since the development of satellite space technology about 50 years ago the solar heliosphere is explored almost routinely by several spacecrafts carrying detectors for measuring the properties of the interplanetary medium including energetic charged particles (cosmic rays), solar wind particle densities, and electromagnetic fields. In 2012, the Voyager 1 spacecraft has even left what could be described as the heliospheric modulation region, as indicated by the sudden disappearance of low energy heliospheric cosmic ray particles. With the available in-situ measurements of interplanetary turbulent electromagnetic fields and of the momentum spectra of different cosmic ray species in different interplanetary environments, the heliosphere is the best cosmic laboratory to test our understanding of the transport and acceleration of cosmic rays in space plasmas. I review both the historical development and the current state of various cosmic ray transport equations. Similarities and differences to transport theories for terrestrial fusion plasmas are highlighted. Any progress in cosmic ray transport requires a detailed understanding of the electromagnetic turbulence that is responsible for the scattering and acceleration of these particles.

  3. Cosmic ray transport in astrophysical plasmas

    Since the development of satellite space technology about 50 years ago the solar heliosphere is explored almost routinely by several spacecrafts carrying detectors for measuring the properties of the interplanetary medium including energetic charged particles (cosmic rays), solar wind particle densities, and electromagnetic fields. In 2012, the Voyager 1 spacecraft has even left what could be described as the heliospheric modulation region, as indicated by the sudden disappearance of low energy heliospheric cosmic ray particles. With the available in-situ measurements of interplanetary turbulent electromagnetic fields and of the momentum spectra of different cosmic ray species in different interplanetary environments, the heliosphere is the best cosmic laboratory to test our understanding of the transport and acceleration of cosmic rays in space plasmas. I review both the historical development and the current state of various cosmic ray transport equations. Similarities and differences to transport theories for terrestrial fusion plasmas are highlighted. Any progress in cosmic ray transport requires a detailed understanding of the electromagnetic turbulence that is responsible for the scattering and acceleration of these particles

  4. Unveiling the Origin of Cosmic Rays

    Olinto, Angela V.

    2015-04-01

    The origin of cosmic rays, relativistic particles that range from below GeVs to hundreds of EeVs, is a century old mystery. Extremely energetic phenomena occurring over a wide range of scales, from the Solar System to distant galaxies, are needed to explain the non-thermal particle spectrum that covers over 12 orders of magnitude. Space Missions are the most effective platforms to study the origin and history of these cosmic particles. Current missions probe particle acceleration and propagation in the Solar System and in our Galaxy. This year ISS-CREAM and CALET join AMS in establishing the International Space Station as the most active site for studying the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. These missions will study astrophysical cosmic ray accelerators as well as other possible sources of energetic particles such as dark matter annihilation or decay. In the future, the ISS may also be the site for studying extremely high-energy extragalactic cosmic rays with JEM-EUSO. We review recent results in the quest for unveiling the sources of energetic particles with balloons and space payloads and report on activities of the Cosmic ray Science Interest Group (CosmicSIG) under the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG).

  5. JUPITER AS A GIANT COSMIC RAY DETECTOR

    We explore the feasibility of using the atmosphere of Jupiter to detect ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). The large surface area of Jupiter allows us to probe cosmic rays of higher energies than previously accessible. Cosmic ray extensive air showers in Jupiter's atmosphere could in principle be detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi observatory. In order to be observed, these air showers would need to be oriented toward the Earth, and would need to occur sufficiently high in the atmosphere that the gamma rays can penetrate. We demonstrate that, under these assumptions, Jupiter provides an effective cosmic ray ''detector'' area of 3.3 × 107 km2. We predict that Fermi-LAT should be able to detect events of energy >1021 eV with fluence 10–7 erg cm–2 at a rate of about one per month. The observed number of air showers may provide an indirect measure of the flux of cosmic rays ≳ 1020 eV. Extensive air showers also produce a synchrotron signature that may be measurable by Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Simultaneous observations of Jupiter with ALMA and Fermi-LAT could be used to provide broad constraints on the energies of the initiating cosmic rays

  6. JUPITER AS A GIANT COSMIC RAY DETECTOR

    Rimmer, P. B.; Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch., E-mail: pr33@st-andrews.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    We explore the feasibility of using the atmosphere of Jupiter to detect ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). The large surface area of Jupiter allows us to probe cosmic rays of higher energies than previously accessible. Cosmic ray extensive air showers in Jupiter's atmosphere could in principle be detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi observatory. In order to be observed, these air showers would need to be oriented toward the Earth, and would need to occur sufficiently high in the atmosphere that the gamma rays can penetrate. We demonstrate that, under these assumptions, Jupiter provides an effective cosmic ray ''detector'' area of 3.3 × 10{sup 7} km{sup 2}. We predict that Fermi-LAT should be able to detect events of energy >10{sup 21} eV with fluence 10{sup –7} erg cm{sup –2} at a rate of about one per month. The observed number of air showers may provide an indirect measure of the flux of cosmic rays ≳ 10{sup 20} eV. Extensive air showers also produce a synchrotron signature that may be measurable by Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Simultaneous observations of Jupiter with ALMA and Fermi-LAT could be used to provide broad constraints on the energies of the initiating cosmic rays.

  7. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  8. Possible cosmic ray signatures in clouds?

    Erlykin, A. D.; Parsons, R. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2009-11-01

    The role of cosmic rays in cloud formation, by cloud condensation nuclei, is still not fully understood. Although it has been claimed by a number of authors that cosmic ray effects should be small—or even non-existent—it is still argued by others that cosmic ray effects do occur. The present work draws attention to the fact that cosmic rays do not constitute a continuous stream of particles but are characterized by occasional near-simultaneous showers of particles. Under certain circumstances, such showers should leave a signature in clouds—near vertical 'cigar-shaped clouds'—and this work describes their properties. Our own observations have revealed no such structure, but it would be valuable to have a more careful search made.

  9. Progenitor model of Cosmic Ray knee

    Bijay, Biplab

    2014-01-01

    Primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays exhibits a knee at about $3$ PeV where a change in the spectral index occurs. Despite many efforts the origin of such a feature of the spectrum is not satisfactorily solved yet. Here in the framework of hypernova model of galactic cosmic ray origin it is proposed that the steepening of the spectrum beyond the knee may be a consequence of mass distribution of progenitor of cosmic ray source. The proposed model can account all the major observed features about cosmic rays without invoking any fine tuning to match flux or spectra at any energy point. The prediction of the proposed model regarding primary composition scenario beyond the knee is quite different from most of the prevailing models of the knee and thereby can be discriminated from precise experimental measurement of the primary composition.

  10. Cosmic ray physics with ARGO-YBJ

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The ARGO--YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking for more than five years at the Yangbajing cosmic ray observatory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l.). The detector collected about $5\\times10^{11}$ events in a wide energy range from few TeVs up to the PeV region. In this work we summarize the latest results in cosmic ray physics particularly focusing on the cosmic ray energy spectrum. The results of the measurement of the all-particle and proton plus helium energy spectra in the energy region between $10^{12} - 10^{16}$ eV are discussed. A precise measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum and composition in this energy region allows a better understanding of the origin of the knee and provides a powerful cross-check among different experimental techniques.

  11. Study on solar cosmic rays

    The review of papers devoted to the investigations of solar cosmic rays (SCR) is presented. Three main directions have been singled out: heliophysical (SCR relation to physics of solar flares), cosmophysical (SCR propagation models) and geophysical (SCR interaction with magnetosphere and Earth ionosphere). The problem of determining and interpreting SCR spectra at the Earth and in a source is recognized to be main problem. At such approach the SCR spectrum transformation with account for accelerated particle propagation in the solar corona, SCR propagation in the interplanetary space and SCR propagation through the magnetosphere and the Earth atmosphere has been studied in detail. All results of the study relate to the prevailing SCR component-protons with kinetic energy epsilonsub(k)>1 MeV. The peculiarities of the SCR spectrum dynamics at the Earth and of particle acceleration in the interplanetary space are considered in detail too. It is concluded that at present the SCR spectrum interpretation as a whole is prevented because of the absence of data on source spectrum in various rigidity ranges

  12. The Mysterious Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray Clustering

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Goldberg, Haim; Reucroft, Stephen; Romero, Gustavo E.; Swain, John; Torres, Diego F.

    2001-01-01

    We examine the correlation between compact radio quasars (redshifts in the range $z = 0.3 - 2.2$) and the arrival direction of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays forming clusters. Our Monte Carlo simulation reveals a statistically significant correlation on the AGASA sample: the chance probability of this effect being less than 1%. The implications of this result on the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are discussed.

  13. Cosmic Ray Interaction Models: an Overview

    Ostapchenko, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    I review the state-of-the-art concerning the treatment of high energy cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, discussing in some detail the underlying physical concepts and the possibilities to constrain the latter by current and future measurements at the Large Hadron Collider. The relation of basic characteristics of hadronic interactions tothe properties of nuclear-electromagnetic cascades induced by primary cosmic rays in the atmosphere is addressed.

  14. Cosmic ray test of INO RPC stack

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to build a 50 kt magnetised iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector using glass Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detector elements. A stack of 12 such glass RPCs of 1 m ×1 m in area is tracking cosmic ray muons for over three years. In this paper, we will review the constructional aspects of the stack and discuss the performance of the RPCs using this cosmic ray data.

  15. Explaining TeV Cosmic-Ray Anisotropies with Non-Diffusive Cosmic-Ray Propagation

    Harding, J Patrick; Mendel, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Constraining the behavior of cosmic ray data observed at Earth requires a precise understanding of how the cosmic rays propagate in the interstellar medium. The interstellar medium is not homogeneous; although turbulent magnetic fields dominate over large scales, small coherent regions of magnetic field exist on scales relevant to particle propagation in the nearby Galaxy. Guided propagation through a coherent field is significantly different from random particle diffusion and could be the explanation of spatial anisotropies in the observed cosmic rays. We present a Monte Carlo code to propagate cosmic particle through realistic magnetic field structures. We discuss the details of the model as well as some preliminary studies which indicate that coherent magnetic structures are important effects in local cosmic-ray propagation, increasing the flux of cosmic rays by over two orders of magnitude at anisotropic locations on the sky. The features induced by coherent magnetic structure could be the cause of the ob...

  16. Recent developments in cosmic ray physics

    Blasi, P. [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5 50125 Firenze (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute (INFN), Viale F. Crispi 6, 60100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    The search for a theory of the origin of cosmic rays that may be considered as a standard, agreeable model is still ongoing. On one hand, much circumstantial evidence exists of the fact that supernovae in our Galaxy play a crucial role in producing the bulk of cosmic rays observed on Earth. On the other hand, important questions about their ability to accelerate particles up to the knee remain unanswered. The common interpretation of the knee as a feature coinciding with the maximum energy of the light component of cosmic rays and a transition to a gradually heavier mass composition is mainly based on KASCADE results. Some recent data appear to question this finding: YAC1 – Tibet Array and ARGO-YBJ find a flux reduction in the light component at ∼ 700 TeV, appreciably below the knee. Whether the maximum energy of light nuclei is as high as 3000 TeV or rather as low as a few hundred TeV has very important consequences on the supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of cosmic rays, as well on the crucial issue of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. In such a complex phenomenological situation, it is important to have a clear picture of what is really known and what is not. Here I will discuss some solid and less solid aspects of the theory (or theories) for the origin of cosmic rays and the implications for future searches in this field.

  17. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    Aloisio, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the production of ultra high energy neutrinos coming from the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays and in the framework of top-down models for the production of these extremely energetic particles. We show the importance of the detection of ultra high energy neutrinos that can be a fundamental diagnostic tool to solve the discrepancy in the observed chemical composition of ultra high energy cosmic rays and, at the extreme energies, can unveil new physics in connection with the recent cosmological observations of the possible presence of tensor modes in the fluctuation pattern of the cosmic microwave background.

  18. Galactic Cosmic Rays: From Earth to Sources

    Brandt, Theresa J.

    2012-01-01

    For nearly 100 years we have known that cosmic rays come from outer space, yet proof of their origin, as well as a comprehensive understanding of their acceleration, remains elusive. Direct detection of high energy (up to 10(exp 15)eV), charged nuclei with experiments such as the balloon-born, antarctic Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER) have provided insight into these mysteries through measurements of cosmic ray abundances. The abundance of these rare elements with respect to certain intrinsic properties suggests that cosmic rays include a component of massive star ejecta. Supernovae and their remnants (SNe & SNRs), often occurring at the end of a massive star's life or in an environment including massive star material, are one of the most likely candidates for sources accelerating galactic comic ray nuclei up to the requisite high energies. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Detector (Fermi LAT) has improved our understanding of such sources by widening the window of observable energies and thus into potential sources' energetic processes. In combination with multiwavelength observations, we are now better able to constrain particle populations (often hadron-dominated at GeV energies) and environmental conditions, such as the magnetic field strength. The SNR CTB 37A is one such source which could contribute to the observed galactic cosmic rays. By assembling populations of SNRs, we will be able to more definitively define their contribution to the observed galactic cosmic rays, as well as better understand SNRs themselves. Such multimessenger studies will thus illuminate the long-standing cosmic ray mysteries, shedding light on potential sources, acceleration mechanisms, and cosmic ray propagation.

  19. Cosmic ray propagation with CRPropa 3

    Batista, Rafael Alves; Evoli, Carmelo; Kampert, Karl-Heinz; Kuempel, Daniel; Mueller, Gero; Sigl, Günter; Van Vliet, Arjen; Walz, David; Winchen, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Solving the question of the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) requires the development of detailed simulation tools in order to interpret the experimental data and draw conclusions on the UHECR universe. CRPropa is a public Monte Carlo code for the galactic and extragalactic propagation of cosmic ray nuclei above $\\sim 10^{17}$ eV, as well as their photon and neutrino secondaries. In this contribution the new algorithms and features of CRPropa 3, the next major release, are presented. CRPropa 3 introduces time-dependent scenarios to include cosmic evolution in the presence of cosmic ray deflections in magnetic fields. The usage of high resolution magnetic fields is facilitated by shared memory parallelism, modulated fields and fields with heterogeneous resolution. Galactic propagation is enabled through the implementation of galactic magnetic field models, as well as an efficient forward propagation technique through transformation matrices. To make use of the large Python ecosystem in astrophy...

  20. Cosmic rays and radiations from the cosmos

    This document gathers a lot of recent information concerning cosmic radiations, it is divided into 4 parts. Part I: energy, mass and angular spectra of cosmic rays. Part II: general phenomenology of cosmic rays, this part deals with the standard model, the maximal energy of protons inside supernova remnants, nucleosynthesis of light elements, and super-bubbles. Part III: radiations from the cosmos, this part deals with high energy gamma rays, non-thermal radiation of super-bubbles, positron transport, and the Compton trail of gamma-ray bursts. Part IV: the Pierre Auger observatory (OPA), this part deals with the detection of gamma ray bursts at OPA, the measurement of anisotropy, and top-down models. (A.C.)

  1. Cascaded Gamma Rays as a Probe of Cosmic Rays

    Murase, Kohta

    2014-06-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE) and ultra-high-energy (UHE) gamma rays from extragalactic sources experience electromagnetic cascades during their propagation in intergalactic space. Recent gamma-ray data on TeV blazars and the diffuse gamma-ray background may have hints of the cascade emission, which are especially interesting if it comes from UHE cosmic rays. I show that cosmic-ray-induced cascades can be discriminated from gamma-ray-induced cascades with detailed gamma-ray spectra. I also discuss roles of structured magnetic fields, which suppress inverse-Compton pair halos/echoes but lead to guaranteed signals - synchrotron pair halos/echoes.

  2. Gamma ray astronomy and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    Diffusive shock acceleration operating at expanding supernova remnant shells is by far the most popular model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Despite the general consensus received by the model, an unambiguous and conclusive proof of the supernova remnant hypothesis is still missing. In this context, the recent developments in gamma ray astronomy provide us with precious insights into the problem of the origin of galactic cosmic rays, since production of gamma rays is expected both during the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova remnant shocks and during their subsequent propagation in the interstellar medium. In particular, the recent detection of a number of supernova remnants at TeV energies nicely fits with the model, but it still does not constitute a conclusive proof of it, mainly due to the difficulty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma ray emission. The main goal of my research is to search for an unambiguous and conclusive observational test for proving (or disproving) the idea that supernova remnants are the sources of galactic cosmic rays with energies up to (at least) the cosmic ray knee. Our present comprehension of the mechanisms of particle acceleration at shocks and of the propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields encourages beliefs that such a conclusive test might come from future observations of supernova remnants and of the Galaxy in the almost unexplored domain of multi-TeV gamma rays. (author)

  3. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  4. Dark Matter Signals In Cosmic Rays?

    Dado, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    The flux of the diffuse gamma-ray background radiation (GBR) does not confirm that the excess in the flux of cosmic ray electrons between 300-800 GeV, which was measured locally with the ATIC instrument in balloon flights over Antartica, is universal as expected from dark matter annihilation. Neither does the increase with energy of the fraction of positrons in the cosmic ray flux of electrons in the 10-100 GeV range that was measured by PAMELA imply a dark matter origin: It is consistent with that expected from the sum of the two major sources of Galactic cosmic rays, non relativistic spherical ejecta and highly relativistic jets from supernova explosions.

  5. Cosmic Ray Nuclei (CRN) detector investigation

    Meyer, Peter; Muller, Dietrich; Lheureux, Jacques; Swordy, Simon

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Nuclei (CRN) detector was designed to measure elemental composition and energy spectra of cosmic radiation nuclei ranging from lithium to iron. CRN was flown as part of Spacelab 2 in 1985, and consisted of three basic components: a gas Cerenkov counter, a transition radiation detector, and plastic scintillators. The results of the experiment indicate that the relative abundance of elements in this range, traveling at near relativistic velocities, is similar to those reported at lower energy.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon processing by cosmic rays

    Micelotta, E R; Tielens, A G G M

    2010-01-01

    Context: Cosmic rays are present in almost all phases of the ISM. PAHs and cosmic rays represent an abundant and ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. However, the interaction between them has never before been fully investigated. Aims: To study the effects of cosmic ray ion (H, He, CNO and Fe-Co-Ni) and electron bombardment of PAHs in galactic and extragalactic environments. Methods: We calculate the nuclear and electronic interactions for collisions between PAHs and cosmic ray ions and electrons with energies between 5 MeV/nucleon and 10 GeV, above the threshold for carbon atom loss, in normal galaxies, starburst galaxies and cooling flow galaxy clusters. Results: The timescale for PAH destruction by cosmic ray ions depends on the electronic excitation energy Eo and on the amount of energy available for dissociation. Small PAHs are destroyed faster, with He and the CNO group being the more effective projectiles. For electron collisions, the lifetime is independent of the PAH size and varies with ...

  7. Ultra heavy cosmic ray experiment (A0178)

    Thompson, A.; Osullivan, D.; Bosch, J.; Keegan, R.; Wenzel, K. P.; Jansen, F.; Domingo, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) is based on a modular array of 192 side viewing solid state nuclear track detector stacks. These stacks were mounted in sets of four in 48 pressure vessels using 16 peripheral LDEF trays. The geometry factor for high energy cosmic ray nuclei, allowing for Earth shadowing, was 30 sq m sr, giving a total exposure factor of 170 sq m sr y at an orbital inclination of 28.4 degs. Scanning results indicate that about 3000 cosmic ray nuclei in the charge region with Z greater than 65 were collected. This sample is more than ten times the current world data in the field (taken to be the data set from the HEAO-3 mission plus that from the Ariel-6 mission) and is sufficient to provide the world's first statistically significant sample of actinide cosmic rays. Results are presented including a sample of ultra heavy cosmic ray nuclei, analysis of pre-flight and post-flight calibration events and details of track response in the context of detector temperature history. The integrated effect of all temperature and age related latent track variations cause a maximum charge shift of + or - 0.8e for uranium and + or - 0.6e for the platinum-lead group. Astrophysical implications of the UHCRE charge spectrum are discussed.

  8. LHCf sheds new light on cosmic rays

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the single photon obtained using data from the LHCf experiment has turned out to be very different from that predicted by the theoretical models used until now to describe the interactions between very high-energy cosmic rays and the earth's atmosphere. The consequences of this discrepancy for cosmic ray studies could be significant.   Artistic impression of cosmic rays entering Earth's atmosphere. (Credit: Asimmetrie/Infn). It took physicists by surprise when analysis of the data collected by the two LHCf calorimeters in 2010 showed that high-energy cosmic rays don't interact with the atmosphere in the manner predicted by theory. The LHCf detectors, set up 140 metres either side of the ATLAS interaction point, are dedicated to the study of the secondary particles emitted at very small angles during proton-proton collisions in the LHC, with energies comparable to cosmic rays entering the earth's atmosphere at 2.5x1016 eV. The aim of the experiment is to r...

  9. High Energy Cosmic Electrons: Messengers from Nearby Cosmic Ray Sources or Dark Matter?

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the recent discoveries by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope in reference to high energy cosmic electrons, and whether their source is cosmic rays or dark matter. Specific interest is devoted to Cosmic Ray electrons anisotropy,

  10. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. Most of the studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: · the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for high energies of particles · an estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or search for sources of Cosmic Rays, · properties of high energy particle interactions at very high energies. Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. · '' cosmic weather '' forecast - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares / events of Coronal Mass Ejection); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipes, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students becomes a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. We organize in Lodz several workshops on particle physics for high school students. This is a part of European activity: EPPOG's Masterclass - Hands on CERN. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EAS and their properties is the main way of experimental studies of very high energy Cosmic Rays. In Lodz Department we run Extensive Air Shower array where EAS are continuously being registered. We concentrate on the studies of detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and interpretation of this phenomenon. In 2004 we started realisation of the Roland Maze Project, the network of EAS detectors placed on the roofs of high schools in Lodz. We received funds from the City of Lodz budget to make a pilot project and equip 10 high schools, each with four 1m2 detectors and GPS. The network is

  11. One century of cosmic rays - A particle physicist's view

    Sutton, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Experiments on cosmic rays and the elementary particles share a common history that dates back to the 19th century. Following the discovery of radioactivity in the 1890s, the paths of the two fields intertwined, especially during the decades after the discovery of cosmic rays. Experiments demonstrated that the primary cosmic rays are positively charged particles, while other studies of cosmic rays revealed various new sub-atomic particles, including the first antiparticle. Techniques developed in common led to the birth of neutrino astronomy in 1987 and the first observation of a cosmic γ-ray source by a ground-based cosmic-ray telescope in 1989.

  12. One century of cosmic rays – A particle physicist's view

    Sutton Christine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on cosmic rays and the elementary particles share a common history that dates back to the 19th century. Following the discovery of radioactivity in the 1890s, the paths of the two fields intertwined, especially during the decades after the discovery of cosmic rays. Experiments demonstrated that the primary cosmic rays are positively charged particles, while other studies of cosmic rays revealed various new sub-atomic particles, including the first antiparticle. Techniques developed in common led to the birth of neutrino astronomy in 1987 and the first observation of a cosmic γ-ray source by a ground-based cosmic-ray telescope in 1989.

  13. The highest-energy cosmic rays

    This is a review of the experimental data concerning the spectrum, arrival distribution and composition of cosmic rays with energies 1019 eV. Before the experimental review I briefly discuss the conditions for the production followed by a review of the propagation of cosmic rays. Then follows a discussion of the properties of the showers produced by the primary cosmic ray particles and a description of the techniques used to detect the showers and extract the energy, direction and nature of the primary. The main conclusion of the experimental review is that there is still insufficient data to answer all the questions concerning the particles which strike the earth with such enormous energies. There has been significant progress which I will discuss and there are good prospects that in the next five years we will come much closer to the answers. Much more can be learned from existing data but a more sophisticated and disciplined analysis will be required

  14. Precision measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    Huege, T; Buitink, S; Dallier, R; Ekers, R D; Falcke, H; James, C W; Martin, L; Revenu, B; Scholten, O; Schröder, F G

    2014-01-01

    Supplemented with suitable buffering techniques, the low-frequency part of the SKA can be used as an ultra-precise detector for cosmic-ray air showers at very high energies. This would enable a wealth of scientific applications: the physics of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays could be probed with very high precision mass measurements, hadronic interactions could be studied up to energies well beyond the reach of man-made particle accelerators, air shower tomography could be performed with very high spatial resolution exploiting the large instantaneous bandwidth and very uniform instantaneous $u$-$v$ coverage of SKA1-LOW, and the physics of thunderstorms and possible connections between cosmic rays and lightning initiation could be studied in unprecedented levels of detail. In this article, we describe the potential of SKA as an air shower radio detector from the perspective of existing radio detection efforts and discuss the associated technical requirements.

  15. Progenitor model of cosmic ray knee

    Bijay, Biplab; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    The primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays exhibits a knee at about 3 PeV where a change in the spectral index occurs. Despite many efforts, the origin of such a feature in the spectrum is not satisfactorily solved yet. Here it is proposed that the steepening of the spectrum beyond the knee may be a consequence of the mass distribution of the progenitor of the cosmic ray source. The proposed speculative model can account for all the major observed features of cosmic rays without invoking any fine tuning to match flux or spectra at any energy point. The prediction of the proposed model regarding the primary composition scenario beyond the knee is quite different from most of the prevailing models of the knee, and thereby can be discriminated from precise experimental measurement of the primary composition.

  16. The LDEF ultra heavy cosmic ray experiment

    Osullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Bosch, J.; Keegan, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smit, A.; Domingo, C.

    1992-01-01

    The LDEF Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) used 16 side viewing LDEF trays giving a total geometry factor for high energy cosmic rays of 30 sq m sr. The total exposure factor was 170 sq m sr y. The experiment is based on a modular array of 192 solid state nuclear track detector stacks, mounted in sets of four in 48 pressure vessels. The extended duration of the LDEF mission has resulted in a greatly enhanced potential scientific yield from the UHCRE. Initial scanning results indicate that at least 1800 cosmic ray nuclei with Z greater than 65 were collected, including the world's first statistically significant sample of actinides. Post flight work to date and the current status of the experiment are reviewed.

  17. Cosmic-ray diffusion in magnetized turbulence

    Tautz, R C

    2015-01-01

    The problem of cosmic-ray scattering in the turbulent electromagnetic fields of the interstellar medium and the solar wind is of great importance due to the variety of applications of the resulting diffusion coefficients. Examples are diffusive shock acceleration, cosmic-ray observations, and, in the solar system, the propagation of coronal mass ejections. In recent years, it was found that the simple diffusive motion that had been assumed for decades is often in disagreement both with numerical and observational results. Here, an overview is given of the interaction processes of cosmic rays and turbulent electromagnetic fields. First, the formation of turbulent fields due to plasma instabilities is treated, where especially the non-linear behavior of the resulting unstable wave modes is discussed. Second, the analytical and the numerical side of high-energy particle propagation will be reviewed by presenting non-linear analytical theories and Monte-Carlo simulations. For the example of the solar wind, the im...

  18. Low-energy cosmic rays in the Orion region

    Pohl, M.

    The recently observed nuclear gamma-ray line emission from the Orion complex implies a high flux of low-energy cosmic rays (LECR) with unusual abundance. This cosmic ray component would dominate the energy density, pressure, and ionising power of cosmic rays, and thus would have a strong impact on...

  19. The origin of cosmic rays: galactic or extragalactic (interrogation mark)

    Foundations upon which all theories of cosmic ray origin must be built, are given. Galactic medium in which these rays travel is discussed. Cosmic ray origin, whether galactic or extragalactic, is discussed. A brief outline about cosmic ray big bang is given

  20. Cosmic Rays: studies and measurements before 1912

    De Angelis, Alessandro [INFN and Università di Udine, Via delle Scienze 206, I-33100 Udine (Italy); LIP/IST Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-06-15

    The discovery of cosmic rays, a milestone in science, was based on the work by scientists in Europe and the New World and took place during a period characterised by nationalism and lack of communication. Many scientists that took part in this research a century ago were intrigued by the penetrating radiation and tried to understand the origin of it. Several important contributions to the discovery of the origin of cosmic rays have been forgotten; historical, political and personal facts might have contributed to their substantial disappearance from the history of science.

  1. Propagation of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei

    Techniques for modeling the propagation of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei, and the required atomic and nuclear data, are assembled in this paper. Emphasis is on understanding nuclear composition in the charge range 3< Z<83. Details of the application of ''matrix methods'' above a few hundred meV per nucleon, a new treatment of electron capture decay, and a new table of cosmic-ray-stable isotopes are presented. Computation of nuclear fragmentation cross sections, stopping power, and electron stripping and attachment are briefly reviewed

  2. Origin(s) of Cosmic Rays

    Drury, Luke O'C

    2014-01-01

    The problem of the origin of Cosmic Rays is now over a century old and while there has been substantial progress, especially in the last decade, there are still open questions. The question of "origin" is open to at least three possible interpretations depending on whether one follows the energy powering the accelerator, the matter being accelerated, or the physics of the acceleration process; these approaches are reviewed in turn. Supernova remnants remain by far the most plausible candidates as dominant sources for the bulk of the Galactic cosmic rays, but contributions from other source populations remain possible. The transition at higher energies from Galactic to extra-galactic populations remains obscure.

  3. Recent developments in cosmic ray physics

    P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri)

    2015-01-01

    The search for a theory of the origin of cosmic rays that may be considered as a standard, agreeable model is still ongoing. On one hand, much circumstantial evidence exists of the fact that supernovae in our Galaxy play a crucial role in producing the bulk of cosmic rays observed on Earth. On the other hand, important questions about their ability to accelerate particles up to the knee remain unanswered. The common interpretation of the knee as a feature coinciding with the maximum energy of...

  4. Cosmic rays at ultra high energies (Neutrinos!)

    Ahlers, M; Tu, H; Ahlers, Markus; Ringwald, Andreas; Tu, Huitzu

    2006-01-01

    Resonant photopion production with the cosmic microwave background predicts a suppression of extragalactic protons above the famous Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff at about E_{GZK} ~ 5 x 10^10 GeV. Current cosmic ray data measured by the AGASA and HiRes Collaborations do not unambiguously confirm the GZK cutoff and leave a window for speculations about the origin and chemical composition of the highest energy cosmic rays. In this work we analyze the possibility of strongly interacting neutrino primaries and derive model-independent quantitative requirements on the neutrino-nucleon inelastic cross section for a viable explanation of the cosmic ray data. Search results on weakly interacting cosmic particles from the AGASA and RICE experiments are taken into account simultaneously. Using a flexible parameterization of the inelastic neutrino-nucleon cross section we find that a combined fit of the data does not favor the Standard Model neutrino-nucleon inelastic cross section, but requires, at 90 % confidence leve...

  5. Cosmic ray feedback in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation

    Jubelgas, M; Pfrommer, C; Springel, V; Ensslin, Torsten A.; Jubelgas, Martin; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that cosmic rays (CRs) contribute significantly to the pressure of the interstellar medium in our own Galaxy, suggesting that they may play an important role in regulating star formation during the formation and evolution of galaxies. We here discuss a novel numerical treatment of the physics of CRs and its implementation in the parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-2. In our methodology, the non-thermal CR population of each gaseous fluid element is approximated by a simple power law spectrum in particle momentum, characterized by an amplitude, a cut-off, and a fixed slope. Adiabatic compression, and a number of physical source and sink terms are modelled which modify the CR pressure of each particle. The most important sources considered are injection by supernovae and diffusive shock acceleration, while the primary sinks are thermalization by Coulomb interactions, and catastrophic losses by hadronic interactions. We also include diffusion of CRs. Our scheme allows us to carr...

  6. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. The energy spectrum (power law energy dependence) suggests a non-thermal origin of these particles. Most studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: - the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for high energies of particles (up to about 1020 eV/particle), - estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or search for sources of Cosmic Rays, - properties of high energy particle interactions at very high energies (nuclear interactions at energies exceeding energy available in laboratories). - Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. - ''cosmic weather'' forecast - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares / events of Coronal Mass Ejection); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipes, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students is a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering the EAS and their properties is the main way of experimental studies of very high energy Cosmic Rays. In our Lodz Department we run an Extensive Air Shower array where EAS are continuously being registered. We concentrate on the studies of detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and interpretation of this phenomenon. In 2004 we started realisation of the Roland Maze Project, the network of EAS detectors placed on the roofs of high schools in Lodz. We received funds from the City of Lodz's budget to make a pilot project and equip 10 high schools, each with

  7. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high-energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. Most of the studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: - the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for the high energies of the particles - an estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or the search for sources of Cosmic Rays, - properties of high-energy particle interactions at very high energies. Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. - '' cosmic weather '' forecasting - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares/Coronal Mass Ejection events); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipelines, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students has become a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. We organize in Lodz and Poznan workshops on particle physics for high school students. This is a part of the European activity: EPPOG's Masterclass - Hands on CERN. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EAS and their properties is the main way of experimentally study's very high energy Cosmic Rays. Locally in Lodz we concentrate on methodological studies of the detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and the interpretation of this phenomenon. We have also performed two series of neutron background measurements in the deep underground Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy (within the ILIAS-TA Project). In 2004, we began the Roland Maze Project, a network of EAS detectors placed on the roofs of high schools in Lodz. The pilot project is to equip 10 high schools, each with four 1m

  8. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. The energy spectrum (power law energy dependence) suggests a non-thermal origin of these particles. Most of the studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: · The nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for the high energies of the particles (up to about 1020 eV/particle), · An estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or search for sources of Cosmic Rays, · properties of high energy particle interactions at very high energies (nuclear interactions at energies exceeding energy available in the laboratories). Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. · 'cosmic weather' forecast - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares / events of Coronal Mass Ejection); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipes, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students becomes a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EAS and their properties is the main way of experimental studies of very high energy Cosmic Rays. In the Lodz Department we run the Extensive Air Shower array where EAS are being registered. We concentrate on the studies of detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and interpretation of this phenomenon. In 2004, we started realisation of the Roland Maze Project, the network of EAS detectors placed on roofs of high schools in Lodz. We received funds from the City of Lodz budget to make a pilot project and equip 10 high schools, each with four 1 m

  9. PRECISE COSMIC RAYS MEASUREMENTS WITH PAMELA

    A. Bruno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The PAMELA experiment was launched on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The apparatus was designed to conduct precision studies of charged cosmic radiation over a wide energy range, from tens of MeV up to several hundred GeV, with unprecedented statistics. In five years of continuous data taking in space, PAMELA accurately measured the energy spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and positrons, as well as protons, electrons and light nuclei, sometimes providing data in unexplored energetic regions. These important results have shed new light in several astrophysical fields like: an indirect search for Dark Matter, a search for cosmological antimatter (anti-Helium, and the validation of acceleration, transport and secondary production models of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Some of the most important items of Solar and Magnetospheric physics were also investigated. Here we present the most recent results obtained by the PAMELA experiment.

  10. Temporal and energy behavior of cosmic ray fluxes in the periods of low solar activity

    Bazilevskaya, G A; Krainev, M B; Makhmutov, V S; Svirzhevskaya, A K; Svirzhevsky, N S

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of galactic cosmic ray intensity is governed by several mechanisms including diffusion, convection, adiabatic energy losses and drift. Relative roles of these factors change in the course of an 11-year solar cycle. That can result in the changes in the energy dependence of the 11-year cosmic ray modulation. The minimum between the solar cycles 23 and 24 was extremely deep and long-lasting which led to the record high cosmic ray fluxes low-energy particles dominating. This was a signature of unusually soft energy spectrum of the cosmic rays. In this work we examine the energy dependence of the 11-year modulation during the last three solar cycles and argue that a soft energy spectrum was observed in the minimum of each cycle however only for particles below of energy around 10 GeV. From mid 1980s the energy dependence of cosmic rays became softer from minimum to minimum of solar activity. The work is based on the cosmic ray data of the spacecraft, balloon-borne and the ground-based observations.

  11. Cosmic-ray neutron spectrometry and dosimetry

    When primary cosmic rays consisting of galactic cosmic rays and solar particles come into the earth's atmosphere, secondary neutrons generated through nuclear reactions with atmospheric atoms reach the ground. Over the past 10 years, there has been increasing concern about the exposure of air crews to atmospheric cosmic radiation. At aviation altitudes, the neutron component of the secondary cosmic radiation contributes about half of the dose equivalent. Recently, an accumulation of the semiconductor device greatly increases and the soft-errors of SRAM and DRAM on the ground level caused by high-energy cosmic-ray neutrons become a serious problem in the world. Under these circumstances, cosmic-ray neutron spectrometry and dosimetry are presented here in the terrestrial and space environments where neutrons and protons coexist. The neutron detection methods for use in this mixed field are described; 1) multi-moderator spectrometer (Bonner Ball), 2) organic liquid scintillation spectrometer, 3) dose-equivalent counter (rem counter) and 4) Phoswich-type detector. Using these detectors, neutron energy spectra and dose-equivalent rates have been measured on the ground at sea level and at mountain level, aboard an airplane and in space. The space experiments were done using a balloon, space shuttle and space station. The neutron spectrum on the ground has three major peaks, thermal energy peak, evaporation peak around 1 MeV and cascade peak around 100 MeV. While on the other hand, the neutron spectrum apart from the ground has no thermal neutron peak that comes from the albedo neutron effect backscattered from the terrestrial surface. The time-sequential experimental results in Japan, Europe and U.S.A. are described with the experimental procedures by paying attention to variation with latitude, altitude and solar activity. (author)

  12. One century of cosmic rays – A particle physicist's view

    Sutton Christine

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on cosmic rays and the elementary particles share a common history that dates back to the 19th century. Following the discovery of radioactivity in the 1890s, the paths of the two fields intertwined, especially during the decades after the discovery of cosmic rays. Experiments demonstrated that the primary cosmic rays are positively charged particles, while other studies of cosmic rays revealed various new sub-atomic particles, including the first antiparticle. Techniques develope...

  13. COSMOS: the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System

    M. Zreda; Shuttleworth, W. J.; Zeng, X; Zweck, C.; Desilets, D.; Franz, T; R. Rosolem

    2012-01-01

    The newly-developed cosmic-ray method for measuring area-average soil moisture at the hectometer horizontal scale is being implemented in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (or the COSMOS). The stationary cosmic-ray soil moisture probe measures the neutrons that are generated by cosmic rays within air and soil and other materials, moderated by mainly hydrogen atoms located primarily in soil water, and emitted to the atmosphere where they mix instantaneously at a s...

  14. Underground cosmic-ray experiment EMMA

    Kuusiniemi, P.; Bezrukov, L.; Enqvist, T.;

    2013-01-01

    EMMA (Experiment with MultiMuon Array) is a new approach to study the composition of cosmic rays at the knee region (1 – 10 PeV). The array will measure the multiplicity and lateral distribution of the high-energy muon component of an air shower and its arrival direction on an event-by-event basi...

  15. Believability of signals from cosmic ray sources

    This paper discusses some of the criteria by which an observer judges whether to believe a signal or limit that has been reported for a cosmic ray source. The importance of specifying the test before looking at the data is emphasized. 5 refs

  16. Spiral Arms as Cosmic Ray Source Distributions

    Werner, M; Strong, A W; Reimer, O

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that the distribution of suspected cosmic ray sources are associated with the spiral arm structure of galaxies. It is yet not clearly understood what effect such a cosmic ray source distribution has on the particle transport in our Galaxy. We use the PICARD code to perform high-resolution 3D simulations of electrons and protons in galactic propagation scenarios that include four-arm and two-arm logarithmic spiral cosmic ray source distributions with and without a central bar structure as well as the spiral arm configuration of the NE2001 model for the distribution of free electrons in the Milky Way. Results of these simulation are compared to an axisymmetric radial source distribution. Also, effects on the cosmic ray flux and spectra due to different positions of the Earth relative to the spiral structure are studied. We find that high energy electrons are strongly confined to their sources and the obtained spectra largely depend on the Earth's position relative to the spiral arms. Similar f...

  17. Cosmic Ray Origin, Acceleration and Propagation

    Baring, M G

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes highlights of the OG3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 sessions of the XXVIth International Cosmic Ray Conference in Salt Lake City, which were devoted to issues of origin/composition, acceleration and propagation.

  18. Recent developments in cosmic ray physics

    Blasi, P

    2014-01-01

    The search for a theory of the origin of cosmic rays that may be considered as a standard, agreeable model is still ongoing. On one hand, much circumstantial evidence exists of the fact that supernovae in our Galaxy play a crucial role in producing the bulk of cosmic rays observed on Earth. On the other hand, important questions about their ability to accelerate particles up to the knee remain unanswered. The common interpretation of the knee as a feature coinciding with the maximum energy of the light component of cosmic rays and a transition to a gradually heavier mass composition is mainly based on KASCADE results. Some recent data appear to question this finding: YAC1 - Tibet Array and ARGO-YBJ find a flux reduction in the light component at $\\sim 700$ TeV, appreciably below the knee. Whether the maximum energy of light nuclei is as high as $3000$ TeV or rather as low as a few hundred TeV has very important consequences on the supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of cosmic rays, as well on the crucia...

  19. Periodic and recurrent variations of cosmic rays

    The new results achieved in the field of periodic and recurrent variations of the intensity of 109 to 1013 eV cosmic rays are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to developments in understanding the fluctuations of corotation-type anisotropies as well as to the structure of the heliosphere and its temporal changes. (author)

  20. Modulation of low-energy cosmic rays

    Recent theories have related the diffusion of cosmic rays in the solar wind to the power spectrum of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations. In this study the power spectrum-diffusion coefficient relation for low-energy protons (T19 cm2/s

  1. Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves

    Renyi Ma; Dongsu Ryu; Hyesung Kang

    2011-03-01

    Based on hydrodynamic numerical simulations and diffusive shock acceleration model, we calculated the ratio of cosmic ray (CR) to thermal energy. We found that the CR fraction can be less than ∼ 0.1 in the intracluster medium, while it would be of order unity in the warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  2. Cosmic ray half life of 56Ni

    A search for the β+ decay of 56Ni has established an upper limit on the branching ratio of 7.2 x 10-7 for the most likely such transition. This provides a lower limit of 2.3 x 104 years for the cosmic ray half life of 56Ni. 2 refs., 2 figs

  3. Accelerator Data for Cosmic Ray Physics

    Albrow, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    I present selected examples of accelerator data, mainly from hadron colliders, that are relevant for understanding cosmic ray showers. I focus on the forward region, $x_{Feynman} > 0.05$, where high energy data are scarce, since the emphasis in collider physics became high-$p_T$ phenomena.

  4. Low cloud properties influenced by cosmic rays

    Marsh, Nigel; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    The influence of solar variability on climate is currently uncertain. Recent observations have indicated a possible mechanism via the influence of solar modulated cosmic rays on global cloud cover. Surprisingly the influence of solar variability is strongest in low clouds (less than or equal to3 km...

  5. Fractional phenomenology of cosmic ray anomalous diffusion

    We review the evolution of the cosmic ray diffusion concept from the ordinary (Einstein) model of Brownian motion to the fractional models that appeared in the last decade. The mathematical and physical foundations of these models are discussed, as are their consequences, related problems, and prospects for further development. (reviews of topical problems)

  6. Cosmic Rays Astrophysics: The Discipline, Its Scope, and Its Applications

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the discipline surrounding cosmic ray astrophysics. It includes information on recent assertions surrounding cosmic rays, exposure levels, and a short history with specific information on the origin, acceleration, transport, and modulation of cosmic rays.

  7. On the origin of high energy cosmic rays

    I summarize some recent observational and theoretical developments in the investigation of the origin of cosmic rays. The implications of the supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays as well as for the transition to extragalactic cosmic rays will be emphasized. I will also discuss the complex observational situation in the ultra high energy region.

  8. Proceedings of the 21. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    Scientific symposium deals with problems of cosmic ray. The Symposium included the following sessions: (1): Relationship of cosmic rays to the environment; (2) Energetic particles and the magnetosphere of the Earth; (3) Energetic particles in the heliosphere; (4) Solar-terrestrial effects on different time scales; (5) Cosmic rays below the knee; (6) Cosmic rays above the knee (7) High energy interactions; (8) GeV and TeV gamma ray astronomy; (9) European projects related to cosmic rays; Future perspectives. Proceedings contains 122 papers dealing with the scope of INIS.

  9. Heliospheric Impact on Cosmic Rays Modulation

    Tiwari, Bhupendra Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Heliospheric Impact on Cosmic RaysModulation B. K. Tiwari Department of Physics, A. P. S. University, Rewa (M.P.), btiwari70@yahoo.com Cosmic rays (CRs) flux at earth is modulated by the heliosphereric magnetic field and the structure of the heliosphere, controls by solar outputs and their variability. Sunspots numbers (SSN) is often treated as a primary indicator of solar activity (SA). GCRs entering the helioshphere are affected by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind speed, their modulation varies with the varying solar activity. The observation based on data recoded from Omniweb data Centre for solar- interplanetary activity indices and monthly mean count rate of cosmic ray intensity (CRI) data from neutron monitors of different cut-off rigidities(Rc) (Moscow Rc=2.42Gv and Oulu Rc=0.80Gv). During minimum solar activity periodof solar cycle 23/24, the sun is remarkably quiet, weakest strength of the IMF and least dense and slowest, solar wind speed, whereas, in 2003, highest value of yearly averaged solar wind speed (~568 Km/sec) associated with several coronal holes, which generate high speed wind stream has been recorded. It is observed that GCRs fluxes reduces and is high anti-correlated with SSN (0.80) and IMF (0.86). CRI modulation produces by a strong solar flare, however, CME associated solar flare produce more disturbance in the interplanetary medium as well as in geomagnetic field. It is found that count rate of cosmic ray intensity and solar- interplanetary parameters were inverse correlated and solar indices were positive correlated. Keywords- Galactic Cosmic rays (GCRs), Sunspot number (SSN), Solar activity (SA), Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF)

  10. Numerical solution of the quasistationary problem about the 27-day modulation of galactic cosmic rays using the perturbation theory

    The method of perturbation theory has been used to obtain a set of differential equations in partial derivatives which describes the galactic cosmic ray variations with the Sun's rotation period in quasistationary case to the approximation of anisotropic diffusion including adiabatic cooling of particles. (orig.)

  11. Cosmic gamma rays from quasars

    The diffuse gamma radiation consists of the galactic and extragalactic components. The latter component is of special interest on account of its cosmological significance. Following the method recently proposed to estimate the gamma ray flux from galaxy clusters, and the detection of gamma rays from the quasars 3C273, the data base of the SAS II satellite was used to estimate the contribution from quasars to the extragalactic gamma ray flux. It is shown that quasars as a whole are significant gamma ray contributors, the average gamma ray flux per quasar in the energy range 35 MeV to 100 Mev being (1.3 + or - 0.9) x .00001 cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1)

  12. Cosmic gamma rays from quasars

    Lau, M. M.; Young, E. C. M.

    1985-01-01

    The diffuse gamma radiation consists of the galactic and extragalactic components. The latter component is of special interest on account of its cosmological significance. Following the method recently proposed to estimate the gamma ray flux from galaxy clusters, and the detection of gamma rays from the quasars 3C273, the data base of the SAS II satellite was used to estimate the contribution from quasars to the extragalactic gamma ray flux. It is shown that quasars as a whole are significant gamma ray contributors, the average gamma ray flux per quasar in the energy range 35 MeV to 100 Mev being (1.3 + or - 0.9) x .00001 cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1).

  13. Exploring the High-Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum with a Toy Model of Cosmic Ray Diffusion

    Clay, Roger

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a static toy model of the cosmic ray (CR) universe in which cosmic ray propagation is taken to be diffusive and cosmic ray sources are distributed randomly with a density the same as that of local L* galaxies, $5 \\times 10^{-3}$ Mpc$^{-3}$. These sources "fire" at random times through the history of the universe but with a set expectation time for the period between bursts. Our toy model model captures much of the essential CR physics despite its simplicity and, moreover, broadly reproduces CR phenomenology for reasonable parameter values and without extreme fine-tuning. Using this model we investigate -- and find tenable -- the idea that the Milky Way may itself be a typical high-energy cosmic ray source. We also consider the possible phenomenological implications of the magnetic CR horizon for the overall cosmic ray spectrum observed at Earth. Finally, we show that anisotropy studies should most profitably focus on cosmic rays detected at energies above the so-called GZK cut-off, $\\sim 6 \\times...

  14. The long-term variability of cosmic ray protons in the heliosphere: A modeling approach

    M.S. Potgieter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Galactic cosmic rays are charged particles created in our galaxy and beyond. They propagate through interstellar space to eventually reach the heliosphere and Earth. Their transport in the heliosphere is subjected to four modulation processes: diffusion, convection, adiabatic energy changes and particle drifts. Time-dependent changes, caused by solar activity which varies from minimum to maximum every ∼11 years, are reflected in cosmic ray observations at and near Earth and along spacecraft trajectories. Using a time-dependent compound numerical model, the time variation of cosmic ray protons in the heliosphere is studied. It is shown that the modeling approach is successful and can be used to study long-term modulation cycles.

  15. Gamma Ray Signatures from Ordinary Cosmic Strings

    MacGibbon, Jane H.; Brandenberger, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    We calculate the flux of ultra high energy photons from individual ordinary (i.e. non-superconducting) cosmic strings and compare the results with the sensitivity of current and proposed TeV and EeV telescopes. Our calculations give only upper limits for the gamma ray flux, since the source of the photons, jets from particle production at cusps, may be weakened by back reaction effects. For the usual cosmic distribution of strings, the predicted bursts from strings with the value of mass per ...

  16. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from beta-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of their prime energy sources. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massi...

  17. Deuterium production by cosmological cosmic rays

    Among the various low-energy interactions that take place at high redshifts (z approximately 100) between a (hypothetical) flux of cosmological cosmic rays (''CCR'': protons and α particles), and the ambient gaseous medium, deuterium production is interesting in view of the relevance of this element to big-bang cosmology. The production cross-sections are discussed in detail. The abundance of deuterium produced by this process is computed by normalizing the CCR flux so as to account for the approximately 1-100 MeV γ-ray background spectrum. The resulting D (and 3He) abundances may reach approximately 20% of their observed value. It is also shown how the results can be compared with those obtained recently by Epstein et al. on deuterium production by ''pregalactic cosmic rays''. (author)

  18. Resolving photons from cosmic ray in DAMPE

    Xu, Zunlei; Chang, Jin; Li, Xiang; Dong, TieKuang; Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer(DAMPE), which took to the skies on 17 December, is designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. The proportion of photons in the cosmic ray is very small, so it's difficult to distinguish between photons and 'background', but necessary for any DAMPE gamma-ray science goals.The paper present a algorithm to identify photons from 'background' mainly by the tracker/converter, which promote pair conversion and measure the directions of incident particles, and an anticoincidence detector,featuring an array of plastic scintillator to detect the charged particles.The method has been studied by simulating using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code and adjusted by the BeamTest at CERN in December,2014.In addition,DAMPE photon detection capabilities can be checked using the flight data.

  19. Cosmic Ray Signatures of Decaying Dark Matter

    Astrophysical and cosmological observations do not require the dark matter particles to be absolutely stable. If they are indeed unstable, their decay into Standard Model particles might occur at a sufficiently large rate to allow the indirect detection of dark matter through an anomalous contribution to the high energy cosmic ray fluxes. We analyze the implications of the excess in the total electron plus positron flux and the positron fraction reported by the Fermi and PAMELA collaborations, respectively, for the scenario of decaying dark matter. We also discuss the constraints on this scenario from measurements of other cosmic ray species and the predictions for the diffuse gamma ray flux and the neutrino flux. In particular, we expect a sizable dipole-like anisotropy which may be observed in the near future by the Fermi-LAT.

  20. Cosmic ray physics with the ALEPH detector

    Besier, H.; Grupen, C.; Kempa, J.; Luitz, S.; Maggi, M.; Maier, D.; Misiejuk, A.; Mueller, A.-S.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Schmelling, M.; Schreiber, V.; Wachsmuth, H. E-mail: horst.wachsmuth@cern.ch; Ziegler, Th.; Zuber, K

    2000-11-01

    ALEPH is one of the four detectors at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) at a depth of about 320 m.w.e. Its hadron calorimeter and scintillator arrays installed at distances up to about 1 km away from ALEPH are used to measure cosmic muon induced time coincidences over large distances. The aim of this experiment (CosmoALEPH) is (1) to study the muon component above 70 GeV of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) and (2) to test the feasibility of searching for time correlations over even larger distances (up to 8 km) between the four LEP detectors. Layout and first results of CosmoALEPH are presented demonstrating the potential for cosmic ray physics in the LEP tunnel. The multiplicity distribution of muons in cosmic events recorded in ALEPH's tracking detector is presented.

  1. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  2. The Astrophysics of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    Kotera, Kumiko

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the workings of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. Current observations show a spectrum consistent with an origin in extragalactic astrophysical sources. Candidate sources range from the birth of compact objects to explosions related to gamma-ray bursts or to events in active galaxies. We discuss the main effects of propagation from cosmologically distant sources including interactions with cosmic background radiation and magnetic fields. We examine possible acceleration mechanisms leading to a survey of candidate sources and their signatures. New questions arise from an observed hint of sky anisotropies and an unexpected evolution of composition indicators. Future observations may reach the necessary sensitivity to achieve charged particle astronomy and to observe ultrahigh energy photons and neutrinos, which will further illuminate the workings of the universe at these extrem...

  3. Cosmic rays, solar activity and the climate

    Although it is generally believed that the increase in the mean global surface temperature since industrialization is caused by the increase in green house gases in the atmosphere, some people cite solar activity, either directly or through its effect on cosmic rays, as an underestimated contributor to such global warming. In this letter a simplified version of the standard picture of the role of greenhouse gases in causing the global warming since industrialization is described. The conditions necessary for this picture to be wholly or partially wrong are then introduced. Evidence is presented from which the contributions of either cosmic rays or solar activity to this warming is deduced. The contribution is shown to be less than 10% of the warming seen in the twentieth century. (letter)

  4. Hydromagnetic waves and cosmic ray diffusion theory

    Lee, M. A.; Voelk, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    Pitch angle diffusion of cosmic rays in hydromagnetic wave fields is considered strictly within the quasilinear approximation. It is shown that the popular assumption of an isotropic power spectrum tensor of magnetic fluctuations requires in this case equal forms and magnitudes of Alfven and magnetosonic wave spectra - a situation which is generally unlikely. The relative contributions to the pitch angle diffusion coefficient from the cyclotron resonances and Landau resonance due to the different types of waves are evaluated for a typical situation in the solar wind. Since in this approximation also the Landau resonance does not lead to particle reflections a proper consideration of the nonlinear particle orbits is indeed necessary to overcome the well known difficulties of quasilinear scattering theory for cosmic rays near 90 degrees pitch angle.

  5. The HEAT Cosmic Ray Antiproton Experiment

    Nutter, Scott

    1998-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration is constructing a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton to proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates.

  6. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-10-21

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above 10{sup 17} eV and to study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km{sup 2} overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. In addition, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km{sup 2}, 61-detector infilled array with 750 m spacing. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km{sup 2} sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Observatory.

  7. Solar cosmic rays fundamentals and applications

    Miroshnichenko, Leonty

    2015-01-01

    The book summarizes the results of solar cosmic ray (SCR) investigations since 1942. The present monograph, unlike the reviews published earlier, treats the problem in self-contained form, in all its associations—from fundamental astrophysical aspects to geophysical, aeronautical and cosmonautical applications. It includes a large amount of new data, accumulated during the last several decades of space research. As a result of the "information burst" in space physics, there are a lot of new interesting theoretical concepts, models and ideas that deserve attention. The author gives an extensive bibliography, which covers non-partially the main achievements and failures in this field. The book will be helpful for a wide audience of space physicists and it will be relevant to graduate and postgraduate courses. The book will serve as a reference work for researchers and students in solar physics and astrophysical plasma physics, as well as in cosmic rays physics, astroparticle physics, space science, solar-terr...

  8. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above $10^{17}$ eV and to study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water-Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km$^2$ overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. In addition, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km$^2$, 61 detector infill array. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km$^2$ sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Auger Observatory.

  9. Cosmic rays, solar activity and the climate

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    Although it is generally believed that the increase in the mean global surface temperature since industrialization is caused by the increase in green house gases in the atmosphere, some people cite solar activity, either directly or through its effect on cosmic rays, as an underestimated contributor to such global warming. In this letter a simplified version of the standard picture of the role of greenhouse gases in causing the global warming since industrialization is described. The conditions necessary for this picture to be wholly or partially wrong are then introduced. Evidence is presented from which the contributions of either cosmic rays or solar activity to this warming is deduced. The contribution is shown to be less than 10% of the warming seen in the twentieth century.

  10. Long-lived staus from cosmic rays

    Ahlers, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Illana, J.I.; Masip, M. [Granada Univ. (Spain). CAFPE y Dept. de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos; Meloni, D. [Univ. degli Studi di Roma La Spienza (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Roma (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    The collision of a high energy cosmic ray with a nucleon in the upper atmosphere could produce long-lived heavy particles. Such particles would be very penetrating, since the energy loss in matter scales as the inverse mass, and could reach a neutrino telescope like IceCube from large zenith angles. Here we study this possibility and focus on the long-lived stau of SUSY models with a gravitino LSP. The signal would be a pair of muon-like parallel tracks separated by 50 meters along the detector. We evaluate the background of muon pairs and show that any events from zenith angles above 80. could be explained by the production of these heavy particles by cosmic rays. (orig.)

  11. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: Strangelets?

    徐仁新; 吴飞

    2003-01-01

    The conjecture that ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are actually strangelets is discussed. Besides the reason that strangelets can do as cosmic rays beyond the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin-cutoff, another argument to support the conjecture is addressed by the study of formation of Te V-scale microscopic black holes when UHECRs bombarding bare strange stars. It is proposed that the exotic quark surface of a bare strange star could be an effective astro-laboratory in the investigations of the extra dimensions and of the detection of ultra-high-energy neutrino fluxes. The flux of neutrinos (and other point-like particles) with energy larger than 2.3 × 1020 eV could be expected to be smaller than 10-26 cm-2 s-1 if there are two extra spatial dimensions.

  12. Search for Antihelium in the Cosmic Rays

    Golden, R. L.; Stochaj, S. J.; Stephens, S. A.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Bowen, T.; Moats, A.; Lloyd-Evans, J.

    1997-04-01

    On 1987 August 22 a balloon flight was conducted using the Goddard Space Flight Center Low-Energy Antiproton configuration of the New Mexico State University balloon-borne magnet spectrometer. The launch site was Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada. The balloon flew at an average atmospheric depth of 4.7 g cm-2 for more than 22 hr. During this period a sample of 4.2 × 104 helium nuclei was gathered. No antihelium candidates were found in this sample. The resultant upper limit for the ratio of antihelium to helium in cosmic rays over the rigidity interval from 1 to 25 GV/c is 9 × 10-5 at 95% confidence. This limit is below the predicted level, assuming equal matter and antimatter in the extragalactic cosmic rays.

  13. Cosmic ray air showers from sphalerons

    Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson marks a key ingredient to establish the electroweak structure of the Standard Model. Its non-abelian gauge structure gives rise to, yet unobserved, non-perturbative baryon and lepton number violating processes. We propose to use cosmic ray air showers, as measured at the Pierre Auger Observatory, to set a limit on the hadronic production cross section of sphalerons. We identify several observables to discriminate between sphaleron and QCD induced air showers.

  14. Ultra high energy cosmic ray horizons

    We calculate the horizons of ultra high energy cosmic rays assuming different primary nuclei ranging from proton to iron at ultra high energies (6.1019 eV). We show that sources of ultra high energy protons and heavy nuclei can originate from distances up to ∼180 Mpc, while low and intermediate mass nuclei can only originate in the local universe (<50 Mpc).

  15. Ultra high energy cosmic ray horizons

    Busca, N.G. [Laboratoire d' Astroparticules at Cosmologie, 10, rue Alice Domon et Lonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2009-05-15

    We calculate the horizons of ultra high energy cosmic rays assuming different primary nuclei ranging from proton to iron at ultra high energies (6.10{sup 19} eV). We show that sources of ultra high energy protons and heavy nuclei can originate from distances up to approx180 Mpc, while low and intermediate mass nuclei can only originate in the local universe (<50 Mpc).

  16. The acceleration of galactic cosmic rays

    A number of acceleration mechanisms are discussed including stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, laminar shock acceleration and acceleration by shocks in scattering media. The self-consistent problem is analysed and it is concluded that provided the cosmic rays are scattered effectively and provided energy losses are not too severe, they can be very efficiently accelerated by shock waves in the interstellar medium. (C.F.)

  17. New results from AMS cosmic ray measurements

    Huang, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a detector designed to search for antimatter in the cosmic rays. The physics results from the test flight in June 1998 are analyzed and published. This paper reviews the results in the five published papers of the AMS collaboration, updates the current understanding of two puzzles, albedo $e^+/e^-$ and albedo $^3$He, and disscusses the influence of albedo particles.

  18. Galactic Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    Olinto, A. V.; Epstein, R. I.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri)

    1999-01-01

    The absence of the expected GZK cutoff strongly challenges the notion that the highest-energy cosmic rays are of distant extragalactic origin. We discuss the possibility that these ultra-high-energy events originate in our Galaxy and propose that they may be due to iron nuclei accelerated from young, strongly magnetic neutron stars. Newly formed pulsars accelerate ions from their surface through relativistic MHD winds. We find that pulsars whose initial spin periods are shorter than $\\sim 4 (...

  19. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Ebr, Jan; Grygar, Jiří; Mandát, Dušan; Nečesal, Petr; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr; Trávníček, Petr; Vícha, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 798, Oct (2014), 172-213. ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13007; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14AR005; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-17501S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Pierre Auger Observatory * high energy cosmic rays * hybrid observatory * water Cherenkov detectors * air fluorescence detectors Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.216, year: 2014

  20. Cosmic rays in the Magellanic clouds

    EGRET data from the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory have been used to determine the flux of gamma rays from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). When compared with data at other wavelengths it is found that the parents of the gamma rays, the initiating cosmic rays (CRs), are concentrated much more strongly than is the case for the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). A consequence is that unless a single discrete gamma-ray source is responsible, the efficiency of CR production and/or trapping in the SMC is higher than would have been expected on the basis of the LMC results; there is also a hint that the SMC may be relatively richer in CR protons than the LMC. (author)

  1. Ultra High-Energy Cosmic Ray Observations

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    The year 2007 has furnished us with outstanding results about the origin of the most energetic cosmic rays: a flux suppression as expected from the GZK-effect has been observed in the data of the HiRes and Auger experiments and correlations between the positions of nearby AGN and the arrival directions of trans-GZK events have been observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory. The latter finding marks the beginning of ultra high-energy cosmic ray astronomy and is considered a major breakthrough starting to shed first light onto the sources of the most extreme particles in nature. This report summarizes those observations and includes other major advances of the field, mostly presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference held in Merida, Mexico, in July 2007. With increasing statistics becoming available from current and even terminated experiments, systematic differences amongst different experiments and techniques can be studied in detail which is hoped to improve our understanding of experimental tec...

  2. Dark matter and galactic cosmic rays

    Dark matter is one of the major problems encountered by modern cosmology and astrophysics, resisting the efforts of both theoreticians and experimentalists. The problem itself is easy to state: many indirect astrophysical measurements indicate that the mass contained in the Universe seems to be dominated by a new type of matter which has never been directly seen yet, this is why it is called dark matter. This hypothesis of dark matter being made of new particles is of great interest for particle physicists, whose theories provide many candidates: dark matter is one of the major topics of astro-particle physics. This work focuses on searching dark matter in the form of new particles, more precisely to indirect detection, i.e. the search of particles produced by dark matter annihilation rather than dark matter particles themselves. In this framework, I will present the studies I have been doing in the field of cosmic rays physics (particularly cosmic ray sources), in several collaborations. In particular, the study of the antimatter component of cosmic rays can give relevant information about dark matter. The last chapter is dedicated to my teaching activities

  3. Astrophysics of Galactic charged cosmic rays

    Castellina, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    A review is given of the main properties of the charged component of galactic cosmic rays, particles detected at Earth with an energy spanning from tens of MeV up to about 10^19 eV. After a short introduction to the topic and an historical overview, the properties of cosmic rays are discussed with respect to different energy ranges. The origin and the propagation of nuclei in the Galaxy are dealt with from a theoretical point of view. The mechanisms leading to the acceleration of nuclei by supernova remnants and to their subsequent diffusion through the inhomogeneities of the galactic magnetic field are discussed and some clue is given on the predictions and observations of fluxes of antimatter, both from astrophysical sources and from dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo. The experimental techniques and instrumentations employed for the detection of cosmic rays at Earth are described. Direct methods are viable up to 10^14 eV, by means of experiments flown on balloons or satellites, while above that ...

  4. Early history of cosmic ray studies

    This is a collection of personal reminiscences about cosmic ray research written by some of those directly involved in the development of the subject. The articles span the period from the discovery of cosmic rays by Hess in 1912 up to the present time and include three written by Nobel Laureates: C.D. Anderson, H. Yukawa and H. Alven. This is the first book to cover the development of cosmic ray studies at the personal level and it provides a first-hand account of the early stages of a subject which has been of great importance not only in its own right but also in astronomy, in the physics of elementary particles and in the development of space research. The 35 accounts convey something of the atmosphere, the excitement and the frustrations of research as experienced at first hand and 150 old photographs, concentrated on this stage of the field, will be of interest to a wide readership wishing to see through the eyes of those most closely concerned something of the way in which research is done and progress in scientific understanding achieved. (orig.)

  5. Tridiurnal variations in cosmic-ray intensity

    The tridiurnal wave in cosmic-ray intensity expected from a free space anisotropy is theoretically calculated for different cosmic-ray stations which are characterized by different shapes of asymptotic cones of acceptance. The amplitude A and the time of maximum Tsub(max) are given for latitude dependence of the form cossup(n) lambda and rigidity dependence of the the form Rsup(β) exp(-(R-1/R0)), where lambda and R are the latitude and rigidity respectively and n, β, R0 are constants. The values of A and Tsub(max) are calculated for different values of n, β and R0 for each station. The dependence of A and Tsub(max) on the anisotropy parameters is studied for the proper selection of cosmic-ray stations whose data may be used in determining these parameters. Available experimental data were used to find the observed amplitudes of the tridiurnal variations at five stations using power spectrum analysis with hanning applied on the averaged trains. Minimum variance analysis of the theoretical and experimental amplitudes showed that β has a value between 1 and 2, R0 greater than 100 GV and n smaller than 3. (author)

  6. Solar panels as cosmic-ray detectors

    Stella, Carlo; Assis, Pedro; Brogueira, Pedro; Santo, Catarina Espirito; Goncalves, Patricia; Pimenta, Mario; De Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Due to fundamental limitations of accelerators, only cosmic rays can give access to centre-of- mass energies more than one order of magnitude above those reached at the LHC. In fact, extreme energy cosmic rays (1018 eV - 1020 eV) are the only possibility to explore the 100 TeV energy scale in the years to come. This leap by one order of magnitude gives a unique way to open new horizons: new families of particles, new physics scales, in-depth investigations of the Lorentz symmetries. However, the flux of cosmic rays decreases rapidly, being less than one particle per square kilometer per year above 1019 eV: one needs to sample large surfaces. A way to develop large-effective area, low cost, detectors, is to build a solar panel-based device which can be used in parallel for power generation and Cherenkov light detection. Using solar panels for Cherenkov light detection would combine power generation and a non-standard detection device.

  7. Cosmic Ray Data in TRT Barrel

    M. Hance

    "I had a great day in August when I went into SR1," said Daniel Froidevaux, former project leader of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker, "not only had all SCT barrels arrived at CERN, but there were cosmic ray tracks seen in the TRT!" Daniel's excitement was mirrored by the rest of the TRT collaboration when, on July 29, the first cosmic ray tracks were seen in the barrel. Along with many others in the community, Daniel was quick to point out that this is the cumulative result of years of R&D, test beam work, and an intense installation and integration schedule. Indeed, the cosmic ray readout is only possible through the coordination of many efforts, from detector mechanics to module assembly, power and high voltage control, cooling, gas systems, electronics and cabling, data acquisition, and monitoring. "Many people have worked very hard on the the TRT, some of them for more than 10 years," said Brig Williams, the leader of the UPenn group responsible for much of the TRT front end electronics. He ...

  8. Cosmic ray acceleration search in Supernova Remnants

    Galactic Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are among the best candidates as source of cosmic rays due to energetics, observed rate of explosion and as possible sites where the Fermi mechanisms naturally plays a key role. Evidence of hadronic acceleration processes taking place in SNRs are being collected with the Fermi-LAT, whose sensitivity in the range 100MeV–100GeV is crucial for disentangling possible hadronic contribution from inverse Compton or bremsstrahlung leptonic component. A survey of the detected SNRs will be given, focusing the attention on the role of the environment and the evolution stage of the SNR in the interpretation of the observed γ-ray spectra

  9. Cosmic ray acceleration search in Supernova Remnants

    Giordano, Francesco; Di Venere, Leonardo [Dipartimento di Fisica M. Merlin dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Galactic Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are among the best candidates as source of cosmic rays due to energetics, observed rate of explosion and as possible sites where the Fermi mechanisms naturally plays a key role. Evidence of hadronic acceleration processes taking place in SNRs are being collected with the Fermi-LAT, whose sensitivity in the range 100MeV–100GeV is crucial for disentangling possible hadronic contribution from inverse Compton or bremsstrahlung leptonic component. A survey of the detected SNRs will be given, focusing the attention on the role of the environment and the evolution stage of the SNR in the interpretation of the observed γ-ray spectra.

  10. Relic neutrino masses and the highest energy cosmic rays

    Fodor, Z.; S.D. Katz; Ringwald, A.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the possibility that a large fraction of the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are decay products of Z bosons which were produced in the scattering of ultrahigh energy cosmic neutrinos on cosmological relic neutrinos. We compare the observed ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum with the one predicted in the above Z-burst scenario and determine the required mass of the heaviest relic neutrino as well as the necessary ultrahigh energy cosmic neutrino flux via a maximum likelihood analysi...

  11. Ionization by Cosmic Rays in the Atmosphere of Titan

    Norman, R. B.; Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C. J.; Blattnig, S.

    2011-12-01

    In-situ measurements by Cassini-Huygens have shown the importance of ionizing particles (solar photons, magnetospheric electrons and protons, cosmics rays) on the atmosphere of Titan. Ionizing particles play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry of Titan and must therefore be accurately modeled to understand the contribution of the differing sources of ionization. To model the initial galactic cosmic ray environment, the Badwar-O'Neill cosmic ray spectrum model was adapted for use at Titan. The Aeroplanets model, an electron transport model for the study of airglow and aurora, was then coupled to the Planetocosmics model, a Monte-carlo cosmic ray transport and energy deposition model, to compute ion production from cosmic rays. In addition, the NAIRAS model, a cosmic ray irradiation model adapted for fast computations, was adopted to the Titan environment and, for the first time, used to compute an ionization profile on a planet other than Earth and compared to the Planetocosmics results. For the first time, the importance of high charge cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere was demonstrated. High charge cosmic rays were found to be especially important below an altitude of 400 km, contributing significantly to the total ionization. Specifically, between 200 km and 400 km, alpha and higher charge cosmic rays are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The increase due to high charge cosmic rays was found for both the Planetocosmics and NAIRAS models.

  12. An alternative interpretation for cosmic ray peaks

    Kim, Doojin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative mechanism based upon dark matter (DM) interpretation for anomalous peak signatures in cosmic ray measurements, assuming an extended dark sector with two DM species. This is contrasted with previous effort to explain various line-like cosmic-ray excesses in the context of DM models where the relevant DM candidate directly annihilates into Standard Model (SM) particles. The heavier DM is assumed to annihilate to an on-shell intermediate state. As the simplest choice, it decays directly into the lighter DM along with an unstable particle which in turn decays to a pair of SM states corresponding to the interesting cosmic anomaly. We show that a sharp continuum energy peak can be readily generated under the proposed DM scenario, depending on dark sector particle mass spectra. Remarkably, such a peak is robustly identified as half the mass of the unstable particle. Furthermore, other underlying mass parameters are analytically related to the shape of energy spectrum. We apply this idea to ...

  13. Key scientific problems from Cosmic Ray History

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    Recently was published the monograph "Cosmic Ray History" by Lev Dorman and Irina Dorman (Nova Publishers, New York). What learn us and what key scientific problems formulated the Cosmic Ray History? 1. As many great discoveries, the phenomenon of cosmic rays was discovered accidentally, during investigations that sought to answer another question: what are sources of air ionization? This problem became interesting for science about 230 years ago in the end of the 18th century, when physics met with a problem of leakage of electrical charge from very good isolated bodies. 2. At the beginning of the 20th century, in connection with the discovery of natural radioactivity, it became apparent that this problem is mainly solved: it was widely accepted that the main source of the air ionization were α, b, and γ - radiations from radioactive substances in the ground (γ-radiation was considered as the most important cause because α- and b-radiations are rapidly absorbed in the air). 3. The general accepted wrong opinion on the ground radioactivity as main source of air ionization, stopped German meteorologist Franz Linke to made correct conclusion on the basis of correct measurements. In fact, he made 12 balloon flights in 1900-1903 during his PhD studies at Berlin University, carrying an electroscope to a height of 5500 m. The PhD Thesis was not published, but in Thesis he concludes: "Were one to compare the presented values with those on ground, one must say that at 1000 m altitude the ionization is smaller than on the ground, between 1 and 3 km the same amount, and above it is larger with values increasing up to a factor of 4 (at 5500 m). The uncertainties in the observations only allow the conclusion that the reason for the ionization has to be found first in the Earth." Nobody later quoted Franz Linke and although he had made the right measurements, he had reached the wrong conclusions, and the discovery of CR became only later on about 10 years. 4. Victor Hess, a

  14. Cosmic-ray exposure ages of chondrules

    Roth, Antoine S. G.; Metzler, Knut; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Leya, Ingo

    2016-07-01

    If chondrules were exposed to cosmic rays prior to meteorite compaction, they should retain an excess of cosmogenic noble gases. Beyersdorf-Kuis et al. (2015) showed that such excesses can be detected provided that the chemical composition of each individual chondrule is precisely known. However, their study was limited to a few samples as they had to be irradiated in a nuclear reactor for instrumental neutron activation analysis. We developed a novel analytical protocol that combines the measurements of He and Ne isotopic concentrations with a fast method to correct for differences in chemical composition using micro X-ray computed tomography. Our main idea is to combine noble gas, nuclear track, and petrography data for numerous chondrules to understand the precompaction exposure history of the chondrite parent bodies. Here, we report our results for a total of 77 chondrules and four matrix samples from NWA 8276 (L3.00), NWA 8007 (L3.2), and Bjurböle (L/LL4). All chondrules from the same meteorite have within uncertainty identical 21Ne exposure ages, and all chondrules from Bjurböle have within uncertainty identical 3He exposure ages. However, most chondrules from NWA 8276 and a few from NWA 8007 show small but resolvable differences in 3He exposure age that we attribute to matrix contamination and/or gas loss. The finding that none of the chondrules has noble gas excesses is consistent with the uniform track density found for each meteorite. We conclude that the studied chondrules did not experience a precompaction exposure longer than a few Ma assuming present-day flux of galactic cosmic rays. A majority of chondrules from L and LL chondrites thus rapidly accreted and/or was efficiently shielded from cosmic rays in the solar nebula.

  15. Cosmic-ray exposure ages of chondrules

    Roth, Antoine S. G.; Metzler, Knut; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Leya, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    If chondrules were exposed to cosmic rays prior to meteorite compaction, they should retain an excess of cosmogenic noble gases. Beyersdorf-Kuis et al. showed that such excesses can be detected provided that the chemical composition of each individual chondrule is precisely known. However, their study was limited to a few samples as they had to be irradiated in a nuclear reactor for instrumental neutron activation analysis. We developed a novel analytical protocol that combines the measurements of He and Ne isotopic concentrations with a fast method to correct for differences in chemical composition using micro X-ray computed tomography. Our main idea is to combine noble gas, nuclear track, and petrography data for numerous chondrules to understand the precompaction exposure history of the chondrite parent bodies. Here, we report our results for a total of 77 chondrules and four matrix samples from NWA 8276 (L3.00), NWA 8007 (L3.2), and Bjurböle (L/LL4). All chondrules from the same meteorite have within uncertainty identical 21Ne exposure ages, and all chondrules from Bjurböle have within uncertainty identical 3He exposure ages. However, most chondrules from NWA 8276 and a few from NWA 8007 show small but resolvable differences in 3He exposure age that we attribute to matrix contamination and/or gas loss. The finding that none of the chondrules has noble gas excesses is consistent with the uniform track density found for each meteorite. We conclude that the studied chondrules did not experience a precompaction exposure longer than a few Ma assuming present-day flux of galactic cosmic rays. A majority of chondrules from L and LL chondrites thus rapidly accreted and/or was efficiently shielded from cosmic rays in the solar nebula.

  16. Stability of a cosmic ray modified tangential discontinuity

    We consider the dispersion relation for waves in a cosmic ray modified plasma for the case when the background flow consists of a cosmic ray pressure balance structure, in which pg+pc=const. where pc and pg denote the cosmic ray and thermal gas pressures respectively. The stability analysis shows that waves at an arbitrary point in the flow may be driven unstable if the cosmic ray pressure gradient is sufficiently large to overcome wave damping due to cosmic ray diffusion. Following S. Chalov close-quote s work (1) we analyze the instability of a cosmic ray modified tangential discontinuity. Chalov considered the case where pc=const. throughout the structure, whereas in our analysis both pc and pg vary in the direction perpendicular to the surface separating two flow regions. Predictions of the linear theory are compared to numerical simulations. Applications to the stability of the heliopause are discussed. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. Cosmic Ray Helium Intensities over the Solar Cycle from ACE

    DeNolfo, G. A.; Yanasak, N. E.; Binns, W. R.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink. P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Lave, K.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Ogliore, R.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenback, M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of cosmic-ray helium energy spectra provide important constraints on cosmic ray origin and propagation. However, helium intensities measured at Earth are affected by solar modulation, especially below several GeV/nucleon. Observations of helium intensities over a solar cycle are important for understanding how solar modulation affects galactic cosmic ray intensities and for separating the contributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays. The Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on ACE has been measuring cosmic ray isotopes, including helium, since 1997 with high statistical precision. We present helium elemental intensities between approx. 10 to approx. 100 MeV/nucleon from the Solar Isotope Spectrometer (SIS) and CRIS observations over a solar cycle and compare these results with the observations from other satellite and balloon-borne instruments, and with GCR transport and solar modulation models.

  18. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 1013 keV cm–1. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm–1, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  19. Cosmic-ray Acceleration and Propagation

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays (CRs) has puzzled scientists since the pioneering discovery by Victor Hess in 1912. In the last decade, however, modern supercomputers have opened a new window on the processes regulating astrophysical collisionless plasmas, allowing the study of CR acceleration via first-principles kinetic simulations. At the same time, a new-generation of X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray telescopes has been collecting evidence that Galactic CRs are accelerated in the blast waves of supernova remnants (SNRs). I present state-of-the-art particle-in-cells simulations of non-relativistic shocks, in which ion and electron acceleration efficiency and magnetic field amplification are studied in detail as a function of the shock parameters. I then discuss the theoretical and observational counterparts of these findings, comparing them with predictions of diffusive shock acceleration theory and with multi-wavelength observations of young SNRs. I especially outline some major open questions, such as the possible cause...

  20. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: present status and future prospects

    Watson, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Reasons for the current interest in cosmic rays above 10^19 eV are described. The latest results on the energy spectrum, arrival direction distribution and mass composition of cosmic rays are reviewed, including data that were reported after the meeting in Blois in June 2001. The enigma set by the existence of ultra high-energy cosmic rays remains. Ideas proposed to explain it are discussed and progress with the construction of the Pierre Auger Observatory is outlined.

  1. Modelling cosmic ray intensities along the Ulysses trajectory

    Ndiitwani, D. C.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Potgieter, M. S.; Heber, B.

    2005-01-01

    International audience Time dependent cosmic ray modulation in the inner heliosphere is studied by comparing results from a 2-D, time-dependent cosmic ray transport model with Ulysses observations. A compound approach, which combines the effects of the global changes in the heliospheric magnetic field magnitude with drifts to establish a realistic time-dependence, in the diffusion and drift coefficients, are used. We show that this model results in realistic cosmic ray modulation from the ...

  2. Simulating field-aligned diffusion of a cosmic ray gas

    Snodin, A. P.; Brandenburg, Axel; Mee, A. J.; Shukurov, Anvar

    2005-01-01

    The macroscopic behaviour of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields is discussed. An implementation of anisotropic diffusion of cosmic rays with respect to the magnetic field in a non-conservative, high-order, finite-difference magnetohydrodynamic code is discussed. It is shown that the standard implementation fails near singular X-points of the magnetic field, which are common if the field is random. A modification to the diffusion model for cosmic rays is described and the resulting teleg...

  3. Celestial Messengers Cosmic Rays The Story of a Scientific Adventure

    Bertolotti, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The book describes from a historical point of view how cosmic rays were discovered. The book describes the research in cosmic rays. The main focus is on how the knowledge was gained, describing the main experiments and the conclusions drawn. Biographical sketches of main researchers are provided. Cosmic rays have an official date of discovery which is linked to the famous balloon flights of the Austrian physicist Hess in 1912. The year 2012 can therefore be considered the centenary of the discovery.

  4. New approach to cosmic ray investigations above the knee

    Bogdanov, A. G.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    It is assumed that at energies around the knee the nucleus-nucleus interaction is drastically changed due to production of blobs of quark-gluon matter with very large orbital momentum. This approach allows explain all so-called unusual events observed in cosmic rays and gives a new connection between results of EAS investigations and energy spectrum and mass composition of primary cosmic rays. To check this approach, the experiments in cosmic rays and at LHC are proposed.

  5. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  6. Cosmic ray induced ionization of molecular clouds

    For a wide energy range, the source of cosmic rays is yet unknown. This is for instance the case for gamma radiation in the GeV to TeV-regime. Such highly energetic gamma rays could in principle be caused by hadronic interactions, by inverse Compton scattering or bremsstrahlung, provided the corresponding required parameters match. Because of sensitivity limits, it is difficult to find sufficient constraints on the aforementioned parameters to definitely pinpoint the formation processes for the observed gamma radiation. However, if the influence of the potential high energy gamma radiation causing processes in lower energy regimes is considered, it can be possible to unambiguously check which of the processes is at work. Here, we will be doing this by examining cosmic ray induced ionization of molecular clouds in the direct vicinity of supernovae for the four currently known objects, namely W28, W44, W51C and IC443. The ionization of molecular hydrogen drives the formation of molecules, excited in rotation and vibration. Their relaxation gives characteristic line emission, which -if detected- will confirm the idea that hadronic interactions are the cause of the observed gamma radiation.

  7. Final Report for NA-22/DTRA Cosmic Ray Project

    Wurtz, Ron E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapline, George F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glenn, Andrew M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nakae, Les F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pawelczak, Iwona A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sheets, Steven A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The primary objective of this project was to better understand the time-correlations between the muons and neutrons produced as a result of high energy primary cosmic ray particles hitting the atmosphere, and investigate whether these time correlations might be useful in connection with the detection of special nuclear materials. During the course of this project we did observe weak correlations between secondary cosmic ray muons and cosmic ray induced fast neutrons. We also observed strong correlations between tertiary neutrons produced in a Pb pile by secondary cosmic rays and minimum ionizing particles produced in association with the tertiary neutrons.

  8. The pulsars and possible local cosmic ray origin

    On the basis of the diffusion model of cosmic ray propagation in interstellar space the density of cosmic ray energy in the circumterrestrial space is calculated under assumption that the pulsars are indicators of place and time of supernovae explosions which in turn are sources of cosmic rays. The analysis has shown that the sources making the basic contribution to the observed energy density of cosmic rays are distributed within the radius r=0.9 kps around the Solar system. 9 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Arrival directions and chemical composition of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    To estimate the chemical composition of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays we apply an approach using the well established magnitude and character of the galactic magnetic field and also both theoretical and experimental distributions of showers in galactic latitude. Arrival directions of cosmic rays in the energy region of (0.8-4)x1019 eV in galactic latitude are consistent with theoretical calculations, if cosmic rays are mainly heavy nuclei. An excess flux of cosmic rays at ∼ 1019 eV from the galactic plane is found

  10. Theory Summary: Very High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Sarkar Subir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a summary of ISVHECRI 2012 from a theorist’s perspective. A hundred years after their discovery, there is renewed interest in very high energy cosmic raysand their interactions which can provide unique information on new physics well beyond the Standard Model if only we knew how to unambiguously decipher the experimental data. While the observational situation has improved dramatically on the past decade with regard to both improved statistics and better understood systematics, the long standing questions regarding the origin of cosmic rays remain only partially answered, while further questions have been raised by new data. A recent development discussed at this Symposium is the advent of forward physics data from several experiments at the LHC, which have broadly vindicated the air shower simulation Monte Carlos currently in use and reduced their uncertainties further. Nevertheless there is still a major extrapolation required to interpret the highest energy air showers observed which appear to be undergoing a puzzling change in their elemental composition, even casting doubt on whether the much vaunted GZK cutoff has indeedbeen observed. The situation is further compounded by the apparent disagreement between Auger and Telescope Array data. A crucial diagnostic will be provided by the detection of the accompanying ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos — two intriguing events have recently been recorded by IceCube.

  11. Acceleration and propagation of solar cosmic rays

    Podgorny, I. M.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the solar cosmic ray measurements on the Geostationary Orbital Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft indicated that the duration of solar flare relativistic proton large pulses is comparable with the solar wind propagation duration from the Sun to the Earth. The front of the proton flux from flares on the western solar disk approaches the Earth with a flight time along the Archimedean spiral magnetic field line of 15-20 min. The proton flux from eastern flares is registered in the Earth's orbit 3-5 h after the flare onset. These particles apparently propagate across IMF owing to diffusion.

  12. Cosmic Ray Origins in Supernova Blast Waves

    Bell, A R

    2014-01-01

    We extend the self-similar solution derived by Chevalier for a Sedov blast wave accelerating cosmic rays (CR) to show that the Galactic CR population can be divided into: (A) CR with energies above ~200GeV released upstream during CR acceleration by supernova remnants (SNR), (B) CR advected into the interior of the SNR during expansion and then released from the SNR at the end of its life to provide the Galactic CR component below ~200GeV. The intersection between the two populations may correspond to a measured change in the Galactic CR spectral index at this energy.

  13. Recent results in cosmic ray physics and their interpretation

    Blasi, Pasquale, E-mail: blasi@arcetri.astro.it [INAF/Osservatorio Astrosico di Arcetri, Firenze, (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The last decade has been dense with new developments in the search for the sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Some of these developments have confirmed the tight connection between cosmic rays and supernovae in our Galaxy, through the detection of gamma rays and the observation of thin non-thermal X-ray rims in supernova remnants. Some others, such as the detection of features in the spectra of some chemicals, opened new questions on the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy and on details of the acceleration process. Here, I will summarize some of these developments and their implications for our understanding of the origin of cosmic rays. I will also discuss some new avenues that are being pursued in testing the supernova origin of Galactic cosmic rays. (author)

  14. Recent results in cosmic ray physics and their interpretation

    The last decade has been dense with new developments in the search for the sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Some of these developments have confirmed the tight connection between cosmic rays and supernovae in our Galaxy, through the detection of gamma rays and the observation of thin non-thermal X-ray rims in supernova remnants. Some others, such as the detection of features in the spectra of some chemicals, opened new questions on the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy and on details of the acceleration process. Here, I will summarize some of these developments and their implications for our understanding of the origin of cosmic rays. I will also discuss some new avenues that are being pursued in testing the supernova origin of Galactic cosmic rays. (author)

  15. Recent results in cosmic ray physics and their interpretation

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has been dense with new developments in the search for the sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Some of these developments have confirmed the tight connection between cosmic rays and supernovae in our Galaxy, through the detection of gamma rays and the observation of thin non-thermal X-ray rims in supernova remnants. Some other, such as the detection of features in the spectra of some chemicals opened new questions on the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy and on details of the acceleration process. Here I will summarize some of these developments and their implications for our understanding of the origin of cosmic rays. I will also discuss some new avenues that are being pursued in testing the supernova origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  16. Cosmic gamma-ray studies at Srinagar

    Cosmic gamma ray studies being carried out at the Nuclear Research Laboratory at Srinagar and Gulmarg are described and some of the results of observation and possible conclusions are mentioned. These studies use ground base techniques which can detect short-time scale gamma ray bursts from supernovae and primordial black hole (PBH) and also high energy gamma rays from various point sources. A large area photomultiplier system is employed to detect pulses of visible fluorescence radiation which is caused by a gamma ray burst of supernovae of PBH origin. However, any signal out a large number of signals recorded at Gulmarg could not be identified as coinciding with any such event observed elsewhere. It shows that the size of the burst source cannot exceed 30 km., which is in agreement with neutron-star source models. An array using plastic scintillator detectors at the corner of a 10 metre square has been set up at Gulmarg to detect air-shower due to high energy gamma rays. Cerenkov light pulses recorded at Gulmarg have been projected on the sidereal map. A significant excess observed in the right ascension range 20 +- 3 h suggests the possible presence of a quasic-periodic source of gamma rays of energy greater than 1014 eV in the general direction of Cygnus X-3. Future programme of studies is mentioned. (K.M.)

  17. Cosmic Magnetic Fields and Their Influence on Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Propagation

    Sigl, Guenter; Miniati, Francesco; Ensslin, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on the propagation of hadronic cosmic rays above 10^19 eV based on large scale structure simulations. Our simulations suggest that rather substantial deflection up to several tens of degrees at 10^20 eV are possible for nucleon primaries. Further, spectra and composition of cosmic rays from individual sources can depend on magnetic fields surrounding these sources in intrinsically unpredictable ways. This is true even if deflectio...

  18. Optical and Ionization Basic Cosmic Ray Detector

    Felix, Julian; Andrade, Diego A.; Araujo, Aurora C.; Arceo, Luis; Cervantes, Carlos A.; Molina, Jorge A.; Palacios, Luz R.

    2014-03-01

    There are drift tubes, operating in the Geiger mode, to detect ionization radiation and there are Cerenkov radiation detectors based on photomultiplier tubes. Here is the design, the construction, the operation and the characterization of a hybrid detector that combines both a drift tube and a Cerenkov detector, used mainly so far to detect cosmic rays. The basic cell is a structural Aluminum 101.6 cm-long, 2.54 cm X 2.54 cm-cross section, 0.1 cm-thick tube, interiorly polished to mirror and slightly covered with TiCO2, and filed with air, and Methane-Ar at different concentrations. There is a coaxial 1 mil Tungsten wire Au-coated at +700 to +1200 Volts electronically instrumented to read out in both ends; and there is in each end of the Aluminum tube a S10362-11-100U Hamamatsu avalanche photodiode electronically instrumented to be read out simultaneously with the Tungsten wire signal. This report is about the technical operation and construction details, the characterization results and potential applications of this hybrid device as a cosmic ray detector element. CONACYT, Mexico.

  19. The Origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    One century ago Viktor Hess carried out several balloon flights that led him to conclude that the penetrating radiation responsible for the discharge of electroscopes was of extraterrestrial origin. One century from the discovery of this phenomenon seems to be a good time to stop and think about what we have understood about Cosmic Rays. The aim of this review is to illustrate the ideas that have been and are being explored in order to account for the observable quantities related to cosmic rays and to summarize the numerous new pieces of observation that are becoming available. In fact, despite the possible impression that development in this field is somewhat slow, the rate of new discoveries in the last decade or so has been impressive, and mainly driven by beautiful pieces of observation. At the same time scientists in this field have been able to propose new, fascinating ways to investigate particle acceleration inside the sources, making use of multifrequency observations that range from the radio, to t...

  20. Transport of cosmic rays across the heliopause

    Zhang, M.; Luo, X.; Pogorelov, N.

    2015-12-01

    The heliopause (HP) is a boundary that separates the flow with embedded magnetic field of solar origin in the inner heliosheath from that of the interstellar origin in the outer heliosheath. According to the theory of ideal MHD, it should be a tangential discontinuity, but magnetic reconnection or instability can make it more complicated. Voyager 1 crossed the HP in August 2012 at a radial distance of 122 AU from the Sun. The behaviors of Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and anomalous cosmic rays (ACR) at the HP crossing are very complex. The intensity of GCR experiences step-like increases to reach a nearly steady interstellar level in the outer heliosheath. Its angular distribution changes from isotropic inside the HP to bidirectional anisotropy that appear on and off for several periods of time in the outer heliosheath. The ACR intensity experiences several episodes of decreases near the HP before it eventually disappears. The anisotropy of ACR in the partial depression regions is pancake-like, indicating there is some temporary trapping of particles of near-90° pitch angles. The information has provided us clues for understanding the properties of particle transport in the turbulence of the interstellar magnetic field. In this paper, we review results of model calculations of GCR and ACR transport across the HP. With the observations and modeling results, we can now establish constraints on the properties of particle scattering, diffusion, and interstellar magnetic field turbulence level.

  1. Cosmic Rays in a Galactic Breeze

    Taylor, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of the non-thermal Fermi bubble features both below and above the Galactic plane, we investigate a scenario in which these bubbles are formed through Galacto-centric outflow. Cosmic rays (CR) both diffusing and advecting within a Galactic breeze outflow, interacting with the ambient gas present, give rise to gamma-ray emission, providing an approximately flat surface brightness profile of this emission, as observed. Applying the same outflow profile further out within the disk, the resultant effects on the observable CR spectral properties are determined. A hardening in the spectra due to the competition of advective and diffusive propagation within a particular energy range is noted, even in the limiting case of equal CR diffusion coefficients in the disk and halo. It is postulated that this hardening effect may relate to the observed hardening feature in the CR spectrum at a rigidity of $\\approx 200$ GV.

  2. Cosmic-ray positrons from millisecond pulsars

    Venter, C; Harding, A K; Gonthier, P L; Büsching, I

    2015-01-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of gamma-ray millisecond pulsar light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ~10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new millisecond pulsars, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic millisecond pulsars to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day millisecond pulsars. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow and redback systems. Since millisecond pulsars are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the p...

  3. Cosmic rays in star-forming galaxies

    Persic, Massimo; Rephaeli, Yoel

    2012-03-01

    The energy density of cosmic ray protons (CRp) in star-forming environments can be (i) measured from γ-ray πo-decay emission, (ii) inferred from the measured radio non-thermal synchrotron emission (once a theoretical p/e ratio and particle-field equipartition have been assumed), and (iii) estimated from the observed supernova rate and the deduced CRp residency time. For most of the currently available galaxies where these methods can be simultaneously applied, the results of the various methods agree and suggest that CRp energy densities range from Script O(10-1) eV cm-3 in very quiet environments up to Script O(102) eV cm-3 in very active ones. The only case for which the methods do not agree is the Small Magellanic Cloud, where the discrepancy between measured and estimated CRp energy density may be due to a smaller characteristic CR confinement volume.

  4. A constraint on prompt supernova cosmic ray production from γ-ray observations

    The consequences of prompt cosmic ray production intrinsic to supernovae are examined for supernova explosions occurring in dense molecular clouds. For reasonable parameters it is shown that prompt cosmic ray production cannot exceed 1048 erg per supernova. This suggests that cosmic ray production takes place mainly in the intercloud medium. (author)

  5. Cosmic Rays in Magnetospheres of the Earth and other Planets

    Dorman, Lev

    2009-01-01

    This monograph describes the behaviour of cosmic rays in the magnetosphere of the Earth and of some other planets. Recently this has become an important topic both theoretically, because it is closely connected with the physics of the Earth’s magnetosphere, and practically, since cosmic rays determine a significant part of space weather effects on satellites and aircraft. The book contains eight chapters, dealing with – The history of the discovery of geomagnetic effects caused by cosmic rays and their importance for the determination of the nature of cosmic rays or gamma rays – The first explanations of geomagnetic effects within the framework of the dipole approximation of the Earth’s magnetic field – Trajectory computations of cutoff rigidities, transmittance functions, asymptotic directions, and acceptance cones in the real geomagnetic field taking into account higher harmonics – Cosmic ray latitude-longitude surveys on ships, trains, tracks, planes, balloons and satellites for determining the...

  6. Cosmic Rays and the Search for a Lorentz Invariance Violation

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    This is an introductory review about the on-going search for a signal of Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) in cosmic rays. We first summarise basic aspects of cosmic rays, focusing on rays of ultra high energy (UHECRs). We discuss the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) energy cutoff for cosmic protons, which is predicted due to photopion production in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This is a process of modest energy in the proton rest frame. It can be investigated to a high precision in ...

  7. Heliospheric current sheet and its interaction with solar cosmic rays

    Malova, Helmi; Popov, Victor; Grigorenko, Elena; Dunko, Andrey; Petrukovich, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    We investigated effects resulting from the interaction of solar cosmic rays (SCR) with the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) in the solar wind. Self-consistent kinetic model of the HCS is developed, where ions demonstrate quasi-adiabatic dynamics. HCS is considered as the equilibrium embedded current structure, where the two main kinds of plasma with different temperatures give the main contribution to the current (low-energy background plasma and SCR). It is shown that HCS is a relatively thin multiscale configuration of the current sheet, embedded in a thicker plasma layer. The taking into account of SCR particles in HCS could lead to a change of its structure and to enhancement of its properties such as the embedding and multi-scaling. Parametric family of solutions is considered where the current balance in HCS is provided at different temperatures of SCR and different concentrations of high-energy plasma. Concentrations of SCR are determined which may contribute to the thickening of the HCS that can be observed in satellite studies. The possibility to apply this modeling for the explanation of experimental observations is considered.

  8. Direct Measurements, Acceleration and Propagation of Cosmic Rays

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes highlights of the OG1 session of the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference, held in Merida (Yucatan, Mexico). The subsessions (OG1.1, OG1.2, OG1.3, OG1.4 and OG1.5) summarized here were mainly devoted to direct measurements, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays.

  9. Measurement of cosmic ray chemical composition at Mt. Chacaltaya

    BASJE group has measured the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around the knee with several methods. These measurements show that the averaged mass number of cosmic ray particles increases with energy up to the knee. In order to measure the chemical composition in much wider energy range, it was started a new experiment at Mt. Chacaltaya in 2000

  10. Origin of high energy cosmic rays: A short review

    I provide here a short review of some recent observational findings in the field of cosmic rays and of selected theoretical advancements in our understanding of acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, from below the knee to the highest energies observed so far

  11. Precision measurements of cosmic ray air showers with the SKA

    Huege, T.; Bray, J.; Buitink, S.; Dallier, R.; Ekers, R. D.; Falcke, H. D. E.; James, C. W.; Martin, L.; Revenu, B.; Scholten, O.; Schroeder, F.

    2014-01-01

    Supplemented with suitable buffering techniques, the low-frequency part of the SKA can be used as an ultra-precise detector for cosmic-ray air showers at very high energies. This would enable a wealth of scientific applications: the physics of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic ray

  12. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Increased ionization could lead to changes in atmospheric chemistry, resulting in ozone depletion. This could increase the flux of solar UVB radiation at the surface, which is potentially harmful to living organisms. Increased ionization affects the global electrical circuit can could possibly enhance the low-altitude cloud formation rate. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose. The muon flux dominates radiation dose from cosmic rays causing DNA damage and increase in the mutation rates, which can have serious biological implications for terrestrial and sub-terrestrial life. This radiation dose is an important constraint on the habitability of a planet. Using CORSIKA, we perform massive computer simulations and construct lookup tables from 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries (1 PeV - 0.1 ZeV in progress), which can be used to quantify these effects. These tables are freely available to the community and can be used for other studies, not necessarily relevant to Astrobiology. We use these tables to study the terrestrial implications of galactic shock generated by the infall of our galaxy toward the Virgo cluster. This could be a possible mechanism explaining the observed periodicity in biodiversity in paleobiology databases.

  13. Cosmic-ray Exposure Ages of Meteorites

    Herzog, G. F.

    2003-12-01

    The classic idea of a cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age for a meteorite is based on a simple but useful picture of meteorite evolution, the one-stage irradiation model. The precursor rock starts out on a parent body, buried under a mantle of material many meters thick that screens out cosmic rays. At a time ti, a collision excavates a precursor rock - a "meteoroid." The newly liberated meteoroid, now fully exposed to cosmic rays, orbits the Sun until a time tf, when it strikes the Earth, where the overlying blanket of air (and possibly of water or ice) again shuts out almost all cosmic rays (cf. Masarik and Reedy, 1995). The quantity tf-ti is called the CRE age, t. To obtain the CRE age of a meteorite, we measure the concentrations in it of one or more cosmogenic nuclides (Table 1), which are nuclides that cosmic rays produce by inducing nuclear reactions. Many shorter-lived radionuclides excluded from Table 1 such as 22Na (t1/2=2.6 yr) and 60Co (t1/2=5.27 yr) can also furnish valuable information, but can be measured only in meteorites that fell within the last few half-lives of those nuclides (see, e.g., Leya et al. (2001) and references therein). Table 1. Cosmogenic nuclides used for calculating exposure ages NuclideHalf-lifea (Myr) Radionuclides 14C0.005730 59Ni0.076 41Ca0.1034 81Kr0.229 36Cl0.301 26Al0.717 10Be1.51 53Mn3.74 129I15.7 Stable nuclides 3He 21Ne 38Ar 83Kr 126Xe a http://www2.bnl.gov/ton. CRE ages have implications for several interrelated questions. From how many different parent bodies do meteorites come? How well do meteorites represent the population of the asteroid belt? How many distinct collisions on each parent body have created the known meteorites of each type? How often do asteroids collide? How big and how energetic were the collisions that produced meteoroids? What factors control the CRE age of a meteorite and how do meteoroid orbits evolve through time? We will touch on these questions below as we examine the data.By 1975, the CRE ages of

  14. CRIME - cosmic ray interactions in molecular environments

    Krause, Julian; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Molecular clouds act as targets for cosmic rays (CR), revealing their presence through either gamma-ray emission due to proton-proton interactions, and/or through the ionization level in the cloud, produced by the CR flux. The ionization rate is a unique tool, to some extent complementary to the gamma-ray emission, in that it allows to constrain the CR spectrum especially for energies below the pion production rate ($\\approx 280$ MeV). Here we study the effect of ionization on $H_2$ clouds due to both CR protons and electrons, using the fully relativistic ionization cross sections, which is important to correctly account for the contribution due to relativistic CRs. The contribution to ionization due to secondary electrons is also included self-consistently. The whole calculation has been implemented into a numerical code which is publicly accessible through a web-interface. The code also include the calculation of gamma-ray emission once the CR spectrum

  15. Key scientific problems from Cosmic Ray History

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    Recently was published the monograph "Cosmic Ray History" by Lev Dorman and Irina Dorman (Nova Publishers, New York). What learn us and what key scientific problems formulated the Cosmic Ray History? 1. As many great discoveries, the phenomenon of cosmic rays was discovered accidentally, during investigations that sought to answer another question: what are sources of air ionization? This problem became interesting for science about 230 years ago in the end of the 18th century, when physics met with a problem of leakage of electrical charge from very good isolated bodies. 2. At the beginning of the 20th century, in connection with the discovery of natural radioactivity, it became apparent that this problem is mainly solved: it was widely accepted that the main source of the air ionization were α, b, and γ - radiations from radioactive substances in the ground (γ-radiation was considered as the most important cause because α- and b-radiations are rapidly absorbed in the air). 3. The general accepted wrong opinion on the ground radioactivity as main source of air ionization, stopped German meteorologist Franz Linke to made correct conclusion on the basis of correct measurements. In fact, he made 12 balloon flights in 1900-1903 during his PhD studies at Berlin University, carrying an electroscope to a height of 5500 m. The PhD Thesis was not published, but in Thesis he concludes: "Were one to compare the presented values with those on ground, one must say that at 1000 m altitude the ionization is smaller than on the ground, between 1 and 3 km the same amount, and above it is larger with values increasing up to a factor of 4 (at 5500 m). The uncertainties in the observations only allow the conclusion that the reason for the ionization has to be found first in the Earth." Nobody later quoted Franz Linke and although he had made the right measurements, he had reached the wrong conclusions, and the discovery of CR became only later on about 10 years. 4. Victor Hess, a

  16. Turbulence and Cosmic Rays in Clusters of Galaxies

    Oh, Siang Peng

    the turbulent crossing time across a cooling fragment is often shorter than the cooling time. Rather than cooling radiatively, a fluid element will then cool (or heat) adiabatically. Besides regulating mass dropout to the cold phase as has been shown in star formation simulations--this dynamical influence may explain the long-standing mystery of why X-ray emission lines at ~1/3 of the ambient ICM temperature are suppressed. Turbulence should also affect optical filaments, which are remarkably straight in HST observations. Using 3D MHD simulations, we study how they can be stiffened by magnetic tension and remain straight, enabling an indirect constraint on B-fields in filaments. The cosmic-ray (CR) component of clusters contain important archeological information, since CR trapping times are of order the Hubble time. Simulations to date ignore CR streaming, which is assumed to be slow. In fact, the streaming of CRs in a high-beta plasma need not be limited to the Alfven speed, and depends on the efficiency of damping processes for plasma waves. We propose an analytic study, followed by simulations to assess streaming timescales and if streaming of CRs can explain the bimodality of radio halos. Spatially varying and energy dependent streaming speeds can also affect CR heating, and the radio spectral index. We use 3D SPH cluster simulations to determine if early structure formation shocks can leave behind a fossil ~100 MeV electron population in the face of various loss processes. Such a population is required both for efficient diffusive shock acceleration in the cluster outskirts (to explain radio relics), and turbulent re-acceleration in the cluster core (to explain radio halos), but its existence has never been demonstrated. Comparison against observations will shed light on acceleration efficiency in a very different regime from current constraints, as well as magnetic field amplification at shocks.

  17. Clusters of Galaxies Shock Waves and Cosmic Rays

    Ryu, D; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung

    2002-01-01

    Recent observations of galaxy clusters in radio and X-ray indicate that cosmic rays and magnetic fields may be energetically important in the intracluster medium. According to the estimates based on theses observational studies, the combined pressure of these two components of the intracluster medium may range between $10% \\sim 100 %$ of gas pressure, although their total energy is probably time dependent. Hence, these non-thermal components may have influenced the formation and evolution of cosmic structures, and may provide unique and vital diagnostic information through various radiations emitted via their interactions with surrounding matter and cosmic background photons. We suggest that shock waves associated with cosmic structures, along with individual sources such as active galactic nuclei and radio galaxies, supply the cosmic rays and magnetic fields to the intracluster medium and to surrounding large scale structures. In order to study 1) the properties of cosmic shock waves emerging during the larg...

  18. Acceleration of Cosmic Rays at Large Scale Cosmic Shocks in the Universe

    Kang, H; Kang, Hyesung

    2002-01-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of large scale structure in the universe have shown that accretion shocks and merger shocks form due to flow motions associated with the gravitational collapse of nonlinear structures. Estimated speed and curvature radius of these shocks could be as large as a few 1000 km/s and several Mpc, respectively. According to the diffusive shock acceleration theory, populations of cosmic-ray particles can be injected and accelerated to very high energy by astrophysical shocks in tenuous plasmas. In order to explore the cosmic ray acceleration at the cosmic shocks, we have performed nonlinear numerical simulations of cosmic ray (CR) modified shocks with the newly developed CRASH (Cosmic Ray Amr SHock) numerical code. We adopted the Bohm diffusion model for CRs, based on the hypothesis that strong Alfv\\'en waves are self-generated by streaming CRs. The shock formation simulation includes a plasma-physics-based ``injection'' model that transfers a small proportion of the thermal prot...

  19. Cosmic rays: an in-flight hazard?

    International airlines are collaborating with physicists to assess whether aircrew are at risk from cosmic radiation as routine monitoring will soon become mandatory. Recently, an international team of physicists has joined forces with NASA and several European airlines to study in detail how the radiation field varies inside the atmosphere depending on the altitude, latitude and solar activity. Astronauts are subjected to the full intensity of high-energy cosmic rays and solar particles (together with the secondary particles produced in the spacecraft walls), and the biological risks in space are the subject of ongoing investigations. A typical return mission to Mars, for example, could result in a total ''dose equivalent'' of up to 0.5 sievert. The dose equivalent takes into account the harm caused by a particular type of radiation. Current estimates suggest that a person who receives a 1 sievert dose of ionizing radiation incurs a few per cent increase in the risk of contracting fatal cancer in his or her lifetime, although the risk level depends on sex and age. The radiation we observe at aircraft altitudes of typically 10-12 km is due to very high-energy particles mainly protons and helium nuclei, together with a small amount of heavy nuclei penetrating the atmosphere and colliding with air atoms. These collisions give rise to the production of more particles, such as protons, neutrons and various mesons. A cascade of particles is then produced by successive interactions as they penetrate deeper into the atmosphere. As a result, the flux of particles increases in the upper atmosphere and reaches a maximum at about 20 km above sea level. Below this point, the number of particles decreases due to energy losses and various particle interactions. Happily, at the Earth's surface we are protected by the air above us, which provides the same degree of shielding as a layer of water 10 m thick. The small amount of radiation that eventually reaches us in the form of

  20. Anisotropic transport and early dynamical impact of Cosmic Rays around Supernova remnants

    Girichidis, Philipp; Walch, Stefanie; Hanasz, Michal

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel implementation of cosmic rays (CR) in the magneto-hydrodynamic code FLASH. CRs are described as separate fluids with different energies. CR advection, energy dependent anisotropic diffusion with respect to the magnetic field and adiabatic losses to follow the evolution of spectra are taken into account. We present a first study of the transport and immediate (~150 kyr) dynamical impact of CRs on the turbulent magnetised interstellar medium around supernova remnants on scales up to 80 pc. CR diffusion quickly leads to an efficient acceleration of low-density gas (mainly perpendicular to the magnetic field) with accelerations up to two orders of magnitude above the thermal values. Peaked (at 1 GeV) CR injection spectra have a stronger impact on the dynamics than power-law spectra. For realistic magnetic field configurations low energy CRs (with smaller diffusion coefficients) distribute anisotropically with large spatial variations of a factor of ten and more. Adiabatic losses can change the ...

  1. Cosmic ray decreases and magnetic clouds

    A study has been made of energetic particle data, obtained from IMP 8, in conjunction with solar wind field and plasma data at the times of reported magnetic clouds. It is shown that magnetic clouds can cause a depression of the cosmic ray flux but high fields are required. A depression of 3% in a neutron monitor requires a field of about 25 nT. Such high fields are found only in a subset of coronal ejecta. The principal cause for Forbush decreases associated with energetic shocks is probably turbulence in the postshock region, although some shocks will be followed by an ejecta with a high field. Each event is different. The lower-energy particles can help in identifying the dominant processes in individual events. 19 refs., 5 figs

  2. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    Dova, M T

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above E > 10 17 eV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. This is a written version of a series of lectures devoted to UHECR at the 2013 CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics. We present anintroduction to acceleration mechanisms of charged particles to the highest energies in astrophysical objects, their propagation from the sources to Earth, and the experimental techniques for their detection. We also discuss some of the relevant observational results from Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators.

  3. Cosmic Ray Variability and Galactic Dynamics

    Medvedev, Mikhail

    2007-05-01

    The spectral analysis of fluctuations of biodiversity (Rohde & Muller, 2005) and the subsequent re-analysis of the diversity record, species origination and extinction rates, gene duplication, etc (Melott & Liebermann, 2007) indicate the presence of a 62$\\pm$3My cyclicity, for the last 500My. Medvedev & Melott (2006) proposed that the cyclicity may be related to the periodicity of the Solar motion with respect to the Galactic plane, which exhibits a 63My oscillation, and the inhomogeneous distribution of Cosmic Rays (CR) throughout the Milky Way, which may affect the biosphere by changing mutation rate, climate, food chain, etc. Here we present a model of CR propagation in the Galactic magnetic fields, in the presence of both the mean field gradient and the strong MHD turbulence in the interstellar medium. We explore the "magnetic shielding effect" as a function of CR energy and composition and estimate the resultant flux of mutagenic secondary muons at the Earth surface.

  4. Early Cosmic Ray Research with Balloons

    The discovery of cosmic rays by Victor Hess during a balloon flight in 1912 at an altitude of 5350 m would not have been possible without the more than one hundred years development of scientific ballooning. The discovery of hot air and hydrogen balloons and their first flights in Europe is shortly described. Scientific ballooning was mainly connected with activities of meteorologists. It was also the geologist and meteorologist Franz Linke, who probably observed first indications of a penetrating radiation whose intensity seemed to increase with the altitude. Karl Bergwitz and Albert Gockel were the first physicists studying the penetrating radiation during balloon flights. The main part of the article deals with the discovery of the extraterrestrial radiation by V. Hess and the confirmation by Werner Kolhörster

  5. Fractionally charged particles in cosmic rays

    Bashindzhagyan, George

    2016-01-01

    The results of many experiments on a search of fractionally charged particles in cosmic rays have been reviewed. The registered by ATIC and PAMELA experiments change of the proton energy spectrum at about 250 GeV can be explained if fractionally charged particles with another energy spectrum slope actually mixed with protons but cannot be separated because of a strong dE/dx fluctuations. The performed simulations show that multilayer detectors can seriously help in such separation. In the Aragats experiment performed using multilayer proportional counter combined with hadron calorimeter a group of 4e/3 like events with unexpectedly high average energy has been registered. It could be explained by their different from regular hadrons energy spectrum. The ATIC experiment ionization spectrum in single charged particle area has been examined. An interesting bump in 2e/3 charge region was observed. The events in the bump have very different from regular protons angular distribution.

  6. Estimates of cellular mutagenesis from cosmic rays

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric track structure model is used to estimate the cross section as a function of particle velocity and charge for mutations at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in human fibroblast cell cultures. Experiments that report the fraction of mutations per surviving cell for human lung and skin fibroblast cells indicate small differences in the mutation cross section for these two cell lines when differences in inactivation rates between these cell lines are considered. Using models of cosmic ray transport, the mutation rate at the HGPRT locus is estimated for cell cultures in space flight and rates of about 2 to 10 x 10(exp -6) per year are found for typical spacecraft shielding. A discussion of how model assumptions may alter the predictions is also presented.

  7. Cosmic-ray acceleration in young protostars

    Padovani, Marco; Marcowith, Alexandre; Ferrière, Katia

    2015-01-01

    The main signature of the interaction between cosmic rays and molecular clouds is the high ionisation degree. This decreases towards the densest parts of a cloud, where star formation is expected, because of energy losses and magnetic effects. However recent observations hint to high levels of ionisation in protostellar systems, therefore leading to an apparent contradiction that could be explained by the presence of energetic particles accelerated within young protostars. Our modelling consists of a set of conditions that has to be satisfied in order to have an efficient particle acceleration through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. We find that jet shocks can be strong accelerators of protons which can be boosted up to relativistic energies. Another possibly efficient acceleration site is located at protostellar surfaces, where shocks caused by impacting material during the collapse phase are strong enough to accelerate protons. Our results demonstrate the possibility of accelerating particles du...

  8. From radio signals to cosmic rays

    Radio detection of high energy cosmic rays is currently being reinvested, both on the experimental and theoretical sides. The question is to know whether radio-detection is a competitive technique compared or in addition to usual detection techniques; in order to increase statistics at the highest energies (around 1020 eV - where particle astronomy should be possible) or to characterize precisely the cosmic rays at lower energies (some 1018 eV). During this work, we tried to progress towards the answer, using radio emission models, experimental data analysis and preparing the next generation of detectors. On the theoretical side, geo-synchrotron emission of the particles of the showers has been computed analytically using a simplified shower model as well as using the Monte Carlo simulation AIRES to have a realistic shower development. Various dependencies of the electric field have been extracted, among which a proportionality of the field with the -v→ * B→ vector under certain conditions. Experimentally, the analysis of CODALEMA data enabled to characterise more precisely the electric field produced by air showers, in particular the topology of the field at ground level, the energy dependency and the coherence with a -v→ * B→ proportionality. These results are summarised in an overall parametrization of the electric field. More data are probably required in order to give a definitive statement on the interest of the radio-detection technique. The CODALEMA parametrization has finally been used to extrapolate CODALEMA's results to a future larger array, extrapolation applied in particular to the AERA detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. (author)

  9. Low-energy cosmic ray protons from nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium.

    Wang, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    The intensity of low-energy (less than 100 MeV) protons from nuclear interactions of higher-energy (above 100 MeV) cosmic rays with the interstellar medium is calculated. The resultant intensity in the 10- to 100-MeV range is larger by a factor of 3-5 than the observed proton intensity near earth. The calculated intensity from nuclear interactions constitutes a lower limit on the actual proton intensity in interstellar space.

  10. 14. European cosmic ray symposium. Symposium program and abstracts

    The abstracts of the 14. European Cosmic Ray Symposium are presented. The papers cover a large variety of topics in cosmic ray physics, both from the theoretical and the experimental point of view. Sun physics, and the effects on the inner heliosphere, the composition, and the properties of the primary and secondary cosmic radiation, galactic acceleration and the results of accelerator physics relevant to cosmic radiation physics, and the description and the results of large detector systems are presented. 63 items are indexed for INIS database. (K.A.)

  11. Intergalactic shock acceleration and the cosmic gamma-ray background

    Miniati, Francesco

    2002-11-01

    We investigate numerically the contribution to the cosmic gamma-ray background from cosmic-ray ions and electrons accelerated at intergalactic shocks associated with cosmological structure formation. We show that the kinetic energy of accretion flows in the low-redshift intergalactic medium is thermalized primarily through moderately strong shocks, which allow for an efficient conversion of shock ram pressure into cosmic-ray pressure. Cosmic rays accelerated at these shocks produce a diffuse gamma-ray flux which is dominated by inverse Compton emission from electrons scattering off cosmic microwave background photons. Decay of neutral π mesons generated in p-p inelastic collisions of the ionic cosmic-ray component with the thermal gas contribute about 30 per cent of the computed emission. Based on experimental upper limits on the photon flux above 100 MeV from nearby clusters we constrain the efficiency of conversion of shock ram pressure into relativistic CR electrons to <~1 per cent. Thus, we find that cosmic rays of cosmological origin can generate an overall significant fraction of order 20 per cent and no more than 30 per cent of the measured gamma-ray background.

  12. Pulsar Wind Nebulae and Cosmic Rays: A Bedtime Story

    Weinstein, A.

    2014-11-15

    The role pulsar wind nebulae play in producing our locally observed cosmic ray spectrum remains murky, yet intriguing. Pulsar wind nebulae are born and evolve in conjunction with SNRs, which are favored sites of Galactic cosmic ray acceleration. As a result they frequently complicate interpretation of the gamma-ray emission seen from SNRs. However, pulsar wind nebulae may also contribute directly to the local cosmic ray spectrum, particularly the leptonic component. This paper reviews the current thinking on pulsar wind nebulae and their connection to cosmic ray production from an observational perspective. It also considers how both future technologies and new ways of analyzing existing data can help us to better address the relevant theoretical questions. A number of key points will be illustrated with recent results from the VHE (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observatory VERITAS.

  13. Cosmic Magnetic Fields and Their Influence on Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Propagation

    We discuss the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on the propagation of hadronic cosmic rays above 1019 eV based on large scale structure simulations. Our simulations suggest that rather substantial deflection up to several tens of degrees at 1020 eV are possible for nucleon primaries. Further, spectra and composition of cosmic rays from individual sources can depend on magnetic fields surrounding these sources in intrinsically unpredictable ways. This is true even if deflection from such individual sources is small. We conclude that the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on ultra-high energy cosmic ray propagation is currently hard to quantify. We discuss possible reasons for discrepant results of simulations by Dolag et al. which predict deflections of at most a few degrees for nucleons. We finally point out that even in these latter simulations a possible heavy component would in general suffer substantial deflection

  14. Cosmic Magnetic Fields and Their Influence on Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Propagation

    Sigl, Guenter [GReCO, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, C.N.R.S., 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Federation de Recherche Astroparticule et Cosmologie, Universite Paris 7, 2 place Jussieu, 75251 Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Miniati, Francesco; Ensslin, Torsten A. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2004-11-15

    We discuss the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on the propagation of hadronic cosmic rays above 10{sup 19} eV based on large scale structure simulations. Our simulations suggest that rather substantial deflection up to several tens of degrees at 10{sup 20} eV are possible for nucleon primaries. Further, spectra and composition of cosmic rays from individual sources can depend on magnetic fields surrounding these sources in intrinsically unpredictable ways. This is true even if deflection from such individual sources is small. We conclude that the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on ultra-high energy cosmic ray propagation is currently hard to quantify. We discuss possible reasons for discrepant results of simulations by Dolag et al. which predict deflections of at most a few degrees for nucleons. We finally point out that even in these latter simulations a possible heavy component would in general suffer substantial deflection.

  15. Cosmic Magnetic Fields and Their Influence on Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Propagation

    Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2004-11-01

    We discuss the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on the propagation of hadronic cosmic rays above 1019 eV based on large scale structure simulations. Our simulations suggest that rather substantial deflection up to several tens of degrees at 1020 eV are possible for nucleon primaries. Further, spectra and composition of cosmic rays from individual sources can depend on magnetic fields surrounding these sources in intrinsically unpredictable ways. This is true even if deflection from such individual sources is small. We conclude that the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on ultra-high energy cosmic ray propagation is currently hard to quantify. We discuss possible reasons for discrepant results of simulations by Dolag et al. which predict deflections of at most a few degrees for nucleons. We finally point out that even in these latter simulations a possible heavy component would in general suffer substantial deflection.

  16. Cosmic Magnetic Fields and Their Influence on Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Propagation

    Sigl, G; Ensslin, T A; Sigl, Guenter; Miniati, Francesco; Ensslin, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on the propagation of hadronic cosmic rays above 10^19 eV based on large scale structure simulations. Our simulations suggest that rather substantial deflection up to several tens of degrees at 10^20 eV are possible for nucleon primaries. Further, spectra and composition of cosmic rays from individual sources can depend on magnetic fields surrounding these sources in intrinsically unpredictable ways. This is true even if deflection from such individual sources is small. We conclude that the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on ultra-high energy cosmic ray propagation is currently hard to quantify. We discuss possible reasons for discrepant results of simulations by Dolag et al. which predict deflections of at most a few degrees for nucleons. We finally point out that even in these latter simulations a possible heavy component would in general suffer substantial deflection.

  17. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  18. Cosmic rays interactions and the abundances of the chemical elements

    Our Galaxy is the largest nuclear interaction experiment which we know, because of the interaction between cosmic ray particles and the interstellar material. Cosmic rays are particles, which have been accelerated in the Galaxy or in extragalactic space. Cosmic rays come as protons, electrons, heavier nuclei, and their antiparticles. Up to energies up to some tens of TeV of particle energy it is possible to derive chemical abundances of cosmic rays. It has been proposed that cosmic ray particles can be attributed to three main sites of origin and acceleration, a) supernova shocks in the interstellar medium, b) supernova shocks in a stellar wind of the predecessor star, and c) powerful radio galaxies. This proposal leads to quantitative tests, which are encouraging so far. Quantitative models for transport and interaction appear to be consistent with the data. Li, Be, B are secondary in cosmic rays, as are many of the odd-Z elements, as well as the sub-Fe elements. At very low energies, cosmic ray particles are subject to ionization losses, which produce a steep low energy cutoff; all particles below the cutoff are moved into the thermal material population, and the particles above it remain as cosmic rays. This then changes the chemical abundances in the interstellar medium, and is a dominant process for many isotopes of Li, Be, B. With a quantitative theory for the origin of cosmic rays proposed, it appears worthwhile to search for yet better spallation cross sections, especially near threshold. With such an improved set of cross sections, the theory of the interstellar medium and its chemical abundances, both in thermal and in energetic particles, could be taken a large step forward. (author)

  19. Quasars as Sources of Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic Rays

    The results are presented that were obtained by analyzing arrival directions for cosmic rays that the Yakutsk array for studying extensive air showers recorded between 1974 and 2002 in the energy region E0 ≥5x1017 eV for zenith angles in the region θ ≤60 deg. . It is shown that quasars for which the redshift lies in the region z≤2.5 can be sources of these cosmic rays. Ordered structures are observed in the disposition of quasars and in the cosmic-ray arrival directions. These structures can be associated in one way or another with the large-scale structure of the Universe

  20. On cosmic-ray cut-off terminology

    The study of cosmic-ray access to location within the geomagnetic field has evolved over the past fifty years. Cosmic-ray cut-off terminology, originally developed to describe particle access and cut-off rigidities, has not evolved with the scientific advances in the field, and misunderstandings and misapplications of historical work have occurred. This paper is an attempt to remedy this situation by clarifying the areas in which changes have occurred and by providing a cross reference between the historical terms and those terms now in use for innovative cosmic-ray studies which are underway in several laboratories

  1. The cosmic-ray shock structure problem for relativistic shocks

    Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    The time asymptotic behaviour of a relativistic (parallel) shock wave significantly modified by the diffusive acceleration of cosmic-rays is investigated by means of relativistic hydrodynamical equations for both the cosmic-rays and thermal gas. The form of the shock structure equation and the dispersion relation for both long and short wavelength waves in the system are obtained. The dependence of the shock acceleration efficiency on the upstream fluid spped, long wavelength Mach number and the ratio N = P sub co/cP sub co+P sub go)(Psub co and P sub go are the upstream cosmic-ray and thermal gas pressures respectively) are studied.

  2. The prototype high-resolution Fly's Eye cosmic ray detector

    The High-Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) is an observatory for the highest energy cosmic rays. It detects the nitrogen fluorescence light induced by the passage of giant cosmic ray extensive air showers through the atmosphere. A two-site prototype of the observatory was operated from September 1994 to November 1996. In this paper we describe the components of that detector, and the procedures used to calibrate the detector and characterise the atmosphere. Data collected by the HiRes prototype are being used for physics studies, including an analysis of the cosmic ray mass composition in the energy range from 1017 to 1018 eV

  3. The toes of the ultra high energy cosmic ray spectrum

    Harari, Diego; Mollerach, Silvia; Roulet, Esteban

    1999-01-01

    We study the effects of the galactic magnetic field on the ultra high energy cosmic ray propagation. We show that the deflections of the cosmic ray trajectories can have many important implications such as (de)magnification of the cosmic ray fluxes by lensing effects (which can modify the spectrum of individual sources), the formation of multiple images of a source or the existence of regions of the sky to which the Earth is almost blind. The appearance of image pairs is related to the existe...

  4. Markov Stochastic Technique to Determine Galactic Cosmic Ray Sources Distribution

    Ashraf Farahat

    2010-06-01

    A new numerical model of particle propagation in the Galaxy has been developed, which allows the study of cosmic-ray production and propagation in 2D. The model has been used to solve cosmic ray diffusive transport equation with a complete network of nuclear interactions using the time backward Markov stochastic process by tracing the particles’ trajectories starting from the Solar System back to their sources in the Galaxy. This paper describes a further development of the model to calculate the contribution of various galactic locations to the production of certain cosmic ray nuclei observed at the Solar System.

  5. Cosmic rays as regulators of molecular cloud properties

    Padovani, Marco; Galli, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic rays are the main agents in controlling the chemical evolution and setting the ambipolar diffusion time of a molecular cloud. We summarise the processes causing the energy degradation of cosmic rays due to their interaction with molecular hydrogen, focusing on the magnetic effects that influence their propagation. Making use of magnetic field configurations generated by numerical simulations, we show that the increase of the field line density in the collapse region results in a reduction of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate. As a consequence the ionisation fraction decreases, facilitating the decoupling between the gas and the magnetic field.

  6. Small-scale Anisotropies of Cosmic Rays from Relative Diffusion

    Ahlers, Markus; Mertsch, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    The arrival directions of multi-TeV cosmic rays show significant anisotropies at small angular scales. It has been argued that this small-scale structure can naturally arise from cosmic ray scattering in local turbulent magnetic fields that distort a global dipole anisotropy set by diffusion. We study this effect in terms of the power spectrum of cosmic ray arrival directions and show that the strength of small-scale anisotropies is related to properties of relative diffusion. We provide a formalism for how these power spectra can be inferred from simulations and motivate a simple analytic extension of the ensemble-averaged diffusion equation that can account for the effect.

  7. Advanced detection techniques for educational experiments in cosmic ray physics

    In this paper we describe several detection techniques that can be employed to study cosmic ray properties and carry out training activities at high school and undergraduate level. Some of the proposed devices and instrumentation are inherited from professional research experiments, while others were especially developed and marketed for educational cosmic ray experiments. The educational impact of experiments in cosmic ray physics in high-school or undergraduate curricula will be exploited through various examples, going from simple experiments carried out with small Geiger counters or scintillation devices to more advanced detection instrumentation which can offer starting points for not trivial research work. (authors)

  8. Clusters of Galaxies as a Storage Room for Cosmic Rays

    Berezinsky, V. S.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Ptuskin, V. S.

    1996-01-01

    It is demonstrated that clusters of galaxies are able to keep cosmic rays for a time exceeding the age of the Universe. This phenomenon reveals itself by the production of the diffuse flux of high energy gamma and neutrino radiation due to the interaction of the cosmic rays with the intracluster gas. The produced flux is determined by the cosmological density of baryons, $\\Omega_b$, if a large part of this density is provided by the intracluster gas. The signal from relic cosmic rays has to b...

  9. Galactic Propagation of Cosmic Rays from Individual Supernova Remnants

    Nierstenhoefer, Nils; Schuppan, Florian; Tjus, Julia Becker

    2015-01-01

    It is widely believed that supernova remnants are the best candidate sources for the observed cosmic ray flux up to the knee, i.e. up to ~PeV energies. Indeed, the gamma-ray spectra of some supernova remnants can be well explained by assuming the decay of neutral pions which are created in hadronic interactions. Therefore, fitting the corresponding gamma spectra allows us to derive the spectra of cosmic rays at the source which are locally injected into our Galaxy. Using these spectra as a starting point, we propagate the cosmic rays through the Galaxy using the publicly available GALPROP code. Here, we will present first results on the contribution of those SNRs to the total cosmic ray flux and discuss implications.

  10. Investigation of Cosmic-Ray Sources with Gamma-Ray Initiated Showers

    Uryson, A V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of investigating ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources is suggested. The method is based on analysis of gamma-ray emission that is generated in extragalactic space when ultra-high energy cosmic particles interact with cosmic background. We have found that intensity of the gamma-ray emission depends on characteristics of cosmic ray sources, specifically on their remoteness and initial particle energy spectra. In the Earth atmosphere cosmic rays initiate air showers, therefore selecting quanta-initiated showers (and excluding those from the galactic plane, gamma-ray sources, etc.) we can obtain above mentioned source characteristics. We derive that the number of quanta-initiated showers is 0 or ~3x1000 depending on source parameters, typical statistics of showers registered at 10^14 eV being of ~10^8. The difference is large enough to use this method for studying ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources.

  11. Gamma-ray emitting supernova remnants as the origin of Galactic cosmic rays?

    Becker Tjus, Julia; Eichmann, Björn; Kroll, Mike; Nierstenhöfer, Nils

    2016-08-01

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the long-standing mysteries in physics and astrophysics. Simple arguments suggest that a scenario of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way as the dominant sources for the cosmic ray population below the knee could work: a generic calculation indicates that these objects can provide the energy budget necessary to explain the observed flux of cosmic rays. However, this argument is based on the assumption that all sources behave in the same way, i.e. they all have the same energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. In this paper, we investigate if a realistic population of SNRs is capable of producing the cosmic ray flux as it is observed below the knee. We use 21 SNRs that are well-studied from radio wavelengths up to gamma-ray energies and derive cosmic ray spectra under the assumption of hadronic emission. The cosmic ray spectra show a large variety in their energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. These sources are assumed to be representative for the total class of SNRs, where we assume that about 100-200 cosmic ray emitting SNRs should be present today. Finally, we use these source spectra to simulate the cosmic ray transport from individual SNRs in the Galaxy with the GALPROP code for cosmic ray propagation. We find that the cosmic ray budget can be matched well for these sources. We conclude that gamma-ray emitting SNRs can be a representative sample of cosmic ray emitting sources. In the future, experiments like CTA and HAWC will help to distinguish hadronic from leptonic sources and to further constrain the maximum energy of the sources and contribute to producing a fully representative sample in order to further investigate the possibility of SNRs being the dominant sources of cosmic rays up to the knee.

  12. Pionic Photons and Neutrinos from Cosmic Ray Accelerators

    Halzen, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the accelerators that produce the Galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays has been a priority mission of several generations of high energy gamma ray and neutrino telescopes; success has been elusive so far. Detecting the gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes associated with cosmic rays reaches a new watershed with the completion of IceCube, the first neutrino detector with sensitivity to the anticipated fluxes, and the construction of CTA, a ground-based gamma ray detector that will map and study candidate sources with unprecedented precision. In this paper, we revisit the prospects for revealing the sources of the cosmic rays by a multiwavelength approach; after reviewing the methods, we discuss supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, active galaxies and GZK neutrinos in some detail.

  13. The History of Cosmic Ray Studies after Hess

    The discovery of cosmic rays by Victor Hess was confirmed with balloon flights at higher altitudes by Kolhörster. Soon the interest turned into questions about the nature of cosmic rays: gamma rays or particles? Subsequent investigations have established cosmic rays as the birthplace of elementary particle physics. The 1936 Nobel prize was shared between Victor Hess and Carl Anderson. Anderson discovered the positron in a cloud chamber. The positron was predicted by Dirac several years earlier. Many new results came now from studies with cloud chambers and nuclear emulsions. Anderson and Neddermeyer saw the muon, which for some time was considered to be a candidate for the Yukawa particle responsible for nuclear binding. Lattes, Powell, Occhialini and Muirhead clarified the situation by the discovery of the charged pions in cosmic rays. Rochester and Butler found V's, which turned out to be short-lived neutral kaons decaying into a pair of charged pions. Λ's, Σ's and Ξ's were found in cosmic rays using nuclear emulsions. After that period, accelerators and storage rings took over. The unexpected renaissance of cosmic rays started with the search for solar neutrinos and the observation of the supernova 1987A and other accelerators in the sky. With the observation of neutrino oscillations one began to look beyond the standard model of elementary particles. After 100 years of cosmic ray research we are again at the beginning of a new era, and cosmic rays may contribute to solve the many open questions, like dark matter and dark energy, by providing energies well beyond those of earth-bound accelerators

  14. Origin and Propagation of Extremely High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Bhattacharjee, P; Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani; Sigl, Guenter

    2000-01-01

    Cosmic ray particles with energies in excess of 10**20 eV have been detected. The sources as well as the physical mechanism(s) responsible for endowing cosmic ray particles with such enormous energies are unknown. This report gives a review of the physics and astrophysics associated with the questions of origin and propagation of these EHE cosmic rays in the Universe. After a brief review of the observed cosmic rays in general and their possible sources and acceleration mechanisms, a detailed discussion is given of possible "top-down" (non-acceleration) scenarios of origin of EHE cosmic rays through decay of sufficiently massive particles originating from processes in the early Universe. The massive particles can come from collapse and/or annihilation of cosmic topological defects (such as monopoles, cosmic strings, etc.) associated with grand unified theories or they could be some long-lived metastable supermassive relic particles that were created in the early Universe and are decaying in the current epoch....

  15. 11. European cosmic ray symposium held at Balatonfuered, Hungary, August 21-27, 1988

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific programme was organized under three main headings: Cosmic rays in the heliosphere, Cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, Properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  16. The 1953 Cosmic Ray Conference at Bagneres de Bigorre

    Cronin, James W

    2011-01-01

    The cosmic ray conference at Bagn`eres de Bigorre in July, 1953 organized by Patrick Blackett and Louis Leprince-Ringuet was a seminal one. It marked the beginning of sub atomic physics and its shift from cosmic ray research to research at the new high energy accelerators. The knowledge of the heavy unstable particles found in the cosmic rays was essentially correct in fact and interpretation and defined the experiments that needed to be carried out with the new accelerators. A large fraction of the physicists who had been using cosmic rays for their research moved to the accelerators. This conference can be placed in importance in the same category as two other famous conferences, the Solvay congress of 1927 and the Shelter Island Conference of 1948.

  17. The contribution by Domenico Pacini to the Cosmic Ray Physics

    Giglietto, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Between 1900 and 1913 several people were investigating about the unknown radiation, later identified as Cosmic Rays. Several experimentalist tried to identify the origin of this radiation and in particular Victor Franz Hess, Theodor Wulf and Domenico Pacini. Among them Domenico Pacini had a crucial role to address the answer to the origin of this radiation in the right way, and V.F.~Hess performed the complete set of measurements that definitively excluded an origin connected to the soil radioactive elements. However the most interesting and may be surprising point it that these pioneers defined 1 century ago the three experimental lines to study the Cosmic Rays: from space, on ground and underground and using only electroscopes. Domenico Pacini in particular may be considered the pioneer of the underground measurements on Cosmic Rays and Hess with his set of systematic measurements with balloon flights, originated the air-space studies on Cosmic Rays.

  18. Glimm-Godunov's Method for Cosmic-ray-hydrodynamics

    Miniati, F

    2006-01-01

    A numerical method for integrating the equations describing a dynamically coupled system made of a fluid and cosmic-rays is developed. In smooth flows the effect of CR pressure is accounted for by modification of the characteristic equations and the energy exchange between cosmic-rays and the fluid, due to diffusive processes in configuration and momentum space, is modeled with a flux conserving method. Provided the shock acceleration efficiency as a function of the upstream conditions and shock Mach number, we show that the Riemann solver can be modified to take into account the cosmic-ray mediation without having to resolve the cosmic-ray induced substructure. Shocks are advanced with Glimm's method which preserves without smearing their discontinuous character, allowing to maintain self-consistency in the shock solutions. In smooth flows either Glimm's or a higher order Godunov's method can be applied, with the latter producing better results when approximations are introduced in the Riemann solver.

  19. Acceleration of cosmic rays in SNR shock waves

    The time dependence of the energy density of cosmic rays accelerated in the outer shock of a supernova is studied in simple nonlinear models. The solutions are classified in their dependence on the parameters of the system. (orig.)

  20. The acceleration of cosmic ray by shock waves

    The acceleration of cosmic rays in flows involving shocks and other compressional waves is considered in terms of one-dimensionl, steady flows and the diffusion approximation. The results suggest that very substantial energy conversion can occur. (author)

  1. On wave stability in relativistic cosmic-ray hydrodynamics

    Webb, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Wave stability of a two-fluid hydrodynamical model describing the acceleration of cosmic rays by the first-order Fermi mechanism in relativistic, cosmic-ray-modified shocks is investigated. For a uniform background state, the short- and long-wavelength wave speeds are shown to interlace, thus assuring wave stability in this case. A JWKB analysis is performed to investigate the stability of short-wavelength thermal gas sound waves in the smooth, decelerating supersonic flow upstream of a relativistic, cosmic-ray-modified shock. The stability of the waves is assessed both in terms of the fluid velocity and density perturbations, as well as in terms of the wave action. The stability and interaction of the short-wavelength cosmic-ray coherent mode with the background flow is also studied.

  2. Supernova envelope shock origin of cosmic rays: a review

    The hydrodynamic shock origin of cosmic rays in the envelope of a Type I presupernova star is reviewed. The possibility of accelerating ultrahigh energy particles to greater than or equal to 1018 eV is unique to the shock mechanism and currently no other suggested galactic or extragalactic site is likely. In this paper a review of the work leading to a renewed commitment to the origin of cosmic rays in the shock ejected envelope of supernova is given. The degree to which this interpretation applies to the origin of all cosmic rays is certainly uncertain and does not exclude the possibility of a fraction of the lower energy cosmic rays being accelerated in collisionless plasma shocks in the interstellar medium. 45 references, 3 figures

  3. Searches for Anisotropy of Cosmic Rays with the Telescope Array

    Cady, Robert; Telescope Array Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    With over seven years of data from the TA surface detector array, we will present the results of various searches for anisotropies in the arrival direction of cosmic rays, including an update of the hotspot above 57 EeV.

  4. The contribution by Domenico Pacini to the Cosmic Ray Physics

    Between 1900 and 1913 several people were investigating about the unknown radiation, later identified as Cosmic Rays. Several experimentalist tried to identify the origin of this radiation and in particular Victor Franz Hess, Theodor Wulf and Domenico Pacini. Among them Domenico Pacini had a crucial role to address the answer to the origin of this radiation in the right way, and V.F. Hess performed the complete set of measurements that definitively excluded an origin connected to the soil radioactive elements. However the most interesting and may be surprising point it that these pioneers defined 1 century ago the three experimental lines to study the Cosmic Rays: from space, on ground and underground and using only electroscopes. Domenico Pacini in particular may be considered the pioneer of the underground measurements on Cosmic Rays and Hess with his set of systematic measurements with balloon flights, originated the air-space studies on Cosmic Rays.

  5. Commissioning the CMS pixel detector with Cosmic Rays

    Heyburn, Bernadette

    2009-01-01

    commissioning activities in the CMS pixel detector. Results from cosmic ray studies will be presented, in addition to results obtained from the integration of the pixel detector within the CMS detector and various calibration and alignment analyses.

  6. Cosmic rays score direct hits with Apollo crew

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 14 astronauts conduted experiments during the spaceflight to help scientists to understand why previous crews have seen flashes of light during missions, believed to be caused by cosmic rays (1 page).

  7. The sensitive area of cosmic ray air shower arrays

    Some closed expressions are derived for the collecting area of cosmic ray air shower arrays, taking into account the varying geometry such arrays present to showers arriving from different directions. (orig.)

  8. Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from dark matter annihilation

    Dick, R.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Kolb, E. W.

    2002-01-01

    Annihilation of clumped superheavy dark matter provides an interesting explanation for the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. The predicted anisotropy signal provides a unique signature for this scenario.

  9. Influence of magnetic clouds on cosmic ray intensity variations

    Yadav, R. S.; Yadav, N. R.; BADRUDDIN; Agrawal, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron monitor data has been analyzed to study the nature of galactic cosmic ray transient modulation associated with three types of interplanetary magnetic clouds - clouds associated with shocks, stream interfaces and cold magnetic enhancements.

  10. Cosmic Ray Results from the CosmoALEPH Experiment

    Grupen, C; Jost, B; Maciuc, F; Luitz, S; Mailov, A; Müller, A S; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Schmelling, M; Tcaciuc, R; Wachsmuth, H; Ziegler, T; Zuber, K

    2008-01-01

    CosmoALEPH is an experiment operated in conjunction with the ALEPH detector. The ALEPH experiment took data from 1989 until the year 2000 at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) at CERN. It provides, among others, high resolution tracking and calorimetry. CosmoALEPH used this e+e− detector for cosmic ray studies. In addition, six scintillator telescopes were installed in the ALEPH pit and the LEP tunnel. The whole experiment operated underground at a vertical depth of 320 meter water equivalent. Data from ALEPH and the scintillator telescopes provide informaton on the lateral distribution of energetic cosmic ray muons in extensive air showers. The decoherence curve of these remnant air shower muons is sensitive to the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays and to the interaction characteristics of energetic hadrons in the atmosphere. An attempt is made to extract the various interdependencies in describing the propagation of primary and secondary cosmic rays through the atmosphere and the rock ov...

  11. Cosmic Rays for High School Students

    Bardeen, Marjorie; Peterson, Robert; Jordan, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    We discuss a suite of QuarkNet activities that provide data from the Fermilab cosmic ray DAQ for three learning modes: survey, exploration and investigation. Teachers and students assemble our classroom detectors. They study data locally and/or upload data to a server for others; students without detectors have access to the data. In survey mode, students may sum columns, draw plots comparing columns, calculate descriptive statistics. They can describe patterns and may indicate outliers. Exploration mode provides visual or tabular data for doing measurements that couple values in different columns for a newly derived measurement. Students still draw plots, calculate statistics and describe patterns. Students may attend a master class performing these tasks in a group setting. Students in investigation mode use data and provided analysis and investigation tools to perform research-type investigations. Students can investigate relationships between measurements extant in the data as well as relationships between the presented data and external data sets. They also may perform the same tasks that they do in other modes e.g., draw plots. Students use a project map associated with a browser-based e-Lab to guide their investigations.

  12. A Cosmic Ray Telescope For Educational Purposes

    Cosmic ray detectors are widely used, for educational purposes, in order to motivate students to the physics of elementary particles and astrophysics. Using a 'telescope' of scintillation counters, the directional characteristics, diurnal variation, correlation with solar activity, can be determined, and conclusions about the composition, origin and interaction of elementary particles with the magnetic field of earth can be inferred. A telescope was built from two rectangular scintillator panels with dimensions: 91.6x1.9x3.7 cm3. The scintillators are placed on top of each other, separated by a fixed distance of 34.6 cm. They are supported by a wooden frame which can be rotated around a horizontal axis. Direction is determined by the coincidence of the signals of the two PMTs. Standard NIM modules are used for readout. This device is to be used in the undergraduate nuclear and particle physics laboratory. The design and construction of the telescope as well as some preliminary results are presented.

  13. Cosmic Ray Spectrum in Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Kang, Hyesung

    2010-01-01

    We perform kinetic simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) expanding into a uniform interstellar medium (ISM). Bohm-like diffusion assumed, and simple models for Alfvenic drift and dissipation are adopted. Phenomenological models for thermal leakage injection are considered as well. We find that the preshock gas temperature is the primary parameter that governs the cosmic ray (CR) acceleration efficiency and energy spectrum, while the CR injection rate is a secondary parameter. For SNRs in the warm ISM, if the injection fraction is larger than 10^{-4}, the DSA is efficient enough to convert more than 20 % of the SN explosion energy into CRs and the accelerated CR spectrum exhibits a concave curvature flattening to E^{-1.6}. Such a flat source spectrum near the knee energy, however, may not be reconciled with the CR spectrum observed at Earth. On the other hand, SNRs in the hot ISM, with an injection fraction smaller than 10^{-4}, are inefficient accelerators with...

  14. Maximum entropy analysis of cosmic ray composition

    Nosek, Dalibor; Ebr, Jan; Vícha, Jakub; Trávníček, Petr; Nosková, Jana

    2016-03-01

    We focus on the primary composition of cosmic rays with the highest energies that cause extensive air showers in the Earth's atmosphere. A way of examining the two lowest order moments of the sample distribution of the depth of shower maximum is presented. The aim is to show that useful information about the composition of the primary beam can be inferred with limited knowledge we have about processes underlying these observations. In order to describe how the moments of the depth of shower maximum depend on the type of primary particles and their energies, we utilize a superposition model. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we are able to determine what trends in the primary composition are consistent with the input data, while relying on a limited amount of information from shower physics. Some capabilities and limitations of the proposed method are discussed. In order to achieve a realistic description of the primary mass composition, we pay special attention to the choice of the parameters of the superposition model. We present two examples that demonstrate what consequences can be drawn for energy dependent changes in the primary composition.

  15. Maximum entropy analysis of cosmic ray composition

    Nosek, Dalibor; Vícha, Jakub; Trávníček, Petr; Nosková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    We focus on the primary composition of cosmic rays with the highest energies that cause extensive air showers in the Earth's atmosphere. A way of examining the two lowest order moments of the sample distribution of the depth of shower maximum is presented. The aim is to show that useful information about the composition of the primary beam can be inferred with limited knowledge we have about processes underlying these observations. In order to describe how the moments of the depth of shower maximum depend on the type of primary particles and their energies, we utilize a superposition model. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we are able to determine what trends in the primary composition are consistent with the input data, while relying on a limited amount of information from shower physics. Some capabilities and limitations of the proposed method are discussed. In order to achieve a realistic description of the primary mass composition, we pay special attention to the choice of the parameters of the sup...

  16. The ATLAS Trigger Commissioning with cosmic rays

    Abolins, M; Adragna, P; Aielli, G; Aleksandrov, E; Aleksandrov, I; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Amorim, A; Anderson, K; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Antonelli, S; Aracena, I; Ask, S; Asquith, L; Avolio, G; Backlund, S; Badescu, E; Bahat Treidel, O; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Barria, P; Bartoldus, R; Batreanu, S; Bauss, B; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Bell, P; Bell, W H; Bellagamba, L; Bellomo, M; Ben Ami, S; Bendel, M; Benhammou, Ya; Benslama, K; Berge, D; Berger, N; Berry, T; Bianco, M; Biglietti, M; Blair, R R; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Bold, T; Booth, J R A; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Brawn, I P; Brelier, B; Bressler, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Buda, S; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Buttar, C; Camarri, P; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Caprini, M; Caracinha, D; Cardarelli, R; Carlino, G; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cerri, A; Charlton, D G; Chiodini, G; Ciapetti, G; Cimino, D; Ciobotaru, M; Clements, D; Coccaro, A; Coluccia, M R; Conde-Muíño, P; Constantin, S; Conventi, F; Corso-Radu, A; Costa, M J; Coura Torres, R; Cranfield, R; Cranmer, K; Crone, G; Curtis, C J; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Davis, A O; Dawson, I; Dawson, J; De Almeida Simoes, J; De Cecco, S; De Pedis, D; De Santo, A; DeAsmundis, R; DellaPietra, M; DellaVolpe, D; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Girolamo, A; Dionisi, C; Djilkibaev, R; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dogaru, M; Dotti, A; Dova, M; Drake, G; Dufour, M -A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E F; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Ermoline, Y; Eschrich, I; Etzion, E; Facius, K; Falciano, S; Farthouat, P; Faulkner, P J W F; Feng, E; Ferland, J; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Fischer, G; Fonseca-Martin, T; Francis, D; Fukunaga, C; Föhlisch, F; Gadomski, S; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; Gee, C N P; George, S; Geweniger, C; Giagu, S; Gillman, A R; Giusti, P; Goncalo, R; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gowdy, S; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Green, B; Galllno, P; Haas, S; Haberichter, W; Hadavand, H; Haeberli, C; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hasegawa, Y; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Head, S; Hellman, S; Hidvegi, A; Hillier, S J; Höcker, A; Hrynóva, T; Hughes-Jones, R; Huston, J; Iacobucci, G; Idarraga, J; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikeno, M; Inada, M; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Izzo, V; Jain, V; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Joos, M; Kadosaka, T; Kajomovitz, E; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kazarov, A; Kehoe, R; Khoriauli, G; Kieft, G; Kilvington, G; Kirk, J; Kiyamura, H; Klofver, P; Klous, S; Kluge, E E; Kobayashi, T; Kolos, S; Kono, T; Konstantinidis, N; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Krasznahorkay, A; Kubota, T; Kugel, A; Kuhn, D; Kurashige, H; Kurasige, H; Kuwabara, T; Kwee, R; Landon, M; Lankford, A; LeCompte, T; Leahu, L; Leahu, M; Ledroit, F; Lehmann-Miotto, G; Lei, X; Lellouch, D; Lendermann, V; Levinson, L; Leyton, M; Li, S; Liberti, B; Lifshitz, R; Lim, H; Lohse, T; Losada, M; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lupu, N; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Mapelli, L; Marchese, F; Martin, B; Martin, B T; Martínez, A; Marzano, F; Masik, J; McMahon, T; McPherson, R; Medinnis, M; Meessen, C; Meier, K; Meirosu, C; Messina, A; Migliaccio, A; Mikenberg, G; Mincer, A; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Mönig, K; Monticelli, F; Moraes, A; Moreno, D; Morettini, P; Murillo Garcia, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Némethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Nisati, A; Niwa, T; Nomachi, M; Nomoto, H; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Ochi, A; Ohm, C; Okumura, Y; Omachi, C; Osculati, B; Oshita, H; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Pectu, M; Perantoni, M; Perera, V; Perera, V J O; Pérez, E; Pérez-Réale, V; Perrino, R; Pessoa Lima Junior, H; Petersen, J; Petrolo, E; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pinto, F; Pinzon, G; Polini, A; Pope, B; Potter, C; Prieur, D P F; Primavera, M; Qian, W; Radescu, V; Rajagopalan, S; Renkel, P; Rescigno, M; Rieke, S; Risler, C; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Roda, C; Rodríguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Roich, A; Romeo, G; Rosati, S; Ryabov, Yu; Ryan, P; Rühr, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamon, A; Salvatore, D; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Santonico, R; Sasaki, O; Scannicchio, D; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J L; Schmitt, K; Scholtes, I; Schooltz, D; Schuler, G; Schultz-Coulon, H -C; Schäfer, U; Scott, W; Segura, E; Sekhniaidze, G; Shimbo, N; Sidoti, A; Silva, L; Silverstein, S; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S; Sloper, J E; Smizanska, M; Solfaroli, E; Soloviev, I; Soluk, R; Spagnolo, S; Spila, F; Spiwoks, R; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, J; Stradling, A; Strom, D; Strong, J; Su, D; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Szymocha, T; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tanaka, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thomas, J P; Tokoshuku, K; Tomoto, M; Torrence, E; Touchard, F; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tripiana, M; Usai, G; Vachon, B; Vandelli, W; Vari, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Vermeulen, J; Von Der Schmitt, J; Wang, M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wilkens, H; Winklmeier, F; Woerling, E E; Wu, S -L; Wu, X; Xella, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamazaki, Y; Yasu, Y; Yu, M; Zanello, L; Zema, F; Zhang, J; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; De Seixas, J M; Dos Anjos, A; Zur Nedden, M; Ozcan, E; Ünel, G; International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. At the design luminosity there are roughly 23 collisions per bunch crossing. ATLAS has designed a three-level trigger system to select potentially interesting events. The first-level trigger, implemented in custom-built electronics, reduces the incoming rate to less than 100 kHz with a total latency of less than 2.5$\\mu$s. The next two trigger levels run in software on commercial PC farms. They reduce the output rate to 100-200 Hz. In preparation for collision data-taking which is scheduled to commence in May 2008, several cosmic-ray commissioning runs have been performed. Among the first sub-detectors available for commissioning runs are parts of the barrel muon detector including the RPC detectors that are used in the first-level trigger. Data have been taken with a full slice of the muon trigger and readout chain, from the detectors in one sector of the RPC system, to the second-level trigger algorit...

  17. Cosmic-ray ionisation in collapsing clouds

    Padovani, Marco; Galli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) play an important role in dense molecular cores, affecting their thermal and dynamical evolution and initiating the chemistry. Several studies have shown that the formation of protostellar discs in collapsing clouds is severely hampered by the braking torque exerted by the entrained magnetic field on the infalling gas, as long as the field remains frozen to the gas. We examine the possibility that the concentration and twisting of the field lines in the inner region of collapse can produce a significant reduction of the ionisation fraction. To check whether the CR ionisation rate (CRir) can fall below the critical value required to maintain good coupling, we first study the propagation of CRs in a model of a static magnetised cloud varying the relative strength of the toroidal/poloidal components and the mass-to-flux ratio. We then follow the path of CRs using realistic magnetic field configurations generated by numerical simulations of a rotating collapsing core. We find that an increment of...

  18. Cosmic ray measurements around the knee

    Chiavassa, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Primary cosmic rays of energy greater than ˜ 1014 eV must be studied by indirect experiments measuring the particles generated in the EAS (Extensive Air Shower) development in atmosphere. These experiments are mainly limited by the systematic errors due to their energy calibration. I will discuss the main sources of these errors: the choice of the hadronic interaction model and of the mass of the primary particle (that cannot be measured on a event by event basis). I will then summarize some recent measurements of the all particle spectrum, and I will show that, keeping into account the differences due to the energy calibration, they all agree on the spectral shape. Then I will describe the measurements of the light and heavy primaries mass groups spectra, discussing the claimed features. Using a simple calculation of the elemental spectra (based on the hypothesis that the knee energies follow a Peter's cycle) I will try to discuss if all these results can be interpreted in a common picture.

  19. Cosmic ray propagation in interplanetary space

    The validity of the test particle picture and the approximation of static fields, as well as the spatial diffusion approximation, are discussed in a general way before specific technical assumptions are introduced. It is argued that the spatial diffusion equation for the intensity per unit energy has a much wider range of applicability than the kinetic (Fokker-Planck) equation it is derived from. This gives a strong weight to the phenomenological propagation theory. Its general success (and possible failure at small energies) for the modulation of galactic cosmic rays and solar events is described. Apparent effects like the ''free boundary'' are given disproportionate weight, since through them the connection to the detailed plasma physics of the solar wind is established. Greatest attention in detail is paid to the pitch angle diffusion theory. A general theory is presented that removes the well-known secularities of the quasi-linear approximation. The possible breakdown of any pitch angle diffusion theory at very small energies is perhaps connected to the observed ''turn up'' of the spectrum at low energies. A first attempt to derive the spatial dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the solar cavity, using such a divergence free scattering theory, is described and compared with recent observations out to 5 AU. (auth)

  20. Propagation of cosmic rays into diffuse clouds

    Morlino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We study the capability of low-energy cosmic rays (CR) to penetrate into diffuse clouds when they move from the hot ionized plasma to a cool cloud embedded in that plasma. The spectrum of CR inside a cloud can be remarkably different from the the one present in the hot interstellar medium because when CRs pass through a dense cloud of matter, they suffer energy losses due to ionization and nuclear interactions. Hence there is a net flux of CRs towards the cloud that can excite Alfv\\'en waves. In turn, self-excited Alfv\\'en waves enhances the diffusion of CRs near the edge of the cloud, forcing CRs to spend more time in this layer and increasing the amount of energy losses. The final effect is that the flux of CR entering into the cloud is strongly suppressed below an energy threshold whose value depends on ambient parameters. For the first time we use the full kinetic theory to describe this problem, coupling CRs and Alfv\\'en waves through the streaming instability, and including the damping of the waves due ...

  1. Cosmic Ray Electrons in Groups and Clusters of Galaxies Primary and Secondary Populations from a Numerical Cosmological Simulation

    Miniati, F; Kang, H; Ryu, D; Miniati, Francesco; Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2001-01-01

    We study the generation and distribution of high energy electrons in cosmic environment and their observational consequences by carrying out the first cosmological simulation that includes directly cosmic ray (CR) particles. Starting from cosmological initial conditions we follow the evolution of primary and secondary electrons (CRE), CR ions (CRI) and a passive magnetic field. CRIs and primary CREs are injected and accelerated at large scale structure shocks. Secondary CREs are continuously generated through inelastic p-p collisions. We include spatial transport, adiabatic expansion/compression, Coulomb collisions, bremsstrahlung, synchrotron (SE)and inverse Compton (IC) emission. We find that, from the perspective of cosmic shock energy and acceleration efficiency, the few detections of hard X-ray radiation excess could be explained in the framework of IC emission of primary CREs in clusters undergoing high accretion/merger phase. Instead, IC emission from both primary and secondary CREs accounts at most fo...

  2. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Sari, R.; Bloom, J. S.; Galama, T. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Price, P. A.; Fox, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Yost, S.; Berger, E.; Diercks, A.; Goodrich, R.; Chaffee, F.

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic γ-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean γ-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 1051 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ( ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host galaxies span a range of luminosities and morphologies, but appear to be broadly typical for the normal, actively star-forming galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes. Some of the challenges for the future include: the nature of the short bursts and possibly other types of bursts and transients; use of GRBs to probe the obscured star formation in the universe, and possibly as probes of the very early universe; and their detection as sources of high-energy particles and gravitational waves.

  3. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Colon, Rafael Antonio; Moncada, Roberto; Guerra, Juan; Anchordoqui, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The search for the origin(s) of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CR) remains one of the cornerstones of high energy astrophysics. The previously proposed sources of acceleration for these UHECRs were gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) due to their energetic activity and powerful jets. However, a problem arises between the acceleration method and the observed CR spectrum. The CRs from GRBs or AGN jets are assumed to undergo Fermi acceleration and a source injection spectrum proportional to E^-2 is expected. However, the most recent fits to the spectrum and nuclear composition suggest an injection spectrum proportional to E^-1. It is well known that such a hard spectrum is characteristic of unipolar induction of rotating compact objects. When this method is applied to the AGN cores, they prove to be much too luminous to accelerate CR nuclei without photodisintegrating, thus creating significant energy losses. Instead, here we re-examine the possibility of these particles being accelerated around the much less luminous quasar remnants, or dead quasars. We compare the interaction times of curvature radiation and photodisintegration, the two primary energy loss considerations with the acceleration time scale. We show that the energy losses at the source are not significant enough as to prevent these CRs from reaching the maximum observed energies. Using data from observatories in the northern and southern sky, the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory respectively, two hotspots have been discerned which have some associated quasar remnants that help to motivate our study.

  4. Cosmic Ray Anomalies from the MSSM?

    Cotta, R.C.; /SLAC; Conley, J.A.; /Bonn U.; Gainer, J.S.; /Argonne /Northwestern U.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    The recent positron excess in cosmic rays (CR) observed by the PAMELA satellite may be a signal for dark matter (DM) annihilation. When these measurements are combined with those from FERMI on the total (e{sup +} + e{sup -}) ux and from PAMELA itself on the {anti p}p ratio, these and other results are difficult to reconcile with traditional models of DM, including the conventional minimal Supergravity (mSUGRA) version of Supersymmetry even if boosts as large as 10{sup 3-4} are allowed. In this paper, we combine the results of a previously obtained scan over a more general 19-parameter subspace of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with a corresponding scan over astrophysical parameters that describe the propagation of CR. We then ascertain whether or not a good fit to this CR data can be obtained with relatively small boost factors while simultaneously satisfying the additional constraints arising from gamma ray data. We find that a specific subclass of MSSM models where the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) is mostly pure bino and annihilates almost exclusively into {tau} pairs comes very close to satisfying these requirements. The lightest in this set of models is found to be relatively close in mass to the LSP and is in some cases the nLSP. These models lead to a significant improvement in the overall fit to the data by {approx}1 unit of {chi}{sup 2}/dof in comparison to the best fit without Supersymmetry while employing boosts in the range {approx}100-200. The implications of these models for future experiments are discussed.

  5. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  6. Calibrating laser test-beams for cosmic-ray observatories

    Wiencke, Lawrence; Arqueros, Fernando; Compton, John; Monasor, Maria; Pilger, David; Rosado, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed UV lasers can provide useful "testbeams" for observatories that use optical detectors, especially fluorescence detectors, to measure high energy cosmic-rays. The light observed by the detector is proportional to the energy of the laser pulse. Since the absolute laser energy can be measured locally, a well-calibrated laser offers a practical way to test the photometric calibration of the cosmic-ray detector including atmospheric corrections. This poster will describe a robotic system fo...

  7. Cosmic Rays and Space Situational Awareness in Europe

    In this paper European space weather activities are sketched and the contribution of cosmic ray research and technology to the European space situational awareness programme is described. Especially the cosmic ray muon detection technique is studied - on ground and in future space based -, because it is considered to be very useful for coronal mass ejection forecast in the next solar maximum between 2011 and 2012. (authors)

  8. Glimm-Godunov's Method for Cosmic-ray-hydrodynamics

    Miniati, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    A numerical method for integrating the equations describing a dynamically coupled system made of a fluid and cosmic-rays is developed. In smooth flows the effect of CR pressure is accounted for by modification of the characteristic equations and the energy exchange between cosmic-rays and the fluid, due to diffusive processes in configuration and momentum space, is modeled with a flux conserving method. Provided the shock acceleration efficiency as a function of the upstream conditions and sh...

  9. Influence of solar and cosmic-ray variability on climate

    Badruddin,; Singh, M

    2013-01-01

    We analyze solar, geomagnetic and cosmic ray flux data along with rainfall and temperature data for almost five solar cycles. We provide evidence of significant influence of solar variability on climate. Specifically, we demonstrate association between lower (higher) rainfall and higher (lower) temperatures with increasing (decreasing) solar activity and decreasing (increasing) cosmic ray intensities. We propose a plausible scenario that accounts the results of our analysis.

  10. Is the highest cosmic-ray flux yet to come?

    Strauss, R. D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    The recent 2009 solar-minimum period was characterized by a record-setting high Galactic cosmic-ray flux observed at Earth. This, along with the unexpected low heliospheric magnetic-field magnitude, caused this period to be characterized as unusual compared with previous minimum epochs. In this work, selected solar-activity proxies and corresponding cosmic-ray observations for the past five solar cycles are compared with each other, and we identify those that showed unusual beh...

  11. Extragalactic cosmic ray self-confinement around sources

    P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Amato, E.; D'Angelo, M

    2015-01-01

    Most models of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays rely on the existence of luminous extragalactic sources. Cosmic rays escaping the galaxy where the source is located produce a sufficiently large electric current to justify the investigation of plasma instabilities induced by such current. Most interesting is the excitation of modes that lead to production of magnetic perturbations that may scatter particles thereby hindering their escape, or at least changing the propagation mode of...

  12. Predicting the response of a submillimeter bolometer to cosmic rays

    Woodcraft, Adam L.; Sudiwala, Rashmi V.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew J.; Wakui, Elley; Bhatia, Ravinder S.; Lange, Andrew E.; Bock, James J.; Turner, Anthony D.; Yun, Minhee H.; Beeman, Jeffrey W.

    2003-01-01

    Bolometers designed to detect. submillimeter radiation also respond to cosmic, gamma, and x rays. Because detectors cannot be fully shielded from such energy sources, it is necessary to understand the effect of a photon or cosmic-ray particle being absorbed. The resulting signal (known as a glitch) can then be removed from raw data. We present measurements using an Americium-241 gamma radiation source to irradiate a prototype bolometer for the High Frequency Instrument in the Planck Surveyor ...

  13. ROBAST: ROOT-based ray-tracing library for cosmic-ray telescopes

    Okumura, Akira

    2016-03-01

    ROBAST (ROOT-based simulator for ray tracing) is a non-sequential ray-tracing simulation library developed for wide use in optical simulations of gamma-ray and cosmic-ray telescopes. The library is written in C++ and fully utilizes the geometry library of the ROOT analysis framework, and can build the complex optics geometries typically used in cosmic ray experiments and ground-based gamma-ray telescopes.

  14. COSMOS: the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System

    M. Zreda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The newly-developed cosmic-ray method for measuring area-average soil moisture at the hectometer horizontal scale is being implemented in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (or the COSMOS. The stationary cosmic-ray soil moisture probe measures the neutrons that are generated by cosmic rays within air and soil and other materials, moderated by mainly hydrogen atoms located primarily in soil water, and emitted to the atmosphere where they mix instantaneously at a scale of hundreds of meters and whose density is inversely correlated with soil moisture. The COSMOS has already deployed more than 50 of the eventual 500 cosmic-ray probes, distributed mainly in the USA, each generating a time series of average soil moisture over its horizontal footprint, with similar networks coming into existence around the world. This paper is written to serve a community need to better understand this novel method and the COSMOS project. We describe the cosmic-ray soil moisture measurement method, the instrument and its calibration, the design, data processing and dissemination used in the COSMOS project, and give example time series of soil moisture obtained from COSMOS probes.

  15. Slow Diffusion of Cosmic-Rays around a Supernova Remnant

    Fujita, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    We study the escape of cosmic-ray protons accelerated at a supernova remnant (SNR). We are interested in their propagation in interstellar medium (ISM) after they leave the shock neighborhood where they are accelerated, but when they are still near the SNR with their energy density higher than that in the average ISM. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we found that the cosmic-rays with energies of <~TeV excite Alfven waves around the SNR on a scale of the SNR itself if the ISM is highly ionized. Thus, even if the cosmic-rays can leave the shock, scattering by the waves prevents them from moving further away from the SNR. The cosmic-rays form a slowly expanding cosmic-ray bubble, and they spend a long time around the SNR. This means that the cosmic-rays cannot actually escape from the SNR until a fairly late stage of the SNR evolution. This is consistent with some results of Fermi and H.E.S.S. observations.

  16. Cosmic rays and space weather. Effects on global climate change

    We consider possible effects of cosmic rays and some other space factors on the Earth's climate change. It is well known that the system of internal and external factors formatting the climate is very unstable; decreasing planetary temperature leads to an increase of snow surface, and decrease of the total solar energy input into the system decreases the planetary temperature even more, etc. From this it follows that even energetically small factors may have a big influence on climate change. In our opinion, the most important of these factors are cosmic rays and cosmic dust through their influence on clouds, and thus, on climate. (orig.)

  17. The contribution of supernova remnants to the galactic cosmic ray spectrum

    Caprioli, D; Blasi, P

    2009-01-01

    The supernova paradigm for the origin of galactic cosmic rays has been deeply affected by the development of the non-linear theory of particle acceleration at shock waves. Here we discuss the implications of applying such theory to the calculation of the spectrum of cosmic rays at Earth as accelerated in supernova remnants and propagating in the Galaxy. The spectrum is calculated taking into account the dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock, the generation of magnetic turbulence which enhances the scattering near the shock, and the dynamical reaction of the amplified field on the plasma. Most important, the spectrum of cosmic rays at Earth is calculated taking into account the flux of particles escaping from upstream during the Sedov-Taylor phase and the adiabatically decompressed particles confined in the expanding shell and escaping at later times. We show how the spectrum obtained in this way is well described by a power law in momentum with spectral index close to -4, despite the co...

  18. Measurement of cosmic-ray muons with the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory, a network of smartphones

    Vandenbroucke, J.; BenZvi, S.; Bravo, S.; Jensen, K.; Karn, P.; Meehan, M.; Peacock, J.; Plewa, M.; Ruggles, T.; Santander, M.; Schultz, D.; Simons, A. L.; Tosi, D.

    2016-04-01

    Solid-state camera image sensors can be used to detect ionizing radiation in addition to optical photons. We describe the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory (DECO), an app and associated public database that enables a network of consumer devices to detect cosmic rays and other ionizing radiation. In addition to terrestrial background radiation, cosmic-ray muon candidate events are detected as long, straight tracks passing through multiple pixels. The distribution of track lengths can be related to the thickness of the active (depleted) region of the camera image sensor through the known angular distribution of muons at sea level. We use a sample of candidate muon events detected by DECO to measure the thickness of the depletion region of the camera image sensor in a particular consumer smartphone model, the HTC Wildfire S. The track length distribution is fit better by a cosmic-ray muon angular distribution than an isotropic distribution, demonstrating that DECO can detect and identify cosmic-ray muons despite a background of other particle detections. Using the cosmic-ray distribution, we measure the depletion thickness to be 26.3 ± 1.4 μm. With additional data, the same method can be applied to additional models of image sensor. Once measured, the thickness can be used to convert track length to incident polar angle on a per-event basis. Combined with a determination of the incident azimuthal angle directly from the track orientation in the sensor plane, this enables direction reconstruction of individual cosmic-ray events using a single consumer device. The results simultaneously validate the use of cell phone camera image sensors as cosmic-ray muon detectors and provide a measurement of a parameter of camera image sensor performance which is not otherwise publicly available.

  19. Measurement of cosmic-ray muons with the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory, a network of smartphones

    Solid-state camera image sensors can be used to detect ionizing radiation in addition to optical photons. We describe the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory (DECO), an app and associated public database that enables a network of consumer devices to detect cosmic rays and other ionizing radiation. In addition to terrestrial background radiation, cosmic-ray muon candidate events are detected as long, straight tracks passing through multiple pixels. The distribution of track lengths can be related to the thickness of the active (depleted) region of the camera image sensor through the known angular distribution of muons at sea level. We use a sample of candidate muon events detected by DECO to measure the thickness of the depletion region of the camera image sensor in a particular consumer smartphone model, the HTC Wildfire S. The track length distribution is fit better by a cosmic-ray muon angular distribution than an isotropic distribution, demonstrating that DECO can detect and identify cosmic-ray muons despite a background of other particle detections. Using the cosmic-ray distribution, we measure the depletion thickness to be 26.3 ± 1.4 μm. With additional data, the same method can be applied to additional models of image sensor. Once measured, the thickness can be used to convert track length to incident polar angle on a per-event basis. Combined with a determination of the incident azimuthal angle directly from the track orientation in the sensor plane, this enables direction reconstruction of individual cosmic-ray events using a single consumer device. The results simultaneously validate the use of cell phone camera image sensors as cosmic-ray muon detectors and provide a measurement of a parameter of camera image sensor performance which is not otherwise publicly available

  20. Radial and Latitudinal Gradients of Anomalous Cosmic-Ray Oxygen and Helium and Galactic Cosmic Rays in the Outer Heliosphere

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; McDonald, F. B.; Webber, W. R.; Lal, N.

    1987-01-01

    We have used measurements from instruments on Voyagers 1 and 2 and Pioneer 10 to derive simultaneous latitudinal and radial gradients of anomalous cosmic-ray helium and oxygen and galactic cosmic rays during the latter part of 1986. We find that the negative latitudinal gradients that first appeared in 1985 when Voyager 1 reached heliolatitudes in excess of the current sheet continue to be observed, with an increased magnitude probably related to the decreasing tilt of the curr...

  1. Propagation of Cosmic Rays: Nuclear Physics in Cosmic-ray Studies

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclei fraction in cosmic rays (CR) far exceeds the fraction of other CR species, such as antiprotons, electrons, and positrons. Thus the majority of information obtained from CR studies is based on interpretation of isotopic abundances using CR propagation models where the nuclear data and isotopic production cross sections in p- and alpha-induced reactions are the key elements. This paper presents an introduction to the astrophysics of CR and diffuse gamma-rays and dimsses some of the puzzles that have emerged recently due to more precise data and improved propagation models. Merging with cosmology and particle physics, astrophysics of CR has become a very dynamic field with a large potential of breakthrough and discoveries in the near fume. Exploiting the data collected by the CR experiments to the fullest requires accurate nuclear cross sections.

  2. Commissioning of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker with cosmic rays

    Stanecka, E.; Atlas Sct Collaboration

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents the results of the tests with cosmic rays of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) as well as operational experience of running the fully integrated silicon detector during the commissioning of the completed SCT. Prior to inserting into ATLAS, the barrel part of the SCT has been integrated with the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) barrel and tested with cosmic rays. A sector of 468 SCT modules has been powered and read simultaneously with TRT modules in physics mode. In total 500 thousand events were recorded during cosmic runs and processed with the ATLAS off-line reconstruction software. The SCT performance was measured in terms of the average noise occupancy per channel (4.5×10-5) and the overall efficiency (>99%). The tests with cosmic rays proved full functionality of the complex Detector Control System (DCS) which provides control, monitoring and safety functions for the detector electronics.

  3. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets. The...... derived positions of the bursts are reported. Additionally, most of the events have been confirmed by coincident detections with instruments on other spacecrafts. The features of two of the bursts and the results of searches for related events in the optical are described....

  4. Background to Dark Matter Searches from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Just as searches for BSM physics at the LHC necessitate a careful audit of SM backgrounds, the search for signals of dark matter in cosmic rays must contend with production of secondaries like e+ and pbar through cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy. The theoretical framework for calculating this has however not been directly calibrated at the high energies being explored by AMS-02 and there may be surprises in store. In particular a nearby source where cosmic rays are being accelerated stochastically can naturally generate a e+ fraction rising with energy as is observed. The test of this is the expected correlated rise in other secondary/primary ratios e.g. B/C and pbar/p. Such a nearby cosmic accelerator should also be detectable through the concomitant flux of neutrinos and its discovery would be (nearly!) as exciting as that of dark matter.

  5. Small-scale anisotropies of cosmic rays from relative diffusion

    Mertsch, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The arrival directions of multi-TeV cosmic rays show significant anisotropies at small angular scales. It has been argued that this small scale structure is reflecting the local, turbulent magnetic field in the presence of a global dipole anisotropy in cosmic rays as determined by diffusion. This effect is analogous to weak gravitational lensing of temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background. We show that the non-trivial power spectrum in this setup can be related to the properties of relative diffusion and we study the convergence of the angular power spectrum to a steady-state as a function of backtracking time. We also determine the steady-state solution in an analytical approach based on a modified BGK ansatz. A rigorous mathematical treatment of the generation of small scale anisotropies will help in unraveling the structure of the local magnetic field through cosmic ray anisotropies.

  6. A Quantum Phase Transition in the Cosmic Ray Energy Distribution

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y

    2015-01-01

    We here argue that the "knee" of the cosmic ray energy distribution at $E_c \\sim 1$ PeV represents a second order phase transition of cosmic proportions. The discontinuity of the heat capacity per cosmic ray particle is given by $\\Delta c=0.450196\\ k_B$. However the idea of a deeper critical point singularity cannot be ruled out by present accuracy in neither theory nor experiment. The quantum phase transition consists of cosmic rays dominated by bosons for the low temperature phase E E_c$. The low temperature phase arises from those nuclei described by the usual and conventional collective boson models of nuclear physics. The high temperature phase is dominated by protons. The transition energy $E_c$ may be estimated in terms of the photo-disintegration of nuclei.

  7. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays: facts, myths and legends

    This is a written version of a series of lectures aimed at graduate students in astrophysics and theoretical/experimental particle physics. In the first part, we explain the important progress made in recent years towards understanding the experimental data on cosmic rays with energies > or approx. 108 GeV. We begin with a brief survey of the available data, including a description of the energy spectrum, mass composition and arrival directions. At this point we also give a short overview of experimental techniques. After that, we introduce the fundamentals of acceleration and propagation in order to discuss the conjectured nearby cosmic-ray sources, and emphasize some of the prospects for a new (multiparticle) astronomy. Next, we survey the state of the art regarding the ultrahigh-energy cosmic neutrinos that should be produced in association with the observed cosmic rays. In the second part, we summarize the phenomenology of cosmic-ray air showers. We explain the hadronic interaction models used to extrapolate results from collider data to ultrahigh energies, and describe the prospects for insights into forward physics at the Large Hadron Collider. We also explain the main electromagnetic processes that govern the longitudinal shower evolution. Armed with these two principal shower ingredients and motivation from the underlying physics, we describe the different methods proposed to distinguish primary species. In the last part, we outline how ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray interactions can be used to probe new physics beyond the electroweak scale. (author)

  8. Ionization and heating by X-rays and cosmic rays*

    Güdel Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-energy radiation from the central T Tauri and protostars plays an important role in shaping protoplanetary disks and influences their evolution. Such radiation, in particular X-rays and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV radiation, is predominantly generated in unstable stellar magnetic fields (e.g., the stellar corona, but also in accretion hot spots. Even jets may produce X-ray emission. Cosmic rays, i.e., high-energy particles either from the interstellar space or from the star itself, are of crucial importance. Both highenergy photons and particles ionize disk gas and lead to heating. Ionization and heating subsequently drive chemical networks, and the products of these processes are accessible through observations of molecular line emission. Furthermore, ionization supports the magnetorotational instability and therefore drives disk accretion, while heating of the disk surface layers induces photoevaporative flows. Both processes are crucial for the dispersal of protoplanetary disks and therefore critical for the time scales of planet formation. This chapter introduces the basic physics of ionization and heating starting from a quantum mechanical viewpoint, then discusses relevant processes in astrophysical gases and their applications to protoplanetary disks, and finally summarizes some properties of the most important high-energy sources for protoplanetary disks.

  9. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    Thompson, David J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TeV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  10. From cosmic ray physics to cosmic ray astronomy: Bruno Rossi and the opening of new windows on the universe

    Bonolis, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Bruno Rossi is considered one of the fathers of modern physics, being also a pioneer in virtually every aspect of what is today called high-energy astrophysics. At the beginning of 1930s he was the pioneer of cosmic ray research in Italy, and, as one of the leading actors in the study of the nature and behavior of the cosmic radiation, he witnessed the birth of particle physics and was one of the main investigators in this fields for many years. While cosmic ray physics moved more and more to...

  11. Stochastic Variations of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    The generalized anisotropic diffusion tensor, streams and drift velocities of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) for the three dimensional Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) have been analysed. Stochastic and regular changes of GCR, especially 11-year and 27-day variations have been studied. It is stressed that in seventies the generalized anisotropic diffusion tensor has been rarely used due to lack of the direct evidence of the latitudinal component of the IMF. However, now this tensor must be largely used as far as the experimental data and theoretical investigations show the existence of the latitudinal component of the IMF, i.e. heliospheric magnetic field is three-dimensional. The nature of the 11-year variation of GCR is critically considered. It is concluded that the general mechanism of the 11-year variation of GCR must be the change of the structure of the stochastic IMF. Particularly the effective size of the irregularities of the IMF responsible for the diffusion of GCR increases in the minima epochs of solar activity with respect to the maxima epochs. Thus, the different character of the diffusion of GCR in different epochs of solar activity is the general mechanism of 11-year variation of GCR. The temporal changes of the energy spectrum of the 11-year variations of GCR versus the solar activity, namely soft energy spectrum in the maxima epochs and hard one in the minima epochs, conform this conclusion. The modelling and experimental investigations show that the amplitude of the 27-day variations of GCR is greater about 1.5 times in the period of the q A>0 solar magnetic cycle than in the period of the solar magnetic cycle q A<0, which is not yet well explained according to the modern theory of GCR modulation. (author)

  12. Cosmic rays and the search for a Lorentz Invariance Violation

    This is an introductory review about the ongoing search for a signal of Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) in cosmic rays. We first summarise basic aspects of cosmic rays, focusing on rays of ultrahigh energy (UHECRs). We discuss the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) energy cutoff for cosmic protons, which is predicted due to photopion production in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This is a process of modest energy in the proton rest frame. It can be investigated to a high precision in the laboratory, if Lorentz transformations apply even at factors γ∼O(1011). For heavier nuclei, the energy attenuation is even faster due to photo-disintegration, again if this process is Lorentz invariant. Hence the viability of Lorentz symmetry up to tremendous γ-factors-far beyond accelerator tests-is a central issue. Next, we comment on conceptual aspects of Lorentz Invariance and the possibility of its spontaneous breaking. This could lead to slightly particle dependent 'Maximal Attainable Velocities'. We discuss their effect in decays, Cerenkov radiation, the GZK cutoff and neutrino oscillation in cosmic rays. We also review the search for LIV in cosmic γ-rays. For multi-TeV γ-rays, we encounter another possible puzzle related to the transparency of the CMB, similar to the GZK cutoff, due to electron/positron creation and subsequent inverse Compton scattering. The photons emitted in a Gamma Ray Burst occur at lower energies, but their very long path provides access to information not that far from the Planck scale. We discuss conceivable nonlinear photon dispersions based on non-commutative geometry or effective approaches. No LIV has been observed so far. However, even extremely tiny LIV effects could change the predictions for cosmic ray physics drastically. An Appendix is devoted to the recent results by the Pierre Auger Collaboration, in particular the hypothesis that nearby Active Galactic Nuclei-or objects next to them-could be the UHECR sources.

  13. Cosmic rays and the search for a Lorentz Invariance Violation

    This is an introductory review about the on-going search for a signal of Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) in cosmic rays. We first summarise basic aspects of cosmic rays, focusing on rays of ultra high energy (UHECRs). We discuss the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) energy cutoff for cosmic protons, which is predicted due to photopion production in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This is a process of modest energy in the proton rest frame. It can be investigated to a high precision in the laboratory, if Lorentz transformations apply even at factors γ ∝ O(1011). For heavier nuclei the energy attenuation is even faster due to photo-disintegration, again if this process is Lorentz invariant. Hence the viability of Lorentz symmetry up to tremendous γ-factors - far beyond accelerator tests - is a central issue. Next we comment on conceptual aspects of Lorentz Invariance and the possibility of its spontaneous breaking. This could lead to slightly particle dependent ''Maximal Attainable Velocities''. We discuss their effect in decays, Cerenkov radiation, the GZK cutoff and neutrino oscillation in cosmic rays. We also review the search for LIV in cosmic γ-rays. For multi TeV γ-rays we possibly encounter another puzzle related to the transparency of the CMB, similar to the GZK cutoff, due to electron/positron creation and subsequent inverse Compton scattering. The photons emitted in a Gamma Ray Burst occur at lower energies, but their very long path provides access to information not far from the Planck scale. We discuss conceivable non-linear photon dispersions based on non-commutative geometry or effective approaches. No LIV has been observed so far. However, even extremely tiny LIV effects could change the predictions for cosmic ray physics drastically. An Appendix is devoted to the recent hypothesis by the Pierre Auger Collaboration, which identifies nearby Active Galactic Nuclei - or objects next to them - as probable UHECR sources. (orig.)

  14. Characterizing the Sites of Hadronic Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    Pihlstrom, Ylva; Mesler, R.; Sjouwerman, L.; Frail, D.; Claussen, M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued that supernova remnant (SNRs) shocks are the acceleration sites for galactic cosmic rays. While this has been established for electrons, solid evidence for hadrons constituting the bulk of the cosmic rays have been lacking. Models of hadronic cosmic ray acceleration in SNRs predict a gamma-ray flux density depending on parameters like the environment density and distance. Few reliable estimates of those parameters exist. SNRs with cosmic rays interacting with molecular clouds are expected to be bright gamma-ray sources, and these sites can be traced using 1720 MHz OH masers. The masers give information about the density and kinematical distance estimates. Only 10% of galactic SNRs harbor OH masers, and we have therefore searched for a more frequently occurring SNR/cloud interaction tracer. We have detected 36 GHz and 44 GHz methanol masers associated with a few SNRs. Here we report on the result of a search for methanol masers in 21 SNRs, and in particular the details of our detections in Sgr A East. Combining observations and modeling of methanol masers in SNRs, we aim to better constrain the density and distance to SNRs with TeV emission. The goal is to test the hadronic cosmic ray models and to understand the mechanisms of particle acceleration in SNRs. This project is supported under NASA-Fermi grant NNX10A055G.

  15. Topics on Cosmic Rays. v.1

    Some theoretical and experimental results concerning with cosmic radiation works or with related ones, mainly of the Brazil-Japan Collaboration, are presented in honor of the 60th aniversary of C.M.G. Lattes. (L.C.)

  16. Winds, Clumps, and Interacting Cosmic Rays in M82

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Gallagher, J S; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2013-01-01

    We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07/yr. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and \\gamma-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are...

  17. Studies in Chaotic adiabatic dynamics

    Chaotic adiabatic dynamics refers to the study of systems exhibiting chaotic evolution under slowly time-dependent equations of motion. In this dissertation the author restricts his attention to Hamiltonian chaotic adiabatic systems. The results presented are organized around a central theme, namely, that the energies of such systems evolve diffusively. He begins with a general analysis, in which he motivates and derives a Fokker-Planck equation governing this process of energy diffusion. He applies this equation to study the open-quotes goodnessclose quotes of an adiabatic invariant associated with chaotic motion. This formalism is then applied to two specific examples. The first is that of a gas of noninteracting point particles inside a hard container that deforms slowly with time. Both the two- and three-dimensional cases are considered. The results are discussed in the context of the Wall Formula for one-body dissipation in nuclear physics, and it is shown that such a gas approaches, asymptotically with time, an exponential velocity distribution. The second example involves the Fermi mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays. Explicit evolution equations are obtained for the distribution of cosmic ray energies within this model, and the steady-state energy distribution that arises when this equation is modified to account for the injection and removal of cosmic rays is discussed. Finally, the author re-examines the multiple-time-scale approach as applied to the study of phase space evolution under a chaotic adiabatic Hamiltonian. This leads to a more rigorous derivation of the above-mentioned Fokker-Planck equation, and also to a new term which has relevance to the problem of chaotic adiabatic reaction forces (the forces acting on slow, heavy degrees of freedom due to their coupling to light, fast chaotic degrees)

  18. Dark matter identification with cosmic-ray antideuterons

    von Doetinchem, Philip

    2016-05-01

    Recent years have seen increased theoretical and experimental effort towards the first-ever detection of cosmic-ray antideuterons, in particular as an indirect signature of dark matter annihilation or decay. In contrast to indirect dark matter searches with positrons, antiprotons, or gamma-rays, which suffer from relatively high and uncertain astrophysical backgrounds, searches with antideuterons benefit from very suppressed conventional backgrounds, offering a potential breakthrough in unexplored phase space for dark matter. This report is a condensed summary of the article “Review of the theoretical and experimental status of dark matter identification with cosmic-ray antideuteron” [1].

  19. Cosmic-ray Propagation and Interactions in the Galaxy

    Strong, Andrew W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Ptuskin, Vladimir S.; /Troitsk, IZMIRAN

    2007-01-22

    We survey the theory and experimental tests for the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy up to energies of 10{sup 15} eV. A guide to the previous reviews and essential literature is given, followed by an exposition of basic principles. The basic ideas of cosmic-ray propagation are described, and the physical origin of its processes are explained. The various techniques for computing the observational consequences of the theory are described and contrasted. These include analytical and numerical techniques. We present the comparison of models with data including direct and indirect--especially gamma-ray--observations, and indicate what we can learn about cosmic-ray propagation. Some particular important topics including electrons and antiparticles are chosen for discussion.

  20. Particle and astrophysics aspects of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the major unresolved astrophysical questions. In particular, the highest energy cosmic rays observed possess macroscopic energies and their origin is likely to be associated with the most energetic processes in the Universe. Their existence triggered a flurry of theoretical explanations ranging from conventional shock acceleration to particle physics beyond the Standard Model and processes taking place at the earliest moments of our Universe. Furthermore, many new experimental activities promise a strong increase of statistics at the highest energies and a combination with γ-ray and neutrino astrophysics will put strong constraints on these theoretical models. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations indicate that charged ultra-high energy cosmic rays can also be used as probes of large scale magnetic fields whose origin may open another window into the very early Universe. We give an overview over this quickly evolving research field. (author)

  1. Cosmological Simulations of Dwarf Galaxies with Cosmic Ray Feedback

    Chen, Jingjing; Salem, Munier

    2016-01-01

    We perform zoom-in cosmological simulations of a suite of dwarf galaxies, examining the impact of cosmic-rays generated by supernovae, including the effect of diffusion. We first look at the effect of varying the uncertain cosmic ray parameters by repeatedly simulating a single galaxy. Then we fix the comic ray model and simulate five dwarf systems with virial masses range from 8-30 $\\times 10^{10}$ Msun. We find that including cosmic ray feedback (with diffusion) consistently leads to disk dominated systems with relatively flat rotation curves and constant star formation rates. In contrast, our purely thermal feedback case results in a hot stellar system and bursty star formation. The CR simulations very well match the observed baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, but have a lower gas fraction than in real systems. We also find that the dark matter cores of the CR feedback galaxies are cuspy, while the purely thermal feedback case results in a substantial core.

  2. The Eddington Limit in Cosmic Rays: An Explanation for the Observed Faintness of Starbursting Galaxies

    Socrates, A; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Socrates, Aristotle; Davis, Shane W.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    We show that the luminosity of a star forming galaxy is capped by the production and subsequent expulsion of cosmic rays from its interstellar medium. By defining an Eddington luminosity in cosmic rays, we show that the star formation rate of a given galaxy is limited by its mass content and the cosmic ray mean free path. When the cosmic ray luminosity and pressure reaches a critical value as a result of vigorous star formation, hydrostatic balance is lost, a cosmic ray-driven wind develops, and star formation is choked off. Cosmic ray pressure-driven winds are likely to produce wind velocities significantly in excess of the galactic escape velocity. It is possible that cosmic ray feedback results in the Faber-Jackson relation for a plausible set of input parameters that describe cosmic ray production and transport, which are calibrated by observations of the Milky Way's interstellar cosmic rays.

  3. Cosmic Ray-Air Shower Measurement from Space

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1997-01-01

    A feasibility study has been initiated to observe from space the highest energy cosmic rays above 1021 eV. A satellite observatory concept, the Maximum-energy Auger (Air)-Shower Satellite (MASS), is recently renamed as the Orbital Wide-angle Collector (OWL) by taking its unique feature of using a very wide field-of-view (FOV) optics. A huge array of imaging devices (about 10(exp 6) pixels) is required to detect and record fluorescent light profiles of cosmic ray cascades in the atmosphere. The FOV of MASS could extend to as large as about 60 in. diameter, which views (500 - 1000 km) of earth's surface and more than 300 - 1000 cosmic ray events per year could be observed above 1020 eV. From far above the atmosphere, the MASS/OWL satellite should be capable of observing events at all angles including near horizontal tracks, and would have considerable aperture for high energy photon and neutrino observation. With a large aperture and the spatial and temporal resolution, MASS could determine the energy spectrum, the mass composition, and arrival anisotropy of cosmic rays from 1020 eV to 1022 eV; a region hitherto not explored by ground-based detectors such as the Fly's Eye and air-shower arrays. MASS/OWL's ability to identify cosmic neutrinos and gamma rays may help providing evidence for the theory which attributes the above cut-off cosmic ray flux to the decay of topological defects. Very wide FOV optics system of MASS/OWL with a large array of imaging devices is applicable to observe other atmospheric phenomena including upper atmospheric lightning. The wide FOV MASS optics being developed can also improve ground-based gamma-ray observatories by allowing simultaneous observation of many gamma ray sources located at different constellations.

  4. Cosmic ray physics in calculations of cosmological structure formation

    Ensslin, Torsten A.; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Jubelgas, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) play a decisive role within our own Galaxy. They provide partial pressure support against gravity, they trace past energetic events such as supernovae, and they reveal the underlying structure of the baryonic matter distribution through their interactions. To study the impact of CRs on galaxy and cosmic structure formation and evolution, we develop an approximative framework for treating dynamical and radiative effects of CRs in cosmological simulations. Our guiding principl...

  5. Significance of medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy in the study of cosmic rays

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the medium-energy (about 10-30 MeV) galactic gamma-ray radiation from primary and secondary electrons and calculates the expected gamma-ray distribution for the specific model of Bignami et al. (1975) on the assumption that the cosmic rays are correlated with the matter on the scale of galactic arms. The energy spectrum typical of regions near the galactic center indicates a dramatic shift from a predominantly cosmic-ray nucleonic mechanism at higher energies to a cosmic-ray electron mechanism at the lower energies. This provides a most important and direct means of probing the cosmic-ray electrons as a function of galactic position by making gamma-ray observations in the few to 40 MeV energy range. Medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy is shown to be a valuable tool in galactic research.

  6. Measurements of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic rays

    The galactic cosmic-ray boron and carbon isotopic composition has been measured. The boron measurement is the first ever made in nuclear emulsion. The carbon measurement has substantially improved the statistical assuracy in the determination of the 13C abundance as compared to an earlier measurement using the same technique. Mass-spectra of cosmic-ray carbon and oxygen in different zenith angle intervals have been compared with calculated spectra. The method makes it possible to study experimentally the atmospheric influence on the primary cosmic-ray isotopic composition. Photometric measurements on fragments from oxygen-induced interactions in nuclear emulsion have been made. Accurate charge assignments have been made on all heavy fragments which has made it possible to study the interaction exclusively event-by-event. Measurements on the isotopic composition of primary cosmic-ray neom have been made. The data are from the Danish-French instrument on the HEAO-3 satellite. The rigidity dependent filtering of the cosmic rays by the Earth's magnetic field has been used. The energy dependence of the 22Ne/20Ne-ratio and its astrophysical implications are discussed. (Author)

  7. Modified non-linear Burgers' equations and cosmic ray shocks

    Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Mckenzie, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    A reductive perturbation scheme is used to derive a generalized non-linear Burgers' equation, which includes the effects of dispersion, in the long wavelength regime for the two-fluid hydrodynamical model used to describe cosmic ray acceleration by the first-order Fermi process in astrophysical shocks. The generalized Burger's equation is derived for both relativistic and non-relativistic cosmic ray shocks, and describes the time evolution of weak shocks in the theory of diffusive shock acceleration. The inclusion of dispersive effects modifies the phase velocity of the shock obtained from the lower order non-linear Burger's equation through the introduction of higher order terms from the long wavelength dispersion equation. The travelling wave solution of the generalized Burgers' equation for a single shock shows that larger cosmic ray pressures result in broader shock transitions. The results for relativistic shocks show a steepening of the shock as the shock speed approaches the relativistic cosmic ray sound speed. The dependence of the shock speed on the cosmic ray pressure is also discussed.

  8. Cosmic-ray transport in the galactic magnetosphere

    It is advantageous to regard cosmic rays as the constitutent particles of the Galactic radiation belts and cosmic ray energization as a consequence of inward radial diffusion in the quasi-dipolar Galactic magnetosphere. This process occurs in addition to Fermi acceleration. The purpose of this work is to explore a magnetospheric explanation for the elevation of Galactic charged particles to cosmic ray energies. The magnetosphere that is of interest in this context is not a planetary magnetosphere but a galactic magnetosphere entirely analogous to those inferred from radio observations of distant galaxies. It is the magnetosphere of the Milky Way. Cosmic rays are (by this interpretation) the charged particles that constitute the radiation belts of the Galactic magnetosphere. Thus, the mechanism by which charged particles attain cosmic-ray energies is presumable the mechanism by which radiation-belt particles attain high energies in more familiar magnetosphere, i.e., the radial diffusion associated with magnetic disturbances that contain spectral power resonant with the azimuthal drift of the particles

  9. Experimental Summary: Very High Energy Cosmic Rays and their Interactions

    Kampert Karl-Heinz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The XVII International Symposium on Very High Energy Cosmic Ray Interactions, held in August of 2012 in Berlin, was the first one in the history of the Symposium,where a plethora of high precision LHC data with relevance for cosmic ray physics was presented. This report aims at giving a brief summary of those measurements andit discusses their relevance for observations of high energy cosmic rays. Enormous progress has been made also in air shower observations and in direct measurements of cosmic rays, exhibiting many more structure in the cosmic ray energy spectrum than just a simple power law with a knee and an ankle. At the highest energy, the flux suppression may not be dominated by the GZK-effect but by the limiting energy of a nearby source or source population. New projects and application of new technologies promise further advances also in the near future. We shall discuss the experimental and theoretical progress in the field and its prospects for coming years.

  10. Extragalactic cosmic ray self-confinement around sources

    Blasi, P; D'Angelo, M

    2015-01-01

    Most models of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays rely on the existence of luminous extragalactic sources. Cosmic rays escaping the galaxy where the source is located produce a sufficiently large electric current to justify the investigation of plasma instabilities induced by such current. Most interesting is the excitation of modes that lead to production of magnetic perturbations that may scatter particles thereby hindering their escape, or at least changing the propagation mode of escaping cosmic rays. We argue that self-generation of waves may force cosmic rays to be confined in the source proximity for energies $E\\lesssim 10^{7} L_{44}^{2/3}$ GeV for low background magnetic fields ($B_{0}\\ll nG$). For larger values of $B_{0}$, cosmic rays are confined close to their sources for energies $E\\lesssim 2\\times 10^{8} \\lambda_{10} L_{44}^{1/4} B_{-10}^{1/2}$ GeV, where $B_{-10}$ is the field in units of $0.1$ nG, $\\lambda_{10}$ is its coherence length in units of 10 Mpc and $L_{44}$ is the source lumi...

  11. The Energetic Trans-Iron Cosmic-ray Experiment (ENTICE)

    Binns, W. R.; Adams. J. H.; Barghouty, A. F.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Hams, T.; Israel, M. H.; Labrador, A. W.; Leske, R. A.; Link, J. T.; Mewwaldt, R. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Sasaki, M.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    The ENTICE experiment is one of two instruments that comprise the "Orbiting Astrophysical Spectrometer in Space (OASIS)", which is presently undergoing a NASA "Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study". ENTICE is designed to make high precision measurements of the abundances of individual elements from neon through the actinides and, in addition, will search for possible superheavy nuclei in the galactic cosmic rays. The ENTICE instrument utilizes silicon detectors, aerogel and acrylic Cherenkov counters, and a scintillating optical fiber hodoscope to measure the charge and energy of these ultra-heavy nuclei for energies greater than 0.5 GeV/nucleon. It is a large instrument consisting of four modules with a total effective geometrical factor of approx.20 sq m sr. Measurements made in space for a period of three years with ENTICE will enable us to determine if cosmic rays include a component of recently synthesized transuranic elements (Pu-94 and Cm-96), to measure the age of that component, and to test the model of the OB association origin of galactic cosmic rays. Additionally, these observations will enable us to study how diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays operates differently on interstellar grains and gas. Keywords: cosmic rays Galaxy:abundances

  12. Estimates of galactic cosmic ray shielding requirements during solar minimum

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Wilson, John W.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates of radiation risk from galactic cosmic rays are presented for manned interplanetary missions. The calculations use the Naval Research Laboratory cosmic ray spectrum model as input into the Langley Research Center galactic cosmic ray transport code. This transport code, which transports both heavy ions and nucleons, can be used with any number of layers of target material, consisting of up to five different arbitrary constituents per layer. Calculated galactic cosmic ray fluxes, dose and dose equivalents behind various thicknesses of aluminum, water and liquid hydrogen shielding are presented for the solar minimum period. Estimates of risk to the skin and the blood-forming organs (BFO) are made using 0-cm and 5-cm depth dose/dose equivalent values, respectively, for water. These results indicate that at least 3.5 g/sq cm (3.5 cm) of water, or 6.5 g/sq cm (2.4 cm) of aluminum, or 1.0 g/sq cm (14 cm) of liquid hydrogen shielding is required to reduce the annual exposure below the currently recommended BFO limit of 0.5 Sv. Because of large uncertainties in fragmentation parameters and the input cosmic ray spectrum, these exposure estimates may be uncertain by as much as a factor of 2 or more. The effects of these potential exposure uncertainties or shield thickness requirements are analyzed.

  13. Origin of very high and ultra high energy cosmic rays

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    While there is some level of consensus on a Galactic origin of cosmic rays up to the knee ($E_{k}\\sim 3\\times 10^{15}$ eV) and on an extragalactic origin of cosmic rays with energy above $\\sim 10^{19}$ eV, the debate on the genesis of cosmic rays in the intermediate energy region has received much less attention, mainly because of the ambiguity intrinsic in defining such a region. The energy range between $10^{17}$ eV and $\\sim 10^{19}$ eV is likely to be the place where the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays takes place. Hence the origin of these particles, though being of the highest importance from the physics point of view, it is also one of the most difficult aspects to investigate. Here I will illustrate some ideas concerning the sites of acceleration of these particles and the questions that their investigation may help answer, including the origin of \\underline{ultra} high energy cosmic rays.

  14. Cosmic Ray Results from the CosmoALEPH Experiment

    Grupen, C. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Hashim, N.-O. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Jost, B. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Maciuc, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Luitz, S. [SLAC M/S 41, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Mailov, A. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Mueller, A.-S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Putzer, A. [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rensch, B. [erphi electronics GmbH, Gewerbering 15, D-83607 Holzkirchen (Germany); Sander, H.-G. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Schmeling, S. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Schmelling, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Tcaciuc, R. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Wachsmuth, H.; Ziegler, Th. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Zuber, K. [University of Sussex, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15

    CosmoALEPH is an experiment operated in conjunction with the ALEPH detector. The ALEPH experiment took data from 1989 until the year 2000 at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) at CERN. It provides, among others, high resolution tracking and calorimetry. CosmoALEPH used this e{sup +}e{sup -} detector for cosmic ray studies. In addition, six scintillator telescopes were installed in the ALEPH pit and the LEP tunnel. The whole experiment operated underground at a vertical depth of 320 meter water equivalent. Data from ALEPH and the scintillator telescopes provide informaton on the lateral distribution of energetic cosmic ray muons in extensive air showers. The decoherence curve of these remnant air shower muons is sensitive to the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays and to the interaction characteristics of energetic hadrons in the atmosphere. An attempt is made to extract the various interdependencies in describing the propagation of primary and secondary cosmic rays through the atmosphere and the rock overburden, and comparing the data with results from Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Results on the multiplicity distributions of remnant air shower muons in ALEPH are also compared with expectations based on MC simulations. Data on the cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio up to momenta of 3 TeV/c as obtained with the time projection chamber in ALEPH's strong magnetic field are presented. The large number of events also allowed to unambiguously observe muon tridents and to estimate the cross section for this process.

  15. Propagation of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere

    Cosmic rays are composed of charged particles, which arrive after a long travel through the Galaxy on Earth. Supernova explosions are considered to be galactic sources, which accelerate these particles up to energies around 1018 eV. Beyond this energy, one supposes that the extragalactic sources, like active galaxy nuclei (AGN), gamma ray bursts or pulsars, are the origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays. The spectral index of the elemental energy distributions of cosmic rays reflects the dynamic of its propagation, particularly the conjugation of the effects connected to the cosmic ray source spectrum and those connected to its propagation (acceleration, absorption and escape). The evolution of the spectral index with the cosmic-ray particle energy constitutes a sensitive test of the components, which determine this evolution. The precise index measurement of individual elemental spectra of the cosmic rays by AMS up to TeV and by the experiment CREAM beyond it, from TeV to PeV, will permit to proceed in this problematic. One of the difficulties on this measurement is to take well into account the systematic errors. During the data analysis we have to take into account in particular the interaction (diffusion and fragmentation) of the ions while their travel through the Earth's atmosphere. The study of the interaction and the fragmentation of these ions in the atmosphere is hence indispensable and described in this work. The study is based on a matrix calculation, which had been successfully implemented and tested and which has permitted to analyse the effects, caused by the experimental uncertainties on the cross sections, on the spectral index measurement. (author)

  16. Cosmic rays and terrestrial life: A brief review

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.

    2014-01-01

    “The investigation into the possible effects of cosmic rays on living organisms will also offer great interest.” - Victor F. Hess, Nobel Lecture, December 12, 1936 High-energy radiation bursts are commonplace in our Universe. From nearby solar flares to distant gamma ray bursts, a variety of physical processes accelerate charged particles to a wide range of energies, which subsequently reach the Earth. Such particles contribute to a number of physical processes occurring in the Earth system. A large fraction of the energy of charged particles gets deposited in the atmosphere, ionizing it, causing changes in its chemistry and affecting the global electric circuit. Remaining secondary particles contribute to the background dose of cosmic rays on the surface and parts of the subsurface region. Life has evolved over the past ∼3 billion years in presence of this background radiation, which itself has varied considerably during the period [1-3]. As demonstrated by the Miller-Urey experiment, lightning plays a very important role in the formation of complex organic molecules, which are the building blocks of more complex structures forming life. There is growing evidence of increase in the lightning rate with increasing flux of charged particles. Is there a connection between enhanced rate of cosmic rays and the origin of life? Cosmic ray secondaries are also known to damage DNA and cause mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. It is now possible to compute radiation doses from secondary particles, in particular muons and neutrons. Have the variations in cosmic ray flux affected the evolution of life on earth? We describe the mechanisms of cosmic rays affecting terrestrial life and review the potential implications of the variation of high-energy astrophysical radiation on the history of life on earth.

  17. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    Baerwald, Philipp [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Inst. for Gravitation and the Cosmos; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  18. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  19. High-energy cosmic rays measured with KASCADE-Grande

    Haungs, A; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Curcio, C; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, D; Wochele, J

    2013-01-01

    The detection of high-energy cosmic rays above a few hundred TeV is realized by the observation of extensive air-showers. By using the multi-detector setup of KASCADE-Grande, energy spectrum, elemental composition, and anisotropies of high-energy cosmic rays in the energy range from below the knee up to 2 EeV are investigated. In addition, the large high-quality data set permits distinct tests of the validity of hadronic interaction models used in interpreting air-shower measurements. After more than 16 years, the KASCADE-Grande experiment terminated measurements end of 2012. This contribution will give an overview of the main results of the data analysis achieved so far, and will report about the status of KCDC, the KASCADE Cosmic-ray Data Center, where via a web-based interface the data will be made available for the interested public.

  20. Investigation of cosmic ray-cloud connections using MISR

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Numerous empirical studies have analyzed International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data and reached contradictory conclusions regarding the influence of solar-modulated galactic cosmic rays on cloud fraction and cloud properties. The Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument on the Terra satellite has been in continuous operation for 13 years and thus provides an independent (and previously unutilized) cloud data set to investigate purported solar-cloud links. Furthermore, unlike many previous solar-climate studies that report cloud fraction MISR measures albedo, which has clearer climatological relevance. Our long-term analysis of MISR data finds no statistically significant correlations between cosmic rays and global albedo or globally averaged cloud height, and no evidence for any regional or lagged correlations. Moreover, epoch superposition analysis of Forbush decreases reveals no detectable albedo response to cosmic ray decreases, thereby placing an upper limit on the possible influ...

  1. Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory

    The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations

  2. Regional cosmic ray induced ionization and geomagnetic field changes

    G. A. Kovaltsov

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic ray induced ionization (CRII is an important factor of outer space influences on atmospheric properties. Variations of CRII are caused by two different processes – solar activity variations, which modulate the cosmic ray flux in interplanetary space, and changes of the geomagnetic field, which affects the cosmic ray access to Earth. Migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may greatly alter CRII in some regions on a time scale of centuries and longer. Here we present a study of CRII regional effects of the geomagnetic field changes during the last millennium for two regions: Europe and the Far East. We show that regional effects of the migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may overcome global changes due to solar activity variations.

  3. Trek and ECCO: Abundance measurements of ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays

    Using the Trek detector, we have measured the abundances of the heaviest elements (with Z>70) in the galactic cosmic rays with sufficient charge resolution to resolve the even-Z elements. We find that the abundance of Pb compared to Pt is ∼3 times lower than the value expected from the most widely-held class of models of the origin of galactic cosmic ray nuclei, that is, origination in a partially ionized medium with solar-like composition. The low abundance of Pb is, however, consistent with the interstellar gas and dust model of Meyer, Drury and Ellison, and with a source enriched in r-process material, proposed by Binns et al. A high-resolution, high-statistics measurement of the abundances of the individual actinides would distinguish between these models. This is the goal of ECCO, the Extremely Heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer, which we plan to deploy on the International Space Station

  4. Cosmogenic neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic ray models

    Aloisio, R.; Boncioli, D.; di Matteo, A.; Grillo, A. F.; Petrera, S.; Salamida, F.

    2015-10-01

    We use an updated version of SimProp, a Monte Carlo simulation scheme for the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, to compute cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on Earth in various scenarios. These fluxes are compared with the newly detected IceCube events at PeV energies and with recent experimental limits at EeV energies of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This comparison allows us to draw some interesting conclusions about the source models for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We will show how the available experimental observations are almost at the level of constraining such models, mainly in terms of the injected chemical composition and cosmological evolution of sources. The results presented here will also be important in the evaluation of the discovery capabilities of the future planned ultra-high energy cosmic ray and neutrino observatories.

  5. Cosmogenic neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic ray models

    Aloisio, R; di Matteo, A; Grillo, A F; Petrera, S; Salamida, F

    2015-01-01

    We use an updated version of SimProp, a Monte Carlo simulation scheme for the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, to compute cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on Earth in various scenarios. These fluxes are compared with the newly detected IceCube events at PeV energies and with recent experimental limits at EeV energies of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This comparison allows us to draw some interesting conclusions about the source models for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We will show how the available experimental observations are almost at the level of constraining such models, mainly in terms of the injected chemical composition and cosmological evolution of sources. The results presented here will also be important in the evaluation of the discovery capabilities of the future planned ultra-high energy cosmic ray and neutrino observatories.

  6. Identifying Galactic Cosmic Ray Origins With Super-TIGER

    deNolfo, Georgia; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Christian, E. R.; Mitchell, J. W.; Hams, T.; Link, J. T.; Sasaki, M.; Labrador, A. W.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    Super-TIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is a new long-duration balloon-borne instrument designed to test and clarify an emerging model of cosmic-ray origins and models for atomic processes by which nuclei are selected for acceleration. A sensitive test of the origin of cosmic rays is the measurement of ultra heavy elemental abundances (Z > or equal 30). Super-TIGER is a large-area (5 sq m) instrument designed to measure the elements in the interval 30 TIGER builds on the heritage of the smaller TIGER, which produced the first well-resolved measurements of elemental abundances of the elements Ga-31, Ge-32, and Se-34. We present the Super-TIGER design, schedule, and progress to date, and discuss the relevance of UH measurements to cosmic-ray origins.

  7. Cosmic X-ray spectroscopy with multilayer optics

    Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Martinez, Dennis S.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer optics operated at normal incidence offer a powerful new technology for the study of the solar spectrum in the XUV. The spectra of most cosmic X-ray sources are strongly extinguished at wavelengths above 40 A due to absorption and scattering by interstellar grains. We describe a number of configurations which allow multilayer optics to be used at nonnormal angles of incidence in conjunction with grazing incidence optics to analyze the spectra of cosmic X-ray sources in the wavelength interval between 1.5 and 40 A. These optical configurations utilize both multilayer mirrors and gratings, and permit the efficient observation of extended sources using stigmatic spectrographs. The response of the instruments described to typical cosmic X-ray sources is also discussed.

  8. The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) timing charge detector

    The use of detectors based on plastic scintillator with photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) is common in cosmic-ray experiments to differentiate particle charges. However, in the presence of a calorimeter, the standard method of pulse charge integration over a time longer than a PMT pulse is hampered by abundant albedo particles. The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) instrument surmounts this problem by measuring the peak voltage of the PMT pulse within ∼3ns of a threshold crossing in the readout of a timing charge detector (TCD). The design and performance of the TCD is presented. A charge resolution of 0.2e for oxygen and 0.4e for iron is obtained for through-going cosmic-ray particles.

  9. The acceleration of cosmic rays by shock waves

    The direct transfer of energy to cosmic rays from supersonic motions of the background medium via shock waves, by means of an efficient first order Fermi mechanism, is considered. The acceleration of cosmic rays by shock waves is most effective in the dilute and hot, 1,000,000-K component of the interstellar medium. There is no limit to the energy that can be achieved by shock acceleration, if enough time is available and the particles can be contained in the vicinity of the shock. The two basic first order Fermi mechanisms contributing to the overall process of shock acceleration of cosmic rays are reflection at, or transmission through, the magnetic field jump associated with the shock, and multiple reflection between the media upstream and downstream of the shock, due to the presence of waves that scatter the particles in pitch angle

  10. Partial ring currents and cosmic ray magnetic cutoff rigidity variations

    A short introduction on cosmic ray modulation and a description of the magnetosphere, and of some physical processes occurring within its boundaries are presented. 20 geomagnetic storms are analysed together with the cosmic ray intensities during these storms as measured by Neutron Monitors. Using a semi-empirical method, the variations in the magnetic cutoff rigidity for the mountain stations Pic du Midi and Jungfraujoch are deduced. These stations are the most sensitive for measuring these variations. The analysis shows that all analyzed storms have an asymmetric development phase. Often the asymmetry even continues during part of the recovery phase. It is shown that variations in magnetic cutoff rigidity occur only during the asymmetric phase of the storm. The largest variations are found when the cosmic ray station is located in the late afternoon-midnight sector. (Auth.)

  11. FPGA development board for applications in cosmic rays physics

    The modern experiments in cosmic rays and particle physics are usually performed with large number of detectors and signal processing have to be done by complex electronics. The analog signals from the detectors are converted to digital (by discriminators or fast ADC) and connected to different type of logic implemented in FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays). A FPGA development board based on Xilinx XC3S50AN was designed, assembled and tested. The board will be used for developing a modern registering controller (to replace the existing now) for the muon telescope in the University and can be used for other experiments in cosmic rays physics when fast digital pulses have to be processed. Keywords: FPGA, Spartan3A, muon telescope, cosmic rays variations

  12. Photon losses in cosmic ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    Colgate, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies, and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10/sup 20/ eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10/sup 13/. Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultrahigh energy cosmic ray 10/sup 20/ eV by greater than 10/sup 4/ times its energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can avoid disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultrahigh energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found.

  13. Cosmic Rays from the Knee to the Ankle

    Haungs, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of the energy spectrum as well as the mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range of PeVto EeV are important for understanding both, the origin of the galactic and the extragalactic cosmic rays. Recently, three modern experimental installations (KASCADE-Grande, IceTop, Tunka-133), dedicated to investigate this primary energy range, have published new results on the all-particle energy spectrum. In this short review these results are presented and the similarities and differences discussed. In addition, the effects of using different hadronic interaction models for interpreting the measured air-shower data will be examined. Finally, a brief discussion on the question if the present results are in agreement or in contradiction with astrophysical models for the transition from galactic to 10 pagesextragalactic origin of cosmic rays completes this paper.

  14. The origins of cosmic rays and quantum effects on gravity

    Tomozawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays is explained by particles emitted during a thermal expansion of explosive objects inside and near the galaxy, remnants of which may be supernova and/or active talaxies, or even stars or galaxies that disappeared from our sight after the explosion. A power law energy spectrum for cosmic rays, E to the (-alpha -1, is obtained from an expansion rate T is proportional to R to the alpha. Using the solution of the Einstein equation, we obtain a spectrum which agrees very well with experimental data. The implication of an inflationary early universe on the cosmic ray spectrum is also discussed. It is also suggested that the conflict between this model and the singularity theorem in classical general relativity may be eliminated by quantum effects.

  15. Cosmic Ray Acceleration during Large Scale Structure Formation

    Blasi, P

    2004-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are storage rooms of cosmic rays. They confine the hadronic component of cosmic rays over cosmological time scales due to diffusion, and the electron component due to energy losses. Hadronic cosmic rays can be accelerated during the process of structure formation, because of the supersonic motion of gas in the potential wells created by dark matter. At the shock waves that result from this motion, charged particles can be energized through the first order Fermi process. After discussing the most important evidences for non-thermal phenomena in large scale structures, we describe in some detail the main issues related to the acceleration of particles at these shock waves, emphasizing the possible role of the dynamical backreaction of the accelerated particles on the plasmas involved.

  16. IONS (ANURADHA): Ionization states of low energy cosmic rays

    Biswas, S.; Chakraborti, R.; Cowsik, R.; Durgaprasad, N.; Kajarekar, P. J.; Singh, R. K.; Vahia, M. N.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutt, N.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    IONS (ANURADHA), the experimental payload designed specifically to determine the ionization states, flux, composition, energy spectra and arrival directions of low energy (10 to 100 MeV/amu) anomalous cosmic ray ions of helium to iron in near-Earth space, had a highly successful flight and operation Spacelab-3 mission. The experiment combines the accuracy of a highly sensitive CR-39 nuclear track detector with active components included in the payload to achieve the experimental objectives. Post-flight analysis of detector calibration pieces placed within the payload indicated no measurable changes in detector response due to its exposure in spacelab environment. Nuclear tracks produced by alpha-particles, oxygen group and Fe ions in low energy anomalous cosmic rays were identified. It is calculated that the main detector has recorded high quality events of about 10,000 alpha-particles and similar number of oxygen group and heavier ions of low energy cosmic rays.

  17. The COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Interaction Code (COSMIC for use in data assimilation

    J. Shuttleworth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture status in land surface models (LSMs can be updated by assimilating cosmic-ray neutron intensity measured in air above the surface. This requires a fast and accurate model to calculate the neutron intensity from the profiles of soil moisture modeled by the LSM. The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX model is sufficiently accurate but too slow to be practical in the context of data assimilation. Consequently an alternative and efficient model is needed which can be calibrated accurately to reproduce the calculations made by MCNPX and used to substitute for MCNPX during data assimilation. This paper describes the construction and calibration of such a model, COSMIC, which is simple, physically-based and analytic and, because it runs at least 50 000 times faster than MCNPX, is appropriate in data assimilation applications. The model includes simple descriptions of (a degradation of the incoming high energy neutron flux with soil depth, (b creation of fast neutrons at each depth in the soil, and (c scattering of the resulting fast neutrons before they reach the soil surface, all of which processes may have parameterized dependency on the chemistry and moisture content of the soil. The site-to-site variability in the parameters used in COSMIC is explored for 42 sample sites in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS, and the comparative performance of COSMIC relative to MCNPX when applied to represent interactions between cosmic-ray neutrons and moist soilis explored. At an example site in Arizona, fast neutron counts calculated by COSMIC from the average soil moisture profile given by an independent network of point measurements in the COSMOS probe footprint are similar to the fast neutron intensity measured by the COSMOS probe. Moreover at this site application of data assimilation using COSMIC to update the Noah Land Surface Model constrains the modeled soil moisture such that it agrees with the values given

  18. Global simulations of galactic winds including cosmic ray streaming

    Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Zweibel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Galactic outflows play an important role in galactic evolution. Despite their importance, a detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for the driving of these winds is lacking. In an effort to gain more insight into the nature of these flows, we perform global three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of an isolated Milky Way-size starburst galaxy. We focus on the dynamical role of cosmic rays injected by supernovae, and specifically on the impact of the streaming and anisotropic diffusion of cosmic rays along the magnetic fields. We find that these microphysical effects can have a significant effect on the wind launching and mass loading factors depending on the details of the plasma physics. Due to the cosmic ray streaming instability, cosmic rays propagating in the interstellar medium scatter on self-excited Alfven waves and couple to the gas. When the wave growth due to the streaming instability is inhibited by some damping process, such as the turbulent damping, the cosmic ...

  19. Cosmic rays and stochastic magnetic reconnection in the heliotail

    P. Desiati

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be generated by diffusive shock acceleration processes in Supernova Remnants, and the arrival direction is likely determined by the distribution of their sources throughout the Galaxy, in particular by the nearest and youngest ones. Transport to Earth through the interstellar medium is expected to affect the cosmic ray properties as well. However, the observed anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays and its energy dependence cannot be explained with diffusion models of particle propagation in the Galaxy. Within a distance of a few parsec, diffusion regime is not valid and particles with energy below about 100 TeV must be influenced by the heliosphere and its elongated tail. The observation of a highly significant localized excess region of cosmic rays from the apparent direction of the downstream interstellar flow at 1–10 TeV energies might provide the first experimental evidence that the heliotail can affect the transport of energetic particles. In particular, TeV cosmic rays propagating through the heliotail interact with the 100–300 AU wide magnetic field polarity domains generated by the 11 yr cycles. Since the strength of non-linear convective processes is expected to be larger than viscous damping, the plasma in the heliotail is turbulent. Where magnetic field domains converge on each other due to solar wind gradient, stochastic magnetic reconnection likely occurs. Such processes may be efficient enough to re-accelerate a fraction of TeV particles as long as scattering processes are not strong. Therefore, the fractional excess of TeV cosmic rays from the narrow region toward the heliotail direction traces sightlines with the lowest smearing scattering effects, that can also explain the observation of a harder than average energy spectrum.

  20. Global diffusion of cosmic rays in random magnetic fields

    Snodin, A. P.; Shukurov, A.; Sarson, G. R.; Bushby, P. J.; Rodrigues, L. F. S.

    2016-04-01

    The propagation of charged particles, including cosmic rays, in a partially ordered magnetic field is characterized by a diffusion tensor whose components depend on the particle's Larmor radius RL and the degree of order in the magnetic field. Most studies of the particle diffusion presuppose a scale separation between the mean and random magnetic fields (e.g. there being a pronounced minimum in the magnetic power spectrum at intermediate scales). Scale separation is often a good approximation in laboratory plasmas, but not in most astrophysical environments such as the interstellar medium (ISM). Modern simulations of the ISM have numerical resolution of the order of 1 pc, so the Larmor radius of the cosmic rays that dominate in energy density is at least 106 times smaller than the resolved scales. Large-scale simulations of cosmic ray propagation in the ISM thus rely on oversimplified forms of the diffusion tensor. We take the first steps towards a more realistic description of cosmic ray diffusion for such simulations, obtaining direct estimates of the diffusion tensor from test particle simulations in random magnetic fields (with the Larmor radius scale being fully resolved), for a range of particle energies corresponding to 10-2 ≲ RL/lc ≲ 103, where lc is the magnetic correlation length. We obtain explicit expressions for the cosmic ray diffusion tensor for RL/lc ≪ 1, that might be used in a sub-grid model of cosmic ray diffusion. The diffusion coefficients obtained are closely connected with existing transport theories that include the random walk of magnetic lines.

  1. Cosmic rays, supernova, and the origin of ultrahigh energy particles

    Colgate, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to10/sup 15 -20/ eV, is still an unsolved problem in high-energy astrophysics. The now classical mechanism of stochastic acceleration of cosmic rays in a strong shock in the interstellar or intergalactic medium is limited in time and dimension for all likely acceleration sites, particularly for the highest energies. Acceleration of cosmic rays across a plasma shock of velocity, ..beta../sub s/ (..beta../sub s/ = v/sub shock//c), requires 1/..beta../sub s/ number of crossings and therefore (1/..beta../sub s/)/sup 2/ number of scatterings for doubling the energy of a particle. This requires a space of the order of 1/..beta../sub s/ x the scattering length, or a multiple of the Larmor radius and hence, the space requirements to cosmic ray acceleration are very many Larmor orbits in dimension, as well as times that are larger by (1/..beta../sub s/)/sup 2/ x t/sub Larmor/. The acceleration of cosmic rays by the shock in the envelope of a Type 1 supernova is reviewed, and the interaction of the accelerated matter with the nearby ISM is considered. The spectrum of relativistic ejected matter is preferentially trapped in the ISM. Further acceleration of each energy group should take place in both the near relativistic shock wave and the compression by the following matter. The possible acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the accretion disk of a near-stationery magnetic neutron star such as Cyg-X3 is another strong possibility. Here the diffusion of magnetic flux radially outwards opposite to the viscous diffusion of mass radially inwards is considered as a likely topology for a unipolar generator acceleration of ultrahigh energy particles.

  2. Cosmic-ray modulation: an ab initio approach

    A better understanding of cosmic-ray modulation in the heliosphere can only be gained through a proper understanding of the effects of turbulence on the diffusion and drift of cosmic rays. We present an ab initio model for cosmic-ray modulation, incorporating for the first time the results yielded by a two-component turbulence transport model. This model is solved for periods of minimum solar activity, utilizing boundary values chosen so that model results are in fair to good agreement with spacecraft observations of turbulence quantities, not only in the solar ecliptic plane but also along the out-of-ecliptic trajectory of the Ulysses spacecraft. These results are employed as inputs for modelled slab and 2D turbulence energy spectra. The latter spectrum is chosen based on physical considerations, with a drop-off at the very lowest wavenumbers commencing at the 2D outerscale. There currently exist no models or observations for this quantity, and it is the only free parameter in this study. The modelled turbulence spectra are used as inputs for parallel mean free path expressions based on those derived from quasi-linear theory and perpendicular mean free paths from extended nonlinear guiding center theory. Furthermore, the effects of turbulence on cosmic-ray drifts are modelled in a self-consistent way, employing a recently developed model for drift along the wavy current sheet. The resulting diffusion coefficients and drift expressions are applied to the study of galactic cosmic-ray protons and antiprotons using a three dimensional, steady-state cosmic-ray modulation code, and sample solutions in fair agreement with multiple spacecraft observations are presented. (author)

  3. The heliospheric modulation of cosmic ray boron and carbon

    M. S. Potgieter

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The observed boron to carbon ratio (B/C at Earth provides a good measure of the overall secondary to primary ratio of galactic cosmic rays. This makes B/C an important constraint and test for the validity and general applicability of theoretical and numerical models of galactic propagation and heliospheric modulation. For this purpose, the modulation of boron and carbon in the heliosphere must be understood in greater detail. The latest approach to heliospheric modulation, using a numerical model containing a termination shock, a heliosheath and particle drifts, is used to the study the modulation of the two species. This model also includes a more comprehensive set of diffusion coefficients. From this and previous work follows that the model is compatible with a variety of observations, for seven species, i.e. protons, anti-protons, electrons, positrons, helium, boron, and carbon, with the same set of parameters for both solar magnetic polarity cycles. Despite the rather flat interstellar spectrum for carbon below 100MeV/nuc, the modulated spectra at 1AU look very similar for boron and carbon, caused by adiabatic energy losses, implying that the carbon modulation should have a much larger radial gradient in the outer heliosphere below ~200-500MeV/nuc than boron. Significant modulation can be caused by the heliosheath but it is strongly dependent on energy and on the field polarity, with almost no effect at high energies to the largest effect at low energies. The solar wind termination shock has an important effect on the B to C ratio in the heliosphere, although small at Earth, during the A<0 cycle, with E<~600MeV/nuc, but it seems less significant for the A>0 cycle and with increasing tilt angles. Drift models produce different spectra for consecutive solar minimum conditions which may account for the modulation level differences between observations around 100MeV/nuc compared to around 500MeV/nuc. All factors taken into account

  4. Cosmic Ray Muon Timing in the ATLAS Detector

    Meirose, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic ray muons analysis is a crucial step in the commissioning of the ATLAS detector. Using cosmic ray muon data recorded during the summer of 2007, we have studied the time-of-flight distributions between back-to-back modules of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. The results are in good agreement with the distributions expected from calorimeter geometry, and allow for cross-checks of timing corrections obtained in laser runs, showing that in a few cases previous results could be further improved. Calorimeter timing is a useful tool to remove non-physics backgrounds, and we introduce new cuts at the cell level which improve the signal to noise ratio.

  5. Cosmic-ray neutron simulations and measurements in Taiwan

    This study used simulations of galactic cosmic ray in the atmosphere to investigate the neutron background environment in Taiwan, emphasising its altitude dependence and spectrum variation near interfaces. The calculated results were analysed and compared with two measurements. The first measurement was a mobile neutron survey from sea level up to 3275 m in altitude conducted using a car-mounted high-sensitivity neutron detector. The second was a previous measured result focusing on the changes in neutron spectra near air/ground and air/water interfaces. The attenuation length of cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere was estimated to be 163 g cm-2 in Taiwan. Cosmic-ray neutron spectra vary with altitude and especially near interfaces. The determined spectra near the air/ground and air/water interfaces agree well with measurements for neutrons below 10 MeV. However, the high-energy portion of spectra was observed to be much higher than our previous estimation. Because high-energy neutrons contribute substantially to a dose evaluation, revising the annual sea-level effective dose from cosmic-ray neutrons at ground level in Taiwan to 35 μSv, which corresponds to a neutron flux of 5.30 x 10-3 n cm-2 s-1, was suggested. The cosmic-ray neutron background in Taiwan was studied using the FLUKA simulations and field measurements. A new measurement was performed using a car-mounted high-efficiency neutron detector, re-coding real-time neutron counting rates from sea level up to 3275 m. The attenuation of cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere exhibited an effective attenuation length of 163 g cm-2. The calculated neutron counting rates over predicted the measurements by ∼32 %, which leaded to a correction factor for the FLUKA-calculated cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere in Taiwan. In addition, a previous measurement regarding neutron spectrum variation near the air/ground and air/water interfaces was re-evaluated. The results showed that the amount of

  6. Gamma and Cosmic-Ray Tests of Special Relativity

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2000-01-01

    Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV) at Planck scale can be tested (see e.g. physics/0003080) through ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR). In a deformed Lorentz symmetry (DLS) pattern where the effective LSV parameter varies like the square of the momentum scale (quadratically deformed relativistic kinematics, QDRK), a 10E-6 LSV at Planck scale would be enough to produce observable effects on the properties of cosmic rays at the 10E20 eV scale: absence of GZK cutoff, stability of unstable parti...

  7. Recent advances and future prospects in cosmic rays research

    In the present paper we focus on some recent observations which led to improved understanding of some aspects of the GCR puzzle. These data essentially concern heavy (Z=4-30) and ultraheavy (Z>30) nuclei in the energy range 0.1-20 GeV/nucleon. As we do not intend to cover the entire scope of cosmic rays studies, important matters such as antiprotons and positrons energy spectra, isotopic anomalies, high energy composition .. are not addressed. Finally a tentative overview of future prospects in cosmic rays research is presented

  8. Observing Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays with Smartphones

    Whiteson, Daniel; Shimmin, Chase; Brodie, Kyle; Burns, Dustin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for observing cosmic rays at ultra-high energy ($>10^{18}$~eV) by repurposing the existing network of smartphones as a ground detector array. Extensive air showers generated by cosmic rays produce muons and high-energy photons, which can be detected by the CMOS sensors of smartphone cameras. The small size and low efficiency of each sensor is compensated by the large number of active phones. We show that if user adoption targets are met, such a network will have significant observing power at the highest energies.

  9. Observing Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays with Smartphones

    Whiteson, Daniel; Mulhearn, Michael; Shimmin, Chase; Cranmer, Kyle; Brodie, Kyle; Burns, Dustin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for observing cosmic rays at ultra-high energy ($>10^{18}$~eV) by repurposing the existing network of smartphones as a ground detector array. Extensive air showers generated by cosmic rays produce muons and high-energy photons, which can be detected by the CMOS sensors of smartphone cameras. The small size and low efficiency of each sensor is compensated by the large number of active phones. We show that if user adoption targets are met, such a network will have si...

  10. Searching for ultra-high energy cosmic rays with smartphones

    Whiteson, Daniel; Mulhearn, Michael; Shimmin, Chase; Cranmer, Kyle; Brodie, Kyle; Burns, Dustin

    2016-06-01

    We propose a novel approach for observing cosmic rays at ultra-high energy (>1018 eV) by repurposing the existing network of smartphones as a ground detector array. Extensive air showers generated by cosmic rays produce muons and high-energy photons, which can be detected by the CMOS sensors of smartphone cameras. The small size and low efficiency of each sensor is compensated by the large number of active phones. We show that if user adoption targets are met, such a network will have significant observing power at the highest energies.

  11. Cosmic ray sun shadow in Soudan 2 underground muon flux.

    Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Barrett, W. L.; Bode, C.; Fields, T. H.; Goodman, M. C.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Price, L. E.; Seidlein, R.; Soudan 2 Collaboration; Thron, J. L.

    1999-06-23

    The absorption of cosmic rays by the sun produces a shadow at the earth. The angular offset and broadening of the shadow are determined by the magnitude and structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IPMF) in the inner solar system. The authors report the first measurement of the solar cosmic ray shadow by detection of deep underground muon flux in observations made during the entire ten-year interval 1989 to 1998. The sun shadow varies significantly during this time, with a 3.3{sigma} shadow observed during the years 1995 to 1998.

  12. High-energy neutrino astronomy: the cosmic ray connection

    This is a review of neutrino astronomy anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 1020 and 1013 eV, respectively. Although the discovery of cosmic rays dates back close to a century, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. There is evidence that the highest-energy cosmic rays are extra-galactic - they cannot be contained by our galaxy's magnetic field anyway because their gyroradius far exceeds its dimension. Elementary elementary-particle physics dictates a universal upper limit on their energy of 5x1019 eV, the so-called Greisen-Kuzmin-Zatsepin cutoff; however, particles in excess of this energy have been observed by all experiments, adding one more puzzle to the cosmic ray mystery. Mystery is fertile ground for progress: we will review the facts as well as the speculations about the sources. There is a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be resolved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of 104 km2 area, arrays of air Cerenkov detectors and, the subject of this review, kilometre-scale neutrino observatories. We will review why cosmic accelerators are also expected to be cosmic beam dumps producing associated high-energy photon and neutrino beams. We will work in detail through an example of a cosmic beam dump, γ-ray bursts (GRBs). These are expected to produce neutrinos from MeV to EeV energy by a variety of mechanisms. We will also discuss active galaxies and GUT-scale remnants, two other classes of sources speculated to be associated with the highest-energy cosmic rays. GRBs and active galaxies are also the sources of the highest-energy γ-rays, with emission observed up to 20 TeV, possibly higher. The important conclusion is that, independently of the specific blueprint of the source, it takes a kilometre-scale neutrino observatory to detect the neutrino beam associated with the highest-energy cosmic rays and γ-rays. We also briefly review the ongoing

  13. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Black Hole Mergers

    Kotera, Kumiko

    2016-01-01

    The recent detection of the gravitational wave source GW150914 by the LIGO collaboration motivates a speculative source for the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays as a possible byproduct of the immense energies achieved in black hole mergers, provided that the black holes have spin as seems inevitable and there are relic magnetic fields and disk debris remaining from the formation of the black holes or from their accretion history. We argue that given the modest efficiency $< 0.01$ required per event per unit of gravitational wave energy release, merging black holes potentially provide an environment for accelerating cosmic rays to ultrahigh energies.

  14. Cosmic ray decreases affect atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    Svensmark, Henrik; Bondo, Torsten; Svensmark, J.

    2009-01-01

    Close passages of coronal mass ejections from the sun are signaled at the Earth's surface by Forbush decreases in cosmic ray counts. We find that low clouds contain less liquid water following Forbush decreases, and for the most influential events the liquid water in the oceanic atmosphere can...... diminish by as much as 7%. Cloud water content as gauged by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) reaches a minimum ≈7 days after the Forbush minimum in cosmic rays, and so does the fraction of low clouds seen by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and in the International...

  15. Interplanetary crew exposure estimates for galactic cosmic rays

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Using the Langley Research Center galactic cosmic-ray transport computer code and the Computerized Anatomical Man model, initial estimates of interplanetary exposure of astronauts to galactic cosmic rays, during periods of solar minimum activity, are made for a realistic human geometry shielded by various thicknesses of spacecraft aluminum shielding. Conventional dose assessment in terms of total absorbed dose and dose equivalent is made for the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow. Included in the analyses are separate evaluations of the contributions from the incident primary ions, from subsequent-generation fragmentation products, and from target fragments. In all cases considered, the equivalent sphere approximation yielded conservative overestimates for the actual organ exposures.

  16. The estimation of galactic cosmic ray penetration and dose rates

    Burrell, M. O.; Wright, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    This study is concerned with approximation methods that can be readily applied to estimate the absorbed dose rate from cosmic rays in rads - tissue or rems inside simple geometries of aluminum. The present work is limited to finding the dose rate at the center of spherical shells or behind plane slabs. The dose rate is calculated at tissue-point detectors or for thin layers of tissue. This study considers cosmic-rays dose rates for both free-space and earth-orbiting missions.

  17. Analysis of cosmic-ray events with ALICE at LHC

    Rodríguez Cahuantzi M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ALICE is one of the four main experiments of the LHC at CERN. Located 40 meters underground, with 30 m of overburden rock, it can also operate to detect muons produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. An analysis of the data collected with cosmic-ray triggers from 2010 to 2013, corresponding to about 31 days of live time, is presented. Making use of the ability of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC to track large numbers of charged particles, a special emphasis is given to the study of muon bundles, and in particular to events with high-muon density.

  18. The Antarctic climate anomaly and galactic cosmic rays

    Svensmark, H

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that galactic cosmic rays may influence the Earth's climate by affecting cloud formation. If changes in cloudiness play a part in climate change, their effect changes sign in Antarctica. Satellite data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are here used to calculate the changes in surface temperatures at all latitudes, due to small percentage changes in cloudiness. The results match the observed contrasts in temperature changes, globally and in Antarctica. Evidently clouds do not just respond passively to climate changes but take an active part in the forcing, in accordance with changes in the solar magnetic field that vary the cosmic-ray flux.

  19. Sidereal variation of cosmic rays and underground measurements

    This paper deals mainly with the evidence for the existence of anisotropies of cosmic ray particles before they enter the solar cavity. The long quest for unambiguous evidence for such genuine anisotropies is not yet over and more data are needed to bring the quest to a satisfactory conclusion. But the present situation gives cause for the belief that the continued effort to determine their characteristics as a function of direction, energy, composition and time will be rewarding because of the information it may shed on the problems of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. (orig.)

  20. Cosmic ray radio emission as air shower detection

    The possibility of radio-detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (within the 10 to 100 MHz range) are discussed. Currently, air showers are detected by various methods, mainly based on particle detectors (KASCADE, Auger) or optical detection (Cerenkov radiation). Recently,to detect radio emission from cosmic ray air showers a method using electromagnetic radiation in low frequency domain (LOFAR) was proposed. We are investigating this possibility, using simulation codes created to investigate electromagnetic radiation of intricate antennae structure, for example fractal antennas. Some of the preliminary results will be communicated in this session. (authors)

  1. Measurements of Cosmic Ray Antiprotons with PAMELA

    Wu, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The PAMELA experiment is a satellite-borne apparatus designed to study charged particles, and especially antiparticles, in the cosmic radiation. The apparatus is mounted on the Resurs DK1 satellite which was launched on 15 June 2006. PAMELA has been traveling around the earth along an elliptical and semi-polar orbit for almost five years. It mainly consists of a permanent magnetic spectrometer, a time of flight system and an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter, which allows antiprotons to be ...

  2. Cosmic Rays in Clusters of Galaxies and Radio Halos

    P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Colafrancesco, S.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate the fluxes of radio, hard X-rays and gamma-ray emission from clusters of galaxies, in the context of a secondary electron model (SEM). In the SEM the radiating electrons are produced by the decay of charged pions in cosmic ray (CR) interactions with the intracluster medium, while gamma ray emission is mainly contributed by the decay of neutral pions. We specifically applied our calculations to the case of the Coma cluster, and found that the combined radio and hard X-ray fluxes c...

  3. Significance of medium energy gamma ray astronomy in the study of cosmic rays

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Medium energy (about 10 to 30 MeV) gamma ray astronomy provides information on the product of the galactic electron cosmic ray intensity and the galactic matter to which the electrons are dynamically coupled by the magnetic field. Because high energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma ray astronomy provides analogous information for the nucleonic cosmic rays and the relevant matter, a comparison between high energy and medium energy gamma ray intensities provides a direct ratio of the cosmic ray electrons and nucleons throughout the galaxy. A calculation of gamma ray production by electron bremsstrahlung shows that: bremsstrahlung energy loss is probably not negligible over the lifetime of the electrons in the galaxy; and the approximate bremsstrahlung calculation often used previously overestimates the gamma ray intensity by about a factor of two. As a specific example, expected medium energy gamma ray intensities are calculated for the speral arm model.

  4. The COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Interaction Code (COSMIC for use in data assimilation

    J. Shuttleworth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture status in land surface models (LSMs can be updated by assimilating cosmic-ray neutron intensity measured in air above the surface. This requires a fast and accurate model to calculate the neutron intensity from the profiles of soil moisture modeled by the LSM. The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX model is sufficiently accurate but too slow to be practical in the context of data assimilation. Consequently an alternative and efficient model is needed which can be calibrated accurately to reproduce the calculations made by MCNPX and used to substitute for MCNPX during data assimilation. This paper describes the construction and calibration of such a model, COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Interaction Code (COSMIC, which is simple, physically based and analytic, and which, because it runs at least 50 000 times faster than MCNPX, is appropriate in data assimilation applications. The model includes simple descriptions of (a degradation of the incoming high-energy neutron flux with soil depth, (b creation of fast neutrons at each depth in the soil, and (c scattering of the resulting fast neutrons before they reach the soil surface, all of which processes may have parameterized dependency on the chemistry and moisture content of the soil. The site-to-site variability in the parameters used in COSMIC is explored for 42 sample sites in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS, and the comparative performance of COSMIC relative to MCNPX when applied to represent interactions between cosmic-ray neutrons and moist soil is explored. At an example site in Arizona, fast-neutron counts calculated by COSMIC from the average soil moisture profile given by an independent network of point measurements in the COSMOS probe footprint are similar to the fast-neutron intensity measured by the COSMOS probe. It was demonstrated that, when used within a data assimilation framework to assimilate COSMOS probe counts into the Noah land surface

  5. Propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays and Dark Matter indirect Detection

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of propagation of cosmic electrons and positrons in the Milky Way and to the indirect detection of dark matter. The existence of dark matter is a hypothesis considered as reasonable from the point of view of cosmology, astrophysics and even particle physics. Nevertheless its detection still eludes us and it is not possible to verify this hypothesis by other means than gravitational one. A possible way to detect dark matter is to look for its annihilation or decay products among Galactic cosmic rays. During the last three years, data concerning cosmic ray electrons and positrons have been accumulated and have reached a remarkable precision. Such a precision requires from us to refine the theoretical models and to quantify the errors. This thesis addresses the study of all the sources of uncertainties affecting predictions of cosmic electrons and positron fluxes, primary and secondary, classical or from exotic origin. The greatest care has been dedicated to the sources and the propagation in the Galactic halo. Moreover a study of gamma and radio emissions associated to these cosmic rays is presented, again with the will of sizing uncertainties. Finally a status of the research for detection of annihilation or decay of Galactic dark matter is presented. (author)

  6. An Absence of Neutrinos Associated with Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Besson, D Bertrand D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Degner, T; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, B; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hülβ, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, M W E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Stüer, M; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a leading candidate for acceleration of ultra high-energy cosmic rays, which would be accompanied by emission of TeV neutrinos produced in proton-photon interactions during acceleration in the GRB fireball. Two analyses using data from two years of the IceCube detector produced no evidence for this neutrino emission, placing strong constraints on models of neutrino and cosmic-ray production in these sources.

  7. Cosmic Rays, Radio Halos and Non-Thermal X-ray Emission in Clusters of Galaxies

    P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Colafrancesco, S.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate the flux of radio, hard X-ray and UV radiation from clusters of galaxies as produced by synchrotron emission and Inverse Compton Scattering of electrons generated as secondaries in cosmic ray interactions in the intracluster medium. Both the spatial distribution of cosmic rays due to their diffusion and the spatial distribution of the intracluster gas are taken into account. Our calculations are specifically applied to the case of the Coma cluster. The fluxes and spectra of the r...

  8. Search for antimatter in 1012 eV cosmic rays using Artemis method and interpretation of the cosmic rays spectrum

    This thesis is divided into three parts. The first part is a review of the present knowledge of the antimatter and of the cosmic rays. Theoretical and experimental aspects are presented. It is demonstrated that a measurement of the antimatter abundance in TeV cosmic rays is of fundamental interest, and would establish the symmetric or asymmetric nature of the Universe. The second part is dedicated to the method of antimatter research through the Earth Moon ion spectrometer (ARTEMIS). The account is given of the winter 1996-97 41-nights observation campaign undertaken at the Whipple Observatory in Arizona (USA). A 109 photomultiplier camera is operated on the 40 meter telescope to detect by Cherenkov imaging the cosmic ray initiated showers. We describe the performance of an optical filter used to reduce the noise. The development and the utilization of a simulation program are described. The main work is the analysis of the data: data characterization, understanding of the apparatus, understanding of the noise and its influence, calibration, search for signals by different methods. Subtle systematic effects are uncovered. The simulations establish that the amount of data is insufficient to reveal a shadow effect in the cosmic ray flux. The conclusion of this work is that the experimental setup was not suitable, and we propose important improvements of the method based on a bigger focal plane that would allow to reach a one percent sensitivity on the antimatter content of the cosmic rays. In the third part of the thesis, an interpretation of the total cosmic ray spectrum is proposed and discussed. (author)

  9. Angular correlation of cosmic neutrinos with ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and implications for their sources

    Moharana, Reetanjali

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic neutrino events detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory with energy $\\gtrsim 30$ TeV have poor angular resolutions to reveal their origin. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), with better angular resolutions at $>60$ EeV energies, can be used to check if the same astrophysical sources are responsible for producing both neutrinos and UHECRs. We test this hypothesis, with statistical methods which emphasize invariant quantities, by using data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, Telescope Array and past cosmic-ray experiments. We find that the arrival directions of the cosmic neutrinos are correlated with $\\ge 100$ EeV UHECR arrival directions at confidence level $\\approx 93\\%$. The strength of the correlation decreases with decreasing UHECR energy and no correlation exists at energy $\\sim 60$ EeV. A search in astrophysical databases within $3^\\circ$ of the arrival directions of UHECRs with energy $\\ge 100$ EeV, that are correlated with the IceCube cosmic neutrinos, resulted in 18 sources from the S...

  10. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: the highest energy frontier

    Neto, João R T de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are the highest energy messengers of the present universe, with energies up to $10^{20}$ eV. Studies of astrophysical particles (nuclei, electrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. The primary particles interact in the atmosphere and generate extensive air showers. Analysis of those showers enables one not only to estimate the energy, direction and most probable mass of the primary cosmic particles, but also to obtain information about the properties of their hadronic interactions at an energy more than one order of magnitude above that accessible with the current highest energy human-made accelerator. In this contribution we will review the state-of-the-art in UHECRs detection. We will present the leading experiments Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array and discuss the cosmic ray energy spectrum, searches for directional anisotropy, studies of mass composition, the determ...

  11. Cosmic Rays Induced Background Radiation on Board of Commercial Flights

    Pinilla, S; Núñez, L A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the total integrated flux of cosmic radiation which a commercial aircraft is exposed to along specific flight trajectories. To study the radiation background during a flight and its modulation by effects such as altitude, latitude, exposure time and transient magnetospheric events, we perform simulations based on Magnetocosmics and CORSIKA codes, the former designed to calculate the geomagnetic effects on cosmic rays propagation and the latter allows us to simulate the development of extended air showers in the atmosphere. In this first work, by considering the total flux of cosmic rays from 5 GeV to 1 PeV, we obtained the expected integrated flux of secondary particles on board of a commercial airplane during the Bogot\\'a-Buenos Aires trip by point-to-point numerical integration.

  12. Cosmic rays and the search for a Lorentz Invariance Violation

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolbi@nucleares.unam.mx

    2011-08-15

    This is an introductory review about the ongoing search for a signal of Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) in cosmic rays. We first summarise basic aspects of cosmic rays, focusing on rays of ultrahigh energy (UHECRs). We discuss the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) energy cutoff for cosmic protons, which is predicted due to photopion production in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This is a process of modest energy in the proton rest frame. It can be investigated to a high precision in the laboratory, if Lorentz transformations apply even at factors {gamma}{approx}O(10{sup 11}). For heavier nuclei, the energy attenuation is even faster due to photo-disintegration, again if this process is Lorentz invariant. Hence the viability of Lorentz symmetry up to tremendous {gamma}-factors-far beyond accelerator tests-is a central issue. Next, we comment on conceptual aspects of Lorentz Invariance and the possibility of its spontaneous breaking. This could lead to slightly particle dependent 'Maximal Attainable Velocities'. We discuss their effect in decays, Cerenkov radiation, the GZK cutoff and neutrino oscillation in cosmic rays. We also review the search for LIV in cosmic {gamma}-rays. For multi-TeV {gamma}-rays, we encounter another possible puzzle related to the transparency of the CMB, similar to the GZK cutoff, due to electron/positron creation and subsequent inverse Compton scattering. The photons emitted in a Gamma Ray Burst occur at lower energies, but their very long path provides access to information not that far from the Planck scale. We discuss conceivable nonlinear photon dispersions based on non-commutative geometry or effective approaches. No LIV has been observed so far. However, even extremely tiny LIV effects could change the predictions for cosmic ray physics drastically. An Appendix is devoted to the recent results by the Pierre Auger Collaboration, in particular the hypothesis that nearby Active Galactic Nuclei-or objects next to

  13. Cosmic rays and the search for a Lorentz Invariance Violation

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2008-11-15

    This is an introductory review about the on-going search for a signal of Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) in cosmic rays. We first summarise basic aspects of cosmic rays, focusing on rays of ultra high energy (UHECRs). We discuss the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) energy cutoff for cosmic protons, which is predicted due to photopion production in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This is a process of modest energy in the proton rest frame. It can be investigated to a high precision in the laboratory, if Lorentz transformations apply even at factors {gamma} {proportional_to} O(10{sup 11}). For heavier nuclei the energy attenuation is even faster due to photo-disintegration, again if this process is Lorentz invariant. Hence the viability of Lorentz symmetry up to tremendous {gamma}-factors - far beyond accelerator tests - is a central issue. Next we comment on conceptual aspects of Lorentz Invariance and the possibility of its spontaneous breaking. This could lead to slightly particle dependent ''Maximal Attainable Velocities''. We discuss their effect in decays, Cerenkov radiation, the GZK cutoff and neutrino oscillation in cosmic rays. We also review the search for LIV in cosmic {gamma}-rays. For multi TeV {gamma}-rays we possibly encounter another puzzle related to the transparency of the CMB, similar to the GZK cutoff, due to electron/positron creation and subsequent inverse Compton scattering. The photons emitted in a Gamma Ray Burst occur at lower energies, but their very long path provides access to information not far from the Planck scale. We discuss conceivable non-linear photon dispersions based on non-commutative geometry or effective approaches. No LIV has been observed so far. However, even extremely tiny LIV effects could change the predictions for cosmic ray physics drastically. An Appendix is devoted to the recent hypothesis by the Pierre Auger Collaboration, which identifies nearby Active Galactic Nuclei - or objects

  14. Inter-galactic Shock Acceleration and the Cosmic Gamma-ray Background

    Miniati, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    We investigate numerically the contribution to the cosmic gamma-ray background from cosmic-rays ions and electrons accelerated at intergalactic shocks associated with cosmological structure formation. We show that the kinetic energy of accretion flows in the low-red-shift inter-galactic medium is thermalized primarily through moderately strong shocks, which allow for an efficient conversion of shock ram pressure into cosmic-ray pressure. Cosmic-rays accelerated at these shocks produce a diffu...

  15. Impact of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the Earth’s ionosphere and atmosphere

    Mateev Lachezar; Lastovicka Jan; Kudela Karel; Asenovski Simeon; Velinov Peter I.Y.; Mishev Alexander; Tonev Peter

    2013-01-01

    A brief review of the study during COST Action ES0803 of effects due to cosmic rays (CR) and solar energetic particles (SEP) in the ionosphere and atmosphere is presented. Models CORIMIA (COsmic Ray Ionization Model for Ionosphere and Atmosphere) and application of CORSIKA (COsmic Ray SImulations for KAscade) code are considered. They are capable to compute the cosmic ray ionization profiles at a given location, time, solar and geomagnetic activity. Intercomparison of the models, as well as c...

  16. Radiation doses along selected flight profiles during two extreme solar cosmic ray events

    E. Flückiger; Bütikofer, R.

    2011-01-01

    The radiation dose rates at flight altitudes may be hazardously increased during solar cosmic ray events. Within the scope of this paper we investigate the total accumulated radiation doses, i.e. the contribution of galactic and solar cosmic rays, during the two extreme solar cosmic ray events on 29 September 1989 and on 20 January 2005 along selected flight profiles. In addition, the paper discusses the consequences of possible solar cosmic ray flux approximations on the results of the radia...

  17. Design of a transition radiation detector for cosmic rays

    Hartmann, G.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T.

    1975-01-01

    Transition radiation detectors consisting of sandwiches of plastic foam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers can be used to identify cosmic ray particles with energies gamma ? E/mc-squared is greater than 10 to the 3rd and to measure their energy in the region gamma is roughly equal to 10 to the 3rd

  18. Relationships between cosmic ray neutron flux and rain flows

    The registration of secondary cosmic ray neutrons is a convenient tool for the investigation of primary cosmic ray variations and for meteorological effects as well. At present a large network of neutron monitors exists, aiming at studies of cosmic ray variations which are related to interplanetary conditions and geomagnetic activity. At the same time cosmic ray variations may be related to some atmospheric processes. In this connection, using the data from two neutron monitors (a standard and a lead free one), a gamma detector from Moscow station and lead free neutron monitor at BEO Moussala, we studied the correlations between rain flows and neutron flux. In this study we used daily averages on the basis of 10 min data for the neutron flux, corrected for barometric pressure and data from local meteo-stations. The preliminary analysis indicates a correlation between rain flows and neutron flux in several cases. To explain observable correlations, calculations of neutron and gamma absorption and albedo neutron spectra have been performed on the basis of the universal software packages FLUKA-2006, FLUKA, 2008 (authors)

  19. Cosmic ray intensity annual variations for the last several centuries

    The problem of differential intensity of cosmic rays in the past in considered by using the time variation of cosmogenic isotope 14C concentration in the Earth's atmosphere and solar activity changes for the last several centuries are analysed. The cyclic variations of cosmic ray intensity with duration of 11 and 80 years are revealed. The rate of 14C content in the Earth's atmosphere. Spectral analysis of available data on 14C formation caused by changes of incident cosmic ray fluxes is obtained using the variations of 14C content in the Earth's atmosphere. Spectral analysis of available data on 14C content and solar spot numbers is carried out. The autospectra, functions of coherence and phase difference are obtained. The correlation functions of these values are calculated. On the basis of investigations performed by measuring the 14C concentration in samples of known age it is possible to reestablish the annual variation of cosmic ray intensity for the approximately 50 000 years. (author)

  20. Observing The Cosmic Ray Moon Shadow With VERITAS

    Bird, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The Earth is subjected to a uniform flux of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) cosmic rays unless they are obscured by an object, such as the Moon, in which case a deficit or shadow is created. Since cosmic rays are charged this deficit is deflected by the Earth's magnetic field, enabling the rigidity of the obstructed cosmic rays to be determined. Measurement of the relative deficits of different species enables the positron fraction and the antiproton ratio to be measured. The April 15, 2014 lunar eclipse was visible with the VERITAS Cherenkov telescopes, which allowed (with special UV bandpass filters) 74 minutes of direct observations of the Moon and the associated deficit in the cosmic-ray flux. The results of this observation are presented. In addition VERITAS has been conducting a series of observations by pointing close to a partially illuminated Moon, with a reduced photomultiplier tube high voltage and UV bandpass filters. We present the technique developed for these observations and their current ...

  1. 1912 – 2012: a century of studying cosmic rays

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    One year ago, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer was docked to the International Space Station. This state-of-the-art tool for studying cosmic rays has revolutionised methods of detecting cosmic radiation, which was discovered barely a century ago.   Victor Francis Hess (in the basket), back from his balloon flight in August 1912. Source: American Physical Society. Exactly one hundred years ago, the Austrian-American physicist Victor Francis Hess discovered cosmic rays. The researcher observed the phenomenon while on board a balloon; he found that at an altitude of 1,000 to 5,000 metres, the wires of his Wulf electrometer (a tool used to measure radiation) showed an increase in electrical charge. Hess had just proven the existence of ionising radiation coming from outside the Earth’s atmosphere. Twenty years or so later, the invention of the Geiger-Müller counter enabled physicists to study the properties of the rays more precisely. One century later, cosmic rays and the ques...

  2. Search for microwave emission from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Berlin, A.; Bogdan, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Bonifazi, C.; Carvalho jr., W.R.; de Mello Neto, J.R.T.; Facal San Luis, P.; Genat, J.F.; Hollon, N.; Mills, E.; Monasor, M.; Privitera, P.; Reyes, L.C.; d´Orfeuil, B.R.; Santos, E.M.; Wayne, S.; Williams, C.; Zas, E.; Zhou, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 5 (2012), "051104-1"-"051104-5". ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : air showers * ultrahigh energy cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2012

  3. Glimm Godunov’s method for cosmic-ray-hydrodynamics

    Miniati, Francesco

    2007-11-01

    A numerical method for integrating the equations describing a dynamically coupled system made of a fluid and cosmic-rays is developed. In smooth flows the effect of CR pressure is accounted for by modification of the characteristic equations and the energy exchange between cosmic-rays and the fluid, due to diffusive processes in configuration and momentum space, is modeled with a flux conserving method. Provided the shock acceleration efficiency as a function of the upstream conditions and shock Mach number, we show that the Riemann solver can be modified to take into account the cosmic-ray mediation without having to resolve the cosmic-ray induced substructure. Shocks are advanced with Glimm’s method which preserves their discontinuous character without any smearing, thus allowing to maintain self-consistency in the shock solutions. In smooth flows either Glimm’s or a higher order Godunov’s method can be applied, with the latter producing better results when approximations are introduced in the Riemann solver.

  4. CERN explores link between cosmic rays and clouds

    2006-01-01

    "Scientists at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, have started a new experiment to investigate the possible influence of galactic cosmic rays on the Earths clouds and climate. This is the first time that a high energy physics accelerator has been used for atmospheric and climate science." (1 page)

  5. Modelling cosmic ray intensities along the Ulysses trajectory

    D. C. Ndiitwani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Time dependent cosmic ray modulation in the inner heliosphere is studied by comparing results from a 2-D, time-dependent cosmic ray transport model with Ulysses observations. A compound approach, which combines the effects of the global changes in the heliospheric magnetic field magnitude with drifts to establish a realistic time-dependence, in the diffusion and drift coefficients, are used. We show that this model results in realistic cosmic ray modulation from the Ulysses launch (1990 until recently (2004 when compared to 2.5-GV electron and proton and 1.2-GV electron and Helium observations from this spacecraft. This approach is also applied to compute radial gradients present in 2.5-GV cosmic ray electron and protons in the inner heliosphere. The observed latitude dependence for both positive and negative charged particles during both the fast latitude scan periods, corresponding to different solar activity conditions, could also be realistically computed. For this an additional reduction in particle drifts (compared to diffusion toward solar maximum is needed. This results in a realistic charge-sign dependent modulation at solar maximum and the model is also applied to predict charge-sign dependent modulation up to the next expected solar minimum.

  6. Radio emission from cosmic ray air showers : Monte Carlo simulations

    Huege, T.; Falcke, H.D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We present time-domain Monte Carlo simulations of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers in the scheme of coherent geosynchrotron radiation. Our model takes into account the important air shower characteristics such as the lateral and longitudinal particle distributions, the particle track lengt

  7. Performance of the LHCb muon system with cosmic rays

    Anelli, M; Auriemma, G; Baldini, W; Bencivenni, G; Berutti, R; Bocci, V; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Botchin, B; Cadeddu, S; Campana, P; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Carletti, M; Ciambrone, P; Dane, E; de Capua, S; Deplano, C; De Simone, P; Dettori, F; Falabella, A; Ferreira Rodriguez, F; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Graziani, G; Gruber, L; Kashchuk, A; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Lenzi, M; Levitskaya, O; Mair, K; Maev, O; Manca, G; Martellotti, G; Massafferri Rodrigues, A; Messi, R; Murtas, F; Neustroev, P; Oldeman, R G.C; Palutan, M; Passaleva, G; Penso, G; Petrella, A; Pinci, D; Pozzi, S; Sabatino, G; Saitta, B; Santacesaria, R; Santovetti, E; Saputi, A; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, T; Sciubba, A; Shatalov, P; Vecchi, S; Veltri, M; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb Muon system performance is presented using cosmic ray events collected in 2009. These events allowed to test and optimize the detector configuration before the LHC start. The space and time alignment and the measurement of chamber efficiency, time resolution and cluster size are described in detail. The results are in agreement with the expected detector performance.

  8. Measurements of cosmic ray anisotropies from Pioneers 10 and 11

    Cosmic ray anisotropy measurements are performed by the University of California, San Diego experiments on Pioneers 10 and 11. A directional Cerenkov counter sensitive to protons and α particles with kinetic energies >= 480 MeV/nucleon is used to determine east-west and north-south anisotropies. (orig./WBU)

  9. How cosmic rays help us understand the Earth's surface

    Kiwi scientists are harnessing homegrown technology to improve a technique that helps track the changing landscape due to erosion, glaciation and the movement of tectonic plates. The method relies on measuring the trace amounts of beryllium and other isotopes produced in the surface of rocks by cosmic rays hitting the Earth. The amount of isotope in a rock can be used to infer how long the rock has been exposed, in the geologically important range from 10 thousand to half a million years ago. Beryllium isotopes, for example, are generated in minerals like quartz in rock surfaces. This occurs through the interaction of cosmic rays, mainly neutrons with atoms of oxygen and silicon. As part of a Marsden project to measure the amount of beryllium produced in unit time, sealed containers of water have been placed at locations in Antarctica, Australia and New Zealand, with data collected every 6 to 12 months. The research is being approached in two ways. The first involves measuring beryllium isotopes produced in the water containers exposed to cosmic rays at locations of varying altitude and geomagnetic latitude. The second approach was measuring cosmic ray (neutron) flux at the same, and other selected locations. (author). 1 fig

  10. Cosmic ray backgrounds for dark matter indirect detection

    Mertsch, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Recently, dark matter indirect searches have gained a lot of attention, mostly due to the possibility of recent anomalies in cosmic rays and microwave sky maps being due to the annihilation or decay of dark matter. In this thesis, we argue however that these signals are plagued by irreducible astrophysical backgrounds and show how plausible conventional physics can mimic the alleged dark matter signals. In particular, we consider the possibility that the rise in the positron fraction observed by the PAMELA satellite is due to the production through (hadronic) cosmic ray spallation and subsequent acceleration of positrons, in the same sources as the primary cosmic rays. We present a new analytical estimate of the range of possible fluctuations in the high energy electron flux due to the discreteness of plausible cosmic ray sources. Fitting our result for the total electron-positron flux measured by the Fermi satellite allows us to fix the only free parameter of the model and make an independent prediction for ...

  11. High-altitude stations and high energy cosmic rays

    The advantages of high-altitude ground-based cosmic ray station have been discussed in many past reports and conferences. It is very satisfying to observe this renewed attention to the research potentials of the Chacaltaya Laboratory. Specific research opportunities are reviewed, and possible future scenarios are noted

  12. The Galactic cosmic-ray Sun shadow observed by HAWC

    Enriquez, O

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Solar corona is difficult to measure directly. However, indirect observations of the solar corona are possible using the deficit in flux of cosmic rays coming from the direction of the Sun. Low-energy cosmic rays (~GeV) are deflected by the inner magnetic field of the Sun and the interplanetary magnetic field frozen into the solar wind. In contrast, high-energy cosmic rays (~TeV and above) are absorbed in the Sun's photosphere producing a shadow in the Sun's nominal position viewed from Earth. Several ground-based instruments have observed the effects of the heliospheric magnetic field on the size of the sun shadow and its position. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is an air shower array located in the central region of Mexico that observes TeV cosmic rays at a rate of about 15 kHz. in this work, we present preliminary images of the sun shadow from data collected by HAWC during 2013 and 2014 for different energy ranges.

  13. Ionospheric response to gamma ray bursts of cosmic origin

    The paper examines the limiting conditions under which is detectable, through the VLF phase-meter, a gamma-ray burst of cosmic origin like those recently observed by Vela spacecrafts. The discussion focuses on the flux density and burst duration and leads to a definition of the threshold needed for a measurable effect

  14. Grandscan - AN Experiment to Study Cosmic Rays around EEV

    Westerhoff, Stefan; Adams, Todd; Benzvi, Segev; Loh, Eugene C.

    For our understanding of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays the energy region between 1017 and 1019 eV is of crucial importance. Previous experiments have found indirect evidence that at these energies the origin of cosmic rays changes from predominantly Galactic to extragalactic. In addition weak evidence for an excess of cosmic rays from the direction of the Galactic center in a narrow energy band around 1018 eV has been claimed. However there is no additional evidence supporting this scenario. Neither Galactic nor extragalactic sources have been unambiguously established. Given the importance of this energy range there is a strong case for a dedicated experiment to study the EeV energy region with high precision. In this presentation we describe the design and capabilities of GRaNDScan a portable air fluorescence detector for stereo viewing of air showers at sub-EeV energies. Located at a site on the southern hemisphere GRaNDScan will provide an accurate map of the Galactic center region long suspected to harbor one or several sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays. It will provide information on the chemical composition of any observed excess and measure the energy spectrum in the region of the second knee. ~

  15. Discrepant hardening observed in cosmic-ray elemental spectra

    Ahn, H S; Bagliesi, M G; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; DuVernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Jeon, J A; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinin, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Minnick, S; Mognet, S I; Nam, J; Nam, S; Nutter, S L; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Wu, J; Yang, J; Yoon, Y S; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y; 10.1088/2041-8205/714/1/L89

    2010-01-01

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment launched five times from Antarctica has achieved a cumulative flight duration of about 156 days above 99.5% of the atmosphere. The instrument is configured with complementary and redundant particle detectors designed to extend direct measurements of cosmic-ray composition to the highest energies practical with balloon flights. All elements from protons to iron nuclei are separated with excellent charge resolution. Here we report results from the first two flights of ~70 days, which indicate hardening of the elemental spectra above ~200 GeV/nucleon and a spectral difference between the two most abundant species, protons and helium nuclei. These results challenge the view that cosmic-ray spectra are simple power laws below the so-called knee at ~1015 eV. This discrepant hardening may result from a relatively nearby source, or it could represent spectral concavity caused by interactions of cosmic rays with the accelerating shock. Other possible ...

  16. An Inexpensive Cosmic Ray Detector for the Classroom

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.; Choi, Seulah

    2010-01-01

    Finding ways to demonstrate--in a high school classroom--that subatomic particles from space produce other particles capable of reaching the Earth's surface is not a trivial task. In this paper, we describe a Geiger-Muller tube-based cosmic ray coincidence detector we produced at a total cost of less than $200, using two tubes purchased used…

  17. Noninvasive Reactor Imaging Using Cosmic-Ray Muons

    Miyadera, H.; Fujita, K.; Karino, Y.; Kume, N.; Nakayama, K.; Sano, Y.; Sugita, T.; Yoshioka, K.; Morris, C. L.; Bacon, J. D.; Borozdin, K. N.; Perry, J. O.; Mizokami, S.; Otsuka, Y.; Yamada, D.

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic-ray-muon imaging is proposed to assess the damages to the Fukushima Daiichi reactors. Simulation studies showed capability of muon imaging to reveal the core conditions.The muon-imaging technique was demonstrated at Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly, where the uranium-dioxide fuel assembly was imaged with 3-cm spatial resolution after 1 month of measurement.

  18. Transport of Cosmic Rays in the Heliosphere: Theoretical Issues

    Observations of cosmic rays and other energetic charged particles in the heliosphere over the past decade have created new challenges to the standard theoretical paradigms for energetic-particle transport. Certainly, some of these will be resolved using the standard Parker (diffusive) transport equation applied to increasingly sophisticated models of heliospheric phenomena. For example, we can apparently understand the modulation of galactic cosmic rays and the acceleration and transport of galactic cosmic rays in terms of this paradigm. Cosmic-ray reaction back on the plasma can also fit into this paradigm. However, it is also becoming increasingly clear that in some situations the diffusion approximation is not strictly valid. The scattering mean free paths may be large or there are significant anisotropies. For example, observations of solar energetic-particle events show non-diffusive effects, particularly in the early phases. Recently observed enhancements on Voyager 1, attributed to the proximity of the solar-wind termination shock, show large anisotropies. In the inner heliosphere, the transport mean-free paths are comparable to the characteristic macroscopic scales, which again makes diffusion models inaccurate. In this overview, the diffusion approximation and more-general treatments of particle transport are compared. It is concluded that even where the diffusion approximation is not strictly valid, it can be a useful guide to the more complete and complex models

  19. Cosmic ray propagation and interactions in the Galaxy

    Zirakashvili, V.N.

    2014-11-15

    Cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy is shortly reviewed. In particular we consider the self-consistent models of CR propagation. In these models CR streaming instability driven by CR anisotropy results in the Alfvénic turbulence which in turn determines the scattering and diffusion of particles.

  20. Measurement of camera image sensor depletion thickness with cosmic rays

    Vandenbroucke, J; Bravo, S; Jensen, K; Karn, P; Meehan, M; Peacock, J; Plewa, M; Ruggles, T; Santander, M; Schultz, D; Simons, A L; Tosi, D

    2015-01-01

    Camera image sensors can be used to detect ionizing radiation in addition to optical photons. In particular, cosmic-ray muons are detected as long, straight tracks passing through multiple pixels. The distribution of track lengths can be related to the thickness of the active (depleted) region of the camera image sensor through the known angular distribution of muons at sea level. We use a sample of cosmic-ray muon tracks recorded by the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory to measure the thickness of the depletion region of the camera image sensor in a commercial smart phone, the HTC Wildfire S. The track length distribution prefers a cosmic-ray muon angular distribution over an isotropic distribution. Allowing either distribution, we measure the depletion thickness to be between 13.9~$\\mu$m and 27.7~$\\mu$m. The same method can be applied to additional models of image sensor. Once measured, the thickness can be used to convert track length to incident polar angle on a per-event basis. Combined with ...

  1. Further delays hit troubled $2bn cosmic-ray detector

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    "A $2bn mission to study cosmic rays will have to wait another few months before being sent to the International Space Station (ISS) after NASA announced last month that it was pushing back the launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour until 26 February 2011" (0.5 page)

  2. Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays as a Grand Unification signal

    Fodor, Z

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the spectrum of the ultrahigh energy (above \\approx 10^{9} GeV) cosmic rays. With a maximum likelihood analysis we show that the observed spectrum is consistent with the decay of extragalactic GUT scale particles. The predicted mass for these superheavy particles is m_X=10^b GeV, where b=14.6_{-1.7}^{+1.6}.

  3. Z-Burst Scenario for the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    Fodor, Z; Ringwald, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The origin of highest energy cosmic rays is yet unknown. An appealing possibility is the so-called Z-burst scenario, in which a large fraction of these cosmic rays are decay products of Z bosons produced in the scattering of ultrahigh energy neutrinos on cosmological relic neutrinos. The comparison between the observed and predicted spectra constrains the mass of the heaviest neutrino. The required neutrino mass is fairly robust against variations of the presently unknown quantities, such as the amount of relic neutrino clustering, the universal photon radio background and the extragalactic magnetic field. Considering different possibilities for the ordinary cosmic rays the required neutrino masses are determined. In the most plausible case that the ordinary cosmic rays are of extragalactic origin and the universal radio background is strong enough to suppress high energy photons, the required neutrino mass is 0.08 eV < m_nu < 0.40 eV. The required ultrahigh energy neutrino flux should be detected in th...

  4. Cosmic-ray half-life of 144Pm

    In order to test the possibility of using 144Pm as a clock to measure the mean cosmic-ray confinement time in the Galaxy, we counted a highly purified 1.4 μCi source of this isotope in GAMMASPHERE and searched for its astrophysically interesting β+ decay branch through the observation of positron-annihilation γ rays in coincidence with the characteristic 697-keV γ ray. Analysis of 57 h of source counting and 15 h of background shows no net signal and results in an upper limit of 3.7 of 511-511-697 keV coincident events. From this result we establish a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branch for this decay mode to be 7.4x10-6%. The implications of this result for the 144Pm cosmic-ray chronometer problem are discussed. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  5. Automatic Recognition of Cosmic Rays at Deep Impact CCDs

    Ipatov, S. I.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Deep Impact Team

    2005-12-01

    The number of cosmic rays on images made by different cameras (HRI VIS, MRI VIS, ITS VIS, HRI IR) during the flight of Deep Impact to Comet Tempel 1 was studied for out-of peak and in the peak (during a flare) of solar activity. Both dark images, which contain only cosmic rays, and normal sky images were considered. We analyzed the work of several programs (imgclean, crfind, and di_crrej) written by several authors and deleting cosmic rays from one image. These programs run well in many cases, but usually they do not work well with raw images, some of the programs have problems with infra-red images and with long (oblique entry) rays, and they delete pixels near the edge of a comet. For infra-red images, imgclean has less problems than other two programs. We have developed an algorithm which allows one to recognize most (but not all) cosmic rays using only one CCD image and which works both with raw and calibrated images. In some cases (e.g. for deleting cosmic rays near a bright star), it works better than the above programs, but for many calibrated images it has no advantages. After the work of our program, pixels of deleted cosmic rays look like neighboring pixels. Crfind and di_crrej only find pixels corresponding to cosmic rays. Analysis of different dark and usual visual images showed that for exposure time t>4 seconds most objects on an image consist of not more than 4 pixels and these objects are caused mainly by hits of cosmic rays. Glitches of large rays have a linear form in contrast to the more circular form for stars. We considered that an object is a ray if the ratio tpix/(dx2+dy^2)object, respectively, increased by 1; tpix is the number of pixels constituting the object). For most HRI and MRI visual images made during low solar activity at t>4 s, the number Nsc of objects on image per second per square centimeter of CCD was about 2-4, both for dark and usual images, and mainly there were no rays consisting of more than 2t pixels, where t is the

  6. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    Baerwald, Philipp; Winter, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corres...

  7. Cosmic ray research in India: 1912-2012

    Tonwar, Suresh C.

    2013-02-01

    The progress of research in cosmic rays in India over the last 100 years is reviewed, starting with the pioneering work of Debendra Mohan Bose and Homi Bhabha. Experimental research in cosmic rays in India received a big push with the establishment of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research by Homi Bhabha in Bombay in 1945, the Physical Research Laboratory by Vikram Sarabhai in Ahemedabad in 1947 and the setting up of a cosmic ray research group by Piara Singh Gill at the Aligarh Muslim University in Aligarh in 1949. Studies on high energy interactions by B.V. Sreekantan and colleagues and on muons and neutrinos deep underground in KGF mines by M.G.K. Menon and coworkers were the highlights of the research work in India in 1950's and 60's. In 1970's and 80's, important advances were made in India in several areas, for example, search for proton decay in KGF mines by M.G.K. Menon et al, search for TeV cosmic gamma-ray sources at Ooty and Pachmari by P.V. Ramanamurthy and colleagues, search for PeV cosmic gamma ray sources by S.C. Tonwar et al at Ooty and by M.V.S. Rao and coworkers at KGF. In 1990's, Sreekantan and Tonwar initiated the GRAPES-3 project at Ooty to determine the composition of cosmic ray flux around the 'knee' in the primary energy spectrum at PeV energies using a large muon detector and a compact air shower array. Another major effort to search for TeV gamma-ray sources was initiated by H. Razdan and C.L. Bhat, initially at Gulmarg in Kashmir in the 1980's, leading to successful observations with a stereoscopic imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope at Mount Abu in early 2000. In recent years the Pachmari group and the Mount Abu group have joined together to install a sophisticated system of atmospheric Cherenkov detectors at Hanle in the Ladakh region at an altitude of 4200 m to continue studies on VHE sources of cosmic gammarays.

  8. On the Origin of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    Stecker, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a new estimation of the photodisintegration and propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHCR) nuclei in intergalactic space. The critical interactions for photodisintegration and energy loss of UHCR nuclei occur with photons of the infrared background radiation (IBR). We have reexamined this problem making use of a new determination of the IBR based on empirical data, primarily from IRAS galaxies, and also collateral information from TeV gamma-ray observations of...

  9. Cosmic Ray Spectra in Nambu-Goldstone Dark Matter Models

    Ibe, Masahiro; /SLAC; Murayama, Hitoshi; /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Tokyo U., IPMU; Shirai, Satoshi; /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U., IPMU; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; /Tokyo U., IPMU /Tokyo U.

    2010-06-11

    We discuss the cosmic ray spectra in annihilating/decaying Nambu-Goldstone dark matter models. The recent observed positron/electron excesses at PAMELA and Fermi experiments are well fitted by the dark matter with a mass of 3TeV for the annihilating model, while with a mass of 6TeV for the decaying model. We also show that the Nambu-Goldstone dark matter models predict a distinctive gamma-ray spectrum in a certain parameter space.

  10. Cosmic Rays and Terrestrial Life: A Brief Review

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.

    2012-01-01

    "The investigation into the possible effects of cosmic rays on living organisms will also offer great interest." - Victor F. Hess, Nobel Lecture, December 12, 1936 High-energy radiation bursts are commonplace in our Universe. From nearby solar flares to distant gamma ray bursts, a variety of physical processes accelerate charged particles to a wide range of energies, which subsequently reach the Earth. Such particles contribute to a number of physical processes occurring in the Earth system. ...

  11. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Polar Correction

    P. Bobik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2D (radius and colatitude Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift, and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0, was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1 AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton intensities, observed in the inner heliosphere with the Ulysses spacecraft during 1995, can be affected by the modification of the IMF in the polar regions.

  12. Cosmic-ray muon radiography for reactor core observation

    Highlights: • Cosmic-ray muon radiography was evaluated by the HTTR. • Cosmic-ray muon radiography could be performed from the outside of the RPV. • Cosmic-ray muon radiography could be performed from the outside of the CV. • The major structures of the HTTR could be detected by Cosmic-ray muon radiography. • The detectable minimum volume is estimated at approximately 1 (m3) in the HTTR. - Abstract: One of the critical problems that have arisen from the accident at TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is the removal of fuel debris. For solving this problem, an examination of the internal reactors has been planned to identify the fuel debris. However, the high radiation dose around the reactors has necessitated the development of a remote sensing method that would enable observation of the internal reactors from the outside. In our study, we focused on a nondestructive inspection method by which cosmic-ray muons could be used to observe the internal reactor from outside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and containment vessel (CV). We conducted an observation test on the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency to evaluate the applicability of the method to the internal visualization of a reactor. We also analytically evaluated the resolution of existing muon telescopes to assess their suitability for the HTTR observation, and were able to detect the major structures of the HTTR based on the distribution of the surface densities calculated from the coincidences measured by the telescopes. Our findings suggested that existing muon telescopes could be used for muon observation of the internal reactor from outside the RPV and CV

  13. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays II

    Fowler, T K; Colgate, S; Li, H; Bulmer, R H; Pino, J

    2011-03-08

    We show that accretion disks around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) could account for the enormous power in observed ultra high energy cosmic rays {approx}10{sup 20} eV (UHEs). In our model, cosmic rays are produced by quasi-steady acceleration of ions in magnetic structures previously proposed to explain jets around Active Galactic Nuclei with supermassive black holes. Steady acceleration requires that an AGN accretion disk act as a dynamo, which we show to follow from a modified Standard Model in which the magnetic torque of the dynamo replaces viscosity as the dominant mechanism accounting for angular momentum conservation during accretion. A black hole of mass M{sub BH} produces a steady dynamo voltage V {proportional_to} {radical}M{sub BH} giving V {approx} 10{sup 20} volts for M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} solar masses. The voltage V reappears as an inductive electric field at the advancing nose of a dynamo-driven jet, where plasma instability inherent in collisionless runaway acceleration allows ions to be steadily accelerated to energies {approx} V, finally ejected as cosmic rays. Transient events can produce much higher energies. The predicted disk radiation is similar to the Standard Model. Unique predictions concern the remarkable collimation of jets and emissions from the jet/radiolobe structure. Given MBH and the accretion rate, the model makes 7 predictions roughly consistent with data: (1) the jet length; (2) the jet radius; (3) the steady-state cosmic ray energy spectrum; (4) the maximum energy in this spectrum; (5) the UHE cosmic ray intensity on Earth; (6) electron synchrotron wavelengths; and (7) the power in synchrotron radiation. These qualitative successes motivate new computer simulations, experiments and data analysis to provide a quantitative verification of the model.

  14. Cosmic-ray acceleration at stellar wind terminal shocks

    Steady-state, spherically symmetric, analytic solutions of the cosmic-ray transport equations, applicable to the problem of acceleration of cosmic rays at the terminal shock to a stellar wind, are studied. The spectra, gradients, and flow patterns of particle modulated and accelerated by the stellar wind and shock are investigated by means of monoenergetic-source solutions at finite radius, as well as solutions with monoenergetic and power-law Galactic spectra. The solutions obtained apply in the test particle limit in which the cosmic rays do not modify the background flow. The solutions show a characteristic power-law momentum spectrum for accelerated particles and a more complex spectrum of particles that are decelerated in the stellar wind. The power-law spectral index depends on the compression ratio of the shock and on the modulation parameters characterizing propagation conditions in the upstream and downstream regions of the shock. Solutions of the transport equations for the total density N (integrated over all energies), pressure P/sub c/, and energy flux F/sub c/ of Galactic cosmic rays interacting with a stellar wind and shock are also studied. The density N(r) increases with radius r, and for strong shocks with large enough modulation parameters, there may be a significant enhancement of the pressure of weakly relativistic particles near the shock compared to the cosmic-ray background pressure P/sub infinity/. The emergent energy flux at infinity is of the order of 4π R2 V1 P/sub infinity/ (V1 is wind velocity upstream of the shock, R is shock radius)

  15. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Fowler, T; Colgate, S; Li, H

    2009-07-01

    Turbulence-driven plasma accelerators produced by magnetized accretion disks around black holes are proposed as the mechanism mainly responsible for observed cosmic ray protons with ultra high energies 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} eV. The magnetized disk produces a voltage comparable to these cosmic ray energies. Here we present a Poynting model in which this voltage provides all of the energy to create the jet-like structures observed to be ejected from accretion disks, and this voltage also accelerates ions to high energies at the top of the expanding structure. Since the inductive electric field E = -v x B driving expansion has no component parallel to the magnetic field B, ion acceleration requires plasma wave generation - either a coherent wave accelerator as recently proposed, or instability-driven turbulence. We find that turbulence can tap the full inductive voltage as a quasi-steady accelerator, and even higher energies are produced by transient events on this structure. We find that both MHD modes due to the current and ion diffusion due to kinetic instability caused by the non-Maxwellian ion distribution contribute to acceleration. We apply our results to extragalactic giant radiolobes, whose synchrotron emissions serve to calibrate the model, and we discuss extrapolating to other astrophysical structures. Approximate calculations of the cosmic ray intensity and energy spectrum are in rough agreement with data and serve to motivate more extensive MHD and kinetic simulations of turbulence that could provide more accurate cosmic ray and synchrotron spectra to be compared with observations. A distinctive difference from previous models is that the cosmic ray and synchrotron emissions arise from different parts of the magnetic structure, thus providing a signature for the model.

  16. Signs of cosmic rays in gravitational wave detectors

    One of the phenomena predicted by Einstein in the derivation of general relativity is the existence of small perturbations of the metric that he named gravitational waves. As they travel through space oscillates the space-time according to its polarization. This is the only major prediction of general relativity not yet proven completely. The small signal generated by the passage of a gravitational wave compared to the noise in the system of detection makes their direct detection one challenge of modern science. In this paper we study the noise generated by cosmic rays in the gravitational antenna Mario Schenberg, located in the city of Sao Paulo. Single muons and hadrons flux measurements held in the northern hemisphere were used to calculate the expected flux of these particles in the city of Sao Paulo. The calculation of the energy deposited in the detector of gravitational waves from cosmic rays was performed by Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4. The transport of muons and protons, with several energy and some different angles of incidence, across the building and the resonant sphere was simulated. We developed a thermo-acoustic model, called multi-point, suitable for calculating the energy deposited in the normal modes from the energy deposited on the sphere by elementary particles. With these results we calculate the expected rate of cosmic ray signals in the main detection mode of gravitational waves, nl = 12, of the Mario Schenberg detector, for temperatures Tnoise between 10-5 and 10-7 K. The results showed for the designed for 4.2 K sensitivity of the Mario Schenberg detector that the rate of signals due to cosmic rays is very small, being around 5 events per day. However, when it will reach the quantum limit will be needed a more detailed analysis of the antenna signal output, since the expected number of cosmic ray noise increases considerably, reaching about 250 signals per day. (author)

  17. CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; 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Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; 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Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

  18. CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run

    2009-11-01

    The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

  19. Signatures of the transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays

    R. AloisioINFN/LNGS; Berezinsky, V.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Ostapchenko, S.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the signatures of the transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays in different scenarios, giving most attention to the dip scenario. The dip is a feature in the diffuse spectrum of ultra-high energy (UHE) protons in the energy range $1\\times 10^{18} - 4\\times 10^{19}$ eV, which is caused by electron-positron pair production on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. The dip scenario provides a simple physical description of the transition from g...

  20. Cosmic rays and dosimetry at aviation altitudes

    Recent concerns regarding the effects of the cosmic radiation field at aircraft altitudes on aircrew have resulted in a renewed interest in detailed measurements of the neutral and charged particle components in the atmosphere. CR-39 nuclear track detectors have been employed on a number of subsonic and supersonic aircraft to measure charge spectra and LET spectra at aircraft altitudes. These detectors are ideal for long term exposures required for these studies and their passive nature makes them suitable for an environment where interference with flight instrumentation could be a problem. We report here on measurements and analysis of short range tracks which were produced by high LET particles generated mainly by neutron interactions at aviation altitudes. In order to test the overall validity of the technique measurements were also carried out at the CERN-CEC field which simulates the radiation field at aviation altitudes and good agreement was found with dose values obtained using mainly heavy ion calibration

  1. The Future of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Contrary to earlier expectations, several cosmic ray events with energies above 1020 eV have been reported by a number of ultra-high energy cosmic ray observatories. According to the AGASA experiment, the flux of such events is well above the predicted Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff due to the pion production of extragalactic cosmic ray protons off the cosmic microwave background. In addition to the relatively high flux of events, the isotropic distribution of arrival directions and an indication of small scale clustering strongly challenge all models proposed to resolve this puzzle. We discuss how the GZK cutoff is modified by the local distribution of galaxies and how astrophysical proton sources with soft injection spectra are ruled out by AGASA data. Sources with hard injection spectrum are barely allowed by the observed spectrum. If the most recent claims by AGASA that the highest energy events are due to clustered nuclei are confirmed, the most plausible explanation are astrophysical sources with very hard spectra such as extragalactic unipolar inductors. In addition, extragalactic magnetic fields need to be well below the current nano-Gauss upper limits. Alternatively, if the primaries are not nuclei, the need for new physics explanations is paramount. We present an overview of the theoretical proposals along with their most general signatures to be tested by upcoming experiments

  2. Cosmic Rays and the Search for a Lorentz Invariance Violation

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    This is an introductory review about the on-going search for a signal of Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) in cosmic rays. We first summarise basic aspects of cosmic rays, focusing on rays of ultra high energy (UHECRs). We discuss the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) energy cutoff for cosmic protons, which is predicted due to photopion production in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This is a process of modest energy in the proton rest frame. It can be investigated to a high precision in the laboratory, if Lorentz transformations apply even at factors $\\gamma \\sim O(10^{11})$. For heavier nuclei the energy attenuation is even faster due to photo-disintegration, again if this process is Lorentz invariant. Hence the viability of Lorentz symmetry up to tremendous gamma-factors - far beyond accelerator tests - is a central issue. Next we comment on conceptual aspects of Lorentz Invariance and the possibility of its spontaneous breaking. This could lead to slightly particle dependent ``Maximal Attainable Veloc...

  3. The energy range of drift effects in the solar modulation of cosmic ray electrons

    Nndanganeni, Rendani R.; Potgieter, Marius S.

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive three-dimensional modulation model is used to study the energy range of drift effects in the solar modulation of cosmic ray (galactic) electrons. Drift effects are defined as the difference between modulated spectra at a given position in the heliosphere computed for the two solar magnetic polarity cycles. The process of curvature, gradient and current sheet drifts in the heliosphere, together with convection, adiabatic energy losses and diffusion have profound effects on electron modulation. However, several reports indicated that the so-called weak-scattering drifts caused an overestimation of drift effects. It is illustrated that drift effects can be reduced in two ways, explicitly and implicitly; both influence the energy range where these effects are present but the implicit approach is more subtle to recognize and understand. A new very local interstellar spectrum for electrons is used. Electrons are most suitable for this type of study because they experience far less adiabatic energy losses than protons so that they respond directly with changes of the diffusion coefficients down to very low kinetic energy, E ∼ 1 MeV. In general, taking several modulation considerations into account, drift effects for electrons at the Earth are getting increasingly larger from above ∼10 MeV, with a maximum effect around 100 MeV, then gradually subsides to become less significant above ∼10 GeV.

  4. On the Origin of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    Stecker, F W

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of a new estimation of the photodisintegration and propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHCR) nuclei in intergalactic space. The critical interactions for photodisintegration and energy loss of UHCR nuclei occur with photons of the infrared background radiation (IBR). We have reexamined this problem making use of a new determination of the IBR based on empirical data, primarily from IRAS galaxies, and also collateral information from TeV gamma-ray observations of two nearby BL Lac objects. Our results indicate that a 200 EeV Fe nucleus can propagate apx. 100 Mpc through the IBR. We argue that it is possible that the highest energy cosmic rays observed may be heavy nuclei.

  5. Observation of Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC

    BenZvi, S Y; Westerhoff, S

    2015-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory, located 4100 m above sea level near Sierra Negra (19$^\\circ$ N) in Mexico, is sensitive to gamma rays and cosmic rays at TeV energies. The arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at these energies shows significant anisotropy on several angular scales, with a relative intensity ranging between 10$^{-3}$ and 10$^{-4}$. We present the results of a study of cosmic-ray anisotropy based on more than 86 billion cosmic-ray air showers recorded with HAWC since June 2013. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map, which has a median energy of 2 TeV, exhibits several regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux. We present the energy dependence of the anisotropy and the cosmic-ray spectrum in the regions of significant excess.

  6. Radio Detection of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Falcke, Heino

    2008-01-01

    The radio technique for the detection of cosmic particles has seen a major revival in recent years. New and planned experiments in the lab and the field, such as GLUE, Anita, LUNASKA, Codalema, LOPES as well as sophisticated Monte Carlo experiments have produced a wealth of new information and I review here briefly some of the main results with the main focus on air showers. Radio emission of ultra-high energy cosmic particles offers a number of interesting advantages. Since radio waves suffer no attenuation, radio measurements allow the detection of very distant or highly inclined showers, can be used day and night, and provide a bolometric measure of the leptonic shower component. The LOPES experiment has detected the radio emission from cosmic rays, confirmed the geosynchrotron effect for extensive air showers, and provided a good calibration fomula to convert the radio signal into primary particle energy. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that also the shower maximum and the particle composition c...

  7. Secondary gamma rays from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays produced in magnetized environments

    Nearby sources of cosmic rays up to a ZeV(=1021 eV) could be observed with a multimessenger approach including secondary γ-rays and neutrinos. If cosmic rays above ∼1018 eV are produced in magnetized environments such as galaxy clusters, the flux of secondary γ-rays can be enhanced by a factor ∼10 at Gev energies and by a factor of a few at TeV energies, compared to unmagnetized sources. Particularly enhanced are synchrotron and cascade photons from e+e- pairs produced by protons from sources with relatively steep injection spectra ∝E-2.6. Such sources should be visible at the same time in ultrahigh energy cosmic ray experiments and γ-ray telescopes

  8. Secondary gamma rays from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays produced in magnetized environments

    Armengaud, Eric; Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco

    2006-04-01

    Nearby sources of cosmic rays up to a ZeV(=1021eV) could be observed with a multimessenger approach including secondary γ-rays and neutrinos. If cosmic rays above ˜1018eV are produced in magnetized environments such as galaxy clusters, the flux of secondary γ-rays can be enhanced by a factor ˜10 at Gev energies and by a factor of a few at TeV energies, compared to unmagnetized sources. Particularly enhanced are synchrotron and cascade photons from e+e- pairs produced by protons from sources with relatively steep injection spectra ∝E-2.6. Such sources should be visible at the same time in ultrahigh energy cosmic ray experiments and γ-ray telescopes.

  9. Extended adiabatic blast waves and a model of the soft X-ray background. [interstellar matter

    Cox, D. P.; Anderson, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical approximation is generated which follows the development of an adiabatic spherical blast wave in a homogeneous ambient medium of finite pressure. An analytical approximation is also presented for the electron temperature distribution resulting from coulomb collisional heating. The dynamical, thermal, ionization, and spectral structures are calculated for blast waves of energy E sub 0 = 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs in a hot low-density interstellar environment. A formula is presented for estimating the luminosity evolution of such explosions. The B and C bands of the soft X-ray background, it is shown, are reproduced by such a model explosion if the ambient density is about .000004 cm, the blast radius is roughly 100 pc, and the solar system is located inside the shocked region. Evolution in a pre-existing cavity with a strong density gradient may, it is suggested, remove both the M band and OVI discrepancies.

  10. Cosmic star formation, gamma-ray burst rate at high redshift and cosmic chemical evolution

    Recent optical observations and Gamma-ray burst rate determinations have led to significant progress in establishing the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift. The SFR in turn is used to predict the ionization history of the Universe (using last results from CMB WMAP mission), the cosmic chemical abundances, and supernova rates. These predictions are done using a hierarchical model for structure formation (Press and Schechter). (author)

  11. Calibration of the Cherenkov Telescope Array using Cosmic Ray Electrons

    Parsons, R D; Schoorlemmer, H

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic ray electrons represent a background for gamma-ray observations with Cherenkov telescopes, initiating air-showers which are difficult to distinguish from photon-initiated showers. This similarity, however, and the presence of cosmic ray electrons in every field observed, makes them potentially very useful for calibration purposes. Here we study the precision with which the relative energy scale and collection area/efficiency for photons can be established using electrons for a major next generation instrument such as CTA. We find that variations in collection efficiency on hour timescales can be corrected to better than 1%. Furthermore, the break in the electron spectrum at ~0.9 TeV can be used to calibrate the energy scale at the 3% level on the same timescale. For observations on the order of hours, statistical errors become negligible below a few TeV and allow for an energy scale cross-check with instruments such as CALET and AMS. Cosmic ray electrons therefore provide a powerful calibration tool, e...

  12. PREFACE: Second School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics

    Zepeda, Arnulfo

    2008-02-01

    The physics of cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos has become nowadays a subject of fast development. On the other hand present and planed experimental facilities installed in the American continent, attract and facilitate the involvement of local young researchers. For these reasons Professor Oscar Saavedra and his team of the high altitude cosmic ray Chacaltaya laboratory and the Universidad Mayor de San Andres in La Paz Bolivia, conceived the idea of organizing the First School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics in La Paz 9-20 August 2004. That school was possible, in spite of the scarcity of funds, thanks to the solidary participation of several distinguish lecturers who paid their travel and local expenses. Their lectures were made available on a CD by the local students. It was then decided that a second school be organized for 2006 in Mexico. It was held from 28 August to 15 September 15. Some of the lecturers in this Second School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics were too busy to write their lectures, but here we put at the disposal of the interested community the contributions of Roberto Battiston, Karen S Caballero, Edgar Casimiro, David Delepine, Giorgio Giacomelli, Gonzalo Rodríguez and Luis Villaseñor. This School was possible thanks to the financial assistance of CONACyT (Mexico), the Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), the University of Torino and the Centro Latino Americano de Fisica. Arnulfo Zepeda The editors of these proceedings are: Rebeca López Rodrigo Pelayo Oscar Saavedra Arnulfo Zepeda

  13. Observational Clues of Galactic Cosmic Rays – from X-ray Point of View

    Bamba, Aya

    2014-11-15

    X-ray observations are the strong tool to study nonthermal phenomena in the universe. Detecting synchrotron X-rays is the direct evidence of accelerated electrons in the magnetic field, and thermal X-rays from the background plasma of the acceleration sites show us their physical parameters such as temperature, density, and so on. Recent X-ray observations show us the discrepancy of the standard model of Galactic cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae, such as high acceleration efficiency, amplification of magnetic field on the shock, escape from the shock, and so on. In this paper, we will introduce how present X-ray observatories, and near-future X-ray observatories will, contribute the understanding Galactic cosmic ray acceleration beyond the standard model, together with radio, optical, and gamma-ray observations.

  14. Nuclear Physics in Space: What We Can Learn From Cosmic Rays

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2004-01-01

    Studies and discoveries in cosmic-ray physics and generally in Astrophysics provide a fertile ground for research in many areas of Particle Physics and Cosmology, such as the search for dark matter, antimatter, new particles, and exotic physics, studies of the nucleosynthesis, origin of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray diffuse emission, formation of the large scale structure of the universe etc. In several years new missions are planned for cosmic-ray experiments, which will tremendously increase the quality and accuracy of cosmic-ray data. On the other hand, direct measurements of cosmic rays are possible in only one location on the outskirts of the Milky Way galaxy and present only a snapshot of very dynamic processes. It has been recently realized that direct information about the fluxes and spectra of cosmic rays in distant locations is provided by the Galactic diffuse gamma-rays, therefore, complementing the local cosmic-ray studies. A wealth of information is also contained in the isotopic abundances of cosmic rays, therefore, accurate evaluation of the isotopic production cross sections is of primary importance for Astrophysics of cosmic rays, studies of the galactic chemical evolution, and Cosmology. In this talk, I will show new results obtained with GALPROP, the most advanced numerical model for cosmic-ray propagation, which includes in a self-consistent way all cosmic-ray species (stable and long-lived radioactive isotopes from H to Ni, antiprotons, positrons and electrons, gamma rays and synchrotron radiation), and all relevant processes and reactions.

  15. The Cosmic Ray Population of the Galactic Central Molecular Zone

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2014-01-01

    The conditions in the Galactic Center are often compared with those in starburst systems, which contain higher supernova rates, stronger magnetic fields, more intense radiation fields, and larger amounts of dense molecular gas than in our own Galactic disk. Interactions between such an augmented interstellar medium and cosmic rays result in brighter radio and gamma-ray emission. Here, we test how well the comparisons between the Galactic Center and starburst galaxies hold by applying a model for cosmic ray interactions to the Galactic Center to predict the resulting gamma-ray emission. The model only partially explains the observed gamma-ray and radio emission. The model for the gamma-ray spectrum agrees with the data at TeV energies but not at GeV energies. Additionally, as the fits of the model to the radio and gamma-ray spectra require significant differences in the optimal wind speed and magnetic field strength, we find that the single-zone model alone cannot account for the observed emission from the Gal...

  16. Constraining the production of cosmic rays by pulsars

    Ivanov, Mikhail M; Rubtsov, Grigory I

    2016-01-01

    One of the possible sources of hadronic cosmic rays (CRs) are newborn pulsars. If it is indeed the case, they should feature diffusive gamma-ray halos produced by interactions of CRs with interstellar gas. In this paper we try to identify extended gamma-ray emission around young pulsars making use of the 7-year Fermi-LAT data. For this purpose we select and analyse a set of 8 pulsars that are most likely to possess detectable gamma-ray halos. We found extended emission that might be interpreted as a gamma-ray halo only in the case of PSR J0007+7303. Its luminosity accords with the total energy of injected cosmic rays $\\sim 10^{50}$ erg, although other interpretations of this source are possible. Irrespectively of the nature of this source we put bounds on the luminosity of gamma-ray halos which suggest that pulsars' contribution to the overall energy budget of galactic~CRs is subdominant in the GeV-TeV range.

  17. Preheating of the Universe by cosmic rays from primordial supernovae at the beginning of cosmic reionization

    Sazonov, S.; Sunyaev, R.

    2015-12-01

    The 21-cm signal from the cosmic reionization epoch can shed light on the history of heating of the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ˜ 30-10. It has been suggested that X-rays from the first accreting black holes could significantly heat the Universe at these early epochs. Here we propose another IGM heating mechanism associated with the first stars. As known from previous work, the remnants of powerful supernovae (SNe) ending the lives of massive Population III stars could readily expand out of their host dark matter minihaloes into the surrounding IGM, aided by the preceding photo-evaporation of the halo's gas by the UV radiation from the progenitor star. We argue that during the evolution of such a remnant, a significant fraction of the SN kinetic energy can be put into low-energy (E ≲ 30 MeV) cosmic rays that will eventually escape into the IGM. These subrelativistic cosmic rays could propagate through the Universe and heat the IGM by ˜10-100 K by z ˜ 15, before more powerful reionization/heating mechanisms associated with the first galaxies and quasars came into play. Future 21-cm observations could thus constrain the energetics of the first SNe and provide information on the magnetic fields in the primordial IGM.

  18. Preheating of the Universe by cosmic rays from primordial supernovae at the beginning of cosmic reionization

    Sazonov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    The 21-cm signal from the cosmic reionization epoch can shed light on the history of heating of the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) at z~30-10. It has been suggested that X-rays from the first accreting black holes could significantly heat the Universe at these early epochs. Here we propose another IGM heating mechanism associated with the first stars. As known from previous work, the remnants of powerful supernovae (SNe) ending the lives of massive Population III stars could readily expand out of their host dark matter minihalos into the surrounding IGM, aided by the preceeding photoevaporation of the halo's gas by the UV radiation from the progenitor star. We argue that during the evolution of such a remnant a significant fraction of the SN kinetic energy can be put into low-energy (E<30 MeV) cosmic rays that will eventually escape into the IGM. These subrelativistic cosmic rays could propagate through the Universe and heat the IGM by ~10-100 K by z~15, before more powerful reionization/heating mec...

  19. A tale of cosmic rays narrated in gamma rays by Fermi

    Tibaldo, L

    2013-01-01

    Because cosmic rays are charged particles scrambled by magnetic fields, combining direct measurements with other observations is crucial to understanding their origin and propagation. As energetic particles traverse matter and electromagnetic fields, they leave marks in the form of neutral interaction products. Among those, gamma rays trace interactions of nuclei that inelastically collide with interstellar gas, as well as of leptons that undergo Bremsstrahlung and inverse-Compton scattering. Data collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) are therefore telling us the story of cosmic rays along their journey from sources through their home galaxies. Supernova remnants emerge as a notable gamma-ray source population, and older remnants interacting with interstellar matter finally show strong evidence of the presence of accelerated nuclei. Yet the maximum energy attained by shock accelerators is poorly constrained. Cygnus X, a massive star-forming region established by the LAT as housing cosmic-ray sourc...

  20. Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray photons observed at the ground level in Japan

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray photons was estimated from the pulse-height spectra of cosmic-rays observed by a spherical NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The pulse-height spectrum of cosmic-ray photons could be successfully separated on the basis of the difference between the pulse-height spectrum by a spherical NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and that by coincidence counting method. It seemed that the pulse-height spectra of cosmic-ray muons by the each measuring system resemble each other in shape, while the pulse-height spectra of cosmic-ray electrons by the each system different each other. So the pulse-height distribution of cosmic-ray muons was determined from the pulse-height spectrum observed by the detector covered with lead. The pulse-height distribution of cosmic-ray electrons was determined as follows: The shape of pulse-height spectrum was calculated on the basis of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray electrons in the lower atmosphere. The pulse-height distributions of cosmic-ray electrons by the single detector system and by the coincidence detector system were calculated by using the EGS4 Monte Carlo Code. The intensity of cosmic-ray electrons was determined by subtracting the pulse-height spectrum observed by the detector covered with lead from that observed by the coincidence detector system. The pulse-height distribution of cosmic-ray photons could be determined from the pulse-height spectrum by the coincidence detector system subtracted from that by the single detector system. The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray photons could be calculated from the pulse-height distribution of cosmic-ray photons by using an unfolding method. It became clear that the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray photons was identified above scores of MeV. (author)