WorldWideScience

Sample records for adhesive small bowel

  1. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction

    Konjic, Ferid; Idrizovic, Enes; Hasukic, Ismar; Jahic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions are the reason for bowel obstruction in 80% of the cases. In well selected patients the adhesive ileus laparoscopic treatment has multiple advantages which include the shorter hospitalization period, earlier food taking, and less postoperative morbidity rate. Case report: Here we have a patient in the age of 35 hospitalized at the clinic due to occlusive symptoms. Two years before an opened appendectomy had been performed on him. He underwent the treatment of exploration laparoscopy and laparoscopic adhesiolysis. Dilated small bowel loops connected with the anterior abdominal wall in the ileocecal region by adhesions were found intraoperatively and then resected harmonically with scalpel. One strangulation around which a small bowel loop was wrapped around was found and dissected. Postoperative course was normal. PMID:27041815

  2. Adhesive small bowel adhesions obstruction: Evolutions in diagnosis, management and prevention

    Catena, Fausto; Di Saverio, Salomone; Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; De Simone, Belinda; Sartelli, Massimo; Van Goor, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions following abdominal surgery represent a major unsolved problem. They are the first cause of small bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation, water-soluble contrast follow-through and computed tomography scan. For patients presenting no signs of strangulation, peritonitis or severe intestinal impairment there is good evidence to support non-operative management. Open surgery is the preferred method for the surgical treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction, in case of suspected strangulation or after failed conservative management, but laparoscopy is gaining widespread acceptance especially in selected group of patients. "Good" surgical technique and anti-adhesive barriers are the main current concepts of adhesion prevention. We discuss current knowledge in modern diagnosis and evolving strategies for management and prevention that are leading to stratified care for patients. PMID:27022449

  3. Peritoneal Adhesions as a Cause of Mechanical Small Bowel Obstruction Based on Own Experience

    Morawski Bartłomiej

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bowel obstruction is a condition which has been known for many years. As time goes by, the problem is still often encountered at surgical emergency rooms. More than 20% of emergency surgical interventions are performed because of symptoms of digestive tract obstruction with the disease mostly situated in the small bowel. Rates of causative factors of the disease have changed over recent years and there have been increasingly more cases of small bowel obstruction caused by peritoneal adhesions, i.e., adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO.

  4. Value of gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction after unsuccessful conservative treatment: A prospective evaluation

    Hok-Kwok Choi; Wai-Lun Law; Judy Wai-Chu Ho; Kin-Wah Chu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Gastrografin is a hyperosmolar water-soluble contrast medium. Besides its predictive value for the need for operative treatment, a potential therapeutic role of this agent in adhesive small bowel obstruction has been suggested. This study aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction when conservative treatment failed.METHODS: Patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction were given trial conservative treatment unless there was fear of bowel strangulation. Those responded in the initial 48 h had conservative treatment continued. Patients who showed no improvement in the initial 48 h were given 100 mL of gastrografin through nasogastric tube followed by serial abdominal radiographs. Patients with the contrast appeared in large bowel within 24 h were regarded ashaving partial obstruction and conservative treatment wascontinued. Patients in which the contrast failed to reachlarge bowel within 24 h were considered to have completeobstruction and laparotomy was performed.RESULTS: Two hundred and twelve patients with 245episodes of adhesive obstruction were included. Fifteenpatients were operated on soon after admission due tofear of strangulation. One hundred and eighty-six episodesof obstruction showed improvement in the initial 48 h andconservative treatment was continued. Two patients hadsubsequent operations because of persistent obstruction.Forty-four episodes of obstruction showed no improvementwithin 48 h and gastrografin was administered. Sevenpatients underwent complete obstruction surgery. Partialobstruction was demonstrated in 37 other cases, obstruction resolved subsequently in all of them except one patient who required laparotomy because of persistent obstruction. The overall operative rate in this study was 10%. There was no complication that could be attributed to the use of gastrografin.CONCLUSION: The use of gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction after unsuccessful conservative treatment is

  5. Adhesive small bowel obstruction: How long can patients tolerate conservative treatment?

    Shou-Chuan Shih; Tsang-En Wang; Kuo-Shyang Jeng; Shee-Chan Lin; Chin-Roa Kao; Sun-Yen Chou; Horng-Yuan Wang; Wen-Hsiung Chang; Cheng-Hsin Chu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate how long patients with small bowel obstruction caused by postoperative adhesions can tolerate conservative treatment.METHODS: The records of patients with small bowel obstruction due to postoperative adhesions were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included the number of admissions, type of management for each admission,duration of conservative treatment, number of repeat laparotomies, and operative findings.RESULTS: One hundred fifty-five patients with this condition from January 1999 to December 2001, for a total of 293 admissions were enrolled in this study. Medical treatment alone was given in 220 admissions, and repeat laparotomy was performed in 73 admissions. The period of observation in patients managed medically ranged from 2 to 12 days (average: 6.9 days), while for those who underwent surgery,the range was 1 to 14 days (average 5.4 days). At surgery,adhesions were the only finding in 46 cases, while there were intestinal complications in 27, or 9.2 % of all 293admissions. Fever and leukocytosis greater than 15 000/mm3were prediction of intestinal complications.CONCLUSION: With closely monitoring, most patients with small bowel obstruction due to postoperative adhesions could tolerate supportive treatment and recover well averagely within 1 week, although some patients require more than 10 days of observation.

  6. [Laparoscopic diagnosis and treatment of early adhesive small bowel obstruction after gynecological surgery].

    Timofeev, M E; Breusenko, V G; Shapoval'iants, S G; Fedorov, E D; Larichev, S E; Kretsu, V N

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of diagnostic and curative laparoscopic interventions in 33 patients with acute early adhesive small bowel obstruction. Ileus developed after surgical treatment (laparotomy) of different gynecological diseases. Laparoscopy appeared as the most informative diagnostic method to confirm diagnosis in all patients, to estimate state of abdominal cavity and small pelvis organs what can help to determine method of surgical treatment. Contraindications for laparoscopic surgery were identified in 12 (36.4%) patients and conversion to laparotomy was applied in this group. Postoperative complications were diagnosed in 1 (8.3%) patient. 2 (16.6%) patients died. Early adhesive ileus was resolved laparoscopically in 21 (63.6%) of 33 patients. Recurrent acute early adhesive ileus was detected in 1 (4.7%) patient. PMID:26031952

  7. An adhesion-related small bowel obstruction occurring within 36 h of a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy

    Shah, Neha; Shah, Sonya Pratik; Thakrar, Amit; Rozati, Hamoun

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of adhesion-related small bowel obstruction occurring within only 36 h of a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. There has been no previously reported case where there has been such a short interval between surgery and adhesion-related small bowel obstruction. This is important to note, as it ensures that adhesion-related small bowel obstruction is on the list of differential diagnoses for patients who present very soon after surgery with symptom...

  8. Detection of the Transition Zone and Adhesions in the Diagnosis of Adhesive Small-bowel Obstruction: the Added Value of Ultrasonography (US) in Comparison with Only CT Imaging

    We aimed to assess retrospectively the benefit of the use of ultrasonography (US) in comparison with the use of only CT imaging for the detection of the transition zone and adhesions to determine a diagnosis of adhesive small-bowel obstruction(SBO). Thirty-five patients underwent an additional US examination after CT imaging to determine a diagnosis of SBO. All of the patients were surgically confirmed as having adhesive SBO. The CT images were interpreted for the location of the transition zone, the location and shape of adhesions and for other SBO findings. All of the additional US scans were performed with reference to the CT findings. The standard of reference for the diagnosis was the surgical findings. The diagnostic accuracy and mean confidence score of the transition zone location and the detection rate of adhesions were evaluated for both CT imaging alone and for CT imaging with additional US. The diagnostic accuracy to locate the transition zone was significantly increased with the use of additional US with CT imaging (94.6%, 33/35) as compared to 65.7% (23/35) with the use of only CT imaging (p = 0.01). The mean confidence score was significantly increased (by 0.95) with the use of an additional US examination (p < 0.01). The detection rate for adhesions was 20% (7/35) with the use of only CT imaging and the detection rate was 68.6% (24/35) with the use of an additional US examination. The use of a US examination in addition to CT imaging can increase the accuracy and confidence to locate the transition zone and can increase the rate to detect adhesions in patients with adhesive SBO. An additional US examination may be especially helpful when the CT findings are equivocal

  9. Value of multidetector CT in decision making regarding surgery in patients with small-bowel obstruction due to adhesion

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of use of multidetector CT (MDCT) to predict the need for subsequent surgery in patients with small-bowel obstruction (SBO) due to adhesion. During a 3-year period, 128 patients with an SBO due to adhesion were enrolled in this prospective study. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively. Surgery was performed in patients who developed signs of strangulation or did not improve, despite a conservative treatment for at least 5 days. Of the 128 patients, 37 patients eventually underwent surgery. Two radiologists interpreted MDCT findings regarded as predictive indicators for subsequent surgery in consensus. The findings included degree of SBO, presence of transition zone, and an abnormal vascular course. These findings were statistically compared between the group operated on and the group not operated on. A higher degree of SBO, an abnormal vascular course, and the presence of transition zone were more frequently seen in the group of patients operated on (p<0.001). Sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative predictive values, and risks for the use of MDCT to predict the need for surgery were 100%, 46.1%, 43%, 100%, and 1.9 (1.5 ≤ 95% confidence interval (CI) ≤ 2.2) for a high-grade obstruction; 100%, 23%, 34.5%, 100%, and 1.3 (1.2 ≤ 95% CI ≤ 1.5) for the presence of a transition zone; and 70.2%, 90.1%, 74.2%, 88.1%, and 7.1 (3.7 ≤ 95% CI ≤ 13.7) for the presence of an abnormal course of the mesenteric vessels, respectively. The presence of a high degree of SBO and an abnormal vascular course around transition zone are useful indicators on MDCT to predict the need for surgery in patients with an SBO due to adhesion. (orig.)

  10. Small bowel resection - discharge

    ... incision is red, warm, swollen, or more painful Short of breath or chest pain Swollen legs or pain in your calves Alternative Names Small intestine surgery - discharge; Bowel resection - small intestine - discharge; Resection of ...

  11. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Symptoms The most common symptoms are: Abdominal ...

  12. Feasibility of laparoscopy for small bowel obstruction

    De Sol Angelo A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherential pathology is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction does not have a clear role yet; surely it doesn't always represent only a therapeutic act, but it is always a diagnostic act, which doesn't interfere with abdominal wall integrity. Methods We performed a review without any language restrictions considering international literature indexed from 1980 to 2007 in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. We analyzed the reference lists of the key manuscripts. We also added a review based on international non-indexed sources. Results The feasibility of diagnostic laparoscopy is high (60–100%, while that of therapeutic laparoscopy is low (40–88%. The frequency of laparotomic conversions is variable ranging from 0 to 52%, depending on patient selection and surgical skill. The first cause of laparotomic conversion is a difficult exposition and treatment of band adhesions. The incidence of laparotomic conversions is major in patients with anterior peritoneal band adhesions. Other main causes for laparotomic conversion are the presence of bowel necrosis and accidental enterotomies. The predictive factors for successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis are: number of previous laparotomies ≤ 2, non-median previous laparotomy, appendectomy as previous surgical treatment causing adherences, unique band adhesion as phatogenetic mechanism of small bowel obstruction, early laparoscopic management within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms, no signs of peritonitis on physical examination, experience of the surgeon. Conclusion Laparoscopic adhesiolysis in small bowel obstruction is feasible but can be convenient only if performed by skilled surgeons in selected patients. The laparoscopic adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction is satisfactorily carried out when early indicated in patients with a low number of laparotomies resulting in a short hospital stay and a lower postoperative

  13. Prospective controlled randomized trial on prevention of postoperative abdominal adhesions by Icodextrin 4% solution after laparotomic operation for small bowel obstruction caused by adherences [POPA study: Prevention of Postoperative Adhesions on behalf of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    D'Alessandro Luigi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adhesive small intestine occlusion [ASIO] is an important cause of hospital admission placing a substantial burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Often times, ASIO is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Icodextrin 4% solution [Adept, Shire Pharmaceuticals, UK] is a high-molecular-weight a-1,4 glucose polymer that is approved in Europe for use as an intra-operative lavage and a post-operative instillate to reduce the occurrence of post-surgery intra-abdominal adhesions. There are no randomized trials on the use of this solution to prevent adhesions after ASIO operation in current medical literature. The current clinical study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of Icodextrin 4% for decreasing the incidence, extent, and severity of adhesions in patients after abdominal surgery for ASIO. Design The study project is a prospective, randomized controlled investigation performed in the Department of Transplant, General and Emergency Surgery of St. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital [Bologna, Italy]. The study is designed and conducted in compliance with the principles of Good Clinical Practice regulations. The study compares the results of Icodextrin 4% against a control group who does not receive anti-adhesion treatment. This randomized study uses a double-blind procedure to evaluate efficacy end points. In other words, designated third party individuals who are unaware of the treatment assigned to the patients to assess adhesion formation. Trial Registration Number ISRCTN22061989 Prospective controlled randomized trial on Prevention of Postoperative Abdominal Adhesions by Icodextrin 4% solution after laparotomic operation for small bowel obstruction caused by adherences [POPA study: Prevention of Postoperative Adhesions

  14. An immunoglobulin G-4 related sclerosing disease of the small bowel: CT and small bowel series findings

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease is rare and is known to involve various organs. We present a case of histologically proven IgG4-related sclerosing disease of the small bowel with imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and small bowel series. CT showed irregular wall thickening, loss of mural stratification and aneurysmal dilatation of the distal ileum. Small bowel series showed aneurysmal dilatations, interloop adhesion with traction and abrupt angulation.

  15. An immunoglobulin G-4 related sclerosing disease of the small bowel: CT and small bowel series findings

    Ko, Young Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Min, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Ji Young; Kim, Jeong Won; Hong, Hye Sook; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul [Hallym University Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease is rare and is known to involve various organs. We present a case of histologically proven IgG4-related sclerosing disease of the small bowel with imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and small bowel series. CT showed irregular wall thickening, loss of mural stratification and aneurysmal dilatation of the distal ileum. Small bowel series showed aneurysmal dilatations, interloop adhesion with traction and abrupt angulation.

  16. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel

    Adenocarcinoma of small bowel is generally a rather rare primary tumour of small bowel with a prevalence rate of 0.5 - 3.0 / 100.000 population, but the most frequent tumour of small intestine. It more often involves the duodenum and jejunum than the ileum. The aim of this paper is also to point out the value of small bowel follow through (SBFT) in the diagnosis of stenosing lesions. An 83 - year old male patient suffered from abdominal pain, malaise, vomiting, cachexia and diarrhoea for 3 months. The result of occult blood testing was negative. Haemoglobin level was normal. Proctoscopy, colonoscopy, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and ultrasonography (US) did not explain the patient's problems. Ileus of the small bowel was established with abdominal plain film. Small bowel follow through (SBFT) and computer tomography (CT) showed a stenosing tumour in the jejunum. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel was established with histological examination after resection of the tumor. SBFT, with manual compression of all segments of the small bowel, can be a very accurate diagnostic investigation for evaluation of stenosing lesions in this part of the intestine. (author)

  17. Small Bowel Bleeding

    ... ACG on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist? Podcasts and Videos GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity © ...

  18. Small bowel transplantation: An overview

    R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron); E. Heineman (Erik); R.L. Marquet (Richard)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractSmall bowel transplantation (SBT) would, in theory, be the treatment of choice for patients suffering from the short bowel syndrome. Although SBT has been done with a considerable degree of success in some centers [36,145], it is by no means an established or widely applicable therapy fo

  19. Small Bowel Review - Part I

    Thomson, ABR; Wild, G.

    1997-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the study of the small bowel. Part I of this two-part review of the small bowel examines carbohydrates, including brush border membrane hydrolysis and sugar transport; amino acids, dipeptides, proteins and food allergy, with a focus on glutamine, peptides and macromolecules, and nucleosides, nucleotides and polyamines; salt and water absorption, and diarrhea, including antidiarrheal therapy and oral rehydration treatment; lipids (digestion and absorption...

  20. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO: 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    Lupo Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for

  1. Effect of the Japanese Herbal Kampo Medicine Dai-Kenchu-To on Postoperative Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction Requiring Long-Tube Decompression: A Propensity Score Analysis

    Hideo Yasunaga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO is an adverse consequence of abdominal surgery. Although the Kampo medicine Dai-kenchu-to is widely used in Japan for treatment of postoperative ASBO, rigorous clinical studies for its use have not been performed. In the present retrospective observational study using the Japanese diagnosis procedure combination inpatient database, we selected 288 propensity-score-matched patients with early postoperative ASBO following colorectal cancer surgery, who received long-tube decompression (LTD with or without Dai-kenchu-to administration. The success rates of LTD were not significantly different between Dai-kenchu-to users and nonusers (84.7% versus 78.5%; P=.224, while Dai-kenchu-to users showed a shorter duration of LTD (8 versus 10 days; P=.012, shorter duration between long-tube insertion and discharge (23 versus 25 days; P=.018, and lower hospital charges ($23,086 versus $26,950; P=.018 compared with Dai-kenchu-to nonusers. In conclusion, the present study suggests that Dai-kenchu-to is effective for reducing the duration of LTD and saving costs.

  2. Small bowel neoplasia in coeliac disease

    Rampertab, S D; Forde, K A; Green, P. H. R.

    2003-01-01

    There is an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with coeliac disease compared with the normal population. It has been suggested that adenocarcinoma of the small intestine in coeliac disease arises through an adenoma-carcinoma sequence but there has been only one reported case of a small bowel adenoma in a patient with coeliac disease. We report three additional cases of a small bowel adenoma in the setting of coeliac disease. In addition, four cases of small bowel adenoca...

  3. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Emanuele; Casciani; Chiara; De; Vincentiis; Gianfranco; Gualdi

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel(SB) has always beenchallenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times(fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations.

  4. Unusual causes of mechanical small bowel obstruction

    We herein report our experience regarding unusual causes of bowel obstruction to increase the awareness of surgeons regarding this disease. From 1991 to 2003, we had experience at the University affiliated hospitals, northern Jordan with 24 patients with small bowel obstruction resulting from unusual causes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these patients with regards to the mode of presentation, cause of obstruction, radiological and operative findings, management and outcome. We recorded 15 patients who underwent previous abdominal surgery. Preoperative diagnosis was correct in only one patient with an internal hernia, but the abdominal CT scan suggested the diagnosis in 5 of the 9 patients who had the scan. The final diagnosis was internal hernias in 11 patients, foreign bodies in 5, ischemic strictures in 3, carcinoid tumors in 2, endometriosis in 2, and metastatic deposit from interstitial bladder carcinoma in one patient. Nine of the 12 patients with recurrent obstruction had either short course or recurrence obstruction during the same hospital admission. W carried out bowel resections in 15 patients (5 resections were due to bowel strangulation). Post operative death occurred in 4 patients. Awareness of these rare causes of intestinal obstruction even in patients with previous abdominal operation might improve the outcome. The tentative diagnosis of adhesion obstruction in patients with unusual obstructive etiology might lead to a higher rate of gangrenous complications. Rigorous preoperative evaluation including careful history and early abdominal CT may show the obstructive cause. (author)

  5. Small bowel resection

    ... reconnect, your surgeon makes an opening called a stoma through the skin of your belly. The small ... of your belly. Stool will go through the stoma into a drainage bag outside your body. This ...

  6. Imaging the small bowel.

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-03-01

    Radiologic investigations continue to play a pivotal role in the diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the small intestine despite enhancement of capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy. Imaging techniques continue to evolve and new techniques in MRI in particular, are being developed.

  7. Imaging differentiation of phytobezoar and small-bowel faeces: CT characteristics with quantitative analysis in patients with small- bowel obstruction

    The objective is to use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to differentiate phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces in patients with small-bowel obstruction (SBO). We retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive SBO patients with surgically proven phytobezoars (n = 31) or adhesion with small-bowel faeces (n = 60). Two readers blinded to the diagnosis recorded the following MDCT features: degree of obstruction, transition point, mesenteric fatty stranding, intraperitoneal fluid, air-fluid level, pneumatosis intestinalis, and portal venous gas. MDCT measurements of the food debris length, attenuation, luminal diameter, and wall thickness of the obstructed bowel were also compared. A higher grade of obstruction with an absence of mesenteric fatty stranding and intraperitoneal fluid was more commonly seen in the phytobezoar group than in the small-bowel faeces group (p < 0.01). The food debris length (phytobezoar, 5.7 ± 2.8 cm; small-bowel feces, 20.3 ± 7.9 cm, p < 0.01) and mean attenuation (phytobezoar, -59.6 ± 43.3 Hounsfield units (HU); small-bowel faeces, 8.5 ± 7.7 HU, p <0.01) were significantly different between the two groups. The ROC curve showed that food debris length <9.5 cm and mean attenuation value < -11.75 HU predicted phytobezoar impaction. MDCT features with measurements of the food debris length and mean attenuation assist the differentiation of phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces. (orig.)

  8. Imaging differentiation of phytobezoar and small-bowel faeces: CT characteristics with quantitative analysis in patients with small- bowel obstruction

    Chen, Ya-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Hsien; Hsu, Hsian-He; Yu, Chih-Yung [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Wang, Hong-Hau [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Tri-Service General Hospital Songshan Branch, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Fan, Hsiu-Lung [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Chen, Ran-Chou [Taipei City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming Univeristy, Department of Biochemical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Chang, Wei-Chou [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming Univeristy, Department of Biochemical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China)

    2015-04-01

    The objective is to use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to differentiate phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces in patients with small-bowel obstruction (SBO). We retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive SBO patients with surgically proven phytobezoars (n = 31) or adhesion with small-bowel faeces (n = 60). Two readers blinded to the diagnosis recorded the following MDCT features: degree of obstruction, transition point, mesenteric fatty stranding, intraperitoneal fluid, air-fluid level, pneumatosis intestinalis, and portal venous gas. MDCT measurements of the food debris length, attenuation, luminal diameter, and wall thickness of the obstructed bowel were also compared. A higher grade of obstruction with an absence of mesenteric fatty stranding and intraperitoneal fluid was more commonly seen in the phytobezoar group than in the small-bowel faeces group (p < 0.01). The food debris length (phytobezoar, 5.7 ± 2.8 cm; small-bowel feces, 20.3 ± 7.9 cm, p < 0.01) and mean attenuation (phytobezoar, -59.6 ± 43.3 Hounsfield units (HU); small-bowel faeces, 8.5 ± 7.7 HU, p <0.01) were significantly different between the two groups. The ROC curve showed that food debris length <9.5 cm and mean attenuation value < -11.75 HU predicted phytobezoar impaction. MDCT features with measurements of the food debris length and mean attenuation assist the differentiation of phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces. (orig.)

  9. CT enteroclysis in small bowel Crohn's disease

    The diagnostic evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease has changed dramatically over the last decade. The introduction of wireless capsule endoscopy, double balloon endoscopy and the introduction of newer therapeutic agents have changed the role of imaging in the small bowel. Additionally, advances in multidetector CT technology have further changed how radiologic investigations are utilized in the diagnosis and management of small bowel Crohn's disease. This article describes how we perform CT enteroclysis in the investigation of small bowel Crohn's disease and discusses the role of CT enteroclysis in the current management of small bowel Crohn's disease.

  10. Small bowel intubation using guide wire: use in decompression of small bowel obstruction

    Small bowel intubation is a useful method in the non-operative decompression of small bowel obstruction and enteral hyperalimentation in malnourished patients. We have tried small bowel intubation with Ventrol tube guided by small bowel enteroclysis guide wire (Bilbao-Dotter wire) in 12 patients. Ten cases were successfully intubated. In 11 cases of bowel obstruction, 9 cases were intubated and 8 cases were effectively drained. One malnourished patient was improved in nutritional state after enteral hyperalimentation through the intubated tube. We believe this method is an easy and time-saving method in the small bowel decompression

  11. Primary Amyloidosis Presenting as Small Bowel Encapsulation

    Jones, Jennifer; van Rosendaal, Guido; Cleary, Cynthia; Urbanski, Stefan; Woodman, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a pathological process which encompasses a spectrum of diseases that result from extracellular deposition of pathological fibrillar proteins. Clinical presentations vary depending on the organs involved. There is no documented case of amyloidosis presenting as small bowel encapsulation. A previously healthy 62-year-old man developed a small bowel obstruction in 1997. At surgery, a peculiar membrane encasing his entire small bowel was discovered. This appeared to have no vascula...

  12. Semitransparent peroral small bowel imaging

    Emons, D.

    1981-10-01

    171 follow-through examinations of the small bowel performed in children and adolescents with a large contrast medium meal and the high voltage-low density barium technique (10 to 25 g BaSO/sub 4//100 ml, depending on age), are described. A ready made suspension, diluted with water, proved unsatisfactory. Coating properties and stability of the diluted, weak suspension were then greatly improved by hydroxyethylcellulose as a thickening agent and in addition by premedication of the patient with cimetidine. Pure cellulose solution instead of the last portion of barium prevented thickening in the ileum. The procedure has the well known advantages of a large contrast medium meal without the problem of overly dense superpositions.

  13. Disturbances in small bowel motility.

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    Recently, the small intestine has become the focus of investigation as a potential site of dysmotility in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A number of motor abnormalities have been defined in some studies, and include \\'clustered\\' contractions, exaggerated post-prandial motor response and disturbances in intestinal transit. The significance of these findings remains unclear. The interpretation of available studies is complicated by differences in subject selection, the direct influence of certain symptoms, such as diarrhoea and constipation, and the interference of compounding factors, such as stress and psychopathology. Dysmotility could also reflect autonomic dysfunction, disturbed CNS control and the response to heightened visceral sensation or central perception. While motor abnormalities may not explain all symptoms in IBS, sensorimotor interactions may be important in symptom pathogenesis and deserve further study.

  14. Transabdominal Ultrasonography of the Small Bowel

    Rudolf Kralik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow doppler enables evaluation of intramural bowel vascularisation, pulse wave doppler helps to quantificate flow in coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography with oral contrast fluid, as well as contrast enhanced ultrasonography with intravenous microbubble contrast also improves small bowel imaging. We present a review of small intestine pathology that should be detected during ultrasound examinations, discuss technical requirements, advantages and limitations of TUS, typical ultrasound signs of Crohn's disease, ileus, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, tumours, ischemic and haemorrhagic conditions of small bowel. In the hands of experienced investigator, despite some significant limitations(obesity, meteorism, is transabdominal ultrasonography reliable, noninvasive and inexpensive alternative method to computerised tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in small bowel examination.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    Deeab, Dhafer A., E-mail: dhafer_ahmed@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dick, Elizabeth; Sergot, Antoni A.; Sundblon, Lauren; Gedroyc, Wady [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  17. Small bowel emergency surgery: literature's review

    Di Saverio Salomone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emergency surgery of the small bowel represents a challenge for the surgeon, in the third millennium as well. There is a wide number of pathologies which involve the small bowel. The present review, by analyzing the recent and past literature, resumes the more commons. The aim of the present review is to provide the main indications to face the principal pathologies an emergency surgeon has to face with during his daily activity.

  18. Feasibility of laparoscopy for small bowel obstruction

    De Sol Angelo A; Migliaccio Carla; Delmonaco Pamela; Cattorini Lorenzo; Morelli Umberto; La Mura Francesco; Cirocchi Roberto; Farinella Eriberto; Cozzaglio Luca; Sciannameo Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Adherential pathology is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction does not have a clear role yet; surely it doesn't always represent only a therapeutic act, but it is always a diagnostic act, which doesn't interfere with abdominal wall integrity. Methods We performed a review without any language restrictions considering international literature indexed from 1980 to 2007 in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. We analyzed th...

  19. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    -intestinal biopsies, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal...... permeability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with CC and chronic diarrhoea participated in the study. Coeliac disease was excluded by small-bowel biopsy and/or serology. Intestinal permeability was assessed as urinary excretion (ratios) 2, 4 and 6 h after ingestion of 14C-labelled mannitol (14C......: No alterations in intestinal permeability in patients with CC could be demonstrated. Impairment of the integrity of the mucosa of the small bowel and the presence of a general dysfunction of the small intestine in patients with CC seem unlikely....

  20. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    , indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  1. Arteriovenous Malformation Detected by Small Bowel Endoscopy

    Takaaki Fujii

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding that originates in the small intestine is often difficult to diagnose. When successful diagnosis reveals a lesion that can be localized preoperatively, the laparoscopic approach is an appropriate and beneficial treatment modality for small bowel resection. A 69-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of gastrointestinal bleeding and symptomatic transfusion-dependent anemia. Upper and lower endoscopy were normal. Double-balloon endoscopy established the source of the bleeding as a 0.5-cm polypoid mass appearing as a submucosal tumor with redness and pulsation in the lower ileum, suggesting a vascular lesion. Laparoscopic small bowel resection was successful in removing the mass in the ileum. Histological evaluation of the mass revealed an arteriovenous malformation. Preoperative small bowel endoscopy can be useful for diagnosing the cause and localization of arteriovenous malformation in the small intestine.

  2. Current Role of Ultrasound in Small Bowel Imaging.

    Wale, Anita; Pilcher, James

    2016-08-01

    Bowel ultrasound is cheap, relatively quick, allows dynamic evaluation of the bowel, has no radiation burden, is well tolerated by patients, and allows repeat imaging. Bowel ultrasound requires a systematic assessment of the entire bowel using high-frequency probes. In addition, hydrosonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be performed. We present the normal sonographic appearances of large and small bowel and the sonographic appearances of acute appendicitis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, intestinal tuberculosis, small bowel ileus and obstruction, small bowel ischemia, and malignant tumors. PMID:27342894

  3. A rare cause of small bowel infarction

    Lim, L.; Collier, K; Harland, R; Temperley, D

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of small bowel infarction due to superior mesenteric artery occlusion secondary to cardiac tumour embolism. To our knowledge, this has not been previously reported in the literature. This case highlights a rare case and reviews current knowledge on the subject.

  4. Small bowel obstruction complicating colonoscopy: a case report

    Hunter Iain A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This report describes a rare complication of colonoscopy and reviews the literature with regard to other rare causes of acute abdominal presentations following colonoscopy. Case presentation After a therapeutic colonoscopy a 60-year-old woman developed an acute abdomen. At laparotomy she was discovered to have small bowel obstruction secondary to incarceration through a congenital band adhesion. Conclusion Although there is no practical way in which such rare complications can be predicted, this case report emphasises the wide array of pathologies that can result in acute abdominal symptoms following colonoscopy.

  5. Application of nasointestinal decompression intubation in small bowel obstruction

    Objective: To evaluate the nasointestinal decompression intubation in acute small intestinal obstruction. Methods: Ten patients with acute small bowel obstruction received nasointestinal decompression intubation under x-ray guidance. The nasointestinal decompression tube passing over a guidewire was inserted into small intestine near Tres ligament or further down distally with assistance of patients adopting in multi-physical positions. Results: The intubation of nasointestinal decompression tubes into small intestine was technically successful in all patients with average procedural time of 16 min. (10-35 min). After placement of the tube, all patients obtained various degrees of symptoms relief including abdominal pain, distention, vomiting, etc. Four patients with simple adhesive obstruction recovered completely and the tube was removed 2 weeks later. Three patients were referred to surgical operation, and 3 others gave up for further treatment. There were no complications such as bleeding or perforation related to intubation. Conclusion: Nasointestinal decompression intubation under guidance of X-ray is rather simple, less time consuming, especially with high efficiency for preoperative gastrointestinal decompression and treating simple adhesive bowel obstruction; ought to be recommended. (authors)

  6. Small bowel neoplasm - a diagnostic dilemma

    Although uncommon, small bowel tumors often present as a diagnostic dilemma for the clinicians. This important clinical entity requires various diagnostic steps and quite often these steps have to be repeated to reach a firm diagnosis. We present here our experience with three such cases and a brief review of the literature regarding the presentation and the diagnostic steps found helpful in arriving at a diagnosis. (author)

  7. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: PartⅡ

    Alan BR Thomson; Angeli Chopra; Michael Tom Clandinin; Hugh Freeman

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology,in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases.Over 1000 publications were reviewed,and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered.In Part Ⅱ we review six topics:absorption,short bowel syndrome,smooth muscle function and intestinal motility,tumors,diagnostic imaging,and cystic fibrosis.

  8. Segmental reversal of the small bowel as treatment of short bowel syndrome in adults

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Qvist, Niels; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome is the result of extensive surgical resection, inherited defects or loss of functional absorbing intestine. Parenteral nutrition is associated with high economical expenses, increased morbidity and decreased quality of life. Intestinal transplantation is associated with high...... morbidity and mortality rates. Segmental reversal of the small bowel can prolong the transit time in the small bowel and in many cases permanently end parenteral nutrition dependency. Segmental reversal of the small bowel should be integrated in the surgical treatment of adults with short bowel syndrome....

  9. Transient small bowel angioedema due to intravenous iodinated contrast media

    Hu, Xiu-Hua; Gong, Xiang-Yang; Hu, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Three cases of transient proximal small bowel angioedema induced by intravenous administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media (CM) are presented. Computed tomography (CT) images in the venous phase displayed the proximal small bowel with circumferential thickening of the wall including the duodenum and proximal segment of the jejunum. The bowel wall was normal in non-enhanced images, and normal or inconspicuous in arterial phase enhanced images. In one of the three cases, the bowel wall...

  10. Modern MRI of the small bowell

    The radiological diagnostics of diseases of the small intestine have undergone a great change in the last two decades. Through rapid progress with new treatments and an increasing therapeutic focus on transmural healing, a complete evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is now crucial. With the introduction of endoscopy, gastrointestinal imaging with a relatively high radiation exposure had only limited applications. The development of cross-sectional imaging allowed a much broader radiological evaluation of abdominal diseases. Due to rapid investigation techniques, excellent soft tissue contrast and the distinct advantage of eliminating exposure to radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the gastrointestinal tract has gained increasing importance. With sufficient filling of the intestinal lumen, simultaneous imaging of all the intestinal wall layers, the perienteric structures and associated abdominal pathologies is now possible. New MR sequences, such as diffusion-weighted sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences and MR fluoroscopy, enable the detection of morphological changes, with additional characterization of affected bowel loops as well as the assessment of functional pathologies with dynamic information about intestinal motility disturbances. Recent guidelines of European radiological and gastroenterological organizations have confirmed the importance of cross-sectional imaging and particularly of MRI for diagnostics and follow-up in patients with Crohn's disease. Due to the possibility of assessment of all the layers of the intestinal wall and the presence of extramural complications, MRI has a significant impact on further therapeutic treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, MR enterography and MR enteroclysis should be the methods of choice for the evaluation of small bowel pathologies because of radiation issues and the great diagnostic value they provide. A

  11. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    Bonasso, Patrick C.; Brandon Lucke-Wold; Uzer Khan

    2016-01-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  12. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    Patrick C. Bonasso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  13. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  14. The diagnostic role of MDCT enterography in small bowel lesions

    Hasan I. Megally; Hosam eldin Mohamed Elmalah; Gehan S. Seifeldein; Nisreen Adel Abbas; Hussien Ahmed Elamin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of MDCT enterography in the diagnosis of small bowel diseases. Patient and methods: Thirty nine patients suspected to have small bowel diseases were examined with 64 MDCT enterography. Result: MDCT enterography easily diagnosed small intestinal diseases which confirmed with histopathological results, operative data and follow up. Conclusions: MDCT can be used as a front-line imaging and one stop imaging modality for the detection of small bowel diseases....

  15. Treating Small Bowel Obstruction with a Manual Physical Therapy: A Prospective Efficacy Study

    Rice, Amanda D.; Patterson, Kimberley; Reed, Evette D.; Wurn, Belinda F.; Klingenberg, Bernhard; King, C. Richard; Wurn, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) caused by adhesions are a common, often life-threatening postsurgical complication with few treatment options available for patients. This study examines the efficacy of a manual physical therapy treatment regimen on the pain and quality of life of subjects with a history of bowel obstructions due to adhesions in a prospective, controlled survey based study. Changes in six domains of quality of life were measured via ratings reported before and after treatment using the validated Small Bowel Obstruction Questionnaire (SBO-Q). Improvements in the domains for pain (p = 0.0087), overall quality of life (p = 0.0016), and pain severity (p = 0.0006) were significant when average scores before treatment were compared with scores after treatment. The gastrointestinal symptoms (p = 0.0258) domain was marginally significant. There was no statistically significant improvement identified in the diet or medication domains in the SBO-Q for this population. Significant improvements in range of motion in the trunk (p ≤ 0.001), often limited by adhesions, were also observed for all measures. This study demonstrates in a small number of subjects that this manual physical therapy protocol is an effective treatment option for patients with adhesive small bowel obstructions as measured by subject reported symptoms and quality of life. PMID:26989690

  16. Pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is just at the resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they can be seen radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor, inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  17. The pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is at the limit of resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they appear radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor,inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  18. Persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction in an adult

    Haridimos Markogiannakis; Dimitrios Theodorou; Konstantinos G Toutouzas; Panagiotis Drimousis; Sotirios Georgios Panoussopoulos; Stilianos Katsaragakis

    2007-01-01

    An extremely rare case of persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction is presented. A 20-year-old female patient without medical history presented with colicky abdominal pain, vomiting, absence of passage of gas and feces, and abdominal distension of 24 h duration. Physical examination and blood tests were normal. Abdominal X-ray showed small bowel obstruction.Computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated dilated small bowel and a band originating from the umbilicus and continuing between the small bowel loops;an omphalomesenteric duct remnant was suspected. In exploratory laparotomy, persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction was identified and resected. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. Although persistent omphalomesenteric duct is an extremely infrequent cause of small bowel obstruction in adult patients, it should be taken into consideration in patients without any previous surgical history.

  19. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls

    Aldona Dlugosz; Björn Winckler; Elin Lundin; Katherina Zakikhany; Gunnar Sandström; Weimin Ye; Lars Engstrand; Greger Lindberg

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy voluntee...

  20. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  1. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    Sarwani, N., E-mail: nsarwani@hmc.psu.ed [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States); Tappouni, R.; Tice, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  2. The Usefulness of Capsule Endoscopy for Small Bowel Tumors

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Su; Shim, Ki-Nam; Choi, Myung-Gyu; ,

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has expanded the range of endoscopic examination of the small bowel. The clinical application of VCE is mainly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and small bowel tumor is one of the clinically significant diagnoses of VCE, often requiring subsequent invasive interventions. Small bowel tumors are detected with a frequency of around 4% with VCE in indications of OGIB, iron deficiency anemia, unexplained abdominal pain, and others. Protruding mass with ble...

  3. Blunt abdominal trauma with transanal small bowel evisceration

    Noushif Medappil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel evisceration through the anus can occur spontaneously or post traumatically. Traumatic transanal small bowel evisceration results from iatrogenic injuries, suction injuries, and blunt abdominal trauma (BAT. We report a 48-year-old female who presented with evisceration of small intestinal loops through the anus following BAT and discuss the etiologies and mechanisms of injury of this rare presentation.

  4. Small bowel angiodysplasia and novel disease associations: a cohort study.

    Holleran, Grainne

    2013-04-01

    Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias recurrently bleed, accounting for 3-5% of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The advent of small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has led to an increased recognition of small bowel angiodysplasias (SBAs) but little is known about their etiology. Previous small cohorts and case reports suggest an equal gender incidence and associations with cardiovascular disease, renal impairment, and coagulopathies.

  5. Dysmotility of the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Kellow, J E; Phillips, S F; Miller, L J; Zinsmeister, A R

    1988-01-01

    Though the pathophysiology of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is commonly attributed to dysfunction of the large intestine, evidence exists to incriminate the small bowel. In order to further explore the role of the small bowel in IBS several stimuli were applied, in an attempt to unmask the dysmotility of the jejunum and ileum. These included infusions of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-OP), a high fat meal, neostigmine and balloon distension of the ileum. Three groups (n = 8) each of ag...

  6. Small bowel obstruction secondary to a liberated Meckel's enterolith

    Demetriou, Vias; McKean, David; Briggs, James; Moore, Niall

    2013-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with a short history of abdominal pain which rapidly progressed to absolute constipation. An abdominal radiograph demonstrated a paucity of bowel gas and a 4 cm lesion with concentric laminar calcification projected over the pelvis. A CT scan revealed a 4 cm giant Meckel's diverticulum, downstream of which a laminated mass was impacted in the lumen of the distal ileum causing small bowel obstruction. Subsequent surgery confirmed small bowel obstruction secondary ...

  7. CT findings of small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma

    The accuracy of CT in the detection of injuries of the solid visceral organ is well established, but the value of CT in diagnosing small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma is controversal. This study was conducted to ascertain CT finding of small bowel rupture result from abdominal trauma. A retrospective analysis of preoperative abdominal CT findings in 40 patients was performed. Small bowel rupture was confirmed by surgery. Precontrast and postcontrast enhanced CT images were obtained in all patients. Diagnostic findings of small bowel rupture including pneumoperitoneum or retroperitoneal air, discontinuity of the bowel wall and extravasation of oral contrast materials were observed in 33 cases(83%). Intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal free air was seen in 31 cases(78%) and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal free fluid collection was seen in 38 patients(95%). Small bowel wall was thickened in 31 cases(78%), bowel wall was enhanced in 12 cases(30%) and bowel wall discontinuity and extravasation of oral contrast material was seen in 5 cases, respectively. The CT scan is sensitive and effective modality for evaluation of small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma, because of high detectability of diagnostic and suggestive CT findings

  8. Contrast enema depiction of small-bowel volvulus in complicated neonatal bowel obstruction

    Navarro, Oscar M.; Daneman, Alan; Miller, Stephen F. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    About one-half of patients with meconium ileus (MI) present with a complication such as volvulus, atresia, meconium peritonitis or giant cystic meconium peritonitis. The treatment of these complications requires surgery. However, the preoperative diagnosis of complicated MI is difficult. We describe two neonates with complicated small-bowel obstruction, one with MI related to cystic fibrosis and the other not related to cystic fibrosis. In both, contrast enema depicted a spiral appearance of the distal small bowel, which at surgery proved to be the result of volvulus associated with antenatal bowel perforation. This appearance of the small bowel on contrast enema in this clinical setting has not been previously described. The recognition of this spiral appearance of the distal small bowel suggests the need for surgery. (orig.)

  9. The Usefulness of Capsule Endoscopy for Small Bowel Tumors.

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Su; Shim, Ki-Nam; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has expanded the range of endoscopic examination of the small bowel. The clinical application of VCE is mainly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and small bowel tumor is one of the clinically significant diagnoses of VCE, often requiring subsequent invasive interventions. Small bowel tumors are detected with a frequency of around 4% with VCE in indications of OGIB, iron deficiency anemia, unexplained abdominal pain, and others. Protruding mass with bleeding, mucosal disruption, irregular surface, discolored area, and white villi are suggested as the VCE findings of small bowel tumor. Device assisted enteroscopy (DAE), computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography and magnetic resonance enteroclysis/enterography also have clinical value in small bowel examination and tumor detection, and they can be used with VCE, sequentially or complementarily. Familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, melanoma, lymphoma, and neuroendocrine tumor with hepatic metastasis are the high risk groups for small bowel tumors, and surveillance programs for small bowel tumors are needed. VCE and radiological imaging have value in screening, and in selected cases, DAE can provide more accurate diagnosis and endoscopic treatment. This review describes the usefulness and clinical impact of VCE on small bowel tumors. PMID:26855919

  10. Diagnostic yield of small bowel capsule endoscopy depends on the small bowel transit time

    Jessie Westerhof; Jan J Koornstra; Reinier A Hoedemaker; Wim J Sluiter; Jan H Kleibeuker; Rinse K Weersma

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO investigate whether the small bowel transit time (SBTT) influences the diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy (CE).METHODS:Six hundred and ninety-one consecutive CE procedures collected in a database were analyzed.SBTT and CE findings were recorded.A running mean for the SBTT was calculated and correlated to the diagnostic yield with a Spearman's correlation test.Subgroup analyses were performed for the various indications for the procedure.RESULTS:There was a positive correlation between the diagnostic yield and SBTT (Spearman's rho 0.58,P < 0.01).Positive correlations between diagnostic yield and SBlT were found for the indication obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (r =0.54,P < 0.01),for polyposis and carcinoid combined (r =0.56,P < 0.01) and for the other indications (r =0.90,P <0.01),but not for suspected Crohn's disease (r =-0.40).CONCLUSION:The diagnostic yield in small bowel capsule endoscopy is positively correlated with the small bowel transit time.This is true for all indications except for suspected Crohn's disease.

  11. CT enteroclysis in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases

    Background: The role of CT enteroclysis is gaining on importance in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. The aim of the study was to present own experiences in CT enteroclysis application, with the use of a 64-detector CT unit. Material/Methods: CT enteroclyses were performed in 60 patients: 53 with the suspicion of the Crohns disease, 2 suspected for carcinoid, 1 with suspicion of the fistula between the small bowel and the bladder, 2 suspected for the tumor of the ileo-caecal region, and in 1 case, the aim of examination was to carry out an evaluation of the postsurgical state of the bowel-bowel anastomosis. We used own endoscopic technique of catheter insertion into the bowel, which shortens the examination time and improves patients comfort. Results: The catheter was correctly introduced into the small bowel in 58 patients (endoscopy had to be repeated in 4 cases). Only 2 examinations failed, because patients refused repeated endoscopy. Radiological signs of the Crohns disease were found in 50 out of 53 patients. In the 3 remaining patients, the appearance of the small bowel was normal. In 5 non-Crohns disease patients, CT enteroclysis enabled a good visualization of the pathology (tumors, fistula). Conclusions: CT enteroclysis with the use of the 64-detector CT unit is a valuable method in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. It could supplement or precede capsule endoscopy. (authors)

  12. Jejunitis and brown bowel syndrome with multifocal carcinogenesis of the small bowel.

    Raithel, Martin; Rau, Tilman T; Hagel, Alexander F; Albrecht, Heinz; de Rossi, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2015-09-28

    This is the first report describing a case where prolonged, severe malabsorption from brown bowel syndrome progressed to multifocally spread small bowel adenocarcinoma. This case involves a female patient who was initially diagnosed with chronic jejunitis associated with primary diffuse lymphangiectasia at the age of 26 years. The course of the disease was clinically, endoscopically, and histologically followed for 21 years until her death at the age 47 due to multifocal, metastasizing adenocarcinoma of the small bowel. Multiple lipofuscin deposits (so-called brown bowel syndrome) and severe jejunitis were observed microscopically, and sections of the small bowel showed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria as well as blocked lymphatic vessels. After several decades, multifocal nests of adenocarcinoma cells and extensive, flat, neoplastic mucosal proliferations were found only in the small bowel, along with a loss of the mismatch repair protein MLH1 as a long-term consequence of chronic jejunitis with malabsorption. No evidence was found for hereditary nonpolyposis colon carcinoma syndrome. This article demonstrates for the first time multifocal carcinogenesis in the small bowel in a malabsorption syndrome in an enteritis-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:26420973

  13. MRI of the small bowel: can sufficient bowel distension be achieved with small volumes of oral contrast?

    Sufficient luminal distension is mandatory for small bowel imaging. However, patients often are unable to ingest volumes of currently applied oral contrast compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate if administration of low doses of an oral contrast agent with high-osmolarity leads to sufficient and diagnostic bowel distension. Six healthy volunteers ingested at different occasions 150, 300 and 450 ml of a commercially available oral contrast agent (Banana Smoothie Readi-Cat, E-Z-EM; 194 mOsmol/l). Two-dimensional TrueFISP data sets were acquired in 5-min intervals up to 45 min after contrast ingestion. Small bowel distension was quantified using a visual five-grade ranking (5 very good distension, 1 = collapsed bowel). Results were statistically compared using a Wilcoxon-Rank test. Ingestion of 450 ml and 300 ml resulted in a significantly better distension than 150 ml. The all-over average distension value for 450 ml amounted to 3.4 (300 ml: 3.0, 150 ml: 2.3) and diagnostic bowel distension could be found throughout the small intestine. Even 45 min after ingestion of 450 ml the jejunum and ileum could be reliably analyzed. Small bowel imaging with low doses of contrast leads to diagnostic distension values in healthy subjects when a high-osmolarity substance is applied. These findings may help to further refine small bowel MRI techniques, but need to be confirmed in patients with small bowel disorders. (orig.)

  14. Transient small-bowel intussusception in children on CT

    Strouse, Peter J. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, F3503, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0252 (United States); DiPietro, Michael A.; Saez, Fermin [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2003-05-01

    To determine the frequency and significance of small-bowel intussusception identified in children on CT. All abdomen CT reports between July 1995 and April 2002 were reviewed to identify patients with small-bowel intussusception. Intussusceptions were identified as an intraluminal mass with a characteristic layered appearance and/or continuity with adjacent mesenteric fat. Ileocolic intussusceptions and intussusceptions related to feeding tubes were excluded. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Twenty-five pediatric patients (16 boys, 9 girls; mean age 11.2 years) were identified with small-bowel intussusception on CT. No patient had a persistent intussusception requiring surgery. Fourteen had limited immediate repeat CT images as part of the same examination, ten of which demonstrated resolution of the CT abnormality. Follow-up CT [n=13 (6 within 24 h)], ultrasound (n=3), small-bowel follow-through (n=4) and surgery (n=3) showed no intussusception. In four patients with persistent symptoms, underlying pathology was identified requiring treatment (giardiasis, 2; small-bowel inflammation/strictures, 1; abscess and partial small-bowel obstruction after perforated appendicitis, 1). In 21 other patients, direct correlation of symptoms to CT abnormality was absent or questionable, no treatment was required, and there was no clinical or imaging evidence of persistence or recurrence. Most small-bowel intussusceptions identified in children by CT are transient and of no clinical significance. (orig.)

  15. Transient small-bowel intussusception in children on CT

    To determine the frequency and significance of small-bowel intussusception identified in children on CT. All abdomen CT reports between July 1995 and April 2002 were reviewed to identify patients with small-bowel intussusception. Intussusceptions were identified as an intraluminal mass with a characteristic layered appearance and/or continuity with adjacent mesenteric fat. Ileocolic intussusceptions and intussusceptions related to feeding tubes were excluded. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Twenty-five pediatric patients (16 boys, 9 girls; mean age 11.2 years) were identified with small-bowel intussusception on CT. No patient had a persistent intussusception requiring surgery. Fourteen had limited immediate repeat CT images as part of the same examination, ten of which demonstrated resolution of the CT abnormality. Follow-up CT [n=13 (6 within 24 h)], ultrasound (n=3), small-bowel follow-through (n=4) and surgery (n=3) showed no intussusception. In four patients with persistent symptoms, underlying pathology was identified requiring treatment (giardiasis, 2; small-bowel inflammation/strictures, 1; abscess and partial small-bowel obstruction after perforated appendicitis, 1). In 21 other patients, direct correlation of symptoms to CT abnormality was absent or questionable, no treatment was required, and there was no clinical or imaging evidence of persistence or recurrence. Most small-bowel intussusceptions identified in children by CT are transient and of no clinical significance. (orig.)

  16. Small Bowel Imaging in Managing Crohn’s Disease Patients

    Jörg G. Albert

    2012-01-01

    bowel CD, and treatment control with imaging is increasingly used to optimize the patients outcome. Thereby, capsule endoscopy, Balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and Magnetic resonance imaging have become key players to manage CD patients. In this review, role of small bowel imaging is detailed discussed for use in diagnosing and managing Crohn's disease patients.

  17. Effect of small bowel preparation with simethicone on capsule endoscopy

    You-hong FANG; Chun-xiao CHEN; Bing-ling ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Background: Capsule endoscopy is a novel non-invasive method for visualization of the entire small bowel. The diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy depends on the quality of visualization of the small bowel mucosa and its complete passage through the small bowel. To date, there is no standardized protocol for bowel preparation before capsule endoscopy. The addition ofsimethicone in the bowel preparation for the purpose of reducing air bubbles in the intestinal lumen had only been studied by a few investigators. Methods: Sixty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups to receive a bowel preparation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution (Group 1) and both PEG solution and simethicone (Group 2). The PEG solution and sime-thicone were taken the night before and 20 min prior to capsule endoscopy, respectively. Frames taken in the small intestine were examined and scored for luminal bubbles by two professional capsule endoscopists. Gastric emptying time and small bowel transit time were also recorded. Results: Simethicone significantly reduced luminal bubbles both in the proximal and distal small intes-tines. The mean time proportions with slight bubbles in the proximal and distal intestines in Group 2 were 97.1% and 99.0%, respectively, compared with 67.2% (P<0.001) and 68.8% (P<0.001) in Group 1. Simethicone had no effect on mean gastric emptying time, 32.08 min in Group 2 compared with 30.88 min in Group 1 (P=0.868), but it did increase mean small intestinal transit time from 227.28 to 281.84 min (P=0.003). Conclusion: Bowel preparation with both PEG and simethicone significantly reduced bubbles in the intestinal lumen and improved the visualization of the small bowel by capsule endoscopy without any side effects observed.

  18. Oral contrast agents for small bowel distension in MRI: influence of the osmolarity for small bowel distention

    Ajaj, Waleed; Kuehle, Christiane; Nuefer, Michael; Goehde, Susanne C.; Lauenstein, Thomas C. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Goyen, Mathias [Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Schneemann, Hubert [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Essen (Germany); Ruehm, Stefan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    To assess the effect of the osmolarity for small bowel distension in MRI, ten volunteers ingested at two separate occasions negative oral contrast agents with different quantity and osmolarity: (1) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 0.2% locus bean gum (LBG) with a quantity of 1500 ml and an osmolarity of 148 mOsmol/l, (2) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 2.0% barium sulphate with a quantity of 1000 ml and an osmolarity of 194 mOsmol/l. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D-TrueFISP images by measuring the small bowel diameters. There were no statistically significant differences in mean small bowel diameter between both contrast agents. The mean small bowel distension was 19.2 mm after ingestion of 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution and 19.0 mm after ingestion of 1000-ml sorbitol-barium sulphate solution. Furthermore, all volunteers found the ingestion of 1000-ml solution more pleasant than the 1500-ml solution. The ingestion of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution led to a sufficient small bowel distension compared to 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution. The side effect rate of both solutions was low. Based on these data, we recommend a quantity of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution as an alternative for 1500-ml sorbitol-LBG solution for optimal bowel distension. (orig.)

  19. Oral contrast agents for small bowel distension in MRI: influence of the osmolarity for small bowel distention

    To assess the effect of the osmolarity for small bowel distension in MRI, ten volunteers ingested at two separate occasions negative oral contrast agents with different quantity and osmolarity: (1) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 0.2% locus bean gum (LBG) with a quantity of 1500 ml and an osmolarity of 148 mOsmol/l, (2) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 2.0% barium sulphate with a quantity of 1000 ml and an osmolarity of 194 mOsmol/l. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D-TrueFISP images by measuring the small bowel diameters. There were no statistically significant differences in mean small bowel diameter between both contrast agents. The mean small bowel distension was 19.2 mm after ingestion of 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution and 19.0 mm after ingestion of 1000-ml sorbitol-barium sulphate solution. Furthermore, all volunteers found the ingestion of 1000-ml solution more pleasant than the 1500-ml solution. The ingestion of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution led to a sufficient small bowel distension compared to 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution. The side effect rate of both solutions was low. Based on these data, we recommend a quantity of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution as an alternative for 1500-ml sorbitol-LBG solution for optimal bowel distension. (orig.)

  20. Normal small bowel wall characteristics on MR enterography

    Purpose: To assess the normal small bowel parameters, namely bowel diameter, bowel wall thickness, number of folds (valvulae connivientes) per 2.5 cm (in.), fold thickness and interfold distance per small bowel segment (duodenum, jejunum, proximal ileum, distal ileum and terminal ileum) on MR enterography. Materials and methods: Between September 2003 and January 2008, 280 MR enterography examinations were performed for investigation of known or suspected small bowel pathology. 120 of these examinations were normal. Sixty-five (m = 29, f = 36, mean age = 34 years, range = 17-73 years) of 120 examinations without a prior small bowel diagnosis, with no prior or subsequent abnormal radiology or endoscopy examinations, no prior small bowel surgery and with a minimum 3 years follow-up demonstrating normality were retrospectively evaluated for the described small bowel parameters. Results: We found the mean diameter of the duodenum to be 24.8 mm (S.D. = 4.5 mm), jejunum to be 24.5 mm (S.D. = 4.2 mm), proximal ileum to be 19.5 mm (S.D. = 3.6 mm), distal ileum to be 18.9 mm (S.D. = 4.2 mm) and terminal ileum to be 18.7 mm (S.D. = 3.6 mm). The number of folds per 2.5 cm varied from 4.6 in the jejunum to 1.5 in the terminal ileum. The fold thickness varied from 2.1 mm in the duodenum to 1.8 mm in the terminal ileum. The small bowel parameters gradually decreased in size from the duodenum to the smallest measurements which were in the terminal ileum. The bowel wall is similar in size throughout the small bowel measuring 1.5 ± 0.5 mm. Conclusion: These results provide the mean, range of normality and standard deviation of the small bowel parameters per segment on the current population on MR enterography. From our experience, knowledge of these parameters is extremely helpful and essential in the everyday assessment of MR enterography studies.

  1. Normal small bowel wall characteristics on MR enterography

    Cronin, Carmel G., E-mail: carmelcronin2000@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Delappe, Eithne; Lohan, Derek G.; Roche, Clare; Murphy, Joseph M. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the normal small bowel parameters, namely bowel diameter, bowel wall thickness, number of folds (valvulae connivientes) per 2.5 cm (in.), fold thickness and interfold distance per small bowel segment (duodenum, jejunum, proximal ileum, distal ileum and terminal ileum) on MR enterography. Materials and methods: Between September 2003 and January 2008, 280 MR enterography examinations were performed for investigation of known or suspected small bowel pathology. 120 of these examinations were normal. Sixty-five (m = 29, f = 36, mean age = 34 years, range = 17-73 years) of 120 examinations without a prior small bowel diagnosis, with no prior or subsequent abnormal radiology or endoscopy examinations, no prior small bowel surgery and with a minimum 3 years follow-up demonstrating normality were retrospectively evaluated for the described small bowel parameters. Results: We found the mean diameter of the duodenum to be 24.8 mm (S.D. = 4.5 mm), jejunum to be 24.5 mm (S.D. = 4.2 mm), proximal ileum to be 19.5 mm (S.D. = 3.6 mm), distal ileum to be 18.9 mm (S.D. = 4.2 mm) and terminal ileum to be 18.7 mm (S.D. = 3.6 mm). The number of folds per 2.5 cm varied from 4.6 in the jejunum to 1.5 in the terminal ileum. The fold thickness varied from 2.1 mm in the duodenum to 1.8 mm in the terminal ileum. The small bowel parameters gradually decreased in size from the duodenum to the smallest measurements which were in the terminal ileum. The bowel wall is similar in size throughout the small bowel measuring 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm. Conclusion: These results provide the mean, range of normality and standard deviation of the small bowel parameters per segment on the current population on MR enterography. From our experience, knowledge of these parameters is extremely helpful and essential in the everyday assessment of MR enterography studies.

  2. Preoperative Diagnosis of Adult Intussusception Caused by Small Bowel Lipoma

    Hiroaki Shiba

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult intussusception is rare, accounting for only 5% of all intussusceptions, for which preoperative diagnosis is difficult. We herein report a preoperatively diagnosed case of adult intussusception caused by a small bowel lipoma. A 33-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with three weeks history of colicky epigastric pain. Computed tomography revealed thickening of the ileal wall suggestive of intussusception. Colonoscopy revealed an ileocolic intussusception. Barium enema for reduction of ileocolic intussusception demonstrated a small bowel tumor in the ileum 15 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve. The intussusception was reduced, and the patient underwent partial resection of the ileum encompassing the small bowel tumor. Histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of lipoma of the small bowel. The patient made a satisfactory recovery and remains well.

  3. Metastatic choriocarcinoma in the small bowel: a case report

    Zohreh Yousefi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: In abnormal postpartum hemorrhage, we should consider the possibility of choriocarcinoma. Although, it is important to note rare manifestations of metastatic choriocarcinoma of small bowel in massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

  4. Massive small bowel bleeding caused by scrub typhus in Korea

    2010-01-01

    A 79-year-old man was diagnosed with scrub typhus based on fever, eschar, skin rash and a markedly elevated serum tsutsugamushi antibody and doxycycline was started. Five days later, hematochezia developed and multiple small bowel ulcerations with hemorrhage were seen on colonoscopy. Despite intensive therapy, the massive hematochezia worsened and the distal small bowel was resected. Multiple ulcerated lesions were identified pathologically as vasculitis caused by scrub typhus. This is the fi...

  5. Pylephlebitis secondary to strangulated umbilical hernia with small bowel ischemia

    Ennio Bruschi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pylephlebitis is a septic thrombophlebitis of the portal venous system that infrequently complicates small bowel infarction. We present a case of pylephlebitis with portomesenteric vein gas bubbles secondary to small bowel ischemia caused by a strangulated umbilical hernia, diagnosed on computed tomography (CT and confirmed in the operating theater. This case is an example of the usefulness of CT in early recognition of suggestive radiologic findings of pylephlebitis associated with intestinal ischemia for prompt treatment of the patient.

  6. Small bowel stromal tumour revealed by a lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Assamoi B. F. Kassi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel stromal tumour must be systematically researched in the presence of obscure and persistent low gastrointestinal bleeding despite a normal endoscopic examination (OGDF and colonoscopy. Video capsule endoscopy is the best diagnosis examination; if it is not available a CT enterography could be useful. Surgical treatment is effective on localized and weak malignancy small bowel stromal tumours. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1248-1250

  7. Small bowel stromal tumour revealed by a lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Assamoi B. F. Kassi; Lebeau, R; Y. S. Kacou; K. J. N'dah; Traore, M.

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel stromal tumour must be systematically researched in the presence of obscure and persistent low gastrointestinal bleeding despite a normal endoscopic examination (OGDF and colonoscopy). Video capsule endoscopy is the best diagnosis examination; if it is not available a CT enterography could be useful. Surgical treatment is effective on localized and weak malignancy small bowel stromal tumours. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000): 1248-1250

  8. Computer-assisted ex vivo, normothermic small bowel perfusion

    Stangl, M.J.; Krapp, J.; Theodorou, D; Eder, M.; Hammer, C; Land, W.; Schildberg, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2000-01-01

    Background: In the present study, a technique for computer-assisted, normothermic, oxygenated, ex vivo, recirculating small bowel perfusion was established as a tool to investigate organ pretreatment protocols and ischemia/reperfusion phenomena. A prerequisite for the desired setup was an organ chamber for ex vivo perfusion and the use of syngeneic whole blood as perfusate. Methods: The entire small bowel was harvested from Lewis rats and perfused in an organ chamber ex vivo for at least 2 h....

  9. Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage Secondary to Small Bowel Ascariasis

    Daphne Dewi, Stephen; Sze Li, Siow

    2012-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage secondary to small bowel ascariasis is extremely rare. A high level of suspicion should be maintained when dealing with acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage in migrants and travellers. Small bowel examination is warranted when carefully repeated upper and lower endoscopies have failed to elicit the source of bleeding. Appropriate test selection is determined by the availability of local expertise. We present a case of acute lower gastrointestinal haemorr...

  10. Small bowel perforation due to fish bone: A case report.

    Pulat, Huseyin; Karakose, Oktay; Benzin, Mehmet Fatih; Benzin, Seyma; Cetin, Recep

    2015-09-01

    Accidental ingestion of foreign bodies are a common condition in clinical practice. However, small bowel perforation which dues to ingestion foreign bodies has been rarely seen. In this article, we report a case of small bowel perforation which dues to ingestion foreign body. A 80-year-old female patient, presenting with complaints of acute abdomen, was admitted to the emergency department. She denied abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The patient had tenderness and defense on the right lower quadrant. Contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography has been used on the patient's diagnosis. This revealed small bowel perforation due to the ingestion of foreign body. The patient was operated emergency. A microperforation due to fish bone was detected on the terminal ileum. The patient underwent debridement and primary repair. The patient was discharged postoperative 7th day without problem. Bowel perforation due to the ingestion of foreign bodies should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen. PMID:27239615

  11. Laparoscopic surgery for small-bowel obstruction caused by Meckel's diverticulum.

    Matsumoto, Takatsugu; Nagai, Motoki; Koike, Daisuke; Nomura, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2016-02-27

    A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of abdominal distention and vomiting. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a blind loop of the bowel extending to near the uterus and a fibrotic band connecting the mesentery to the top of the bowel, suggestive of Meckel's diverticulum (MD) and a mesodiverticular band (MDB). After intestinal decompression, elective laparoscopic surgery was carried out. Using three 5-mm ports, MD was dissected from the surrounding adhesion and MDB was divided intracorporeally. And subsequent Meckel's diverticulectomy was performed. The presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa was confirmed histologically. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged 5 d after the operation. She has remained healthy and symptom-free during 4 years of follow-up. This was considered to be an unusual case of preoperatively diagnosed and laparoscopically treated small-bowel obstruction due to MD in a young adult woman. PMID:26981191

  12. US features of transient small bowel intussusception in pediatric patients

    Kim, Ji Hye [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-15

    To describe the sonographic (US) and clinical features of spontaneously reduced small bowel intussusception, and to discuss the management options for small bowel intussusception based on US findings with clinical correlation. During a five years of period, 34 small bowel intussusceptions were diagnosed on US in 32 infants and children. The clinical presentations and imaging findings of the patients were reviewed. The clinical presentations included abdominal pain or irritability (n = 25), vomiting (n 5), diarrhea (n = 3), bloody stool (n = 1), and abdominal distension (n = 1), in combination or alone. US showed multi-layered round masses of small (mean, 1.5 {+-} 0.3 cm) diameters and with thin (mean, 3.5 {+-} 1 mm) outer rims along the course of the small bowel. The mean length was 1.8 {+-} 0.5 cm and peristalsis was seen on the video records. There were no visible lead points. The vascular flow signal appeared on color Doppler images in all 21 patients examined. Spontaneous reduction was confirmed by combinations of US (n = 28), small bowel series (n = 6), CT scan (n = 3), and surgical exploration (n 2). All patients discharged with improved condition. Typical US findings of the transient small bowel intussusception included 1) small size without wall swelling, 2) short segment, 3) preserved wall motion, and 4) absence of the lead point. Conservative management with US monitoring rather than an immediate operation is recommended for those patient with typical transient small bowel intussusceptions. Atypical US findings or clinical deterioration of the patient with persistent intussusception warrant surgical exploration.

  13. CT Findings of Small Bowel Anisakiasis: Analysis of Four Cases

    We wanted to describe the CT findings of small bowel anisakiasis with the pathologic correlation. Four patients with surgically and pathologically proven small bowel anisakiasis were included in this retrospective study. They were three men and one woman and their ages ranged from 28 to 43 years (mean age: 38 years). We evaluated their clinical, CT and histological findings. All the patients had a history of ingesting raw fish within 24 hours from the time of symptom onset. They complained of abdominal pain (n=4), nausea (n=4), vomiting (n=2) and diarrhea (n=1). Physical examination revealed tenderness (n=4), rebound tenderness (n=4) and increased bowel sounds (n=3). Leukocytosis was noted in all the patients on the laboratory examination. None of the patients showed eosinophilia. The CT findings were segmental small bowel wall thickening with preserved layering (n=4), focal segmental luminal narrowing with proximal dilatation (n=4), peritoneal thickening (n=3), mesenteric or omental infiltration (n=4) and varying degrees of ascites (n=4). On the histopathologic examination, they revealed an infiltration of eosinophils (n=4) in all layers of the bowel wall with severe edema. The larvae were found on surgico-pathologic examination in all the cases. The CT findings may be helpful to make the specific diagnosis of small bowel anisakiasis in a patient with the clinical findings of an acute abdomen and a history of eating raw fish

  14. Predictive factors of small bowel patency in Crohn's disease patients

    Andreia Albuquerque

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patency capsule was developed to avoid small bowel video capsule endoscopy retention, namely in patients with Crohn's disease. Aims: To evaluate the predictive factors of small bowel patency in Crohn's disease patients. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis including 151 Crohn's disease patients submitted to patency capsule (Agile® Patency Capsule from 2011 to 2012. Patients that excreted the intact patency capsule were classified as having a patent small bowel (without patency capsule retention, other patients were considered to have negative patency of the small bowel (patency capsule retention. Results: Patients had a mean age of 41±14 years, 54% were female and 25% had been previously submitted to surgery. Stricturing disease was seen in 20% of cases and penetrating disease in 16% of cases. Left-sided colonic lesions and ileal strictures were observed at colonoscopy in 13% and 9% of patients, respectively. In our sample, 28% of patients had negative patency of the small bowel (patency capsule retention. In multivariate analysis, independent factors that were associated with negative patency of the small bowel in Crohn's disease patients were stricturing (OR 10.16, p < 0.001 and penetrating phenotypes (OR 11.73, p = 0.001, left-sided colonic lesions (OR 3.77, p = 0.038, ileal stricture (OR 9.76, p = 0.003; previous intestinal surgery was found to be protective (OR 0.16, p = 0.006. Conclusions: Stricturing or penetrating disease, ileal strictures, no previous surgery and left-sided colonic lesions were the factors associated with negative small bowel patency in Crohn's disease patients.

  15. A Look into the Small Bowel in Crohn's Disease

    Park, Soo Jung; Kim, Won Ho

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease that can affect the entire gastrointestinal tract, with the small bowel (SB) being the most commonly affected site. In some patients, refractory inflammation or chronic strictures of the SB are responsible for a debilitating course of the disease that might lead to severely reduced quality of life. Therefore, SB imaging is a crucial element in diagnosing and/or managing SB CD, and continues to evolve because of technologic advances. SB end...

  16. A new method for radiolucent presentation of small bowel

    A new method for radiolucent presentation of small bowell is described. A modified easy introducible small tube for contrast medium instillation is used. For stabilization of contrast medium a contrast enhancing substance is added. A 0.5% solution of this substance is also used as distention medium. Consequently contrast medium is equally distributed and coating of intestinal mucosa pattern is greatly enhanced. (orig.)

  17. Merkel cell carcinoma metastatic to the small bowel mesentery

    Guang-Yu Yang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is an uncommon cutaneous malignant tumor that presents as a rapidly growing skin nodule on sun-exposed areas of the body. MCC is aggressive with regional nodal and distant metastases to the skin, lung, and bones. There have been no reports of metastatic MCC to the mesentery and 6 reports describing metastasis to the small intestine. We present a case of metastatic MCC to the mesentery with infiltration to the small bowel, 8 years after original tumor resection. This is the 5th metastasis and it encased the small bowel resulting in a hair-pin loop contributing to the unusual clinical presentation. Although MCC metastatic to the bowel is uncommon, it is not rare. It is important to recognize the unusual manifestations of this disease as they are becoming more common in the future. Routine radiologic surveillance and thorough review of systems are important to patient follow-up.

  18. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth is Associated with Intestinal Inflammation in the Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Liliana David; Alexandru Babin; Alina Picos; Dan Lucian Dumitrascu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is encountered in bowel disorders, including irritable bowel symptoms. Low degrees of inflammation have been recently reported in the irritable bowel syndrome. We looked for the association between intestinal inflammation and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome.Methods. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was assessed by the H2 glucose breath test in 90 consecutive patients with irritable bowel syndrome....

  19. Small bowel injury in low-dose aspirin users.

    Endo, Hiroki; Sakai, Eiji; Kato, Takayuki; Umezawa, Shotaro; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is well known to be associated with an increased risk of serious upper gastrointestinal complications, such as peptic ulceration and bleeding. Until recently, attention was mainly focused on aspirin-induced damage of the stomach and duodenum. However, recently, there has been growing interest among gastroenterologists on the adverse effects of aspirin on the small bowel, especially as new endoscopic techniques, such as capsule endoscopy (CE) and balloon-assisted endoscopy, have become available for the evaluation of small bowel lesions. Preliminary CE studies conducted in healthy subjects have shown that short-term administration of LDA can induce mild mucosal inflammation of the small bowel. Furthermore, chronic use of LDA results in a variety of lesions in the small bowel, including multiple petechiae, loss of villi, erosions, and round, irregular, or punched-out ulcers. Some patients develop circumferential ulcers with stricture. In addition, to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal lesions in LDA users, it is important for clinicians to confirm the differences in the gastrointestinal toxicity between different types of aspirin formulations in clinical use. Some studies suggest that enteric-coated aspirin may be more injurious to the small bowel mucosa than buffered aspirin. The ideal treatment for small bowel injury in patients taking LDA would be withdrawal of aspirin, however, LDA is used as an antiplatelet agent in the majority of patients, and its withdrawal could increase the risk of cardiovascular/cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. Thus, novel means for the treatment of aspirin-induced enteropathy are urgently needed. PMID:25501289

  20. Ileo-ileal Intussusception and Bowel Obstruction Caused by Plasmablastic Lymphoma of Small Bowel- A Rare Entity in Rare Location

    Thakur, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    Intussusception of small bowel is considered a rare cause of bowel obstruction in adults accounting for only about 1% of bowel obstruction in adults. Intussusception in adults is uncommon with 95% cases of intussusceptions occurring in children. Adult intussusception from small intestinal lymphoma is also rare with only 36 cases reported in the literature between 2000 and 2011. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is an aggressive lymphoid neoplasm usually seen in the oral cavity in the clinical setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Plasmablastic lymphoma of the small intestine is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of plasmablastic lymphoma of small bowel with ileoileal intussusception in an HIV-negative immunocompetent male patient.

  1. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls.

    Dlugosz, Aldona; Winckler, Björn; Lundin, Elin; Zakikhany, Katherina; Sandström, Gunnar; Ye, Weimin; Engstrand, Lars; Lindberg, Greger

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy volunteers (11 females) aged 20-(32)-48 years. Sequences were analysed based on taxonomic classification. The phyla with the highest total abundance across all samples were: Firmicutes (43%), Proteobacteria (23%), Bacteroidetes (15%), Actinobacteria (9.3%) and Fusobacteria (7.0%). The most abundant genera were: Streptococcus (19%), Veillonella (13%), Prevotella (12%), Rothia (6.4%), Haemophilus (5.7%), Actinobacillus (5.5%), Escherichia (4.6%) and Fusobacterium (4.3%). We found no difference among major phyla or genera between patients with IBS and controls. We identified a cluster of samples in the small bowel microbiota dominated by Prevotella, which may represent a common enterotype of the upper small intestine. The remaining samples formed a gradient, dominated by Streptococcus at one end and Escherichia at the other. PMID:25687743

  2. Acute small bowel obstruction due to chicken bone bezoar

    Vetpillai P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Preadeepan Vetpillai,1 Ayo Oshowo21CT2 Surgery in General, Charing Cross Hospital, 2Colorectal and Laparoscopic Surgery, Whittington Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Acute intestinal obstruction due to foreign bodies, or bezoar, is a rare occurrence in an adult with a normal intestinal tract. We report an unusual case of a 43-year-old black man with no previous abdominal surgery and no significant medical history who presented with an acute episode of small bowel obstruction due to an impacted undigested chicken bone.Keywords: small bowel obstruction, chicken bone, bezoar

  3. Splenic angiosarcoma metastasis to small bowel presented with gastrointestinal bleeding

    Jun-Te Hsu; Chin-Yew Lin; Ting-Jun Wu; Han-Ming Chen; Tsann-Long Hwang; Yi-Yin Jan

    2005-01-01

    Primary splenic angiosarcoma is a very rare,aggressive neoplasm with a high metastatic rate and dismal prognosis. This neoplasm usually presents with abdominal pain, splenomegaly, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Splenic angiosarcoma with bleeding gastrointestinal metastases is extremely rare. The literature contains only two case reports. This study reported a 44-year-old male patient with splenic angiosarcoma with sustained repeated gastrointestinal bleeding due to small bowel metastases. Salvage surgery was performed by splenectomy and resection of the metastatic small bowel tumors. The post-operative course was uneventful; the patient survived with the disease and had no GI bleeding, 7 mo after surgery.

  4. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency...... neoplasm seen in 29 centers of 10 European Countries. RESULTS: Of 5129 patients undergoing VCE, 124 (2.4%) had small-bowel tumors (112 primary, 12 metastatic). Among these patients, indications for VCE were: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (108 patients), abdominal pain (9), search for primary neoplasm...

  5. Gastric band connection tube results in small bowel obstruction: an acute emergency.

    Suter, Katherine J L; Rajasagaram, Niruben; Nottle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) is a widely performed procedure for the morbid obesity epidemic. Despite its low mortality compared with other mainstream bariatric surgeries, it is not without its complications. The authors report a late and rare complication of a small bowel obstruction in a 52-year-old woman from an LAGB placed for 2 years. She was diagnosed clinically and radiologically with a small bowel obstruction. However, in the setting of an LAGB, this became a closed-loop obstruction. She proceeded to an emergency laparoscopy, which revealed that the port connection tube had formed dense adhesions to the jejunum causing an obstructive band. This is only the fifth reported case in Australia; as bariatric surgery continues to rise, these patients may present unannounced to any emergency department and as such should be treated as a closed-loop obstruction with immediate resuscitative and surgical management instituted. PMID:27170704

  6. Risk factors for small bowel cancer in Crohn's disease.

    Lashner, B A

    1992-08-01

    Suspected risk factors for adenocarcinoma of the small bowel in Crohn's disease include surgically excluded small bowel loops, chronic fistulous disease, and male sex. Review of all seven University of Chicago cases failed to confirm any suspected risk factor. A case-control study was performed to identify possible alternatives. Each case was matched to four randomly selected controls from an inflammatory bowel disease registry matched for year of birth, sex, and confirmed small bowel Crohn's disease. Three factors were significantly associated with the development of cancer: (1) Four cancers developed in the jejunum, and jejunal Crohn's disease was associated with the development of cancer [odds ratio (OR) 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-39.3]. (2) There was an association between the development of cancer and occupations known to be associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk (OR 20.3, CI 2.7-150.5). Three cases (a chemist with exposure to halogenated aromatic compounds and aliphatic amines, a pipefitter with exposure to asbestos, and a machinist with exposures to cutting oils, solvents, and abrasives) and one of 28 controls (a fireman with multiple hazardous exposures) had an occupational risk factor. (3) Among medications taken for at least six months, only 6-mercaptopurine use was associated with cancer (OR 10.8, CI 1.1-108.7). In conclusion, proximal small bowel disease, 6-mercaptopurine use, and hazardous occupations are associated with cancer of the small bowel in patients with Crohn's disease and can be added to the list of suspected risk factors. PMID:1499440

  7. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Small bowel

    The small bowel is a hollow organ involved in the transit and absorption of food. In relation to its anatomical location, a significant amount of this organ is exposed in whole or in part to ionizing radiation in external radiotherapy during abdominal or pelvic irradiation either for primary cancers or metastasis. The acute functional changes during external beam radiation are mainly leading to diarrhea, abdominal pain and bloating. The main late side effects of irradiation of the small intestine are chronic diarrhea, malabsorption with steatorrhoea, abdominal spasms, intestinal obstruction, bleeding and fistulas. The architecture of the small intestine may be considered as parallel with a significant correlation between the irradiated volume of small bowel and the likelihood of acute toxicity, whatever the dose. The literature analysis recommends to consider the volume of small bowel receiving 15 Gy (threshold of 100 to 200 cm3) but also 30 and 50 Gy (thresholds of 35 to 300 cm3, depending on the level of dose considered). Modern techniques of conformal radiotherapy with modulated intensity will probably have beneficial impact on small bowel toxicity. (authors)

  8. Small-bowel perforation caused by fish bone

    Sheng-Der Hsu; De-Chuan Chan; Yao-Chi Liu

    2005-01-01

    A diagnosis of small-bowel perforation, caused by a sharp or pointed foreign body, is rarely made preoperatively because the clinical symptoms are usually nonspecific and can mimic other surgical conditions, such as appendicitis and diverticulitis. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman who experienced severe pain in the right iliac fossa and fever for about five days before arrival at our hospital. The presumptive diagnosis was acute purulent appendicitis and an emergency appendectomy was planned. Swelling and erythema were noted in a segment of the small bowel in the lower right abdomen. A tiny pointed object was found penetrating the inflamed portion of the bowel, which proved to be a sharp fish bone (gray snapper). The bone was removed, followed by segmental resection of the terminal ileum and ascending colon. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  9. [Vaginal eviscentration with secondary strangulation of small bowel].

    Gembal, Piotr; Grzegorczyk, Wiesław; Grabowski, Bogumił; Milik, Krzysztof; Pajak, Marek; Bielecki, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    A case of 81 year old patient with eviscentration through vagina with a strangulation of small bowel was described. The woman was treated gynecologically and underwent surgery previously. The eviscentration occurred 21 months after last surgery and was connected with high abdominal pressure during defecation. Woman was qualified to an urgent laparotomy, and the hole about 15 mm length in vaginal posterior vault was found. Through the hole passed small bowel which was strangulated. The bowel was removed to the abdominal cavity and during its control no necrosis was found. The color and vascularity return to normal and right peristaltic was noticed. The hole in parietal peritoneum was closed by a continuous suture. The hole in vagina was also closed by the continuous suture from the perineal side. Woman in good general condition was discharged from hospital in the 13th day after surgery. PMID:18540188

  10. MR enterography in the evaluation of small bowel dilation

    Cronin, C.G. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: carmelcronin2000@hotmail.com; Lohan, D.G.; Browne, A.M.; Alhajeri, A.N.; Roche, C.; Murphy, J.M. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland)

    2009-10-15

    Magnetic reasonance (MR) enterography enables high contrast resolution depiction of the location and cause of bowel obstruction through a combination of predictable luminal distension and multiplanar imaging capabilities. Furthermore, because the patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation, sequential 'dynamic' MR imaging can be performed repeatedly over time further facilitating depiction of the site and/or the cause of obstruction. With increasing availability of MR imaging and standardization of the oral contrast medium regimens, it is likely that this technique will assume an ever-increasing role in the evaluation of small bowel dilation in the coming years. We illustrate the utility of MR enterography in the evaluation of small bowel dilation, whether it be mechanical, functional (e.g., ileus), or related to infiltrative mural disease.

  11. MR enterography in the evaluation of small bowel dilation

    Magnetic reasonance (MR) enterography enables high contrast resolution depiction of the location and cause of bowel obstruction through a combination of predictable luminal distension and multiplanar imaging capabilities. Furthermore, because the patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation, sequential 'dynamic' MR imaging can be performed repeatedly over time further facilitating depiction of the site and/or the cause of obstruction. With increasing availability of MR imaging and standardization of the oral contrast medium regimens, it is likely that this technique will assume an ever-increasing role in the evaluation of small bowel dilation in the coming years. We illustrate the utility of MR enterography in the evaluation of small bowel dilation, whether it be mechanical, functional (e.g., ileus), or related to infiltrative mural disease.

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease—the role of cross-sectional imaging techniques in the investigation of the small bowel

    Athanasakos, Athanasios; Mazioti, Argyro; Economopoulos, Nikolaos; Kontopoulou, Christina; Stathis, Georgios; Filippiadis, Dimitrios; Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis; Alexopoulou, Efthymia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children and adolescents is based on the integration of clinical, biological, endoscopic, histological and radiological data. Methods: The most important part of the diagnosis is the histology, which is acquired by endoscopy. Imaging of the small bowel has changed in recent years, but the imaging goals are primarily to determine the extent of small bowel involvement, assess complications and define candidates for surger...

  13. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    Bartusek, D. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: dbartusek@fnbrno.cz; Valek, V. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Husty, J. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jhusty@fnbrno.cz; Uteseny, J. [Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: juteseny@fnbrno.cz

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease.

  14. Small Bowel Injury in Peritoneal Encapsulation following Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    Naidoo, K.; Mewa Kinoo, S.; Singh, B.

    2013-01-01

    Small bowel encapsulation is a rare entity which is usually found incidentally at autopsy. We report the first case of peritoneal encapsulation encountered serendipitously at laparotomy undertaken for penetrating abdominal trauma and review the literature on peritoneal encapsulation. We also compare this phenomenon to abdominal cocoon and sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis.

  15. Small Bowel Injury in Peritoneal Encapsulation following Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    K. Naidoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel encapsulation is a rare entity which is usually found incidentally at autopsy. We report the first case of peritoneal encapsulation encountered serendipitously at laparotomy undertaken for penetrating abdominal trauma and review the literature on peritoneal encapsulation. We also compare this phenomenon to abdominal cocoon and sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis.

  16. Gastric Versus Small Bowel Feeding in Critically Ill Adults.

    Schlein, Kirsten

    2016-08-01

    Critically ill patients often require enteral feedings as a primary supply of nutrition. Whether enteral nutrition (EN) should be delivered as a gastric versus small bowel feeding in the critically ill patient population remains a contentious topic. The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM)/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN), the European Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN), and the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines (CCPG) are not in consensus on this topic. No research to date demonstrates a significant difference between the two feeding routes in terms of patient mortality, ventilator days, or length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU); however, studies provide some evidence that there may be other benefits to using a small bowel feeding route in critically ill patients. The purpose of this paper is to examine both sides of this debate and review advantages and disadvantages of both small bowel and gastric routes of EN. Practical issues and challenges to small bowel feeding tube placement are also addressed. Finally, recommendations are provided to help guide the clinician when selecting a feeding route, and suggestions are made for future research. PMID:26920643

  17. A radiologist's guide to small bowel and multivisceral transplantation

    This review will describe the indications for the various small bowel containing transplants. The importance of early referral will be highlighted. Radiologists play a central role in assessing these complex patients prior to transplantation. Furthermore, in the postoperative period, radiologists play an important part in diagnosing and treating complications

  18. Small bowel obstruction due to ingested superabsorbent beads

    Hao D. Pham

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Superabsorbent water beads have found many uses as household decorative items, crafts, and other industrial uses. We report a case of ingestion of several LiquiBlock Rainbow brand superabsorbent beads by a ten month old girl leading to small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and removal of the beads.

  19. Breathhold MRI of the small bowel in Crohn's disease after enteroklysis with oral magnetic particles

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of breathhold MRI following enteroclysis with addition of oral magnetic particles to study the extension, detection of stenoses and extraluminal manifestations in Crohn's disease. Results: Typical findings were marked bowel wall thickening with strong contrast enhancement. 95.8% of affected small bowel segments and 94.7% of stenoses were correctly detected by MRI. All four fistulas were detected and important extraluminal findings were seen in 6/18 patients. Additionally, one ileoileal and two ileosigmoidal adhesions, two extraluminal abscesses and affection of the right ureter were delineated. Conclusion: MRI in Crohn's disease offers the potential to avoid radiation exposure in this relatively young patient group. Important additional findings relevant to indication of surgery are seen in approximately one third of cases. The replacement of transduodenal intubation by oral contrast application remains to be further studied. (orig./AJ)

  20. Electrostimulation to move endoscopes in the small bowel

    Mosse, Charles A.; Mills, Timothy N.; Appleyard, Mark; Swain, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Background: Methods are required for propulsion of endoscopes through the small bowel and for propelling capsule endoscopes without cables. Aim: To test the hypothesis that electrical stimulation could propel an endoscope by stimulating muscular contraction. Methods: Prototype acrylic devices of ovoid shape were constructed with two stainless steel electrodes mounted on the tapered section. Five devices of 13 to 23 mm diameter with a taper of 16 degree(s) to 20 degree(s) (half angle) were tested. When in contact with the bowel wall electrostimulation was applied causing circular muscle contraction which when applied to the taper of the ovoid resulted in forward propulsion of the device. The method does not induce peristalsis but works by stimulating local contraction. The device was tested in small bowel and oesophagus of anaesthetized pigs. Results: Electrostimulation caused the ovoid to advance rapidly (6 mm/sec) up and down the oesophagus by inducing circular esophageal muscle contraction. When stimulated at 15 Hz with 30 ms pulses the threshold for movement was 12 mA; at 20 mA the device moved reliably in both directions in the small bowel at speeds of up to 4.5 mm/s, negotiating tight curves.

  1. The lack of impact of pelvic irradiation on small bowel mobility: implications for radiotherapy treatment planning

    Purpose: Small bowel contrast is frequently used during simulation for patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy to assist in the design of blocks that exclude small bowel from the radiation field. In many instances, a large field is treated to 45 gray (Gy), followed by a field reduction to exclude the small bowel. This prospective study was designed to assess whether the position and mobility of the small bowel changed after the initial 45 Gy, thereby determining whether a special small bowel series done at initial simulation is applicable at the time of field reduction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing pelvic irradiation were given small bowel contrast for their initial simulation. Radiographs were taken with the bladder empty and the bladder full. The location of the small bowel and its displacement with bladder distention was measured. This entire procedure was repeated prior to field reduction (after 39.6-46.0 Gy). Results: There was no demonstrable alteration in small bowel mobility after 39.6-46.0 Gy. The approximate position of the small bowel relative to bony landmarks was unchanged. Conclusion: The position and mobility of the small bowel appears not to be affected by 39.6-46.0 Gy of pelvic radiotherapy. Therefore, it is reasonable to design reduced pelvic fields to exclude the small bowel based on special small bowel series done at initial treatment simulation

  2. MR imaging of the small bowel in Crohn's disease

    MR and CT techniques optimized for small bowel imaging are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of small bowel disorders. Several studies have shown the advantage of these techniques over tradition barium fluoroscopic examinations secondary to improvements in spatial and temporal resolution combined with improved bowel distending agents. The preference of MR vs. CT has been geographical and based on expertise and public policy. With the increasing awareness of radiation exposure, there has been a more global interest in implementing techniques that either reduce or eliminate radiation exposure [Brenner DJ, Hall EJ. Computed tomography-an increasing source of radiation exposure. N Engl J Med 2007;357:2277-84]. This is especially important in patients with chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease who may require multiple studies over a lifetime or in studies that require sequential imaging time points such as in assessment of gastrointestinal motility [Froehlich JM, Patak MA, von Weymarn C, Juli CF, Zollikofer CL, Wentz KU. Small bowel motility assessment with magnetic resonance imaging. J Magn Reson Imaging 2005;21:370-75]. A recent study showed that certain subgroups of patients with Crohn's disease may be exposed to higher doses of radiation; those diagnosed at an early age, those with upper tract inflammation, penetrating disease, requirement of intravenous steroids, infliximab or multiple surgeries [Desmond AN, O'Regan K, Curran C, et al. Crohn's disease: factors associated with exposure to high levels of diagnostic radiation. Gut 2008;57:1524-29]. Therefore it has been suggested that techniques that can reduce or eliminate radiation exposure should be considered for imaging [Brenner DJ, Hall EJ. Computed tomography-an increasing source of radiation exposure. N Engl J Med 2007;357:2277-84]. Owing to the excellent softtissue contrast, direct multiplanar imaging capabilities, new ultrafast breath-holding pulse sequences, lack of ionizing

  3. Association between two single base polymorphisms of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene and inflammatory bowel disease

    Habibi, Manijeh; Naderi, Nosratllah; Farnood, Alma; Balaii, Hedieh; Dadaei, Tahereh; Almasi, Shohreh; Zojaji, Homayoun; Asadzadeh Aghdae, Hamid; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study evaluated the association between G241R and K469E polymorphisms of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene and inflammatory bowel disease in Iranian population. Background: Inflammatory bowel disease including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. There are two single base polymorphisms of intercellular adhesion molecule 1gene, G241R and K469E, reported to be associated with inflammatory disorders. Patients and methods: In this case-control study, 156 inflammatory bowel disease patients (110 ulcerative colitis and 46 Crohn’s disease patients) and 131 healthy controls were enrolled. Two polymorphisms of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene, including G241R and K469E, were assessed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: The E469 allele of K469E polymorphism was significantly more frequent in Crohn’s disease patients compared to controls (P< 0.05, OR= 1.83; 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.96). The mutant homozygote genotype of K469E polymorphism (E/E) was also significantly more frequent in Crohn’s disease patients compared to controls (P< 0.05, OR= 4.23; 95% CI: 1.42 to 12.59). No difference was observed in the frequency of K469E polymorphism among ulcerative colitis patients compared to controls. There were no significant differences in genotype and allele frequencies of G241R polymorphism among ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease patients compared to control subjects. Conclusion: According to our findings, K469E polymorphism of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene may probably participate in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease in Iran. PMID:27099667

  4. Functional and immunological aspects of small bowel transplantation : an experimental study in dogs

    Meijssen, Maarten

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSmall bowel transplantation is thought to be the ultimate therapeutic treatment for patients with an irreversible short bowel syndrome and those with intolerance to long-term total parenteral nutrition. Although the small bowel was one of the first organs to be transplanted experimentally, it is the last to be engrafted successfully in humans. The extreme immunogenicity of the small bowel graft and its compromised function after the transplantation procedure still hamper clinical ...

  5. The role of multidetector computed tomography in evaluation of small bowel obstructions

    Mehmet Fatih İnci

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate therole and additional diagnostic contribution of multi-detectorcomputed tomography (MDCT in patients with acuteabdominal pain caused by small bowel obstruction.Materials and methods: A total of 48 patients who admittedto our hospital with acute abdominal pain and underwentMDCT on suspicion of intestinal obstruction and hadabdominal surgery between January 2012 and October2012 were included to our study. MDCT images were interpretedby two experienced radiologist retrospectively.All clinical data and surgery notes also were evaluated.Patients had surgery due to penetrating or blunt abdominalinjury were excluded.Results: Of these 48 patients, 26 (54.1% were male and22 (45.9% were female. Patients’ ages ranged 25 to 71and mean age was 52±5.4 years. The causes of intestinalobstruction of patients were adhesions for 12 (46.1% patients,tumors for 7 (26.9% patients, external hernias for5 (19.2% patients, internal hernia for 1 (3.9% patient andintussusception for 1 (3.9% patient. A total concordancebetween the MDCT findings and definitive diagnosis wasfound in 26 of 23 cases and the sensitivity and specifityof MDCT in the diagnosis of small bowel obstruction werefound to be 88.5% and 90%, respectively.Conclusion: MDCT is a fast, effective and reliable imagingmethod for preoperative diagnosing small bowel obstructioncauses acute abdominal pain with the advantagesof MDCT such as multi-planar and three-dimensionalreformatted imaging.Key words: Acute abdominal pain, multi-detector computed tomography, small bowel obstruction

  6. [Prenatal discovery of Joubert syndrome associated with small bowel volvulus].

    Aurégan, C; Donciu, V; Millischer, A-E; Khen-Dunlop, N; Deloison, B; Sonigo, P; Magny, J-F

    2016-03-01

    Joubert syndrome and prenatal volvulus are difficult to diagnose during pregnancy. Joubert syndrome and related diseases should be considered in case of prenatal abnormal features of the fourth ventricle. Small bowel volvulus is also a surgical emergency because of the risk of intestinal necrosis before or after delivery. This type of condition justifies the transfer of pregnant women to a specialized hospital where the newborn may receive appropriate care. We report the case of a 31-week and 4-day gestational-age fetus in whom intrauterine growth retardation and small-bowel volvulus were diagnosed. Additional imaging revealed associated Joubert syndrome. This highlights the need for regular ultrasound monitoring during pregnancy and the comanagement of obstetricians and pediatricians to provide appropriate care before and after delivery. PMID:26850151

  7. Small Bowel Perforation as a Postoperative Complication from a Laminectomy

    Robert H. Krieger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain is one of the leading chief complaints affecting adults in the United States. As a result, this increases the percentage of patients that will eventually undergo surgical intervention to alleviate debilitating, chronic symptoms. A 37-year-old woman presented ten hours postoperatively after a lumbar laminectomy with an acute abdomen due to the extraordinarily rare complication of small bowel injury secondary to deep surgical penetration.

  8. Blind bedside insertion of small bowel feeding tubes.

    Duggan, SN

    2009-12-01

    The use of Naso-Jejunal (NJ) feeding is limited by difficulty in feeding tube placement. Patients have traditionally required transfer to Endoscopy or Radiology for insertion of small bowel feeding tubes, with clear resource implications. We hypothesised that the adoption of a simple bedside procedure would be effective and reduce cost. Clinical nutrition and nurse specialist personnel were trained in the 10\\/10\\/10 method of blind bedside NJ insertion.

  9. Non-specific granulomatous inflammatory lesions of small bowel.

    Bapat R; Ravishankar D; Rohandia O; Joshi A; Vora I

    1995-01-01

    The entity of nonspecific granulomatous inflammatory lesions(NSGIL) of the small bowel is a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. Data of 52 histopathologically proven cases of NSGIL seen by us between 1986 and 1991 were analysed. All these patients presented with either intestinal obstruction or perforation. They were thoroughly evaluated and investigated for tuberculosis. Of the 52 patients, 6 patients received antitubercular therapy (ATT) before and after surgery and 32 patients only after s...

  10. Acute small bowel obstruction due to chicken bone bezoar

    Vetpillai P; Oshowo A

    2012-01-01

    Preadeepan Vetpillai,1 Ayo Oshowo21CT2 Surgery in General, Charing Cross Hospital, 2Colorectal and Laparoscopic Surgery, Whittington Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Acute intestinal obstruction due to foreign bodies, or bezoar, is a rare occurrence in an adult with a normal intestinal tract. We report an unusual case of a 43-year-old black man with no previous abdominal surgery and no significant medical history who presented with an acute episode of small bowel obstruction due to an impacted u...

  11. Small Bowel Dose Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    LaCouture, Tamara A; Xue, Jinyu; Subedi, Gopal; Xu, Qianyi; Lee, Justin T; Kubicek, Gregory; Asbell, Sucha O

    2016-04-01

    Inconsistencies permeate the literature regarding small bowel dose tolerance limits for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. In this review, we organized these diverse published limits with MD Anderson at Cooper data into a unified framework, constructing the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Risk Map, demonstrating low-risk and high-risk SBRT dose tolerance limits for small bowel. Statistical models of clinical data from 2 institutions were used to assess the safety spectrum of doses used in the exposure of the gastrointestinal tract in SBRT; 30% of the analyzed cases had vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (VEGFI) or other biological agents within 2 years before or after SBRT. For every dose tolerance limit in the DVH Risk Map, the probit dose-response model was used to estimate the risk level from our clinical data. Using the current literature, 21Gy to 5cc of small bowel in 3 fractions has low toxicity and is reasonably safe, with 6.5% estimated risk of grade 3 or higher complications, per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. In the same fractionation for the same volume, if lower risk is required, 16.2Gy has an estimated risk of only 2.5%. Other volumes and fractionations are also reviewed; for all analyzed high-risk small bowel limits, the risk is 8.2% or less, and the low-risk limits have 4% or lower estimated risk. The results support current clinical practice, with some possibility for dose escalation. PMID:27000513

  12. Small Bowel Crohn's disease MRI pictorial essay

    The focus of this article includes revision of normal small bowel anatomy on sequences performed at our institution, with advantages and disadvantages; brief summary of the disease; appearance of acute active disease; usefulness of ancillary findings of active disease; appearance of chronic disease both active and inactive; complications of Crohn's disease; pitfalls and limitations of interpretation; and clinically relevant reporting through clinician feedback.

  13. Functional and immunological aspects of small bowel transplantation : an experimental study in dogs

    M.A.C. Meijssen (Maarten)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSmall bowel transplantation is thought to be the ultimate therapeutic treatment for patients with an irreversible short bowel syndrome and those with intolerance to long-term total parenteral nutrition. Although the small bowel was one of the first organs to be transplanted experimentall

  14. Comparison of upper gastrointestinal radiographic findings to histopathologic observations: a retrospective study of 41 dogs and cats with suspected small bowel infiltrative disease (1985 to 1990)

    It was the intent of this study to define which, if any, radiographic observations corresponded with specific causes of diffuse infiltrative small bowel disease and if radiographic findings could differentiate inflammatory disease from neoplastic disease and either of them from normal. Bowel spasticity, luminal narrowing, and thumb printing tend to indicate the presence of tumor more often than inflammatory disease. Increased bowel gas in cats and barium adhesion in dogs and cats suggest that a component of enteritis is present. Decreased bowel gas in dogs is more often associated with obstructive disease, but is not helpful in differentiating diffuse inflammatory disease from diffuse neoplastic disease. While several observations that can foster differentiation of neoplastic from inflammatory disease were found, this study also indicated that the UGI lacks a high degree of predictive value other than to indicate the presence of infiltrative small bowel disease

  15. Large Intraluminal Ileal Hematoma Presenting as Small Bowel Obstruction in a Child

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future

  16. Safety of enteral rehabilitative therapy in rat small bowel transplantation

    张小桥; 黎介寿; 李宁; 施鑫; 李幼生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety of enteral rehabilitative therapy in rat small bowel transplantation. Methods Forty-eight rat recipients of allogeneic heterotopic small bowel transplantation (SD and Wistar) were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the application or not of enteral rehabilitative therapy and cyclosporine A (CsA). The pathological changes of the graft, IL-2 receptor expression in lamina propria lymphocytes, serum IL-2 concentrations, results of spleen lymphocytes transformation test and the IL-2 secretion capacity were determined and compared. Results Enteral rehabilitative therapy could promote the immune function of the recipient so as to augment the acute rejection. But such effects could be blocked by the commonly used immunosuppressant CsA. Under the immunosuppression of CsA (10 mg*kg-1*d-1, i.m.), application of enteral rehabilitative therapy did not induce or aggravate acute rejection.Conclusion Under effective immunosuppression, application of enteral rehabilitative therapy is safe in rat small bowel transplantation.

  17. Local radiotherapy of exposed murine small bowel: Apoptosis and inflammation

    Thornberg Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preoperative radiotherapy of the pelvic abdomen presents with complications mostly affecting the small bowel. The aim of this study was to define the features of early radiation-induced injury on small bowel. Methods 54 mice were divided into two groups (36 irradiated and 18 sham irradiated. Animals were placed on a special frame and (in the radiated group the exteriorized segment of ileum was subjected to a single absorbed dose of 19 or 38 Gy radiation using 6 MV high energy photons. Specimens were collected for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC and ELISA analysis after 2, 24 and 48 hours. Venous blood was collected for systemic leucocyte count in a Burker chamber. Results Histology demonstrated progressive infiltration of inflammatory cells with cryptitis and increased apoptosis. MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein concentration was significantly increased in irradiated animals up to 48 hours. No significant differences were observed in IL-10 (interleukin and TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor levels. IHC with CD45 showed a significant increase at 2 hours of infiltrating leucocytes and lymphocytes after irradiation followed by progressive decrease with time. Caspase-3 expression increased significantly in a dose dependent trend in both irradiated groups up to 48 hours. Conclusion Acute small bowel injury caused by local irradiation is characterised by increased apoptosis of crypt epithelial cells and by lymphocyte infiltration of the underlying tissue. The severity of histological changes tends to be dose dependent and may affect the course of tissue damage.

  18. Advanced small bowel adenocarcinoma: Molecular characteristics and therapeutic perspectives.

    Zaaimi, Yosra; Aparicio, Thomas; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Taieb, Julien; Zaanan, Aziz

    2016-04-01

    Small bowel cancer represents less than 5% of all gastrointestinal cancers, while small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) accounts for about one third of all cancers of the small bowel. Although SBA frequently appears sporadically, some diseases are risk factors, such as Crohn's disease and some genetic predispositions to cancer. Progress in the identification of molecular alterations suggests some similarities in carcinogenesis between SBA and colorectal cancer. Evidence levels for the treatment and prognosis of these tumors are insufficient because of the scarcity of this disease and the absence of randomized trials. Chemotherapy based on fluoropyrimidine plus a platinum salt appears to be the most effective treatment regimen in non-randomized prospective trials for advanced SBA. Targeted therapy, against the angiogenic pathway or the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, for example, is not yet established, but seems promising given the over-expression of vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF)-A or EGFR observed in SBA. Phase I and II studies are currently evaluating the safety and efficacy of these targeted therapies in SBA treatment. The low incidence of SBA should promote the development of international collaborations to improve our knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying these tumors and to set up therapeutic trials. PMID:26547136

  19. Small bowel neuroendocrine tumors: From pathophysiology to clinical approach.

    Xavier, Sofia; Rosa, Bruno; Cotter, José

    2016-02-15

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), defined as epithelial tumors with predominant neuroendocrine differentiation, are among the most frequent types of small bowel neoplasm. They represent a rare, slow-growing neoplasm with some characteristics common to all forms and others attributable to the organ of origin. The diagnosis of this subgroup of neoplasia is not usually straight-forward for several reasons. Being a rare form of neoplasm they are frequently not readily considered in the differential diagnosis. Also, clinical manifestations are nonspecific lending the clinician no clue that points directly to this entity. However, the annual incidence of NETs has risen in the last years to 40 to 50 cases per million probably not due to a real increase in incidence but rather due to better diagnostic tools that have become progressively available. Being a rare malignancy, investigation regarding its pathophysiology and efforts toward better understanding and classification of these tumors has been limited until recently. Clinical societies dedicated to this matter are emerging (NANETS, ENETS and UKINETS) and several guidelines were published in an effort to standardize the nomenclature, grading and staging systems as well as diagnosis and management of NETs. Also, some investigation on the genetic behavior of small bowel NETs has been recently released, shedding some light on the pathophysiology of these tumors, and pointing some new directions on the possible treating options. In this review we focus on the current status of the overall knowledge about small bowel NETs, focusing on recent breakthroughs and its potential application on clinical practice. PMID:26909234

  20. Efficacy of small bowel follow-through with oral administration of methylcellulose in the diagnosis of small bowel disease

    To evaluate the usefulness of modified Small Bowel Follow Through (SBFT) with oral administration of methylcellulose in patients with small bowel diseases. Mean transit time was 142 minutes, and the maximum diameter of the jejunum and ileum was 2.9 cm and 2.1 cm respectively: in 45 patients (63%) the examination was concluded within 2 hours. The quality of images was excellent in 29 cases (41%), good in 30 (42%), fair in 8 (11%), and poor in 3 (4%). Images related to the inflammatory and vascular disease were graded as 'good' or 'excellent' in 92% and 89% of cases, respectively, and the image quality of lesions of the jejunum and ileum were graded, respectively, as 'good' or 'excellent' in 96 % and 63% of cases. Using this modified technique, sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 99%, respectively. Modified SBFT with the oral administration of methylcellulose is a simple but highly sensitive method of evaluating small bowel diseases. It is especially valuable in cases of inflammatory and vascular disease of the small intestine and lesions in the jejunum. (author). 15 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  1. Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: The First Study in Iran

    Abbasi, Mehdi HayatBakhsh; Zahedi, MohammadJavad; Darvish Moghadam, Sodaif; Shafieipour, Sara; HayatBakhsh Abbasi, Mahroo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may have a role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). So, the aim of this study was to assess the association between SIBO and IBS by using glucose breath test (GBT) in Kerman city as the first study in Iranian population. METHODS 107 patients with IBS and 107 healthy individuals were enrolled in our study. All the participants underwent GBT. A peak of H2 values >20 p.p.m above the basal value after glucose ingestion ...

  2. Left paraduodenal hernia presenting as recurrent small bowel obstruction

    Yu-Min Huang; Andy Shau-Bin Chou; Yung-Kang Wu; Chao-Chuan Wu; Ming-Che Lee; Haw-Tzong Chen; Yao-Jen Chang

    2005-01-01

    Internal herniation of the small bowel is a relatively rare cause of intestinal obstruction. Left paraduodenal hernia resulting from abnormal rotation of the midgut during embryonic development is the most common form of congenital internal hernia. We report our experience in the diagnosis and management of a young male with left paraduodenal hernia presenting as recurrent intestinal obstruction. Correct preoperative diagnosis of left paraduodenal hernia had been difficult due to non-specific clinical presentations, but the advent of modern imaging technology makes early and correct diagnosis possible. Due to the risk of obstruction and strangulation, surgical treatment is indicated; however,timely intervention increases the likelihood of a favorable outcome.

  3. Giant small bowel diverticulum presenting after percutaneous gastrostomy: case report

    Robinson, G.J.; Clark, J.A.; Pugash, R.A. [St. Michael' s Hospital, Wellesley Central Site, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-10-01

    The standard technique for percutaneous gastrostomy requires insufflation of air into the stomach via a nasogastric tube before percutaneous gastric puncture. We present a previously undescribed complication in which the insertion of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube resulted in the distention of a previously undiagnosed giant small bowel diverticulum. This led to discomfort for the patient, further radiologic investigation and a delay in discharge. Symptoms resolved with conservative management. We suggest a strategy for avoiding this complication, as well as for reducing the incidence of post-procedure ileus. (author)

  4. Delayed Presentation of Trichobezoar with Small Bowel Obstruction

    Soofia Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel obstruction is a common surgical emergency but trichobezoar as an etiology, rarely reported. A seven year old school going female child presented with acute intestinal obstruction with a palpable and mobile mass in the abdomen. At exploration, a 10 cm long trichobezoar was found in the distal ileum which was removed through enterotomy. Postoperative course remained uneventful. Further probing revealed that child used to eat her own scalp hairs at the age of 2 years and the habit persisted for about 18 months which resulted in alopecia at that time. Later on she started showing normal behavior.

  5. Finding the solution for incomplete small bowel capsule endoscopy

    José; Cotter; Francisca; Dias; de; Castro; Joana; Magalhes; Maria; Joo; Moreira; Bruno; Rosa

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate whether the use of real time viewer(RTV)and administration of domperidone to patients with delayed gastric passage of the capsule could reduce the rate of incomplete examinations(IE)and improve the diagnostic yield of small bowel capsule endoscopy(SBCE).METHODS:Prospective single center interventional study,from June 2012 to February 2013.Capsule location was systematically checked one hour after ingestion using RTV.If it remained in the stomach,the patient received 10 mg domperidone per os and the location of the capsule was rechecked after 30 min.If the capsule remained in the stomach a second dose of10 mg of domperidone was administered orally.After another 30 min the position was rechecked and if the capsule remained in the stomach,it was passed into the duodenum by upper gastrointestinal(GI)endoscopy.The rate of IE and diagnostic yield of SBCE were compared with those of examinations performed before the use of RTV or domperidone in our Department(control group,January 2009-May 2012).RESULTS:Both groups were similar regarding age,sex,indication,inpatient status and surgical history.The control group included 307 patients,with 48(15.6%)IE.The RTV group included 82 patients,with3(3.7%)IE,P=0.003.In the control group,average gastric time was significantly longer in patients with IE than in patients with complete examination of the small bowel(77 min vs 26 min,P=0.003).In the RTV group,the capsule remained in the stomach one hour after ingestion in 14/82 patients(17.0%)vs 48/307(15.6%)in the control group,P=0.736.Domperidone did not significantly affect small bowel transit time(260min vs 297 min,P=0.229).The capsule detected positive findings in 39%of patients in the control group and 49%in the RTV group(P=0.081).CONCLUSION:The use of RTV and selective administration of domperidone to patients with delayed gastric passage of the capsule significantly reduces incomplete examinations,with no effect on small bowel transit time or diagnostic yield.

  6. MRI enterography: the future of small bowel diagnostics?

    Feuerbach, S

    2010-01-01

    MRI plays an increasing role in small bowel imaging of Crohn's disease. MR enterography (MRE) without nasojejunal intubation and radiation exposure offers similar results compared to MR enteroclysis (with intubation) and should be therefore the preferred method. Sensitivity and specificity is comparable to that of CT enterography. Capsule endoscopy is obviously superior to MRE in detecting superficial lesions, but this is limited to the mucosa and stenosis has to be excluded before examination using imaging, like MRE. There are no convincing studies in the literature regarding assessment of disease activity with imaging. Moreover, there is no consensus in the literature about a suitable reference standard. PMID:20926869

  7. Intestinal anisakiasis as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    Kojima, Gotaro; Usuki, Shinichiro; Mizokami, Ken; Tanabe, Marianne; Machi, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Anisakiasis, a parasitic infection by larvae of the nematode Anisakis found in raw or undercooked saltwater fish, mostly involves stomach but rarely small intestine. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain and developed small bowel obstruction caused by intestinal anisakiasis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed segmental edema of the intestinal wall with proximal dilatation. The patient underwent urgent laparotomy because strangulated small bowel obstruction was suspected. A localized portion of the intestine around jejunoileal junction was found to be erythematous, edematous, and hardened, which was resected. The resected specimen showed a linear whitish worm, Anisakis simplex, penetrating into the intestinal mucosa. It is often clinically challenging to consider intestinal anisakiasis in the differential diagnosis because of its nonspecific abdominal symptoms and findings. Although gastrointestinal anisakiasis is still rare in the United States, the incidence is expected to rise given the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine such as sushi or sashimi. Anisakiasis should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms after consumption of raw or undercooked fish. PMID:23786678

  8. Small bowel adenocarcinoma mimicking a large adrenal tumor

    Ivović Miomira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel is a rare gastrointestinal neoplasm usually affecting the distal duodenum and proximal jejunum. Because of their rarity and poorly defined abdominal symptoms, a correct diagnosis is often delayed. Case Outline. We present a 43-year-old woman admitted at the Clinic for Endocrinology due to a large tumor (over 7 cm of the left adrenal gland. The tumor was detected by ultrasound and confirmed by CT scan. The patient complained of abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant, fatigue and septic fever. Normal urinary catecholamines excluded pheochromocytoma. The endocrine evaluations revealed laboratory signs of subclinical hypercorticism: midnight cortisol 235 nmol/L, post 1 mg - overnight Dexamethasone suppression test for cortisol 95.5 nmol/L and basal ACTH 4.2 pg/mL. Plasma rennin activity and aldosterone were within the normal range. Surgery was performed. Intraoperative findings showed signs of acute peritonitis and a small ulceration of the jejunum below at 70 cm on the anal side from the Treitz’s ligament. Adrenal glands were not enlarged. Patohistology and immunochemistry identified adenocarcinoma of the jejunum without infiltration of the lymphatic nodules. The extensive jejunal resection and lavage of the peritoneum were performed. Due to complications of massive peritonitis, the patient died seven days after surgery. Conclusion. Poorly defined symptoms and a low incidence make the diagnosis of small bowel carcinoma, particularly of the jejunal region, very difficult in spite of the new endoscopic techniques.

  9. Supra-transumbilical laparotomy (STL approach for small bowel atresia repair: Our experience and review of the literature

    Ernesto Leva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supra-Transumbilical Laparotomy (STL has been used in paediatric surgery for a broad spectrum of abdominal procedures. We report our experience with STL approach for small bowel atresia repair in newborns and review previous published series on the topic. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients with small bowel atresia were treated via STL approach at our Institution over a 5-year period and their charts were retrospectively reviewed. Results: STL procedure was performed at mean age of 3.1 day. No malrotation disorders were detected with pre-operative contrast enema. Eight patients (54.1% presented jejunal atresia, five (35.7% ileal atresia, and one (7.1% multiple ileal and jejunal atresias. Standard repair with primary end-to-back anastomosis was performed in all but one patient. In the newborn with multiple atresia, STL incision was converted in supra-umbilical transverse incision due to difficulty of exposition. After surgery, one patient developed anastomotic stricture, and another developed occlusion due to adhesions: Both infants required second laparotomy. No infections of the umbilical site were recorded, and cosmetic results were excellent in all patients. Conclusions: Increasing evidence suggests that STL approach for small bowel atresia is feasible, safe and provides adequate exposure for small bowel atresia surgery. When malrotation and colonic/multiple atresia are pre-operatively ruled out, STL procedure can be choosen as first approach.

  10. MRI of the small-bowel: how to differentiate primary neoplasms and mimickers

    Masselli, G; Colaiacomo, M C; Marcelli, G; Bertini, L.; Casciani, E; Laghi, F; D'Amico, P.; Caprasecca, S; Polettini, E; Gualdi, G

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the gastrointestinal tract is gaining clinical acceptance and is increasingly used to evaluate patients with suspected small-bowel diseases. MRI may be performed with enterography or enteroclysis, both of which combine the advantages of cross-sectional imaging with those of conventional enteroclysis. In this paper, MRI features of primary small-bowel neoplasms, the most important signs for differential diagnosis and the diseases that can be considered as mimickers of small-bowel neopla...

  11. Small bowel MRI in adult patients: not just Crohn’s disease—a tutorial

    Kavaliauskiene, Giedre; Ziech, Manon L. W.; Nio, C Yung; Stoker, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To provide an overview of less well-known small bowel and mesenteric diseases found at small bowel magnetic resonance (MR) enterography/enteroclysis and to review the imaging findings. MR enterography and enteroclysis are important techniques for evaluation of small bowel diseases. In most centres these techniques are primarily used in Crohn’s disease, and most radiologists are familiar with these MRI findings. However, the knowledge of findings in other diseases is often sparse, i...

  12. Fecal calprotectin as a biomarker of inflammatory lesions of the small bowel seen by videocapsule endoscopy

    Juan Egea-Valenzuela; Fernando Alberca-de-las-Parras; Fernando Carballo-Álvarez

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The levels of calprotectin in the stools are proportional to neutrophil activity in the enteric lumen, so fecal calprotectin is a useful intestinal inflammatory biomarker. It is an extended tool as predictor of colonic pathology but there is scare evidence about its utility in the small bowel. Objective: To test the yield of fecal calprotectin to detect lesions in the small bowel. Material and methods: We have retrospectively included 71 patients sent for small bowel capsule end...

  13. Phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: a case report

    Rauf Fozia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Phytobezoars are concretions of poorly digested fruit and vegetable fibers found in the alimentary tract. Previous gastric resection, gastrojejunostomy, or pyloroplasty predispose people to bezoar formation. Small-bowel bezoars normally come from the stomach, and primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare. They are seen only in patients with underlying small-bowel diseases such as diverticula, strictures, or tumors. Primary small-bowel bezoars almost always present as intestinal obstructions, although it is a very rare cause, being responsible for less than 3% of all small-bowel obstructions in one series. Jejunal diverticula are rare, with an incidence of less than 0.5%. They are usually asymptomatic pseudodiverticula of pulsion type, and complications are reported in 10% to 30% of patients. A phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum is an extremely rare presentation. Case presentation A 78-year-old Pakistani man presented to our clinic with small-bowel obstruction. Upon exploration, we found a primary small-bowel bezoar originating in a jejunal diverticulum and causing jejunal obstruction. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment harboring the diverticulum was performed, and our patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare but must be kept in mind as a possible cause of small-bowel obstruction.

  14. Small Bowel Obstruction due to Mesodiverticular Band of Meckel's Diverticulum: A Case Report

    Sumer, Aziz; Kemik, Ozgur; Olmez, Aydemir; Dulger, A. Cumhur; Hasirci, Ismail; Iliklerden, Umit; Kisli, Erol; Kotan, Cetin

    2010-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the small intestine. Common complications related to a Meckel's diverticulum include haemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, and inflammation. Small bowel obstruction due to mesodiverticular band of Meckel's diverticulum is a rare complication. Herein, we report the diagnosis and management of a small bowel obstruction occurring due to mesodiverticular band of a Meckel's diverticulum. PMID:20814563

  15. Small Bowel Obstruction due to Mesodiverticular Band of Meckel's Diverticulum: A Case Report

    Aziz Sumer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the small intestine. Common complications related to a Meckel's diverticulum include haemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, and inflammation. Small bowel obstruction due to mesodiverticular band of Meckel's diverticulum is a rare complication. Herein, we report the diagnosis and management of a small bowel obstruction occurring due to mesodiverticular band of a Meckel's diverticulum.

  16. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease.

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-07-01

    In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease.We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses.The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P bowel length ≤230 cm are risk factors affecting the poor nutritional status of patients with Crohn disease after small bowel resection. PMID:27472702

  17. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: the first study in iran.

    Abbasi, Mehdi HayatBakhsh; Zahedi, MohammadJavad; Darvish Moghadam, Sodaif; Shafieipour, Sara; HayatBakhsh Abbasi, Mahroo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may have a role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). So, the aim of this study was to assess the association between SIBO and IBS by using glucose breath test (GBT) in Kerman city as the first study in Iranian population. METHODS 107 patients with IBS and 107 healthy individuals were enrolled in our study. All the participants underwent GBT. A peak of H2 values >20 p.p.m above the basal value after glucose ingestion was considered suggestive of SIBO. SPSS software version 17 was used for data analysis. P value SIBO. We suggest a Placebo-controlled bacterial eradication study for identifying the role of SIBO in IBS. PMID:25628852

  18. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma from hand skin causing small bowel obstruction: an unusual case presentation

    Li, Ruixin; Chen, Zihua; Wen, Qiaocheng; Chen, Zhikang

    2014-01-01

    The small bowel rarely suffers from metastatic tumors from outside the abdomen. Small bowel obstructions caused by the metastatic spread of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the hand to the intestines are even rarer. A 71-year-old man with intermittent abdominal distension and pain for 4 months was diagnosed with partial bowel obstruction. The patient underwent a video capsule endoscopic examination; however, the patient was unable to pass the capsule, which worsened the abdominal distension. ...

  19. Computed Tomography Enterography and Magnetic Resonance Enterography: The Future of Small Bowel Imaging

    Baker, Mark E.; Einstein, David M.; Veniero, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 5 years, computed tomography enterography (CTE) and to a lesser extent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) have supplanted the routine small bowel series and enteroclysis in the evaluation of many small bowel diseases, especially Crohn's disease. Both CTE and MRE use similar methods of bowel lumen opacification and distension and both have distinct advantages and disadvantages. Both have been most extensively studied in patients with Crohn's disease. What is certain is that thes...

  20. Small bowel obstruction caused by self-anchoring suture used for peritoneal closure following robotic inguinal hernia repair

    Khan, Faraz A.; Hashmi, Asra; Edelman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal herniorraphy is a commonly performed procedure given the reported decrease in pain and earlier return to activity when compared with the open approach. Moreover, robotic assistance offers the operating surgeon considerable ergonomic advantages, making it an attractive alternative to conventional laparoscopic herniorraphy. Robotic herniorraphy utilizes the transabdominal preperitoneal approach where following repair peritoneal closure is necessary to avoid mesh exposure to the viscera. Self-anchoring sutures are frequently used to this end given the ease of use and knotless application. We present an unusual case of post-operative small bowel obstruction following robotic inguinal hernia repair caused by the self-anchoring suture used for peritoneal closure. This patient presented 3 days post-procedure with symptoms and cross-sectional imaging indicative of small bowel obstruction with a clear transition point. Underwent laparoscopic lysis of a single adhesive band originating from the loose intraperitoneal end of the suture leading to resolution of symptoms. PMID:27340230

  1. Novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: Selective inhibition of cytokines and adhesion molecules

    Kazuhiko Nakamura; Kuniomi Honda; Takahiro Mizutani; Hirotada Akiho; Naohiko Harada

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which non-specifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD causes an overproduction of inflammatory cytokines and trafficking of effector leukocytes into the bowel, thus leading to an uncontrolled intestinal inflammation. Such recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD created a recent trend of novel biological therapies which specifically inhibit the molecules involved in the inflammatory cascade. Major targets for such treatment are inflammatory cytokines and their receptors, and adhesion molecules. A chimeric anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody, infliximab, has become a standard therapy for CD and it is also likely to be beneficial for UC. Several anti-TNF reagents have been developed but most of them seem to not be as efficacious as infliximab. A humanized anti-TNF monoclonal antibody, adalimumab may be useful for the treatment of patients who lost responsiveness or developed intolerance to infliximab.Antibodies against IL-12 p40 and IL-6 receptor could be alternative new anti-cytokine therapies for IBD. Antiinterferon-γ and anti-CD25 therapies were developed,but the benefit of these agents has not yet been established. The selective blocking of migration of leukocytes into intestine seems to be a nice approach.Antibodies against α4 integrin and α4β7 integrin showed benefit for IBD. Antisense oligonucleotide of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) may be efficacious for IBD. Clinical trials of such compounds have been either recently reported or are currently underway. In this article, we review the efficacy and safety of such novel biological therapies for IBD.

  2. Ultrasonographic appearance of Ascaris lumbricoides in the small bowel.

    Mahmood, T; Mansoor, N; Quraishy, S; Ilyas, M; Hussain, S

    2001-03-01

    Roundworm infestation, one of the most common helminthic diseases worldwide, is caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, one of the largest parasites that infests the human bowel. A lumbricoides is virtually universal at some stage of childhood in semitropical and tropical regions. This study describes our experience with the ultrasonographic appearance of intestinal ascariasis in 84 patients, 2.5 to 42 years of age, examined over 2 years beginning October 1997. The patients' conditions ranged from acute intestinal obstruction to no clinical features pertaining to obstruction. Ultrasonographic examination was performed with an Echocee power Doppler real-time unit with a variable-frequency 3.7-MHz convex, 7.5-MHz linear probe. In longitudinal section the Ascaris worm presented as a linear intraluminal mass with 3 or 4 linear echogenic interfaces; in the cross section, it was round, sometimes appearing as a "target" sign. Some worms also showed serpentine movements. Sonographic examination of the patients in the left lateral decubitus position after ingestion of water improved detection and visualization of the worms in some cases. It is concluded that A lumbricoides in the small bowel has a sonographic appearance that can be recognized by the wary observer. PMID:11270532

  3. Incarcerated Trocar Site Herniation of the Small Bowel following Laparoscopic Myomectomy

    Zomer, Monica Tessmann; de Azevedo, Rafael Menezes

    2013-01-01

    Small bowel herniation through the fascial defect created by the entry of trocars is one of the major complications of the laparoscopic surgery. In this paper, we describe a 42-year-old woman developing an incarcerated trocar site herniation of the small bowel following laparoscopic myomectomy and treated by laparoscopic approach. PMID:23956895

  4. Fecal calprotectin is equally sensitive in Crohn's disease affecting the small bowel and colon

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Kjeldsen, Jens; Nathan, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The utility of fecal calprotectin (fCal) in small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) remains to be clarified. The primary aim of this study was to determine levels of fCal in CD restricted to the small bowel compared with CD affecting the colon, in patients undergoing their first diagnostic work-up. In...

  5. Inter-observer agreement for detection of small bowel Crohn's disease with capsule endoscopy

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Nathan, Torben; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Compared to other modalities, capsule endoscopy (CE) has a high diagnostic yield for diagnosing small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). The aim of this study was to determine the inter-observer agreement for detection of small bowel CD with predefined diagnostic criteria. MATERIAL AND METHODS...

  6. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome following Small Bowel Obstruction

    Shoumitro Deb

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 64-year-old lady who developed clinical features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following a laparotomy for small bowel obstruction. Following the operation she developed paralytic ileus and required total parenteral nutrition for one month. A suspected history of average 40 units of weekly alcohol consumption prior to the operation could not be confirmed and the patient did not show any sign of alcohol dependence. Within a few months of treatment with a daily oral dose of thiamine 200 mgs supplemented by multivitamins the patient showed subjective evidence of improvement in confusion, confabulation, and anterograde amnesia, although objective tests showed residual deficits in many areas of cognitive functioning, including immediate and delayed recall of verbal and non-verbal materials, planning and switching of attention.

  7. Small Bowel Perforation due to Gossypiboma Caused Acute Abdomen.

    Colak, Tahsin; Olmez, Tolga; Turkmenoglu, Ozgur; Dag, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Gossypiboma, an infrequent surgical complication, is a mass lesion due to a retained surgical sponge surrounded by foreign body reaction. In this case report, we describe gossypiboma in the abdominal cavity which was detected 14 months after the hysterectomy due to acute abdominal pain. Gossypiboma was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). The CT findings were a rounded mass with a dense central part and an enhancing wall. In explorative laparotomy, small bowel loops were seen to be perforated due to inflammation of long standing gossypiboma. Jejunal resection with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The patient was discharged whithout complication. This case was presented to point to retained foreign body (RFB) complications and we believed that the possibility of a retained foreign body should be considered in the differential diagnosis of who had previous surgery and complained of pain, infection, or palpable mass. PMID:24288645

  8. Non-specific granulomatous inflammatory lesions of small bowel.

    Bapat R

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The entity of nonspecific granulomatous inflammatory lesions(NSGIL of the small bowel is a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. Data of 52 histopathologically proven cases of NSGIL seen by us between 1986 and 1991 were analysed. All these patients presented with either intestinal obstruction or perforation. They were thoroughly evaluated and investigated for tuberculosis. Of the 52 patients, 6 patients received antitubercular therapy (ATT before and after surgery and 32 patients only after surgery. Fourteen patients did not receive ATT. Surgical procedures undertaken included stricturoplasty, resection/anastomosis and simple suturing of perforation. No complications were seen in patients who received ATT; however, six of 14 patients who did not receive ATT developed wound sepsis and 2 developed partial wound dehiscence. Many of these NSGIL lesions could be tuberculous in etiology though typical caseating granulomas were not seen.

  9. Scintigraphic assessment of gastric emptying, small bowel and colonic transit

    This paper describes a simplified scintigraphy method of whole gut transit measurement proposed by Camilleri et al. Two tracers are used: 111In-labelled Amberlite beads for colonic motility study and 99mTc-labelled beads for gastric emptying evaluation. The 111In-labelled beads are placed in a capsule given to the patient at time T2, which disintegrates in the distal ileon or proximal colon in order to release the radiopharmaceutical at the beginning of the colon. The 99mTc-labelled beads are incorporated in a omelette served to the patient at T0 and are used to measure gastric emptying and small bowel transit. Static anterior and posterior views are obtained at different times (T0, T2, T4 and ring the different transit times. (authors). 241 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Gastric Trichobezoar Causing Intermittent Small Bowel Obstruction: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    Nicole G. Coufal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the unusual case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with multiple episodes of small bowel obstruction. Initial exploratory lap-roscopy did not reveal an etiology of the obstruction. Subsequent upper endoscopy identified a non-obstructing gastric trichobezoar which could not be removed endoscopically but was not thought to be responsible for the small bowel obstruction given its location. One week postoperatively, the patient experienced recurrence of small bowel obstruction. Repeat endoscopy disclosed that the trichobezoar was no longer located in the stomach and upon repeat laparotomy was extracted from the mid-jejunum. In the following 8 months, the patient had no further episodes of small bowel obstruction. Consequently, gastric bezoars should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent small bowel obstruction.

  11. Modern MRI of the small bowell; Moderne MRT des Duenndarms

    Scharitzer, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    The radiological diagnostics of diseases of the small intestine have undergone a great change in the last two decades. Through rapid progress with new treatments and an increasing therapeutic focus on transmural healing, a complete evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is now crucial. With the introduction of endoscopy, gastrointestinal imaging with a relatively high radiation exposure had only limited applications. The development of cross-sectional imaging allowed a much broader radiological evaluation of abdominal diseases. Due to rapid investigation techniques, excellent soft tissue contrast and the distinct advantage of eliminating exposure to radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the gastrointestinal tract has gained increasing importance. With sufficient filling of the intestinal lumen, simultaneous imaging of all the intestinal wall layers, the perienteric structures and associated abdominal pathologies is now possible. New MR sequences, such as diffusion-weighted sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences and MR fluoroscopy, enable the detection of morphological changes, with additional characterization of affected bowel loops as well as the assessment of functional pathologies with dynamic information about intestinal motility disturbances. Recent guidelines of European radiological and gastroenterological organizations have confirmed the importance of cross-sectional imaging and particularly of MRI for diagnostics and follow-up in patients with Crohn's disease. Due to the possibility of assessment of all the layers of the intestinal wall and the presence of extramural complications, MRI has a significant impact on further therapeutic treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, MR enterography and MR enteroclysis should be the methods of choice for the evaluation of small bowel pathologies because of radiation issues and the great diagnostic value they provide. A

  12. Small bowel capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: Outcome analysis using telemetry review

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine if there were any interactions between cardiac devices and small bowel capsules secondary to electromagnetic interference (EMI) in patients who have undergone small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE).

  13. Interobserver and intermodality agreement for detection of small bowel Crohn's disease with MR enterography and CT enterography

    Jensen, Michael D; Ormstrup, Tina; Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel;

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and computed tomography enterography (CTE) visualizes small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) and its complications with high accuracy. The aim of this study was to determine the interobserver and intermodality agreement for detection of small bowel CD....

  14. Effect of experimental stress on the small bowel and colon in healthy humans

    Pritchard, SE; Garsed, KC; Hoad, CL; Lingaya, M; Banwait, R; Thongborisute, W; Roberts, E; Costigan, C; Marciani, L.; Gowland, PA; Spiller, RC

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are frequently reported to be exacerbated by stress. Animal studies suggest that corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mediates the effect of stress on the bowel. We have shown that stressed IBS patients with diarrhea have constricted small bowels. We hypothesized that we could mimic this effect by applying experimental stress in the form of either hand immersion in ice water or CRH injection in healthy volunteers (HV). Methods The postpr...

  15. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance contribute to irritable bowel syndrome symptomatology in Pakistan

    Javed Yakoob; Zaigham Abbas; Rustam Khan; Saeed Hamid; Safia Awan; Wasim Jafri

    2011-01-01

    Background /Aim: The symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome resemble those of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SIBO and lactose intolerance (LI) occurrence in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) according to Rome III criteria. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective case-control study, patients over 18 years of age with altered bowel habit, bloating, and patients who had lactose Hydrogen bre...

  16. Acute small bowel obstruction due to a large intraluminal blood clot after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Green, Jessica; Ikuine, Tomoko; Hacker, Shoshana; Urrego, Hernan; Tuggle, Karleena

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are a known perioperative complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and common etiologies include internal hernia, port site hernia, jejunojejunostomy stricture, ileus and adhesions. Less commonly, SBO can be caused by superior mesenteric artery syndrome, intussusception and intraluminal blood clot. We present a case of SBO caused by intraluminal blood clot from jejunojejunostomy staple line bleeding in a patient with a normal coagulation profile. Computed tomography was used to elucidate the cause of perioperative SBO, and diagnostic laparoscopy was used to both diagnose and treat the complication. In this case, the intraluminal clot was evacuated laparoscopically by enterotomy, thrombectomy and primary closure without anastomotic revision since there was no evidence of continued bleeding. Administration of enoxaparin and Toradol post-operatively may have exacerbated mild intraluminal bleeding occurring at the stapled jejunojejunal anastomosis. Prompt recognition and treatment of perioperative SBO can prevent catastrophic consequences related to bowel perforation. PMID:27554828

  17. The Importance of Alternative Diagnostic Modalities in the Diagnosis of Small Bowel Tumors After a Negative Capsule Endoscopy

    Iolanda Ribeiro; Rolando Pinho; Adélia Rodrigues; Carlos Fernandes; Joana Silva; Ana Ponte; Davide Tente; João Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is widely accepted as the preferred diagnostic test in the evaluation of small bowel diseases, especially in the setting of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. It has revolutionized small bowel examination and has improved the detection of small bowel tumors. However, small bowel tumors are sometimes missed by capsule endoscopy. Furthermore, there are several recent reports comparing capsule endoscopy with other diagnostic modalities, such as double balloon enteroscopy and CT...

  18. The relevance of free fluid between intestinal loops detected by sonography in the clinical assessment of small bowel obstruction in adults

    ; abdominal plain film showed an increased dilatation of small bowel loops with moderate thickened wall and air-fluid levels. In 34 other patients US examination revealed the presence of thick-walled loops, hypoperistalsis and a larger amount of free extraluminal fluid. Radiographic findings in these patients were: horizontal featured and markedly dilated small bowel loops presenting parietal thickness, presence of intraluminal fluid stasis and evidence of thickened, sparse and incomplete valvulae conniventes. At surgery etiology of small bowel obstructions was various, but most of cases related to adhesions (70 cases). The presence of extraluminal fluid were confirmed at surgery in 104 patients. Conclusions: Our experience using sonography in suspicion of SBO (small bowel obstruction) suggests the usefulness of this imaging modality to differentiate a functional or obstructive ileus, demonstrating the evidence of intestinal peristalsis. Furthermore, the presence of a large amount of fluid between dilated small bowel loops suggests worsening mechanical small bowel obstruction, that requires not a medical therapy but immediate surgery

  19. Adhesive small bowel obstruction: predictive value of oral contrast administration on the need for surgery Obstrucción intestinal adherencial: valor predictivo de la administración precoz de contraste radiológico sobre la necesidad de cirugía

    J Perea García

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: adhesive small bowel obstruction (SBO is a common cause of hospital admission. Nonoperative management is initially recommended unless there is suspicion of strangulation, but its optimal duration is controversial. The aims of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of radiographic small bowel examination with contrast medium to predict the need for surgery in SBO. Material and methods: this prospective study carried out from January 1999 to December 2001, included 100 patients with clinical and radiological criteria of adhesive SBO. We described the past medical history, as well as clinical picture, blood tests and radiological findings in these patients. Fifty cubic centimeters of 5% barium suspension were given orally, and plain abdominal radiographs were taken at 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours afterwards. A liquid diet was given as soon as the contrast medium appeared in the right colon. Otherwise, surgical intervention was considered based on the outcome of the patient and the criteria of the emergency surgical team. Results: in 70 patients, barium contrast appeared in the right colon, and a liquid diet was tolerated by 69 of them (98.6%. Mean hospitalization time for this group was 43 ± 17 hours. In the remaining 30 patients, no evidence of barium contrast in the right colon was seen, and 25 of them underwent surgery (75%, while the other 5 tolerated a liquid diet. Mean hospitalization time for this second group of patients was 13.8 ± 11 days. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the absence of contrast medium in the right colon within 24 hours as a predictor of surgery were 93, 96, 98 and 83%, respectively. There was a statistical significant relationship (p Introducción: la obstrucción intestinal adherencial (OIA es una importante causa de ingreso hospitalario. Salvo que exista sospecha de estrangulación, está indicado inicialmente el manejo conservador. No obstante, el

  20. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy for a patient with an intractable small bowel injury after repeat surgeries: a case report

    Takeyama Hiromitsu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The management of intestinal injury can be challenging, because of the intractable nature of the condition. Surgical treatment for patients with severe adhesions sometimes results in further intestinal injury. We report a conservative management strategy using percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy for an intractable small bowel surgical injury after repeated surgeries. Case presentation A 78-year-old Japanese woman had undergone several abdominal surgeries including urinary cystectomy for bladder cancer. After this operation, she developed peritonitis as a result of a small bowel perforation thought to be due to an injury sustained during the operation, with signs consistent with systemic inflammatory response syndrome: body temperature 38.5°C, heart rate 92 beats/minute, respiratory rate 23 breaths/minute, white blood cell count 11.7 × 109/L (normal range 4-11 × 109/μL. Two further surgical interventions failed to control the leak, and our patient's clinical condition and nutritional status continued to deteriorate. We then performed percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy, and continuous suction was applied as an alternative to a third surgical intervention. With this endoscopic intervention, the intestinal leak gradually closed and oral feeding became possible. Conclusion We suggest that the technique of percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy combined with a somatostatin analog is a feasible alternative to surgical treatment for small bowel leakage, and is less invasive than a nasojejunal tube.

  1. Reducing false positives of small bowel segmentation on CT scans by localizing colon regions

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Automated small bowel segmentation is essential for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of small bowel pathology, such as tumor detection and pre-operative planning. We previously proposed a method to segment the small bowel using the mesenteric vasculature as a roadmap. The method performed well on small bowel segmentation but produced many false positives, most of which were located on the colon. To improve the accuracy of small bowel segmentation, we propose a semi-automated method with minimum interaction to distinguish the colon from the small bowel. The method utilizes anatomic knowledge about the mesenteric vasculature and a statistical method of colon detection. First, anatomic labeling of the mesenteric arteries is used to identify the arteries supplying the colon. Second, a statistical detector is created by combining two colon probability maps. One probability map is of the colon location and is generated from colon centerlines generated from CT colonography (CTC) data. Another probability map is of 3D colon texture using Haralick features and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. The two probability maps are combined to localize colon regions, i.e., voxels having high probabilities on both maps were labeled as colon. Third, colon regions identified by anatomical labeling and the statistical detector are removed from the original results of small bowel segmentation. The method was evaluated on 11 abdominal CT scans of patients suspected of having carcinoid tumors. The reference standard consisted of manually-labeled small bowel segmentation. The method reduced the voxel-based false positive rate of small bowel segmentation from 19.7%±3.9% to 5.9%±2.3%, with two-tailed P-value < 0.0001.

  2. Goblet Cell Carcinoid Tumor of the Appendix with Small Bowel Obstruction: A Case Report

    Hwang, Su Yeon; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Min Jeong; Koh, Sung Hye; Jeon, Eui Yong; Min, Kwang Seon; Seo, Jin Won; Park, Hyoung Chul [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Goblet cell carcinoid tumor of the appendix (GCTA) is a tumor with histological features of both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumors. The most common clinical presentation of GCTA is acute appendicitis, although small bowel obstruction has been reported as a rare clinical symptom of GCTA. However, to the best of our knowledge, the CT feature of small bowel obstructions in patients with GCTA has not been reported to date. Here, we present a case of small bowel obstruction in a patient with GCTA caused by extensive tumor infiltration at the terminal ileum and distal ileum.

  3. Radiological aspects of diagnosis and staging of small bowel lymphoma - a case report

    The authors report a case of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the small bowel, presenting with ulcerative lesions on radiological studies. primary intestinal lymphoma is considered a rare entity and its diagnosis criteria are quiet strict. The secondary form of the disease - involvement of the small bowel by systemic lymphoma - constitutes an infrequent clinical presentation of these neoplasms and must be considered when the criteria for primary disease are not fulfilled. Diagnosis is based on small bowel series studies and/or computed tomography findings, but the definitive diagnosis is established by biopsy. (author)

  4. Radiation enteropathy and leucocyte-endothelial cell reactions in a refined small bowel model

    Osman Nadia

    2004-09-01

    recruitment of leucocytes and changes in intestinal microflora in the small bowel after radiotherapy.

  5. Small bowel imaging-- a rapidly changing field and a challenge to radiology.

    Maglinte, Dean D T

    2006-05-01

    There was a time when the small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was the primary method of diagnosing diseases of the small intestine. Enteroclysis was reinvented in the 70's and with the SBFT remained the dominant methods of investigating the mesenteric small intestine to the late 90's. Since the introduction of the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner in 1973, the ability of monoslice CT to diagnose different causes of intestinal obstruction and inflammatory bowel diseases emerged. The introduction of helical CT technology in 1989 and subsequently multichannel CT further changed small bowel imaging. Faster acquisition of a large volume of data with thinner collimation allowed multiplanar reformatting a distinct advantage in evaluating an organ which is longer than wide. The introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with its increased soft tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to acquire ultrafast sequences has made MR imaging an important tool in small bowel imaging (1). PMID:16395533

  6. Small bowel imaging- a rapidly changing field and a challenge to radiology

    There was a time when the small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was the primary method of diagnosing diseases of the small intestine. Enteroclysis was reinvented in the 70's and with the SBFT remained the dominant methods of investigating the mesenteric small intestine to the late 90's. Since the introduction of the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner in 1973, the ability of monoslice CT to diagnose different causes of intestinal obstruction and inflammatory bowel diseases emerged. The introduction of helical CT technology in 1989 and subsequently multichannel CT further changed small bowel imaging. Faster aquisition of a large volume of data with thinner collimation allowed multiplanar reformatting a distinct advantage in evaluating an organ which is longer than wide. The introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with its increased soft tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to acquire ultrafast sequences has made MR imaging an important tool in small bowel imaging (1). (orig.)

  7. Ultrasound in Crohn's disease of the small bowel

    Objective: The purpose of this work is to prospectively evaluate high resolution ultrasonography with graded compression in the ability to detect Crohn's disease of the small bowel (CDSB) together with its complications and activity signs, compared with enteroclysis, CT and immunoscintigraphy in the mirror of the final diagnosis. Methods and material: In a series of 73 consecutive patients, who were referred for enteroclysis with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc labeled monoclonal antigranulocyte antibody (AGAb) examinations were performed within 10 days from each other. For the final evaluation the diagnosis of CDSB was based on combination of clinical and enteroclysis findings (73 cases) and in 17 cases additional surgical and pathological data were available. The results of other modalities were blinded to the radiologists performing and reading out the exams. The diagnostic values of each modality was assessed also in those 18 patients, who had early Crohn's disease. In the group of 43 patients with proven CDSB who had all the four imaging modalities, the modalities were compared in their ability to demonstrate various pathological conditions related to CD. Increased (>500 ml/min) flow measured by Doppler US in the superior mesenteric artery and increased color signs in the gut wall seen by power Doppler sonography were compared to CDAI. Results: Of the 73 patients the combination of enteroclysis and clinical tests demonstrated CDSB in 47. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasound were 88.4, 93.3 and 90.4%, respectively. Enteroclysis was the most accurate method. CT was more sensitive than US, but less specific. The accuracy of US, CT and scintigraphy were similar. In the group of 18 patients, who had early CDSB, the sensitivity of US decreased to only 67%, CT and scintigraphy had higher values. Intra- and perimural abscesses, and sinus tracts were also more

  8. Radiological assessment of small bowel obstructions: value of conventional enteroclysis and dynamic MR-enteroclysis

    Purpose: To compare small bowel lesions, especially stenoses, with conventional enteroclysis, static MRI and dynamic MR-enteroclysis. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with Crohn's disease or other suspected small bowel lesions were examined. MRI was performed in a static and a dynamic way either within one hour after conventional enteroclysis (n = 30) or a few days afterwards (n = 12). In order to monitor bowel filling and to characterize stenoses in a dynamic fashion, 4 series of coronal T2w HASTE breath hold sequences were used, first without additional bowel opacification and then during administration of 1,5 l methyl cellulose via a naso-intestinal tube in the MR unit. Intravenously applied Buscopan was used to reduce bowel movement. Results: In 4 out of 42 Patients, application of methylcellulose was limited to 1000 ml because of gastrointestinal complaints or visible gastral reflux. All patients could be evaluated. Static MRI performed within one hour after conventional enteroclysis and no additional bowel opacification showed insufficient bowel distension. Distension was still better than in MRI without prior application of contrast medium. On the contrary, dynamic MR - enteroclysis lead to controlled and complete bowel distension which allowed for significantly better evaluation of normal bowel anatomy and pathological alterations of the gut. Because of a better bowel distension and dynamic evaluation, MR-enteroclysis revealed significantly more stenoses (n = 42) than MRI obtained with less distension (n = 27, p < 0.001), and characterization of lesions was comparable to conventional enteroclysis (p < 0.001). Fixed and non-fixed stenoses could be differentiated by dynamic MR-enteroclysis. Furthermore, extraluminal complication of Crohn's disease such as abscesses and fistulae or large bowel manifestation of disease were shown in 13 patients. (orig.)

  9. The effect of obesity levels on irradiated small bowel volume in belly board with small bowel displacement device for rectal cancer radiotherapy

    Kim, Se Young; Kim, Joo Ho; Park, Hyo Kuk; Cho, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    For radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients treated with small bowel displacement device (SBDD) and belly board, We will suggest new indication of using SBDD depending on obesity index by analyzing correlation between obesity and irradiated small bowel volume. In this study, We reviewed 29 rectal cancer patients who received pelvic radiation therapy with belly board and SBDD from January to April in 2012. We only analyzed those patients treated with three-field technique (PA and both LAT) on 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fx). We measured patients' height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and divided BMI into two groups.(≥23:BMI=group 1, <23:BMI=group 2) We performed a statistical analysis to evaluate correlation between total volume of bladder (TV{sub bldder}), obesity index and high dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 90% of prescribed dose, HDV{sub sb}), low dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 33% of prescribed dose, LDV{sub sb}). The result shows, gender, WHR and status of pre operative or post operative do not greatly affect HDV{sub sb} and LDV{sub sb}. Statistical result shows, there are significant correlation between HDV{sub sb} and BMI (p<0.04), HDV{sub sb} and TV{sub bladder} (p<0.01), LDV{sub sb} and TV{sub bladder} (p<0.01). BMI seems to correlate with HDV{sub sb} but does not with LDV{sub sb} (p>0.05). There are negative correlation between HDV{sub sb} and BMI, TV{sub bladder} and HDV{sub sb}, TV{sub bladder} and LDV{sub sb} . Especially, BMI group1 has more effective and negative correlation with HDV{sub sb} (p=0.027) than in BMI group 2. In the case of BMI group 1, TV{sub bladder} has significant negative correlation with HDV{sub sb} and LDV{sub sb} (p<0.04). In conclusions, we confirmed that Using SBDD with belly board in BMI group 1 could more effectively reduce irradiated small bowel volume in radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Therefore, We suggest using belly board with SBDD in order

  10. The effect of obesity levels on irradiated small bowel volume in belly board with small bowel displacement device for rectal cancer radiotherapy

    For radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients treated with small bowel displacement device (SBDD) and belly board, We will suggest new indication of using SBDD depending on obesity index by analyzing correlation between obesity and irradiated small bowel volume. In this study, We reviewed 29 rectal cancer patients who received pelvic radiation therapy with belly board and SBDD from January to April in 2012. We only analyzed those patients treated with three-field technique (PA and both LAT) on 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fx). We measured patients' height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and divided BMI into two groups.(≥23:BMI=group 1, <23:BMI=group 2) We performed a statistical analysis to evaluate correlation between total volume of bladder (TVbldder), obesity index and high dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 90% of prescribed dose, HDVsb), low dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 33% of prescribed dose, LDVsb). The result shows, gender, WHR and status of pre operative or post operative do not greatly affect HDVsb and LDVsb. Statistical result shows, there are significant correlation between HDVsb and BMI (p<0.04), HDVsb and TVbladder (p<0.01), LDVsb and TVbladder (p<0.01). BMI seems to correlate with HDVsb but does not with LDVsb (p>0.05). There are negative correlation between HDVsb and BMI, TVbladder and HDVsb, TVbladder and LDVsb . Especially, BMI group1 has more effective and negative correlation with HDVsb (p=0.027) than in BMI group 2. In the case of BMI group 1, TVbladder has significant negative correlation with HDVsb and LDVsb (p<0.04). In conclusions, we confirmed that Using SBDD with belly board in BMI group 1 could more effectively reduce irradiated small bowel volume in radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Therefore, We suggest using belly board with SBDD in order to reduce the small bowel toxicity in rectal radiotherapy, if patients' BMI is above 23

  11. Small bowel capsule endoscopy: Where are we after almost15 years of use?

    Cedric Van de Bruaene; Danny De Looze; Pieter Hindryckx

    2015-01-01

    The development of capsule endoscopy (CE) in 2001has given gastroenterologists the opportunity toinvestigate the small bowel in a non-invasive way. CE ismost commonly performed for obscure gastrointestinalbleeding, but other indications include diagnosis orfollow-up of Crohn's disease, suspicion of a smallbowel tumor, diagnosis and surveillance of hereditarypolyposis syndromes, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatorydrug-induced small bowel lesions and celiac disease.Almost fifteen years have passed since the release ofthe small bowel capsule. The purpose of this reviewis to offer the reader a brief but complete overviewon small bowel CE anno 2014, including the technicaland procedural aspects, the possible complications andthe most important indications. We will end with somefuture perspectives of CE.

  12. A concealed small bowel perforation in an adult secondary to bicycle handlebar trauma

    Nolan, GJ; Simpson, RR

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH) secondary to bicycle handlebar is a rare injury. The majority of the literature describes abdominal wall herniation in children. We present a rare case of TAWH in an adult with a concealed small bowel perforation. Although clinical examination in conjunction with computed tomography can exclude the majority of solid organ injuries, small bowel injuries can often be missed. Our case initially revealed a serosal tear in the small bowel but, on close inspection, a separate 3mm perforation was identified, hidden in the small bowel mesentery. We strongly support a low threshold for operative intervention if there is any suspicion. Moreover, we stress the importance of meticulous examination during laparotomy as this injury could have been easily missed, resulting in potential morbidity or mortality in a patient sustaining such an injury. PMID:23676803

  13. Novel single nucleotide polymorphism markers for low dose aspirin-associated small bowel bleeding.

    Akiko Shiotani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aspirin-induced enteropathy is now increasingly being recognized although the pathogenesis of small intestinal damage induced by aspirin is not well understood and related risk factors have not been established. AIM: To investigate pharmacogenomic profile of low dose aspirin (LDA-induced small bowel bleeding. METHODS: Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was performed using the Affymetrix DMET™ Plus Premier Pack. Genotypes of candidate genes associated with small bowel bleeding were determined using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay kits and direct sequencing. RESULTS: In the validation study in overall 37 patients with small bowel bleeding and 400 controls, 4 of 27 identified SNPs: CYP4F11 (rs1060463 GG (p=0.003, CYP2D6 (rs28360521 GG (p=0.02, CYP24A1 (rs4809957 T allele (p=0.04, and GSTP1 (rs1695 G allele (p=0.04 were significantly more frequent in the small bowel bleeding group compared to the controls. After adjustment for significant factors, CYP2D6 (rs28360521 GG (OR 4.11, 95% CI. 1.62 -10.4 was associated with small bowel bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: CYP4F11 and CYP2D6 SNPs may identify patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced small bowel bleeding.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sofia Children' s Hospital, First Department of Paediatrics, Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and {tau}2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  15. Transstomal Small Bowel Evisceration after Colonic Perforation Secondary to Ischemic Colitis

    Ali Guner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stomas are commonly used in a temporary or permanent fashion in gastrointestinal surgeries. The complication rate of stomas has been reported to vary between 23 and 50%. There is only one case in the literature involving transstomal small bowel evisceration following colonic perforation. In this paper, we aimed to present a patient with a perforated colon secondary to ischemic colitis, which resulted in small bowel evisceration through this perforation site.

  16. Transstomal Small Bowel Evisceration after Colonic Perforation Secondary to Ischemic Colitis

    Ali Guner; Izzettin Kahraman; Omer Faruk Ozkan; Adem Aktas; Can Kece

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal stomas are commonly used in a temporary or permanent fashion in gastrointestinal surgeries. The complication rate of stomas has been reported to vary between 23 and 50%. There is only one case in the literature involving transstomal small bowel evisceration following colonic perforation. In this paper, we aimed to present a patient with a perforated colon secondary to ischemic colitis, which resulted in small bowel evisceration through this perforation site.

  17. JEJUNAL ANGIOFIBROMA AS AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF SMALL BOWELL INTUSSUSCEPTION IN ADULT - CASE REPORT

    C.N. Neacsu; D. Vintila; Paula Popa; D. Ferariu; Felicia Crumpei

    2005-01-01

    Adult intussusception represents only about 5% of all intussusceptions and is usually caused by a small bowel tumor acting as the apex of invagination. We report an unusual case in a 57-years-old woman with intussusception caused by a tumor located in the jejunum. We performed jejunal resection with end-to-end anastomosis. Histologically the diagnosis was angiofibroma with mixoid areas, without malign aspects. Benign tumors of the small bowell are rare clinical entities and angiofibroma is a ...

  18. Evidence for peptidoglycan absorption in rats with experimental small bowel bacterial overgrowth.

    Lichtman, S N; Keku, J; Schwab, J. H.; Sartor, R B

    1991-01-01

    Surgical creation of jejunal self-filling blind loops (SFBL) causes small bowel bacterial overgrowth which is associated with hepatobiliary inflammation in the susceptible Lewis and Wistar rat strains. Since hepatic injury occurs when small bowel anaerobic bacterial concentrations are increased 4 to 6 log10 units per ml and hepatic bacterial cultures are negative, we postulate that the inflammation is caused by absorption of phlogistic cell wall polymers originating from bacteria within the l...

  19. Small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoar formation within meckel diverticulum: CT findings

    Frazzini, V.I. Jr.; English, W.J.; Bashist, B.; Moore, E. [Columbia Univ. College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Intestinal obstruction due to a phytobezoar within a Meckel diverticulum is exceedingly rare, with only seven reported cases in the surgical literature. The most important precipitating factor is the ingestion of agents high in fiber and cellulose. Small bowel obstruction in all but one case was due to retrograde propagation of the bezoar into the small bowel lumen. We report the clinical and CT findings in such a patient following a vegetarian diet. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Whipple's disease demonstrated by double contrast small bowel enema with barium and methylcellulose

    The radiologic findings on small bowel enema examination using barium and methylcellulose (SBE+Ba+MC) in a patient with Whipple's disease before and after treatment are described. The changes on SBE+Ba+MC corresponded well to the clinical and morphologic picture. The advantages of this double contrast technique compared to the enteroclysis with barium alone are demonstrated. The SBE+Ba+MC is a good method to demonstrate the manifestations of Whipple's disease involving the small bowel and the mesentery. (orig.)

  1. Ultrasonographic findings of ascaris in the small bowel: A case report

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University college of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Jin [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University college of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Soo [Keimyung University college of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Ascariasis is one of the most common helminthic disease worldwide and evoked variable clinical manifestations by the migration of worm in the alimentary and biliary tract. The ultrasonographic detection of ascaris in the small bowel is relatively difficult, and no report on the ultrasonographic findings have been published in Korea. On abdominal ultrasonography, ascaris is seen as an intraluminal tubular structure with 4 linear echogenic stripes and movement. We report a case of ascaris in the small bowel detected by abdominal ultrasonography.

  2. Ultrasonographic findings of ascaris in the small bowel: A case report

    Ascariasis is one of the most common helminthic disease worldwide and evoked variable clinical manifestations by the migration of worm in the alimentary and biliary tract. The ultrasonographic detection of ascaris in the small bowel is relatively difficult, and no report on the ultrasonographic findings have been published in Korea. On abdominal ultrasonography, ascaris is seen as an intraluminal tubular structure with 4 linear echogenic stripes and movement. We report a case of ascaris in the small bowel detected by abdominal ultrasonography.

  3. Non-emergency small bowel obstruction: assessment of CT findings that predict need for surgery

    To identify CT findings predictive of surgical management in non-emergency small bowel obstruction (SBO). Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT of 129 patients with non-emergency SBO were evaluated for small bowel luminal diameter, wall thickness, presence of the small bowel faeces sign (intraluminal particulate matter in a dilated small bowel) and length, transition point, submucosal oedema, mesenteric stranding, ascites and degree of obstruction (low grade partial, high grade partial and complete obstruction). Medical records were reviewed for age, gender, management and history of abdominal surgery, abdominal malignancy, or SBO. Statistical analyses were performed with Stata Release 9.2. Degree of obstruction was the only predictor of need for surgery. Whereas 18.0% of patients with low-grade partial obstruction (n = 50) underwent surgery, 32.5% of patients with high-grade partial obstruction (n = 77) and 100% of patients with complete obstruction (n = 2) required surgery (P = 0.004). The small bowel faeces sign was inversely predictive of surgery (P = 0.018). In non-emergency SBO patients with contrast-enhanced CT imaging, grade of obstruction predicts surgery, while the small bowel faeces sign inversely predicts need for surgery. (orig.)

  4. Developing a new measure of small bowel peristalsis with dynamic MR: a proof of concept study

    Farghal, Aser; Kasmai, Bahman; Malcolm, Paul N.; Toms, Andoni P. [Dept. of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich Univ. Hospital NHS Trust, Norwich (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andoni.toms@nnuh.nhs.uk; Graves, Martin J. [Univ. Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Background. Small bowel peristalsis is a complex of many individual motion elements. Although each element of peristalsis can be measured there is no current global measure of peristalsis. Purpose. To examine the feasibility of automated computerized assessment of global small bowel motility using simple computational methods. Material and Methods. Coronal dynamic MR images were obtained from five healthy volunteers who had fasted for 9 h and drunk 1.5 L of water. Images were taken using single breath-hold and ECG triggering. Acquisitions were repeated at 10 and 20 min after an intramuscular injection of hyoscine butylbromide. Parametric maps were generated representing the mean change in signal amplitude (MSA) per voxel for each dynamic acquisition. Two observers independently assessed thresholding for optimal segmentation of small bowel from other sources of signal. Total voxel activity (TVA) for each study was calculated as a sum of MSA per slice and whole examination and TVA profiles were generated. Results. Independent observations suggest that the automated segmentation method described usefully segments small bowel activity from other signal. Small bowel movement represented as TVA varied three-fold in the five volunteers and was inhibited by anti-muscarinic injection. Conclusion. It is possible to develop a new measure, based on automated segmentation of mean signal amplitude changes, of small bowel peristalsis using dynamic MR.

  5. A potential association between exposure to hepatitis B virus and small bowel adenocarcinoma.

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M; Mehta, Mamta; Ludwig, Emmy

    2016-06-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has never been described as a risk factor for small bowel adenocarcinoma, although infection is a known risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. From May 2009 to December 2014, we implemented an institution-wide screening program for hepatitis B viral serologies prior to starting chemotherapy. Evidence of exposure [hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positivity in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity] was highest in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (21.1%), followed by small bowel cancer (12.5%). The small bowel adenocarcinoma cases with anti-HBc positivity were reviewed. Special attention was paid to known risk factors for small bowel cancers. One patient had a diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). However, the other patients had no genetic syndromes, history of inflammatory bowel disease or other chronic inflammation to explain their risk. We postulate exposure to bile acids, tumorigenesis of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and/or damage to the intestinal mucosa secondary to HBV exposure/infection as potential mechanisms for development of small bowel adenocarcinoma. More research is warranted to further elucidate this association. PMID:27284484

  6. Role of computed tomography angiography in detection and staging of small bowel carcinoid tumors

    David; Bonekamp; Siva; P; Raman; Karen; M; Horton; Elliot; K; Fishman

    2015-01-01

    Small-bowel carcinoid tumors are the most common form(42%) of gastrointestinal carcinoids, which by themselves comprise 70% of neuroendocrine tumors. Although primary small bowel neoplasms are overall rare(3%-6% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms), carcinoids still represent the second most common(20%-30%) primary small-bowel malignancy after small bowel adenocarcinoma. Their imaging evaluation is often challenging. State-of-the-art high-resolution multiphasic computed tomography together with advanced postprocessing methods provides an excellent tool for their depiction. The manifold interactive parameter choices however require knowledge of when to use which technique. Here, we discuss the imaging appearance and evaluation of duodenal, jejunal and ileal carcinoid tumors, including the imaging features of the primary tumor, locoregional mesenteric nodal metastases, and distant metastatic disease. A protocol for optimal lesion detection is presented, including the use of computed tomography enterography, volume acquisition, computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional mapping. Imaging findings are illustrated with a series of challenging cases which illustrate the spectrum of possible disease in the small bowel and mesentery, the range of possible appearances in the bowel itself on multiphase data and extraluminal findings such as the desmoplastic reaction in mesentery and hypervascular liver metastases. Typical imaging pitfalls and pearls are illustrated.

  7. Role of computed tomography angiography in detection and staging of small bowel carcinoid tumors.

    Bonekamp, David; Raman, Siva P; Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-09-28

    Small-bowel carcinoid tumors are the most common form (42%) of gastrointestinal carcinoids, which by themselves comprise 70% of neuroendocrine tumors. Although primary small bowel neoplasms are overall rare (3%-6% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms), carcinoids still represent the second most common (20%-30%) primary small-bowel malignancy after small bowel adenocarcinoma. Their imaging evaluation is often challenging. State-of-the-art high-resolution multiphasic computed tomography together with advanced postprocessing methods provides an excellent tool for their depiction. The manifold interactive parameter choices however require knowledge of when to use which technique. Here, we discuss the imaging appearance and evaluation of duodenal, jejunal and ileal carcinoid tumors, including the imaging features of the primary tumor, locoregional mesenteric nodal metastases, and distant metastatic disease. A protocol for optimal lesion detection is presented, including the use of computed tomography enterography, volume acquisition, computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional mapping. Imaging findings are illustrated with a series of challenging cases which illustrate the spectrum of possible disease in the small bowel and mesentery, the range of possible appearances in the bowel itself on multiphase data and extraluminal findings such as the desmoplastic reaction in mesentery and hypervascular liver metastases. Typical imaging pitfalls and pearls are illustrated. PMID:26435774

  8. Temsirolimus therapy and small bowel perforation in a pediatric patient with Clostridium septicum bacteremia

    Melissa Anne Herrin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Temsirolimus has been demonstrated to result in significant disease stabilization in children with high-grade glioma, neuroblastoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. While mucositis has been reported as a common adverse effect of temsirolimus therapy in adult and pediatric patients, bowel perforation is an infrequent and life-threatening side effect of temsirolimus in adults and has not previously been reported in children. We present a child treated with temsirolimus for recurrent metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma who underwent ileocecectomy and small bowel resection for perforation with frank necrosis. His presentation was complicated by Clostridium septicum infection, a rare, frequently fatal, gastrointestinal pathogen associated with malignancy and bowel ischemia.

  9. Molecular Analysis for Differential Diagnosis of Small Bowel Obstruction: Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Diamine Oxidase Activity

    Akimoto, Teruyuki; Takada, Moriatsu; Ichihara, Takao; Kuroda, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Background: A small bowel obstruction is classified as simple (nonstrangulated) or strangulated. The early recognition with correct diagnosis of small bowel obstruction is a critical issue as the release from strangulation requires surgical emergency. Methods: To evaluate the physiological effect on small bowel obstruction, a metallic ring was put in the small intestine (simple ileus) and a loop obstruction was made with keeping the blood flow (strangulated obstruction). Serum level of cytoki...

  10. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences

  11. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C. [Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences.

  12. Adhesive mounting device for small objects

    A fixture for mounting small parts, such as laser fusion target spheres or microelectronic components is described. It consists of a glass stalk drawn and truncated near its tip. The truncated end of the glass stalk is dipped into silicone rubber forming an extending streamer. After the rubber cures for approximately 24 hours, a small part is touched to the streamer, and will be held securely throughout processing. The streamer may be formed about a carbon fibre or may be free-standing. (author)

  13. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Stomach and Small Bowel

    Published data suggest that the risk of moderately severe (≥Grade 3) radiation-induced acute small-bowel toxicity can be predicted with a threshold model whereby for a given dose level, D, if the volume receiving that dose or greater (VD) exceeds a threshold quantity, the risk of toxicity escalates. Estimates of VD depend on the means of structure segmenting (e.g., V15 = 120 cc if individual bowel loops are outlined or V45 = 195 cc if entire peritoneal potential space of bowel is outlined). A similar predictive model of acute toxicity is not available for stomach. Late small-bowel/stomach toxicity is likely related to maximum dose and/or volume threshold parameters qualitatively similar to those related to acute toxicity risk. Concurrent chemotherapy has been associated with a higher risk of acute toxicity, and a history of abdominal surgery has been associated with a higher risk of late toxicity.

  14. Small bowel obstruction and abdominal pain after robotic versus open radical prostatectomy.

    Lundström, Karl-Johan; Folkvaljon, Yasin; Loeb, Stacy; Axelson, Anna Bill; Stattin, Pär; Nordin, Pär

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine whether intraperitoneal robot-assisted surgery leads to small bowel obstruction (SBO), possibly caused by the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and methods In total, 7256 men treated by intraperitoneal robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and 9787 men treated by retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) in 2005-2012 were identified in the Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the risk of readmission for SBO, SBO-related surgery and admissions due to abdominal pain up to 5 years postoperatively. Results During the first postoperative year, the risk of readmission for SBO was higher after RARP than after RRP [hazard ratio (HR) 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-3.25] but after 5 years there was no significant difference (HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.86-1.91), and there was no difference in the risk of SBO surgery during any period. The risk of admission for abdominal pain was significantly increased after RARP during the first year (HR 2.24, 95% CI 1.50-3.33) but not after 5 years (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.92-1.63). Conclusion Intraperitoneal RARP had an increased risk of SBO and abdominal pain in the short term during the first year, but not in the long term, compared to RRP. PMID:26936203

  15. Ghrelin and glucagon-like peptide-2 increase immediately following massive small bowel resection

    MUTO, Mitsuru; Kaji, Tatsuru; MUKAI, Motoi; NAKAME, Kazuhiko; Yoshioka, Takako; Tanimoto, Akihide; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; ムトウ, ミツル; カジ, タツル; ムカイ, モトイ; ナカメ, カズヒコ; ヨシオカ, タカコ; タニモト, アキヒデ; マツフジ, ヒロシ; 武藤, 充

    2013-01-01

    Children with short bowel syndrome face life-threatening complications. Therefore, there is an urgent need for a new therapy to induce effective adaptation of the remnant intestine. Adaptation occurs only during feeding. We focused on preprandial acyl ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin, and postprandial glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), which are known to have active orexigenic and trophic actions. This study aims to clarify the secretion trends of these hormones after massive small bowel resection ...

  16. Spectrum of imaging findings on MDCT enterography in patients with small bowel tuberculosis

    Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is the sixth most common extrapulmonary site of involvement. The sites of involvement in abdominal tuberculosis, in descending order of frequency, are lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity, and gastrointestinal tract. The radiological armamentarium for evaluating tuberculosis of the small bowel (SBTB) includes barium studies (small bowel follow-through, SBFT), CT (multidetector CT, CT enterography, and CT enteroclysis), ultrasound (sonoenteroclysis), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; enterography and enteroclysis). In this review, we illustrate the abnormalities at MDCT enterography in 20 consecutive patients with SB TB and also describe extraluminal findings in these patients. MDCT enterography allows non-invasive good-quality assessment of well-distended bowel loops and the adjacent soft tissues. It displays the thickness and enhancement of the entire bowel wall in all three planes and allows examination of all bowel loops, especially the ileal loops, which are mostly superimposed. The terminal ileum and ileocaecal junction are the most common sites of small bowel involvement in intestinal TB. The most common abnormality is short-segment strictures with symmetrical concentric mural thickening and homogeneous mural enhancement. Other findings include lymphadenopathy, ascites, enteroliths, peritoneal thickening, and enhancement. In conclusion, MDCT enterography is a comprehensive technique for the evaluation of SB TB

  17. Complete small bowel obstruction secondary to transomental herniation in pregnancy

    Katawala, Tasneem; Hamlyn, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    During pregnancy, abdominal pain can be caused by both obstetric and non-obstetric causes. Non-obstetric causes of severe abdominal pain during pregnancy must always be considered. Complete bowel obstruction caused by an internal hernia is rare in obstetric surgical patients. Delays in diagnosis can occur due to non-specific signs and symptoms which can be present in normal pregnancy, and a reluctance to operate on the pregnant patient. Prompt diagnosis and early surgical intervention is the ...

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of small bowel atresia: A case report

    Jamal A; Mesdaghi Nia S

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we report a case of jejunal atresia that was detected pre-nataly. Polyhydramnios and multiple dilated bowel loops in the lower part of fetal abdomen in ulterasonography helped us to diagnose this abnormality. Post-natal barium enema showed it and also it was confirmed by laparotomy confirmed it. Pre-natal diagnosis is important in these cases to facilitate delivery in centers where expert team of specialists are available to allow optimal neonatal care.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of small bowel atresia: A case report

    Jamal A

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report a case of jejunal atresia that was detected pre-nataly. Polyhydramnios and multiple dilated bowel loops in the lower part of fetal abdomen in ulterasonography helped us to diagnose this abnormality. Post-natal barium enema showed it and also it was confirmed by laparotomy confirmed it. Pre-natal diagnosis is important in these cases to facilitate delivery in centers where expert team of specialists are available to allow optimal neonatal care.

  20. Lymphangioma of the small bowel mesentery: A case report and review of the literature

    Worapop Suthiwartnarueput

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioma is a rare benign condition characterized by proliferation of lymphatic spaces. It is usually found in the head and neck of affected children. Lymphangioma of the small-bowel mesentery is rare, having been reported for less than 1% of all lymphangiomas. Importantly, it can cause fatal complications such as volvulus or involvement of the main branch of the mesenteric arteries, requiring emergency surgery. Moreover, the gross and histopathologic findings may resemble benign multicystic mesothelioma and lymphangiomyoma. Immunohistochemical study for factor VIII-related antigen, D2-40, calretinin and human melanoma black-45 (HMB-45 are essential for diagnosis. Factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 are positive in lymphangioma but negative in benign multicystic mesothelioma. HMB-45 shows positive study in the smooth-muscle cells around the lymphatic spaces of the lymphangiomyoma. We report a case of small-bowel volvulus induced by mesenteric lymphangioma in a 2-year-and-9-mo-old boy who presented with rapid abdominal distension and vomiting. The abdominal computed tomography scan showed a multiseptated mass at the right lower quadrant with a whirl-like small-bowel dilatation, suggestive of a mesenteric cyst with midgut volvulus. The intraoperative findings revealed a huge, lobulated, yellowish pink, cystic mass measuring 20 cm × 20 cm × 10 cm, that was originated from the small bowel mesentery with small-bowel volvulus and small-bowel dilatation. Cut surface of the mass revealed multicystic spaces containing a milky white fluid. The patient underwent tumor removal with small-bowel resection and end-to-end anastomosis. Microscopic examination revealed that the cystic walls were lined with flat endothelial cells and comprised of smooth muscle in the walls. The flat endothelial cells were positive for factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 but negative for calretinin. HMB-45 showed negative study in the smooth-muscle cells around the

  1. Contrast-Enhanced Cross Sectional Imaging and Capsule Endoscopy: New Perspectives for a Whole Picture of the Small Bowel

    Pedro Boal Carvalho; José Cotter

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel evaluation is a challenging task and has been revolutionized by high-quality contrasted sectional imaging (CT enterography - CTE) and magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) as well as by small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE). The decision of which technique to employ during the investigation of small bowel diseases is not always simple or straightforward. Moreover, contraindications may preclude the use of these techniques in some patients, and although they are noninvasive proce...

  2. X-ray findings of small bowel taeniasis: A clinical and experimental study

    Kim, Hong Soo; Kang, Hee Woong; Bahk, Yong Whee [St Mary' s Hospital Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1972-12-15

    Unlike ascariasis of the small bowel, taeniasis can be detected radiologically with much difficulty because of the basic difference between the morphological features of each helminth. However once the characteristics of tape worms are appreciated and kept in mind, radiological diagnosis is fairly accurately made. In the present study we have reported typical radiological features of the small bowel taeniasis as observed in 6 adults patients seen at the Department of Radiology of St. Mary's Hospital and Holy Family Hospital, Catholic Medical College. Tapering tape-like or ribbon -like radiolucent shadows in distal small bowel appear unique. Compression spot film study of the ileum is most important in revealing such findings. An animal experiment using the swine small intestine and parasitological specimen of evacuated worm of taenia saginata was designed to help understand radiological manifestation in vivo.

  3. X-ray findings of small bowel taeniasis: A clinical and experimental study

    Unlike ascariasis of the small bowel, taeniasis can be detected radiologically with much difficulty because of the basic difference between the morphological features of each helminth. However once the characteristics of tape worms are appreciated and kept in mind, radiological diagnosis is fairly accurately made. In the present study we have reported typical radiological features of the small bowel taeniasis as observed in 6 adults patients seen at the Department of Radiology of St. Mary's Hospital and Holy Family Hospital, Catholic Medical College. Tapering tape-like or ribbon -like radiolucent shadows in distal small bowel appear unique. Compression spot film study of the ileum is most important in revealing such findings. An animal experiment using the swine small intestine and parasitological specimen of evacuated worm of taenia saginata was designed to help understand radiological manifestation in vivo

  4. Auxiliary en-bloc liver-small bowel transplantation with partial pancreas preservation in pigs

    Zhen-Yu Yin; Xiao-Dong Ni; Feng Jiang; Ning Li; You-Sheng Li; Xiao-Ming Wang; Jie-Shou Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe an auxiliary combined liver-small bowel transplantation model with the preservation of duodenum, head of pancreas and hepatic biliary system in pigs. The technique, feasibility, security and immunosuppression were commented.METHODS: Forty outbred long-white pigs were randomized into two groups, and the auxiliary composite liver/small bowel allotransplantations were undertaken in 10 long-white pigs in each group with the recipient liver preserved.Group A was not treated with immunosuppressive drugs while group B was treated with cyclosporine A and methylprednisolone after operation. The hemodynamic changes and amylase of body fluid (including blood, urine and abdominal drain) were analyzed.RESULTS: The average survival time of the animals was 10±1.929 d (6 to 25 d) in group A while more than 30 d in group B. The pigs could tolerate the hemodynamic fluctuation during operation and the hemodynamic parameters recovered to normal 2 h after blood reperfusion. The transient high amylase level was decreased to normal one week after operation and autopsy showed no pancreatitis.CONCLUSION: Auxiliary en-bloc liver-small bowel transplantation with partial pancreas preservation is a feasible and safe model with simplified surgical techniques for composite liver/small bowel transplantation. This model may be used as a preclinical training model for clinical transplantation method, clinical liver-small bowel transplantation related complication research, basic research including immunosuppressive treatment, organ preservation, acute rejection, chronic rejection, immuno-tolerance and xenotransplantation.

  5. CT findings in acute small bowel diverticulitis; Computertomographie bei akuter Duenndarmdivertikulitis

    Ferstl, F.J.; Obert, R. [Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinisches Zentrum (RNZ) am St. Theresienkrankenhaus Nuernberg (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Small bowel diverticulitis is a rare cause of an acute abdomen. Originating from acquired diverticula of the jejunum, less often of the ileum, or Meckel diverticulum, the symptoms are non-specific, simulating other acute inflammatory disorders, such as appendicitis, cholecystitis or colonic diverticulitis. The diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis is solely based on radiologic findings, with computed tomography (CT) regarded as the method of choice. In recent years, a number of case reports have described the spectrum of the CT features in acute small bowel diverticulitis and its dependence on the severity of the inflammatory process. Typical findings are an inflamed diverticulum, inflammatory mesenteric infiltration, extraluminal gas collection and mural edema of adjacent small bowel loops with resultant separation of bowel loops. An enterolith is rarely found in an inflamed diverticulum. Complications include abscesses, fistulae, small bowel obstruction and free perforation with peritonitis. Small bowel diverticulitis can be a diagnostic problem if it involves the terminal ileum or Meckel's diverticulum. For preoperative confirmation of the presumed diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis on CT, an enteroclysis for acquired diverticula or a technetium scan for Meckel's diverticulum should be performed. We present the CT findings in three patients of acute small bowel diverticulitis, two affecting the jejunum and one a Meckel's diverticulum. (orig.) [German] Die akute Duenndarmdivertikulitis ist eine seltene Ursache eines akuten Abdomens. Ausgehend von den erworbenen Divertikeln des Jejunums, seltener des Ileums, oder von einem Meckel-Divertikel, manifestiert sich die Divertikulitis klinisch durch eine unspezifische Symptomatik, die zuerst an die haeufigeren, akutentzuendlichen Erkrankungen des Abdomens wie z. B. Appendizitis, Cholezystitis oder Kolondivertikulitis denken laesst. Die Duenndarmdivertikulitis kann praeoperativ nur durch

  6. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Femoral Hernia; Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Akrami, Majid; Karami, MohamamdYasin; Zangouri, Vahid; Deilami, Iman; Maalhagh, Mehrnoush

    2016-01-01

    Femoral hernias account for 2% to 4% of groin hernias, are more common in women, and are more appropriate to present with strangulation and require emergency surgery.This condition may lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction or strangulation and possible bowel resection-anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge, there is few reports of strangulated femoral hernia.We herein present an 82-year-old lady who presented with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On examination, the patient had a generalized tenderness and distention. The working diagnosis at this time was a bowel obstruction. A computed tomography scan revealed the hernia occurring medial to the femoral vessels and below the inguinal ligament .Laparotomy was performed and patient was treated successfully with surgical therapy.Herniawas repaired and a small bowel resection was performed with end to end anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was doing well at a 12-month follow-up visit. Obstructing femoral hernia of the small bowel is rare and the physician should suspect femoral hernia as a bowel obstruction cause. PMID:27162928

  7. Contrast radiography in small bowel obstruction. A randomized trial of barium sulfate and a nonionic low-osmolar contrast medium

    Thirty-six adult patients clinically suspected of small bowel obstruction underwent small bowel contrast radiography with either barium sulfate or a nonionic low-osmolar contrast medium after randomization. Films were taken after 2, 4, and 8 hours and later when needed. No difference as regards visualization and diagnostic quality was found between the 2 media. It is concluded that a nonionic low-osmolar contrast medium is an alternative to barium sulfate for small bowel contrast radiography where small bowel obstruction is suspected. (orig.)

  8. Capsule endoscopy retention as a helpful tool in the management of a young patient with suspected small-bowel disease

    Chryssostomos Kalantzis; Periklis Apostolopoulos; Panagiota Mavrogiannis; Dimitrios Theodorou; Xenofon Papacharalampous; Ioannis Bramis; Nikolaos Kalantzis

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is an easy and painless procedure permitting visualization of the entire small-bowel during its normal peristalsis. However, important problems exist concerning capsule retention in patients at risk of small bowel obstruction. The present report describes a young patient who had recurrent episodes of overt gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin, 18 years after small bowel resection in infancy for ileal atresia.Capsule endoscopy was performed, resulting in capsule retention in the distal small bowel. However, this event contributed to patient management by clearly identifying the site of obstruction and can be used to guide surgical intervention, where an anastomotic ulcer is identified.

  9. Inpatient capsule endoscopy leads to frequent incomplete small bowel examinations

    Cemal Yazici; John Losurdo; Michael D Brown; Scott Oosterveen; Robert Rahimi; Ali Keshavarzian; Leila Bozorgnia

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To examine the predictive factors of capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rate (CECR) including the effect of inpatient and outpatient status.METHODS:We identified 355 consecutive patients who completed CE at Rush University Medical Center between March 2003 and October 2005.Subjects for CE had either nothing by mouth or clear liquids for the afternoon and evening of the day before the procedure.CE exams were reviewed by two physicians who were unaware of the study hypotheses.After retrospective analysis,21 cases were excluded due to capsule malfunction,prior gastric surgery,endoscopic capsule placement or insufficient data.Of the remaining 334 exams [264 out-patient (OP),70 in-patient (IP)],CE indications,findings,location of the patients [IP vs OP and intensive care unit (ICU) vs general medical floor (GMF)] and gastrointestinal transit times were analyzed.Statistical analysis was completed using SPSS version 17 (Chicago,IL).Chi-square,t test or fisher exact-tests were used as appropriate.Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with incomplete CE exams.RESULTS:The mean age for the entire study population was 54.7 years.Sixty-one percent of the study population was female,and gender was not different between IPs vs OPs (P =0.07).The overall incomplete CECR was 14% in our study.Overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGB) was significantly more common for the IP CE (P =0.0001),while abdominal pain and assessment of IBD were more frequent indications for the OP CE exams (P =0.002 and P =0.01,respectively).Occult OGB was the most common indication and arteriovenous malformations were the most common finding both in the IPs and OPs.The capsule did not enter the small bowel (SB) in 6/70 IPs and 8/264OPs (P =0.04).The capsule never reached the cecum in 31.4% (22/70) of IP vs 9.5% (25/ 264) of OP examinations (P < 0.001).The mean gastric transit time (GTT) was delayed in IPs compared to OPs,98.5 ±139.5 min vs 60.4

  10. A combination of small bowel imaging methods: conventional enteroclysis with complementary magnetic resonance enteroclysis

    Akman, C. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Korman, U. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: ugurk9@istanbul.edu.tr; Oguet, G. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Kurugoglu, S. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Urger, E. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Ulus, S. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Esen, G. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Tasci, I. [Department of Surgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    AIM: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the overall findings of conventional enteroclysis (CE) with complementary magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) in small bowel disease. METHODS: The study included 32 patients referred from various clinical departments, with known or suspected small bowel disease and abnormalities on CE. Immediately after CE, true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), and unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences with fat saturation were obtained. Mucosal, mural and luminal changes of the small bowel were evaluated by each technique. In addition, bowel wall thickening, bowel wall enhancement and perienteric changes were assessed by MRE. The radiological findings obtained were evaluated together as a combination, and the role of MRE in the determination of the activity and complications of the small bowel disease was assessed. Radiological findings were correlated with clinical evaluation and follow-up in all cases, including endoscopy in 14 cases and surgery in 5 cases. RESULTS: MRE provided important supplementary mural and extramural information, including degree of pathological wall thickness, mural enhancement pattern associated with disease activity, perivisceral collection, abscess formation, mesenteric fibrofatty proliferation, lymphadenopathy and increase in perienteric vascularity. Short strictures were not revealed on MRE; however, for patients with a history of abdominal malignancy, MRE helped characterize the level of any obstruction and the extent of the disease. CONCLUSION: We recommend MRE for patients who have findings of advanced inflammatory bowel disease or neoplasm on CE examination. The combination of these two techniques can provide important information on the degree and extent of the disorder.

  11. Fecal calprotectin as a biomarker of inflammatory lesions of the small bowel seen by videocapsule endoscopy

    Juan Egea-Valenzuela

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The levels of calprotectin in the stools are proportional to neutrophil activity in the enteric lumen, so fecal calprotectin is a useful intestinal inflammatory biomarker. It is an extended tool as predictor of colonic pathology but there is scare evidence about its utility in the small bowel. Objective: To test the yield of fecal calprotectin to detect lesions in the small bowel. Material and methods: We have retrospectively included 71 patients sent for small bowel capsule endoscopy in study for suspected inflammatory bowel disease. All of them had a determination of fecal calprotectin and had been sent to colonoscopy with no findings. Patients have been divided in groups: A, fecal calprotectin 100 µg/g, and we have analyzed which of them presented inflammatory lesions in capsule endoscopy studies. Results: The rate of patients with signi ficative lesions was 1 out of 10 (10% in group A, 6 out of 24 (25% in group B, and 21 out of 34 (62% in group C. If we consider levels over 50 µg/g pathologic, fecal calprotectin presents sensitivity: 96%, specificity: 23%, NPV: 90% and PPV: 56%. If we consider levels over 100 µg/g pathologic these values are sensitivity: 75%, specificity: 67%, NPV: 79% and PPV: 62%. Conclusions: Fecal calprotectin has high sensitivity but not so good specificity for predicting small bowel lesions after a normal colonoscopy. In daily practice it will be more useful to establish in 100 µg/g the limit to indicate capsule endoscopy studies.

  12. Ethanol inhibition of glucose absorption in isolated, perfused small bowel of rats

    There is evidence for both humans and rats that malnutrition frequently occurs when ethanol is chronically ingested. Small bowel 14C-labelled glucose absorption was measured with an ex vivo system in which the small bowel of the rat was surgically removed and then arterially perfused with an artificial medium. Glucose absorption for a control group of seven rats was 248 +/- 8 microM/min/gm dry weight of small bowel (mean +/- SEM). This was significantly greater than the value 112 +/- 12 microM/min/gm dry weight (P less than 0.005) for a group of five rats in which a competitive inhibitor of glucose absorption, phlorizin (0.2 mM), was added to the bowel lumen. In the presence of 3% ethanol within the gut lumen of five rats, glucose absorption was also reduced (to 131 +/- 12 microM/min/gm dry weight) compared to absorption in the control group (P less than 0.005). The calculated amount of glucose absorbed was corrected for metabolism to lactate and carbon dioxide. We conclude that both phlorizin and ethanol inhibit glucose absorption in the isolated and perfused small bowel of rats and that probably at least part of the malnutrition in ethanol-fed rats is due to glucose malabsorption

  13. Ume (Japanese Apricot-Induced Small Bowel Obstruction with Chronic Radiation Enteritis

    Takuya Hashimoto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Stricture formation is recognized as one of the complications of chronic radiation enteritis. Here, we present a case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with small bowel obstruction 16 years after pelvic irradiation for uterine cancer. Computed tomographic (CT scan of the abdomen demonstrated a 1-cm foreign body in the terminal ileum. Laparotomy revealed a stone of ume (Japanese apricot stuck in an ileal stricture, leading to complete impaction and perforation. She was successfully treated with ileocecal resection and ileocolic anastomosis without any complication. Pathological study revealed that the low compliance caused by fibrosis of the bowel wall prevented the small ume stone from passing through the irradiated ileum. Our case implies the specific risk of food-induced small bowel obstruction in patients with a history of pelvic irradiation.

  14. Small bowel obstruction secondary to migration of a fragment of lithobezoar: a case report.

    Medani, Mekki

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Small bowel obstruction is a common world-wide condition that has a range of etiological factors. The management is largely dependent on the cause of the obstruction. Small bowel obstruction caused by foreign body ingestion is rare; many items have been reported as responsible, but there are no reports implicating polyurethane foam. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 44-year-old Irish male who presented following ingestion of polyurethane foam. He was asymptomatic on presentation but developed a small bowel obstruction shortly thereafter. CONCLUSION: Patients presenting following ingestion of polyurethane foam should be scheduled for elective laparotomy, gastrotomy, and retrieval of the cast on the next available theatre list - given that they are suitable for surgery.

  15. Carcinoid tumors of the small-bowel: Evaluation with 64-section CT-enteroclysis

    Soyer, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.soyer@lrb.aphp.fr [Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Lariboisière - AP-HP, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne-Paris Cité, 10 rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Amboise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Dohan, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.dohan@lrb.aphp.fr [Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Lariboisière - AP-HP, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne-Paris Cité, 10 rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Amboise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Eveno, Clarisse, E-mail: larisse.eveno@lrb.aphp.fr [Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne-Paris Cité, 10 rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Amboise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Department of Digestive Diseases, Hôpital Lariboisière - AP-HP, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); and others

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the imaging presentation of carcinoid tumors of the small-bowel at 64-section CT-enteroclysis and determine the sensitivity of this technique for tumor detection. Patients and methods: The 64-section CT-enteroclysis examinations of 22 patients with histopathologically proven small-bowel carcinoid tumors and those of 6 patients with suspected recurrence after small-bowel resection for carcinoid tumor were reviewed. Images were analyzed with respect to imaging presentation. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, of 64-section CT-enteroclysis for the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the small-bowel were estimated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Twenty-five carcinoid tumors were confirmed in 22 patients (prevalence, 22/28; 79%). Overall sensitivity for carcinoid tumor detection was 76% (19/25; 95%CI: 55–91%) on a per-lesion basis. On a per-patient basis, 64-section CT-enteroclysis had a sensitivity of 86% (19/22; 95%CI: 65–97%), a specificity of 100% (6/6; 95%CI: 54–100%) and an accuracy of 89% (25/28; 95%CI: 72–98%) for the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor. Focal small-bowel wall thickening, mesenteric stranding, and mesenteric mass were found in 20/22 (91%), 18/22 (82%) and 15/22 (68%) patients with pathologically confirmed tumors. Conclusion: 64-Section CT-enteroclysis shows highly suggestive features for the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the small-bowel and achieves high degrees of sensitivity for tumor detection.

  16. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-12-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group.

  17. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Novel Insight in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Evangelos J. Giamarellos Bourboulis; Michalis Tzivras

    2009-01-01

    A total of 65-84% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) presents with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). SIBO is defined as the presence of more than 105 cfu/ml of colonic type bacteria in the lumen of the small bowel. It is more common in patients with IBS and predominant bloating and diarrhea. Based on the implication of SIBO in the pathogenesis of IBS, six trials have been conducted and analyzed in this review aiming to define a role of rifaximin for the management of ...

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: Meaningful association or unnecessary hype

    Uday C Ghoshal; Srivastava, Deepakshi

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, and altered stool form and passage. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which there is overgrowth of bacteria in small bowel in excess of 105 colony forming units per milliliter on culture of the upper gut aspirate. Frequency of SIBO varied from 4%-78% among patients with IBS and from 1%-40% among controls. Higher frequency in some studies might be due to fa...

  19. Ileo-anal pouch necrosis secondary to small bowel volvulus: A case report

    Hewes Jim

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Small bowel volvulus is a rare occurrence in the Western world and its occurrence after ileo-anal ouch formation is even rarer. Case Presentation We report a case of a 26 year old lady who presented with small bowel volvulus and subsequent ischaemia and necrosis of her ileo-anal pouch created 5 years previously. Conclusion This case illustrates a rare but potentially devastating complication of ileo-anal pouch formation and as such the diagnosis should be borne in mind when a patient with a pouch presents with an acute abdomen.

  20. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of small bowel mesentery in associated with cecal cancer: a case report

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sun; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Park, Choog Ki; Park, Dong Woo [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Wook; Oh, Young Ha [Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma is a rare disease that is histopathologically defined as a solitary tumor composed of a monoclonal proliferation of cells with plasmacytic differentiation in an extramedullary site. Most of these tumors occur in the submucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract, and they rarely occur in the small bowel mesentery. We report here on a case of extramedullary plasmacytoma of the small bowel mesentery that was in association with a cecal cancer. Abdominal ultrasound and CT revealed a lobulated soft tissue mass with a cystic portion and peripheral calcification. In this case, the preoperative radiological diagnosis was difficult due to accompanying cecal cancer.

  1. Software-assisted quantitative analysis of small bowel motility compared to manual measurements

    Aim: To validate a newly developed software prototype that automatically analyses small bowel motility by comparing it directly with manual measurement. Material and methods: Forty-five patients with clinical indication for small bowel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were retrospectively included in this institutional review board-approved study. MRI was performed using a 1.5 T system following a standard MR-enterography protocol. Small bowel motility parameters (contractions-per-minute, luminal diameter, amplitude) were measured three times each in identical segments using the manual and the semiautomatic software-assisted method. The methods were compared for agreement, repeatability, and time needed for each measurement. All parameters were compared between the methods. Results: A total of 91 small-bowel segments were analysed. No significant intra-individual difference (p > 0.05) was found for peristaltic frequencies between the methods (mean: 4.14/min manual; 4.22/min software-assisted). Amplitudes (5.14 mm; 5.57 mm) and mean lumen diameters (17.39 mm; 14.68) differed due to systematic differences in the definition of the bowel wall. Mean duration of single measurement was significantly (p < 0.01) shorter with the software (6.25 min; 1.30 min). The scattering of repeated measurements was significantly (p < 0.05) lower using the software. Conclusion: The software-assisted method accomplished highly reliable, fast and accurate measurement of small bowel motility. Measurement precision and duration differed significantly between the two methods in favour of the software-assisted technique

  2. Quantification, validation, and follow-up of small bowel motility in Crohn's disease

    Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Peng, Jennifer Q.; Safdar, Nabile M.; Conklin, Laurie; Sze, Raymond; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has become a mainstay in the evaluation, assessment and follow up of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease (CD), thanks to its high image quality and its non-ionizing nature. In particular, the advent of faster MRE sequences less sensitive to image-motion artifacts offers the possibility to obtain visual, structural and functional information of the patient's small bowel. However, the inherent subjectivity of the mere visual inspection of these images often hinders the accurate identification and monitoring of the pathological areas. In this paper, we present a framework that provides quantitative and objective motility information of the small bowel from free-breathing MRE dynamic sequences. After compensating for the breathing motion of the patient, we create personalized peristaltic activity maps via optical flow analysis. The result is the creation of a new set of images providing objective and precise functional information of the small bowel. The accuracy of the new method was also evaluated from two different perspectives: objective accuracy (1.1 ± 0.6 mm/s of error), i.e., the ability of the system to provide quantitative and accurate information about the motility of moving bowel landmarks, and subjective accuracy (avg. difference of 0.7 ± 0.7 in a range of 1 to 5), i.e., the degree of agreement with the subjective evaluation of an expert. Finally, the practical utility of the new method was successfully evaluated in a preliminary study with 32 studies of healthy and CD cases, showing its potential for the fast and accurate assessment and follow up of CD in the small bowel.

  3. Dislocation of small bowel volume within box pelvic treatment fields, using new 'up down table' device

    Purpose: To present the impact of a novel minimization device, the up down table (UDT), on the volume of small bowel included within a 4-field pelvic irradiation plan. Methods: A polystyrene bowel displacement standard mold was created and added to a customized vacuum cushion (Vac Lok) formed around the abdomen and legs of each patient in the prone position. Two hundred seventy-seven consecutive patients with pelvic malignancies treated with the UDT device were compared with 1 historic series (68 cases) treated at our division. Small bowel contrast dyes at the time of simulation were used in all patients. Results: The average volume of small bowel within the planning target volume (high-dose volume, calculated with Gallagher method) was 100 cm3 (median 49±114) in the series treated with standard box technique and 23 cm3 (median 0±64) in the series treated with the UDT (p3 (median 447±338) and 158 cm3 (median 69±207), respectively (p<0.001). The incidence of G1, G2, and G3 acute enteric toxicity (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria) in the UDT series was 16%, 15%, and 1.5%; in the standard box technique, it was 28%, 25%, and 3%, respectively (p<0.05). The incidence of acute enteric toxicity directly correlated with the irradiated small bowel volume. In the UDT series, the 5-year actuarial incidence of G3 chronic enteric toxicity was 1.8%. The setup procedures, analyzed in 18 cases, revealed no systematic errors and a standard deviation equal to ±5 mm for random errors. Conclusions: The UDT technique is comfortable, inexpensive, highly reproducible, and permits an almost full bowel displacement from standard radiotherapy fields

  4. Metastatic melanoma causing small bowel intussusception: diagnosis by {sup 1}8F-FDG PET/CT

    Souza, Frederico Ferreira de; Johnston, Ciaran [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Brigham and Women' s Hospital. Dana Farber Cancer Institute], e-mail: ffsouza@partners.org; Souza, Felipe Ferreira de; Souza, Daniel Andrade Tinoco de [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (United States). Brigham and Women' s Hospital

    2009-09-15

    Malignant melanoma is a common and aggressive disease that frequently causes metastases to the small bowel. This study illustrates a case of small bowel intussusception secondary to metastatic melanoma visualized at {sup 1}8F-FDG PET/CT in a 48-year-old woman who had this examination for restaging purposes. (author)

  5. The clinical characteristics of 625 patients with malignant small bowel tumors

    俞利结

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of MSBT(malignant small bowel tumors) .Methods Six hundred and twenty-five cases of MSBT were recruited in this study and their clinical records and information including age,gender,blood types,family history,personal

  6. Transient small-bowel intussusceptions in adults: significance of ultrasonographic detection

    Maconi, G. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: giovanni.maconi@unimi.it; Radice, E. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Greco, S. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Bezzio, C. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Bianchi Porro, G. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    Aim: To investigate the frequency, clinical significance, and outcome of small-bowel intussusceptions in adults detected using ultrasound in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: In two different retrospective (January 2001 to April 2003) and prospective (May 2003 to June 2005) periods, 33 small-bowel intussusceptions were found in 32 patients (13 females; mean age: 38.1 years) with known or suspected intestinal disease. Patients underwent diagnostic work-up to assess any organic disease. Patients with self-limiting intussusception were submitted to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. Results: Of the 32 patients with small-bowel intussusception, 25 were identified in the prospective series of 4487 examinations (0.53%) and seven in the retrospective series of 5342 examinations (0.15%; p = 0.002). Four patients had persistent and 28 self-limiting intussusceptions. Self-limiting intussusceptions were idiopathic in 11 patients (39%) or associated with organic diseases in 17 (Crohn's disease in 11 patients, celiac disease in three, ulcerative colitis in one patient, and previous surgery for cancer in two). Self-limiting intussusceptions were asymptomatic in 25% of patients. Conclusion: Small-bowel intussusceptions in adults are not rare and are frequently self-limiting, idiopathic, or related to organic diseases, mainly Crohn's disease and coeliac disease.

  7. Prospective evaluation of small bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate for capsule endoscopy

    Franke, Andreas; Hummel, Frank; Knebel, Phillip; Antoni, Christoph; Böcker, Ulrich; Singer, Manfred V; Löhr, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of Prepacol®, a combination of sodium phosphate and bisacodyl, on transit and quality of capsule endoscopy (CE). METHODS: Fivety two consecutive patients were included in this prospective study. CE was performed following a 12 h fasting period. Twenty six patients were randomized for additional preparation with Prepacol®. The quality of CE was assessed separately for the proximal and the distal small bowel by 3 experienced endoscopists on the basis of a graduation which was initially developed with 20 previous CE. RESULTS: Preparation with Prepacol® accelerated small bowel transit time (262 ± 55 min vs 287 ± 97 min), but had no effect on the quality of CE. Visibility was significantly reduced in the distal compared to the proximal small bowel. CONCLUSION: The significantly reduced visibility of CE in the distal small bowel allocates the need for a good preparation. Since Prepacol® has no beneficial effect on CE the modality of preparation and the ideal time of application remains unclear. Further standardized examinations are necessary to identify sufficient preparation procedures and to determine the impact of the volume of the preparation solution. PMID:18395907

  8. Use of a preparation of galactomannane for translucent small bowel presentation

    An improvement of radiological small bowel examination is achieved by a specially composed contrast medium, the use of a galactomannane based non methylcellulose containing distention medium and a specially adapted instillation technique. The distention of the terminal ileum can be supported pharmacologically by ceruletid. (orig.)

  9. Herpes simplex colitis in a child with combined liver and small bowel transplant.

    Delis, S; Kato, T; Ruiz, P; Mittal, N; Babinski, L; Tzakis, A

    2001-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has been a rare cause of gastrointestinal (GI) infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. A variety of GI sites may be involved; however, only three reported cases of HSV colitis have been documented in the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HSV colitis in a small bowel transplant recipient. PMID:11560759

  10. NSAID-induced deleterious effects on the proximal and mid small bowel in seronegative spondyloarthropathy patients

    Mihai Rimba(s); M(a)d(a)lina Marinescu; Mihail Radu Voiosu; Cristian R(a)svan B(a)icu(s); Simona Caraiola; Adriana Nicolau; Doina Ni(t)escu; Georgeta Camelia Badea; Magda Ileana P(a)rvu

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the small bowel of seronegative spondyloarthropathy (SpA) patients in order to ascertain the presence of mucosal lesions. METHODS:Between January 2008 and June 2010,54 consecutive patients were enrolled and submitted to avideo capsule endoscopy (VCE) examination.History and demographic data were taken,as well as the history of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumption.After reading each VCE recording,a capsule endoscopy scoring index for small bowel mucosal inflammatory change (Lewis score) was calculated.Statistical analysis of the data was performed. RESULTS:The Lewis score for the whole cohort was 397.73.It was higher in the NSAID consumption subgroup (P = 0.036).The difference in Lewis score between NSAID users and non-users was reproduced for the first and second proximal tertiles of the small bowel, but not for its distal third (P values of 0.036,0.001 and 0.18,respectively).There was no statistical significant difference between the groups with regard to age or sex of the patients. CONCLUSION:The intestinal inflammatory involvement of SpA patients is more prominent in NSAID users for the proximal/mid small bowel,but not for its distal part.

  11. Penetrating ectopic peptic ulcer in the absence of Meckel's diverticulum ultimately presenting as small bowel obstruction.

    Hurley, Hilary

    2012-02-03

    We report here how a heterotopic penetrating peptic ulcer progressed to cause small bowel obstruction in a patient with multiple previous negative investigations. The clinical presentation, radiographic features and pathological findings of this case are described, along with the salient lessons learnt. The added value of wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) in such circumstances is debated.

  12. Diseases of the small bowel in chronic diarrhea: diagnosis and treatment

    M. Simadibrata

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic diarrhea in Asia is between 0.8-1.0%. The diseases and abnormalities according to the location, which can cause chronic diarrhea, are divided into three locations: the small bowel, the large bowel and extraintestinal. The small bowel diseases include infectious and non-infectious diseases. The infectious diseases are bacterial infections, parasitic infections etc. The non-infectious diseases include of Crohn’s disease, Celiac sprue, NSAID enteropathy, lactose intolerance, benign tumor, carcinoid tumor, carcinoma, post surgery complications, laxative etc. The approaches to diagnosis include good anamnesis, careful physical examination, supporting laboratory tests, more specialized supporting examinations including X-ray of the colon, esophagogastroduodenum follow-through, enteroclysis, ileo-colonoscopy and endoscopy on the upper portion of the digestive tract including the small intestine with biopsy for histopathology examinations. The treatment for chronic diarrhea is divided into supportive and causal therapy. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 179-89 Keywords: small bowel, chronic diarrhea, approaches to diagnosis, treatment

  13. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preoperative CT-guided percutaneous needle localization of the bleeding small bowel segment.

    Heiss, Peter; Feuerbach, Stefan; Iesalnieks, Igors; Rockmann, Felix; Wrede, Christian E; Zorger, Niels; Schlitt, Hans J; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Hamer, Okka W

    2009-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Double balloon enteroscopy, angiography, and surgery including intraoperative enteroscopy failed to identify the bleeding site. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) depicted active bleeding of a small bowel segment. The bleeding segment was localized by CT-guided percutaneous needle insertion and subsequently removed surgically. PMID:19328430

  14. Transient small-bowel intussusceptions in adults: significance of ultrasonographic detection

    Aim: To investigate the frequency, clinical significance, and outcome of small-bowel intussusceptions in adults detected using ultrasound in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: In two different retrospective (January 2001 to April 2003) and prospective (May 2003 to June 2005) periods, 33 small-bowel intussusceptions were found in 32 patients (13 females; mean age: 38.1 years) with known or suspected intestinal disease. Patients underwent diagnostic work-up to assess any organic disease. Patients with self-limiting intussusception were submitted to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. Results: Of the 32 patients with small-bowel intussusception, 25 were identified in the prospective series of 4487 examinations (0.53%) and seven in the retrospective series of 5342 examinations (0.15%; p = 0.002). Four patients had persistent and 28 self-limiting intussusceptions. Self-limiting intussusceptions were idiopathic in 11 patients (39%) or associated with organic diseases in 17 (Crohn's disease in 11 patients, celiac disease in three, ulcerative colitis in one patient, and previous surgery for cancer in two). Self-limiting intussusceptions were asymptomatic in 25% of patients. Conclusion: Small-bowel intussusceptions in adults are not rare and are frequently self-limiting, idiopathic, or related to organic diseases, mainly Crohn's disease and coeliac disease

  15. Yeast mediates lactic acidosis suppression after antibiotic cocktail treatment in short small bowel?

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Severijnen, R.S.V.M.; Skladal, D.; Bakkeren, J.A.J.; Sperl, W.

    2005-01-01

    During acidotic periods in a girl with a short small bowel, very high D-lactic acid concentrations were measured in blood and urine; the patient's characteristic faecal flora contained mainly lactobacilli, and during antibiotic cocktail treatment also many yeasts. In this case report we sought to un

  16. Surgically treated primary malignant tumor of small bowel:A clinical analysis

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the clinical presentation,treatment and survival of patients with primary malignant tumor of small bowel(PMTSB).METHODS:Clinicopathologic data about 141 surgically treated PMTSB patients(91 males and 50 females) at the median age of 53.5 years(range 23-79 years) were retrospectively analyzed.RESULTS:The most common initial clinical features of the patients were intermittent abdominal discomfort or vague abdominal pain(67.4%),abdominal mass(31.2%),bowel obstruction(24.1%),hemotochezia(21.3%),...

  17. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes. PMID:26076568

  18. Formation of microchimerism in rat small bowel transplantation by splenocyte infusion

    Da-Xun Piao; Tao Jiang; Lian-Xin Liu; An-Long Zhu; Shao-Feng Jin; Ying-Hui Guan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of donor splenocyte infusion combined with cyclosporine A (CsA) on rejection of rat small bowel transplantation (SBT).METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and female Wistar rats weighing 230-270 g were used as donors and recipients respectively in the study. Heterotopic small bowel transplantation was performed. The rats were divided into three groups: group one receiving allotransplantation (SD→Wistar), group two receiving allotransplantation (SD→Wistar) + donor splenocyte infusion, group three receiving allotransplantation (SD →Wistar) + donor splenocyte infusion + CsA followed by CsA 10 mg/kg per day after transplantation, in which recipient Wistar rats were injected with 2 ×108 SD splenocytes 28 d before transplantation, and treated with CsA after transplantation. Finally, the specific DNA fragment of donor Y chromosome was detected in recipient peripheral blood and skin by PCR. The survival time after small bowel transplantation was observed.Gross and histopathological examinations were performed.RESULTS: The survival time after small bowel transplantation was 7.1 ± 1.2 d in group 1, 18.4 ± 3.6 d in group 2 and 31.5 ± 3.1 d in group 3. The survival time was significant longer (P < 0.01) in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2. The gross and histopathological examination showed that the rejection degree in group 3was lower than that in groups 1 and 2.CONCLUSION: Donor splenocyte infusion combined with CsA decreases remarkably the rejection and prolongs the survival time after rat small bowel transplantation.

  19. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: are there any predictors?

    McCallum Richard W; Sostarich Sandra; Reddymasu Savio C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which excessive levels of bacteria, mainly the colonic-type species are present in the small intestine. Recent data suggest that SIBO may contribute to the pathophysiology of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Methods Adults with IBS based on Rome II criteria who had predominance of bloating and flatulence underwent a gluc...

  20. Ileus and Small Bowel Obstruction in an Emergency Department Observation Unit: Are there Outcome Predictors?

    Charles L. Emerman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of our study was to describe the evaluation and outcome of patients with ileus and bowel obstruction admitted to an emergency department (ED observation unit (OU and to identify predictors of successful management for such patients. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 129 patients admitted to a university-affiliated, urban, tertiary hospital ED OU from January 1999 through November 2004. Inclusion criteria were all adult patients admitted to the OU with an ED diagnosis of ileus, partial small bowel obstruction, or small bowel obstruction, and electronic medical records available for review. The following variables were examined: ED diagnosis, history of similar admission, number of prior abdominal surgeries, surgery in the month before, administration of opioid analgesia at any time after presentation, radiographs demonstrating air–fluid levels or dilated loops of small bowel, hypokalemia, use of nasogastric decompression, and surgical consultation. Results: Treatment failure, defined as hospital admission from the OU, occurred in 65 (50.4% of 129 patients. Only the use of a nasogastric tube was associated with OU failure (21% discharged versus 79% requiring admission, P ¼ 0.0004; odds ratio, 5.294; confidence interval, 1.982–14.14. Conclusion: Half of the patients admitted to our ED OU with ileus or varying degrees of small bowel obstruction required hospital admission. The requirement of a nasogastric tube in such patients was associated with a greater rate of observation unit failure. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:404–407.

  1. Small Bowel Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Peritoneal Space Versus Small Bowel Loop Contouring Techniques

    Purpose: To determine whether volumes based on contours of the peritoneal space can be used instead of individual small bowel loops to predict for grade ≥3 acute small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A standardized contouring method was developed for the peritoneal space and retrospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 67 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and analyzed against patient toxicity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Results: Grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity occurred in 16% (11/67) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between small bowel irradiation and acute small bowel toxicity was supported by the use of both small bowel loop and peritoneal space contouring techniques. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that, for both contouring methods, the greatest sensitivity for predicting toxicity was associated with the volume receiving between 15 and 25 Gy. Conclusion: DVH analysis of peritoneal space volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, suggesting that the contours of the peritoneal space provide a reasonable surrogate for the contours of individual small bowel loops. The study finds that a small bowel V15 less than 275 cc and a peritoneal space V15 less than 830 cc are associated with a less than 10% risk of grade ≥3 acute toxicity

  2. MR imaging of the small bowel in Crohn's disease

    Siddiki, Hassan [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Fidler, Jeff [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)], E-mail: fidler.jeff@mayo.edu

    2009-03-15

    MR and CT techniques optimized for small bowel imaging are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of small bowel disorders. Several studies have shown the advantage of these techniques over tradition barium fluoroscopic examinations secondary to improvements in spatial and temporal resolution combined with improved bowel distending agents. The preference of MR vs. CT has been geographical and based on expertise and public policy. With the increasing awareness of radiation exposure, there has been a more global interest in implementing techniques that either reduce or eliminate radiation exposure [Brenner DJ, Hall EJ. Computed tomography-an increasing source of radiation exposure. N Engl J Med 2007;357:2277-84]. This is especially important in patients with chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease who may require multiple studies over a lifetime or in studies that require sequential imaging time points such as in assessment of gastrointestinal motility [Froehlich JM, Patak MA, von Weymarn C, Juli CF, Zollikofer CL, Wentz KU. Small bowel motility assessment with magnetic resonance imaging. J Magn Reson Imaging 2005;21:370-75]. A recent study showed that certain subgroups of patients with Crohn's disease may be exposed to higher doses of radiation; those diagnosed at an early age, those with upper tract inflammation, penetrating disease, requirement of intravenous steroids, infliximab or multiple surgeries [Desmond AN, O'Regan K, Curran C, et al. Crohn's disease: factors associated with exposure to high levels of diagnostic radiation. Gut 2008;57:1524-29]. Therefore it has been suggested that techniques that can reduce or eliminate radiation exposure should be considered for imaging [Brenner DJ, Hall EJ. Computed tomography-an increasing source of radiation exposure. N Engl J Med 2007;357:2277-84]. Owing to the excellent softtissue contrast, direct multiplanar imaging capabilities, new ultrafast breath-holding pulse sequences, lack of

  3. Multi-detector CT enterography with iso-osmotic mannitol as oral contrast for detecting small bowel disease

    Lian-He Zhang; Shi-Zheng Zhang; Hong-Jie Hu; Min Gao; Ming Zhang; Qian Cao; Qiao-wei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and usefulness of multi-detector CT enterography with orally administered iso-osmotic mannitol as negative contrast in demonstrating small bowel disease.METHODS: Thirteen volunteers and 38 patients with various kinds of small bowel disease were examined. We administered about 1 500 mL iso-osmotic mannitol as negative contrast agent and then proceeded with helical CT scanning on a Siemens Sensation 16 scanner. All volunteers and patients were interviewed about their tolerance of the procedure. Two radiologists postprocessed imaging data with MPR, thin MIP, VRT and INSPACE when necessary and then interpreted the scans,and adequacy of luminal distention was evaluated on a four-point scale. Demonstration of features of various kinds of small bowel disease was analyzed.RESULTS: The taste of iso-osmotic mannitol is good (slightly sweet) and acceptable by all. Small bowel distention was excellent and moderate in most volunteers and patients. CT features of many kinds of diseases such as tumors, Crohn's disease,and small bowel obstruction,etc. were clearly displayed.CONCLUSION: Multi-detector CT enterography with iso-osmotic mannitol as negative contrast to distend the small bowel is a simple, rapid, noninvasive and effective method of evaluating small bowel disease.

  4. Stagnant loop syndrome resulting from small-bowel irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

    Stagnant or blind-loop syndrome includes vitamin B12 malabsorption, steatorrhea, and bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. A case is presented to demonstrate this syndrome occurring after small-bowel irradiation injury with exaggeration postenterocolic by-pass. Alteration of normal small-bowel flora is basic to development of the stagnant-loop syndrome. Certain strains of bacteria as Bacteriodes and E. coli are capable of producing a malabsorption state. Definitive therapy for this syndrome developing after severe irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass includes antibiotics. Rapid symptomatic relief from diarrhea and improved malabsorption studies usually follow appropriate antibiotic therapy. Recolonization of the loop(s) with the offending bacterial species may produce exacerbation of symptoms. Since antibiotics are effective, recognition of this syndrome is important. Foul diarrheal stools should not be considered a necessary consequence of irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

  5. Efficacy and efficiency of small bowel double contrast enema

    Roedl, W.; Possel, H.M.; Prull, A.; Wunderlich, L.

    1986-02-01

    The double contrast examination is the most effective morphological screening method for the evaluation of the whole small intestine. Its sensitivity is 85%, its specifity 96.7%. In specific clinical problems the number of pathological roentgen rises: from 34,4% when all indications are taken into consideration to 58% in indications specific to the small intestine such as Morbus Crohn or the malabsorption syndrome. Search for tumors and the double contrast of the small intestine in unclear gastro-intestinal bleeding are unproductive. The weak point of this screening method is the lower part of the small intestine. Therefore, the selective peroral or retrograde analysis of the terminal ileum supplement the contrast method. A precondition for good results is an adequate technical standard. Besides the clinical results some technical results are therefore discussed such as contrast medium quantities, examination and X-ray time, radiation exposure and influences on the image quality. (orig.).

  6. Aspirin-induced small bowel injuries and the preventive effect of rebamipide

    Kazuhiro Mizukami; Kazunari Murakami; Takashi Abe; Kunimitsu Inoue; Masahiro Uchida; Tadayoshi Okimoto; Masaaki Kodama; Toshio Fujioka

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the influence of taking low-dose aspirin for 4 wk on small intestinal complications and to examine the preventive effect of rebamipide. METHODS: This study was conducted as a singlecenter, randomized, double-blind, cross-over, placebocontrolled study. Eleven healthy male subjects were enrolled. Each subject underwent video capsule endoscopy after 1 and 4 wk of taking aspirin and omeprazole, along with either rebamipide or placebo therapy. The primary endpoint was to evaluate small bowel damage in healthy subjects before and after taking low-dose aspirin for 4 wk. RESULTS: The number of subjects with mucosal breaks (defined as multiple erosions and/or ulcers) were 1 at 1 wk and 1 at 4 wk on the jejunum, and 6 at 1 wk (P = 0.0061) and 7 at 4 wk on the ileum (P = 0.0019). Rebamipide significantly prevented mucosal breaks on the ileum compared with the placebo group (P = 0.0173 at 1 wk and P = 0.0266 at 4 wk). CONCLUSION: Longer-term, low-dose aspirin administration induced damage in the small bowel. Rebamipide prevented this damage, and may be a candidate drug for treating aspirin-induced small bowel complications.

  7. Radiologic findings of small bowel rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma

    Bowel rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma is no longer rare, and is among the most challenging problems that confront the physicians and radiologists. It is frequently difficult to diagnose because the symptoms may be trivial during the early stage and masked by more obvious, but less lethal injuries. It is well known that the roentgen examination of the abdomen is also of little value to exclude bowel rupture because of infrequency of positive findings and free gas. The plain films of 23 cases of jejunal rupture and 8 cases of ileal rupture were evaluated to sort and diagnostic features of small bowel rupture caused by blunt abdominal trauma. 1. Free intraperitoneal gas was noted in 6 cases of jejunal rupture (26%) and 1 case of ileal rupture (13%), and definite radiological evidence of free intraperitoneal fluid was present in 16 cases of patients (52%). 2. The contour change of bowel loops such as tapering or indentation were seen in 11 cases of patients (36%), and local opacity along the mesenteric root axis was demonstrated in 19 cases of patients (61%). 3. Paralytic ileus was localized to LUQ in jejunal rupture and to mid-abdomen in ileal rupture, and gastric and transverse-colon distension with gas was noticeable especially in jejunal rupture

  8. Delayed Presentation of Small Bowel Injury During Suprapubic Catheterisation

    Jackson BL

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of small intestine injury resulting from suprapubic catheter insertion. This case is of particular interest for three reasons. Firstly, the presentation of the injury was delayed by three months, until the time of the first catheter exchange. Secondly, the injury was managed conservatively, without surgical exploration. Finally, the injury occurred using a newer, Seldinger-type suprapubic catheter insertion kit.

  9. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis presenting as small bowel obstruction: A case report and review of the literature

    Min Young Yun; Young Up Cho; In Suh Park; Sun Keun Choi; Sei Joong Kim; Seok Hwan Shin; Kyung Rae Kim

    2007-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease of unknown etiology. It is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the bowel wall to a variable depth and symptoms associated with gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the authors experienced a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis presenting as small bowel obstruction. A 51-year old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. Physical examination revealed a distended abdomen with diffuse tenderness. Complete blood count showed mild leukocytosis without eosinophilia. Computed tomography confirmed a dilatation of the small intestine with ascites. An emergency laparotomy was performed for a diagnosis of peritonitis due to intestinal obstruction. Segmental resection of the ileum and end to end anastomosis were performed. Histologically, there was a dense infiltration of eosinophils throughout the entire thickness of ileal wall and eosinophilic enteritis was diagnosed. The patient recovered well, and was free from gastrointestinal symptoms at the time when we reported her disease.

  10. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. PMID:26527610

  11. Acute Portomesenteric Venous Thrombosis following Laparoscopic Small Bowel Resection and Ventral Hernia Repair

    Bhradeev Sivasambu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening complication of laparoscopic surgery that has been described in literature. Prompt diagnosis and early initiation of treatment are vital to prevent life-threatening complications such as mesenteric ischemia and infarction. A 51-year-old lady had laparoscopic small bowel resection and primary anastomosis with ventral hernia repair 4 weeks earlier for partial small bowel obstruction. Her postoperative period was uneventful and she was discharged home. Four weeks after surgery she developed watery diarrhea and generalized abdominal pain for four-day duration. A computed tomography of the abdomen revealed portomesenteric venous thrombosis although a computed tomography of abdomen before surgery 4 weeks back did not show any portomesenteric venous thrombosis. We are reporting a case of acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis as a complication of laparoscopic surgery.

  12. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    Sergio Peralta, Claudia Cottone, Tiziana Doveri, Piero Luigi Almasio, Antonio Craxi

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO.METHODS: Our survey included 115 patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria for diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); a total of 97 patients accepted to perform a breath test with lactulose (BTLact), and those who had a po...

  13. Simultaneous culture of saliva and jejunal aspirate in the investigation of small bowel bacterial overgrowth.

    Hamilton, I.; Worsley, B W; Cobden, I; Cooke, E. M.; Shoesmith, J G; Axon, A T

    1982-01-01

    Both saliva and jejunal aspirate were cultured from 22 patients with suspected small bowel bacterial overgrowth and from eight controls. Large numbers of organisms (greater than 10(6)/ml) were recovered from the jejunal aspirate of 16 subjects, in five of whom the same organisms were present in similar relative proportions in the saliva, suggesting contamination of the sample with saliva, while in 11 the jejunal organisms differed from those in saliva. In eight of these the jejunal flora was ...

  14. Spontaneous transmesenteric hernia: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction in an adult

    Poras Chaudhary

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of spontaneous transmesenteric hernia with strangulation in an adult. Transmesenteric hernia (TMH is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction and is seldom diagnosed preoperatively, and most TMHs in adults are related to predisposing factors, such as previous surgery, abdominal trauma, and peritonitis. TMH are more likely to develop volvulus and strangulation or ischemia. A brief review of etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment is discussed.

  15. Small bowel MR enterography: problem solving in Crohn’s disease

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Anderson, Simon; Irving, Peter; Sanderson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is fast becoming the first-line radiological investigation to evaluate the small bowel in patients with Crohn’s disease. It can demonstrate both mural and extramural complications. The lack of ionizing radiation, together with high-contrast resolution, multiplanar capability and cine-imaging make it an attractive imaging modality in such patients who need prolonged follow-up. A key question in the management of such patients is the assessment of disease a...

  16. A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction in Adults: Left Paraduodenal Internal Hernia

    Sardarian, Hossein; Maleki, Iradj; Mortazian, Meisam; Jafari, Ramezan; Tayebi, Pouya; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    A 47 years old lady presented with repeated intermittent, colicky, left upper, and periumblical abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting since two years prior to admission. Each episode of the pain spontaneously subsided after bilious vomiting. The patient had no history of surgery, abdominal trauma or intra-abdominal infection, weight loss or previous history for small bowel obstruction (SBO). MRI enterography was suggestive of internal hernia and surgery documented left paraduoden...

  17. Resveratrol Attenuates Both Small Bowel and Liver Changes in Obstructive Jaundice

    Temi, Volkan; Okay, Erdem; Güneş, Abdullah; Şimşek, Turgay; Çekmen, Mustafa; Bilgili, Ümit

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is well known that mucosal changes and alterations in liver function occur in the experimental obstructive jaundice model. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on obstructive jaundice-induced changes in the small bowel mucosa and liver using ischaemia-modified albumin as a marker of oxidative damage. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: The study used a rodent experimental model of obstructive jaundice, including a sham gr...

  18. Passage of intestinal (small bowel) cast – an unusual complication of neutropenic sepsis

    Samee, A.; Kirby, R. M.; Brunt, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman was admitted with neutropenic sepsis, 3 days following the final cycle of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Her condition deteriorated with progressive abdominal distension, bilious vomiting and diarrhoea. Abdominal examination revealed a mild degree of peritonism. Five days later she passed a small bowel cast per rectum, showing gross fungal contamination on histology. She was managed conservatively with antibiotics and antifungal medications and nutritional support.

  19. The effects of erythromycin in small-bowel follow-through

    Jang, Hyun Yong; Lee, Young Hwan; Jung, Kyung Jae; Chung, Duck Soo; Kim, Ok Dong; Hwang, Jin Bok [Catholic Univ. School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of erythromycin(EM), known to accelerate gastric emptying, in modified small-bowel follow-through(SBFT). We evaluated 32 normal patients who underwent modified SBFT by oral administration of methylcellulose. In the EM injection group(n=20), 500 mg EM (3 mg/kg in pediatric patients) in 100 ml saline was infused intravenously over a 15-minute period prior to the administration of a barium meal, while in the control group(n=12), EM was not infused. Gastric emptying time(GET), small-bowel transit time(SBTT) for barium and methylcellulose, small-bowel transit(SBT) during the first 15 minutes, luminal diameter and quality of image were compared between the two groups. SBT was assigned 1, 2, 3, or 4 points, depending on the extent to which the barium head reached the proximal or distal jejunum, and the proximal or distal ileum during the initial 15-minute. Three radiologists reached a consensus as to image quality. Mean GET was significantly faster in the EM injection group (18.5 mins for 150 ml barium suspension and 25.8 mins for 600 ml methylcellulose). The SBT score during the initial 15 minutes was significantly higher in the EM injection group (3.3 points) than in the control group (2.4points), but mean SBTT was not significantly different between the two groups. Luminal diameter and image quality were also higher in the EM injection group. EM does not decrease SBTT but is highly effective for shortening gastric emptying time, helping to increase the range of fluoroscopic examination and improve image quality in modified small-bowel follow-through, especially in patients with delayed gastric emptying.

  20. Ethanol Ablation of a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Presenting as a Small Bowel Obstruction

    Chin, Matthew; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chang, Kenneth; Lee, John; Samarasena, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has historically been used as an ablative agent for a variety of lesions. One of the more common applications of this technique is celiac plexus neurolysis; however, recent reports have suggested a role for the endoscopic alcohol ablation of a variety of solid and cystic lesions. We report a novel case of endoscopic ethanol ablation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as a small bowel obstruction.

  1. The role of heterolactic lactobacilli in diarrhoea of short small bowel patients

    Severijnen, René; Naber, Ton; Tolboom, Jules; Bongaerts, ger

    2011-01-01

    Patients with a short small bowel (SSB) suffer continuously from abdominal pain, flatulence and diarrhoea. Their faeces contains a very characteristic flora, that normally consists of >70% (sometimes even up to 99%) of lactobacilli. In this study, we intended to prove that the mentioned inconveniences are mainly caused by fermentative activity of the massively present heterolactic lactobacilli. Bubbling SSB faeces was examined for bacterial composition and gas production. The effect of ora...

  2. Small bowel ischaemia resulting from delayed presentation of an incarcerated right-sided diaphragmatic hernia

    Hopkins, JC; Gash, K; Armstrong, CP

    2011-01-01

    A 51 year old man presented with a short history of severe upper abdominal pain and vomiting. An initial chest radiograph demonstrated gas in the right subphrenic space and a subsequent CT scan demonstrated a hernia through the mid-part of the right hemi-diaphragm, containing small bowel and omentum. A detailed history revealed that there had been trauma to the right side of the chest approximately 12 years previously. An emergency laparoscopy revealed a right sided diaphragmatic hernia conta...

  3. Proximal small bowel obstruction caused by a massive intraluminal thrombus from a stress ulcer

    Siddiky, AH; GUPTA, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of proximal small bowel obstruction caused by an occlusive thrombus as a result of bleeding from a duodenal ulcer, which is likely to be stress induced. Initial presentation was confused as a bleeding duodenal ulcer and resultant ileus. Such reports are incredibly rare in the literature and never has one been reported as a result of a stress ulcer. Obstructive symptoms in the acute postoperative patient may be confused for an ileus but mechanical causes must be excluded. Th...

  4. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part Ⅰ

    Alan BR Thomson; Angeli Chopra; Michael Tom Clandinin; Hugh Freeman

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all parts of gastroenterology and hepatology,there have been many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases.Over 1000 publications were reviewed for 2008 and 2009,and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered.In Part Ⅰ of this Editorial Review,seven topics are considered:intestinal development; proliferation and repair;intestinal permeability; microbiotica,infectious diarrhea and probiotics; diarrhea; salt and water absorption; necrotizing enterocolitis; and immunology/allergy.These topics were chosen because of their importance to the practicing physician.

  5. Detected peritoneal fluid in small bowel obstruction is associated with the need for surgical intervention.

    O'Daly, Brendan J

    2009-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Predicting the clinical course in adhesional small bowel obstruction is difficult. There are no validated clinical or radiologic features that allow early identification of patients likely to require surgical intervention. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of 100 patients consecutively admitted to a tertiary level teaching hospital over a 3-year period (2002-2004) who had acute adhesional small bowel obstruction and underwent computed tomography (CT). The primary outcomes that we assessed were conservative management or the need for surgical intervention. We investigated time to physiologic gastrointestinal function recovery as a secondary outcome. We examined independent predictors of surgical intervention in a bivariate analysis using a stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients investigated, we excluded 12. Of the 88 remaining patients, 58 (66%) were managed conservatively and 30 (34%) underwent surgery. Peritoneal fluid detected on a CT scan (n = 37) was associated more frequently with surgery than conservative management (46% v. 29%, p = 0.046, chi(2)). Logistical regression identified peritoneal fluid detected on a CT scan as an independent predictor of surgical intervention (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.15-7.84). CONCLUSION: The presence of peritoneal fluid on a CT scan in patients with adhesional small bowel obstruction is an independent predictor of surgical intervention and should alert the clinician that the patient is 3 times more likely to require surgery.

  6. Small bowel perforation resulting from blunt abdominal trauma. Interval change of radiological characteristics

    We analyzed radiography and computed tomography (CT) findings of small bowel perforation due to blunt trauma to identify the keys to diagnosis. Twelve patients with surgically proven small bowel perforation were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent radiography and CT, and five underwent presurgical follow-up CT. Radiological findings were evaluated and correlated to the elapsed time from the onset of the trauma retrospectively. Radiography demonstrated free air in only 8% (1/12) and 25% (3/12) at the initial and follow-up examinations, respectively. In contrast, the initial and follow-up CT scans detected extraluminal air in 58% (7/12) and 92% (11/12), respectively. Mesenteric fat obliteration was seen in 58% (7/12) and 75% (9/12) at initial and follow-up CT, respectively. The incidence of both extraluminal air and mesenteric fat obliteration on CT increased as time elapsed, particularly after 8 h. High-density ascites was seen in 75% at initial CT, including two patients without extraluminal air, but was observed in all but one patient at follow-up CT. The chance of detecting extraluminal air increases as time elapses. High-density ascites may be seen without extraluminal air and might be an indirect or precedent sign of small bowel perforation. Radiologists need to be familiar with these radiological features. (author)

  7. Low-Radiation-Dose Modified Small Bowel CT for Evaluation of Recurrent Crohn's Disease

    A. Z. Kielar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease affects any part of the GI tract, commonly the terminal ileum. To decrease radiation exposure we developed a low-radiation-dose unenhanced CT (modified small Bowel CT, MBCT to evaluate the small bowel using hyperdense oral contrast. Technique. MBCT was investigated in patients with pathologically proven Crohn's disease presenting with new symptoms from recurrent inflammation or stricture. After ethics board approval, 98 consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated. Kappa values from two independent reviewers were calculated for presence of obstruction, active inflammation versus chronic stricture, and ancillary findings. Forty-two patients underwent surgery or colonoscopy within 3 months. Results. Kappa was 0.84 for presence of abnormality versus a normal exam and 0.89 for differentiating active inflammation from chronic stricture. Level of agreement for presence of skip areas, abscess formation, and fistula was 0.62, 0.75, and 0.78, respectively. In the subset with “gold standard” follow-up, there was 83% agreement. Conclusions. MBCT is a low-radiation technique with good to very good interobserver agreement for determining presence of obstruction and degree of disease activity in patients with Crohn's disease. Further investigation is required to refine parameters of disease activity compared to CT enterography and small bowel follow through.

  8. Evaluation of different small bowel contrast agents by multi - detector row CT

    Wang, Yong-Ren; Yu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Zhi-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different oral small bowel contrast agents towards the intestinal dilatation and intestinal wall structure exhibition by the abdominal multi - detector row CT (MDCT) examination. Methods: 80 patients were performed the whole abdominal CT examination, then randomly divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each group. 45 minutes before the CT examination, the patients were served with a total of 1800 ml pure water, pure milk, dilute lactulose solution and isotonic mannitol solution, respectively. Results: The images were blinded read by two experienced abdominal radiologists in the workstation, the cross-sectional diameters of duodenum, jejunum, proximal and terminal ends of ileum of each patient were measured, then the analysis of variance was performed to analyze the differences in the intestinal dilatation among the experimental groups. The scoring method was used to score the intestinal dilatation and intestinal structure exhibition. The diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the best intestinal dilation degrees. Similarly, the diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the highest scores in the entire small bowel dilatation degree and intestinal structure exhibition. Conclusions: 2.5% osmotic mannitol and the diluted lactulose solution enabled the full dilatation of small bowel, and could clearly exhibit the wall structure. PMID:26629131

  9. Accuracy of enteroclysis in Crohn's disease of the small bowel: a retrospective study

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of enteroclysis in the diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the small bowel in a group of consecutive patients. From January 1992 to December 1995, 165 patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel presented to our institution for enteroclysis. In 14 patients up to three enteroclysis exams were performed. Most patients (78 %) underwent colonoscopy and retrograde ileoscopy. In the remaining patients clinical follow-up was used as gold standard. In 79 patients no radiographic abnormalities were found. Sixty-one patients (40 men and 21 women; mean age 34.2 years) had a radiological diagnosis of Crohn's disease. This involved the terminal ileum in 39 patients (64 %) either alone (n = 25) or in association with the pelvic ileum (n = 14). In 12 of these patients retrograde ileoscopy was not feasible. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery. In 4 patients pathology revealed diseases other than Crohn's. These patients had all ileocecal diseases (tuberculosis = 2; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma = 1; adenocarcinoma = 1). One false-negative result was observed. Overall, enteroclysis showed a sensitivity of 98.2 % and a positive predictive value of 93.4 %. Enteroclysis is a sensitive technique in evaluating both the extent and the severity of small bowel involvement in Crohn's disease, although the overlap of radiographic findings may hamper its accuracy when the disease is confined to the ileocecal area. (orig.)

  10. Multi-slice spiral CT evaluation in Crohn's disease of small bowel

    Objective: To assess the value of enhanced MSCT scan for the Crohn's disease of small bowel. Methods: Fourty-five patients of small bowel Crohn's disease who were proved by multi-method were examined by two-phase enhanced scan with MSCT. The images were reformed in ADW 4.2 by MPR mainly. The CT values of the lesion segments in different phases were tested, with one way ANOVA in statistical analysis; the density difference between the lesion segments and normal segments in different phases were tested, the cases were divided according to 10 HU, and compared them with each other by χ2 test. Results: The average CT value of lesion segments was (39.3±3.7) HU in plain scan, (74.8±13.8) HU in artery phase, (90.2±12.3) HU in portal vein phase, there were sinigicant difference in them (F=258.87, P10 HU respectively in plain scan, 6 cases and 39 cases in artery phase, 2 cases and 43 cases in portal vein phase, by χ2 test, there were sinigicant difference between plain scan and artery phase (χ2=32.49, P2= 39.22, P2= 1.10, P>0.05). After enhancement, the lesions can display clearly than plain scan, and the detectable rate was raised highly. Conclusion: Two-phase enhancement scan can diagnosis the Crohn's disease of small bowel and evaluate it overall. (authors)

  11. Laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder following total extra-peritoneal repair of inguinal hernia

    Sandeep Aggarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesh erosion into visceral organs is a rare complication following laparoscopic mesh repair for inguinal hernia with only 15 cases reported in English literature. We report the first case of complete laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder. A 62-year-male underwent laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia at another centre in April 2012. He presented to our centre 21 months later with persistent lower urinary tract infection (UTI. On evaluation mesh erosion into bowel and urinary bladder was suspected. At laparoscopy, a small bowel loop was adhered to the area of inflammation in the left lower abdomen. After adhesiolysis, mesh was seen to be eroding into small bowel. The entire infected mesh was pulled out from the pre-peritoneal space and urinary bladder wall using gentle traction. The involved small bowel segment was resected, and bowel continuity restored using endoscopic linear cutter. The resected bowel along with the mesh was extracted in a plastic bag. Intra-operative test for leak from urinary bladder was found to be negative. The patient recovered uneventfully and is doing well at 12 months follow-up with resolution of UTI. Laparoscopic approach to mesh erosion is feasible as the plane of mesh placement during laparoscopic hernia repair is closer to peritoneum than during open hernia repair.

  12. Laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder following total extra-peritoneal repair of inguinal hernia

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Praneeth, Kokkula; Rathore, Yashwant; Waran, Vignesh; Singh, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    Mesh erosion into visceral organs is a rare complication following laparoscopic mesh repair for inguinal hernia with only 15 cases reported in English literature. We report the first case of complete laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder. A 62-year-male underwent laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia at another centre in April 2012. He presented to our centre 21 months later with persistent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). On evaluation mesh erosion into bowel and urinary bladder was suspected. At laparoscopy, a small bowel loop was adhered to the area of inflammation in the left lower abdomen. After adhesiolysis, mesh was seen to be eroding into small bowel. The entire infected mesh was pulled out from the pre-peritoneal space and urinary bladder wall using gentle traction. The involved small bowel segment was resected, and bowel continuity restored using endoscopic linear cutter. The resected bowel along with the mesh was extracted in a plastic bag. Intra-operative test for leak from urinary bladder was found to be negative. The patient recovered uneventfully and is doing well at 12 months follow-up with resolution of UTI. Laparoscopic approach to mesh erosion is feasible as the plane of mesh placement during laparoscopic hernia repair is closer to peritoneum than during open hernia repair. PMID:26917927

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-quantified small bowel motility is a sensitive marker of response to medical therapy in Crohn's disease

    Plumb, A. A.; Menys, A.; Russo, E; Prezzi, D.; Bhatnagar, G.; Vega, R; Halligan, S; Orchard, T R; Taylor, S A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) can measure small bowel motility, reduction in which reflects inflammatory burden in Crohn's Disease (CD). However, it is unknown if motility improves with successful treatment.

  14. Triphasic Computed Tomography Enterography with Polyethylene Glycol to Detect Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastases to the Small Bowel

    Chua, Chian-Sem; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Wu, Chin-Chu; Lin, Yu-Min; Chong, Lee-Won; Hsu, Yi-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Enteroclysis was first used to diagnose small bowel obstruction in 1996. However, nasojejunal intubation required during enteroclysis causes discomfort to the patient. Triphasic computed tomography (CT) enterography, a noninvasive procedure that does not require intubation, was found to be an efficient method to diagnose small bowel lesions. We describe our experience of using triphasic CT enterography with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for diagnosing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the ...

  15. Role of Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Differentiating between Fibrotic and Active Inflammatory Small Bowel Stenosis in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    Francesca Fornasa; Chiara Benassuti; Luca Benazzato

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prospectively differentiating between fibrotic and active inflammatory small bowel stenosis in patients with Crohn′s disease (CD). Materials and Methods: A total of 111 patients with histologically proven CD presenting with clinical and plain radiographic signs of small bowel obstruction underwent coronal and axial MRI scans after oral administration of polyethylene glycol solution. A stenosis was judged prese...

  16. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases

    Jingjing Wang; Qiaozhen Guo; Jianping Zhao; Mei Liu; Guangquan Liao; Nianjun Chen; Dean Tian; Xiaoli Wu

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overal...

  17. Small bowel obstruction following computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography using psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent.

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Cervini, Patrick; Kirpalani, Anish; Vlachou, Paraskevi A; Grover, Samir C; Colak, Errol

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case series describing four patients who developed small bowel obstruction following the use of psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent for computed tomography or magnetic resonance enterography. Radiologists who oversee computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography should be aware of this potential complication when using psyllium seed husk and other bulking agents, particularly when imaging patients with known or suspected small bowel strictures or active inflammation. PMID:25157531

  18. Small Bowel Obstruction Following Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Enterography Using Psyllium Seed Husk As an Oral Contrast Agent

    Yingming Amy Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case series describing four patients who developed small bowel obstruction following the use of psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent for computed tomography or magnetic resonance enterography. Radiologists who oversee computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography should be aware of this potential complication when using psyllium seed husk and other bulking agents, particularly when imaging patients with known or suspected small bowel strictures or active inflammation.

  19. Lactose malabsorption in Greek adults: correlation of small bowel transit time with the severity of lactose intolerance.

    Ladas, S.; Papanikos, J; Arapakis, G

    1982-01-01

    Using breath hydrogen analysis after 139 mmol (50 g) oral lactose load, we investigated the prevalence of lactose malabsorption in 200 Greek adults and examined the relationship between symptoms and small bowel transit time. One hundred and fifty subjects had increased breath hydrogen concentrations (greater than 20 ppm) after the lactose load. In these individuals peak breath hydrogen concentration was inversely related to small bowel transit time (r = 0.63, 6 = 6.854, p less than 0.001) and...

  20. Breath Hydrogen Gas Concentration Linked to Intestinal Gas Distribution and Malabsorption in Patients with Small-bowel Pseudo-obstruction

    Yoshihisa Urita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The patient with colonic obstruction may frequently have bacterial overgrowth and increased breath hydrogen (H2 levels because the bacterium can contact with food residues for longer time. We experienced two cases with intestinal obstruction whose breath H2 concentrations were measured continuously.Case 1: A 70-year-old woman with small bowel obstruction was treated with a gastric tube. When small bowel gas decreased and colonic gas was demonstrated on the plain abdominal radiograph, the breath H2 concentration increased to 6 ppm and reduced again shortly.Case 2: A 41-year-old man with functional small bowel obstruction after surgical treatment was treated with intravenous administration of erythromycin. Although the plain abdominal radiograph demonstrated a decrease of small-bowel gas, the breath H2 gas kept the low level. After a clear-liquid meal was supplied, fasting breath H2 concentration increased rapidly to 22 ppm and gradually decreased to 9 ppm despite the fact that the intestinal gas was unchanged on X-ray. A rapid increase of breath H2 concentration may reflect the movement of small bowel contents to the colon in patients with small-bowel pseudo-obstruction or malabsorption following diet progression.Conclusions: Change in breath H2 concentration had a close association with distribution and movement of intestinal gas.

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor causing small bowel intussusception in a patient with Crohn's disease

    George E Theodoropoulos; Dimitrios Linardoutsos; Dimitrios Tsamis; Paraskevas Stamopoulos; Dimitrios Giannopoulos; Flora Zagouri; Nikolaos V Michalopoulos

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of jejunoileal intussusception in a 42-year-old patient with Crohn's disease caused by a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient complained of vague diffuse abdominal pain for a period of 4 mo. Intussusception was suspected at computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Segmental resection of the small intestine was performed. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor as well as aphthous ulcerations and areas of inflammation, which were characteristic of Crohn's disease. This is the first report of small bowel intussusception due to a gastrointestinal stromal tumor coexisting with Crohn's disease.

  2. Computer-aided detection of small bowel strictures in CT enterography

    Sainani, Nisha I.; Näppi, Janne J.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    The workflow of CT enterography in an emergency setting could be improved significantly by computer-aided detection (CAD) of small bowel strictures to enable even non-expert radiologists to detect sites of obstruction rapidly. We developed a CAD scheme to detect strictures automatically from abdominal multi-detector CT enterography image data by use of multi-scale template matching and a blob detector method. A pilot study was performed on 15 patients with 22 surgically confirmed strictures to study the effect of the CAD scheme on observer performance. The 77% sensitivity of an inexperienced radiologist assisted by CAD was comparable with the 81% sensitivity of an unaided expert radiologist (p=0.07). The use of CAD reduced the reading time to identify strictures significantly (p<0.0001). Most of the false-positive CAD detections were caused by collapsed bowel loops, approximated bowel wall, muscles, or vessels, and they were easy to dismiss. The results indicate that CAD could provide radiologists with a rapid and accurate interpretation of strictures to improve workflow in an emergency setting.

  3. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  4. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance contribute to irritable bowel syndrome symptomatology in Pakistan

    Javed Yakoob

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background /Aim: The symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome resemble those of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SIBO and lactose intolerance (LI occurrence in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D according to Rome III criteria. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective case-control study, patients over 18 years of age with altered bowel habit, bloating, and patients who had lactose Hydrogen breath test (H 2 BT done were included. The "cases" were defined as patients who fulfill Rome III criteria for IBS-D, while "controls" were those having chronic nonspecific diarrhea (CNSD who did not fulfill Rome III criteria for IBS-D. Demographic data, predominant bowel habit pattern, concurrent use of medications, etc., were noted. Results: Patients with IBS-D were 119 (51% with a mean age of 35 ± 13 years, while those with CNSD were 115 (49% with mean age 36 ± 15 years. Patients in both IBS-D and CNSD were comparable in gender, with male 87 (74% and female 77 (64%. SIBO was documented by lactose H 2 BT in 32/234 (14% cases. It was positive in 22/119 (19% cases with IBS-D, while 10/115 (9% cases had CNSD (P = 0.03. LI was positive in 43/234 (18% cases. Of these, 25/119 (21% cases had IBS-D and 18/115 (16% cases had CNSD (P = 0.29. Conclusion: SIBO was seen in a significant number of our patients with IBS-D. There was no significant age or gender difference in patients with or without SIBO.

  5. Use of CT Enterography for Small Bowel Pathology:Experience and Findings in 90 Patients

    Proper evaluation of the small intestine is achieved with the combination of intravenous contrast medium and large volume of neutral contrast medium administered orally to stretch the intestinal lumen and produce images for the assessment of the lumen, thickness and pattern of enhancement of the small intestine walls. Materials and methods: Between May 2007 and February 2009 we retrospectively collected 90 cases of mainly outpatients who consulted our clinic. They were prepared taking a liquid diet for 24 hours that had no residue and complete fasting 4 hours prior to the examination. A total of 2000 cc of water was administrated orally (divided in 500 cc, 75, 65, 25 and 15 minutes prior to the examination). Then 100 cc of contrast medium (OptirayTM ) were administered intravenously, at a rate of 4 cc/sec. An early arterial phase was performed 20 seconds after injection, and a portal phase 60 seconds after IV contrast administration. The studies were performed in a 16 channels, General Electric multidetector scanner, with 3.0 mm slices, with multiplanar reconstructions and MIP. Results: The studies were interpreted by a group body imaging radiologists. The most frequent findings were: diverticular disease, cystic lesions, neoplasia, Crohn's disease,ileitis, mechanical obstruction, hiatal hernia, cholelithiasis, hepatic hemangiomas, duodenal diverticulum, polyposis, intestinal mal rotation, and active bleeding. Conclusions: CT enterography is a useful and noninvasive technique for diagnosing small bowel disorders, allowing, in most cases, a satisfactory distension of the small bowel without the use of an enteral tube.

  6. Increased density of tolerogenic dendritic cells in the small bowel mucosa of celiac patients

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Uibo, Oivi; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Raivo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the densities of dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and their interrelations in the small bowel mucosa in untreated celiac disease (CD) patients with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D). METHODS: Seventy-four patients (45 female, 29 male, mean age 11.1 ± 6.8 years) who underwent small bowel biopsy were studied. CD without T1D was diagnosed in 18 patients, and CD with T1D was diagnosed in 15 patients. Normal small bowel mucosa was found in two T1D patients. Thirty-nine patients (mean age 12.8 ± 4.9 years) with other diagnoses (functional dyspepsia, duodenal ulcer, erosive gastritis, etc.) formed the control group. All CD patients had partial or subtotal villous atrophy according to the Marsh classification: Marsh grade IIIa in 9, grade IIIb in 21 and grade IIIc in 3 cases. Thirty-nine patients without CD and 2 with T1D had normal small bowel mucosa (Marsh grade 0). The densities of CD11c+, IDO+, CD103+, Langerin (CD207+) DCs and FOXP3+ Tregs were investigated by immunohistochemistry (on paraffin-embedded specimens) and immunofluorescence (on cryostat sections) methods using a combination of mono- and double-staining. Sixty-six serum samples were tested for IgA-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) using a fully automated EliA™ Celikey® IgA assay (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Freiburg, Germany). RESULTS: The density of CD11c+ DCs was significantly increased in CD patients compared with patients with normal mucosa (21.67 ± 2.49 vs 13.58 ± 1.51, P = 0.007). The numbers of FOXP3+ cells were significantly higher in CD patients (10.66 ± 1.50 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.0002) and in patients with CD and coexisting T1D (8.11 ± 1.64 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.002) compared with patients with normal mucosa. The density of FOXP3+ cells significantly correlated with the histological grade of atrophic changes in the small bowel mucosa according to the March classification (r = 0.62; P < 0.0001) and with levels of IgA antibody (r = 0.55; P < 0

  7. Differentiation between small bowel intussusception in children and adults and the radiological findings which require an operation

    Jeong, Myeong Ja; Lee, Ji Won; Han, Heon; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Kim, Soung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Jae Hyung; Jun, Woo Sun [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    To assess the differences in small bowel intussusceptions between children and adults, and to interpret the radiological findings requiring a surgical procedure. A total of 62 study subjects (35 children, 27 adults) with small bowel intussusception diagnosed by US or CT and seen between January 2005 and December 2007 were included in this study. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed both the medical records and radiological findings of each study subject. We contrasted the range of features found to be typical of small bowel intussusception for both children and adults based on cause, abdominal symptoms, diagnostic tools, and treatments. Also, we evaluated the radiological findings requiring a surgical procedure. The causes of small bowel intussusception were not identified in children; however, 4 adults were found to have tumors (a lipoma, a hemangioma, 2 metastases) ({rho} = 0.031). All of the children (100%) and 8 adults (29.6%) had abdominal symptoms ({rho} < 0.001). The primary diagnostic tool in children was the US (31 cases, 88.6%), as opposed to the CT in adults (27 cases, 100%) ({rho} < 0.001). A spontaneous reduction was confirmed in all children (100%) and supposed in 23 adults (85.2%) ({rho} = 0.031). The noteworthy radiological findings of 4 study subjects having undergone a surgical procedure are masses at the lead point and small bowel obstruction ({rho} < 0.0001). Cases of small bowel intussusception in children are different from cases observed in adults, based on cause, symptoms, and diagnostic tools. However, most cases are spontaneously reduced. Important radiological findings requiring a surgical procedure were found to be caused by masses at the lead point and at the small bowel obstruction.

  8. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the human fetal small bowel as shown by c-kit immunohistochemistry

    Wester, T.; Eriksson, L; Olsson, Y; L. Olsen

    1999-01-01

    Background—Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, which is required for their development and spontaneous pacemaker activity in the bowel. From murine models it has been proposed that ICCs do not develop until after birth, but more recent findings indicate that c-kit is expressed early in the embryonic period. The temporal development of ICCs in the human gut remains unknown. 
Aim—To investigate ICCs in the human fetal small bowel u...

  9. An Intestinal Occlusion Device for Prevention of Small Bowel Distention During Transgastric Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery

    Jonathan M. Tomasko; Mathew, Abraham; Moyer, Matthew T.; Haluck, Randy S.; Pauli, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bowel distention from luminal gas insufflation reduces the peritoneal operative domain during natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures, increases the risk for iatrogenic injury, and leads to postoperative patient discomfort. Methods: A prototype duodenal occlusion device was placed in the duodenum before NOTES in 28 female pigs. The occlusion balloon was inflated and left in place during the procedure, and small bowel distension was subject...

  10. IMPAIRED SMALL BOWEL BARRIER INTEGRITY IN THE PRESENCE OF LUMENAL PANCREATIC DIGESTIVE ENZYMES LEADS TO CIRCULATORY SHOCK

    Kistler, Erik B.; Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2012-01-01

    In bowel ischemia, impaired mucosal integrity may allow intestinal pancreatic enzyme products to become systemic and precipitate irreversible shock and death. This can be attenuated by pancreatic enzyme inhibition in the small bowel lumen. It is unresolved, however, whether ischemically-mediated mucosal disruption is the key event allowing pancreatic enzyme products systemic access, and whether intestinal digestive enzyme activity in concert with increased mucosal permeability leads to shock ...

  11. Chimerism induction by nonmyeloablactive preconditioning and bone marrow infusion in rat small bowel transplantation

    Bakonyi Neto Alexandre

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In our previous work we demonstrated that the use of donor specific bone marrow infusions ( DSBMI after small bowel transplantation did not improve the graft survival after a short course of immunossupression. PURPOSE: In the current study, we evaluated whether recipient preconditioning with different regimens of radiation combined with DSBMI may enhance small bowel allograft survival with minimum recipient morbidity. METHODS: Heterotopic small bowel transplantation (SBTx was performed with Lewis rats as recipients and DA rats as donors, which were immunossupressed with a short course of tacrolimus (FK 506 at 1mg/Kg/day for 5 days and distributed in 4 groups: group 1 (n= 4 without both irradiation and DSBMI; Groups 2 (n= 6, 3 (n= 9 and 4 (n= 6 received 100 x 10(6 DSBM cells at the time of the transplant. Groups 3 and 4 were irradiated with 250 and 400 rd respectively. Animals were examined daily for clinical signs of rejection or GVHD. Blood samples were taken weekly for chimeric studies by FC and intestinal biopsies were performed every 2 weeks. RESULTS: Animals in G1 and G2 had minimal rejection at day 15 after SBTx while GVHD was clinically and histologically characterized in G 3 and G 4. Total chimerism and T-cell chimerism was higher in irradiated groups when compared to non-irradiated groups. With exception of G1 and 2 where rejection was the cause of death, all animals in G3 and 4 died of GVHD. CONCLUSION:We concluded that low cytoreductive of irradiation can successfully decrease the graft rejection but not prevent the occurrence of GVHD.

  12. Studies of the small bowel surface by scanning electron microscopy in infants with persistent diarrhea

    U. Fagundes-Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the ultrastructural abnormalities of the small bowel surface in 16 infants with persistent diarrhea. The age range of the patients was 2 to 10 months, mean 4.8 months. All patients had diarrhea lasting 14 or more days. Bacterial overgrowth of the colonic microflora in the jejunal secretion, at concentrations above 10(4 colonies/ml, was present in 11 (68.7% patients. The stool culture was positive for an enteropathogenic agent in 8 (50.0% patients: for EPEC O111 in 2, EPEC O119 in 1, EAEC in 1, and Shigella flexneri in 1; mixed infections due to EPEC O111 and EAEC in 1 patient, EPEC O119 and EAEC in 1 and EPEC O55, EPEC O111, EAEC and Shigella sonnei in 1. Morphological abnormalities in the small bowel mucosa were observed in all 16 patients, varying in intensity from moderate 9 (56.3% to severe 7 (43.7%. The scanning electron microscopic study of small bowel biopsies from these subjects showed several surface abnormalities. At low magnification (100X most of the villi showed mild to moderate stunting, but on several occasions there was subtotal villus atrophy. At higher magnification (7,500X photomicrographs showed derangement of the enterocytes; on several occasions the cell borders were not clearly defined and very often microvilli were decreased in number and height; in some areas there was a total disappearance of the microvilli. In half of the patients a mucus-fibrinoid pseudomembrane was seen partially coating the enterocytes, a finding that provides additional information on the pathophysiology of persistent diarrhea.

  13. Accelerating the transit time of barium sulphate suspensions in small bowel examinations

    Purpose: To determine whether hyperosmolar and effervescent agents proven individually to accelerate transit time in the barium small bowel examination have an additive effect when combined, surpassing that of either agent alone. Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-nine patients were randomised to four groups. Three hundred milliliters of barium sulphate alone was given to the first group. Fifteen milliliters of iodinated hyperosmolar contrast agent (Gastrografin, meglumine/sodium diatrizoate, Schering) was given in addition to barium sulphate to the second group while six packets of effervescent granules (Carbex, Ferring) were added for the third group. The final group was given a combination of both additives and barium sulphate. The time taken following ingestion for the contrast column to reach the caecum, as assessed by frequent interval fluoroscopy, was recorded. A subgroup of 32 patients were selected randomly from the four groups, 8 from each and assessed for quality of examination. Statistical assessments were made using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: One hundred and nineteen patients were analysed after exclusions. The addition of accelerant to barium sulphate, both individually and in combination significantly reduced the small bowel transit time (p < 0.001). No significant difference existed between the additives when used with barium alone. The combined group had significantly faster transit times compared to the hyperosmolar group (p = 0.02). Differences between combined and effervescent groups tended towards significance (p = 0.09). No significant difference existed between groups when examination quality was assessed. Conclusion: These results suggest that the addition of combined effervescent and hyperosmolar agents to the barium suspension may significantly shorten the small bowel transit time without adversely affecting examination quality. This has implications for patient acceptability of the examination as well as

  14. Intussusception of the small bowel secondary to malignant metastases in two 80-year-old people: a case series

    Papanicolaou Athanasios

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Small bowel intussusception is rare in adults and accounts for one percent of all bowel obstructions. Malignancy is the etiologic agent in approximately 50 percent of all cases. Case presentation Our first patient was an 80-year-old Caucasian woman with signs and symptoms of intermittent bowel obstruction for the last 12 months. Pre-operative investigation by abdominal computed tomography scanning revealed an obstruction at the ileocecal valve. Exploratory laparotomy revealed an ileocecal intussusception. She underwent an enterectomy. Histological examination showed metastatic breast cancer (lobular carcinoma. Our patient had previously undergone a mastectomy due to carcinoma three years earlier. Our second patient was an 80-year-old Caucasian man with signs and symptoms of acute bowel obstruction. Pre-operative investigation by abdominal computed tomography scanning showed an intussusception in the proximal part of the small bowel. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a jejunojejunal intussusception. He underwent an enterectomy. Histological examination showed metastatic melanoma. Our patient had a prior history of a primary cutaneous melanoma which was excised two years ago. Conclusion Pre-operative determination of the etiologic agent of intussusception in the small bowel in adults is difficult. Although a computed tomography scan is very helpful, the diagnosis of intussusception is made by exploratory laparotomy and histological examination defines the etiologic agent. A prior malignancy in the patient's history must be taken under consideration as a possible cause of intussusception.

  15. Prevalence of small bowel bacterial overgrowth and its association with nutrition intake in nonhospitalized older adults

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Klein, B.; Schecher, K.;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) in older adults and to assess whether SBBO is associated with abdominal complaints and nutrient intake. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Eight senior residence sites in Stuttgart, Germany. PARTICIPANTS: Older...... nutritional status was recorded with a computer-aided diet history. RESULTS: The prevalence of a positive hydrogen breath test (>10 ppm increase) was 15.6% in older adults, compared with 5.9% in subjects aged 24 to 59. The intake of inhibitors of gastric acid production contributed significantly to the high...

  16. Meckel’s diverticulitis causing small bowel obstruction by a novel mechanism

    Vishalkumar G. Shelat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Meckel’s diverticulum occurs in 2% of the general population and majority of patients remain asymptomatic. Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common presentation in the paediatric population. While asymptomatic and incidentally found Meckel’s diverticulum may be left alone, surgery is essential for treating a symptomatic patient. Despite advances in imaging and technology, pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult. We present a first report of an unusual mechanism of small bowel obstruction due to Meckel’s diverticulitis in a paediatric patient. The diagnosis was only apparent at laparotomy.

  17. Imaging findings of midgut volvuIus associated with a large small-bowel diverticulum in an aduIt patient: case report

    Kim, Jee Young; Rha, Sung Eun; Oh, Soon Nam; Bo, Seal Hwang; Byun, Jae Young [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-01

    Although most patients with jejunoileal diverticulum are asymptomatic, a large, small-bowel diverticulum can be associated with midgut volvulus in an adult. We present a rare case of midgut volvulus that was associated with a large, small-bowel diverticulum in a 77-year-old woman presenting with chronic recurrent abdominal pain. The CT showed the characteristic whirl sign of twisted mesentery, the small bowel loops along the superior mesenteric artery and a large sac-like small-bowel diverticulum. A small bowel series also demonstrated a corkscrew appearance of proximal jejunum, a finding suggestive of midgut volvulus, and a large jejunal diverticulum. During the laparotomy, the small bowel was seen twisted counterclockwise 270 .deg.. The mesenteric root was very shortened. A 4 cm sized diverticulum was seen on the mesenteric border of jejunum, on the portion about 40 cm distal from the Treitz ligament.

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: meaningful association or unnecessary hype.

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Srivastava, Deepakshi

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, and altered stool form and passage. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which there is overgrowth of bacteria in small bowel in excess of 10⁵ colony forming units per milliliter on culture of the upper gut aspirate. Frequency of SIBO varied from 4%-78% among patients with IBS and from 1%-40% among controls. Higher frequency in some studies might be due to fallacious criteria [post-lactulose breath-hydrogen rise 20 PPM above basal within 90 min (early-peak)]. Glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) has a low sensitivity to diagnose SIBO. Hence, studies based on GHBT might have under-estimated frequency of SIBO. Therefore, it is important to analyze these studies carefully to evaluate whether the reported association between IBS and SIBO is over or under-projected. This review evaluates studies on association between SIBO and IBS, discordance between different studies, their strength and weakness including methodological issues and evidence on therapeutic manipulation of gut flora on symptoms of IBS. PMID:24627585

  19. Evaluation of small bowel blood flow in healthy subjects receiving low-dose aspirin

    Urara Nishida, Mototsugu Kato, Mutsumi Nishida, Go Kamada, Takeshi Yoshida, Shouko Ono, Yuichi Shimizu, Masahiro Asaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between low-dose aspirin-induced small bowel mucosal damage and blood flow, and the effect of rebamipide.METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The subjects were divided into two groups: a placebo group given low-dose aspirin plus placebo and a rebamipide group given low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide for a period of 14 d. Capsule endoscopy and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography were performed before and after administration of drugs. Areas under the curves and peak value of time-intensity curve were calculated.RESULTS: Absolute differences in areas under the curves were -1102.5 (95% CI: -1980.3 to -224.7, P = 0.0194 in the placebo group and -152.7 (95% CI: -1604.2 to 641.6, P = 0.8172 in the rebamipide group. Peak values of time intensity curves were -148.0 (95% CI: -269.4 to -26.2, P = 0.0225 in the placebo group and 28.3 (95% CI: -269.0 to 325.6, P = 0.8343 in the rebamipide group. Capsule endoscopy showed mucosal breaks only in the placebo group.CONCLUSION: Short-term administration of low-dose aspirin is associated with small bowel injuries and blood flow.

  20. Effect of acetylcysteine on adaptation of intestinal smooth muscle after small bowel bypass

    The authors have postulated that the adaptive changes in function and structure of bypassed segments of small bowel are due in part to the change in intestinal contents following operation. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if a mucolytic agent could alter the adaptation. Rats were anesthetized and a 70% jejunoileal bypass was performed. The bypassed segments then were perfused with either saline or acetylcysteine for 3-12 days. Then, either intestinal transit was determined using Cr-51, or segments were taken for morphometric analysis. Transit, as assessed by the geometric center, was increased 32% by acetylcysteine treatment. Treatment also caused a decrease in hypertrophy of the muscularis. Muscle wet weight, muscle cross-sectional area, and muscle layer thickness all were significantly less in those animals infused with acetyl-cysteine. No decreases in hypertrophy were seen in the in-continuity segments. These data indicate that alterations in intestinal content can affect the course of adaptation of intestinal muscle in response to small bowel bypass

  1. Evaluation of small bowel blood flow in healthy subjects receiving low-dose aspirin

    Urara Nishida; Mototsugu Kato; Mutsumi Nishida; Go Kamada; Takeshi Yoshida; Shouko Ono; Yuichi Shimizu; Masahiro Asaka

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between low-dose aspirin-induced small bowel mucosal damage and blood flow, and the effect of rebamipide.METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The subjects were divided into two groups:a placebo group given low-dose aspirin plus placebo and a rebamipide group given low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide for a period of 14 d. Capsule endoscopy and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography were performed before and after administration of drugs. Areas under the curves and peak value of time-intensity curve were calculated.RESULTS: Absolute differences in areas under the curves were -1102.5 (95% CI: -1980.3 to -224.7, P = 0.0194) in the placebo group and -152.7 (95% CI:-1604.2 to 641.6, P = 0.8172) in the rebamipide group.Peak values of time intensity curves were -148.0 (95%CI: -269.4 to -26.2, P = 0.0225) in the placebo group and 28.3 (95% CI: -269.0 to 325.6, P = 0.8343) in the rebamipide group. Capsule endoscopy showed mucosal breaks only in the placebo group.CONCLUSION: Short-term administration of low-dose aspirin is associated with small bowel injuries and blood flow.

  2. CT enterography: a preliminary experience in the evaluation of small bowel diseases

    Costa-Silva, Luciana [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Medical School. Dept. of Supplementary Propedeutics; Martins, Tatiana [Ecoar Medicina Diagnostica, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Passos, Maria do Carmo Friche [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Medical School. Dept. of Medical Practice

    2010-09-15

    Objective: the present study was aimed at demonstrating the value of computed tomography enterography (CT enterography) and how this imaging method can be useful in the diagnostic elucidation and assessment of patients with small bowel diseases. Materials and methods: retrospective evaluation of 35 patients submitted to CT enterography in a 16-row multidetector CT equipment from May/2008 to March/2009. All the patients received intravenous and neutral oral iodinated contrast agents (polyethylene glycol). Main indications were: Crohn's disease, diarrhea of undetermined origin and suspicion of neoplasia. Results: a good correlation was observed between CT enterography findings and clinical, laboratory and endoscopic data related to the disease activity in patients with Crohn's disease. In 15 cases alterations compatible with Crohn's disease were identified, nine of them suggesting disease activity. A diagnosis was achieved in the majority of the patients with diarrhea. Carcinoid tumors were identified in two patients. Conclusion: CT enterography is a simple and effective method in the evaluation of inflammatory/neoplastic small bowel diseases, particularly in cases of Crohn's disease, indicating disease activity. One of the main advantages of this method is the possibility of evaluating associated mesenteric and extraintestinal alterations (author)

  3. CT enterography: a preliminary experience in the evaluation of small bowel diseases

    Objective: the present study was aimed at demonstrating the value of computed tomography enterography (CT enterography) and how this imaging method can be useful in the diagnostic elucidation and assessment of patients with small bowel diseases. Materials and methods: retrospective evaluation of 35 patients submitted to CT enterography in a 16-row multidetector CT equipment from May/2008 to March/2009. All the patients received intravenous and neutral oral iodinated contrast agents (polyethylene glycol). Main indications were: Crohn's disease, diarrhea of undetermined origin and suspicion of neoplasia. Results: a good correlation was observed between CT enterography findings and clinical, laboratory and endoscopic data related to the disease activity in patients with Crohn's disease. In 15 cases alterations compatible with Crohn's disease were identified, nine of them suggesting disease activity. A diagnosis was achieved in the majority of the patients with diarrhea. Carcinoid tumors were identified in two patients. Conclusion: CT enterography is a simple and effective method in the evaluation of inflammatory/neoplastic small bowel diseases, particularly in cases of Crohn's disease, indicating disease activity. One of the main advantages of this method is the possibility of evaluating associated mesenteric and extraintestinal alterations (author)

  4. The stepchild of intestinal diagnostics. Evaluation of radiological methods to diagnose leiomyomas of the small bowel

    Purpose: Various radiological methods to diagnose small bowel neoplasmas and problems of differential diagnosis specially considerating leiomyomas are discussed. Patients and methods: Two patients with leiomyoma of the ileum underwent enteroclysis, computed tomography of the abdomen, intra-arterial DSA and colour Doppler sonography. Another patient with leiomyosarcoma just underwent CT of the abdomen with CT-guided biopsy. Results: Due to the homogenous density and the smooth surface of the tumors in computed tomography and respectively enteroclysis and the presentation of the tumor vascularisation in the angiography and Colour Doppler sonography in both patients a leiomyoma of the small bowel was diagnosed. Postoperatively this diagnosis was histologically confirmed. The CT-findings of the patient with leiomyosarcoma were not suspicious of a malignant tumor. Conclusion: Radiologically it is not possible to determine the dignity of smooth muscle cell tumors safely. That is the reason why the diagnosis has to be achieved operatively. But the histopathological diagnosis based on the mitotic rate may be difficult. Therefore the after care has to be carried out thoroughly. (orig.)

  5. Growing indications for CEUS: The kidney, testis, lymph nodes, thyroid, prostate, and small bowel

    Cantisani, V., E-mail: vito.cantisani@uniroma1.it [Department of Radiology, Anatomopathology and Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Weskott, H.P. [Central Ultrasound Department, Klinikum Siloah , Hannover (Germany); Romanini, L. [University Hospital of Pavia (Italy); Grazhdani, H. [Department of Radiology, Anatomopathology and Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy); Passamonti, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Ospedale di Lodi (Italy); Drudi, F.M.; Malpassini, F. [Department of Radiology, Anatomopathology and Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy); Isidori, A. [Department of Experimental Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Meloni, F.M. [Dipartimento servizi diagnostici, Ospedale Valduce, Como (Italy); Calliada, F. [University Hospital of Pavia (Italy); D’Ambrosio, F. [Department of Radiology, Anatomopathology and Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is increasingly used for non-hepatic applications. • There is a growing clinical use for a variety of pathologies of the kidney, testis, and small bowel. • Updated knowledge for proper use of CEUS in uncommon fields is provided. - Abstract: Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is increasingly used for non-hepatic applications as well, so that nearly all organs have been investigated. Among them, there is a growing clinical use for a variety of pathologies of the kidney, testis, and small bowel. The possibility to differentiate benign from malignant nodes in cancer patients has been investigated. A new application is in the detection of sentinel nodes after intradermal microbubble injection. The need to distinguish thyroid nodules eligible for fine needle aspiration cytology has led to the use of CEUS in thyroid examinations as well. The potential of CEUS for prostate cancer detection has been extensively investigated, with encouraging initial results. Early promise, however, has not been fulfilled. New perspective regards evaluation of the extent of prostate tissue devascularization following ablative treatments.

  6. Geriatric Small Bowel Obstruction: An Analysis of Treatment and Outcomes Compared to a Younger Cohort

    Krause, William R.; Webb, Travis P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common condition, but little is known about its presentation, management, and outcomes in geriatric patients. Methods A retrospective review was performed comparing geriatric (≥65 years of age) and non-geriatric patients admitted with SBO. Admission characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were compared. Data analysis included Student’s t test and chi-square test or Fisher exact test. Results Among 80 geriatric and 136 non-geriatric patients no difference was observed between admission characteristics, treatment, time to or type of surgery, length of post-op stay, or overall complications. Cardiac complications (15% vs 0%, p=0.0082) and sub-acute care facility discharge (29% vs 5%, prisk profile and discharge disposition discussion should be encouraged. Summary This study analyzes geriatric patients presenting with small bowel obstruction when cared for by an Acute Care Surgery service. Compared to younger adults, the presentation, treatment response, and outcomes are similar with the exception of cardiac complications and discharge destination. PMID:25048569

  7. Growing indications for CEUS: The kidney, testis, lymph nodes, thyroid, prostate, and small bowel

    Highlights: • Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is increasingly used for non-hepatic applications. • There is a growing clinical use for a variety of pathologies of the kidney, testis, and small bowel. • Updated knowledge for proper use of CEUS in uncommon fields is provided. - Abstract: Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is increasingly used for non-hepatic applications as well, so that nearly all organs have been investigated. Among them, there is a growing clinical use for a variety of pathologies of the kidney, testis, and small bowel. The possibility to differentiate benign from malignant nodes in cancer patients has been investigated. A new application is in the detection of sentinel nodes after intradermal microbubble injection. The need to distinguish thyroid nodules eligible for fine needle aspiration cytology has led to the use of CEUS in thyroid examinations as well. The potential of CEUS for prostate cancer detection has been extensively investigated, with encouraging initial results. Early promise, however, has not been fulfilled. New perspective regards evaluation of the extent of prostate tissue devascularization following ablative treatments

  8. Gradient-enhanced volume rendering: an image processing strategy to facilitate whole small bowel imaging with MRI

    Wyss, Michael [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M.; Patak, Michael A.; Juli, Christoph F.; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Scheidegger, Markus B. [ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Wentz, Klaus U. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); University of Witten Herdecke, Herdecke (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    MRI of the small bowel with positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent is a promising non-invasive imaging method. The aim of our study was to introduce small bowel MRI in a display format that clinicians are accustomed to and that maximizes the amount of information visualized on a single image. Twelve healthy volunteers, median age 32 years (range 18-49 years) participated in the study. A mixture of 20 ml Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), 0.8 g/kg body weight psyllium fibre (Metamucil) and 1.2 l water were sequentially administered over a period of 4 h. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T unit (Philips Gyroscan, Intera). Fat-saturated, 3D, gradient echo imaging was performed while the patient was in apnea (30 s). Bowel motion was reduced with 40 mg intravenously administered scopolamine (Buscopan). A 3D, gradient-enhanced, volume rendering technique was applied to the 3D data sets. Standard projections [left anterior oblique (LAO), right anterior oblique (RAO), supine and prone] resembling conventional enteroclysis were successfully generated within fewer than 10 min processing time. Reconstructions were reproducible and provided an entire overview of the small bowel. In addition thin-slab volume rendering allowed an overlap-free display of individual structures. Positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent, combined with a gradient enhanced volume rendering method, allows the reconstruction of the small bowel in a pattern resembling conventional double-contrast enteroclysis. Segmental display without overlay is possible. (orig.)

  9. Invasive aspergillosis causing small bowel infarction in a patient of carcinoma breast undergoing chemotherapy

    Jain Vinod

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report a 45 year old lady presenting with proximal jejunal gangrene due to invasive Aspergillosis. The patient was undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for advance carcinoma of breast (Stage IV. Methods The patient was referred to our surgical emergency for acute abdominal symptoms for 6 hours. Histopathology revealed bowel wall necrosis and vascular invasion by Aspergillus Fumigatus. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the patient received Amphotericin-B (1 mg/kg/day for invasive aspergillosis. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was confirmed by isolating Aspergillus Fumigatus from bronchoalveolar lavage and by a positive circulating galactomannan test (ELISA Assay. Results Detailed history revealed dry cough and two episodes of haemoptesis for 2 weeks. Haemogram and counts revealed anemia and neutropenia. Plain X – ray of the abdomen showed multiple air fluid levels and ultrasound of the abdomen revealed distended bowel loops. On exploration small bowel was found to be gangrenous. The patient was successfully managed by supportive treatment and conventional intravenous Amphotericin-B for 2 weeks. The lady was discharged one week after completion of antifungal therapy and one month later she underwent toilet mastectomy. The lady came to follow up for 1 year and she is currently under hormone therapy. Conclusion With the emergence of new and powerful immunosuppressive, anticancer drugs and potent antibiotics the survival of transplant and critically ill patients has remarkably increased but it has shown a significant rise in the incidence of invasive opportunistic fungal infections. We conclude hat the diagnosis of invasive gastrointestinal aspergillosis may be considered in a neutropenic patient with acute abdominal symptoms.

  10. Microscopy of bacterial translocation during small bowel obstruction and ischemia in vivo – a new animal model

    Hafner Mathias

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing animal models provide only indirect information about the pathogenesis of infections caused by indigenous gastrointestinal microflora and the kinetics of bacterial translocation. The aim of this study was to develop a novel animal model to assess bacterial translocation and intestinal barrier function in vivo. Methods In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, 0.5 ml of a suspension of green fluorescent protein-transfected E. coli was administered by intraluminal injection in a model of small bowel obstruction. Animals were randomly subjected to non-ischemic or ischemic bowel obstruction. Ischemia was induced by selective clamping of the terminal mesenteric vessels feeding the obstructed bowel loop. Time intervals necessary for translocation of E. coli into the submucosal stroma and the muscularis propria was assessed using intravital microscopy. Results Bacterial translocation into the submucosa and muscularis propria took a mean of 36 ± 8 min and 80 ± 10 min, respectively, in small bowel obstruction. Intestinal ischemia significantly accelerated bacterial translocation into the submucosa (11 ± 5 min, p E. coli were visible in frozen sections of small bowel, mesentery, liver and spleen taken two hours after E. coli administration. Conclusions Intravital microscopy of fluorescent bacteria is a novel approach to study bacterial translocation in vivo. We have applied this technique to define minimal bacterial transit time as a functional parameter of intestinal barrier function.

  11. Computed tomography to detect body packing: an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction

    Concealment of illicit drugs within the alimentary tract is now an established method used by both smugglers and traffickers to evade detection by authorities. Those who ingest wrapped packets of drugs to transport them across international borders are known as 'body packers,' whereas those who ingest packages of drugs upon an unexpected encounter with law enforcement agents are known as 'body stuffers' or 'quick swallowers. Although most of these individuals require no medical care, acute drug toxicity (from inadvertent leaking of contents or rupture of the drug packet) and bowel obstruction are recognized hazards of drug packet ingestion. The detection of these packets is a challenge to custom officials and police interested in preventing the import and trafficking of illegal drugs, as well as to physicians who have to treat individuals who have ingested them. We report a case of a 38-year-old intravenous drug abuser who presented with an acute small bowel obstruction secondary to an impacted intraluminal heroin balloon in the mid jejunum. The value of computed tomography (CT) in the patient's diagnostic evaluation is highlighted. (author)

  12. Computed tomography to detect body packing: an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction

    Brown, J.A. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Phang, T. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Surgery, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Enns, R. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Butchart, M.K. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Filipenko, J.D. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Pathology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Mason, A.C.; Cooperberg, P.I. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2002-04-01

    Concealment of illicit drugs within the alimentary tract is now an established method used by both smugglers and traffickers to evade detection by authorities. Those who ingest wrapped packets of drugs to transport them across international borders are known as 'body packers,' whereas those who ingest packages of drugs upon an unexpected encounter with law enforcement agents are known as 'body stuffers' or 'quick swallowers. Although most of these individuals require no medical care, acute drug toxicity (from inadvertent leaking of contents or rupture of the drug packet) and bowel obstruction are recognized hazards of drug packet ingestion. The detection of these packets is a challenge to custom officials and police interested in preventing the import and trafficking of illegal drugs, as well as to physicians who have to treat individuals who have ingested them. We report a case of a 38-year-old intravenous drug abuser who presented with an acute small bowel obstruction secondary to an impacted intraluminal heroin balloon in the mid jejunum. The value of computed tomography (CT) in the patient's diagnostic evaluation is highlighted. (author)

  13. Small bowel obstruction due to an endometriotic ileal stricture with associated appendiceal endometriosis: A case report and systematic review of the literature

    Priyanka A. Sali

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Ours is probably the first case of small bowel obstruction due to ileal and appendiceal endometriosis that was managed with laparoscopic right hemicolectomy. We highlight the preoperative diagnostic dilemma and the progression of the cyclical symptoms. Thus, endometriosis must be considered in cases of small bowel obstruction in women in the reproductive age group as a rare cause.

  14. Prospective study of treatment techniques to minimize the volume of pelvic small bowel with reduction of acute and late effects associated with pelvic irradiation

    The volume, distribution, and mobility of opacified pelvic small bowel (PSB) were determined by fluoroscopy and orthogonal radiographs in 150 consecutive patients undergoing pelvic irradiation. Various techniques including uteropexy, omental transposition, bladder distention, inclining the patient, and anterior abdominal wall compression in the supine and prone treatment position were studied for their effect on the volume and location of small bowel within the pelvis. Abdominal wall compression in the prone position combined with bladder distention was selected for further investigation because of its simplicity, reproducibility, patient comfort, and ability to displace the small bowel. Factors correlating with the volume of pelvic small bowel (PSB) included prior pelvic surgery, pelvic irradiation (XRT), and body mass index. After pelvic surgery, especially following abdominoperineal resection (APR), there was a greater volume of PSB which was also less mobile. The severity of acute gastrointestinal effects positively correlated with the volume of irradiated small bowel. Overall, 67% of patients experienced little or no diarrhea, 30% developed mild diarrhea, and no patient required treatment interruption. Late gastrointestinal effects correlated with the prior pelvic surgery and with the volume of small bowel receiving greater than 45 Gy. Small bowel obstruction was not observed in 75 patients who had no previous pelvic surgery. However, following pelvic surgery excluding APR, 2/50 patients and following APR, 3/25 patients developed small bowel obstruction

  15. Acute small bowel obstruction caused by endometriosis: A case report and review of the literature

    Antonella De Ceglie; Claudio Bilardi; Sabrina Blanchi; Massimo Picasso; Marcello Di Muzio; Alberto Trimarchi; Massimo Conio

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal involvement of endometriosis has been found in 3%-37% of menstruating women and exclusive localization on the ileum is very rare (1%-7%).Endometriosis of the distal ileum is an infrequent cause of intestinal obstruction,ranging from 7% to 23% of all cases with intestinal involvement.We report a case in which endometrial infiltration of the small bowel caused acute obstruction requiring emergency surgery,in a woman whose symptoms were not related to menses.Histology of the resected specimen showed that endometriosis was mainly prevalent in the muscularis propria and submucosa and that the mucosa was not ulcerated but had inflammation and glandular alteration. Endometrial lymph node involvement,with a cystic glandular pattern was also deted.

  16. Small bowel diverticulosis as a cause of ileus: a case report.

    Janevska, D; Trajkovska, M; Janevski, V; Serafimoski, V

    2013-01-01

    Small bowel diverticulosis (SBD) is a rare condition. In most cases it is asymptomatic, but sometimes it can be manifested with chronic non-specific or acute symptoms. Because of the absence of pathognomonic signs and symptoms and truly reliable diagnostic tests, SBD is hard to diagnose and this is usually done incidentally by radiographic examination or during laparatomy. For uncomplicated patients, those with chronic abdominal pain, syndromes of malabsorption related to jejunoileal diverticulosis, bacterial overgrowth or an episode of intestinal obstruction, as in our case, conservative management is the initial option for treatment. A case of a patient with obstructive symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract due to SBD that was conservatively treated and had a positive outcome is presented. PMID:23917752

  17. Seatbelt injury causing small bowel devascularisation: case series and review of the literature.

    O'Dowd, Vincent

    2012-01-31

    The use of seatbelts has increased significantly in the last twenty years, leading to a decrease in mortality from road traffic accidents (RTA). However, this increase in seatbelt use has also led to a change in the spectrum of injuries from RTA; abdominal injuries, particularly intestinal injuries have dramatically increased with the routine use of seatbelts. Such intestinal injuries frequently result from improper placement of the "lap belt". We present 3 cases in which passengers wearing a seatbelt sustained significant devascularisation injuries to the small bowel requiring emergency surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is crucial in such cases to prevent delays in diagnosis that can lead to severe complications and adverse outcomes. It is evident that while advocating seatbelt use, the importance of education in correct seatbelt placement should also be a focus of public health strategies to reduce RTA morbidity and mortality.

  18. Capsule Endoscopy for Ileitis with Potential Involvement of Other Sections of the Small Bowel

    Hyun Seok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ileitis is defined as inflammation of the ileum. This condition includes ulcers, aphthous ulcers, erosions, and nodular or erythematous mucosa. Various etiologies are associated with ileitis. Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, infectious conditions, neoplasms, infiltrative disorders, vasculitides, spondyloarthritis, endometriosis, and radiation therapy-related conditions involve the ileum. However, the differential diagnosis of terminal ileitis can be difficult in many cases. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE has become a useful tool for the diagnosis of a variety of small bowel lesions. This review describes each of the various conditions associated with ileitis and the diagnostic value of VCE for ileitis, which may help identify and evaluate these conditions in clinical practice. Based on the information provided by VCE, a definitive diagnosis could be made using the patients’ medical history, clinical course, laboratory and ileocolonoscopic findings, radiologic imaging findings, and histologic findings.

  19. Massive retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma presenting with small bowel obstruction 18 years following initial diagnosis.

    Cronin, E M P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ganglioneuroma is a rare tumour of neural crest origin, which arises from maturation of a neuroblastoma. While previously considered to be non-functioning, they are now known to be frequently endocrinologically active. AIMS AND METHODS: We report a case of a massive retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma presenting with small bowel obstruction in an adult, 18 years after initial diagnosis. Urinary dopamine levels were elevated, but other catecholamines were within normal limits. This is the first report in the English-language literature of a retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma presenting with or causing intestinal obstruction. We also review the metabolic, radiological, and histological features of these tumours. Relevant publications were identified from a Medline search using the MeSH headings \\'ganglioneuroma\\

  20. Medical risk factors for small-bowel adenocarcinoma with focus on Crohn's disease

    Kærlev, Linda; Teglbjaerg, P.S.; Sabroe, Svend;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn disease and biliary diseases have been associated with small-bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA). We examined how medical conditions affect the risk of SBA. METHODS: A population-based European multicentre case-control study during the period 1995-97 including 95 histologically verified...... cases of SBA along with 3335 population controls; 70 cases (74%) and 2070 (62%) controls were interviewed about previous medical conditions. RESULTS: Crohn disease was identified in two SBA cases (both located in ileum) and two controls; odds ratio (OR) 53.6 (6.0-477) (95% CI in parentheses). Only one...... case and no controls had had long-standing Crohn disease. Coeliac disease was associated with SBA (2 cases, 0 controls), but one of the cases was diagnosed at the same time as the SBA. Overall, people with a history of gallstones had no increased risk of SBA. The OR was exclusively increased during the...

  1. Capsule endoscopy in suspected small bowel Crohn's disease: Economic impact of disease diagnosis and treatment

    Jonathan A Leighton; Ian M Gralnek; Randel E Richner; Michael J Lacey; Frank J Papatheofanis

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To model clinical and economic benefits of capsule endoscopy (CE) compared to ileo-colonoscopy and small bowel follow-through (SBFT) for evaluation of suspected Crohn's disease (CD).METHODS: Using decision analytic modeling, total and yearly costs of diagnostic work-up for suspected CD were calculated, including procedure-related adverse events,hospitalizations, office visits, and medications. The model compared CE to SBFT following ileo-colonoscopy and secondarily compared CE to SBFT for initial evaluation.RESULTS: Aggregate charges for newly diagnosed,medically managed patients are approximately $8295.Patients requiring aggressive medical management costs are $29 508; requiring hospitalization, $49 074.At sensitivity > 98.7% and specificity of > 86.4%, CE is less costly than SBFT.CONCLUSION: Costs of CE for diagnostic evaluation of suspected CD is comparable to SBFT and may be used immediately following ileo-colonoscopy.

  2. Tumor estromal gastrointestinal de intestino delgado Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of small bowel

    Francisco Marivaldo Benício da Silva

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Stromal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (gists represent relatively rare lesions that arise from connective tissue elements located along the entire length of the gut. They were initially identified by immunohistochemical investigation, proving their origin from nondifferentiated mesenchymal cells. Only a minority of this lesions, mainly those confined to the esophagus and rectum, have been shown to correspond to mature, well-differentiated types of neoplasms such as leiomyoma or leiomyosarcoma. The majority of gists corresponds to a heterogeneous group of lesions that have as their common denominator an immature proliferation of epithelioid or spindle cells arising from its muscle layers, or between them, showing partial or incomplete myoide, neural, ganglionic, or mixed features of differentiation. This case report intends to show a gist of small bowel in a male, 46 years old, with a two-year of evolution.

  3. Small bowel perforation due to indistinguishable metastasis of angiosarcoma: case report and brief literature review.

    Uchihara, Tomoyuki; Imamura, Yu; Iwagami, Shiro; Kajihara, Ikko; Kanemaru, Hisashi; Karashima, Ryuichi; Ida, Satoshi; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Baba, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Iyama, Ken-Ichi; Ihn, Hironobu; Baba, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    Intestinal metastasis of angiosarcoma is extremely rare. We herein report a case of intestinal perforation due to intestinal metastasis of angiosarcoma. The patient was a 72-year-old Japanese man with multiple recurrent angiosarcomas of the scalp. He developed acute abdominal pain with guarding, and we performed an emergency exploratory laparotomy. An intestinal perforation was found 80 cm from the ligament of Treitz, and partial jejunectomy was successfully performed. Macroscopic inspection revealed no obvious injury, ulcer, or tumor at or around the perforation site. Pathological examination revealed angiosarcoma cells penetrating through all layers of the jejunum at the site of intestinal perforation. This is the first reported case of intestinal perforation caused by indistinguishable intestinal metastasis of angiosarcoma. This case emphasizes intestinal metastasis of angiosarcoma as a possible cause of small bowel perforation in patients with advanced angiosarcoma, even when no visible tumor is present during surgery. PMID:27156097

  4. MALIGNANT MELANOMA WITH MULTIPLE METASTASES ON THE SMALL BOWEL - CASE REPORT

    V.T. Grigorean

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant melanomas often cause intestinal metastasis.Metastases of malignant melanoma are the most common secondary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.The incidence of intestinal metastasis of malignant melanomas is 1.5-4.4% in clinical studies, reaching upto 35.6-58% in necroptic studies. AIM: We present a clinical case of multiple metastases to the smallbowel with point of departure right retroauricular malignant melanoma. METHODS: Patient T.I., 76years old, is admitted in our clinic with occlusion clinical features installed by approximately 2-3 days.From anamnesis we retain a subocclusion clinical feature installed by approximately 1-2 months, withgradual overheating. On clinical examination a right supraclavicular tumoral formation is found, sizing2.5-3cm, suggestive for malignant melanoma. The abdominal CT shows multiple tumoral formations inthe small bowel, with no other secondary determinations in the other organs. RESULTS: Intraoperatorywe have found six secondary lesions on the jejunum, two on the ileum and two mesenteric metastases. Itwas done partial enterectomy on the jejunal segment with latero-lateral jejuno-jejunal anastomoses andpartial enterectomy on the ileum segment with ileostoma. Postoperatory short-term outcome, at six andtwelve months was favorable. CONCLUSIONS: Small bowel metastases of malignant melanoma is thefirst suspected diagnosis in a patient with oclusive/suboclusive intestinal manifestations and clinicallesions suggestive of malignant melanoma. The patient presentes for acute complications (occlusion,intestinal perforation or chronic complications (chronic digestive bleeding, anemic syndrome. Oftennon-specific symptoms are present, which delay the diagnosis. Surgical treatment is the first therapeuticoption, even in case of multiple secondary determinations.

  5. Towards a less costly but accurate test of gastric emptying and small bowel transit

    Our aim is to develop a less costly but accurate test of stomach emptying and small bowel transit by utilizing selected scintigraphic observations 1-6 hr after ingestion of a radiolabeled solid meal. These selected data were compared with more detailed analyses that require multiple scans and labor-intensive technical support. A logistic discriminant analysis was used to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of selected summaries of scintigraphic transit measurements. We studied 14 patients with motility disorders (eight neuropathic and six myopathic, confirmed by standard gastrointestinal manometry) and 37 healthy subjects. The patient group had abnormal gastric emptying (GE) and small bowel transit time (SBTT). The proportion of radiolabel retained in the stomach from 2 to 4 hr (GE 2 hr, GE 3 hr, GE 4 hr), as well as the proportion filling the colon at 4 and 6 hr (CF 4 hr, CF 6 hr) were individually able to differentiate health from disease (P less than 0.05 for each). From the logistic discriminant model, an estimated sensitivity of 93% resulted in similar specificities for detailed and selected transit parameters for gastric emptying (range: 62-70%). Similarly, combining selected observations, such as GE 4 hr with CF 6 hr, had a specificity of 76%, which was similar to the specificity of combinations of more detailed analyses. Based on the present studies and future confirmation in a larger number of patients, including those with less severe motility disorders, the 2-, 4-, and 6-hr scans with quantitation of proportions of counts in stomach and colon should provide a useful, relatively inexpensive strategy to identify and monitor motility disorders in clinical and epidemiologic studies

  6. Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis without inflammatory bowel disease is genetically different from large duct disease

    Næss, Sigrid; Björnsson, Einar; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Al Mamari, Said; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Chapman, Roger; Bergquist, Annika; Melum, Espen; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Schrumpf, Erik; Lie, Benedicte A.; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Karlsen, Tom H.; Hov, Johannes R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is phenotypically a mild version of large duct PSC, but it is unknown whether these phenotypes share aetiology. We aimed to characterize their relationship by investigating genetic associations in the HLA complex, which represent the strongest genetic risk factors in large duct PSC. Methods Four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1) were genotyped in 87 small duct PSC patients, 485 large duct PSC patients and 1117 controls across three geographical regions. Results HLA-DRB1*13:01 (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.4, P=0.01) and HLA-B*08 (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4, P=0.02) were significantly associated with small duct PSC compared with healthy controls. Based on the observed frequency of HLA-B*08 in small duct PSC, the strongest risk factor in large duct PSC, an estimated 32% (95% CI 4%–65%) of this population can be hypothesized to represent early stages or mild variants of large duct PSC. This subgroup may be constituted by small duct PSC patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which greatly resembled large duct PSC in its HLA association. In contrast, small duct PSC without IBD was only associated with HLA-DRB1*13:01(P=0.03) and was otherwise distinctly dissimilar from large duct PSC. Conclusions Small duct PSC with IBD resembles large duct PSC in its HLA association and may represent early stages or mild variants of large duct disease. Different HLA associations in small duct PSC without IBD could indicate that this subgroup is a different entity. HLA-DRB1*13:01 may represent a specific risk factor for inflammatory bile duct disease. PMID:24517468

  7. A prospective study of differences in duodenum compared to remaining small bowel motion between radiation treatments: Implications for radiation dose escalation in carcinoma of the pancreas

    As a foundation for a dose escalation trial, we sought to characterize duodenal and non-duodenal small bowel organ motion between fractions of pancreatic radiation therapy. Nine patients (4 women, 5 men) undergoing radiation therapy were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients had up to four weekly CT scans performed during their course of radiation therapy. Pancreas, duodenum and non-duodenal small bowel were then contoured for each CT scan. On the initial scan, a four-field plan was generated to fully cover the pancreas. This plan was registered to each subsequent CT scan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analyses were performed for the duodenum, non-duodenal small bowel, large bowel, and pancreas. With significant individual variation, the volume of duodenum receiving at least 80% of the prescribed dose was consistently greater than the remaining small bowel. In the patient with the largest inter-fraction variation, the fractional volume of non-duodenal small bowel irradiated to at least the 80% isodose line ranged from 1% to 20%. In the patient with the largest inter-fraction variation, the fractional volume of duodenum irradiated to at least the 80% isodose line ranged from 30% to 100%. The volume of small bowel irradiated during four-field pancreatic radiation therapy changes substantially between fractions. This suggests dose escalation may be possible. However, dose limits to the duodenum should be stricter than for other segments of small bowel

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of capsule endoscopy for small bowel Crohn's disease is superior to that of MR enterography or CT enterography

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Nathan, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael;

    2011-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) detects small bowel Crohn's disease with greater diagnostic yield than radiologic procedures, although there are concerns that CE has low specificity. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of CE, magnetic resonance imaging enterography (MRE) and computed tomography...... enterography (CTE) in patients with suspected or newly diagnosed Crohn's disease....

  9. Distal small bowel motility and lipid absorption in patients following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair surgery

    Robert J Fraser; Paul Jury; John Dent; Marc Ritz; Addolorata C Di Matteo; Rosalie Vozzo; Monika Kwiatek; Robert Foreman; Brendan Stanley; Jack Walsh; Jim Burnett

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate distal small bowel motility and lipid absorption in patients following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair surgery.METHODS: Nine patients (aged 35-78 years; body mass index (BMI) range: 23-36 kg/m2) post-surgery for AAA repair, and seven healthy control subjects (20-50 years;BMI range: 21-29 kg/m2) were studied. Continuous distal small bowel manometry was performed for up to 72 h, during periods of fasting and enteral feeding (Nutrison(R)). Recordings were analyzed for the frequency,origin, length of migration, and direction of small intestinal burst activity. Lipid absorption was assessed on the first day and the third day post surgery in a subset of patients using the 13C-triolein-breath test, and compared with healthy controls. Subjects received a 20-min intraduodenal infusion of 50 mL liquid feed mixed with 200 μL 13C-triolein. End-expiratory breath samples were collected for 6 h and analyzed for 13CO2 concentration.RESULTS: The frequency of burst activity in the proximal and distal small intestine was higher in patients than in healthy subjects, under both fasting and fed conditions (P<0.005). In patients there was a higher proportion of abnormally propagated bursts (71% abnormal), which began to normalize by d 3 (25% abnormal) post-surgery.Lipid absorption data was available for seven patients on d 1 and four patients on d 3 post surgery. In patients,absorption on d 1 post-surgery was half that of healthy control subjects (AUC 13CO2 1323 ± 244 vs 2 646 ±365;P< 0.05, respectively), and was reduced to the one-fifth that of healthy controls by d 3 (AUC 13CO2 470 ± 832 vs 2646 ± 365; P< 0.05, respectively).CONCLUSION: Both proximal and distal small intestinal motor activity are transiently disrupted in critically ill patients immediately after major surgery,with abnormal motility patterns extending as far as the ileum. These motor disturbances may contribute to impaired absorption of enteral nutrition, especially when

  10. Diagnosis of Small-Bowel Diseases: Prospective Comparison of Multi-Detector Row CT Enterography with MR Enterography.

    Masselli, Gabriele; Di Tola, Marco; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Laghi, Francesca; Monti, Riccardo; Bernieri, Maria Giulia; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To prospectively compare the accuracies of computed tomographic (CT) enterography and magnetic resonance (MR) enterography for the detection and characterization of small-bowel diseases. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and informed consent was obtained from all participants. From June 2009 to July 2013, 150 consecutive patients (81 men and 69 women; mean age, 38.8 years; range, 18-74 years), who were suspected of having a small-bowel disease on the basis of clinical findings and whose previous upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy findings were normal, underwent CT and MR enterography. Two independent readers reviewed CT and MR enterographic images for the presence of small-bowel diseases, for differentiating between inflammatory and noninflammatory diseases, and for extraenteric complications. The histopathologic findings of surgical (n = 23) and endoscopic (n = 32) biopsy specimens were used as the reference standard; the results of video-capsule endoscopy (n = 36) and clinical follow-up (n = 59) were used only to confirm the absence of small-bowel disease. Results MR and CT enterography were successfully performed in all 150 patients. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, in identifying patients with small-bowel lesions were 75.9% (41 of 54), 94.8% (91 of 96), and 88.0% (132 of 150) for CT enterography and 92.6% (50 of 54), 99.0% (95 of 96), and 96.7% (145 of 150) for MR enterography. The sensitivity of MR enterography was significantly higher than that of CT enterography for the detection of both overall small-bowel diseases (P = .0159) and neoplastic diseases (P = .0412) but not for the detection of inflammatory diseases (P > .99) or noninflammatory and nonneoplastic diseases (P = .6171). Conclusion MR enterography is more accurate than CT enterography in the detection of small-bowel diseases; MR enterography was more accurate in detecting neoplastic diseases in particular

  11. An unusual cause of small bowel obstruction caused by a Richter's-type hernia into the urinary bladder

    Sakai, Naomi S.; Acharya, Vikas; Mansour, Sami; Saleemi, Mohammed A.; Cheslyn-Curtis, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The authors present an unusual case of small bowel obstruction in a 62-year-old man. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 62-year-old man with a background of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain, distension, vomiting and had not opened his bowels for three days. 3 weeks previously he had a repeat Transurtheral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT), during which there was an iatrogenic perforation of the bladder. A CT scan of ...

  12. Anaesthetic Management of a patient with Myasthenia Gravis and Small Bowel Intussusception for Jejuno-Ileal Anastomoses

    Pawan Kumar Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting voluntary skeletal muscles. The altered sensitivity of acetylcholine receptors to muscle relaxants and concomitant treatment with anticholinesterase in these patients affect their anaesthetic management. Patients who have undergone bowel anastomosis and are on regular anticholinesterase treatment are susceptible to anastomotic leaks. We report successful anaesthetic management of class I myasthenic patient with coexisting small bowel intussusception operated for jejuno-ileal anastomoses using regional, inhalational and intravenous (i.v anaesthesia based on train of four responses, and avoiding the use of reversal (anticholinesterase.

  13. Evaluation of radiation exposure dose at double-balloon endoscopy for the patients with small bowel disease

    Nagura, Asuka; Nakamura, Masanao; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Koyama, Shuji; Hinami, Tomoki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel diseases. Although fluoroscopy is used to confirm the position of endoscope at DBE, the endoscopist does not have the knowledge with regard to the radiation exposure dose. In this study, we evaluated the absorbed dose during DBE in patients with suspected or established small bowel diseases. This was a retrospective study in which the estimated fluoroscopic radiation absorbed doses loaded on the small bowel and skin were determined according to the data of the referential X-ray experiment with a human body phantom. The subjects were 415 DBEs preformed in total. The mean small bowel absorbed doses on antegrade and retrograde DBEs were 42.2 and 53.8 mGy, respectively, showing that the organ dose applied in retrograde DBE was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The mean skin absorbed doses of them were 79.2 and 101.0 mGy, respectively, showing that the dose was also significantly higher on retrograde DBE (P<0.0001). Of 27 cases who were applied endoscopic balloon dilation, the mean fluoroscopy time was 16.0 minutes, and mean small bowel and skin absorbed doses were 121.9 and 228.9 mGy, respectively. In conclusion, endoscopist should be careful for reducing the organ exposure dose at DBE, particularly for the lower abdominal region. Abbreviations: Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE), endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (DBERCP), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) PMID:27578908

  14. Correlation of MRI-determined small bowel Crohn's disease categories with medical response and surgical pathology

    Ian Craig Lawrance; Christopher J Welman; Peter Shipman; Kevin Murray

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to categorize small bowel Crohn's disease (SB CD) into groups that correlate with response to medical therapy and surgical pathology. METHODS: Data was collected from all patients with MRI evidence of SB CD without significant colonic disease over a 32-mo period. Two radiologists,blinded to clinical findings, evaluated each MRI and grouped them based on bowel wall thickness and wall enhancement. These categories were: (1) "fibrosis",(2) "mild segmental hyper-enhancement and mild wall thickening", (3) "mild segmental hyper-enhancement and marked wall thickening", (4) "marked segmental transmural hyper-enhancement". Patient response to additional medical therapy post-MRI was prospectively determined at 8-wk. Non-responders underwent endoscopy and were offered therapeutic endoscopy or surgery. Surgical pathology was assessed against the MRI category.RESULTS: Fifty-five patients were included. Females and category "2" patients were more likely, and patients with luminal narrowing and hold-up less likely,to respond to medical therapy ( P < 0.05). Seventeen patients underwent surgery. The surgical pathological findings of fibrosis and the severity of inflammation correlated with the MRI category in all cases. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that SB CD can be grouped by the MRI findings and that these groups are associated with patients more likely to respond to continued medical therapy. The MRI categories also correlated with the presence and level of intestinal inflammation and fibrosis on surgical pathology, and may be of prognostic use in the management of CD patients.

  15. Value of CT findings to predict surgical ischemia in small bowel obstruction: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Millet, Ingrid; Taourel, Patrice; Ruyer, Alban [CHU Lapeyronie, From Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Molinari, Nicolas [CHU Montpellier, From Department of Medical Information, Montpellier (France)

    2015-06-01

    Our aim was to assess the diagnostic performance in determining strangulation in small bowel obstruction (SBO) for five CT findings commonly considered in published small bowel obstruction (SBO) management guidelines. Medical databases were searched for ''bowel obstruction'', ''computed tomography'', ''strangulation'', and related terms. Two reviewers independently selected articles for CT findings investigated with surgical or histological reference standards for strangulation. Bivariate random-effects meta-analytical methods were used. A total of 768 patients, including 205 with strangulation from nine studies, were evaluated. The reduced bowel wall enhancement CT sign had the highest specificity (95 %, CI 75-99), with a positive LR of 11.07 (2.27-53.88) and DOR of 22.86 (4.99-104.61). The mesenteric fluid sign had the highest sensitivity (89 %, CI 75-96) with a negative LR of 0.16 (0.07-0.39) and a DOR of 13.9 (5.73-33.75). The bowel wall thickness had a sensitivity of 48 % (CI 41-54), a specificity of 83 % (CI 74-89), a positive LR of 2.84 (1.83-4.41) and a negative LR of 0.62 (0.53-0.72). The other CT findings had lower diagnostic performance. Two CT findings should be used in clinical practice: reduced enhanced bowel wall is highly predictive of ischemia, and absence of mesenteric fluid is a reliable finding to rule out strangulation. (orig.)

  16. No relationship between gastric pH, small bowel bacterial colonisation, and diarrhoea in HIV-1 infected patients

    Wilcox, C; Waites, K; SMITH, P., CUBAS, M., CORRIN, J., TAPIA, J., DE PEDRO, I., RUIZ COBO, J., PEREDA ROSALES, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Background/Aims—Conclusive studies of small bowel bacterial overgrowth in patients with HIV-1 infection are limited. The relation was therefore determined between the quantity and species of bacteria in the proximal small intestine of HIV-1 infected patients and the presence of diarrhoea, gastric acidity, severity of immune deficiency, and clinical outcome. 
Methods—Bacteria in the duodenal fluids obtained endoscopically from 32 HIV-1 infected patients, 21 of whom had dia...

  17. Quantitative in vivo analysis of small bowel motility using MRI examinations in mice--proof of concept study.

    Bickelhaupt, S; Wurnig, M C; Lesurtel, M; Patak, M A; Boss, A

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel motility analyses using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could reduce current invasive techniques in animal studies and comply with the 'three Rs' rule for human animal experimentation. Thus we investigated the feasibility of in vivo small bowel motility analyses in mice using dynamic MRI acquisitions. All experimental procedures were approved by the institutional animal care committee. Six C57BL/6 mice underwent MRI without additional preparation after isoflurane anaesthetization in the prone position on a 4.7 T small animal imager equipped with a linear polarized hydrogen birdcage whole-body mouse coil. Motility was assessed using a true fast imaging in a steady precession sequence in the coronal orientation (acquisition time per slice 512 ms, in-plane resolution 234 × 234 µm, matrix size 128 × 128, slice thickness 1 mm) over 30 s corresponding to 60 acquisitions. Motility was manually assessed measuring the small bowel diameter change over time. The resulting motility curves were analysed for the following parameters: contraction frequency per minute (cpm), maximal contraction amplitude (maximum to minimum [mm]), luminal diameter (mm) and luminal occlusion rate. Small bowel motility quantification was found to be possible in all animals with a mean small bowel contraction frequency of 10.67 cpm (SD ± 3.84), a mean amplitude of the contractions of 1.33 mm (SD ± 0.43) and a mean luminal diameter of 1.37 mm (SD ± 0.42). The mean luminal occlusion rate was 1.044 (SD ± 0.45%/100). The mean duration needed for a single motility assessment was 185 s (SD ± 54.02). Thus our study demonstrated the feasibility of an easy and time-sparing functional assessment for in vivo small bowel motility analyses in mice. This could improve the development of small animal models of intestinal diseases and provide a method similar to clinical MR examinations that is in concordance with the 'three Rs' for humane animal

  18. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: are there any predictors?

    McCallum Richard W

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is a condition in which excessive levels of bacteria, mainly the colonic-type species are present in the small intestine. Recent data suggest that SIBO may contribute to the pathophysiology of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Methods Adults with IBS based on Rome II criteria who had predominance of bloating and flatulence underwent a glucose breath test (GBT to determine the presence of SIBO. Breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after ingestion of 50 g of glucose dissolved in 150 mL of water. Results of the glucose breath test, which measures hydrogen and methane levels in the breath, were considered positive for SIBO if 1 the hydrogen or methane peak was >20 ppm when the baseline was Results Ninety-eight patients were identified who underwent a GBT (mean age, 49 y; 78% female. Thirty-five patients (36% had a positive GBT result suggestive of SIBO. A positive GBT result was more likely in patients >55 years of age (odds ratio [OR], 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-9.0 and in females (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.1-14.5. Hydrogen was detected more frequently in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.4-45, and methane was the main gas detected in patients with constipation-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.3-44. There was no significant correlation between the presence of SIBO and the predominant bowel pattern or concurrent use of tegaserod, proton pump inhibitors, or opiate analgesics. Conclusions Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was present in a sizeable percentage of patients with IBS with predominance of bloating and flatulence. Older age and female sex were predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Identification of possible predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS could aid in the development of successful treatment plans.

  19. The effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide upon the migrating myoelectric complex in the ovine small bowel

    Romanski Krzysztof W.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no evident and precise data regarding the effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC in sheep. Thus, in five rams seven bipolar platinum electrodes were implanted in the abomasal antrum and entire small intestine. The strain gauge force transducer was also attached near the duodenal electrode in three of these animals. During the experiments the myoelectric and motor activity was continuously recorded in fasted and non-fasted sheep. During the recordings two normal consecutive phases 3 of the MMC were recorded. Then, slow injections of CCK-OP of 0.02; 0.2 and 2.0 _g/kg of body weight were given intravenously during phase 1, 2a or 2b of the MMC, identified in the duodenum, until next two consecutive phases 3 MMC were recorded. The moderate dose of CCK-OP administered during phase 2a in non-fasted animals shortened the MMC cycles significantly while the highest dose of the hormone increased the cycle duration and inhibited phase 3 MMC in the duodenum. No such effect was observed in the jejunum. However, duration of phase 3 in this region was decreased mostly by the highest dose of CCK-OP. It can be concluded that CCK inhibits the MMC in ovine small bowel and its effect in the duodenum is most pronounced.

  20. Intestinal small bowel lymphomas - diagnosis and treatment; Primaer intestinale Lymphome - Diagnosestellung mittels CT und Therapie

    Goessmann, H.; Reith, H.B. [Klinikum fuer Visceral-, Thorax und Gefaesschirurgie, Klinikum Konstanz (Germany); Goerlitz, T.; Beck, A. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum Konstanz (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Primary intestinal lymphomas are most common in the stomach. The mucosa associated lymphatic tissue (MALT)-lymphoma which is closely associated with helicobacter pylori is very well known. In most cases, these malignancies are from B-cells origin. Another possible point of manifestation, although not well known, is the small bowel. Both tumors have enormous capabilities to enlarge in the abdominal cave. This is responding to their often asymptomatic manifestation. The symptoms, if they occur, are widespread and unspecific. Ileus, diarrhae, abdominal pain or bleeding will be observed, in rare cases also perforation or gastrointestinal or cutaneous fistulas. Diagnostic imaging often demonstrates a tumour of massive size by then, which is echopoor in the abdominal ultrasound. Our report concerns two cases of small intestine lymphomas, which were diagnosed by CT-scanning and treated in our clinic in only a short period of time. The first case was a low malignant jejunal lymphoma which was almost asymptomatic, whereas the second case had an ileus, due to compression of the intestine because of a high malignant lymphoma of the ileocecal region. (orig.)

  1. Chemical screening identifies filastatin, a small molecule inhibitor of Candida albicans adhesion, morphogenesis, and pathogenesis

    Fazly, Ahmed; Jain, Charu; Dehner, Amie C.; Issi, Luca; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Ali, Akbar; Cao, Hong; Fidel, Paul L.; P. Rao, Reeta; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans, begins with adhesion to host cells or implanted medical devices followed by biofilm formation. By high-throughput phenotypic screening of small molecules, we identified compounds that inhibit adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene. Our lead candidate compound also inhibits binding of C. albicans to cultured human epithelial cells, the yeast-to-hyphal morphological transition, induction of the hyphal-specific HWP1 promoter, biofilm forma...

  2. Serial intralesional injections of infliximab in small bowel Crohn’s strictures are feasible and might lower inflammation

    Hendel, Jakob; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Vilmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease can cause strictures throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Endoscopic balloon dilatation is a well-established treatment, but recurrence is seen in up to three out of four cases. Infliximab is playing an increasingly important role in the modern systemic treatment of...... severe Crohn's disease. Combining the anti-inflammatory effects of infliximab with the proven effect of endoscopic balloon dilatation could possibly improve outcome. In small studies, intralesional injections in perianal fistulas have been effective and endoscopic injection therapy in colonic strictures...... is feasible. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to assess whether serial intralesional injection of infliximab in small bowel strictures is feasible and reduces local inflammation. METHODS: We included six patients with Crohn's disease and inflammatory small bowel strictures. They were treated with endoscopic...

  3. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  4. How much helpful is the capsule endoscopy for the diagnosis of small bowel lesions?

    Osman Ersoy; Bulent Sivri; Serap Arslan; Figen Batman; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the practically usefulness and diagnostic yield of this new method in a group of patients with suspected small bowel lesions.METHODS: Capsule endoscopic (CE) examination by using M2A capsule endoscope TM (Given Imaging,Yoqneam, Israel) was performed in thirty nine patients (26 males, 13 females) with suspected small intestinal lesions. The composing of the patients was as follows:obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in twenty three patients, known Crohn's disease in 6 patients, in whom CE was used to evaluate the severity and extension of the diseases, chronic diarrhea in 8 patients, abdominal pain in one patient and malignancy in one patient with unknown origin.RESULTS: In two patients CE failed. Different abnormalities were revealed in 26 patients overall.Detection rate of abnormalities was highest among patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the source of bleeding was demonstrated in 17 of 23 patients with obscure bleeding (73.9%). Entero-Behcet was diagnosed in two patients by CE as a source of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. In 6 patients with known Crohn's disease, CE revealed better evaluation of the disease extension. In 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients with chronic diarrhea; CE revealed some mucosal abnormalities as the cause of chronic diarrhea. In a patient with unexplained abdominal pain and in a cancer patient with unknown origin, CE examination was normal.CONCLUSION: In our relatively small series, we found that capsule endoscopy is a useful diagnostic tool particularly in diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea and in estimating the extension of Crohn's disease.

  5. Small- bowel mucosal changes and antibody responses after low- and moderate-dose gluten challenge in celiac disease

    Lähdeaho Marja-Leena

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the restrictive nature of a gluten-free diet, celiac patients are looking for alternative therapies. While drug-development programs include gluten challenges, knowledge regarding the duration of gluten challenge and gluten dosage is insufficient. We challenged adult celiac patients with gluten with a view to assessing the amount needed to cause some small-bowel mucosal deterioration. Methods Twenty-five celiac disease adults were challenged with low (1-3 g or moderate (3-5g doses of gluten daily for 12 weeks. Symptoms, small-bowel morphology, densities of CD3+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs and celiac serology were determined. Results Both moderate and low amounts of gluten induced small-bowel morphological damage in 67% of celiac patients. Moderate gluten doses also triggered mucosal inflammation and more gastrointestinal symptoms leading to premature withdrawals in seven cases. In 22% of those who developed significant small- intestinal damage, symptoms remained absent. Celiac antibodies seroconverted in 43% of the patients. Conclusions Low amounts of gluten can also cause significant mucosal deterioration in the majority of the patients. As there are always some celiac disease patients who will not respond within these conditions, sample sizes must be sufficiently large to attain to statistical power in analysis.

  6. Small bowel transplantation complicated by cytomegalovirus tissue invasive disease without viremia.

    Avsar, Yesim; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kabar, Iyad; Wolters, Heiner; Anthoni, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H J; Beckebaum, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    We report on a small bowel transplant patient, donor/recipient seropositive (D+/R+) for cytomegalovirus (CMV), with a clinical course complicated by CMV disease. Anti-CMV prophylaxis was given for 100 days. Immunosuppression consisted of alemtuzumab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Five months posttransplant, CMV tissue invasive disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract was evident without the presence of viremia, tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Complete viral load suppression was achieved with intravenous ganciclovir, followed by valganciclovir for secondary prophylaxis. Mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone were discontinued. Shortly thereafter the patient presented with recurrent CMV and candida esophagitis. While on ganciclovir and caspofungin, the patient developed CMV tissue invasive disease of the ileal graft, with persistent absence of viremia. Foscarnet and CMV immunoglobulin were added. Viral load declined to undetectable levels; however, clinical improvement did not occur due to occurrence of graft rejection. Despite infliximab and high dose prednisolone, graft rejection was progressive, requiring surgical explantation of the graft. This case highlights the importance of additional diagnostic tools such as endoscopy including PCR analysis of tissue samples. Extension of primary antiviral prophylaxis interval up to 6 months and prolonged retreatment for recurrent CMV disease may be useful to avoid severe CMV-related complications. PMID:24703746

  7. Root of the small-bowel mesentery: correlative anatomy and CT features of pathologic conditions.

    Okino, Y; Kiyosue, H; Mori, H; Komatsu, E; Matsumoto, S; Yamada, Y; Suzuki, K; Tomonari, K

    2001-01-01

    The root of the small-bowel mesentery (SBM) is an important peritoneal fold that is contiguous to other peritoneal ligaments and mesocolons. Several pathologic conditions can occur in the SBM itself, and diseases that spread through the connections from adjacent organs frequently involve it. The root of the SBM is contiguous to the hepatoduodenal ligament around the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and contiguous to the right side of the transverse mesocolon around the gastrocolic trunk. The inferior mesenteric vein, which is a landmark of the descending mesocolon, runs along the left side of the root of the SBM. Malignant neoplasms can spread to the SBM by means of direct extension, extension along the neural plexus, extension along neighboring ligaments, or extension along lymphatic vessels. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis and perforation of a jejunal diverticulum can also spread to the SBM. Anomalies that can occur in the SBM include rotation anomalies and internal hernia. Vascular lesions of the SBM include thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), acute SMV thrombosis, SMA dissection, arterioportal fistula, and portal venous gas. Other pathologic conditions that can occur in the SBM are edema or congestion, mesenteric tear, mesenteric panniculitis, and tumors or tumorlike lesions. PMID:11706218

  8. Prospective evaluation of magnetic resonance enterography for the detection of mesenteric small bowel tumours

    Amzallag-Bellenger, Elisa; Hoeffel, Christine [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Radiology, Reims Cedex (France); Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Barbe, Coralie [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Statistics, Reims Cedex (France); Diebold, Marie-Daniele [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Pathology, Reims Cedex (France); Cadiot, Guillaume [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Gastroenterology, Reims Cedex (France)

    2013-07-15

    To prospectively evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) enterography for detecting mesenteric small-bowel tumours (MSBTs) and assess the added value of gadolinium-chelate injection. Over a 2-year period MR enterography examinations of 75 patients (33 men, 42 women; mean age, 53.8 years; range, 19-85) with suspected MSBT were blindly analysed by two readers for the presence of MSBT. Sensitivities, specificities, predictive positive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs) and accuracies of MR enterography for the detection of MSBT were calculated on per-patient and per-lesion bases. The McNemar test was used to compare sensitivities and specificities of the unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced sets of MR enterographies. Thirty-seven MSBTs were pathologically confirmed in 26 patients. The mean tolerance score of the examinations was 0.7. On a per-patient basis, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for detection of MSBT were 96 % [95 % CI, 89-100 %], 96 % [90-100 %], 93 % [83-100 %], 98 % [94-100 %] and 96 % [92-100 %], respectively. On a per-lesion basis, sensitivity and PPV were 70 % [56-85 %] and 93 % [83-100 %], respectively. Gadolinium injection yielded higher sensitivities on both bases (P = 0.008). MR enterography is an accurate and well-tolerated imaging modality for detecting MSBT. Intravenous administration of gadolinium-chelate improves sensitivity for MSBT detection. (orig.)

  9. Prospective evaluation of magnetic resonance enterography for the detection of mesenteric small bowel tumours

    To prospectively evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) enterography for detecting mesenteric small-bowel tumours (MSBTs) and assess the added value of gadolinium-chelate injection. Over a 2-year period MR enterography examinations of 75 patients (33 men, 42 women; mean age, 53.8 years; range, 19-85) with suspected MSBT were blindly analysed by two readers for the presence of MSBT. Sensitivities, specificities, predictive positive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs) and accuracies of MR enterography for the detection of MSBT were calculated on per-patient and per-lesion bases. The McNemar test was used to compare sensitivities and specificities of the unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced sets of MR enterographies. Thirty-seven MSBTs were pathologically confirmed in 26 patients. The mean tolerance score of the examinations was 0.7. On a per-patient basis, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for detection of MSBT were 96 % [95 % CI, 89-100 %], 96 % [90-100 %], 93 % [83-100 %], 98 % [94-100 %] and 96 % [92-100 %], respectively. On a per-lesion basis, sensitivity and PPV were 70 % [56-85 %] and 93 % [83-100 %], respectively. Gadolinium injection yielded higher sensitivities on both bases (P = 0.008). MR enterography is an accurate and well-tolerated imaging modality for detecting MSBT. Intravenous administration of gadolinium-chelate improves sensitivity for MSBT detection. (orig.)

  10. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO. METHODS: Our survey included 115 patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria for diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); a total of 97 patients accepted to perform a breath test with lactulose (BTLact), and those who had a positive test, received Rifaximin (Normix®, Alfa Wassermann) 1200 mg/d for 7 d; 3 wk after the end of treatment, the BTLact was repeated. RESULTS: Based on the BTLact results, SIBO was present in about 56% of IBS patients, and it was responsible for some IBS-related symptoms, such as abdominal bloating and discomfort, and diarrhoea. 1-wk treatment with Rifaximin turned the BTLact to negative in about 50% of patients and significantly reduced the symptoms, especially in those patients with an alternated constipation/diarrhoea-variant IBS. CONCLUSION: SIBO should be always suspected in patients with IBS, and a differential diagnosis is done by means of a “breath test”. Rifaximin may represent a valid approach to the treatment of SIBO. PMID:19496193

  11. Mixed Periampullary Adenocarcinoma and Somatostatinoma with Small Bowel Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Nilanjana Tewari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Gastrointestinal (GI involvement is present in about one quarter of cases of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Adenocarcinomas have been reported in several organs. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most common GI lesion seen in NFI. GISTs in combination with ampullary neuroendocrine tumors in NF-1 have been reported rarely. Case Report We present the case of a 44 year old man who presented with a history of obstructive jaundice and weight loss. Investigations revealed a pancreatic tumor associated with a common bile duct (CBD stricture. At operation, an ampullary adenocarcinoma that infiltrated into the head of pancreas with an adjacent somatostatinoma was found. In addition, a small bowel GIST was present. Conclusions Mixed periampullary adenocarcinoma and somatostatinoma in a patient with NF1 has only been previously reported once. The current case highlights the spectrum of associated tumor types which canbe seen in association with NF1. Patients with NF1 who present with jaundice and weight loss should be investigated in the usual manner with increased suspicion for duodenal and ampullary tumors.

  12. Measurement of small bowel transit time by 99Tcm-SC imaging: preliminary clinical study

    Objective: To develop a method of measuring small bowel transit time (SBTT) by 99Tcm-sulfur collide (SC) imaging and to compare with the method of added lactose in the test meal. Methods: 20 healthy volunteers and 26 patients with gastrointestinal disorders were studied. In fasting state, the subjects were asked to ingest the 99Tcm-SC labelled solid meal within 5 minutes, then the image acquisition was immediately started with SPECT. The images were acquired every 15 min during the first hour, at 30 min intervals during 2∼4 hours and hourly thereafter until 80% radioactivity had entered the colon. One week later, the same procedure of imaging with 15 g lactulose added in the test meal was performed. The regions of interest (ROIs) were taken at stomach and colon, and the SBTT was calculated by deconvolution or by subtraction of the 50% time of gastric emptying from the 50% time of colon filling. Results: 1) The mean SBTT of 20 healthy volunteers was (4.2 +- 0.5) h, oral-caecum transit time (OCTT) was (4.3 +- 0.6) h; lactulose shortened the SBTT by (1.8 +- 0.6) h; 2) 26 patients showed different results of SBTT due to their different gastrointestinal disorders bases. Conclusions: 99Tcm-SC imaging was a noninvasive and useful method to measure SBTT. The added lactulose can shorten the examination time and help to identify the time of food to the ileocecal region

  13. Internal transomental herniation with a trapped small bowel mimicking acute appendicitis☆

    Rudroff, Claudia; Balogh, Adam; Hilswicht, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal herniation with subsequent bowel obstruction is uncommon, and making a correct diagnosis prior to surgery is often difficult. PRESENTATION OF CASE In this case report we present a man, who suffered from sudden extreme right-sided abdominal pain. The diagnostic workup was inconclusive. Emergency surgery was indicated with a suspicion of acute appendicitis. We found a strangulated ileus caused by an internal herniation of the small intestine through a hole in the greater omentum. The patient had no history of surgery or other physical disorders explaining this finding. The obstruction was resolved and the postoperative clinical course was uncomplicated. DISCUSSION A thorough diagnostic workup including CT scan would most probably have given the correct diagnosis. However, the clinical course and initiation of the correct treatment would have been delayed significantly. CONCLUSION We suggest that the diagnostic workup of patients with unclear lower abdominal pain should be limited and that acute clinical symptoms require rapid laparoscopic evaluation and surgical treatment. PMID:24291681

  14. Elevated ST2 Distinguishes Incidences of Pediatric Heart and Small Bowel Transplant Rejection.

    Mathews, L R; Lott, J M; Isse, K; Lesniak, A; Landsittel, D; Demetris, A J; Sun, Y; Mercer, D F; Webber, S A; Zeevi, A; Fischer, R T; Feingold, B; Turnquist, H R

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum soluble (s) suppressor of tumorigenicity-2 is observed during cardiovascular and inflammatory bowel diseases. To ascertain whether modulated ST2 levels signify heart (HTx) or small bowel transplant (SBTx) rejection, we quantified sST2 in serially obtained pediatric HTx (n = 41) and SBTx recipient (n = 18) sera. At times of biopsy-diagnosed HTx rejection (cellular and/or antibody-mediated), serum sST2 was elevated compared to rejection-free time points (1714 ± 329 vs. 546.5 ± 141.6 pg/mL; p = 0.0002). SBTx recipients also displayed increased serum sST2 during incidences of rejection (7536 ± 1561 vs. 2662 ± 543.8 pg/mL; p = 0.0347). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that serum sST2 > 600 pg/mL could discriminate time points of HTx rejection and nonrejection (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.724 ± 0.053; p = 0.0003). ROC analysis of SBTx measures revealed a similar discriminative capacity (AUC = 0.6921 ± 0.0820; p = 0.0349). Quantitative evaluation of both HTx and SBTx biopsies revealed that rejection significantly increased allograft ST2 expression. Pathway and Network Analysis of biopsy data pinpointed ST2 in the dominant pathway modulated by rejection and predicted tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β as upstream activators. In total, our data indicate that alloimmune-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines increase ST2 during rejection. They also demonstrate that routine serum sST2 quantification, potentially combined with other biomarkers, should be investigated further to aid in the noninvasive diagnosis of rejection. PMID:26663613

  15. Small- bowel mucosal changes and antibody responses after low- and moderate-dose gluten challenge in celiac disease

    Lähdeaho Marja-Leena; Mäki Markku; Laurila Kaija; Huhtala Heini; Kaukinen Katri

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Due to the restrictive nature of a gluten-free diet, celiac patients are looking for alternative therapies. While drug-development programs include gluten challenges, knowledge regarding the duration of gluten challenge and gluten dosage is insufficient. We challenged adult celiac patients with gluten with a view to assessing the amount needed to cause some small-bowel mucosal deterioration. Methods Twenty-five celiac disease adults were challenged with low (1-3 g) or mode...

  16. SEMS vs cSEMS in duodenal and small bowel obstruction: High risk of migration in the covered stent group

    Waidmann, Oliver; Trojan, Jörg; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Sarrazin, Christoph; Bechstein, Wolf Otto; Ulrich, Frank; Zeuzem, Stefan; Albert, Jörg Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare clinical success and complications of uncovered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) vs covered SEMS (cSEMS) in obstruction of the small bowel. Methods: Technical success, complications and outcome of endoscopic SEMS or cSEMS placement in tumor related obstruction of the duodenum or jejunum were retrospectively assessed. The primary end points were rates of stent migration and overgrowth. Secondary end points were the effect of concomitant biliary drainage on migration rate a...

  17. Frequency of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Non-Specific Diarrhea

    Uday C Ghoshal; Sunil KUMAR; Mehrotra, Mansi; Lakshmi, CP; Misra, Asha

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs in varying frequency in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We studied the frequency of SIBO in IBS and chronic non-specific diarrhea (CNSD). Methods 129 patients with IBS (Manning's criteria), 73 with CNSD (≥ 4 weeks diarrhea with two of these tests normal [urine D-xylose, fecal fat and duodenal biopsy]) and 51 healthy controls (HC) were evaluated for SIBO using glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT). Diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) ...

  18. Changes in small intestinal chromogranin A-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance

    Mazzawi, Tarek; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for enteroendocrine cells in the gut, and CgA-immunoreactive cell densities are abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The majority of patients with IBS report that their symptoms develop after consuming certain foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary guidance on the total enteroendocrine cell densities in the small intestine, as detected by CgA. A total of 14 patients with IBS underwent a gastroscopy ...

  19. A randomised, controlled study of small intestinal motility in patients treated with sacral nerve stimulation for irritable bowel syndrome

    Fassov, Janne; Lundby, Lilli; Worsøe, Jonas; Buntzen, Steen; Laurberg, Søren; Krogh, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is among the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. In selected patients with severe diarrhoea-predominant or mixed IBS subtypes sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) alleviates IBS-specific symptoms and improves quality of life. The mode of action, however, remains unknown. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of SNS on small intestinal motility in IBS patients. Methods Twenty patients treated with SNS for severe diarrhoea-predominant o...

  20. Surveillance of FAP: a prospective blinded comparison of capsule endoscopy and other GI imaging to detect small bowel polyps

    Tescher Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is a hereditary disorder characterized by polyposis along the gastrointestinal tract. Information on adenoma status below the duodenum has previously been restricted due to its inaccessibility in vivo. Capsule Endoscopy (CE may provide a useful adjunct in screening for polyposis in the small bowel in FAP patients. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of CE in the assessment of patients with FAP, compared to other imaging modalities for the detection of small bowel polyps. Method 20 consecutive patients with previously diagnosed FAP and duodenal polyps, presenting for routine surveillance of polyps at The Royal Melbourne Hospital were recruited. Each fasted patient initially underwent a magnetic resonance image (MRI of the abdomen, and a barium small bowel follow-through study. Capsule Endoscopy was performed four weeks later on the fasted patient. An upper gastrointestinal side-viewing endoscopy was done one (1 to two (2 weeks after this. Endoscopists and investigators were blinded to results of other investigations and patient history. Results Within the stomach, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy found more polyps than other forms of imaging. SBFT and MRI generally performed poorly, identifying fewer polyps than both upper gastrointestinal and capsule endoscopy. CE was the only form of imaging that identified polyps in all segments of the small bowel as well as the only form of imaging able to provide multiple findings outside the stomach/duodenum. Conclusion CE provides important information on possible polyp development distal to the duodenum, which may lead to surgical intervention. The place of CE as an adjunct in surveillance of FAP for a specific subset needs consideration and confirmation in replication studies. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000616370

  1. The Importance of Alternative Diagnostic Modalities in the Diagnosis of Small Bowel Tumors After a Negative Capsule Endoscopy

    Iolanda Ribeiro

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of a patient with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to a gastrointestinal stromal tumor diagnosed by CT enterography after two negatives capsule endoscopies. This case shows that capsule endoscopy may overlook significant life threatening lesions and highlights the importance of using other diagnostic modalities after a negative capsule endoscopy, especially in patients with a high index of suspicion for small bowel tumoral pathology or persistent/recurrent bleeding.

  2. Subclassification of small bowel Crohn's disease using magnetic resonance enterography: a review using evidence-based medicine methodology.

    Murphy, D J; Smyth, A E; McEvoy, S H; Gibson, D J; Doherty, G A; Malone, D E

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has a growing role in imaging small bowel Crohn's disease (SBCD), both in diagnosis and assessment of treatment response. Certain SBCD phenotypes respond well to biologic therapy and others require surgery; MRE has an expanding role in triaging these patients. In this review, we evaluate the MRE signs that subclassify SBCD using evidence-based medicine (EBM) methodology and provide a structured approach to MRE interpretation. PMID:26372328

  3. Small bowel obstruction following computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography using psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Cervini, Patrick; Kirpalani, Anish; Vlachou, Paraskevi A; Grover, Samir C; Colak, Errol

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of some contemporary imaging methods is dependent on adequate distention of the small bowel by oral contrast agent(s). Many are available, and choices vary among institutions based on several factors such as ease of use and side-effect profile, among others. To date, however, there is no established consensus on the ideal oral contrast agent for computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography. In a case series of four patients, this article illustr...

  4. Small Bowel Obstruction Following Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Enterography Using Psyllium Seed Husk As an Oral Contrast Agent

    Yingming Amy Chen; Patrick Cervini; Anish Kirpalani; Paraskevi A Vlachou; Grover, Samir C; Errol Colak

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of some contemporary imaging methods is dependent on adequate distention of the small bowel by oral contrast agent(s). Many are available, and choices vary among institutions based on several factors such as ease of use and side-effect profile, among others. To date, however, there is no established consensus on the ideal oral contrast agent for computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography. In a case series of four patients, this article illustr...

  5. Small bowel volvulus in mid and late pregnancy: can early diagnosis be established to avoid catastrophic outcomes?

    Cong, Qing; Li, Xilian; Ye, Xuping; Sun, Li; Jiang, Wei; Han, Zhigang; Lu, Weiqi; Xu, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Volvulus in pregnancy is rare and difficult to diagnose. Delayed diagnosis would result in high maternal and fetal mortality. Here we present an unusual case of small bowel volvulus in late pregnancy timely managed by emergency Cesarean section and derotation with excellent maternal and fetal outcomes. Volvulus should be considered in patients complaining ongoing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, constipation even diarrhea. Imaging is essential for early and precise diagnosis, including plain...

  6. Management of small bowel volvulus in a patient with simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT): a case report

    Aydin Unal; Yazici Pinar; Toz Huseyin; Hoscoskun Cuneyt; Coker Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    Abstract There are several surgical complications which can occur following simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT). Although intestinal obstruction is known to be a common complication after any type of abdominal surgery, the occurrence of small bowel volvulus, which is one of the rare causes of intestinal obstruction, following SPKT has not been published before. A 24-year-old woman suffering from type I diabetes mellitus with complications of nephropathy resulting in end stage ...

  7. The role of computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of clinically occult post-traumatic small bowel perforation

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of computed tomography [CT] in the diagnosis of occult post-traumatic small bowel perforation and to discuss the role of CT in the management of this patient group. Method: This review includes three patients who presented with mild abdominal symptoms following minor blunt abdominal trauma. Initial radiographs and laboratory investigations were unremarkable but their symptoms failed to resolve and contrast-enhanced CT was performed for further evaluation. Results: In each case the CT appearances were indicative of localised small bowel perforation, with no evidence of other visceral injury. In two patients pockets of free intraperitoneal air were present closely related to the second part of the duodenum suggesting injury at this site. In the third case, a thickened proximal jejunal loop was demonstrated with free air and fluid in the adjacent mesentery consistent with a focal perforation. These CT findings were subsequently confirmed at laparotomy. Conclusion: CT is an accurate diagnostic tool in the assessment of clinically and radiologically occult traumatic small bowel injury. The use of CT should be considered in patients who have unresolving abdominal symptoms even after apparently insignificant abdominal trauma.

  8. The role of computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of clinically occult post-traumatic small bowel perforation

    Ahmed, I. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, East Sussex Hospitals NHS Trust, Kings Drive, Eastbourne BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ia43@yahoo.com; Ahmed, N. [Department of Medicine, University College Hospital, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Bell, D.J.; Hughes, D.V. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, East Sussex Hospitals NHS Trust, Kings Drive, Eastbourne BN21 2UD (United Kingdom); Evans, G.H. [Department of Surgery, Eastbourne District General Hospital, East Sussex Hospitals NHS Trust, Kings Drive, Eastbourne BN21 2UD (United Kingdom); Howlett, D.C. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, East Sussex Hospitals NHS Trust, Kings Drive, Eastbourne BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of computed tomography [CT] in the diagnosis of occult post-traumatic small bowel perforation and to discuss the role of CT in the management of this patient group. Method: This review includes three patients who presented with mild abdominal symptoms following minor blunt abdominal trauma. Initial radiographs and laboratory investigations were unremarkable but their symptoms failed to resolve and contrast-enhanced CT was performed for further evaluation. Results: In each case the CT appearances were indicative of localised small bowel perforation, with no evidence of other visceral injury. In two patients pockets of free intraperitoneal air were present closely related to the second part of the duodenum suggesting injury at this site. In the third case, a thickened proximal jejunal loop was demonstrated with free air and fluid in the adjacent mesentery consistent with a focal perforation. These CT findings were subsequently confirmed at laparotomy. Conclusion: CT is an accurate diagnostic tool in the assessment of clinically and radiologically occult traumatic small bowel injury. The use of CT should be considered in patients who have unresolving abdominal symptoms even after apparently insignificant abdominal trauma.

  9. Detection of small bowel tumor based on multi-scale curvelet analysis and fractal technology in capsule endoscopy.

    Liu, Gang; Yan, Guozheng; Kuang, Shuai; Wang, Yongbing

    2016-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has been a revolutionary technique to noninvasively inspect gastrointestinal (GI) tract diseases, especially small bowel tumor. However, it is a tedious task for physicians to examine captured images. To develop a computer-aid diagnosis tool for relieving the huge burden of physicians, the intestinal video data from 89 clinical patients with the indications of potential tumors was analyzed. Out of the 89 patients, 15(16.8%) were diagnosed with small bowel tumor. A novel set of textural features that integrate multi-scale curvelet and fractal technology were proposed to distinguish normal images from tumor images. The second order textural descriptors as well as higher order moments between different color channels were computed from images synthesized by the inverse curvelet transform of the selected scales. Then, a classification approach based on support vector machine (SVM) and genetic algorithm (GA) was further employed to select the optimal feature set and classify the real small bowel images. Extensive comparison experiments validate that the proposed automatic diagnosis scheme achieves a promising tumor classification performance of 97.8% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity in the selected images from our clinical data. PMID:26829705

  10. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases

    Jingjing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05, while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05. The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis.

  11. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases.

    Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Qiaozhen; Zhao, Jianping; Liu, Mei; Liao, Guangquan; Chen, Nianjun; Tian, Dean; Wu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05), while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05). The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26962305

  12. Radiographic plain film and CT findings in lipoid pneumonia in infants following aspiration of mineral oil used in the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides

    Four children developed lipoid pneumonia following ingestion of mineral oil for the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides whorl. CT of the chest showed negative Hounsfield numbers which may prove useful in diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Radiographic plain film and CT findings in lipoid pneumonia in infants following aspiration of mineral oil used in the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides

    Oliveira, G.A. de; Del Caro, S.R.; Bender Lamego, C.M.; Mercon de Vargas, P.R.; Vervloet, V.E.C.

    1985-02-01

    Four children developed lipoid pneumonia following ingestion of mineral oil for the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides whorl. CT of the chest showed negative Hounsfield numbers which may prove useful in diagnosis.

  14. Effectiveness of polaprezinc for low-dose aspirin-induced small-bowel mucosal injuries as evaluated by capsule endoscopy: a pilot randomized controlled study

    Watari, Ikue; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Aoyama, Taiki; Imagawa, Hiroki; Shishido, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Shigeto; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of low-dose aspirin (LDA)-induced small-bowel injury has not been established. Polaprezinc, a chelate of zinc and L-carnosine, may be efficacious for such injury. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled study to investigate whether polaprezinc is effective against LDA-induced small-bowel injuries. Methods Consecutive patients under long-term (>3 months) LDA treatment and who agreed to participate in our study underwent initial capsule endoscopy (CE). Patients with LDA-...

  15. Assessment of dynamic contrast enhancement of the small bowel in active Crohn's disease using 3D MR enterography

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the dynamic contrast enhancement of the small bowel segments with and without active Crohn's disease at 3D MR enterography (MRE). Materials and methods: Thirteen patients (five men, eight women; mean age 41.2 years; range 29-56) were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner (Sonata, Siemens Medical) with standard MR sequences after having ingested 1000 ml of a 3% mannitol solution. Subsequently, high resolution 3D gradient-echo (volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination = VIBE) data sets were obtained pre-contrast and 20-40 s, 60-80 s, and 120-140 s after i.v. Gd-DOTA administration (0.2 mmol/kg). Signal enhancement was measured on single slices both in normal and histologically confirmed (12/13) inflamed small bowel wall segments as well as in the aorta, the psoas muscle, and the background to calculate signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR). Results: Small bowel wall enhancement was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in inflamed compared to normal segments at 20-40 s (SNR inflamed: 58.7 ± 33.8 vs normal: 36.0 ± 19.8; p = 0.048; CNR inflamed: 34.8 ± 23.4 vs normal: 16.3 ± 11.2; p = 0.017) and at 60-80 s (SNR: 60.3 ± 25.1 vs 41.9 ± 20.0; p = 0.049; CNR: 34.9 ± 15.1 vs 19.3 ± 13.2; p = 0.01) after i.v. contrast administration, respectively. Even at 120-140 s CNR was still increased in inflamed segments (33.7 ± 16.0 vs 18.1 ± 13.2; p = 0.04), while differences in SNR did not attain statistical significance (63.0 ± 26.2 vs 45.3 ± 23.3; p = 0.15). Conclusion: In active Crohn's disease, histologically confirmed inflamed small bowel wall segments demonstrate a significantly increased early uptake of gadolinium on 3D VIBE sequences compared to normal small bowel segments.

  16. Automatic classification of small bowel mucosa alterations in celiac disease for confocal laser endomicroscopy

    Boschetto, Davide; Di Claudio, Gianluca; Mirzaei, Hadis; Leong, Rupert; Grisan, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to gluten and similar proteins, affecting genetically susceptible persons, increasing their risk of different complications. Small bowels mucosa damage due to CD involves various degrees of endoscopically relevant lesions, which are not easily recognized: their overall sensitivity and positive predictive values are poor even when zoom-endoscopy is used. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) allows skilled and trained experts to qualitative evaluate mucosa alteration such as a decrease in goblet cells density, presence of villous atrophy or crypt hypertrophy. We present a method for automatically classifying CLE images into three different classes: normal regions, villous atrophy and crypt hypertrophy. This classification is performed after a features selection process, in which four features are extracted from each image, through the application of homomorphic filtering and border identification through Canny and Sobel operators. Three different classifiers have been tested on a dataset of 67 different images labeled by experts in three classes (normal, VA and CH): linear approach, Naive-Bayes quadratic approach and a standard quadratic analysis, all validated with a ten-fold cross validation. Linear classification achieves 82.09% accuracy (class accuracies: 90.32% for normal villi, 82.35% for VA and 68.42% for CH, sensitivity: 0.68, specificity 1.00), Naive Bayes analysis returns 83.58% accuracy (90.32% for normal villi, 70.59% for VA and 84.21% for CH, sensitivity: 0.84 specificity: 0.92), while the quadratic analysis achieves a final accuracy of 94.03% (96.77% accuracy for normal villi, 94.12% for VA and 89.47% for CH, sensitivity: 0.89, specificity: 0.98).

  17. Seventy-five gram glucose tolerance test to assess carbohydrate malabsorption and small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    Yoshihisa Urita; Motonobu Sugimoto; Kazumasa Miki; Susumu Ishihara; Tatsuo Akimoto; Hiroto Kato; Noriko Hara; Yoshiko Honda; Yoko Nagai; Kazushige Nakanishi; Nagato Shimada

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate non-invasively the incidence of absorption of carbohydrates in diabetic patients during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to determine whether malabsorption may be associated with insulin secretion and insulin resistance.METHODS: A standard 75-g OGTT was performed in 82 diabetic patients. The patients received 75 g of anhydrous glucose in 225 mL of water after an overnight fasting and breath samples were collected at baseline and up to 120 min afler ingestion. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations were measured. Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were measured before ingestion and at 30, 60, g0, 120 min post-ingestion.RESULTS: When carbohydrate malabsorption was defined as subjects with an increase of at least 10 ppm (parts per million) in hydrogen or methane excretion within a 2-h period, 28 (34%) had carbohydrate malabsorption. According to the result of increased breath test, 21 (75%) patients were classified as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and 7 (25%) as glucose malabsorption. Patients with carbohydrate malabsorption were older and had poor glycemic control as compared with those without carbohydrate malabsorption. The HOMA value, the sum of serum insulin during the test and the Ainsulin/Aglucose ratio were greater in patients with carbohydrate malabsorption.CONCLUSION: Insulin resistance may be overestimated by using these markers if the patient has carbohydrate malabsorption, or that carbohydrate malabsorption may be present prior to the development of insulin resistance.Hence carbohydrate malabsorption should be taken into account for estimating insulin resistance and β-cell function.

  18. Reporting small bowel dose in cervix cancer high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Liao, Yixiang; Dandekar, Virag; Chu, James C H; Turian, Julius; Bernard, Damian; Kiel, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel (SB) is an organ at risk (OAR) that may potentially develop toxicity after radiotherapy for cervix cancer. However, its dose from brachytherapy (BT) is not systematically reported as in other OARs, even with image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT). This study aims to introduce consideration of quantified objectives for SB in BT plan optimization and to evaluate the feasibility of sparing SB while maintaining adequate target coverage. In all, 13 patients were included in this retrospective study. All patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) 45Gy in 25 fractions followed by high dose rate (HDR)-BT boost of 28Gy in 4 fractions using tandem/ring applicator. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomographic (CT) images were obtained to define the gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and OARs (rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, and SB). Treatment plans were generated for each patient using GEC-ESTRO recommendations based on the first CT/MRI. Treatment plans were revised to reduce SB dose when the [Formula: see text] dose to SB was > 5Gy, while maintaining other OAR constraints. For the 7 patients with 2 sets of CT and MRI studies, the interfraction variation of the most exposed SB was analyzed. Plan revisions were done in 6 of 13 cases owing to high [Formula: see text] of SB. An average reduction of 19% in [Formula: see text] was achieved. Meeting SB and other OAR constraints resulted in less than optimal target coverage in 2 patients (D90 of HR-CTV < 77Gyαβ10). The highest interfraction variation was observed for SB at 16 ± 59%, as opposed to 28 ± 27% for rectum and 21 ± 16% for bladder. Prospective reporting of SB dose could provide data required to establish a potential correlation with radiation-induced late complication for SB. PMID:26235549

  19. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V5, V1, etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p 5 and V15. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further investigation

  20. Management of small bowel volvulus in a patient with simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT: a case report

    Aydin Unal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are several surgical complications which can occur following simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT. Although intestinal obstruction is known to be a common complication after any type of abdominal surgery, the occurrence of small bowel volvulus, which is one of the rare causes of intestinal obstruction, following SPKT has not been published before. A 24-year-old woman suffering from type I diabetes mellitus with complications of nephropathy resulting in end stage renal disease (ESRD, neuropathy and retinopathy underwent SPKT. On the postoperative month 5, she was brought to the emergency service due to abdominal distention with mild abdominal pain. After laboratory research and diagnostic radiological tests had been carried out, she underwent exploratory laparotomy to determine the pathology for acute abdominal symptoms. Intra-operative observation revealed the presence of an almost totally ischemic small bowel which had occurred due to clockwise rotation of the mesentery. Initially, simple derotation was performed to avoid intestinal resection because of her risky condition, particularly for short bowel syndrome, and subsequent intestinal response was favorable. Thus, surgical treatment was successfully employed to solve the problem without any resection procedure. The patient's postoperative follow-up was uneventful and she was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 7. According to our clinical viewpoint, this study emphasizes that if there is even just a suspicion of acute abdominal problem in a patient with SPKT, surgical intervention should be promptly performed to avoid any irreversible result and to achieve a positive outcome.

  1. Immunohistochemical and morphological features of a small bowel leiomyoma in a black crested macaque (Macaca nigra

    Aristizabal-Arbelaez Mónica

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous gastrointestinal neoplasms in non-human primates are commonly seen in aged individuals. Due to genetic similarities between human and non-human primates, scientists have shown increasing interest in terms of comparative oncology studies. Case presentation The present study is related to a case of an intestinal leiomyoma in a black crested macaque (Macaca nigra, kept on captivity by Matecaña Zoo, Pereira City, Colombia. The animal had abdominal distension, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and behavioral changes. Clinical examination showed an increased volume in the upper right abdominal quadrant caused by a neoplastic mass. The patient died during the surgical procedure. Necropsy revealed several small nodules in the peritoneum with adhesion to different portions of the small and large intestines, liver, stomach and diaphragm. Tissue samples were collected, routinely processed and stained by H&E. Microscopic examination revealed a mesenchymal tumor limited to tunica muscularis, resembling normal smooth muscle cells. Neoplastic cells were positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and negative for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 by immunohistochemistry. Those morphological and immunohistochemical findings allowed to diagnose the intestinal leiomyoma referred above. Conclusion Neoplastic diseases in primates have multifaceted causes. Their manifestations are understudied, leading to a greater difficulty in detection and measurement of the real impact provides by this disease.

  2. A rare case of small bowel volvulus after jenjunoileal bariatric bypass requiring emergency surgery: a case report

    Patel Pranav H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bariatric surgery is on the increase throughout the world. Jejunoileal bypass bariatric procedures have fallen out of favor in western surgical centers due to the high rate of associated complications. They are, however, performed routinely in other centers and as a consequence of health tourism, management of complications related to these procedures may still be encountered. Case presentation We describe a rare case of small bowel obstruction in a 45-year-old British Caucasian woman, secondary to a volvulus of the jejunoileal anastomosis following bariatric bypass surgery. The pre-operative diagnosis was confirmed by radiology. We describe a successful surgical technique for this rare complication. Conclusions Bariatric surgery may be complicated by bowel obstruction. Early imaging is vital for diagnosis and effective management. The use of our surgical technique provides a simple and effective approach for the successful management of this bariatric complication.

  3. The Relationship between Small-Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Intestinal Permeability in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Won, Kyoung Hee; Park, Soon Min

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a frequent finding in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients with IBS also have abnormal intestinal permeability, which is probably due to low-grade inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Our aim was to verify the relationship between SIBO and small-intestinal permeability in IBS patients. Methods A cohort of 38 IBS patients (20 women and 18 men; age range 16-70 years; mean age 40.2 years) with symptoms that ...

  4. Differentiation between active and chronic Crohn's disease using MRI small-bowel motility examinations — Initial experience

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of locally active Crohn's disease on systemic small-bowel motility in patients with chronic Crohn's disease compared to healthy individuals. Material and methods: Fifteen healthy individuals (11 men, four women; mean age 37 years) and 20 patients with histopathologically proven active (n = 15; 10 women, 5 men; mean age 45 years) or chronic (n = 5; four women, one man; mean age 48 years) Crohn's disease were included in this institutional review board-approved, retrospective study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 1.5 T) was performed after standardized preparation. Two-dimensional (2D) cine sequences for motility acquisition were performed in apnoea (27 s). Motility assessment was performed using dedicated software in three randomly chosen areas of the small-bowel outside known Crohn's disease-affected hotspots. The main quantitative characteristics (frequency, amplitude, occlusion rate) were compared using Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Three randomly chosen segments were analysed in each participant. Patients with active Crohn's disease had significantly (p < 0.05) reduced contraction frequencies (active Crohn's disease: 2.86/min; chronic: 4.14/min; healthy: 4.53/min) and luminal occlusion rates (active: 0.43; chronic: 0.70; healthy: 0.73) compared to healthy individuals and patients with chronic Crohn's disease. Contraction amplitudes were significantly reduced during active Crohn's disease (6.71 mm) compared to healthy participants (10.14 mm), but this only reached borderline significance in comparison to chronic Crohn's disease (8.87 mm). Mean bowel lumen diameter was significantly (p = 0.04) higher in patients with active Crohn's disease (16.91 mm) compared to healthy participants (14.79 mm) but not in comparison to patients with chronic Crohn's disease (13.68). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that local inflammatory activity of small-bowel segments in patients with

  5. Pneumatosis Intestinalis of the Small Bowel; Radiological and Intra-operative findings

    Light D; Robinson A; Hennessy C

    2010-01-01

    Pneumatosis Intestinalis is defined as the infiltration of gas into the bowel wall. It is a radiological and intra-operative finding of varying aetiology which varies from benign to life threatening conditions. We describe here a case of a 67 year old woman who presented with diffuse abdominal pain and was found to have Pneumatosis Intestinalis.

  6. Management of a Small Paracentral Corneal Perforation Using Iatrogenic Iris Incarceration and Tissue Adhesive

    Akira Kobayashi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical intervention for corneal perforation is indicated when the anterior chamber does not reform within a short period of time. Herein, we report the successful management of a small paracentral corneal perforation using autologous iris incarceration and tissue adhesive. Case: A 41-year-old man developed a small paracentral corneal perforation (0.5 mm in size in the right eye, while the treating physician attempted to remove the residual rust ring after removal of a piece of metallic foreign body. Observations: The eye was initially managed with a bandage soft contact lens to ameliorate the aqueous leakage; however, without success. Iatrogenic iris incarceration of the wound was first induced, followed by application of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive to the perforated site. As a result, the anterior chamber was immediately reformed and maintained. Complete corneal epithelialization of the perforation was achieved in 2 months without visual compromises. Conclusions: Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive with iatrogenic incarceration of the autologous iris was effective in treating this type of small corneal perforation. This technique is simple and potentially useful for small paracentral corneal perforations outside the visual axis and without good apposition.

  7. Small-bowel MRI in children and young adults with Crohn disease: retrospective head-to-head comparison of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Small-bowel MRI based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences has been challenged by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for detection of inflammatory bowel lesions and complications in patients with Crohn disease. To evaluate free-breathing DWI, as compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, in children, adolescents and young adults with Crohn disease. This retrospective study included 33 children and young adults with Crohn disease ages 17 ± 3 years (mean ± standard deviation) and 27 matched controls who underwent small-bowel MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences and DWI at 1.5 T. The detectability of Crohn manifestations was determined. Concurrent colonoscopy as reference was available in two-thirds of the children with Crohn disease. DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI correctly identified 32 and 31 patients, respectively. All 22 small-bowel lesions and all Crohn complications were detected. False-positive findings (two on DWI, one on contrast-enhanced MRI), compared to colonoscopy, were a result of large-bowel lumen collapse. Inflammatory wall thickening was comparable on DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI. DWI was superior to contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of lesions in 27% of the assessed bowel segments and equal to contrast-enhanced MRI in 71% of segments. DWI facilitates fast, accurate and comprehensive workup in Crohn disease without the need for intravenous administration of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced MRI is superior in terms of spatial resolution and multiplanar acquisition. (orig.)

  8. Small-bowel MRI in children and young adults with Crohn disease: retrospective head-to-head comparison of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Neubauer, Henning; Evangelista, Laura; Wirth, Clemens; Beer, Meinrad [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Pabst, Thomas; Machann, Wolfram; Koestler, Herbert; Hahn, Dietbert [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dick, Anke [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Paediatrics, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Small-bowel MRI based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences has been challenged by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for detection of inflammatory bowel lesions and complications in patients with Crohn disease. To evaluate free-breathing DWI, as compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, in children, adolescents and young adults with Crohn disease. This retrospective study included 33 children and young adults with Crohn disease ages 17 {+-} 3 years (mean {+-} standard deviation) and 27 matched controls who underwent small-bowel MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences and DWI at 1.5 T. The detectability of Crohn manifestations was determined. Concurrent colonoscopy as reference was available in two-thirds of the children with Crohn disease. DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI correctly identified 32 and 31 patients, respectively. All 22 small-bowel lesions and all Crohn complications were detected. False-positive findings (two on DWI, one on contrast-enhanced MRI), compared to colonoscopy, were a result of large-bowel lumen collapse. Inflammatory wall thickening was comparable on DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI. DWI was superior to contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of lesions in 27% of the assessed bowel segments and equal to contrast-enhanced MRI in 71% of segments. DWI facilitates fast, accurate and comprehensive workup in Crohn disease without the need for intravenous administration of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced MRI is superior in terms of spatial resolution and multiplanar acquisition. (orig.)

  9. The most characteristic lesions and radiologic signs of Crohn disease of the small bowel: air enteroclysis, MDCT, endoscopy, and pathology.

    Carbo, Alberto I; Reddy, Threta; Gates, Thomas; Vesa, Telciane; Thomas, Jaiyeola; Gonzalez, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    This pictorial essay describes the most characteristic lesions and radiologic signs of Crohn disease of the small bowel: nodular lymphoid hyperplasia, abnormal mucosal folds, villous pattern, aphthous ulcerations, linear ulcerations, cobblestone pattern, string sign, target sign, comb sign, creeping fat, sinus tracts, fistulas, and abscesses. Each description includes the definition, a correlation with the pathologic findings, an explanation of the possible physiopathologic mechanism, sample radiologic images with air enteroclysis or MDCT, the correspondence with the endoscopic findings when possible, and a list of differential diagnoses. PMID:24173609

  10. Clinical Efficacy of Various Diagnostic Tests for Small Bowel Tumors and Clinical Features of Tumors Missed by Capsule Endoscopy

    Jung Wan Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of various diagnostic tools such as computerized tomography (CT, small bowel follow-through (SBFT, and capsule endoscopy (CE in diagnosing small bowel tumors (SBTs. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate the clinical features of SBTs missed by CE. Methods. We retrospectively studied 79 patients with histologically proven SBT. Clinical data were analyzed with particular attention to the efficacy of CT, SBFT, and CE in detecting SBT preoperatively. We also analyzed the clinical features of SBTs missed by CE. Results. The most common symptoms of SBT were bleeding (43% and abdominal pain (13.9%. Diagnostic yields were as follows: CT detected 55.8% of proven SBTs; SBFT, 46.1%; and CE, 83.3%. The sensitivity for detecting SBTs was 40.4% for CT, 43.9% for SBFT, and 79.6% for CE. Two patients with nondiagnostic but suspicious findings on CE and seven patients with negative findings on CE were eventually found to have SBT. These nine patients were eventually diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (4, small polyps (3, inflammatory fibroid polyp (1, and adenocarcinoma (1. These tumors were located in the proximal jejunum (5, middle jejunum (1, distal jejunum (1, and proximal ileum (1. Conclusion. CE is more efficacious than CT or SBFT for detecting SBTs. However, significant tumors may go undetected with CE, particularly when located in the proximal jejunum.

  11. Gangrenous small bowel obstruction secondary to congenital internal herniation: a case report.

    Tan, Y L; Alhagi, Muthu V

    2012-02-01

    Congenital internal herniation is a rare condition presenting as recurrent abdominal pain or acute intestinal obstruction. In cases in which bowel incarceration or strangulation develop, rapid progression to bowel ischemia, necrosis or perforation is inevitable. Mortality in such cases has been reported to be as high as 50%. Despite advances in imaging modalities, arriving at a pre-operative diagnosis of a congenital internal herniation remains a challenge. We report such a case where imaging was unsuccessful in determining the cause of intestinal obstruction in a 3 year old child. Congenital internal herniation may result in disastrous consequences if not addressed in a timely fashion due to its rarity. Hence a high index of clinical suspicion is needed to avoid missing this diagnosis in a child presenting with recurrent abdominal pain or acute intestinal obstruction. PMID:22582563

  12. Crohn's disease at the small bowel imaging by the ultrasound-enteroclysis

    Summary: Crohn's disease is more likely a systemic disease governed by a shift in the immune response, thus affecting the whole MALT system. Its treatment should be as conservative as possible and surgery is usually taking place after complications like indolent fistulations, stenoses, bleeding, or bowel perforation started. Standard radiological methods to check the extent of the disease are loaded either with certain radiation exposure (enteroclysis, CT) or lack standardization (ultrasound). The aim of this small study was to evaluate the worth of ultrasound-enteroclysis in detecting the extent and complications of the Crohn's disease in surgically treated patients. Material and methods: Since 1997, when we started with the ultrasound-enteroclysis, 246 surgical performances were involved into our study. Out of them, 181 had conventional abdominal intestinal ultrasound as well as conventional enteroclysis within 1 week. Remaining 65 cases were diagnosed by the ultrasound-enteroclysis. Intestinal ultrasound was performed on the Ultramark 3000 HDI device with autofocussable convex 5 MHz and linear 7.5 MHz probes or nowadays ATL 5000 HDI, 7-12 MHz linear probe. No contrast enhancement was used. Enteroclysis was done with the Micropaque suspension diluted 1:1 with HP-7000 300 ml with its application rate up to 75 ml/min followed by HP-7000 solution 2000 ml, application rate of 120 ml/min. The patients with ultrasound-enteroclysis were applied HP 7000 solution only (2000 ml, rate 100 ml/s) via an enteroclysis catheter. All investigations were video-recorded. Results: Consent with the per-operative finding was reached in 162 from 181 enteroclyses and in 169 of 181 ultrasounds. Ultrasound-enteroclysis was precise in 61 cases from 65. Among these, 60 patients had the recurrence during the treatment proved by clinical and laboratory results. This re-activation was clearly revealed in 38 from 43 cases by enteroclysis, 41 from 43 by US and in 16 from 17 by ultrasound

  13. The challenge of segmental small bowel motility quantitation using MR enterography

    Menys, A.; Plumb, A.; Atkinson, D.; Taylor, S A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of “cine” MRI using segmental regions of interest (ROIs) has become increasingly popular for investigating bowel motility; however, variation in motility in healthy subjects both within and between scans remains poorly described. Methods: 20 healthy individuals (mean age, 28 years; 14, males) underwent MR enterography to acquire dynamic motility scans in both breath hold (BH) and free breathing (FB) on 2 occasions. Motility data were quantitatively assessed by placing four...

  14. Recurrent small bowel infarction in a young man: polycythaemia or vasculitis?

    Hussain, Abdulzahra; Ansari, Taj; Mahmood, Hind; Ellul, Joe

    2009-01-01

    A 29-year-old man presented with a 3 day history of right lower quadrant pain, nausea and vomiting. There was tenderness in the right lower quadrant. At surgery the appendix was normal but an infarcted terminal ileum segment was found and resected. Histopathological examination was suggestive of vasculitis. The patient was discharged in good condition and follow-up for the first year was unremarkable. Unfortunately he developed another episode of bowel ischaemia in the second year and underwe...

  15. 14C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had 14C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested 14C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption

  16. Transabdominal ultrasonography of the small bowel after oral administration of a non-absorbable anechoic solution: Comparison with barium enteroclysis

    AIM: The aim of this study was to determine if oral administration of a non-absorbable anechoic solution conveys any benefit during abdominal ultrasound (US), with special reference to its accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-three adult out-patients scheduled for small bowel barium enema (SBE) were included. The day before SBE all patients underwent abdominal US before and after oral administration of an isotonic non-absorbable electrolyte solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG-ELS). Sensitivity and specificity were evaluated using SBE as a gold standard. RESULTS: After ingestion of PEG-ELS satisfactory distension of the intestinal lumen was obtained (11-25 mm) with sequential visualization of jejunoileal loops in 30.9 ± 17.3 min. In 15 out of 53 cases both US and SBE showed bowel changes characteristic of Crohn's disease. In three out of 53 cases both US and SBE showed neoplasms. In one out of 53 cases US was negative, SBE positive for local nodularity and ulcerations typical of Crohn's disease. In one out of 53 cases US was negative, SBE positive for macronodularity consistent with coeliac disease. In five out of 53 cases US was negative, while SBE was positive for mininodularity expressive of lymphoid hyperplasia. In 28 out of 53 cases both examinations were negative. CONCLUSION: PEG-ELS administration allows a thorough US investigation of the small bowel, with fair sensitivity (72%) and excellent specificity (100%). False negative findings are mainly due to lymphoid hyperplasia, a feature of uncertain significance in adults. Cittadini G. et al.(2001)

  17. Aggregation of amphiphilic polymers in the presence of adhesive small colloidal particles

    Baulin, Vladimir A.; Johner, Albert; Avalos, Josep Bonet

    2010-11-01

    The interaction of amphiphilic polymers with small colloids, capable to reversibly stick onto the chains, is studied. Adhesive small colloids in solution are able to dynamically bind two polymer segments. This association leads to topological changes in the polymer network configurations, such as looping and cross-linking, although the reversible adhesion permits the colloid to slide along the chain backbone. Previous analyses only consider static topologies in the chain network. We show that the sliding degree of freedom ensures the dominance of small loops, over other structures, giving rise to a new perspective in the analysis of the problem. The results are applied to the analysis of the equilibrium between colloidal particles and star polymers, as well as to block copolymer micelles. The results are relevant for the reversible adsorption of silica particles onto hydrophilic polymers, used in the process of formation of mesoporous materials of the type SBA or MCM, cross-linked cyclodextrin molecules threading on the polymers and forming the structures known as polyrotaxanes. Adhesion of colloids on the corona of the latter induce micellization and growth of larger micelles as the number of colloids increase, in agreement with experimental data.

  18. Ultrasonographic findings of the intestinal wall being changed by small bowel obstruction in rabbits: Correlation with histopathology

    To evaluate the change of the wall of obstructed small bowel loop on ultrasonography (US), the changes of pre- and post-obstructed segments were examined by using US and correlated with histopathologic findings. Small bowel loops of seven rabbits were caused to be obstructed by surgery. One of them was sacrificed after 12 hours, and six were after 24 hours. The bowel loop of about 10 cm in length was cut and removed from obstructed site for evaluation with US and correlation with histopathologic findings. One control was also included and correlated by the same way, without bowel obstruction. After US examination, the bowel loops were opened at the mesenteric border. They were mounted into hard paper, and put in a plastic pail filled with 2 liters of physiologic saline. The specimens were imaged with 10 MHz linear array transducer with high definition zoom. After sonographic examination, the specimens were fixed with 10% formalin solution and stained by hematoxylin-eosin. The segments of small bowel showed three layers on US, which were hyperechoic, hypoechoic, and hyperechoic from the mucosal surface. The total thickness of the pre-obstructed segments was 1.65 ± 0.15 mm, and of post-obstructed was 1.62 ± 0.14 mm; there was no significant difference (p>0.05). The ratio of the second hypoechoic layer to total thickness was 23% at pre-obstructed segments, 17% at post-obstructed, and 7% at the control. Under microscopic examination, the total thickness of the pre-obstructed segments were measured as 0.95 ± 0.12 mm, and that of the post-obstructed was measured as 0.9± 0.11 mm; there was no significant difference (p>0.05). The total thickness on US was about 0.7 mm thicker than in microscopic findings, so considering the ratio of each layers, the first hyperechoic and the second hypoechoic layers were assumed to be mucosal layer, and the third hyperechoic layer was assumed to be submucosal and muscle layers. Histopathologic findings of both pre- and post

  19. Ultrasonographic findings of the intestinal wall being changed by small bowel obstruction in rabbits: Correlation with histopathology

    Nam, Deok Ho; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Kim, Youn Wha [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-15

    To evaluate the change of the wall of obstructed small bowel loop on ultrasonography (US), the changes of pre- and post-obstructed segments were examined by using US and correlated with histopathologic findings. Small bowel loops of seven rabbits were caused to be obstructed by surgery. One of them was sacrificed after 12 hours, and six were after 24 hours. The bowel loop of about 10 cm in length was cut and removed from obstructed site for evaluation with US and correlation with histopathologic findings. One control was also included and correlated by the same way, without bowel obstruction. After US examination, the bowel loops were opened at the mesenteric border. They were mounted into hard paper, and put in a plastic pail filled with 2 liters of physiologic saline. The specimens were imaged with 10 MHz linear array transducer with high definition zoom. After sonographic examination, the specimens were fixed with 10% formalin solution and stained by hematoxylin-eosin. The segments of small bowel showed three layers on US, which were hyperechoic, hypoechoic, and hyperechoic from the mucosal surface. The total thickness of the pre-obstructed segments was 1.65 {+-} 0.15 mm, and of post-obstructed was 1.62 {+-} 0.14 mm; there was no significant difference (p>0.05). The ratio of the second hypoechoic layer to total thickness was 23% at pre-obstructed segments, 17% at post-obstructed, and 7% at the control. Under microscopic examination, the total thickness of the pre-obstructed segments were measured as 0.95 {+-} 0.12 mm, and that of the post-obstructed was measured as 0.9{+-} 0.11 mm; there was no significant difference (p>0.05). The total thickness on US was about 0.7 mm thicker than in microscopic findings, so considering the ratio of each layers, the first hyperechoic and the second hypoechoic layers were assumed to be mucosal layer, and the third hyperechoic layer was assumed to be submucosal and muscle layers. Histopathologic findings of both pre- and post

  20. Tuberculosis versus non-Hodgldn's lymphomas involving small bowel mesentery: Evaluation with contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Peng Dong; Bin Wang; Quan-Ye Sun; Hui Cui

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the specific computed tomography (CT) imaging criteria for differentiating tuberculosis involving the small bowel mesenteric lymph nodes from lymphomas.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the anatomic distribution,CT enhancement patterns of lymphoma in 18 patients with mesenteric tuberculosis and 22 with untreated non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) involving small bowel mesentery (SBM).Of the 18 patients with tuberculosis,9 had purely mesenteric tuberculous lymphadenopathy (TL),and 9 had mesenteric TL accompanied with tuberculous mesenteritis (TLM).RESULTS: CT showed that tuberculosis and NHL mainly affected lymph nodes in the body and root of SBM.Homogeneously enhanced lymph nodes in the body and root of SBM were found more often in the NHL (P<0.05).Homogeneously mixed peripheral enhanced lymph nodes in the body of SBM were found more often in mesenteric TL and TLM (P<0.05).Peripheral enhanced lymph nodes in the root of SBM were found more often in mesenteric TL and TLM (P<0.01)."Sandwich sign" in the root of SBM was observed more often in NHL (P<0.05).COMCLUSION: Anatomic lymph node distribution,sandwich sign and specific enhancement patterns of lymphadenopathy in SBM on CT images can be used in differentiating between tuberculosis and untreated NHL involving SBM.

  1. Long-acting somatostatin analogues provide significant beneficial effect in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia: Results from a proof of concept open label mono-centre trial

    Hall, Barry; Breslin, Niall; McNamara, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel angiodysplasias account for over 50% of causes of small bowel bleeding and carry a worse prognosis than lesions located elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Re-bleeding rates are high even after first-line endoscopic therapy and are associated with high levels of morbidity for affected patients. Small trials of long-acting somatostatin analogues have shown promising results but have not yet been assessed in patients with refractory small bowel disease. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of long-acting somatostatin analogues in reducing re-bleeding rates and transfusion requirements, and improving haemoglobin levels in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia. Methods Patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia were treated with 20 mg of long-acting octreotide for a minimum of three months. Response was assessed according to: rates of re-bleeding, haemoglobin levels, transfusion requirements, and side effects. Results A total of 24 patients were initially treated and 20 received at least three doses. Rates of complete, partial and non-response were 70%, 20% and 10% respectively. Average haemoglobin rates increased from 9.19 g/dl to 11.35 g/dl (p = 0.0027, 95% confidence interval (CI) −3.5 to −1.1) in the group overall and 70% remained transfusion-free after a mean treatment duration of 8.8 months. The rate of adverse events was higher than previously reported at 30%. Conclusion Long-acting somatostatin analogues offer a therapeutic advantage in a significant proportion of patients with small bowel angiodysplasia. With careful patient selection and close observation, a long-acting somatostatin analogue should be considered in all patients with persistent anaemia attributable to refractory disease in conjunction with other standard treatments. PMID:26966525

  2. Short bowel syndrome

    This thesis describes some aspects of short bowel syndrome. When approximately 1 m or less small bowel is retained after extensive resection, a condition called short bowel syndrome is present. Since the advent of parenteral nutrition, the prognosis of patients with a very short bowel has dramatically improved. Patients with 40 to 100 cm remaining jejunum and/or ileum can generally be maintained with oral nutrition due to increased absorption of the small bowel remnant as result of intestinal adaptation. This study reports clinical, biochemical and nutritional aspects of short bowel patients on oral or parenteral nutrition, emphasizing data on absorption of various nutrients and on bone metabolism. Furthermore, some technical apsects concerning long-term parenteral nutrition are discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Idiopathic abdominal cocoon syndrome with unilateral abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia in a young case of small bowel obstruction

    Fei, Xiang; Yang, Hai-Rui; Yu, Peng-Fei; Sheng, Hai-Bo; Gu, Guo-Li

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal cocoon syndrome (ACS) is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction due to total or partial encapsulation of the small intestine by a fibrocollagenous membrane. Idiopathic ACS with abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia is even rarer clinically. We successfully treated a 26-year-old male case of small bowel obstruction with acute peritonitis. He was finally diagnosed with idiopathic ACS with unilateral abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia during exploratory laparotomy. He then underwent enterolysis, cryptorchidectomy, and appendectomy. He recovered gradually from the operations and early postoperative inflammatory ileus. There has been no recurrence of intestinal obstruction since the operation, and he is still in follow-up. We analyzed his clinical data and retrospectively reviewed the literature, and our findings may be helpful for the clinical diagnosis and treatment on ACS. PMID:27239122

  4. Effects of Bolus and Continuous Nasogastric Feeding on Gastric Emptying, Small Bowel Water Content, Superior Mesenteric Artery Blood Flow, and Plasma Hormone Concentrations in Healthy Adults

    Chowdhury, Abeed H.; Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L.; Costigan, Carolyn; Marciani, Luca; Macdonald, Ian A.; Bowling, Timothy E.; Lobo, Dileep N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to demonstrate the effect of continuous or bolus nasogastric feeding on gastric emptying, small bowel water content, and splanchnic blood flow measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the context of changes in plasma gastrointestinal hormone secretion. Background: Nasogastric/nasoenteral tube feeding is often complicated by diarrhea but the contribution of feeding strategy to the etiology is unclear. Methods: Twelve healthy adult male participants who underwent nasogastric intubation before a baseline MRI scan, received 400 mL of Resource Energy (Nestle) as a bolus over 5 minutes or continuously over 4 hours via pump in this randomized crossover study. Changes in gastric volume, small bowel water content, and superior mesenteric artery blood flow and velocity were measured over 4 hours using MRI and blood glucose and plasma concentrations of insulin, peptide YY, and ghrelin were assayed every 30 minutes. Results: Bolus nasogastric feeding led to significant elevations in gastric volume (P < 0.0001), superior mesenteric artery blood flow (P < 0.0001), and velocity (P = 0.0011) compared with continuous feeding. Both types of feeding reduced small bowel water content, although there was an increase in small bowel water content with bolus feeding after 90 minutes (P < 0.0068). Similarly, both types of feeding led to a fall in plasma ghrelin concentration although this fall was greater with bolus feeding (P < 0.0001). Bolus feeding also led to an increase in concentrations of insulin (P = 0.0024) and peptide YY (P < 0.0001), not seen with continuous feeding. Conclusion: Continuous nasogastric feeding does not increase small bowel water content, thus fluid flux within the small bowel is not a major contributor to the etiology of tube feeding-related diarrhea. PMID:25549202

  5. Efficacy of polyethylene glycol adhesion barrier after gynecological laparoscopic surgery: Results of a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Broek, R.P. Ten; Kok-Krant, N.; Verhoeve, H.R.; Goor, H. van; Bakkum, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative adhesions are the most frequent complication of peritoneal surgery, causing small bowel obstruction, female infertility and chronic pain. This pilot study assessed the efficacy of a sprayable polyethylene glycol (PEG) barrier in the prevention of de novo adhesions. 16 patients undergoi

  6. Bariumexaminations of the small intestine and the colon in inflammatory bowel disease; Konventionelle Duenn- und Dickdarmdiagnostik bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen

    Antes, G. [Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Klinikum Kempten-Oberallgaeu g, GmbH, Kempten (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the possibilities of conventional radiography in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease of the small intestine and colon.Material and methods For more than 25 years we examine the small bowel employing enteroclysis with barium and methylcellulose and the colon with the usual double-contrast method. In the last 152 months 1560 small bowel enemas were performed. In the last 40 months 410 examinations of the colon were performed. There is a thirty percent decrease in enteroclysis examinations within the past 5 years,however, the rate of examinations with positive results increased from 46 to 57%.The proportion of the inflammatory small intestinal diseases (not only Crohn's disease) remained constant with 18%.Concerning the examinations of the colon for inflammatory disease we confirmed the diagnosis in seven cases.The radiation exposure for the enteroclysis in inflammatory diseases was 7mSv, for colon examinations 14 mSv. Barium examinations, especially of the stomach and colon are decreasing in frequency.Therefore the art of performance and interpretation might get lost.Enteroclysis, however, is still the method of reference for the other imaging methods.The advantages compared to the other imaging methods are the excellent presentation of the details of the mucosal surface and the observation of functional disorders. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung Diese Uebersichtsarbeit soll die Moeglichkeiten der konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik an Duenndarm und Kolon bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen aufzeigen.Material und Methoden Seit mehr als 25 Jahren untersuchen wir den Duenndarm mit dem Enteroklysma mit Barium und Methylzellulose und das Kolon mit der ueblichen Doppelkontrastmethode. In den letzten 152 Monaten wurden 1560 Duenndarmuntersuchungen durchgefuehrt. In den letzten 40 Monaten erfolgten 410 Kolonuntersuchungen.Ergebnisse Bei den Duenndarmuntersuchungen wurde in den letzten 5 Jahren ein Rueckgang um 30% beobachtet

  7. CD2 deficiency partially prevents small bowel inflammation and improves parasite control in murine Toxoplasma gondii infection

    Nina N Pawlowski; Daniela Struck; Katja Grollich; Anja A Kühl; Martin Zeitz; Oliver Liesenfeld; J(o)rg C Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether bowel inflammation and/or parasite control is altered in the absence of the T cell adhesion molecule CD2.METHODS: Wildtype (WT) and CD2 deficient (CD2-/-)mice were infected with 100 cysts of Toxoplasma gondii(T.gondii) (ME49) by gavage. On d 7 after infection mice were killed. Necrosis and the number of parasites/cm ileum were determined. Cytokine levels of stimulated cells as well as sera were evaluated. Secondly, survival of WT vs CD2-/- mice was analysed using Kaplan-Meier analysis.RESULTS: CD2-/- mice survived longer than WT mice(mean: 23.5 vs 7.1 d, P = 0.001). Further, CD2-/- mice showed less weight loss and less ileal inflammation than WT mice at d 7 post infection. In addition, the number of parasites in the ileum was significantly lower in CD2-/-mice than in WT mice (88 ± 12 vs 349±58 cm, P < 0.01).This was paralleled by lower production of IFN-γ and IL-6 from TLA-stimulated mLN cells and increased IFN-γ production by splenocytes.CONCLUSION: CD2 deficient mice are more resistant to T.gondii infection than WT mice. In contrast to most current immunosuppressive or biological therapies CD2 deficiency reduces intestinal inflammation and at the same time helps to control infection.

  8. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder presented as small bowel intussusception in adult liver transplant patient

    Joo, Sun Hyung; Acun, Zeki; Stefanovic, Alexandra; Blieden, Clifford R.; Ikpatt, Offiong F.; Moon, Jang

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction after liver transplant is a rare complication, with diverse clinical manifestations. Intestinal adhesion is the most common cause. However, internal hernia, abdominal wall hernia, and neoplasm are also reported. Intussusception is another rare cause of intestinal obstruction, which has been reported primarily in pediatric patients. Herein, we report a case of intestinal obstruction from intussusception in an adult liver transplant patient associated with post-transplant...

  9. Perforation of metastatic melanoma to the small bowel with simultaneous gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    Nathan Brummel; Ziad Awad; Shellaine Frazier; Jiafan Liu; Nitin Rangnekar

    2005-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a common site of metastases for malignant melanoma. These metastatic tumors are often asymptomatic. We describe a case of a 58-year-old male who presented with a sudden onset of generalized abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history was significant for lentigo melanoma of the right cheek. Laparotomy was performed and two segments ofsmall bowel, one with a perforated tumor, the other with a non-perforated tumor, were removed. Histology and immunohistochemical staining revealed the perforated tumor to be a metastatic malignant melanoma and the non-perforated tumor was found to be a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The patient was discharged 7 d postoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature of a simultaneous metastatic malignant melanoma and a GIST. Surgical intervention is warranted in patients with symptomatic GIT metastases to improve the quality of life or in those patients with surgical emergencies.

  10. A prospective randomized comparison between two MRI studies of the small bowel in Crohn's disease, the oral contrast method and MR enteroclysis.

    Negaard, Anne; Paulsen, Vemund; Sandvik, Leiv; Berstad, Audun Elnaes; Borthne, Arne; Try, Kirsti; Lygren, Idar; Storaas, Tryggve; Klow, Nils-Einar

    2007-09-01

    The aim was to compare bowel distension and diagnostic properties of magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel with oral contrast (MRI per OS) with magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE). Forty patients with suspected Crohn's disease (CD) were examined with both MRI methods. MRI per OS was performed with a 6% mannitol solution and MRE with nasojejunal intubation and a polyethylenglycol solution. MRI protocol consisted of balanced fast field echo (B-FFE), T2 and T1 sequences with and without gadolinium. Two experienced radiologists individually evaluated bowel distension and pathological findings including wall thickness (BWT), contrast enhancement (BWE), ulcer (BWU), stenosis (BWS) and edema (EDM). The diameter of the small bowel was smaller with MRI per OS than with MRE (difference jejunum: 0.55 cm, p < 0.001; ileum: 0.35 cm, p < 0.001, terminal ileum: 0.09 cm, p = 0.08). However, CD was diagnosed with high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values: MRI per OS 88%, 89%, 89%, 89%; MRE 88%, 84%, 82%, 89%) and inter-observer agreement (MRI per OS k = 0.95; MRE k = 1). In conclusion, bowel distension was inferior in MRI per OS compared to MRE. However, both methods diagnosed CD with a high diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. PMID:17483955

  11. Connection tubing causing small bowel obstruction and colonic erosion as a rare complication after laparoscopic gastric banding: a case report

    Tan Liza BK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is the most frequently performed bariatric procedure for the treatment of morbid obesity and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. Complications related to obesity surgery are rare and their presentation is often non-specific. Thus, it is highly important for physicians who are practising bariatric surgery to be aware of complications described in single-case studies or series when they come across similar complications even years after the primary bariatric operation. Case presentation We report the case of a 47-year-old Malay woman who was admitted with symptoms and signs suggesting intestinal obstruction five years after gastric band placement. Conclusions In our patient, the band connection wire tube was the cause of both small bowel obstruction and colonic erosion. Computed axial tomography is the cornerstone of the investigation of such patients. After surgical removal of the connecting tube, our patient recovered without sequelae.

  12. Role of luminal nutrients and endogenous GLP-2 in intestinal adaptation to mid-small bowel resection

    Dahly, Elizabeth M; Gillingham, Melanie B; Guo, Ziwen; Murali, Sangita G; Nelson, David W; Holst, Jens Juul; Ney, Denise M

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the role of luminal nutrients and glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) in intestinal adaptation, rats were subjected to 70% midjejunoileal resection or ileal transection and were maintained with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or oral feeding. TPN rats showed small bowel mucosal...... hyperplasia at 8 h through 7 days after resection, demonstrating that exogenous luminal nutrients are not essential for resection-induced adaptation when residual ileum and colon are present. Increased enterocyte proliferation was a stronger determinant of resection-induced mucosal growth in orally fed...... animals, whereas decreased apoptosis showed a greater effect in TPN animals. Resection induced significant transient increases in plasma bioactive GLP-2 during TPN, whereas resection induced sustained increases in plasma GLP-2 during oral feeding. Resection-induced adaptive growth in TPN and orally fed...

  13. Autoimmune enteropathy with a CD8+ CD7- T-cell small bowel intraepithelial lymphocytosis: case report and literature review

    Bishu Shrinivas

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult onset autoimmune enteropathy (AIE is a rare condition characterized by diarrhea refractory to dietary therapy diagnosed in patients with evidence of autoimmune conditions. Auto-antibodies to gut epithelial cells and other tissues are commonly demonstrated. Despite increasing awareness, the pathogenesis, histologic, immunologic and clinical features of AIE remain uncertain. There remains controversy regarding the diagnostic criteria, the frequency and types of auto-antibodies and associated autoimmune conditions, and the extent and types of histologic and immunologic abnormalities. CD4+ T-cells are thought to at least responsible for this condition; whether other cell types, including B- and other T-cell subsets are involved, are uncertain. We present a unique case of AIE associated with a CD8+CD7- lymphocytosis and review the literature to characterize the histologic and immunologic abnormalities, and the autoantibodies and autoimmune conditions associated with AIE. Case Presentation We present a case of immune mediated enteropathy distinguished by the CD8+CD7- intra-epithelial and lamina propria lymphocytosis. Twenty-nine cases of AIE have been reported. The majority of patients had auto-antibodies (typically anti-enterocyte, preferential small bowel involvement, and predominately CD3+ CD4+ infiltrates. Common therapies included steroids or immuno-suppressive agents and clinical response with associated with histologic improvement. Conclusions AIE is most often characterized (1 IgG subclass anti-epithelial cell antibodies, (2 preferential small bowel involvement, and (3 CD3+ alphabeta TCR+ infiltrates; there is insufficient evidence to conclude CD4+ T-cells are solely responsible in all cases of AIE.

  14. Effect of different treatment plans on irradiated small-bowel volume in gynecologic patients undergoing whole-pelvic irradiation

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different treatment plans for whole-pelvic irradiation on small-bowel volumes (SBVs) in patients with gynecologic malignancies, 40 patients were enrolled in this study. Computed tomography (CT) simulations were performed, and the small bowel of each patient was outlined manually. Treatment plans with equal-weighted (EW) and non-equal-weighted (NEW) (70% in bilateral directions) techniques of four-field and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were performed. The V10-V100 represented the volume (cm3) at different levels of the prescribed doses (10-100%). The V10-V100 was compared among the different treatment planning techniques, and patients who were suitable for IMRT or NEW were identified. IMRT and NEW significantly reduced the V50-V100 and V40-V60 levels compared with EW, respectively. NEW caused a significant reduction in the V30-V60 levels in patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥26 kg/m2. Patients with IMRT demonstrated lower V70-V100 levels compared with those with NEW. In patients with a BMI ≥26 kg/m2 or an age ≥55 years, lower V20-V50 levels were noted using NEW compared with IMRT. Treatment planning with larger weighting in the bilateral directions in four-field radiotherapy reduces the low-dose SBV in patients with gynecologic malignancies, especially in those with a high BMI or the elderly. IMRT effectively reduces high-dose SBV, especially in patients with a low BMI. (author)

  15. The Clinical Outcomes of Transcatheter Microcoil Embolization in Patients with Active Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Small Bowel

    Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Soo Teik [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To assess the clinical outcomes of the transcatheter microcoil embolization in patients with active lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding in the small bowel, as well as to compare the mortality rates between the two groups based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus determined by an angiography. We retrospectively evaluated all of the consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for treatment of acute LGI bleeding between January 2003 and October 2007. In total, the study included 36 patients who underwent a colonoscopy and were diagnosed to have an active bleeding in the LGI tracts. Based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus, determined by an angiography, the patients were classified into two groups. The clinical outcomes included technical success, clinical success (no rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (> 30 days), as well as the major and minor complication rates. Of the 36 patients, 17 had angiography-proven bleeding that was distal to the marginal artery. The remaining 19 patients did not have a bleeding focus based on the angiography results. The technical and clinical success rates of performing transcatheter microcoil embolizations in patients with active bleeding were 100% and 88%, respectively (15 of 17). One patient died from continued LGI bleeding and one patient received surgery to treat the continued bleeding. There was no note made on the delayed bleeding or on the major or minor complications. Of the 19 patients without active bleeding, 16 (84%) did not have recurrent bleeding. One patient died due to continuous bleeding and multi-organ failure. The superselective microcoil embolization can help successfully treat patients with active LGI bleeding in the small bowel, identified by the results of an angiography. The mortality rate is not significantly different between the patients of the visualization and non-visualization groups on angiography.

  16. Breath test for differential diagnosis between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel disease: An observation on non-absorbable antibiotics

    Esposito, I; Leone, A.; Gregorio, G Di; Giaquinto, S; de Magistris, L; Ferrieri, A; G. Riegler

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) among patients with an earlier diagnosis of irritable bowel disease (IBS) in our geographical area, and to collect information on the use of locally acting non-absorbable antibiotics in the management of SIBO.

  17. Experimental small bowel preservation using Polysol: A new alternative to University of Wisconsin solution, Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution?

    Lai Wei; Koichiro Hata; Benedict Marie Doorschodt; Reinhard Büttner; Thomas Minor; René H Tolba

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the potential of Polysol, a newly developed preservation solution, in cold storage of small bowel grafts, compared with the current standards,University of Wisconsin solution (UW), Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK).METHODS: Male Wistar rats were used as donors.Small bowels were retrieved, flushed and then stored in the respective 4 solutions for 18 h at 4℃. Functional integrity of the grafts was evaluated by isolated reperfusion with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37℃ for 30 min in all 4 groups.RESULTS: Polysol preservation exhibited the highest tissue ATP concentration and the lowest release of LDH.Malondialdehyde, an index for tissue lipid peroxidation,was also the lowest in Polysol. Tissue oxygen consumption was significantly higher in Polysol than in the others. Of interest, UW-storage promoted 10-fold higher apoptosis than in the others. Moreover, electron microscopy revealed that the mucosal villi/micro-villi formation and the cell organelles, including mitochondria,were both significantly better preserved in Polysol, while deleterious alterations were apparent in the others, most notably in UW. Although Celsior and HTK exhibited the better trend of results than UW in some parameters, but could not reach the over-all superiority to UW.CONCLUSION: Cold storage using Polysol resulted in significantly better integrity and function of small bowel grafts than UW. Hence, Polysol may be a novel alternative for the small bowel preservation.

  18. New Evidence on the Impact of Antithrombotics in Patients Submitted to Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy for the Evaluation of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Pedro Boal Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE plays a decisive role in the obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB diagnosis. Antithrombotics may increase bleeding risk in patients with preexistent lesions or through direct mucosal aggression. We aimed to correlate antithrombotics usage with lesions with bleeding potential found in SBCE. Methods. Retrospective single-center study including 274 consecutive SBCE performed over 7 years for OGIB. The lesions were classified as P0 (no bleeding potential, P1 (uncertain bleeding potential: erosions, and P2 (high bleeding potential: angioectasias, ulcers, and tumors. We assessed antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug use during the 60 days preceding SBCE. Results. One-third of the patients were under antithrombotic therapy. The diagnostic yield of SBCE for P2 lesions was 30.0%. Angioectasias (20.4% were the most frequently observed lesions. There was a significant correlation between anticoagulant drug use and a higher incidence of P2 lesions in the small bowel (43.2% versus 26.5%; OR = 2.11, P=0.026. We found no significant correlation between antiplatelets and lesions with bleeding potential in SBCE. Conclusions. Small bowel lesions with high bleeding potential were more frequently detected when the patient was on anticoagulant drugs, resulting in a twofold risk. Antiplatelet drugs were not associated with small bowel lesions.

  19. Intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation following small bowel transplantation in the rat

    In addition to its role in absorbing nutrients, the intestinal mucosa provides an important barrier against toxins and bacteria in the bowel lumen. The present study evaluated gut barrier function following orthotopic (in continuity) intestinal grafting in rats. Graft histology, intestinal permeability, and bacterial translocation to the grafted mesenteric lymph nodes, the host's liver, and the host's spleen were assessed on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days. The study group received no immunosuppression after allotransplantation. The two control groups included rats with isografts and rats with cyclosporine-treated allografts. On the 7th POD, the study animals had moderate transmural inflammation due to rejection, with normal histology in the isografts and CsA-treated allografts; increased intestinal permeability, measured by urinary excretion of oral 51Cr-EDTA (P less than 0.01); and increased number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen (P less than 0.05). The number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen of the study group positively correlated with the changes in intestinal permeability (P less than 0.05). Rejection of the orthotopic intestinal graft leads to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation from the lumen of the graft to the host's reticuloendothelial system. Measures to improve gut barrier function and antibiotic therapy during rejection episodes may help reduce the incidence of septic complications after intestinal grafting

  20. Small Bowel Perforation Caused by Pancreaticojejunal Anastomotic Stent Migration after Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Periampullary Carcinoma

    Giulio Mari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreaticoduodenectomy is the gold standard for patients with resectable periampullary carcinoma. The protection of the anastomosis by positioning of an intraluminal stent is a technique used to lower the frequency of anastomotic fistulas. However the use of anastomotic stents is still debated and stent related complications are reported. Case report A fifty-three-year old male underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD for a T2N0 periampullary carcinoma with a pancreaticojejunal (duct to mucosa anastomosis protected by a free floating 6 Fr Nelaton stent in the Wirsung duct. Twenty-three months after surgery the patient accessed Emergency Department for severe abdominal pain associated to temperature, high white blood cell count and an significant increase in C reactive protein. Method Abdominal CT scan shown the presence of a tubular stent in the mesogastrium/lower right quadrant. No evident free intra-abdominal air was detected. The patient was submitted to explorative laparotomy. After debridement for localized peritonitis the Nelaton trans anastomotic stent was found in the abdomen. There was no evidence of bowel perforation, but intestinal loops covered with fibrin and suspect for impending perforation were resected. Conclusion There is a lack of evidence about the true rate of post-operative complications related to pancreatic stenting. We believe that in patients presenting with abdominal pain or peritonitis that previously underwent PD with stentguided pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, the hypothesis of stent migration should at least be taken into consideration.

  1. Conservative management of small bowel perforation in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    Allaparthi, Satya; Verma, Himanshu; Burns, David L; Joyce, Ann M

    2013-08-16

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. EDS type IV, or vascular EDS, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the type III pro-collagen gene (COL3A1). Common complications of EDS type IV include gastrointestinal bleeding and bowel perforations, posing diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas for both surgeons and gastroenterologists. Here, we describe a complicated case of EDS type IV in a 35-year-old caucasian female who presented with overt gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient had a prior history of spontaneous colonic perforation, and an uncomplicated upper endoscopy was performed. A careful ileoscopy was terminated early due to tachycardia and severe abdominal pain, and a subsequent computed tomography scan confirmed the diagnosis of ileal perforation. The patient was managed conservatively, and demonstrated daily improvement. At the time of hospital discharge, no further episodes of gastrointestinal blood loss had occurred. This case highlights the benefit of conservative management for EDS patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage. It is recommended that surgical treatment should be reserved for patients who fail conservative treatment or in cases of hemodynamic instability. Finally, this case demonstrates the necessity for a higher threshold of operative or endoscopic interventions in EDS type IV patients. PMID:23951395

  2. Role of Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Differentiating between Fibrotic and Active Inflammatory Small Bowel Stenosis in Patients with Crohn′s disease

    Francesca Fornasa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in prospectively differentiating between fibrotic and active inflammatory small bowel stenosis in patients with Crohn′s disease (CD. Materials and Methods: A total of 111 patients with histologically proven CD presenting with clinical and plain radiographic signs of small bowel obstruction underwent coronal and axial MRI scans after oral administration of polyethylene glycol solution. A stenosis was judged present if a small bowel segment had >80% lumen reduction as compared to an adjacent normal loop and mural thickening of >3 mm. At the level of the stenosis, both T2 signal intensity and post-gadolinium T1 enhancement were quantified using a 5-point scale (0: very low; 1: low; 2: moderate; 3: high; and 4: very high. A stenosis was considered fibrotic if the sum of the two values (activity score: AS did not exceed 1. Results: A small bowel stenosis was identified in 48 out of 111 patients. Fibrosis was confirmed at histology in all of the 23 patients with AS of 0 or 1, who underwent surgery within 3 days of the MRI examination. In the remaining 25 patients (AS: 2-8, an active inflammatory stenosis was suspected and remission of the obstructive symptoms was obtained by means of medical treatment. One of these patients (AS: 2, however, underwent surgery after 14 days, due to recurrence. MRI had 95.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 97.9% accuracy in the diagnosis of fibrotic stenosis. Conclusion: MRI is reliable in differentiating fibrotic from inflammatory small bowel stenosis in CD.

  3. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Wurnig, Moritz; Boss, Andreas [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.Patak@patak.ch [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Clinic, Radiology, Witellikerstrasse 40, 8032 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments.

  4. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments

  5. 14C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had 14C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested 14C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05), and 21.8% at 1 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05). In Group II, the percentage reductions were 11.8% and 3.7% at 1/2 and 1 hour, respectively (p greater than 0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption

  6. Peritoneal adhesion index (PAI): proposal of a score for the “ignored iceberg” of medicine and surgery

    Coccolini Federico; Ansaloni Luca; Manfredi Roberto; Campanati Luca; Poiasina Elia; Bertoli Paolo; Capponi Michela Giulii; Sartelli Massimo; Saverio Salomone Di; Cucchi Michele; Lazzareschi Daniel; Pisano Michele; Catena Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Peritoneal adhesions describe a condition in which pathological bonds form between the omentum, the small and large bowels, the abdominal wall, and other intra-abdominal organs. Different classification systems have been proposed, but they do not resolve the underlying problem of ambiguity in the quantification and definition of adhesions. We therefore propose a standardized classification system of adhesions to universalize their definition based on the macroscopic appearance of adh...

  7. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  8. An atypical presentation of small bowel obstruction and perforation secondary to sporadic synchronous intra-abdominal desmoid tumours

    Abdalla, Sala; Wilkinson, Michelle; Wilsher, Mark; Uzkalnis, Aleksandras

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid tumours (DTs) are rare, soft tissue tumours which account for 0.03% of all neoplasms. They are characteristically locally invasive but do not metastasize. There is frequent association with females of reproductive age, a history of abdominal surgery or trauma and a family history of fibromatoses. Intra-abdominal DTs are infrequently sporadic and more commonly associated with inherited disorders such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated FAP and Gardener’s syndrome. Presentation of case The authors report a rare case of small bowel obstruction and perforation secondary to sporadic, synchronous intra-abdominal DTs in a 54-year old man with atypical symptoms and no risk factors or family history. Discussion Intra-abdominal DTs have a worse prognosis as they can cause intestinal bleeding, obstruction and perforation. Due to the rarity of these tumours there are no clear guidelines on their management and this is instead based on small case series from specialist centres. In the non-acute setting patients with sporadic intra-abdominal DTs should be managed in a specialist sarcoma unit by a multidisciplinary team. In the presence of FAP or other polyposis syndromes patients with DTs should be managed at a specialist colorectal unit. Emergent presentations require emergency surgery in suitable candidates. Conclusion In non-emergency presentations of DTs, it is essential to exclude FAP, AFAP and other hereditary polyposis syndromes since this affects treatment and subsequent follow-up. PMID:26866881

  9. The effect on the small bowel of 5-FU and oxaliplatin in combination with radiation using a microcolony survival assay

    Kjellén Elisabeth

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In locally advanced rectal cancer, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU-based chemoradiation is the standard treatment. The main acute toxicity of this treatment is enteritis. Due to its potential radiosensitizing properties, oxaliplatin has recently been incorporated in many clinical chemoradiation protocols. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent 5-FU and oxaliplatin influence the radiation (RT induced small bowel mucosal damage when given in conjunction with single or split dose RT. Methods Immune competent balb-c mice were treated with varying doses of 5-FU, oxaliplatin (given intraperitoneally and total body RT, alone or in different combinations in a series of experiments. The small bowel damage was studied by a microcolony survival assay. The treatment effect was evaluated using the inverse of the slope (D0 of the exponential part of the dose-response curve. Results In two separate experiments the dose-response relations were determined for single doses of RT alone, yielding D0 values of 2.79 Gy (95% CI: 2.65 - 2.95 and 2.98 Gy (2.66 - 3.39, for doses in the intervals of 5-17 Gy and 5-10 Gy, respectively. Equitoxic low doses (IC5 of the two drugs in combination with RT caused a decrease in jejunal crypt count with significantly lower D0: 2.30 Gy (2.10 - 2.56 for RT+5-FU and 2.27 Gy (2.08 - 2.49 for RT+oxaliplatin. Adding both drugs to RT did not further decrease D0: 2.28 Gy (1.97 - 2.71 for RT+5-FU+oxaliplatin. A clearly higher crypt survival was noted for split course radiation (3 × 2.5 Gy compared to a single fraction of 7.5 Gy. The same difference was seen when 5-FU and/or oxaliplatin were added. Conclusion Combining 5-FU or oxaliplatin with RT lead to an increase in mucosal damage as compared to RT alone in our experimental setting. No additional reduction of jejunal crypt counts was noted when both drugs were combined with single dose RT. The higher crypt survival with split dose radiation indicates a

  10. A coverage probability based method to estimate patient-specific small bowel planning volumes for use in radiotherapy

    Background and purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a statistical method for generation of patient-specific planning organ-at-risk volumes (PRVs) for the small bowel (SB), by efficient use of a few repeat CT scans. Materials and methods: The PRVs are generated from a coverage probability (CP) matrix of the small bowel wall (SBW) by thresholding. To estimate the CPs, we extend a previously published 'relative frequency of coverage' approach by adding a 'soft margin' around each SBW instance. This prevents the CP matrix from containing any holes, thus making it more robust. As the number of CTs approach infinity, the 'soft margin' approaches zero and the CP matrix converges to the 'relative frequency of coverage'. The PRVs were evaluated by using the bootstrap method in three patients with different degrees of SB motion: The PRVs from randomly sampled subsets of CTs were compared to the PRVs generated from all 10-11 CT scans, by analysis of sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the PRVs generated for CP = 0.005 (i.e. generous patient-specific PRVs) and for CP = 0.03 (i.e. tight patient-specific PRVs) were compared to an intestinal cavity (IC) approach and a population based PRV approach of 10 and 30 mm isotropic planning margins around SB. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of the PRVs depend on the number of CT scans and the CP threshold. With three CT scans and a threshold of 0.03, an average sensitivity of 94-96% and specificity of 86-97% was obtained. All investigated SB planning volumes had an average overlap >89% of both SB and SBW. The tight patient-specific PRVs and the 10 mm margins had the lowest relative volumes, followed by the generous patient-specific PRVs, the 30 mm margins and the ICs. Conclusions: Based on a few CTs, our method generates patient-specific SB PRVs which are both sensitive and specific. Compared to conventional approaches, the patient-specific PRVs are either similar or better in predicting for SB voxels, and at the

  11. The effect on the small bowel of 5-FU and oxaliplatin in combination with radiation using a microcolony survival assay

    In locally advanced rectal cancer, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation is the standard treatment. The main acute toxicity of this treatment is enteritis. Due to its potential radiosensitizing properties, oxaliplatin has recently been incorporated in many clinical chemoradiation protocols. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent 5-FU and oxaliplatin influence the radiation (RT) induced small bowel mucosal damage when given in conjunction with single or split dose RT. Immune competent balb-c mice were treated with varying doses of 5-FU, oxaliplatin (given intraperitoneally) and total body RT, alone or in different combinations in a series of experiments. The small bowel damage was studied by a microcolony survival assay. The treatment effect was evaluated using the inverse of the slope (D0) of the exponential part of the dose-response curve. In two separate experiments the dose-response relations were determined for single doses of RT alone, yielding D0 values of 2.79 Gy (95% CI: 2.65 - 2.95) and 2.98 Gy (2.66 - 3.39), for doses in the intervals of 5-17 Gy and 5-10 Gy, respectively. Equitoxic low doses (IC5) of the two drugs in combination with RT caused a decrease in jejunal crypt count with significantly lower D0: 2.30 Gy (2.10 - 2.56) for RT+5-FU and 2.27 Gy (2.08 - 2.49) for RT+oxaliplatin. Adding both drugs to RT did not further decrease D0: 2.28 Gy (1.97 - 2.71) for RT+5-FU+oxaliplatin. A clearly higher crypt survival was noted for split course radiation (3 × 2.5 Gy) compared to a single fraction of 7.5 Gy. The same difference was seen when 5-FU and/or oxaliplatin were added. Combining 5-FU or oxaliplatin with RT lead to an increase in mucosal damage as compared to RT alone in our experimental setting. No additional reduction of jejunal crypt counts was noted when both drugs were combined with single dose RT. The higher crypt survival with split dose radiation indicates a substantial recovery between radiation fractions. This mucosal

  12. Evaluation of small-bowel transit for solid and liquid test meal in healthy men and women

    Bennink, R.; Maegdenbergh, V. van den; De Roo, M.; Mortelmans, L. [Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Peeters, M.; Geypens, B.; Rutgeerts, P. [Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Gastroenterology

    1999-12-01

    Evaluation of severe functional gastrointestinal motility disorders requires an investigation of the entire gastrointestinal tract. This should be possible with a single radionuclide imaging study. The purpose of this study was (1) to define normal values of small-bowel transit in men and women and (2) to assess a possible difference between gender or test meal, since it has been shown that women have slower gastric emptying than men, and gastric emptying of solids is slower than liquids. A standard gastric-emptying test for a solid (technetium-99m sulphur colloids, 230 Kcal) and liquid (indium-111 DTPA water) test meal was performed in 12 healthy male and 12 healthy female volunteers. After 135 min, the volunteer was place in the supine position for static imaging of the abdomen every 15 min for 6 h. Decay and crossover-corrected geometric mean gastric-emptying data were fit to a modified power exponential function to determine the 10% stomach emptying time for solids and liquids separately. An ROI was drawn around the caecum and ascending colon to determine the arrival time of at least 10% of the solid and liquid test meal. Ten percent small-bowel transit time (10% SBTT) and orocaecal transit time (OCTT) were calculated. The OCTT for males and females, respectively for solids and liquids, are 294.6{+-}18.8; 301.3{+-}24.5; 294.6{+-}18.8 and 301.3{+-}24.5 min. The 10% SBTT for males and females, respectively for solids and liquids, are 280.3{+-}18.4; 280.6{+-}24.0; 288.2{+-}18.9 and 297.4{+-}24.4 (means{+-}SEM) min. We observed a simultaneous transfer of solids and liquids from the terminal ileum to caecum (correlation coefficient 0.90). There is no statistically significant difference in SBTT between gender or solids and liquids. In contrast to the gastric-emptying time, the SBTT of solids and liquids were not significantly different nor was a gender difference found. Determination of the OCTT seems to be the simplest and most accurate approach to measure SBTT

  13. Comparison of the belly board device method and the distended bladder method for reducing irradiated small bowel volumes in preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer patients

    Purpose: To determine the most effective method to reduce the irradiated small bowel volume when using a belly board device (BBD), a distended bladder (DB), or both in patients with rectal cancer undergoing preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The study involved 20 patients with rectal cancer who were scheduled to receive preoperative pelvic RT. Patients were asked to empty their bladders and then drink 300 mL of water 2 h before the treatment planning computed tomographic (CT) scan. To identify the small bowel, an oral contrast solution (450 mL) was given 1 h before the CT scan. Two sets of transverse images were taken at 1-cm-thickness intervals with patients in the prone position with or without the BBD. After voiding, two additional sets of CT scans were obtained in prone positions with or without BBD. The conventional three-field treatment plan, composed of a 6-MV photon posterior-anterior field and 15-MV photon opposed lateral fields with wedges of 45 degrees, was made using a three-dimensional treatment planning system. The beam weights of the three-field plan were equal. The volume of irradiated small bowel was calculated for doses between 10% and 100% of the prescribed dose at 10% intervals. For each 10% dose increment, the effect of the BBD and the DB on the irradiated volume was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon signed rank, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Results: All patients underwent four sets of CT scan under the conditions of four different methods as follows: Group I = empty bladder without the use of belly board; Group II empty bladder with the use of belly board; Group III = distended bladder without the use of belly board; Group IV = distended bladder with the use of belly board. We found that the volume of irradiated small bowel decreased in the order of Group I, Group II, Group III, and Group IV at all dose levels (p 3), in Group III it varied between 48.1% and 82.0% (21.6-163.1 cm3), and in Group IV between 51

  14. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries. PMID:26253722

  15. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio,Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO.

  16. Decreased risk of surgery for small bowel obstruction after laparoscopic colon cancer surgery compared with open surgery

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Andersen, Peter; Erichsen, Rune; Scheike, Thomas; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of surgical approach on the incidence of small bowel obstruction (SBO) is unclear. The aim of the current study was to analyze the long-term risk of surgery for SBO after open and laparoscopic surgery and to assess how subsequent SBO surgery impacts on mortality after colonic...... database and followed through May 2014 in the Danish National Patient Register. The primary endpoint was surgery for SBO. Secondarily, mortality among patients who subsequently underwent SBO surgery and those who did not was compared. RESULTS: Among the 8583 included patients, 251 (2.9 %) underwent surgery...... for SBO during follow-up (median 8.8 years). The 3-year cumulative incidence of SBO surgery was 1.5 %; 1.2 % after laparoscopic and 1.6 % after open surgery. Laparoscopic surgery was associated with a decreased risk of SBO (hazard ratio [HR] 0.61 (CI 0.37 to 0.99, P = 0.048) compared with open surgery...

  17. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Characteristics, Psychological Factors, and Peripheral Cytokines

    Chu, Hua; Fox, Mark; Zheng, Xia; Deng, Yanyong; Long, Yanqin; Huang, Zhihui; Du, Lijun; Xu, Fei; Dai, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Psychosocial factors and low-grade colonic mucosal immune activation have been suggested to play important roles in the pathophysiology of IBS. In total, 94 patients with IBS and 13 healthy volunteers underwent a 10 g lactulose hydrogen breath test (HBT) with concurrent 99mTc scintigraphy. All participants also completed a face-to-face questionnaire survey, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Life Event Stress (LES), and general information. Serum tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels were measured. The 89 enrolled patients with IBS and 13 healthy controls had no differences in baseline characteristics. The prevalence of SIBO in patients with IBS was higher than that in healthy controls (39% versus 8%, resp.; p = 0.026). Patients with IBS had higher anxiety, depression, and LES scores, but anxiety, depression, and LES scores were similar between the SIBO-positive and SIBO-negative groups. Psychological disorders were not associated with SIBO in patients with IBS. The serum IL-10 level was significantly lower in SIBO-positive than SIBO-negative patients with IBS. PMID:27379166

  18. Automatic detection of small bowel tumors in endoscopic capsule images by ROI selection based on discarded lightness information.

    Vieira, Pedro M; Ramos, Jaime; Lima, Carlos S

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatic detection of tumoral frames in endoscopic capsule videos by using features directly extracted from the color space. We show that tumor can be appropriately discriminated from normal tissue by using only color information histogram measures from the Lab color space and that light saturated regions are usually classified as tumoral regions when color based discriminative procedures are used. These regions are correctly classified if lightening is discarded becoming the tissue classifier based only on the color differences a and b of the Lab color space. While current state of the art systems for small bowel tumor detection usually rely on the processing of the whole frame regarding features extraction this paper proposes the use of fully automatic segmentation in order to select regions likely to contain tumoral tissue. Classification is performed by using Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) by using features from color channels a and b of the Lab color space. The proposed algorithm outperforms in more than 5% a series of other algorithms based on features obtained from the higher frequency components selected from Wavelets and Curvelets transforms while saving important computational resources. In a matter of fact the proposed algorithm is more than 25 times faster than algorithms requiring wavelet/curvelet and co-occurrence computations. PMID:26736929

  19. Acute changes in canine small bowel muscle prostaglandin synthesis and function after x-irradiation with 9.38 Gy

    Abdominal radiotherapy is often limited by radiation-induced enteritis. Prostaglandin (PG) synthesis may play a role in the altered function of small bowel (SB) muscle and mucosa. Therefore, the authors have investigated the effects of X-radiation on PG synthesis, and other aspects of canine SB smooth muscle function. Canine SB received 9.38 Gy of 250 kVp X-radiation in situ. Electrodes were used to monitor spike burst and propagation of electrical activity in the SB muscle pre- and post-exposure. Animals were sacrificed prior to irradiation and at 1 and 4 days post-irradiation. Serum PG levels were assayed from mesenteric artery and vein samples, and SB muscle was removed for analysis of PG synthesis. SB muscle myoelectric activity decreased after irradiation until sacrifice (day 4). The PG synthesis in irradiated SB muscle at days 1 and 4 increased in PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2/α and in thromboxane A/sub 2/ metabolite, while the PGI/sub 2/ metabolite decreased. PG levels in venous blood indicate similar changes after passage through the intestine. Although causality is not established, radiation does induce changes in PG synthesis which correlate with changes in myoelectric activity (motility)

  20. GLP-1 and GLP-2 act in concert to inhibit fasted, but not fed, small bowel motility in the rat

    Bozkurt, Ayhan; Näslund, Erik; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2002-01-01

    Small bowel motility was studied in rats at increasing (1-20 pmol/kg/min) intravenous doses of either glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) alone, or in combination in the fasted and fed state. There was a dose-dependent inhibitory action of GLP-1 on the migrating...... myoelectric complex (MMC), where the dose of 5 pmol/kg/min induced an increased MMC cycle length. No effect was seen with GLP-2 alone, but the combination of GLP-1 and GLP-2 induced a more pronounced inhibitory effect, with significant increase of the MMC cycle length from a dose of 2 pmol/kg/min. During fed...... motility, infusion of GLP-1 resulted in an inhibition of spiking activity compared to control. In contrast, infusion of GLP-2 only numerically increased spiking activity compared to control, while the combination of GLP-1 and GLP-2 resulted in no change compared to control. In summary, this study...

  1. Development of a predictive model of Crohn’s disease proximal small bowel involvement in capsule endoscopy evaluation

    Rodrigues-Pinto, Eduardo; Cardoso, Helder; Rosa, Bruno; Santos-Antunes, João; Rodrigues, Susana; Marques, Margarida; Lopes, Susana; Albuquerque, Andreia; Carvalho, Pedro; Moreira, Maria; Cotter, José; Macedo, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: One of the indications for capsule endoscopy (CE) is the detection of proximal small bowel (SB) involvement in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Our aim was to assess clinical, laboratory and endoscopic predictors associated with proximal SB involvement in CD patients submitted to CE. Patients and methods: Retrospective multicenter study in which Lewis score (LS) was systematically determined in 190 CE of patients diagnosed with CD between 2003 and 2014. Results: Significant inflammatory activity (LS > 135) was present in 23 % of the patients in the first tertile and in 31 % of the patients in the second tertile. Albumin, haemoglobin, and total proteins were significantly lower in patients with a LS > 790 compared to patients with a LS  0.249 predicts proximal SB involvement with 90 % sensitivity and 40 % specificity (AUROC 0.732). Conclusions: One-third of patients had proximal SB involvement. Predictive factors were significant weight loss, stricturing behaviour, and ileal involvement at ileocolonoscopy. These data help to select CD patients that benefit the most from performing a CE. PMID:27556069

  2. Rifaximin for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients without irritable bowel syndrome

    Boltin, Doron; Perets, Tsachi Tsadok; Shporn, Einav; Aizic, Shoshana; LEVY, SIGAL; Niv, Yaron; Dickman, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Background Rifaximin is a minimally absorbed antibiotic with high luminal activity, used to treat various gastrointestinal diseases. Although rifaximin has been proposed as first line treatment for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), few data are available regarding its efficacy in non-IBS subjects. We aimed to assess the ability of rifaximin to normalize lactulose-H2 breath tests in non-IBS subjects with symptoms suggestive of SIBO. Materials and methods Consecutive non-IBS patient...

  3. Small bowel Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors can physiologically alter gut motility before causing mechanical obstruction

    Kothari, Manish S; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Meyrick-Thomas, John

    2005-01-01

    Background Gastro Intestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are rare stromal neoplasms that represent the most common mesenchymal tumor of the G.I. tract, accounting for 5% of all sarcomas [1,2]. Originating from interstitial cells of Cajal, which are regulators of gut peristalsis, they are preferentially located in the stomach and the small intestine [3] and clinical presentation is variable, ranging from vague complaints to major G.I. bleeding. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for pa...

  4. Multiple metastases to the small bowel from large cell bronchial carcinomas

    Davor Tomas; Mario Ledinsky; Mladen Belicza; Bozo Kru(s)lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Metastases from lung cancer to gastrointestinal tract are not rare atpostmortem studies but the development of clinically significant symptoms from the gastrointestinal metastases is very unusual.METHODS: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were cut into 5 μm thick sections and routinely stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Some slides were also stained with Alcian-PAS. Antibodies used were primary antibodies to pancytokeratin, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, smooth muscle actin and CD-117.RESULTS: We observed three patients who presented with multiple metastases from large cell bronchial carcinoma to small intestine. Two of them had abdominal symptoms (sudden onset of abdominal pain, constipation and vomiting) and in one case the tumor was incidentally found during autopsy. Microscopically, all tumors showed a same histological pattern and consisted almost exclusively of strands and sheets of poorly cohesive, polymorphic giant cells with scanty, delicate stromas. Few smaller polygonal anaplastic cells dispersed between polymorphic giant cells,were also observed. Immunohistochemistry showed positive staining of the tumor cells with cytokeratin and vimentin. Microscopically and immunohistochemically all metastases had a similar pattern to primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine.CONCLUSION: In patients with small intestine tumors showing anaplastic features, especially with multiple tumors, metastases from large cell bronchial carcinoma should be first excluded, because it seems that they are more common than expected.

  5. Small bowel enteroclysis with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in patients with failed and uncertain passage of a patency capsule

    Video capsule enteroscopy (VCE) has revolutionized small bowel imaging, enabling visual examination of the mucosa of the entire small bowel, while MR enteroclysis (MRE) and CT enteroclysis (CTE) have largely replaced conventional barium enteroclysis. A new indication for MRE and CTE is the clinical suspicion of small bowel strictures, as indicated by delayed or non-delivery of a test capsule given before a VCE examination, to exclude stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical value of subsequent MRE and CTE in patients in whom a test capsule did not present itself in due time. Seventy-five consecutive patients were identified with a delayed or unnoticed delivery of the test capsule. Seventy patients consented to participate and underwent MRE (44) or CTE (26). The medical records and imaging studies were retrospectively reviewed and symptoms, laboratory results and imaging findings recorded. Lesions compatible with Crohns disease were shown by MRE in 5 patients, by CTE in one and by VCE in four, one of whom had lesions on MRE. In patients without alarm symptoms and findings (weight loss, haematochezia, anaemia, nocturnal diarrheoa, ileus, fistula, abscess and abnormal blood tests) imaging studies did not unveil any such lesion. VCE's were performed in only 20 patients, mainly younger than 50 years of age, although no stenotic lesion was shown by MRE and CTE. In the remaining 50 patients no VCE or other endoscopic intervention was performed indicating that the referring physician was content with the diagnostic information from MRE or CTE. The diagnostic value of MRE and CTE is sufficient for clinical management of most patients with suspected small bowel disease, and thus VCE may be omitted or at least postponed for later usage

  6. Development and Validation of a Questionnaire to Measure Serious and Common Quality of Life Issues for Patients Experiencing Small Bowel Obstructions

    Rice, Amanda D.; Wakefield, Leslie B.; Kimberley Patterson; Evette D'Avy Reed; Belinda F. Wurn; Bernhard Klingenberg; C. Richard King, III; Wurn, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    A validated questionnaire to assess the impact of small bowel obstructions (SBO) on patients’ quality of life was developed and validated. The questionnaire included measurements for the impact on the patients’ quality of life in respect to diet, pain, gastrointestinal symptoms and daily life. The questionnaire was validated using 149 normal subjects. Chronbach alpha was 0.86. Test retest reliability was evaluated with 72 normal subjects, the correlation coefficient was 0.93. Discriminate val...

  7. Effects of Bolus and Continuous Nasogastric Feeding on Gastric Emptying, Small Bowel Water Content, Superior Mesenteric Artery Blood Flow, and Plasma Hormone Concentrations in Healthy Adults

    Chowdhury, Abeed H.; Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L.; Costigan, Carolyn; Marciani, Luca; Macdonald, Ian A.; Bowling, Timothy E.; Lobo, Dileep N

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to demonstrate the effect of continuous or bolus nasogastric feeding on gastric emptying, small bowel water content, and splanchnic blood flow measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the context of changes in plasma gastrointestinal hormone secretion. Background: Nasogastric/nasoenteral tube feeding is often complicated by diarrhea but the contribution of feeding strategy to the etiology is unclear. Methods: Twelve healthy adult male participants who underwent naso...

  8. Indications and selection of MR enterography vs. MR enteroclysis with emphasis on patients who need small bowel MRI and general anaesthesia: results of a survey

    Torkzad, Michael R.; Masselli, Gabriele; Halligan, Steve; Oto, Aytek; Neubauer, Henning; Taylor, Stuart; Gupta, Arun; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Lawrance, Ian C; Welman, Christopher J.; Negård, Anne; Ekberg, Olle; Patak, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Aims To survey the perceived indications for magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel (MRE) by experts, when MR enteroclysis (MREc) or MR enterography (MREg) may be chosen, and to determine how the approach to MRE is modified when general anaesthesia (GA) is required. Materials and methods Selected opinion leaders in MRE completed a questionnaire that included clinical indications (MREg or MREc), specifics regarding administration of enteral contrast, and how the technique is altered to ...

  9. Intestinal intussusception and occlusion caused by small bowel polyps in the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Management by combined intraoperative enteroscopy and resection through minimal enterostomy: case report

    Gama-Rodrigues Joaquim J.; Silva José Hyppolito da; Aisaka Adilson A.; Jureidini Ricardo; Falci Júnior Renato; Maluf Filho Fauze; Chong A. Kim; Tsai André Wan Wen; Bresciani Cláudio

    2000-01-01

    The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a hereditary disease that requires frequent endoscopic and surgical intervention, leading to secondary complications such as short bowel syndrome. CASE REPORT: This paper reports on a 15-year-old male patient with a family history of the disease, who underwent surgery for treatment of an intestinal occlusion due to a small intestine intussusception. DISCUSSION: An intra-operative fiberscopic procedure was included for the detection and treatment of numerous polyp...

  10. An obscure cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small bowel

    Robyn L. Gorski; Salah Abdel Jalil; Manver Razick; Ala' Abdel Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small intestine is a rare condition. It usually results in gastrointestinal bleeding and it could happen many years after the diagnosis with renal cell cancer. Treatment includes surgery as well as targeted agents such as tyrosine kinases. We report here the case of an 82-year-old man with a past medical history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma and right nephrectomy 6 years earlier, who presented with recurrent episodes of syncope and black stools. He ...

  11. Amifostine alleviates radiation-induced lethal small bowel damage via promotion of 14-3-3σ-mediated nuclear p53 accumulation.

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Min; Chen, Yi-Fan; Wang, Chung-Chi; Lin, I-Hui; Huang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Kuender D

    2014-10-30

    Amifostine (AM) is a radioprotector that scavenges free radicals and is used in patients undergoing radiotherapy. p53 has long been implicated in cell cycle arrest for cellular repair after radiation exposure. We therefore investigated the protective p53-dependent mechanism of AM on small bowel damage after lethal whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI). AM increased both the survival rate of rats and crypt survival following lethal 18 Gy WAI. The p53 inhibitor PFT-α compromised AM-mediated effects when administered prior to AM administration. AM significantly increased clonogenic survival in IEC-6 cells expressing wild type p53 but not in p53 knockdown cells. AM significantly increased p53 nuclear accumulation and p53 tetramer expression before irradiation through the inhibition of p53 degradation. AM inhibited p53 interactions with MDM2 but enhanced p53 interactions with 14-3-3σ. Knockdown of 14-3-3σ also compromised the effect of AM on clonogenic survival and p53 nuclear accumulation in IEC-6 cells. For the first time, our data reveal that AM alleviates lethal small bowel damage through the induction of 14-3-3σ and subsequent accumulation of p53. Enhancement of the p53/14-3-3σ interaction results in p53 tetramerization in the nucleus that rescues lethal small bowel damage. PMID:25230151

  12. An unexpected cause of small bowel obstruction in an adult patient: midgut volvulus.

    Söker, Gökhan; Yılmaz, Cengiz; Karateke, Faruk; Gülek, Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    The most important complication of intestinal malrotation is midgut volvulus because it may lead to intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. A 29-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Ultrasonography (US), colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS), CT and barium studies were carried out. On US and CDUS, twisting of intestinal segments around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and alteration of the SMA-SMV relationship were detected. CT demonstrated that the small intestine was making a rotation around the SMA and SMV, which amounted to more than 360°. The upper gastrointestinal barium series revealed a corkscrew appearance of the duodenum and proximal jejunum, which is a pathognomonic finding of midgut volvulus. Prior knowledge of characteristic imaging findings of midgut volvulus is essential in order to reach proper diagnosis and establish proper treatment before the development of intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. PMID:24811563

  13. Interplay of nutrients and microbial metabolites in intestinal immune homeostasis: distinct and common mechanisms of immune regulation in the small bowel and colon.

    Perrigoue, Jacqueline; Das, Anuk; Mora, J Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is the largest body surface exposed to the environment. While there are common features when comparing immune responses along the intestinal mucosa, the small bowel and colon exhibit striking differences in their mechanisms driving immune regulation. The vitamin A (VA) metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (RA) signaling via RA nuclear receptors plays a key role in immune homeostasis in the small bowel, and recent work indicates that RA is required for establishing immune tolerance to dietary antigens in the upper intestinal tract by inducing α4β7(+)CCR9(+) gut-tropic TREG. In contrast, microbiota-specific TREG in the colon do not appear to require RA, but can be regulated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), microbial metabolites that signal through the G protein-coupled receptor GPR43. Moreover, TREG do not need CCR9 to home to the colon, but utilize another G protein-coupled receptor, GPR15, which is upregulated by SCFA. Thus, the mechanisms governing intestinal tolerance to dietary antigens in the upper digestive tract differ from those controlling tolerance to the microbiota in the colon, with RA and SCFA playing key complementary roles in their respective compartments. In addition to VA and SCFA, recent studies have highlighted the roles of other dietary and microbial metabolites that influence immune cell homeostasis across the small and large bowel including dietary ligands for aryl hydrocarbon receptor and microbiota-modified bile acids. Understanding the complex and dynamic interplay between dietary metabolites and commensal microbiota within the intestinal microenvironment could therefore inform novel strategies for the treatment of food allergies and inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25227295

  14. Multidetector helical CT in the evaluation of acute small bowel obstruction: Comparison of non-enhanced (no oral, rectal or IV contrast) and IV enhanced CT

    Purpose: To compare accuracy of non-enhanced CT (NECT) (no oral or IV contrast) and enhanced CT (ECT) (IV enhanced only) to diagnose small bowel obstruction and evaluate reviewer's experience impact. Materials and methods: Ninety-nine adult patients underwent 105 NECT and ECT (6 patients had 2 examinations) on a four-detector CT. An abdominal radiologist, an abdominal imaging fellow, a second-year radiology resident retrospectively reviewed NECTs and ECTs separately and independently blinded to outcome. Discrepancy of diameter of proximal and distal small bowel ± a transition was considered indication of mechanical bowel obstruction. Reference standard was surgery in 26 and chart review in 79. Results: Mechanical obstruction was present in 56% (59/105). The average sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive and accuracy values for NECT were 88.1% (CI: 80-96%), 77% (CI: 65-89%), 83.0% (CI: 72-95%), 83% (CI: 74-92%), and 83% (CI: 76-90%) with no significant difference between three reviewers. The corresponding numbers for ECT were 87.6% (CI: 79-96%), 75% (CI: 63-88%), 82.6.0% (CI: 71-94%), 82.1% (CI: 73-92%), and 82% (CI: 75-90%) (p > 0.5). Area under curve (AUC) of ROC curves of three reviewers did not show significant statistical difference (p > 0.5). Conclusions: NECT and ECT have comparable accuracy to diagnose mechanical small bowel obstruction and can be interpreted by reviewers with different levels of expertise.

  15. Treatment with a belly-board device significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated and results in low acute toxicity in adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer: results of a prospective study

    Background and purpose: To determine whether treatment prone on a belly-board significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated in women receiving adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer, and to prospectively study acute small bowel toxicity using an accepted recording instrument. Material and methods: Thirty-two gynecologic patients underwent simulation with CT scanning supine and prone. Small bowel was delineated on every CT slice, and treatment was prone on the belly-board using 3-5 fields-typically Anterior, Right and Left Lateral, plus or minus Lateral Boosts. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy and all treatments were delivered in 1.8 Gy fractions. Concomitant Cisplatin was administered in 13 patients with cervical carcinoma. Comparison of small bowel dose-volumes was made between supine and prone, with each subject acting as their own matched pair. Acute small bowel toxicity was prospectively measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria: Version 2.0. Results: Treatment prone on the belly-board significantly reduced the volume of small bowel receiving ≥100; ≥95; ≥90; and ≥80% of the prescribed dose, but not ≥50%. This was found whether volume was defined in cubic centimeters or % of total small bowel volume. Of 29 evaluable subjects, 2 (7%) experienced 1 episode each of grade 3 diarrhoea. All other toxicity events were grade 2 or less and comprised diarrhoea (59%), abdominal pain or cramping (48%), nausea (38%), anorexia (17%), vomiting (10%). There were no Grade 4 events and no treatment days were lost due to toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment prone on a belly-board device results in significant small bowel sparing, during adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. The absence of Grade 4 events or Treatment Days Lost compares favorably with the published literature

  16. An obscure cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small bowel

    Robyn L. Gorski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small intestine is a rare condition. It usually results in gastrointestinal bleeding and it could happen many years after the diagnosis with renal cell cancer. Treatment includes surgery as well as targeted agents such as tyrosine kinases. We report here the case of an 82-year-old man with a past medical history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma and right nephrectomy 6 years earlier, who presented with recurrent episodes of syncope and black stools. He underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD and colonoscopy without evident source of bleeding. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE showed three bleeding lesions in the jejunum and ileum. Push enteroscopy revealed a proximal jejunum bleeding mass that was suspicious for malignancy. Histopathology demonstrated poorly differentiated carcinoma. Given the patient’s history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma, and similarity of histologic changes to the old renal cell cancer specimen, metastatic renal cell carcinoma was felt to be the responsible etiology.

  17. Assessment of dynamic contrast enhancement of the small bowel in active Crohn's disease using 3D MR enterography

    Knuesel, Patrick R.; Kubik, Rahel A.; Crook, David W. [Department of Radiology, Kantonsspital Baden, CH-5404 Baden (Switzerland); Eigenmann, Franz [Department of Internal Medicine, Kantonsspital Baden, CH-5404 Baden (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Department of Radiology, Kantonsspital Baden, CH-5404 Baden (Switzerland)], E-mail: froehlich@guerbet.ch

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the dynamic contrast enhancement of the small bowel segments with and without active Crohn's disease at 3D MR enterography (MRE). Materials and methods: Thirteen patients (five men, eight women; mean age 41.2 years; range 29-56) were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner (Sonata, Siemens Medical) with standard MR sequences after having ingested 1000 ml of a 3% mannitol solution. Subsequently, high resolution 3D gradient-echo (volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination = VIBE) data sets were obtained pre-contrast and 20-40 s, 60-80 s, and 120-140 s after i.v. Gd-DOTA administration (0.2 mmol/kg). Signal enhancement was measured on single slices both in normal and histologically confirmed (12/13) inflamed small bowel wall segments as well as in the aorta, the psoas muscle, and the background to calculate signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR). Results: Small bowel wall enhancement was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in inflamed compared to normal segments at 20-40 s (SNR inflamed: 58.7 {+-} 33.8 vs normal: 36.0 {+-} 19.8; p = 0.048; CNR inflamed: 34.8 {+-} 23.4 vs normal: 16.3 {+-} 11.2; p = 0.017) and at 60-80 s (SNR: 60.3 {+-} 25.1 vs 41.9 {+-} 20.0; p = 0.049; CNR: 34.9 {+-} 15.1 vs 19.3 {+-} 13.2; p = 0.01) after i.v. contrast administration, respectively. Even at 120-140 s CNR was still increased in inflamed segments (33.7 {+-} 16.0 vs 18.1 {+-} 13.2; p = 0.04), while differences in SNR did not attain statistical significance (63.0 {+-} 26.2 vs 45.3 {+-} 23.3; p = 0.15). Conclusion: In active Crohn's disease, histologically confirmed inflamed small bowel wall segments demonstrate a significantly increased early uptake of gadolinium on 3D VIBE sequences compared to normal small bowel segments.

  18. Breathhold MRI of the small bowel in Crohn`s disease after enteroklysis with oral magnetic particles; Duenndarm-MRT mit schnellen MR-Sequenzen bei Morbus Crohn nach Enteroklysma mit oralen Eisenpartikeln

    Holzknecht, N.; Helmberger, T.; Gauger, J.; Faber, S.; Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Ritter, C. von [Medizinische Klinik 2, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of breathhold MRI following enteroclysis with addition of oral magnetic particles to study the extension, detection of stenoses and extraluminal manifestations in Crohn`s disease. Results: Typical findings were marked bowel wall thickening with strong contrast enhancement. 95.8% of affected small bowel segments and 94.7% of stenoses were correctly detected by MRI. All four fistulas were detected and important extraluminal findings were seen in 6/18 patients. Additionally, one ileoileal and two ileosigmoidal adhesions, two extraluminal abscesses and affection of the right ureter were delineated. Conclusion: MRI in Crohn`s disease offers the potential to avoid radiation exposure in this relatively young patient group. Important additional findings relevant to indication of surgery are seen in approximately one third of cases. The replacement of transduodenal intubation by oral contrast application remains to be further studied. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Das Ziel dieser Arbeit war der Vergleich der diagnostischen Effizienz des konventionellen Duenndarmenteroklysmas mit anschliessender MRT mit negativem oralem Kontrastmittel bezueglich der Ausdehnung, Stenoseerkennung und relevanter Zusatzinformation bei Morbus Crohn. Im Vergleich mit dem Enteroklysma konnte die MRT-Untersuchung 95,8% der befallenden Segmente und 94,7% der Stenosen identifizieren. Alle 4 Fisteln wurden detektiert und zusaetzlich relevante Befunde in 6 von 18 Patienten gesehen (eine ileoileale und 2 ileosigmoidale Adhaesionen, 2 extraluminale Abzesse und ein entzuendlicher Pseudotumor mit Einbeziehung des rechten Ureters). Das Stenosegrading zeigte keine signifikanten Unterschiede (p=0,11). Zusaetzlich wurden extraluminal eine mesenteriale Lymphadenopathie (15/18) und mesenteriale Fettgewebsproliferation (12/18) mittels MRT nachgewiesen. (orig./AJ)

  19. Blue mode imaging may improve the detection and visualization of small-bowel lesions: A capsule endoscopy study

    Usama M Abdelaal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diagnostic miss rate and time consumption are the two challenging limitations of small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE. In this study, we aimed to know whether using of the blue mode (BM combined with QuickView (QV at a high reviewing speed could influence SBCE interpretation and accuracy. Materials and Methods: Seventy CE procedures were totally reviewed in four different ways; (1 using the conventional white light, (2 using the BM, [on a viewing speed at 10 frames per second (fps], (3 using white light, and (4 using the BM (on a viewing speed at 20 fps. In study A, the results of (1 were compared with those of (2, and in study B, the results of (3 and (4 were separately compared with those of (1. Results: In study A, the total number of the vascular (P < 0.001 and the inflammatory lesions (P = 0.005 detected by BM was significantly higher than that detected by the white light. No lesion was found using the white light that was not detected by the BM. Moreover, the BM highly improved the image quality of all the vascular lesions and the erythematous ones from the nonvascular lesions. In study B, the total number of only the vascular lesions, detected by the BM on a rapid speed of viewing at 20 fps was significantly higher than that detected by the white light (P = 0.035. However, the true miss rate for the BM was 4%. Conclusion: BM imaging is a new method that improved the detection and visualization of the vascular and erythematous nonvascular lesions of SB as compared with the conventional white light imaging. Using of the BM at a slow viewing speed, markedly reduced the diagnostic miss rate of CE.

  20. Occupational risk factors for small bowel carcinoid tumor: a European population-based case-control study.

    Kaerlev, Linda; Teglbjaerg, Peter Stubbe; Sabroe, Svend; Kolstad, Henrik A; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Eriksson, Mikael; Guénel, Pascal; Hardell, Lennart; Cyr, Diane; Ballard, Terri; Zambon, Paola; Morales Suárez-Varela, María M; Stang, Andreas; Olsen, Jorn

    2002-06-01

    Small bowel carcinoid tumor (SBC) is a rare disease of unknown etiology but with an age-, sex-, and place-specific occurrence that may indicate an occupational origin. A European multicenter population-based case-control study was conducted from 1995 through 1997. Incident SBC cases between 35 and 69 years of age (n = 101) were identified, together with 3335 controls sampled from the catchment area of the cases. Histological review performed by a reference pathologist left 99 cases for study; 84 cases and 2070 population controls were interviewed. The industries most closely associated (a twofold or more odds ratio [OR]) with SBC, taking into account a 10-year time lag after exposure were, among women, employment in wholesale industry of food and beverages (OR, 8.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 34.9]) and among men, manufacture of motor vehicle bodies (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.2 to 22.4), footwear (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 0.9 to 16.1), and metal structures (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 10.4). The identified high-risk occupations with an OR above 2 were shoemakers, structural metal preparers, construction painters and other construction workers, bookkeepers, machine fitters, and welders (men). The OR for regular occupational use of organic solvents for at least half a year was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0 to 4.2). Exposure to rust-preventive paint containing lead was suggested as another potential occupational exposure (OR, 9.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 107). This explorative study suggests an association between certain occupational exposures and SBC, but some of these associations could be attributable to chance. All findings should be regarded as tentative. PMID:12085477

  1. Small bowel toxicity after high dose spot scanning-based proton beam therapy for paraspinal/retroperitoneal neoplasms

    Schneider, R.A.; Albertini, F.; Koch, T.; Ares, C.; Lomax, A.; Goitein, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy; Vitolo, V. [Fondazione CNAO, Pavia (Italy); Hug, E.B. [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy; ProCure Proton Therapy Centers, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Mesenchymal tumours require high-dose radiation therapy (RT). Small bowel (SB) dose constraints have historically limited dose delivery to paraspinal and retroperitoneal targets. This retrospective study correlated SB dose-volume histograms with side-effects after proton radiation therapy (PT). Patients and methods: Between 1997 and 2008, 31 patients (mean age 52.1 years) underwent spot scanning-based PT for paraspinal/retroperitoneal chordomas (81 %), sarcomas (16 %) and meningiom (3 %). Mean total prescribed dose was 72.3 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness, RBE) delivered in 1.8-2 Gy (RBE) fractions. Mean follow-up was 3.8 years. Based on the pretreatment planning CT, SB dose distributions were reanalysed. Results: Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as gross tumour volume (GTV) plus 5-7 mm margins. Mean PTV was 560.22 cm{sup 3}. A mean of 93.2 % of the PTV was covered by at least 90 % of the prescribed dose. SB volumes (cm{sup 3}) receiving doses of 5, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 75 and 80 Gy (RBE) were calculated to give V5, V20, V30, V40, V50, V60, V70, V75 and V80 respectively. In 7/31 patients, PT was accomplished without any significant SB irradiation (V5 = 0). In 24/31 patients, mean maximum dose (Dmax) to SB was 64.1 Gy (RBE). Despite target doses of > 70 Gy (RBE), SB received > 50 and > 60 Gy (RBE) in only 61 and 54 % of patients, respectively. Mean SB volumes (cm{sup 3}) covered by different dose levels (Gy, RBE) were: V20 (n = 24): 45.1, V50 (n = 19): 17.7, V60 (n = 17): 7.6 and V70 (n = 12): 2.4. No acute toxicity {>=} grade 2 or late SB sequelae were observed. Conclusion: Small noncircumferential volumes of SB tolerated doses in excess of 60 Gy (RBE) without any clinically-significant late adverse effects. This small retrospective study has limited statistical power but encourages further efforts with higher patient numbers to define and establish high-dose threshold models for SB toxicity in modern radiation oncology. (orig.)

  2. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT: differences in target volumes and improvement in clinically relevant doses to small bowel in rectal carcinoma

    Delclos Marc E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong dose-volume relationship exists between the amount of small bowel receiving low- to intermediate-doses of radiation and the rates of acute, severe gastrointestinal toxicity, principally diarrhea. There is considerable interest in the application of highly conformal treatment approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, to reduce dose to adjacent organs-at-risk in the treatment of carcinoma of the rectum. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive dosimetric evaluation of IMRT compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in standard, preoperative treatment for rectal cancer. Methods Using RTOG consensus anorectal contouring guidelines, treatment volumes were generated for ten patients treated preoperatively at our institution for rectal carcinoma, with IMRT plans compared to plans derived from classic anatomic landmarks, as well as 3DCRT plans treating the RTOG consensus volume. The patients were all T3, were node-negative (N = 1 or node-positive (N = 9, and were planned to a total dose of 45-Gy. Pairwise comparisons were made between IMRT and 3DCRT plans with respect to dose-volume histogram parameters. Results IMRT plans had superior PTV coverage, dose homogeneity, and conformality in treatment of the gross disease and at-risk nodal volume, in comparison to 3DCRT. Additionally, in comparison to the 3DCRT plans, IMRT achieved a concomitant reduction in doses to the bowel (small bowel mean dose: 18.6-Gy IMRT versus 25.2-Gy 3DCRT; p = 0.005, bladder (V40Gy: 56.8% IMRT versus 75.4% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, pelvic bones (V40Gy: 47.0% IMRT versus 56.9% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, and femoral heads (V40Gy: 3.4% IMRT versus 9.1% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, with an improvement in absolute volumes of small bowel receiving dose levels known to induce clinically-relevant acute toxicity (small bowel V15Gy: 138-cc IMRT versus 157-cc 3DCRT; p = 0.005. We found that the IMRT treatment volumes were typically larger than that

  3. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Kehlet, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... preparation has significant adverse physiologic effects, which may be attributed to dehydration. The majority of these findings is small and may not be of clinical relevance in otherwise healthy patients undergoing bowel preparation and following recommendations for oral fluid intake....

  4. Peritoneal adhesion index (PAI): proposal of a score for the "ignored iceberg" of medicine and surgery.

    Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; Manfredi, Roberto; Campanati, Luca; Poiasina, Elia; Bertoli, Paolo; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Sartelli, Massimo; Di Saverio, Salomone; Cucchi, Michele; Lazzareschi, Daniel; Pisano, Michele; Catena, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions describe a condition in which pathological bonds form between the omentum, the small and large bowels, the abdominal wall, and other intra-abdominal organs. Different classification systems have been proposed, but they do not resolve the underlying problem of ambiguity in the quantification and definition of adhesions. We therefore propose a standardized classification system of adhesions to universalize their definition based on the macroscopic appearance of adhesions and their diffusion to different regions of the abdomen. By scoring with these criteria, the peritoneal adhesion index (PAI) can range from 0 to 30, unambiguously specifying precise adhesion scenarios. The standardized classification and quantification of adhesions would enable different studies to more meaningfully integrate their results, thereby facilitating a more comprehensive approach to the treatment and management of this pathology. PMID:23369320

  5. Changes in small intestinal chromogranin A-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance.

    Mazzawi, Tarek; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2016-05-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for enteroendocrine cells in the gut, and CgA-immunoreactive cell densities are abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The majority of patients with IBS report that their symptoms develop after consuming certain foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary guidance on the total enteroendocrine cell densities in the small intestine, as detected by CgA. A total of 14 patients with IBS underwent a gastroscopy with duodenal biopsies and 11 of them also underwent a colonoscopy, with biopsy samples obtained from the ileum. Fourteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received 3 sessions of dietary guidance. Gastroscopies and colonoscopies were performed on both the controls and patients with IBS (at baseline and at 3-9 months after receiving guidance). Biopsy samples obtained from the duodenum and ileum were immunostained for CgA using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method and were quantified using computerized image analysis. The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum (mean ± SEM values) in the control subjects was 235.9 ± 31.9 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 36.9 ± 9.8 and 103.7 ± 16.9 cells/mm2 before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007). The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the ileum in the control subjects was 47.4 ± 8.3 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 48.4 ± 8.1 and 17.9 ± 4.4 cells/mm2, before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.0006). These data indicate that changes in CgA-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with IBS after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the small intestinal enteroendocrine cells, which may contribute to an improvement in the IBS symptoms. PMID:26987104

  6. Recurrence of an NSAID-induced diaphragmatic disease of the small intestine.

    Sumner, Daniel; Sahota, Jagjit; Schofield, John

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman was referred to the surgical team from clinic, reporting of a 1-week history of vomiting and abdominal distension on a background of previous large bowel resection for a flare up of diverticulitis with a suspicion of diaphragm disease of the small intestine diagnosed at the same time. She was initially managed conservatively owing to the likely diagnosis of adhesion(s) leading to small bowel obstruction, but a CT of the abdomen a day later revealed a recurrence of diaphragmatic disease of the small bowel causing an obstruction, most likely due to chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. She was taken to theatre for an emergency laparotomy and small bowel resection due to previous resections, from which she made a good recovery; she was discharged from hospital 8 days later. PMID:27170609

  7. A Short Bowel (Small Intestine = 40 cm, No Ileocecal Valve, and Colonic Inertia Patient Works Well with Oral Intake Alone without Parenteral Nutrition

    Ming-Yi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 50-year-old male who suffered from ischemic bowel disease, having undergone massive resection of small intestine and ileocecal valve. He had to cope with 40 cm proximal jejunum and 70 cm distal colon remaining. In the postoperative period parenteral nutrition (PN was used immediately for nutrition support and electrolyte imbalance correction. We gave him home PN as regular recommendation for the short bowel status after discharge from hospital. This patient has tolerated regular oral intake 2 months later and did not develop significant short bowel syndrome. There were several episodes of venous access infection which troubled this patient and admitted him for treatment during home PN. Therefore, we changed home PN to cyclic tapering pattern. The patient could maintain his nutrition and hydration with oral intake alone after tapering home PN 15 months later. He has survived more than one year without PN support and still maintained 80% ideal body weight with average albumin of 3.5 ± 0.2 mg/dL. Although patient was hospitalized every two months to supplement nutrients, however, this has greatly improved the quality of life.

  8. Diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of mesenteric small bowel tumours with Magnetic Resonance-enterography

    Amzallag-Bellenger, Elisa; Nguyen, Truong Luong Francis; Amara, Nedjoua; Hoeffel, Christine [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Radiology, Reims Cedex (France); Hopital Robert Debre, Pole d' imagerie, Department of Radiology, Cedex Reims (France); Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Barbe, Coralie [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Statistics, Reims Cedex (France); Hopital Robert Debre, Pole d' imagerie, Department of Radiology, Cedex Reims (France)

    2014-11-15

    To retrospectively investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for detecting mesenteric small bowel tumours (MSBTs) via MR-enterography. MR-enterographies of 98 patients with suspected MSBTs were blindly analyzed by two independent readers for the presence of MSBTs. Four imaging sets including ''standard'' (Haste and TrueFisp), ''standard + DWI,'' ''standard + gadolinium-enhanced'' and ''standard + DWI + gadolinium-enhanced'' were reviewed. Diagnostic performance of different readings were compared with McNemar's test. Twenty-nine MSBTs were pathologically confirmed. For R1 (junior radiologist) sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for the detection of MSBTs via standard MRI were 52 % [95 % CI: 34 %-70 %] (15/29), 94 % [95 % CI: 89 %-100 %] (65/69), 79 % [95 % CI: 61 %-97 %] (15/19), 82 % [95 % CI: 74 %-91 %] (65/79) and 82 % [95 % CI: 74 %-89 %] (80/98), respectively. For R2 (senior radiologist) they were 76 % [95 % CI: 60 %-91 %] (22/29), 96 % [95 % CI: 91-100 %] (66/69), 88 % [95 % CI: 75 %-100 %] (22/25), 90 % [95 % CI: 84 %-97 %] (66/73) and 90 % [95 % CI: 84 %-96 %] (88/98), respectively. Adding DWI they were 72 % [95 % CI: 56 %-89 %] (21/29), 91 % [95 % CI: 85 %-98 %] (63/69), 78 % [95 % CI: 62 %-94 %] (21/27), 89 % [95 % CI: 81 %-96 %] (63/71) and 87 % [95 % CI: 80 %-94 %] (85/98) for R1 and 79 % [95 % CI: 65 %-94 %] (23/29), 97 % [95 % CI: 93 %-100 %] (67/69), 92 % [95 % CI: 81 %-100 %] (23/25), 92 % [95 % CI: 86 %-98 %] (67/73) and 92 % [95 % CI: 86 %-97 %] (90/98) for R2. Sensitivities for tumour detection were higher after adding DWI to standard MRI, although only for R1 was this significant (P = 0.03). Adding DWI to standard + gadolinium-enhanced MRI did not significantly increase MR performance. DWI improves MSBT detection via MR-enterography compared to standard unenhanced MR-enterography, especially for unexperienced readers. (orig.)

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of mesenteric small bowel tumours with Magnetic Resonance-enterography

    To retrospectively investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for detecting mesenteric small bowel tumours (MSBTs) via MR-enterography. MR-enterographies of 98 patients with suspected MSBTs were blindly analyzed by two independent readers for the presence of MSBTs. Four imaging sets including ''standard'' (Haste and TrueFisp), ''standard + DWI,'' ''standard + gadolinium-enhanced'' and ''standard + DWI + gadolinium-enhanced'' were reviewed. Diagnostic performance of different readings were compared with McNemar's test. Twenty-nine MSBTs were pathologically confirmed. For R1 (junior radiologist) sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for the detection of MSBTs via standard MRI were 52 % [95 % CI: 34 %-70 %] (15/29), 94 % [95 % CI: 89 %-100 %] (65/69), 79 % [95 % CI: 61 %-97 %] (15/19), 82 % [95 % CI: 74 %-91 %] (65/79) and 82 % [95 % CI: 74 %-89 %] (80/98), respectively. For R2 (senior radiologist) they were 76 % [95 % CI: 60 %-91 %] (22/29), 96 % [95 % CI: 91-100 %] (66/69), 88 % [95 % CI: 75 %-100 %] (22/25), 90 % [95 % CI: 84 %-97 %] (66/73) and 90 % [95 % CI: 84 %-96 %] (88/98), respectively. Adding DWI they were 72 % [95 % CI: 56 %-89 %] (21/29), 91 % [95 % CI: 85 %-98 %] (63/69), 78 % [95 % CI: 62 %-94 %] (21/27), 89 % [95 % CI: 81 %-96 %] (63/71) and 87 % [95 % CI: 80 %-94 %] (85/98) for R1 and 79 % [95 % CI: 65 %-94 %] (23/29), 97 % [95 % CI: 93 %-100 %] (67/69), 92 % [95 % CI: 81 %-100 %] (23/25), 92 % [95 % CI: 86 %-98 %] (67/73) and 92 % [95 % CI: 86 %-97 %] (90/98) for R2. Sensitivities for tumour detection were higher after adding DWI to standard MRI, although only for R1 was this significant (P = 0.03). Adding DWI to standard + gadolinium-enhanced MRI did not significantly increase MR performance. DWI improves MSBT detection via MR-enterography compared to standard unenhanced MR-enterography, especially for unexperienced readers. (orig.)

  10. Influence of bellyboard on the volume and dose of small bowel in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of post-operative Stage II + III rectum cancer

    Objective: To prospectively assess the effect of bellyboard on volume and dose of small bowel in post-operative stage II + III rectum cancer patient treated with three-dimensional conformal radio- therapy. Methods: Nine patients with rectum cancer after radical operation were examined by sim-CT scan. Two sets of images were taken for the whole pelvis with or without bellyboard. A three-beam treatment plan of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was made by the XioCMS treatment planning system. The max dose, the mean dose and the dose on V5, V10, V15, V20, V25, V30, V35, V40, V45, V50, V55 were evaluated in the plan of two positions. Results: Of the two sets of plans, the mean dose of the plan with bellyboard was lower than without bellyboard (1749.4 cGy vs 2124.8 cGy, P=0.023). And the high-dose volume of the plan with bellyboard was smaller than without bellyboard (V50: 51.4 cm3 vs 57.7 cm3, P 0.319). However, the low dose volume was signicantly larger than that in the plan with bellyboard(V5: 376.3 cm3 vs 230.1 cm3, P =0.001). And the mean dose(3557.0 cGy vs 4036.1 cGy, P=0.001)and V15-V50 of the bladder were significantly reduced by the bellyboard. Conclusion: The use of bellyboard signicantly reducess the mean dose in small bowel and bladder, and increases the low-dose volume of small bowel for post-operative stage II + III rectum cancer patient when treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. Morpho-functional evaluation of small bowel using wireless motility capsule and video capsule endoscopy in patients with known or suspected Crohn’s disease: pilot study

    Yung, Diana; Douglas, Sarah; Hobson, Anthony R.; Giannakou, Andry; Plevris, John N.; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: SmartPill® (Given Imaging Corp.,Yoqneam,Israel) is an ingestible, non-imaging capsule that records physiological data including contractions and pH throughout the gastrointestinal tract. There are scarce data looking at SmartPill® assessment of patients with known/suspected small-bowel Crohn’s Disease (CD). This pilot study aims to investigate feasibility and safety of SmartPill® to assess gut motility in this group.  Patients and methods: Over 1 year, patients with known/suspected CD, referred for small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE), were invited to participate and 12 were recruited (7 female, 5 male, mean age 44.2 ± 16.6 years). They underwent hydrogen breath test to exclude small-bowel bacterial overgrowth, patency capsule (Agile®), and provided stool samples for fecal calprotectin (FC). Patients ingested PillCam®SB2 and SmartPill® 4 hours apart. Using unpublished data, 33 healthy controls also were identified for the study. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Of the 12 patients enrolled, 10 underwent complete Smartpill® examination (1 stomach retention, 1 dropout). Pillcam® was complete in 10 (1 dropout, 1 stomach retention). Mean fecal calprotectin was 340 ± 307.71 mcg/g. The study group had longer transit times and lower gut motility index than did the controls. The difference in motility appears to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Longer transit times for SmartPill® (not statistically significant) may have been due to different specifications between the capsules. Limitations included transient Smartpill® signal loss (5/10 studies). Conclusions: This is the first pilot to attempt combining SBCE and SmartPill® to assess small-bowel CD. Data on motility in CD are scarce. Multimodal information can provide a clearer clinical picture. Despite concerns about capsule retention in CD patients, SmartPill® seems safe for use if a patency capsule is employed beforehand. PMID

  12. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won;

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members of the Internatio.......8%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In HNPCC patients, SBC can be the first and only cancer and may develop as soon as the early teens. The distribution of MSH2 mutations found in patients with HNPCC-associated SBCs significantly differed from that found in the control group (P < 0.001)....

  13. Effect of small peptide (P-15) on HJMSCs adhesion to hydroxyap-atite

    Cheng, Wei; Tong, Xin; Hu, QinGang; Mou, YongBin; Qin, HaiYan

    2016-02-01

    P-15, a synthetic peptide of 15-amino acids, has been tested in clinical trials to enhance cell adhesion and promote osseointe- gration. This feature of P-15 has also inspired the development of designing new bone substitute materials. Despite the increasing applications of P-15 in bone graft alternatives, few studies focus on the mechanism of cell adhesion promoted by P-15 and the mechanical property changes of the cells interacting with P-15. In this article, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) based single cell indentation force spectroscopy to study the impact of P-15 on the stiffness and the adhesion ability of human jaw bone mesenchymal stem cells (HJMSCs) to hydroxyapatite (HA). We found that the stiffness of HJMSCs increases as the concentration of P-15 grows in short culture intervals and that the adhesion forces between HJMSCs and HA particles in both the presence and absence of P-15 are all around 30pN. Moreover, by calculating the binding energy of HJMSCs to HA particles mixed with and without P-15, we proved that P-15 could increase the adhesion energy by nearly four times. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was also exploited to study the morphology of HJMSCs cultured in the presence and absence of P-15 on HA disc surface for a short term. Apparent morphological differences were observed between the cells cultured with and without P-15. These results explain the probable underlying adhesion mechanism of HJMSC promoted by P-15 and can serve as the bases for the design of bone graft substitute materials.

  14. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D.; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. Methods The rat model ...

  15. Analysis of a grading system to assess the quality of small-bowel preparation for capsule endoscopy: in search of the Holy Grail

    Goyal, Jatinder; Goel, Anshum; McGwin, Gerald; Weber, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy is vulnerable to inadequate visualization related to residual bile or chyme remaining in the lumen despite intestinal lavage. It has been challenging to determine the optimal lavage preparation of the bowel and patient diet before capsule endoscopy, as well as the timing of the procedure, because no well-accepted, validated grading system for assessing the quality of intestinal lavage before capsule endoscopy is available. There remains no consensus on the reliability of qualitative, quantitative, or computer-derived assessments of the quality of preparation for capsule endoscopy. This study evaluates intra-observer and interobserver agreement for a previously validated scale. Materials and methods: The digital images of 34 patients who underwent capsule endoscopy were independently reviewed by two blinded physicians according to a previously validated grading scale. One of the physicians reviewed and graded the patients a second time. The quality of the bowel luminal preparation was assessed with a qualitative parameter (fluid transparency) and a more quantitative parameter (mucosal invisibility) for each of three small-intestinal segments, and an overall small-bowel score for each parameter was assigned as well. A weighted kappa coefficient was used to calculate intra-observer (observer 1A and 1B) and interobserver (observer 1A and observer 2) agreement. A kappa value of 0.60 or more suggests strong agreement, 0.40 to 0.60 moderate agreement, and less than 0.40 poor agreement. Results: The intra-observer weighted kappa index for both fluid transparency and mucosal visibility was 0.52, which is consistent with moderate agreement. The interobserver weighted kappa indices for fluid transparency and mucosal invisibility were 0.29 and 0.42, respectively, demonstrating suboptimal interobserver agreement. The individual segment interobserver kappa indices were better for mucosal visibility (0.52, 0.39, and 0.47 for

  16. Short bowel syndrom as a complication of Crohn's disease

    Skok, Pavel; Ocepek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    During the course of Crohn's disease, some patients require surgical bowel resection due to intestinal stenosis. Attention is drawn to a possible complication of such surgical procedures: in a patients with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome developed following several small and large intestine resections that were necessary in the treatment of recidiving acute bowel obstructions. When the remnant small bowel is shorter than 200 cm, characteristic symptoms of short bowel syndrome develop i...

  17. Quasistatic adhesive contact of visco-elastic bodies and its numerical treatment for very small viscosity

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Panagiotopoulos, C.G.; Mantič, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 93, 10 11 (2013), s. 823-840. ISSN 1521-4001 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : adhesive contact * debonding * delamination Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/zamm.201200239/abstract

  18. Fatores preditivos de morbimortalidade no trauma de intestino delgado Predictive factors of morbimortality in small bowel trauma

    Gustavo Pereira Fraga

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Os objetivos deste estudo foram avaliar o diagnóstico e o tratamento das lesões de intestino delgado e determinar os fatores que influenciaram a morbimortalidade. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo incluindo 410 pacientes com lesão de intestino delgado operados entre janeiro de 1994 e dezembro de 2004. Os dados coletados incluíram: mecanismo de trauma, métodos diagnósticos, tempo transcorrido até a intervenção cirúrgica, grau das lesões, índices de trauma, conduta cirúrgica (sutura ou ressecção e anastomose, morbidade (especialmente fístula e mortalidade. A comparação entre os grupos foi feita usando os testes de Fisher e Yates. RESULTADOS: O mecanismo de trauma foi penetrante em 321 pacientes (78,3% e fechado em 89 (21,7%. Houve mais pacientes tratados cirurgicamente com intervalo maior que 6 horas após o trauma no grupo trauma contuso se comparados com trauma penetrante (pBACKGROUND: The purposes of this study were to evaluate the diagnosis and management of small bowel injury (SBI and to determine significant factors affecting morbidity and mortality. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed including 410 patients with SBI operated between January 1994 and December 2004. Data included mechanism of injury, methods of diagnosis, time to operation, organ injury scaling, trauma scores, type of repair (enterorrhaphy vs. resection and anastomosis, morbidity (specifically fistula and mortality. Comparisons between groups were analyzed using the Fisher and Yates tests. RESULTS: The mechanism of injury was penetrating in 321 patients (78.3% and blunt in 89 (21.7%. There were more patients with at least 6 hours of delay to operation in the blunt trauma group than in the penetrating one (p<0.05. Enterorrhaphy was performed in 52.2% of the patients and resection with anastomosis in 46.8%, both with the same incidence of fistula (approximately 4.7%. Morbidity rate was 35.1% and fistula was more frequent in patients with

  19. Peritoneal adhesion index (PAI: proposal of a score for the “ignored iceberg” of medicine and surgery

    Coccolini Federico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peritoneal adhesions describe a condition in which pathological bonds form between the omentum, the small and large bowels, the abdominal wall, and other intra-abdominal organs. Different classification systems have been proposed, but they do not resolve the underlying problem of ambiguity in the quantification and definition of adhesions. We therefore propose a standardized classification system of adhesions to universalize their definition based on the macroscopic appearance of adhesions and their diffusion to different regions of the abdomen. By scoring with these criteria, the peritoneal adhesion index (PAI can range from 0 to 30, unambiguously specifying precise adhesion scenarios. The standardized classification and quantification of adhesions would enable different studies to more meaningfully integrate their results, thereby facilitating a more comprehensive approach to the treatment and management of this pathology.

  20. The small bowel flora in individuals with cecoileal reflux Estudo da flora do delgado em doentes com refluxo cecoileal

    Wellington Monteiro Machado

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The observation of cecoileal reflux to barium enema is not rare; however, its causes and consequences have not been widely investigated. Considering that ileocecal junction exerts a function as barrier to invasion of bacteria from colon to small bowel, it seems interesting to study the intestinal microflora in subjects carrying cecoileal reflux. AIMS: This study aims at evaluating the ileal flora in individuals with cecoileal reflux. METHODS: A group of 36 subjects comprising 30 females and 6 males with a mean age of 54 years was assessed. Twenty-five individuals with cecoileal reflux and 11 without cecoileal reflux were submitted to small intestine contamination evaluation through the breath test with lactulose-H2 and measurement of the orocecal transit time by means of alternate current biosusceptometry. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth was characterized by orocecal transit time-H2 shortening. RESULTS: Comparison of basal H2, orocecal transit time-H2 and orocecal transit time-alternate current biosusceptometry measurements did not statistically differ between the groups with and without cecoileal reflux. Orocecal transit time-H2 was significantly smaller than orocecal transit time-alternate current biosusceptometry, particularly in individuals with cecoileal reflux. A significant correlation between the two methods was observed only in relation to control, not existing in relation to cecoileal reflux group. CONCLUSIONS: Smaller orocecal transit time-H2 and the loss of correlation with orocecal transit time-alternate current biosusceptometry observed in the individuals with cecoileal reflux suggest a differentiated behavior for such group relative to control, which could be associated with small intestine bacterial overgrowth.RACIONAL: Fato de observação não rara, é o encontro de refluxo cecoileal durante realização de enema opaco. As causas e conseqüências deste achado têm sido pouco estudadas. OBJETIVOS: Sabendo que a