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Sample records for adhesin psrp binds

  1. Binding characteristics of Escherichia coli adhesins in human urinary bladder.

    Virkola, R; Westerlund, B; Holthöfer, H; Parkkinen, J; Kekomäki, M; Korhonen, T K

    1988-01-01

    We studied domains in the human bladder that acted as receptors for Escherichia coli P, S, type 1, type 1C, and O75X fimbriae or adhesin and domains in the human kidneys that were receptors for E. coli type 1C fimbriae. Binding sites in frozen tissue sections were localized by direct staining with fluorochrome-labeled recombinant strains and by indirect immunofluorescence with the purified adhesins. In the bladder, the P and S fimbriae showed closely similar binding to the epithelial and musc...

  2. Bifunctional Role of the Treponema pallidum Extracellular Matrix Binding Adhesin Tp0751 ▿

    Houston, Simon; Hof, Rebecca; Francescutti, Teresa; Hawkes, Aaron; Boulanger, Martin J.; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2011-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, is a highly invasive pathogenic spirochete capable of attaching to host cells, invading the tissue barrier, and undergoing rapid widespread dissemination via the circulatory system. The T. pallidum adhesin Tp0751 was previously shown to bind laminin, the most abundant component of the basement membrane, suggesting a role for this adhesin in host tissue colonization and bacterial dissemination. We hypothesized that similar to that of other invasive pathogens, the interaction of T. pallidum with host coagulation proteins, such as fibrinogen, may also be crucial for dissemination via the circulatory system. To test this prediction, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methodology to demonstrate specific binding of soluble recombinant Tp0751 to human fibrinogen. Click-chemistry-based palmitoylation profiling of heterologously expressed Tp0751 confirmed the presence of a lipid attachment site within this adhesin. Analysis of the Tp0751 primary sequence revealed the presence of a C-terminal putative HEXXH metalloprotease motif, and in vitro degradation assays confirmed that recombinant Tp0751 purified from both insect and Escherichia coli expression systems degrades human fibrinogen and laminin. The proteolytic activity of Tp0751 was abolished by the presence of the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline. Further, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry showed that Tp0751 binds zinc and calcium. Collectively, these results indicate that Tp0751 is a zinc-dependent, membrane-associated protease that exhibits metalloprotease-like characteristics. However, site-directed mutagenesis of the HEXXH motif to HQXXH did not abolish the proteolytic activity of Tp0751, indicating that further mutagenesis studies are required to elucidate the critical active site residues associated with this protein. This study represents the first published description of a T. pallidum protease capable of degrading host

  3. A sialoreceptor binding motif in the Mycoplasma synoviae adhesin VlhA.

    Meghan May

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma synoviae depends on its adhesin VlhA to mediate cytadherence to sialylated host cell receptors. Allelic variants of VlhA arise through recombination between an assemblage of promoterless vlhA pseudogenes and a single transcription promoter site, creating lineages of M. synoviae that each express a different vlhA allele. The predicted full-length VlhA sequences adjacent to the promoter of nine lineages of M. synoviae varying in avidity of cytadherence were aligned with that of the reference strain MS53 and with a 60-a.a. hemagglutinating VlhA C-terminal fragment from a Tunisian lineage of strain WVU1853(T. Seven different sequence variants of an imperfectly conserved, single-copy, 12-a.a. candidate cytadherence motif were evident amid the flanking variable residues of the 11 total sequences examined. The motif was predicted to adopt a short hairpin structure in a low-complexity region near the C-terminus of VlhA. Biotinylated synthetic oligopeptides representing four selected variants of the 12-a.a. motif, with the whole synthesized 60-a.a. fragment as a positive control, differed (P<0.01 in the extent they bound to chicken erythrocyte membranes. All bound to a greater extent (P<0.01 than scrambled or irrelevant VlhA domain negative control peptides did. Experimentally introduced branched-chain amino acid (BCAA substitutions Val3Ile and Leu7Ile did not significantly alter binding, whereas fold-destabilizing substitutions Thr4Gly and Ala9Gly tended to reduce it (P<0.05. Binding was also reduced to background levels (P<0.01 when the peptides were exposed to desialylated membranes, or were pre-saturated with free sialic acid before exposure to untreated membranes. From this evidence we conclude that the motif P-X-(BCAA-X-F-X-(BCAA-X-A-K-X-G binds sialic acid and likely mediates VlhA-dependent M. synoviae attachment to host cells. This conserved mechanism retains the potential for fine-scale rheostasis in binding avidity, which could be a

  4. Re-evaluation of a bacterial antifreeze protein as an adhesin with ice-binding activity.

    Shuaiqi Guo

    Full Text Available A novel role for antifreeze proteins (AFPs may reside in an exceptionally large 1.5-MDa adhesin isolated from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. MpAFP was purified from bacterial lysates by ice adsorption and gel electrophoresis. We have previously reported that two highly repetitive sequences, region II (RII and region IV (RIV, divide MpAFP into five distinct regions, all of which require mM Ca(2+ levels for correct folding. Also, the antifreeze activity is confined to the 322-residue RIV, which forms a Ca(2+-bound beta-helix containing thirteen Repeats-In-Toxin (RTX-like repeats. RII accounts for approximately 90% of the mass of MpAFP and is made up of ∼120 tandem 104-residue repeats. Because these repeats are identical in DNA sequence, their number was estimated here by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Structural homology analysis by the Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (Phyre2 server indicates that the 104-residue RII repeat adopts an immunoglobulin beta-sandwich fold that is typical of many secreted adhesion proteins. Additional RTX-like repeats in RV may serve as a non-cleavable signal sequence for the type I secretion pathway. Immunodetection shows both repeated regions are uniformly distributed over the cell surface. We suggest that the development of an AFP-like domain within this adhesin attached to the bacterial outer surface serves to transiently bind the host bacteria to ice. This association would keep the bacteria within the upper reaches of the water column where oxygen and nutrients are potentially more abundant. This novel envirotactic role would give AFPs a third function, after freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance: that of transiently binding an organism to ice.

  5. Heterologous Expression of the Treponema pallidum Laminin-Binding Adhesin Tp0751 in the Culturable Spirochete Treponema phagedenis▿

    Cameron, Caroline E.; Kuroiwa, Janelle M. Y.; Yamada, Mitsunori; Francescutti, Teresa; Chi, Bo; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    2008-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, is an unculturable, genetically intractable bacterium. Here we report the use of the shuttle vector pKMR4PEMCS for the expression of a previously identified T. pallidum laminin-binding adhesin, Tp0751, in the nonadherent, culturable spirochete Treponema phagedenis. Heterologous expression of Tp0751 in T. phagedenis was confirmed via reverse transcriptase PCR analysis with tp0751 gene-specific primers and immunofluorescence a...

  6. FimH adhesin from host unrestricted Salmonella Enteritidis binds to different glycoprotein ligands expressed by enterocytes from sheep, pig and cattle than FimH adhesins from host restricted Salmonella Abortus-ovis, Salmonella Choleraesuis and Salmonella Dublin.

    Grzymajło, Krzysztof; Ugorski, Maciej; Kolenda, Rafał; Kędzierska, Anna; Kuźmińska-Bajor, Marta; Wieliczko, Alina

    2013-10-25

    Adhesion to gut tissues and colonization of the alimentary tract, two important stages in the pathogenesis of Salmonella, are mediated by FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae. It was suggested that minor differences in the structure of FimH are most likely associated with differences in adhesion specificities, and may determine the tropism of various Salmonella serovars to different species and tissues. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing the binding properties of FimH proteins from three Salmonella enterica serovars with limited (Choleraesuis, Dublin) or restricted (Abortusovis) host ranges to FimH from broad host range S. Enteritidis and mannose inactive FimH from S. Gallinarum. Although all active variants of FimH protein were able to bind mannose-rich glycoproteins (RNase B, HRP and Man-BSA) with comparable affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance, there were significant differences in the binding profiles of the FimH proteins from host restricted serovars and host unrestricted serovar Enteritidis, to glycoproteins from enterocyte cell lines established in vitro and derived from sheep, pig and cattle. When low-binding FimH adhesin from S. Enteritidis was subjected to Western blot analysis, it bound to surface membrane protein of about 130 kDa, and high-binding FimH adhesins from S. Abortusovis, S. Choleraesuis and S. Dublin bound to surface membrane protein of about 55 kDa present in each cell line. Differential binding of FimH proteins from host-restricted and broad-host-range Salmonella to intestinal receptors was confirmed using mutant FimH adhesins obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the low-binding variant of FimH from S. Choleraesuis with mutation Leu57Pro lost the ability to bind protein band of 55 kDa, but instead interacted with glycoprotein of about 130 kDa. On the other hand, the high-binding variant of FimH adhesin from S. Enteritids with mutation Asn101Ser did not bind to its receptor of 130 kDa, but instead it

  7. A Structural Model for Binding of the Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesin GspB to Host Carbohydrate Receptors

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Bensing, Barbara A.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Melancon, Bruce J.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Ward, Nicholas J.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Oliver, Kevin M.; Cecchini, Gary; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M. (VA); (UCLA); (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2014-10-02

    GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR) adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIb{alpha}. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we determined the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of the GspB binding region (GspB{sub BR}), both alone and in complex with a disaccharide precursor to sialyl-T antigen. Analysis of the GspB{sub BR} structure revealed that it is comprised of three independently folded subdomains or modules: (1) an Ig-fold resembling a CnaA domain from prokaryotic pathogens; (2) a second Ig-fold resembling the binding region of mammalian Siglecs; (3) a subdomain of unique fold. The disaccharide was found to bind in a pocket within the Siglec subdomain, but at a site distinct from that observed in mammalian Siglecs. Confirming the biological relevance of this binding pocket, we produced three isogenic variants of S. gordonii, each containing a single point mutation of a residue lining this binding pocket. These variants have reduced binding to carbohydrates of GPIb{alpha}. Further examination of purified GspB{sub BR}-R484E showed reduced binding to sialyl-T antigen while S. gordonii harboring this mutation did not efficiently bind platelets and showed a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by an animal model of endocarditis. Analysis of other SRR proteins revealed that the predicted binding regions of these adhesins also had a modular organization, with those known to bind carbohydrate receptors having modules homologous to the Siglec and Unique subdomains of GspBBR. This suggests that the binding specificity of the SRR family of adhesins is determined by the type and organization of discrete modules within the binding domains, which may affect the tropism of organisms for different tissues.

  8. Study of the structural and dynamic effects in the FimH adhesin upon α-d-heptyl mannose binding.

    Vanwetswinkel, Sophie; Volkov, Alexander N; Sterckx, Yann G J; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; Vranken, Wim F; Bouckaert, Julie; Roy, René; Wyns, Lode; van Nuland, Nico A J

    2014-02-27

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli cause urinary tract infections by adhering to mannosylated receptors on the human urothelium via the carbohydrate-binding domain of the FimH adhesin (FimHL). Numerous α-d-mannopyranosides, including α-d-heptyl mannose (HM), inhibit this process by interacting with FimHL. To establish the molecular basis of the high-affinity HM binding, we solved the solution structure of the apo form and the crystal structure of the FimHL-HM complex. NMR relaxation analysis revealed that protein dynamics were not affected by the sugar binding, yet HM addition promoted protein dimerization, which was further confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. Finally, to address the role of Y48, part of the "tyrosine gate" believed to govern the affinity and specificity of mannoside binding, we characterized the FimHL Y48A mutant, whose conformational, dynamical, and HM binding properties were found to be very similar to those of the wild-type protein. PMID:24476493

  9. Lcl of Legionella pneumophila Is an Immunogenic GAG Binding Adhesin That Promotes Interactions with Lung Epithelial Cells and Plays a Crucial Role in Biofilm Formation ▿

    Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; So, Jannice; Tang, Patrick; Low, Donald E.; Terebiznik, Mauricio; Guyard, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In vitro and in vivo, interactions of L. pneumophila with lung epithelial cells are mediated by the sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of the host extracellular matrix. In this study, we have identified several Legionella heparin binding proteins. We have shown that one of these proteins, designated Lcl, is a polymorphic adhesin of L. pneumop...

  10. The soluble recombinant Neisseria meningitidis adhesin NadA(Δ351-405) stimulates human monocytes by binding to extracellular Hsp90.

    Cecchini, Paola; Tavano, Regina; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia; Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Montanari, Paolo; Papini, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    The adhesin NadA favors cell adhesion/invasion by hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis B (MenB). Its recombinant form NadA(Δ351-405,) devoid of the outer membrane domain, is an immunogenic candidate for an anti-MenB vaccine able to stimulate monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism of NadA(Δ351-405) cellular effects in monocytes. We show that NadA(Δ351-405) (against which we obtained polyclonal antibodies in rabbits), binds to hsp90, but not to other extracellular homologous heat shock proteins grp94 and hsp70, in vitro and on the surface of monocytes, in a temperature dependent way. Pre-incubation of monocytes with the MenB soluble adhesin interfered with the binding of anti-hsp90 and anti-hsp70 antibodies to hsp90 and hsp70 at 37°C, a condition in which specific cell-binding occurs, but not at 0°C, a condition in which specific cell-binding is very diminished. Conversely, pre-incubation of monocytes with anti-hsp90 and anti-hsp70 antibodies did not affected NadA(Δ351-405) cell binding in any temperature condition, indicating that it associates to another receptor on their plasma membrane and then laterally diffuses to encounter hsp90. Consistently, polymixin B interfered with NadA(Δ351-405) /hsp90 association, abrogated the decrease of anti-hsp90 antibodies binding to the cell surface due to NadA(Δ351-405) and inhibited adhesin-induced cytokine/chemokine secretion without affecting monocyte-adhesin binding. Co-stimulation of monocytes with anti-hsp90 antibodies and NadA(Δ351-405) determined a stronger but polymixin B insensitive cell activation. This indicated that the formation of a recombinant NadA/hsp90/hsp70 complex, although essential for full monocyte stimulation, can be replaced by anti-hsp90 antibody/hsp90 binding. Finally, the activation of monocytes by NadA(Δ351-405) alone or in the presence of anti-hsp90 antibodies were both inhibited by neutralizing anti-TLR4 antibodies, but not by

  11. Characterization of two heparan sulphate-binding sites in the mycobacterial adhesin Hlp

    Previato Jose O

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histone-like Hlp protein is emerging as a key component in mycobacterial pathogenesis, being involved in the initial events of host colonization by interacting with laminin and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. In the present study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR was used to map the binding site(s of Hlp to heparan sulfate and identify the nature of the amino acid residues directly involved in this interaction. Results The capacity of a panel of 30 mer synthetic peptides covering the full length of Hlp to bind to heparin/heparan sulfate was analyzed by solid phase assays, NMR, and affinity chromatography. An additional active region between the residues Gly46 and Ala60 was defined at the N-terminal domain of Hlp, expanding the previously defined heparin-binding site between Thr31 and Phe50. Additionally, the C-terminus, rich in Lys residues, was confirmed as another heparan sulfate binding region. The amino acids in Hlp identified as mediators in the interaction with heparan sulfate were Arg, Val, Ile, Lys, Phe, and Thr. Conclusion Our data indicate that Hlp interacts with heparan sulfate through two distinct regions of the protein. Both heparan sulfate-binding regions here defined are preserved in all mycobacterial Hlp homologues that have been sequenced, suggesting important but possibly divergent roles for this surface-exposed protein in both pathogenic and saprophic species.

  12. Prevalence and clonal distribution of pcpA, psrP and Pilus-1 among pediatric isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Laura Selva

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable deaths globally. The objective of this study was to determine the distribution and clonal type variability of three potential vaccine antigens: Pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein (PsrP, Pilus-1, and Pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA among pneumococcal isolates from children with invasive pneumococcal disease and healthy nasopharyngeal carriers. We studied by Real-Time PCR a total of 458 invasive pneumococcal isolates and 89 nasopharyngeal pneumococcal isolates among children (total = 547 strains collected in Barcelona, Spain, from January 2004 to July 2010. pcpA, psrP and pilus-1 were detected in 92.8%, 51.7% and 14.4% of invasive isolates and in 92.1%, 48.3% and 18% of carrier isolates, respectively. Within individual serotypes the prevalence of psrP and pilus-1 was highly dependent on the clonal type. pcpA was highly prevalent in all strains with the exception of those belonging to serotype 3 (33.3% in serotype 3 isolates vs. 95.1% in other serotypes; P<.001. psrP was significantly more frequent in those serotypes that are less apt to be detected in carriage than in disease; 58.7% vs. 39.1% P<.001. Antibiotic resistance was associated with the presence of pilus-1 and showed a negative correlation with psrP. These results indicate that PcpA, and subsequently Psrp and Pilus-1 together might be good candidates to be used in a next-generation of multivalent pneumococcal protein vaccine.

  13. EHEC Adhesins

    McWilliams, Brian D.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesins are a group of proteins in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) that are involved in the attachment or colonization of this pathogen to abiotic (plastic or steel) and biological surfaces, such as those found in bovine and human intestines. This review provides the most up-to-date information on these essential adhesion factors, summarizing important historical discoveries and analyzing the current and future state of this research. In doing so, the proteins intimin and Tir are d...

  14. EHEC Adhesins

    McWilliams, Brian D.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesins are a group of proteins in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) that are involved in the attachment or colonization of this pathogen to abiotic (plastic or steel) and biological surfaces, such as those found in bovine and human intestines. This review provides the most up-to-date information on these essential adhesion factors, summarizing important historical discoveries and analyzing the current and future state of this research. In doing so, the proteins intimin and Tir are discussed in depth, especially regarding their role in the development of attaching and effacing lesions and in EHEC virulence. Further, a series of fimbrial proteins (Lpf1, Lpf2, curli, ECP, F9, ELF, Sfp, HCP, and type 1 fimbriae) are also described, emphasizing their various contributions to adherence and colonization of different surfaces and their potential use as genetic markers in detection and classification of different EHEC serotypes. This review also discusses the role of several autotransporter proteins (EhaA-D, EspP, Saa and Sab, and Cah), as well as other proteins associated with adherence, such as flagella, EibG, Iha, and OmpA. While these proteins have all been studied to varying degrees, all of the adhesins summarized in this chapter have been linked to different stages of the EHEC life cycle, making them good targets for the development of more effective diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25635238

  15. Proteolytic processing of the cilium adhesin MHJ_0194 (P123J ) in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae generates a functionally diverse array of cleavage fragments that bind multiple host molecules.

    Raymond, Benjamin B A; Jenkins, Cheryl; Seymour, Lisa M; Tacchi, Jessica L; Widjaja, Michael; Jarocki, Veronica M; Deutscher, Ania T; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the aetiological agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, regulates the presentation of proteins on its cell surface via endoproteolysis, including those of the cilial adhesin P123 (MHJ_0194). These proteolytic cleavage events create functional adhesins that bind to proteoglycans and glycoproteins on the surface of ciliated and non-ciliated epithelial cells and to the circulatory host molecule plasminogen. Two dominant cleavage events of the P123 preprotein have been previously characterized; however, immunoblotting studies suggest that more complex processing events occur. These extensive processing events are characterized here. The functional significance of the P97 cleavage fragments is also poorly understood. Affinity chromatography using heparin, fibronectin and plasminogen as bait and peptide arrays were used to expand our knowledge of the adhesive capabilities of P123 cleavage fragments and characterize a novel binding motif in the C-terminus of P123. Further, we use immunohistochemistry to examine in vivo, the biological significance of interactions between M. hyopneumoniae and fibronectin and show that M. hyopneumoniae induces fibronectin deposition at the site of infection on the ciliated epithelium. Our data supports the hypothesis that M. hyopneumoniae possesses the molecular machinery to influence key molecular communication pathways in host cells. PMID:25293691

  16. Expression, purification and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin BabA.

    Subedi, Suresh; Moonens, Kristof; Romão, Ema; Lo, Alvin; Vandenbussche, Guy; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Muyldermans, Serge; Borén, Thomas; Remaut, Han

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human pathogen that colonizes about 50% of the world's population, causing chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcers and even gastric cancer. A steady emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains poses an important public health threat and there is an urgent requirement for alternative therapeutics. The blood group antigen-binding adhesin BabA mediates the intimate attachment to the host mucosa and forms a major candidate for novel vaccine and drug development. Here, the recombinant expression and crystallization of a soluble BabA truncation (BabA(25-460)) corresponding to the predicted extracellular adhesin domain of the protein are reported. X-ray diffraction data for nanobody-stabilized BabA(25-460) were collected to 2.25 Å resolution from a crystal that belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.96, b = 131.41, c = 123.40 Å, α = 90.0, β = 94.8, γ = 90.0°, and which was predicted to contain two BabA(25-460)-nanobody complexes per asymmetric unit. PMID:25484214

  17. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals by fimbrial designer adhesins

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, Kristian; Klemm, Per

    1999-01-01

    Naturally occurring adhesins bind to specific molecular targets in a lock-and-key fashion due to the composition of the binding domain of the adhesin. By introduction of random peptide libraries in a suitable surface exposed carrier protein it is possible to create and select designer adhesins wi...... for the bioaccumulation of heavy metals from the environment. (C) 1999 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Lcl of Legionella pneumophila Is an Immunogenic GAG Binding Adhesin That Promotes Interactions with Lung Epithelial Cells and Plays a Crucial Role in Biofilm Formation ▿

    Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; So, Jannice; Tang, Patrick; Low, Donald E.; Terebiznik, Mauricio; Guyard, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In vitro and in vivo, interactions of L. pneumophila with lung epithelial cells are mediated by the sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of the host extracellular matrix. In this study, we have identified several Legionella heparin binding proteins. We have shown that one of these proteins, designated Lcl, is a polymorphic adhesin of L. pneumophila that is produced during legionellosis. Homologues of Lcl are ubiquitous in L. pneumophila serogroups but are undetected in other Legionella species. Recombinant Lcl binds to GAGs, and a Δlpg2644 mutant demonstrated reduced binding to GAGs and human lung epithelial cells. Importantly, we showed that the Δlpg2644 strain is dramatically impaired in biofilm formation. These data delineate the role of Lcl in the GAG binding properties of L. pneumophila and provide molecular evidence regarding its role in L. pneumophila adherence and biofilm formation. PMID:21422183

  19. Lcl of Legionella pneumophila is an immunogenic GAG binding adhesin that promotes interactions with lung epithelial cells and plays a crucial role in biofilm formation.

    Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; So, Jannice; Tang, Patrick; Low, Donald E; Terebiznik, Mauricio; Guyard, Cyril

    2011-06-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In vitro and in vivo, interactions of L. pneumophila with lung epithelial cells are mediated by the sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of the host extracellular matrix. In this study, we have identified several Legionella heparin binding proteins. We have shown that one of these proteins, designated Lcl, is a polymorphic adhesin of L. pneumophila that is produced during legionellosis. Homologues of Lcl are ubiquitous in L. pneumophila serogroups but are undetected in other Legionella species. Recombinant Lcl binds to GAGs, and a Δlpg2644 mutant demonstrated reduced binding to GAGs and human lung epithelial cells. Importantly, we showed that the Δlpg2644 strain is dramatically impaired in biofilm formation. These data delineate the role of Lcl in the GAG binding properties of L. pneumophila and provide molecular evidence regarding its role in L. pneumophila adherence and biofilm formation. PMID:21422183

  20. The Yersinia adhesin YadA collagen-binding domain structure is a novel left-handed parallel beta-roll.

    Nummelin, Heli; Merckel, Michael C; Leo, Jack C; Lankinen, Hilkka; Skurnik, Mikael; Goldman, Adrian

    2004-02-25

    The crystal structure of the recombinant collagen-binding domain of Yersinia adhesin YadA from Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 was solved at 1.55 A resolution. The trimeric structure is composed of head and neck regions, and the collagen binding head region is a novel nine-coiled left-handed parallel beta-roll. Before the beta-roll, the polypeptide loops from one monomer to the rest, and after the beta-roll the neck region does the same, making the transition from the globular head region to the narrower stalk domain. This creates an intrinsically stable 'lock nut' structure. The trimeric form of YadA is required for collagen binding, and mutagenesis of its surface residues allowed identification of a putative collagen-binding surface. Furthermore, a new structure-sequence motif for YadA beta-roll was used to identify putative YadA-head-like domains in a variety of human and plant pathogens. Such domains may therefore be a common bacterial strategy for avoiding host response. PMID:14765110

  1. The Yersinia adhesin YadA collagen-binding domain structure is a novel left-handed parallel β-roll

    Nummelin, Heli; Merckel, Michael C; Leo, Jack C; Lankinen, Hilkka; Skurnik, Mikael; Goldman, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structure of the recombinant collagen-binding domain of Yersinia adhesin YadA from Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 was solved at 1.55 Å resolution. The trimeric structure is composed of head and neck regions, and the collagen binding head region is a novel nine-coiled left-handed parallel β-roll. Before the β-roll, the polypeptide loops from one monomer to the rest, and after the β-roll the neck region does the same, making the transition from the globular head region to the narrower stalk domain. This creates an intrinsically stable ‘lock nut' structure. The trimeric form of YadA is required for collagen binding, and mutagenesis of its surface residues allowed identification of a putative collagen-binding surface. Furthermore, a new structure–sequence motif for YadA β-roll was used to identify putative YadA-head-like domains in a variety of human and plant pathogens. Such domains may therefore be a common bacterial strategy for avoiding host response. PMID:14765110

  2. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin

  3. More than a marine propeller--the flagellum of the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 is the major adhesin mediating binding to human mucus.

    Troge, Anja; Scheppach, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Bjoern O; Rund, Stefan A; Heuner, Klaus; Wehkamp, Jan; Stange, Eduard F; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A

    2012-12-01

    The flagellum of the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) is not just responsible for motility, but also for EcN's ability to induce the production of human β-defensin 2. Here, we report a third function of this EcN organell. In this study we investigated the role of the EcN flagellum in adhesion to different host tissues by ex vivo and in vitro studies. Ex vivo studies with cryosections of human gut biopsies revealed that the flagellum of EcN is most likely important for efficient adhesion to the human intestinal tract. These results and in vitro studies with different epithelial cells indicated that the presence of mucus is important for efficient mediation of adhesion by the flagellum of EcN. We observed direct interaction between isolated flagella from EcN wild type and porcine mucin 2 as well as human mucus. However, we could not observe any interaction of the flagella with murine mucus. For the first time, we identified the mucus component gluconate as one receptor for the binding of flagella from EcN and were able to exclude the flagellin domain D3 as a responsible interaction partner. We propose that the flagellum of EcN is its major adhesin in vivo, which enables this probiotic strain to compete efficiently for binding sites on host tissue with several bacterial pathogens. PMID:23131416

  4. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States); Smith, Adam N. [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (United States); Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine, E-mail: jbrady@dental.ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry (United States); Long, Joanna R., E-mail: jrlong@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the carbohydrate-binding region of the Streptococcus gordonii adhesin GspB

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Bensing, Barbara A.; Cecchini, Gary; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M. (VA); (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2012-07-11

    The carbohydrate-binding region of the bacterial adhesin GspB from Streptococcus gordonii strain M99 (GspB{sub BR}) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Separate sparse-matrix screening of GspB{sub BR} buffered in either 20 mM Tris pH 7.4 or 20 mM HEPES pH 7.5 resulted in different crystallographic behavior such that different precipitants, salts and additives supported crystallization of GspB{sub BR} in each buffer. While both sets of conditions supported crystal growth in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, the crystals had distinct unit-cell parameters of a = 33.3, b = 86.7, c = 117.9 {angstrom} for crystal form 1 and a = 34.6, b = 98.3, c = 99.0 {angstrom} for crystal form 2. Additive screening improved the crystals grown in both conditions such that diffraction extended to beyond 2 {angstrom} resolution. A complete data set has been collected to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution with an overall R{sub merge} value of 0.04 and an R{sub merge} value of 0.33 in the highest resolution shell.

  6. Enhanced effect of BCG vaccine against pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice with lung Th17 response to mycobacterial heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin antigen.

    Fukui, Masayuki; Shinjo, Kikuko; Umemura, Masayuki; Shigeno, Satoko; Harakuni, Tetsuya; Arakawa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Goro

    2015-12-01

    Although the BCG vaccine can prevent tuberculosis (TB) in infants, its ability to prevent adult pulmonary TB is reportedly limited. Therefore, development of a novel effective vaccine against pulmonary TB has become an international research priority. We have previously reported that intranasal vaccination of mice with a mycobacterial heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) plus mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) enhances production of IFN-γ and anti-HBHA antibody and suppresses extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination after intranasal infection with BCG. In the present study, the effects of intranasal HBHA + CT vaccine on murine pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection were examined. Intranasal HBHA + CT vaccination alone failed to reduce the bacterial burden in the infected lung. However, a combination vaccine consisting of s.c. BCG priming and an intranasal HBHA + CT booster significantly enhanced protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection on day 14 compared with BCG vaccine alone. Further, it was found that intranasal HBHA + CT vaccine enhanced not only IFN-γ but also IL-17A production by HBHA-specific T cells in the lung after pulmonary Mtb infection. Therefore, this combination vaccine may be a good candidate for a new vaccine strategy against pulmonary TB. PMID:26577130

  7. Fibronectin Binding to the Treponema pallidum Adhesin Protein Fragment rTp0483 on Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers

    Dickerson, Matthew T.; Abney, Morgan B.; Cameron, Caroline E.; Knecht, Marc; Bachas, Leonidas G.; Anderson, Kimberly W.

    2012-01-01

    Past work has shown that Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, binds host fibronectin (FN). FN and other host proteins are believed to bind to rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of T. pallidum, and it is postulated that this interaction may facilitate cell attachment and mask antigenic targets on the surface. This research seeks to prepare a surface capable of mimicking the FN binding ability of T. pallidum in order to investigate the impact of FN binding with adsorbed Tp0483 on the host response to the surface. By understanding this interaction it may be possible to develop more effective treatments for infection and possibly mimic the stealth properties of the bacteria. Functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on0 gold were used to investigate rTp0483 and FN adsorption. Using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) rTp0483 adsorption and subsequent FN adsorption onto rTp0483 was determined to be higher on negatively charged carboxylate-terminated self-assembled monolayers (−COO− SAMs) compared to the other surfaces analyzed. Kinetic analysis of rTp0483 adsorption using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) supported this finding. Kinetic analysis of FN adsorption using SPR revealed a multi-step event, where the concentration of immobilized rTp0483 plays a role in FN binding. An examination of relative QCM dissipation energy compared to the shift in frequency showed a correlation between the physical properties of adsorbed rTp0483 and SAM surface chemistry. In addition, AFM images of rTp0483 on selected SAMs illustrated a preference of rTp0483 to bind as aggregates. Adsorption on −COO− SAMs was more uniform across the surface, which may help further explain why FN bound more strongly. rTp0483 antibody studies suggested the involvement of amino acids 274–289 and 316–333 in binding between rTp0483 to FN, while a peptide blocking study only showed inhibition of binding with amino acids 316–333. Finally, surface adsorbed rTp0483 with FN

  8. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  9. The multifunctional LigB adhesin binds homeostatic proteins with potential roles in cutaneous infection by pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    Henry A Choy

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a potentially fatal zoonotic disease in humans and animals caused by pathogenic spirochetes, such as Leptospira interrogans. The mode of transmission is commonly limited to the exposure of mucous membrane or damaged skin to water contaminated by leptospires shed in the urine of carriers, such as rats. Infection occurs during seasonal flooding of impoverished tropical urban habitats with large rat populations, but also during recreational activity in open water, suggesting it is very efficient. LigA and LigB are surface localized proteins in pathogenic Leptospira strains with properties that could facilitate the infection of damaged skin. Their expression is rapidly induced by the increase in osmolarity encountered by leptospires upon transition from water to host. In addition, the immunoglobulin-like repeats of the Lig proteins bind proteins that mediate attachment to host tissue, such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagens, laminin, and elastin, some of which are important in cutaneous wound healing and repair. Hemostasis is critical in a fresh injury, where fibrinogen from damaged vasculature mediates coagulation. We show that fibrinogen binding by recombinant LigB inhibits fibrin formation, which could aid leptospiral entry into the circulation, dissemination, and further infection by impairing healing. LigB also binds fibroblast fibronectin and type III collagen, two proteins prevalent in wound repair, thus potentially enhancing leptospiral adhesion to skin openings. LigA or LigB expression by transformation of a nonpathogenic saprophyte, L. biflexa, enhances bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen. Our results suggest that by binding homeostatic proteins found in cutaneous wounds, LigB could facilitate leptospirosis transmission. Both fibronectin and fibrinogen binding have been mapped to an overlapping domain in LigB comprising repeats 9-11, with repeat 11 possibly enhancing binding by a conformational effect. Leptospirosis

  10. The multifunctional LigB adhesin binds homeostatic proteins with potential roles in cutaneous infection by pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    Choy, Henry A; Kelley, Melissa M; Croda, Julio; Matsunaga, James; Babbitt, Jane T; Ko, Albert I; Picardeau, Mathieu; Haake, David A

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a potentially fatal zoonotic disease in humans and animals caused by pathogenic spirochetes, such as Leptospira interrogans. The mode of transmission is commonly limited to the exposure of mucous membrane or damaged skin to water contaminated by leptospires shed in the urine of carriers, such as rats. Infection occurs during seasonal flooding of impoverished tropical urban habitats with large rat populations, but also during recreational activity in open water, suggesting it is very efficient. LigA and LigB are surface localized proteins in pathogenic Leptospira strains with properties that could facilitate the infection of damaged skin. Their expression is rapidly induced by the increase in osmolarity encountered by leptospires upon transition from water to host. In addition, the immunoglobulin-like repeats of the Lig proteins bind proteins that mediate attachment to host tissue, such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagens, laminin, and elastin, some of which are important in cutaneous wound healing and repair. Hemostasis is critical in a fresh injury, where fibrinogen from damaged vasculature mediates coagulation. We show that fibrinogen binding by recombinant LigB inhibits fibrin formation, which could aid leptospiral entry into the circulation, dissemination, and further infection by impairing healing. LigB also binds fibroblast fibronectin and type III collagen, two proteins prevalent in wound repair, thus potentially enhancing leptospiral adhesion to skin openings. LigA or LigB expression by transformation of a nonpathogenic saprophyte, L. biflexa, enhances bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen. Our results suggest that by binding homeostatic proteins found in cutaneous wounds, LigB could facilitate leptospirosis transmission. Both fibronectin and fibrinogen binding have been mapped to an overlapping domain in LigB comprising repeats 9-11, with repeat 11 possibly enhancing binding by a conformational effect. Leptospirosis patient antibodies react

  11. Lectin-Glycan Interaction Network-Based Identification of Host Receptors of Microbial Pathogenic Adhesins

    Ielasi, Francesco S.; Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Donohue, Dagmara; Claes, Sandra; Sahli, Hichem; Schols, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first step in the infection of humans by microbial pathogens is their adherence to host tissue cells, which is frequently based on the binding of carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectin-like adhesins) to human cell receptors that expose glycans. In only a few cases have the human receptors of pathogenic adhesins been described. A novel strategy—based on the construction of a lectin-glycan interaction (LGI) network—to identify the potential human binding receptors for pathogenic adhesins with lectin activity was developed. The new approach is based on linking glycan array screening results of these adhesins to a human glycoprotein database via the construction of an LGI network. This strategy was used to detect human receptors for virulent Escherichia coli (FimH adhesin), and the fungal pathogens Candida albicans (Als1p and Als3p adhesins) and C. glabrata (Epa1, Epa6, and Epa7 adhesins), which cause candidiasis. This LGI network strategy allows the profiling of potential adhesin binding receptors in the host with prioritization, based on experimental binding data, of the most relevant interactions. New potential targets for the selected adhesins were predicted and experimentally confirmed. This methodology was also used to predict lectin interactions with envelope glycoproteins of human-pathogenic viruses. It was shown that this strategy was successful in revealing that the FimH adhesin has anti-HIV activity. PMID:27406561

  12. Adhesins of Bartonella spp.

    O'Rourke, Fiona; Schmidgen, Thomas; Kaiser, Patrick O; Linke, Dirk; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2011-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells represents the first step in the infection process and one of the decisive features in the pathogenicity of Bartonella spp. B. henselae and B. quintana are considered to be the most important human pathogenic species, responsible for cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, trench fever and other diseases. The ability to cause vasculoproliferative disorders and intraerythrocytic bacteraemia are unique features of the genus Bartonella. Consequently, the interaction with endothelial cells and erythrocytes is a focus in Bartonella research. The genus harbours a variety of trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) such as the Bartonella adhesin A (BadA) of B. henselae and the variably expressed outer-membrane proteins (Vomps) of B. quintana, which display remarkable variations in length and modular construction. These adhesins mediate many of the biologically-important properties of Bartonella spp. such as adherence to endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins and induction of angiogenic gene programming. There is also significant evidence that the laterally acquired Trw-conjugation systems of Bartonella spp. mediate host-specific adherence to erythrocytes. Other potential adhesins are the filamentous haemagglutinins and several outer membrane proteins. The exact molecular functions of these adhesins and their interplay with other pathogenicity factors (e.g., the VirB/D4 type 4 secretion system) need to be analysed in detail to understand how these pathogens adapt to their mammalian hosts. PMID:21557057

  13. The pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein is an intra-species bacterial adhesin that promotes bacterial aggregation in vivo and in biofilms.

    Carlos J Sanchez

    Full Text Available The Pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein (PsrP is a pathogenicity island encoded adhesin that has been positively correlated with the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease. Previous studies have shown that PsrP mediates bacterial attachment to Keratin 10 (K10 on the surface of lung cells through amino acids 273-341 located in the Basic Region (BR domain. In this study we determined that the BR domain of PsrP also mediates an intra-species interaction that promotes the formation of large bacterial aggregates in the nasopharynx and lungs of infected mice as well as in continuous flow-through models of mature biofilms. Using numerous methods, including complementation of mutants with BR domain deficient constructs, fluorescent microscopy with Cy3-labeled recombinant (rBR, Far Western blotting of bacterial lysates, co-immunoprecipitation with rBR, and growth of biofilms in the presence of antibodies and competitive peptides, we determined that the BR domain, in particular amino acids 122-166 of PsrP, promoted bacterial aggregation and that antibodies against the BR domain were neutralizing. Using similar methodologies, we also determined that SraP and GspB, the Serine-rich repeat proteins (SRRPs of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus gordonii, respectively, also promoted bacterial aggregation and that their Non-repeat domains bound to their respective SRRPs. This is the first report to show the presence of biofilm-like structures in the lungs of animals infected with S. pneumoniae and show that SRRPs have dual roles as host and bacterial adhesins. These studies suggest that recombinant Non-repeat domains of SRRPs (i.e. BR for S. pneumoniae may be useful as vaccine antigens to protect against Gram-positive bacteria that cause infection.

  14. The BR domain of PsrP interacts with extracellular DNA to promote bacterial aggregation; structural insights into pneumococcal biofilm formation

    Schulte, Tim; Mikaelsson, Cecilia; Beaussart, Audrey; Kikhney, Alexey; Deshmukh, Maya; Wolniak, Sebastian; Pathak, Anuj; Ebel, Christine; Löfling, Jonas; Fogolari, Federico; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Svergun, Dmitri; Nygren, Per-Åke; Achour, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    The major human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of disease and death worldwide. Pneumococcal biofilm formation within the nasopharynx leads to long-term colonization and persistence within the host. We have previously demonstrated that the capsular surface-associated pneumococcal serine rich repeat protein (PsrP), key factor for biofilm formation, binds to keratin-10 (KRT10) through its microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM)-related globular binding region domain (BR187–385). Here, we show that BR187–385 also binds to DNA, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and size exclusion chromatography. Further, heterologous expression of BR187–378 or the longer BR120–378 construct on the surface of a Gram-positive model host bacterium resulted in the formation of cellular aggregates that was significantly enhanced in the presence of DNA. Crystal structure analyses revealed the formation of BR187–385 homo-dimers via an intermolecular β-sheet, resulting in a positively charged concave surface, shaped to accommodate the acidic helical DNA structure. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering and circular dichroism studies indicate that the aggregate-enhancing N-terminal region of BR120–166 adopts an extended, non-globular structure. Altogether, our results suggest that PsrP adheres to extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix and thus promotes pneumococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27582320

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Adhesin Unique to Oral Fusobacteria

    Han, Yiping W.; Ikegami, Akihiko; Rajanna, Chythanya; Kawsar, Hameem I.; Zhou, Yun; Li, Mei; Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Genco, Robert J.; Kuramitsu, Howard K.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2005-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative anaerobe that is prevalent in periodontal disease and infections of different parts of the body. The organism has remarkable adherence properties, binding to partners ranging from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells to extracellular macromolecules. Understanding its adherence is important for understanding the pathogenesis of F. nucleatum. In this study, a novel adhesin, FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A), was demonstrated to bind to the surface proteins of...

  16. Identification of novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv using integrated approach of multiple computational algorithms and experimental analysis.

    Sanjiv Kumar

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria interacting with eukaryotic host express adhesins on their surface. These adhesins aid in bacterial attachment to the host cell receptors during colonization. A few adhesins such as Heparin binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA, Apa, Malate Synthase of M. tuberculosis have been identified using specific experimental interaction models based on the biological knowledge of the pathogen. In the present work, we carried out computational screening for adhesins of M. tuberculosis. We used an integrated computational approach using SPAAN for predicting adhesins, PSORTb, SubLoc and LocTree for extracellular localization, and BLAST for verifying non-similarity to human proteins. These steps are among the first of reverse vaccinology. Multiple claims and attacks from different algorithms were processed through argumentative approach. Additional filtration criteria included selection for proteins with low molecular weights and absence of literature reports. We examined binding potential of the selected proteins using an image based ELISA. The protein Rv2599 (membrane protein binds to human fibronectin, laminin and collagen. Rv3717 (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and Rv0309 (L,D-transpeptidase bind to fibronectin and laminin. We report Rv2599 (membrane protein, Rv0309 and Rv3717 as novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Our results expand the number of known adhesins of M. tuberculosis and suggest their regulated expression in different stages.

  17. The PapG protein is the alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-(1----4)-beta-D-galactopyranose-binding adhesin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Lund, B; Lindberg, F; Marklund, B I; Normark, S

    1987-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli adhere to uroepithelial cells by their digalactoside alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-(1----4)-beta-D-galactopyranose [alpha-D-Galp-(1----4)-beta-D-Galp or Gal alpha (1----4)Gal]-binding pili, which are composed of repeating identical subunits. The major subunit (PapA) of these pili is not required for binding, but the papF and papG gene products are essential for adhesion. Transcomplementation analysis between the pap gene cluster and a related gene cluster encoding a ...

  18. Allelic Variation of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Adhesin DbpA Influences Spirochetal Binding to Decorin, Dermatan Sulfate, and Mammalian Cells▿

    Benoit, Vivian M.; Fischer, Joshua R.; Lin, Yi-Pin; Parveen, Nikhat; Leong, John M.

    2011-01-01

    After transmission by an infected tick, the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, colonizes the mammalian skin and may disseminate systemically. The three major species of Lyme disease spirochete—B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii—are associated with different chronic disease manifestations. Colonization is likely promoted by the ability to bind to target tissues, and Lyme disease spirochetes utilize multiple adhesive molecules to interact with divers...

  19. The Giant Adhesin SiiE of Salmonella enterica

    Britta Barlag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative, food-borne pathogen, which colonizes the intestinal tract and invades enterocytes. Invasion of polarized cells depends on the SPI1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS and the SPI4-encoded type I secretion system (T1SS. The substrate of this T1SS is the non-fimbrial giant adhesin SiiE. With a size of 595 kDa, SiiE is the largest protein of the Salmonella proteome and consists of 53 repetitive bacterial immunoglobulin (BIg domains, each containing several conserved residues. As known for other T1SS substrates, such as E. coli HlyA, Ca2+ ions bound by conserved D residues within the BIg domains stabilize the protein and facilitate secretion. The adhesin SiiE mediates the first contact to the host cell and thereby positions the SPI1-T3SS to initiate the translocation of a cocktail of effector proteins. This leads to actin remodeling, membrane ruffle formation and bacterial internalization. SiiE binds to host cell apical membranes in a lectin-like manner. GlcNAc and α2–3 linked sialic acid-containing structures are ligands of SiiE. Since SiiE shows repetitive domain architecture, we propose a zipper-like binding mediated by each individual BIg domain. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of the SPI4-T1SS and the giant adhesin SiiE.

  20. Mannoprotein Adhesin of Candida albicans Germ Tubes

    VARDAR-ÜNLÜ, Gülhan

    1998-01-01

    The production and detection of a mannoprotein adhesin (MPA) of the hyphal-form cells of C. albicans on plastic petri dishes was investigated. Using Concanavalin A-coated latex microspheres, the MPA was detected on the plastic surface on which C. albicans produced germ tubes. The adhesin was extracted using dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. It did not inhibit the adhesion of the yeast-form C. albicans to buccal epithelial cells (BEC). This suggested that the MPA of the hyphal-form ...

  1. Tribological performance of paddy straw reinforced polypropylene (PSRP and unidirectional glass-pultruded-kenaf (UGPK composites

    R.M. Nasir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In standard preparation and fabrication of natural-fibre embedded composites, 5 wt. % of natural fibre is enough to strengthen and homogenized in parental matrix as the mechanical strength was observed to increase by more than 25% of pure matrix. Hence, paddy straw and kenaf has been a potential candidate in northern region of Malaysia due to its abundance and easily replenished. A unidirectional glass-pultruded-kenaf (UGPK and paddy straws reinforced polypropylene (PSRP was studied focusing on its tribological performance. Meanwhile, friction and wear properties were examined using pin-on-disc machine under ambient temperature with dry contact condition. The tests were conducted at various sliding velocities (1.178-2.749m/s and applied normal loads (9.82-19.64N. The results showed that specific wear rate and friction coefficient decreased with increasing applied normal load and sliding velocity, but the applied normal load was more influential. The coefficient of friction ranges from 0.5 to 4 and wear rate varies from 0.5 to 4 x 10-5 mm3/Nm for PSRP. The friction coefficient of UGPK is within a range of 2.76 to 4.54 at the given test parameters while its wear rate ranging from 0.8 to 1.79 x 10-5mm3/Nm. The failure mode observed during the test was micro-buckling and followed by splitting while fiber-matrix interfacial failure occurred.

  2. Neutralizing monoclonal antibody epitopes of the Entamoeba histolytica galactose adhesin map to the cysteine-rich extracellular domain of the 170-kilodalton subunit.

    Mann, B J; Chung, C Y; Dodson, J M; Ashley, L S; Braga, L L; Snodgrass, T L

    1993-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucins and colonic epithelial cells via a galactose-binding adhesin. The adhesin is a heterodimeric glycoprotein composed of 170- and 35-kDa subunits. Fragments of the hgl1 gene encoding the 170-kDa subunit were expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and reacted with anti-adhesin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human immune sera. The MAbs tested recognize seven distinct epitopes on the 170-kDa subunit and have distinc...

  3. Molecular design of Mycoplasma hominis Vaa adhesin

    Boesen, Thomas; Fedosova, Natalya U.; Kjeldgaard, Morten;

    2001-01-01

    The variable adherence-associated (Vaa) adhesin of the opportunistic human pathogen Mycoplasma hominis is a surface-exposed, membrane-associated protein involved in the attachment of the bacterium to host cells. The molecular masses of recombinant 1 and 2 cassette forms of the protein determined by...

  4. Regions important for the adhesin activity of Moraxella catarrhalis Hag

    Lafontaine Eric R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Moraxella catarrhalis Hag protein, an Oca autotransporter adhesin, has previously been shown to be important for adherence of this respiratory tract pathogen to human middle ear and A549 lung cells. Results The present study demonstrates that adherence of M. catarrhalis isogenic hag mutant strains to the human epithelial cell lines Chang (conjunctival and NCIH292 (lung is reduced by 50–93%. Furthermore, expressing Hag in a heterologous Escherichia coli background substantially increased the adherence of recombinant bacteria to NCIH292 cells and murine type IV collagen. Hag did not, however, increase the attachment of E. coli to Chang cells. These results indicate that Hag directly mediates adherence to NCIH292 lung cells and collagen, but is not sufficient to confer binding to conjunctival monolayers. Several in-frame deletions were engineered within the hag gene of M. catarrhalis strain O35E and the resulting proteins were tested for their ability to mediate binding to NCIH292 monolayers, middle ear cells, and type IV collagen. These experiments revealed that epithelial cell and collagen binding properties are separable, and that residues 385–705 of this ~2,000 amino acid protein are important for adherence to middle ear and NCIH292 cells. The region of O35E-Hag encompassing aa 706 to 1194 was also found to be required for adherence to collagen. In contrast, β-roll repeats present in Hag, which are structural features conserved in several Oca adhesins and responsible for the adhesive properties of Yersinia enterocolitica YadA, are not important for Hag-mediated adherence. Conclusion Hag is a major adherence factor for human cells derived from various anatomical sites relevant to pathogenesis by M. catarrhalis and its structure-function relationships differ from those of other, closely-related autotransporter proteins.

  5. Novel roles for the AIDA adhesin from diarrheagenic Escherichia coli:

    Sherlock, Orla; Schembri, Mark; Reisner, A.;

    2004-01-01

    Diarrhea-causing Escherichia coli strains are responsible for numerous cases of gastrointestinal disease and constitute a serious health problem throughout the world. The ability to recognize and attach to host intestinal surfaces is an essential step in the pathogenesis of such strains. AIDA is a...... potent bacterial adhesin associated with some diarrheagenic E. coli strains. AIDA mediates bacterial attachment to a broad variety of human and other mammalian cells. It is a surface-displayed autotransporter protein and belongs to the selected group of bacterial glycoproteins; only the glycosylated form...... binds to mammalian cells. Here, we show that AIDA possesses self-association characteristics and can mediate autoaggregation of E. coli cells. We demonstrate that intercellular AIDA-AIDA interaction is responsible for bacterial autoaggregation. Interestingly, AIDA-expressing cells can interact with...

  6. Functional characterization of a mucus-specific LPXTG surface adhesin from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    von Ossowski, Ingemar; Satokari, Reetta; Reunanen, Justus; Lebeer, Sarah; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Vanderleyden, Jos; de Vos, Willem M; Palva, Airi

    2011-07-01

    In spite of the wealth of clinical evidence supporting the health benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in humans, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its probiosis. Current knowledge suggests that the health-promoting effects of this probiotic strain might be partly dependent on its persistence in the intestine and adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG contains mucus-binding pili that might also explain the occupation of its ecological niche as a comparatively less stringent allochthonous intestine-dwelling bacterium. To uncover additional surface proteins involved in mucosal adhesion, we investigated the adherence properties of the only predicted protein (LGG_02337) in L. rhamnosus GG that exhibits homology with a known mucus-binding domain. We cloned a recombinant form of the gene for this putative mucus adhesin and established that the purified protein readily adheres to human intestinal mucus. We also showed that this mucus adhesin is visibly distributed throughout the cell surface and participates in the adhesive interaction between L. rhamnosus GG and mucus, although less prominently than the mucus-binding pili in this strain. Based on primary structural comparisons, we concluded that the current annotation of the LGG_02337 protein likely does not accurately reflect its predicted properties, and we propose that this mucus-specific adhesin be called the mucus-binding factor (MBF). Finally, we interpret our results to mean that L. rhamnosus GG MBF, as an active mucus-specific surface adhesin with a presumed ancillary involvement in pilus-mediated mucosal adhesion, plays a part in the adherent mechanisms during intestinal colonization by this probiotic. PMID:21602388

  7. Lectinlike adhesins in the Bacteroides fragilis group.

    Rogemond, V; Guinet, R M

    1986-01-01

    Lectinlike adhesins were identified in the Bacteroides fragilis group by using sugars immobilized on agarose beads either with whole bacteria by direct microscopic examination or with soluble extracts by immunoaffinoelectrophoresis. These two methods allowed the identification of two sugars reacting with whole bacteria and with the corresponding extracts: alpha-D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. Among eight strains tested representing seven species, the two strains of B. fragilis were equally...

  8. Competitive inhibition of adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli,enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Clostridium difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1027

    Shi-Shun Zhong; Zhen-Shu Zhang; Ji-De Wang; Zhuo-Sheng Lai; Qun-Ying Wang; Ling-Jia Pan; Yue-Xin Ren

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe competitive inhibition of adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli(ETEC), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli(EPEC) and Clostridium difficile ( C. difficile)to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1027 (B. ado 1027).METHODS: The binding of bacteria to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo was counted by adhesion assay. The inhibition of adherence of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of B. ado 1027was evaluated quantitatively by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The purified adhesin at the concentration of 10μg/mL, 20μg/mL and 30μg/mL except at 1μg/mL and 5μg/mL could inhibit significantly the adhesion of ETEC,EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo.Moreover, we observed that a reduction in bacterial adhesion was occurred with increase in the concentration of adhesin,and MFI (Mean fluorescent intensity) was decreased with increase in the concentration of adhesin.CONCLUSION: The purified adhesin of B. ado 1027 can inhibit the adhesion of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo in a dose-dependent manner.

  9. Identification of glycoprotein receptors within the human salivary proteome for the lectin-like BabA and SabA adhesins of Helicobacter pylori by fluorescence-based 2-D bacterial overlay.

    Walz, Anke; Odenbreit, Stefan; Stühler, Kai; Wattenberg, Andreas; Meyer, Helmut E; Mahdavi, Jafar; Borén, Thomas; Ruhl, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Because gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori takes place via the oral route, possible interactions of this bacterium with human salivary proteins could occur. By using modified 1- and 2-D bacterial overlay, binding of H. pylori adhesins BabA and SabA to the whole range of salivary proteins was explored. Bound salivary receptor molecules were identified by MALDI-MS and by comparison to previously established proteome maps of whole and glandular salivas. By use of adhesin-deficient mutants, binding of H. pylori to MUC7 and gp-340 could be linked to the SabA and BabA adhesins, respectively, whereas binding to MUC5B was associated with both adhesins. Binding of H. pylori to the proline-rich glycoprotein was newly detected and assigned to BabA adhesin whereas the SabA adhesin was found to mediate binding to newly detected receptor molecules, including carbonic anhydrase VI, secretory component, heavy chain of secretory IgA1, parotid secretory protein and zinc-alpha(2)-glycoprotein. Some of these salivary glycoproteins are known to act as scavenger molecules or are involved in innate immunity whereas others might come to modify the pathogenetic properties of this organism. In general, this 2-D bacterial overlay technique represents a useful supplement in adhesion studies of bacteria with complex protein mixtures. PMID:19253298

  10. Sticky Matrix: Adhesion Mechanism of the Staphylococcal Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin.

    Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Feuillie, Cécile; Beaussart, Audrey; Derclaye, Sylvie; Kucharíková, Soňa; Lasa, Iñigo; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2016-03-22

    The development of bacterial biofilms on surfaces leads to hospital-acquired infections that are difficult to fight. In Staphylococci, the cationic polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) forms an extracellular matrix that connects the cells together during biofilm formation, but the molecular forces involved are unknown. Here, we use advanced force nanoscopy techniques to unravel the mechanism of PIA-mediated adhesion in a clinically relevant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain. Nanoscale multiparametric imaging of the structure, adhesion, and elasticity of bacteria expressing PIA shows that the cells are surrounded by a soft and adhesive matrix of extracellular polymers. Cell surface softness and adhesion are dramatically reduced in mutant cells deficient for the synthesis of PIA or under unfavorable growth conditions. Single-cell force spectroscopy demonstrates that PIA promotes cell-cell adhesion via the multivalent electrostatic interaction with polyanionic teichoic acids on the S. aureus cell surface. This binding mechanism rationalizes, at the nanoscale, the well-known ability of PIA to strengthen intercellular adhesion in staphylococcal biofilms. Force nanoscopy offers promising prospects for understanding the fundamental forces in antibiotic-resistant biofilms and for designing anti-adhesion compounds targeting matrix polymers. PMID:26908275

  11. Essential Roles and Regulation of the Legionella pneumophila Collagen-Like Adhesin during Biofilm Formation

    Julia Mallegol; Carla Duncan; Akriti Prashar; Jannice So; Low, Donald E.; Mauricio Terebeznik; Cyril Guyard

    2012-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp) and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644) is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular functi...

  12. BslA, the S-layer adhesin of B. anthracis, is a virulence factor for anthrax pathogenesis

    Kern, Justin; Schneewind, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Microbial pathogens use adhesive surface proteins to bind to and interact with host tissues, events that are universal for the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. A surface adhesin of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, required to mediate these steps has not been discovered. Previous work identified BslA, an S-layer protein, to be necessary and sufficient for adhesion of the anthrax vaccine strain, Bacillus anthracis Sterne, to host cells. Here we asked whether encapsulated ...

  13. Oral streptococci utilize a Siglec-like domain of serine-rich repeat adhesins to preferentially target platelet sialoglycans in human blood.

    Lingquan Deng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Damaged cardiac valves attract blood-borne bacteria, and infective endocarditis is often caused by viridans group streptococci. While such bacteria use multiple adhesins to maintain their normal oral commensal state, recognition of platelet sialoglycans provides an intermediary for binding to damaged valvular endocardium. We use a customized sialoglycan microarray to explore the varied binding properties of phylogenetically related serine-rich repeat adhesins, the GspB, Hsa, and SrpA homologs from Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis species, which belong to a highly conserved family of glycoproteins that contribute to virulence for a broad range of Gram-positive pathogens. Binding profiles of recombinant soluble homologs containing novel sialic acid-recognizing Siglec-like domains correlate well with binding of corresponding whole bacteria to arrays. These bacteria show multiple modes of glycan, protein, or divalent cation-dependent binding to synthetic glycoconjugates and isolated glycoproteins in vitro. However, endogenous asialoglycan-recognizing clearance receptors are known to ensure that only fully sialylated glycans dominate in the endovascular system, wherein we find these particular streptococci become primarily dependent on their Siglec-like adhesins for glycan-mediated recognition events. Remarkably, despite an excess of alternate sialoglycan ligands in cellular and soluble blood components, these adhesins selectively target intact bacteria to sialylated ligands on platelets, within human whole blood. These preferred interactions are inhibited by corresponding recombinant soluble adhesins, which also preferentially recognize platelets. Our data indicate that circulating platelets may act as inadvertent Trojan horse carriers of oral streptococci to the site of damaged endocardium, and provide an explanation why it is that among innumerable microbes that gain occasional access to the bloodstream, certain viridans group

  14. Evolution of Salmonella enterica virulence via point mutations in the fimbrial adhesin.

    Dagmara I Kisiela

    Full Text Available Whereas the majority of pathogenic Salmonella serovars are capable of infecting many different animal species, typically producing a self-limited gastroenteritis, serovars with narrow host-specificity exhibit increased virulence and their infections frequently result in fatal systemic diseases. In our study, a genetic and functional analysis of the mannose-specific type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH from a variety of serovars of Salmonella enterica revealed that specific mutant variants of FimH are common in host-adapted (systemically invasive serovars. We have found that while the low-binding shear-dependent phenotype of the adhesin is preserved in broad host-range (usually systemically non-invasive Salmonella, the majority of host-adapted serovars express FimH variants with one of two alternative phenotypes: a significantly increased binding to mannose (as in S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi C, S. Dublin and some isolates of S. Choleraesuis, or complete loss of the mannose-binding activity (as in S. Paratyphi B, S. Choleraesuis and S. Gallinarum. The functional diversification of FimH in host-adapted Salmonella results from recently acquired structural mutations. Many of the mutations are of a convergent nature indicative of strong positive selection. The high-binding phenotype of FimH that leads to increased bacterial adhesiveness to and invasiveness of epithelial cells and macrophages usually precedes acquisition of the non-binding phenotype. Collectively these observations suggest that activation or inactivation of mannose-specific adhesive properties in different systemically invasive serovars of Salmonella reflects their dynamic trajectories of adaptation to a life style in specific hosts. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that point mutations are the target of positive selection and, in addition to horizontal gene transfer and genome degradation events, can contribute to the differential pathoadaptive evolution of Salmonella.

  15. Oil fuel delivery optimization for multi product and multi depot: the case of petrol station replenishment problem (PSRP)

    Surjandari, Isti; Rachman, Amar; Dianawati, Fauzia; Wibowo, R. Pramono

    2011-10-01

    With the Oil and Gas Law No. 22 of 2001, national and foreign private enterprises can invest in all sectors of Oil and Gas in Indonesia. In anticipation of this free competition, Pertamina, as a state-owned enterprises, which previously had monopolized the oil and gas business activities in Indonesia, should be able to improve services as well as the efficiency in order to compete in the free market, especially in terms of cost efficiency of fuel distribution to gas station (SPBU). To optimize the distribution activity, it is necessary to design a scheduling system and its fuel delivery routes daily to every SPBU. The determination of routes and scheduling delivery of fuel to the SPBU can be modeled as a Petrol Station Replenishment Problem (PSRP) with the multi-depot, multi-product, time windows and split deliveries, which in this study will be completed by the Tabu Search algorithm (TS). This study was conducted in the area of Bandung, the capital of West Java province, which is a big city and the neighboring city of Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia. By using the fuel delivery data for one day, the results showed a decrease of 16.38% of the distance of the route compared to the current conditions, which impacted on the reduction of distribution costs and decrease the number of total trips by 5.22% and 3.83%.

  16. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Adhesin Unique to Oral Fusobacteria

    Han, Yiping W.; Ikegami, Akihiko; Rajanna, Chythanya; Kawsar, Hameem I.; Zhou, Yun; Li, Mei; Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Genco, Robert J.; Kuramitsu, Howard K.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2005-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative anaerobe that is prevalent in periodontal disease and infections of different parts of the body. The organism has remarkable adherence properties, binding to partners ranging from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells to extracellular macromolecules. Understanding its adherence is important for understanding the pathogenesis of F. nucleatum. In this study, a novel adhesin, FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A), was demonstrated to bind to the surface proteins of the oral mucosal KB cells. FadA is composed of 129 amino acid (aa) residues, including an 18-aa signal peptide, with calculated molecular masses of 13.6 kDa for the intact form and 12.6 kDa for the secreted form. It is highly conserved among F. nucleatum, Fusobacterium periodonticum, and Fusobacterium simiae, the three most closely related oral species, but is absent in the nonoral species, including Fusobacterium gonidiaformans, Fusobacterium mortiferum, Fusobacterium naviforme, Fusobacterium russii, and Fusobacterium ulcerans. In addition to FadA, F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 and ATCC 49256 also encode two paralogues, FN1529 and FNV2159, each sharing 31% identity with FadA. A double-crossover fadA deletion mutant, F. nucleatum 12230-US1, was constructed by utilizing a novel sonoporation procedure. The mutant had a slightly slower growth rate, yet its binding to KB and Chinese hamster ovarian cells was reduced by 70 to 80% compared to that of the wild type, indicating that FadA plays an important role in fusobacterial colonization in the host. Furthermore, due to its uniqueness to oral Fusobacterium species, fadA may be used as a marker to detect orally related fusobacteria. F. nucleatum isolated from other parts of the body may originate from the oral cavity. PMID:16030227

  17. Transcription profile of Trichophyton rubrum conidia grown on keratin reveals the induction of an adhesin-like protein gene with a tandem repeat pattern

    Bitencourt, Tamires Aparecida; Macedo, Claudia; Franco, Matheus Eloy; Assis, Amanda Freire; Komoto, Tatiana Takahasi; Stehling, Eliana Guedes; Beleboni, Rene Oliveira; Malavazi, Iran; Marins, Mozart; Fachin, Ana Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Background Trichophyton rubrum is a cosmopolitan filamentous fungus that can infect human keratinized tissue (skin, nails and, rarely, hair) and is the major agent of all chronic and recurrent dermatophytoses. The dermatophyte infection process is initiated through the release of arthroconidial adhesin, which binds to the host stratum corneum. The conidia then germinate, and fungal hyphae invade keratinized skin structures through the secretion of proteases. Although arthroconidia play a cent...

  18. Protection of gerbils from amebic liver abscess by immunization with a recombinant protein derived from the 170-kilodalton surface adhesin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Zhang, T.; Stanley, S L

    1994-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes extensive morbidity and mortality worldwide through intestinal infection and amebic liver abscess. Here we show that vaccination of gerbils, a standard model for amebic liver abscess, with recombinant proteins derived from the 170-kDa galactose-binding adhesin of E. histolytica and the serine-rich E. histolytica protein or a combination of the two recombinant antigens provides excellent protection against subsequent hepatic challenge with vi...

  19. Detection of Fusobacterium Nucleatum and fadA Adhesin Gene in Patients with Orthodontic Gingivitis and Non-Orthodontic Periodontal Inflammation

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we ...

  20. The role of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans fimbrial adhesin on MMP-8 activity in aggressive periodontitis pathogenesis

    Rini Devijanti Ridwan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans is Gram negative and a major bacterial agent associated with aggressive periodontitis in young adult, this bacteria was an important factor in pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans possesses fimbriae with an adhesin protein that was the first bacterial molecules to make physical contact with host. Purpose: The objective of this research was to analyzed the influence of A. actinomycetemcomitans fimbrial adhesin protein induction on MMP-8 activity. Methods: The research was an experimental laboratory study, the step in this study were isolation and identification A. actinomycetemcomitans, characterize A. actinomycetemcomitans adhesin and study the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans adhesin in Wistar rats. Results: The result of this research on the role of adhesin in Wistar rats after analysis with Analysis of Variance (ANOVA showed significant differences in the control group with group induction with A. actinomycetemcomitans, A. actinomycetemcomitans plus adhesin and adhesin. MMP-8 activity increased with induction A. actinomycetemcomitans and 24 kDa A. actinomycetemcomitans adhesin. This fimbrial adhesin protein showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans has the ability to adhesion, colonization and invasion for host in aggressive periodontitis pathogenesis. Conclusion: A. actinomycetemcomitans fimbrial adhesin protein induction increasing MMP-8 activity for aggressive periodontitis pathogenesis.Latar belakang: A. actinomycetemcomitans merupakan salah satu bakteri Gram negatif yang terkait dengan periodontitis agresif yang menyerang penderita usia muda dan merupakan faktor penting dalam patogenesis periodontitis agresif. A. actimycetemcomitans mempunyai fimbriae dengan protein adhesin yang merupakan molekul pertama dari bakteri untuk melakukan kontak fisik dengan host. Tujuan: Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menganalisis pengaruh induksi adhesin A

  1. Surface adhesins and exopolymers of selected foodborne pathogens

    Jaglic, Zoran; Desvaux, Mickaël; Weiss, Agnes;

    2014-01-01

    of bacterial surface structures are involved in this process and these promote bacterial adhesion in a more or less specific manner. In this review, we will focus on those surface adhesins and exopolymers in selected foodborne pathogens that are involved mainly in primary adhesion. Their role in biofilm...... development will also be considered when appropriate. Both the clinical impact and implications for food safety of such adhesion will be discussed....

  2. Hydrophobic adhesin of E coli in ulcerative colitis.

    Burke, D A; Axon, A T

    1988-01-01

    Pathogenic E coli have adhesive properties which are mirrored by an increase in their surface hydrophobicity. E coli isolated from patients with ulcerative colitis possess a mannose resistant adhesin similar to that found in pathogenic E coli. In this study 42 E coli isolates from patients with colitis have been compared with 15 from controls to assess hydrophobicity and cellular adherence. The salting out method and the buccal epithelial cell technique were used respectively. E coli isolated...

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel Plasmodium falciparum adhesin involved in erythrocyte invasion.

    Nidhi Hans

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major health problem worldwide. All clinical symptoms of malaria are attributed to the asexual blood stages of the parasite life cycle. Proteins resident in apical organelles and present on the surface of P. falciparum merozoites are considered promising candidates for the development of blood stage malaria vaccines. In the present study, we have identified and characterized a microneme associated antigen, PfMA [PlasmoDB Gene ID: PF3D7_0316000, PFC0700c]. The gene was selected by applying a set of screening criteria such as transcriptional upregulation at late schizogony, inter-species conservation and the presence of signal sequence or transmembrane domains. The gene sequence of PfMA was found to be conserved amongst various Plasmodium species. We experimentally demonstrated that the transcript for PfMA was expressed only in the late blood stages of parasite consistent with a putative role in erythrocyte invasion. PfMA was localized by immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy to be in the micronemes, an apical organelle of merozoites. The functional role of the PfMA protein in erythrocyte invasion was identified as a parasite adhesin involved in direct attachment with the target erythrocyte. PfMA was demonstrated to bind erythrocytes in a sialic acid independent, chymotrypsin and trypsin resistant manner and its antibodies inhibited P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. Invasion of erythrocytes is a complex multistep process that involves a number of redundant ligand-receptor interactions many of which still remain unknown and even uncharacterized. Our work has identified and characterized a novel P. falciparum adhesin involved in erythrocyte invasion.

  4. Treponema pallidum Fibronectin-Binding Proteins

    Cameron, Caroline E.; Brown, Elizabeth L.; Kuroiwa, Janelle M. Y.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Brouwer, Nathan L.

    2004-01-01

    Putative adhesins were predicted by computer analysis of the Treponema pallidum genome. Two treponemal proteins, Tp0155 and Tp0483, demonstrated specific attachment to fibronectin, blocked bacterial adherence to fibronectin-coated slides, and supported attachment of fibronectin-producing mammalian cells. These results suggest Tp0155 and Tp0483 are fibronectin-binding proteins mediating T. pallidum-host interactions.

  5. Structures of C-mannosylated anti-adhesives bound to the type 1 fimbrial FimH adhesin

    Jerome de Ruyck

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Selective inhibitors of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH are recognized as attractive alternatives for antibiotic therapies and prophylaxes against Escherichia coli infections such as urinary-tract infections. To construct these inhibitors, the α-d-mannopyranoside of high-mannose N-glycans, recognized with exclusive specificity on glycoprotein receptors by FimH, forms the basal structure. A hydrophobic aglycon is then linked to the mannose by the O1 oxygen inherently present in the α-anomeric configuration. Substitution of this O atom by a carbon introduces a C-glycosidic bond, which may enhance the therapeutic potential of such compounds owing to the inability of enzymes to degrade C-glycosidic bonds. Here, the first crystal structures of the E. coli FimH adhesin in complex with C-glycosidically linked mannopyranosides are presented. These findings explain the role of the spacer in positioning biphenyl ligands for interactions by means of aromatic stacking in the tyrosine gate of FimH and how the normally hydrated C-glycosidic link is tolerated. As these new compounds can bind FimH, it can be assumed that they have the potential to serve as potent new antagonists of FimH, paving the way for the design of a new family of anti-adhesive compounds against urinary-tract infections.

  6. Endocytosis-inducer adhesins produced by enteropathogenic serogroups of Escherichia coli participate on bacterial attachment to infant enterocytes

    João Ramos Costa Andrade

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC infection of Hep-2 cells preoceeds through bacterial attachment to cell surface and internalization of adhered bacteria. EPEC attachment is a prerequisite for cell infection and is mediated by adhesins that recognize carbohydrate-containing receptors on cell membrane. Such endocytosis-inducer adhesins (EIA also promote EPEC binding to infant enterocytes, suggesting that EIA may have an important role on EPEC gastroenteritis.A infecção de células Hep-2 por E. coli enteropatogênicas (ECEP implica na aderência bacteriana e posterior interiorização dos microrganismos aderidos por um mecanismo de endocitose. A aderência das ECEP é pré-requisito para a infecção e é mediada por adesinas que reconhecem receptores inibidos por certas oses na membrana celular. Tais "adesinas indutoras da endocitose" (AIE também promovem a ligação bacteriana a enterócitos obtidos do intestino delgado de lactente, sugerindo que as AIE possam desempenhar algum papel nas diarréias causadas por ECEP.

  7. Structures of C-mannosylated anti-adhesives bound to the type 1 fimbrial FimH adhesin.

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Lensink, Marc F; Bouckaert, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Selective inhibitors of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH are recognized as attractive alternatives for antibiotic therapies and prophylaxes against Escherichia coli infections such as urinary-tract infections. To construct these inhibitors, the α-d-mannopyranoside of high-mannose N-glycans, recognized with exclusive specificity on glycoprotein receptors by FimH, forms the basal structure. A hydrophobic aglycon is then linked to the mannose by the O1 oxygen inherently present in the α-anomeric configuration. Substitution of this O atom by a carbon introduces a C-glycosidic bond, which may enhance the therapeutic potential of such compounds owing to the inability of enzymes to degrade C-glycosidic bonds. Here, the first crystal structures of the E. coli FimH adhesin in complex with C-glycosidically linked mannopyranosides are presented. These findings explain the role of the spacer in positioning biphenyl ligands for interactions by means of aromatic stacking in the tyrosine gate of FimH and how the normally hydrated C-glycosidic link is tolerated. As these new compounds can bind FimH, it can be assumed that they have the potential to serve as potent new antagonists of FimH, paving the way for the design of a new family of anti-adhesive compounds against urinary-tract infections. PMID:27158502

  8. Identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei adhesins for human respiratory epithelial cells

    Hogan Robert J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei cause the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. A well-studied aspect of pathogenesis by these closely-related bacteria is their ability to invade and multiply within eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the means by which B. pseudomallei and B. mallei adhere to cells are poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to identify adherence factors expressed by these organisms. Results Comparative sequence analyses identified a gene product in the published genome of B. mallei strain ATCC23344 (locus # BMAA0649 that resembles the well-characterized Yersinia enterocolitica autotransporter adhesin YadA. The gene encoding this B. mallei protein, designated boaA, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to significantly increase adherence to human epithelial cell lines, specifically HEp2 (laryngeal cells and A549 (type II pneumocytes, as well as to cultures of normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE. Consistent with these findings, disruption of the boaA gene in B. mallei ATCC23344 reduced adherence to all three cell types by ~50%. The genomes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and DD503 were also found to contain boaA and inactivation of the gene in DD503 considerably decreased binding to monolayers of HEp2 and A549 cells and to NHBE cultures. A second YadA-like gene product highly similar to BoaA (65% identity was identified in the published genomic sequence of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 (locus # BPSL1705. The gene specifying this protein, termed boaB, appears to be B. pseudomallei-specific. Quantitative attachment assays demonstrated that recombinant E. coli expressing BoaB displayed greater binding to A549 pneumocytes, HEp2 cells and NHBE cultures. Moreover, a boaB mutant of B. pseudomallei DD503 showed decreased adherence to these respiratory cells. Additionally, a B. pseudomallei strain lacking expression of both boaA and boaB was impaired in its ability to

  9. Specificity of Campylobacter jejuni Adhesin PEB3 for Phosphates and Structural Differences among Its Ligand Complexes

    Min, Tongpil; Vedadi, Masoud; Watson, David C.; Wasney, Gregory A.; Munger, Christine; Cygler, Miroslaw; Matte, Allan; Young, N. Martin; (NRCC); (McGill); (Toronto)

    2009-04-22

    PEB3 is a glycoprotein adhesin from Campylobacter jejuni whose structure suggested a role in transport. We have investigated potential ligands for PEB3 and characterized their binding properties using biophysical methods in solution and by X-ray crystallography. A thermal aggregation assay of PEB3 with a library of physiological compounds identified three possible ligands [3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and aconitate], which stabilized wild-type PEB3 but did not stabilize either a PEB3 form containing two mutations at the ligand-binding site, T138A/S139A, or a second PEB3 mutant, K135E, at a site {approx}14 {angstrom} away. Fluorescence titration experiments and cocrystal structures with various ligands were used to characterize the binding of 3-PG, PEP, and phosphate to PEB3. Further, a C. jejuni growth experiment in minimal medium supplemented with 3-PG showed that this molecule enhances the growth of wild-type C. jejuni, but not of the PEB3 mutants. Crystallographic analysis of PEB3 complexes revealed that the Ser171-Gln180 region in the presence of 3-PG or other phosphates is helical and similar to those of other transport proteins, but it is nonhelical when citrate is bound. The K135E mutation resulted in expression of a more highly glycosylated form of PEB3 in vivo, and its crystal structure showed the conformation of the first two residues of the glycan. On the basis of our findings, we suggest that PEB3 is a transport protein that may function in utilization of 3-PG or other phosphate-containing molecules from the host.

  10. Investigation of anti-WI-1 adhesin antibody-mediated protection in experimental pulmonary blastomycosis.

    Wüthrich, M; Klein, B S

    2000-05-01

    Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis elicits strong antibody responses to the surface adhesin WI-1. The antibodies are directed chiefly against the adhesive domain, a 25-amino-acid repeat. Tandem-repeat-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were studied for their opsonic activity in vitro and their capacity to adoptively transfer protection in murine experimental blastomycosis. mAbs to WI-1 enhanced binding and entry of B. dermatitidis yeasts into J774. 16 cells but did not enhance killing or growth inhibition of the yeast. Passive transfer of 8 mAbs to WI-1 into 3 different inbred strains of mice also did not improve the course of experimental infection and sometimes worsened it. mu-deficient mice were more resistant to experimental blastomycosis than were intact littermates, and passive transfer of the mAbs into these mice did not protect them against experimental infection. Thus, antibody to WI-1 does not appear to improve the outcome of murine blastomycosis and may enhance the infection. PMID:10823774

  11. Essential roles and regulation of the Legionella pneumophila collagen-like adhesin during biofilm formation.

    Julia Mallegol

    Full Text Available Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644 is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS. In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL, may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface.

  12. Essential roles and regulation of the Legionella pneumophila collagen-like adhesin during biofilm formation.

    Mallegol, Julia; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; So, Jannice; Low, Donald E; Terebeznik, Mauricio; Guyard, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp) and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644) is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s) of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS). In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL), may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface. PMID:23029523

  13. Dependence of Bacterial Protein Adhesins on Toll-Like Receptors for Proinflammatory Cytokine Induction

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Schifferle, Robert E.; DeNardin, Ernesto; Russell, Michael W.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signal transducers that mediate inflammatory reactions induced by microbes through pattern recognition of virulence molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoproteins. We investigated whether proinflammatory cytokine responses induced by certain bacterial protein adhesins may also depend on TLRs. In differentiated THP-1 mononuclear cells stimulated by LPS-free recombinant fimbrillin (rFimA) from Porphyromonas gingivalis, cytokine release was abrogated by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to CD14 and TLR4 but not to TLR2. Similar experiments using anti-β2 integrin MAbs suggested that β2 integrins (CD11/CD18) also play a role in cytokine induction by rFimA or native fimbriae. Minor fimbriae (distinct from the fimA-encoded major fimbriae) of P. gingivalis induced proinflammatory cytokine release in a CD14- and TLR2-dependent mode. Cytokine induction by BspA, a leucine-rich repeat protein from Bacteroides forsythus, depended heavily on CD14 and TLR2. We also found that the ability of the streptococcal protein AgI/II to stimulate cytokine release depended partially on CD14 and TLR4, and the AgI/II segment that possibly interacts with these receptors was identified as its N-terminal saliva-binding region. When THP-1 cells were exposed to rFimA for 24 h, surface expression of CD14 and CD18 was decreased and the cells became hyporesponsive to cytokine induction by a second challenge with rFimA. However, tolerance induction was abolished when the THP-1 cells were pretreated with rFimA in the presence of either anti-CD14 MAb or anti-TLR4 MAb. Induction of cross-tolerance between rFimA and LPS correlated with downregulation of the pattern recognition receptors involved. Our data suggest that the CD14-TLR2/4 system is involved in cytokine production and tolerance induction upon interaction with certain proinflammatory bacterial protein adhesins. PMID:11874886

  14. A spatially localized rhomboid protease cleaves cell surface adhesins essential for invasion by Toxoplasma

    Brossier, Fabien; Jewett, Travis J.; Sibley, L. David; Urban, Sinisa

    2005-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause serious human and animal diseases, the treatment of which requires identification of new therapeutic targets. Host-cell invasion culminates in the essential cleavage of parasite adhesins, and although the cleavage site for several adhesins maps within their transmembrane domains, the protease responsible for this processing has not been discovered. We have identified, cloned, and characterized the five nonmitochondrial rhomboid intramembrane proteases encoded in t...

  15. Diversity of Expressed vlhA Adhesin Sequences and Intermediate Hemagglutination Phenotypes in Mycoplasma synoviae▿

    May, Meghan; Brown, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    A reservoir of pseudogene alleles encoding the primary adhesin VlhA occurs in the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae. Recombination between this reservoir and its single expression site was predicted to result in lineages of M. synoviae that each express a different vlhA allele as a consequence of host immune responses to those antigens. Such interstrain diversity at the vlhA expression site, including major differences in the predicted secondary structures of their expressed adhesins, was co...

  16. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae adhesin (P1) in the nonhemadsorbing population of virulent Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    Kahane, I; Tucker, S.; Baseman, J B

    1985-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae organisms possessing a hemadsorbing-negative (HA-) phenotype comprise more than 50% of the population of virulent M. pneumoniae cultures. Monoclonal antibody to P1, the major adhesin of M. pneumoniae reacts with this HA- mycoplasma fraction based upon radioimmunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Demonstration of P1 in the entire mycoplasma population suggests that topological organization of this adhesin in the membrane or the physiological state of the mycoplasmas may d...

  17. Structure and copy number of gene clusters related to the pap P-adhesin operon of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Arthur, M; Campanelli, C; Arbeit, R D; Kim, C.; Steinbach, S; C. E. Johnson; Rubin, R H; Goldstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    The structurally related pap and prs operons of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate J96 encode a P and an F adhesin that mediate bacterial attachment to the human P blood group antigen and the Forssman antigen, respectively. Using probes prepared from different segments of the pap operon, Southern blot hybridizations were performed to characterize pap-related sequences of 30 E. coli clinical isolates expressing different adhesin phenotypes. Gene clusters encoding P and F adhesins displ...

  18. Structural and Functional Analysis of a New Subfamily of Glycosyltransferases Required for Glycosylation of Serine-rich Streptococcal Adhesins

    Zhu, Fan; Erlandsen, Heidi; Ding, Lei; Li, Jingzhi; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Meixian; Liang, Xiaobo; Ma, Jinbiao; Wu, Hui (UAB)

    2011-09-16

    Serine-rich repeat glycoproteins (SRRPs) are a growing family of bacterial adhesins found in many streptococci and staphylococci; they play important roles in bacterial biofilm formation and pathogenesis. Glycosylation of this family of adhesins is essential for their biogenesis. A glucosyltransferase (Gtf3) catalyzes the second step of glycosylation of a SRRP (Fap1) from an oral streptococcus, Streptococcus parasanguinis. Although Gtf3 homologs are highly conserved in SRRP-containing streptococci, they share minimal homology with functionally known glycosyltransferases. We report here the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Gtf3. The structural analysis indicates that Gtf3 forms a tetramer and shares significant structural homology with glycosyltransferases from GT4, GT5, and GT20 subfamilies. Combining crystal structural analysis with site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro glycosyltransferase assays, we identified residues that are required for UDP- or UDP-glucose binding and for oligomerization of Gtf3 and determined their contribution to the enzymatic activity of Gtf3. Further in vivo studies revealed that the critical amino acid residues identified by the structural analysis are crucial for Fap1 glycosylation in S. parasanguinis in vivo. Moreover, Gtf3 homologs from other streptococci were able to rescue the gtf3 knock-out mutant of S. parasanguinis in vivo and catalyze the sugar transfer to the modified SRRP substrate in vitro, demonstrating the importance and conservation of the Gtf3 homologs in glycosylation of SRRPs. As the Gtf3 homologs only exist in SRRP-containing streptococci, we conclude that the Gtf3 homologs represent a unique subfamily of glycosyltransferases.

  19. Entamoeba histolytica: Adhesins and Lectins in the Trophozoite Surface

    Magdalena Aguirre García

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amebiasis in humans and is responsible for 100,000 deaths annually, making it the third leading cause of death due to a protozoan parasite. Pathogenesis appears to result from the potent cytotoxic activity of the parasite, which kills host cells within minutes. Although the mechanism is unknown, it is well established to be contact-dependent. The life cycle of the parasite alternates with two forms: the resistant cyst and the invasive trophozoite. The adhesive interactions between the parasite and surface glycoconjugates of host cells, as well as those lining the epithelia, are determinants for invasion of human tissues, for its cytotoxic activity, and finally for the outcome of the disease. In this review we present an overview of the information available on the amebic lectins and adhesins that are responsible of those adhesive interactions and we also refer to their effect on the host immune response. Finally, we present some concluding remarks and perspectives in the field.

  20. Localization of adhesins on the surface of a pathogenic bacterial envelope through atomic force microscopy

    Arnal, L.; Longo, G.; Stupar, P.; Castez, M. F.; Cattelan, N.; Salvarezza, R. C.; Yantorno, O. M.; Kasas, S.; Vela, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first and a significant step in establishing infection. This adhesion normally occurs in the presence of flow of fluids. Therefore, bacterial adhesins must be able to provide high strength interactions with their target surface in order to maintain the adhered bacteria under hydromechanical stressing conditions. In the case of B. pertussis, a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for pertussis, a highly contagious human respiratory tract infection, an important protein participating in the adhesion process is a 220 kDa adhesin named filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), an outer membrane and also secreted protein that contains recognition domains to adhere to ciliated respiratory epithelial cells and macrophages. In this work, we obtained information on the cell-surface localization and distribution of the B. pertussis adhesin FHA using an antibody-functionalized AFM tip. Through the analysis of specific molecular recognition events we built a map of the spatial distribution of the adhesin which revealed a non-homogeneous pattern. Moreover, our experiments showed a force induced reorganization of the adhesin on the surface of the cells, which could explain a reinforced adhesive response under external forces. This single-molecule information contributes to the understanding of basic molecular mechanisms used by bacterial pathogens to cause infectious disease and to gain insights into the structural features by which adhesins can act as force sensors under mechanical shear conditions.Bacterial adhesion is the first and a significant step in establishing infection. This adhesion normally occurs in the presence of flow of fluids. Therefore, bacterial adhesins must be able to provide high strength interactions with their target surface in order to maintain the adhered bacteria under hydromechanical stressing conditions. In the case of B. pertussis, a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for pertussis, a highly contagious human respiratory tract

  1. Neisseria adhesin A variation and revised nomenclature scheme.

    Bambini, Stefania; De Chiara, Matteo; Muzzi, Alessandro; Mora, Marirosa; Lucidarme, Jay; Brehony, Carina; Borrow, Ray; Masignani, Vega; Comanducci, Maurizio; Maiden, Martin C J; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Jolley, Keith A

    2014-07-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), involved in the adhesion and invasion of Neisseria meningitidis into host tissues, is one of the major components of Bexsero, a novel multicomponent vaccine licensed for protection against meningococcal serogroup B in Europe, Australia, and Canada. NadA has been identified in approximately 30% of clinical isolates and in a much lower proportion of carrier isolates. Three protein variants were originally identified in invasive meningococci and named NadA-1, NadA-2, and NadA-3, whereas most carrier isolates either lacked the gene or harbored a different variant, NadA-4. Further analysis of isolates belonging to the sequence type 213 (ST-213) clonal complex identified NadA-5, which was structurally similar to NadA-4, but more distantly related to NadA-1, -2, and -3. At the time of this writing, more than 89 distinct nadA allele sequences and 43 distinct peptides have been described. Here, we present a revised nomenclature system, taking into account the complete data set, which is compatible with previous classification schemes and is expandable. The main features of this new scheme include (i) the grouping of the previously named NadA-2 and NadA-3 variants into a single NadA-2/3 variant, (ii) the grouping of the previously assigned NadA-4 and NadA-5 variants into a single NadA-4/5 variant, (iii) the introduction of an additional variant (NadA-6), and (iv) the classification of the variants into two main groups, named groups I and II. To facilitate querying of the sequences and submission of new allele sequences, the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are available at http://pubmlst.org/neisseria/NadA/. PMID:24807056

  2. FungalRV: adhesin prediction and immunoinformatics portal for human fungal pathogens

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of sequence data of human pathogenic fungi generates opportunities to develop Bioinformatics tools and resources for vaccine development towards benefitting at-risk patients. Description We have developed a fungal adhesin predictor and an immunoinformatics database with predicted adhesins. Based on literature search and domain analysis, we prepared a positive dataset comprising adhesin protein sequences from human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Coccidioides immitis, Coccidioides posadasii, Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Pneumocystis carinii, Pneumocystis jirovecii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The negative dataset consisted of proteins with high probability to function intracellularly. We have used 3945 compositional properties including frequencies of mono, doublet, triplet, and multiplets of amino acids and hydrophobic properties as input features of protein sequences to Support Vector Machine. Best classifiers were identified through an exhaustive search of 588 parameters and meeting the criteria of best Mathews Correlation Coefficient and lowest coefficient of variation among the 3 fold cross validation datasets. The "FungalRV adhesin predictor" was built on three models whose average Mathews Correlation Coefficient was in the range 0.89-0.90 and its coefficient of variation across three fold cross validation datasets in the range 1.2% - 2.74% at threshold score of 0. We obtained an overall MCC value of 0.8702 considering all 8 pathogens, namely, C. albicans, C. glabrata, A. fumigatus, B. dermatitidis, C. immitis, C. posadasii, H. capsulatum and P. brasiliensis thus showing high sensitivity and specificity at a threshold of 0.511. In case of P. brasiliensis the algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 66.67%. A total of 307 fungal adhesins and adhesin like proteins were predicted from the entire proteomes of eight human pathogenic fungal

  3. Assessment of Adhesins as an Indicator of Pathovar-Associated Virulence Factors in Bovine Escherichia coli

    Valat, Charlotte; Forest, Karine; Auvray, Frédéric; Métayer, Véronique; Méheut, Thomas; Polizzi, Charlène; Gay, Emilie; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The CS31A, F17, and F5 adhesins are usually targeted by serology-based methods to detect pathogenic Escherichia coli associated with calf enteritis. However, the virulence traits of the selected isolates are still poorly described. Here, from a set of 349 diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from cattle, we demonstrated a 70.8% concordance rate (Cohen's kappa, 0.599) between serology- and PCR-based approaches for the detection of adhesins under field conditions. A 79% to 82.4% correspondence betwee...

  4. A distinct sortase SrtB anchors and processes a streptococcal adhesin AbpA with a novel structural property

    Liang, Xiaobo; Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Scannapieco, Frank A.; Haase, Elaine M.; Matthews, Steve; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Surface display of proteins by sortases in Gram-positive bacteria is crucial for bacterial fitness and virulence. We found a unique gene locus encoding an amylase-binding adhesin AbpA and a sortase B in oral streptococci. AbpA possesses a new distinct C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. We demonstrated that this C-terminal motif is required for anchoring AbpA to cell wall. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that SrtB has dual functions, anchoring AbpA to the cell wall and processing AbpA into a ladder profile. Solution structure of AbpA determined by NMR reveals a novel structure comprising a small globular α/β domain and an extended coiled-coil heliacal domain. Structural and biochemical studies identified key residues that are crucial for amylase binding. Taken together, our studies document a unique sortase/adhesion substrate system in streptococci adapted to the oral environment rich in salivary amylase. PMID:27492581

  5. A distinct sortase SrtB anchors and processes a streptococcal adhesin AbpA with a novel structural property.

    Liang, Xiaobo; Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Scannapieco, Frank A; Haase, Elaine M; Matthews, Steve; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Surface display of proteins by sortases in Gram-positive bacteria is crucial for bacterial fitness and virulence. We found a unique gene locus encoding an amylase-binding adhesin AbpA and a sortase B in oral streptococci. AbpA possesses a new distinct C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. We demonstrated that this C-terminal motif is required for anchoring AbpA to cell wall. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that SrtB has dual functions, anchoring AbpA to the cell wall and processing AbpA into a ladder profile. Solution structure of AbpA determined by NMR reveals a novel structure comprising a small globular α/β domain and an extended coiled-coil heliacal domain. Structural and biochemical studies identified key residues that are crucial for amylase binding. Taken together, our studies document a unique sortase/adhesion substrate system in streptococci adapted to the oral environment rich in salivary amylase. PMID:27492581

  6. The influence of adhesin protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans on IL-8 and MMP-8 titre in aggressive periodontitis

    Rini Revijanti Ridwan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesion can actually be considered as a part of both a powerful survival mechanism and a virulence mechanism for bacterial pathogens. Bacterial adhesin is an instrument for bacteria to do invasion to host. Bacterial adhesin depends on ligand interaction as a signaling mediator that will influence invasion and increase pro and anti-inflammatory because of the influence of the receptors of innate immune response. Aggregatibacter actimycetemcomitans has fimbriae included in type IV pili containing mostly with protein weighed 6.5 kDa and at least with protein weighed 54 kDa. Purpose: The purpose of this research is to analyze the influence of the induction of adhesin protein derived from A. actinomycetemcomitans on IL-8 and MMP-8 titre of Wistar rats. Methods: Adhesin protein derived from A. actinomycetemcomitans weighed 24 kDa was induced on the maxillary first molar sulcus of Wistar rats to prove that adhesin protein could affect IL-8 and MMP-8 titre. Next, to determine its influence, Elisa technique was conducted. Results: It is known that the levels of IL-8 and MMP-8 titre were increased in the group induced with adhesin protein derived from A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with the control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded that adhesin protein derived from A. actinomycetemcomitans can cause alveolar bone damage through the increasing levels of IL-8 and MMP-8 in aggressive periodontitis.

  7. Identification, characterization and cloning of Entamoeba histolytica adhesins: Their potential use in diagnosis

    Entamoeba histolytica adhesins were detected by the generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) inhibitors of adhesion. In other experiments trophozoites were radiolabeled with 125I or with (35S)-methionine and incubated with red blood cells (RBS's) or epithelial MDCK cells. Labeled amebic proteins of 210, 160, 112, 90, 70, 50 and 24 kDa were detected adhered on RBCs. Iodinated MDCK proteins formed ligand-receptor complexes with amebic proteins of 112 kDa, 90 and 48 to 50 kDa, when incubated with amebic proteins separated by gel electrophoresis. When RBC's interacted with adherence-deficient mutants, used in this work as highly negative genetic controls, proteins of 112 and 90 kDa appeared diminished on RBS surface, in comparison with wild type strain. The 112 kDa adhesin was not detected in a monoxenic nonpathogenic E. histolytica strain, isolated from an asymptomatic carrier. An E. histolytica DNA library was constructed in lambda gt-11, and recombinant clones were selected using polyclonal antibodies against the 112 kDa adhesin. In spite of the fact that DNA of the parasite was cloned, production of the hybrid protein in Escherichia coli was relatively efficient. Correlation of the presence of adhesins with the virulence of E. histolytica trophozoites encourage us to propose these proteins and their antibodies as good candidates in the design of reliable and inexpensive diagnosis and vaccine methods. (author). 23 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Decorin Binding by DbpA and B of Borrelia garinii, Borrelia afzelii, and Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto

    Salo, Jemiina; Loimaranta, Vuokko; Lahdenne, Pekka; Viljanen, Matti K.; Hytönen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    Background. Decorin adherence is crucial in the pathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis. Decorin-binding proteins (Dbp) A and B are the adhesins that mediate this interaction. DbpA and B of Borrelia garinii, Borrelia afzelii, and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (ss) differ in their amino acid sequence, but little attention has been paid to the potential difference in their decorin binding.

  9. Identification of Mannheimia haemolytica Adhesins Involved in Binding to Bovine Bronchial Epithelial Cells▿

    Kisiela, Dagmara I.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica, a commensal organism of the upper respiratory tract in cattle, is the principal bacterial pathogen associated with the bovine respiratory disease complex. Adherence to the respiratory mucosa is a crucial event in its pathogenesis. However, the bacterial components that contribute to this process are not fully characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that M. haemolytica adhered to bovine bronchial epithelial cells (BBEC) in vitro and that adherence was inhibited by...

  10. Phage display revisited: Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody directed against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A using the PROFILER technology.

    Cariccio, Veronica Lanza; Domina, Maria; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Bruttini, Marco; Bartolini, Erika; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Santini, Laura; Brunelli, Brunella; Norais, Nathalie; Borgogni, Erica; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong need for rapid and reliable epitope mapping methods that can keep pace with the isolation of increasingly larger numbers of mAbs. We describe here the identification of a conformational epitope using Phage-based Representation OF ImmunoLigand Epitope Repertoire (PROFILER), a recently developed high-throughput method based on deep sequencing of antigen-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries. A novel bactericidal monoclonal antibody (mAb 9F11) raised against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), an important component of the Bexsero(®) anti-meningococcal vaccine, was used to evaluate the technique in comparison with other epitope mapping methods. The PROFILER technology readily identified NadA fragments that were capable of fully recapitulating the reactivity of the entire antigen against mAb 9F11. Further analysis of these fragments using mutagenesis and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry allowed us to identify the binding site of mAb 9F11 (A250-D274) and an adjoining sequence (V275-H312) that was also required for the full functional reconstitution of the epitope. These data suggest that, by virtue of its ability to detect a great variety of immunoreactive antigen fragments in phage-displayed libraries, the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify epitope-containing regions and provide, in addition, useful clues for the functional characterization of conformational mAb epitopes. PMID:26963435

  11. Expression and Immunological Characterization of the Carboxy-Terminal Region of the P1 Adhesin Protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Chaudhry, Rama; Nisar, Nazima; Hora, Bhavna; Chirasani, Sridhar Reddy; Malhotra, Pawan

    2005-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the causative agent of primary atypical pneumonia in humans. Adherence of M. pneumoniae to host cells requires several adhesin proteins, such as P1, P30, and P116. A major limitation in developing a specific diagnostic test for M. pneumoniae is the inability to express adhesin proteins in heterologous expression systems due to unusual usage of the UGA stop codon, leading to premature termination of these proteins in Escherichia coli. In the present study, we successfu...

  12. Escherichia coli F41 adhesin: genetic organization, nucleotide sequence, and homology with the K88 determinant.

    1988-01-01

    The genetic organization of the polypeptides required for the biosynthesis of the F41 adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains was investigated. Maxicell analysis demonstrated that a recombinant plasmid which mediated mannose-resistant hemagglutination and F41 antigen production encoded four polypeptides of 29, 30, 32, and 86 kilodaltons. The 29-kilodalton protein was identified as the F41 antigen, and the nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined. Extensive homology was obser...

  13. Dependence of Bacterial Protein Adhesins on Toll-Like Receptors for Proinflammatory Cytokine Induction

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Schifferle, Robert E.; DeNardin, Ernesto; Russell, Michael W.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signal transducers that mediate inflammatory reactions induced by microbes through pattern recognition of virulence molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoproteins. We investigated whether proinflammatory cytokine responses induced by certain bacterial protein adhesins may also depend on TLRs. In differentiated THP-1 mononuclear cells stimulated by LPS-free recombinant fimbrillin (rFimA) from Porphyromonas gingivalis, cytokine release was a...

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of the FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    The FadA adhesin from F. nucleatum, which is involved in bacterial attachment and invasion of human oral epithelial cells, has been crystallized in space group P61 or P65, and X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å resolution. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe prevalent in the oral cavity that is associated with periodontal disease, preterm birth and infections in other parts of the human body. The bacteria attach to and invade epithelial and endothelial cells in the gum tissue and elsewhere via a 13.7 kDa adhesin protein FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A). FadA exists in two forms: the intact form (pre-FadA), consisting of 129 amino acids, and the mature form (mFadA), which lacks an 18-residue signal sequence. Both forms have been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. mFadA has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P61 or P65, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.3, c = 125.7 Å and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals exhibit an unusually high solvent content of 74%. Synchrotron X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å. The crystals are suitable for X-ray structure determination. The crystal structure of FadA may provide a basis for the development of therapeutic agents to combat periodontal disease and other infections associated with F. nucleatum

  15. Chimeric FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae: a bacterial surface display system for heterologous sequences

    Pallesen, L; Poulsen, LK; Christiansen, Gunna; Klemm, P

    1995-01-01

    The FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae has been tested as a display system for heterologous protein segments on the surface of Escherichia coli. This was carried out by introduction of restriction site handles (BglII sites) in two different positions in the fimH gene, followed by in-frame insertion of...... heterologous DNA segments encoding two reporter sequences. In the selected positions such insertions did not significantly alter the function of the FimH protein with regard to surface location and adhesive ability. The system seemed to be quite flexible, since chimeric versions of the FimH adhesin containing...... feasibility study point to the possibility of using the FimH adhesin as a general surface display system for sizeable protein segments....

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of the FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Nithianantham, Stanley [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Xu, Minghua [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4905 (United States); Wu, Nan [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Han, Yiping W., E-mail: ywh2@case.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4905 (United States); Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shoham, Menachem, E-mail: ywh2@case.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    The FadA adhesin from F. nucleatum, which is involved in bacterial attachment and invasion of human oral epithelial cells, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, and X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å resolution. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe prevalent in the oral cavity that is associated with periodontal disease, preterm birth and infections in other parts of the human body. The bacteria attach to and invade epithelial and endothelial cells in the gum tissue and elsewhere via a 13.7 kDa adhesin protein FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A). FadA exists in two forms: the intact form (pre-FadA), consisting of 129 amino acids, and the mature form (mFadA), which lacks an 18-residue signal sequence. Both forms have been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. mFadA has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.3, c = 125.7 Å and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals exhibit an unusually high solvent content of 74%. Synchrotron X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å. The crystals are suitable for X-ray structure determination. The crystal structure of FadA may provide a basis for the development of therapeutic agents to combat periodontal disease and other infections associated with F. nucleatum.

  17. Crystal structure of JlpA, a surface-exposed lipoprotein adhesin of Campylobacter jejuni

    Kawai, Fumihiro; Paek, Seonghee; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Prouty, Michael; Kanipes, Margaret I.; Guerry, Patricia; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2012-01-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni JlpA protein is a surface-exposed lipoprotein that was discovered as an adhesin promoting interaction with host epithelium cells, an early critical step in the pathogenesis of C. jejuni disease. Increasing evidence ascertained that JlpA is antigenic, indicating a role of JlpA in immune response during the infectious process. Here, we report the crystal structure of JlpA at 2.7Å resolution, revealing a catcher's mitt shaped unclosed half β-barrel. Although the apparent...

  18. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. PMID:26455806

  19. K88 Fimbrial Adhesin Targeting of Microspheres Containing Gentamicin Made with Albumin Glycated with Lactose

    Sarabia-Sainz, Andre-i; Sarabia-Sainz, Hector Manuel; Ramos-Clamont Montfort, Gabriela; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Guzman-Partida, Ana María; Guzman, Roberto; Garcia-Soto, Mariano; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2015-01-01

    The formulation and characterization of gentamicin-loaded microspheres as a delivery system targeting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88) was investigated. Glycated albumin with lactose (BSA-glucose-β (4-1) galactose) was used as the microsphere matrix (MS-Lac) and gentamicin included as the transported antibiotic. The proposed target strategy was that exposed galactoses of MS-Lac could be specifically recognized by E. coli K88 adhesins, and the delivery of gentamicin would inhibit bacterial growth. Lactosylated microspheres (MS-Lac1, MS-Lac2 and MS-Lac3) were obtained using a water-in-oil emulsion, containing gentamicin, followed by crosslinking with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Electron microscopy displayed spherical particles with a mean size of 10–17 µm. In vitro release of gentamicin from MS-Lac was best fitted to a first order model, and the antibacterial activity of encapsulated and free gentamicin was comparable. MS-Lac treatments were recognized by plant galactose-specific lectins from Ricinus communis and Sophora japonica and by E. coli K88 adhesins. Results indicate MS-Lac1, produced with 4.2 mg/mL of crosslinker, as the best treatment and that lactosylated microsphere are promising platforms to obtain an active, targeted system against E. coli K88 infections. PMID:26389896

  20. K88 Fimbrial Adhesin Targeting of Microspheres Containing Gentamicin Made with Albumin Glycated with Lactose

    Andre-i Sarabia-Sainz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The formulation and characterization of gentamicin-loaded microspheres as a delivery system targeting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88 was investigated. Glycated albumin with lactose (BSA-glucose-β (4-1 galactose was used as the microsphere matrix (MS-Lac and gentamicin included as the transported antibiotic. The proposed target strategy was that exposed galactoses of MS-Lac could be specifically recognized by E. coli K88 adhesins, and the delivery of gentamicin would inhibit bacterial growth. Lactosylated microspheres (MS-Lac1, MS-Lac2 and MS-Lac3 were obtained using a water-in-oil emulsion, containing gentamicin, followed by crosslinking with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Electron microscopy displayed spherical particles with a mean size of 10–17 µm. In vitro release of gentamicin from MS-Lac was best fitted to a first order model, and the antibacterial activity of encapsulated and free gentamicin was comparable. MS-Lac treatments were recognized by plant galactose-specific lectins from Ricinus communis and Sophora japonica and by E. coli K88 adhesins. Results indicate MS-Lac1, produced with 4.2 mg/mL of crosslinker, as the best treatment and that lactosylated microsphere are promising platforms to obtain an active, targeted system against E. coli K88 infections.

  1. K88 Fimbrial Adhesin Targeting of Microspheres Containing Gentamicin Made with Albumin Glycated with Lactose.

    Sarabia-Sainz, Andre-I; Sarabia-Sainz, Hector Manuel; Montfort, Gabriela Ramos-Clamont; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Guzman-Partida, Ana María; Guzman, Roberto; Garcia-Soto, Mariano; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2015-01-01

    The formulation and characterization of gentamicin-loaded microspheres as a delivery system targeting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88) was investigated. Glycated albumin with lactose (BSA-glucose-β (4-1) galactose) was used as the microsphere matrix (MS-Lac) and gentamicin included as the transported antibiotic. The proposed target strategy was that exposed galactoses of MS-Lac could be specifically recognized by E. coli K88 adhesins, and the delivery of gentamicin would inhibit bacterial growth. Lactosylated microspheres (MS-Lac1, MS-Lac2 and MS-Lac3) were obtained using a water-in-oil emulsion, containing gentamicin, followed by crosslinking with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Electron microscopy displayed spherical particles with a mean size of 10-17 µm. In vitro release of gentamicin from MS-Lac was best fitted to a first order model, and the antibacterial activity of encapsulated and free gentamicin was comparable. MS-Lac treatments were recognized by plant galactose-specific lectins from Ricinus communis and Sophora japonica and by E. coli K88 adhesins. Results indicate MS-Lac1, produced with 4.2 mg/mL of crosslinker, as the best treatment and that lactosylated microsphere are promising platforms to obtain an active, targeted system against E. coli K88 infections. PMID:26389896

  2. Expression and functional identification of the hypothetical adhesin P32 from Mycoplasma genitalium

    LIN BO LI; YI MOU WU; WEN BO ZHANG; MIN JUN YU

    2006-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is the main causative agent for non-gonococcal and non-chlamydial urethritis. P32 is the putative surface-exposed membrane protein of M. genitalium and it has substaintial identity in amino acid sequence with adhesin protein P30 from M. pneumoniae. Since M. pneumoniae mutants lacking P30 protein is defective in cytadherence, P32 protein has been proposed to be an essential adhesin implicated in the adherence of M. genitalium to host cells. The prokaryotic expression vector pET-30 ( + )/p32 was constructed in the present study, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli and purified under denaturing condition. As demonstrated by the immunoblotting analysis, the recombinant protein could react with rabbit antisera against M. genitalium, and adherence inhibition assays were performed with antisera against this recombinant protein. It was demonstrated that P32 protein apperared to be an adhesion protein of M. genitalium, thus providing the experimental basis for better understanding of the pathogenesis of M. genitalium infection and for the development of the related vaccines against the infection.

  3. BigA is a novel adhesin of Brucella that mediates adhesion to epithelial cells.

    Czibener, Cecilia; Merwaiss, Fernando; Guaimas, Francisco; Del Giudice, Mariela Giselda; Serantes, Diego Armando Rey; Spera, Juan Manuel; Ugalde, Juan Esteban

    2016-04-01

    Adhesion to cells is the initial step in the infectious cycle of basically all pathogenic bacteria, and to do so, microorganisms have evolved surface molecules that target different cellular receptors. Brucella is an intracellular pathogen that infects a wide range of mammals whose virulence is completely dependent on the capacity to replicate in phagocytes. Although much has been done to elucidate how Brucella multiplies in macrophages, we still do not understand how bacteria invade epithelial cells to perform a replicative cycle or what adhesion molecules are involved in the process. We report the identification in Brucella abortus of a novel adhesin that harbours a bacterial immunoglobulin-like domain and demonstrate that this protein is involved in the adhesion to polarized epithelial cells such as the Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney models targeting the bacteria to the cell-cell interaction membrane. While deletion of the gene significantly reduced adhesion, over-expression dramatically increased it. Addition of the recombinant protein to cells induced cytoskeleton rearrangements and showed that this adhesin targets proteins of the cell-cell interaction membrane in confluent cultures. PMID:26400021

  4. Evidence for the Sialylation of PilA, the PI-2a Pilus-Associated Adhesin of Streptococcus agalactiae Strain NEM316.

    Eric Morello

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (or Group B Streptococcus, GBS is a commensal bacterium present in the intestinal and urinary tracts of approximately 30% of humans. We and others previously showed that the PI-2a pilus polymers, made of the backbone pilin PilB, the tip adhesin PilA and the cell wall anchor protein PilC, promote adhesion to host epithelia and biofilm formation. Affinity-purified PI-2a pili from GBS strain NEM316 were recognized by N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc, also known as sialic acid specific lectins such as Elderberry Bark Lectin (EBL suggesting that pili are sialylated. Glycan profiling with twenty different lectins combined with monosaccharide composition by HPLC suggested that affinity-purified PI-2a pili are modified by N-glycosylation and decorated with sialic acid attached to terminal galactose. Analysis of various relevant mutants in the PI-2a pilus operon by flow-cytometry and electron microscopy analyses pointed to PilA as the pilus subunit modified by glycosylation. Double labeling using PilB antibody and EBL lectin, which specifically recognizes N-acetylneuraminic acid attached to galactose in α-2, 6, revealed a characteristic binding of EBL at the tip of the pilus structures, highly reminiscent of PilA localization. Expression of a secreted form of PilA using an inducible promoter showed that this recombinant PilA binds specifically to EBL lectin when produced in the native GBS context. In silico search for potentially glycosylated asparagine residues in PilA sequence pointed to N427 and N597, which appear conserved and exposed in the close homolog RrgA from S. pneumoniae, as likely candidates. Conversion of these two asparagyl residues to glutamyl resulted in a higher instability of PilA. Our results provide the first evidence that the tip PilA adhesin can be glycosylated, and suggest that this modification is critical for PilA stability and may potentially influence interactions with the host.

  5. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  6. Synthetic Peptide Immunogens Elicit Polyclonal and Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Linear Epitopes in the D Motifs of Staphylococcus aureus Fibronectin-Binding Protein, Which Are Composed of Amino Acids That Are Essential for Fibronectin Binding

    Huesca, Mario; Sun, Qing; Peralta, Robert; Shivji, Gulnar M.; Sauder, Daniel N.; McGavin, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    A fibronectin (Fn)-binding adhesin of Staphylococcus aureus contains three tandem 37- or 38-amino-acid motifs (D1, D2, and D3), which function to bind Fn. Plasma from patients with S. aureus infections contain antibodies that preferentially recognize ligand induced binding sites in the D motifs and do not inhibit Fn binding (F. Casolini, L. Visai, D. Joh, P. G. Conaldi, A. Toniolo, M. Höök, and P. Speziale, Infect. Immun. 66:5433–5442, 1998). To eliminate the influence of Fn binding on antibo...

  7. Mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein mediates collagen-dependent cytoadherence

    André Alves Dias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When grown in the presence of exogenous collagen I, Mycobacterium bovis BCG was shown to form clumps. Scanning electron microscopy examination of these clumps revealed the presence of collagen fibres cross-linking the bacilli. Since collagen is a major constituent of the eukaryotic extracellular matrices, we assayed BCG cytoadherence in the presence of exogenous collagen I. Collagen increased the interaction of the bacilli with A549 type II pneumocytes or U937 macrophages, suggesting that BCG is able to recruit collagen to facilitate its attachment to host cells. Using an affinity chromatography approach, we have isolated a BCG collagen-binding protein corresponding to the previously described mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein (LBP/Hlp, a highly conserved protein associated with the mycobacterial cell wall. Moreover, Mycobacterium leprae LBP/Hlp, a well-characterized adhesin, was also able to bind collagen I. Finally, using recombinant fragments of M. leprae LBP/Hlp, we mapped the collagen-binding activity within the C-terminal domain of the adhesin. Since this protein was already shown to be involved in the recognition of laminin and heparan sulphate-containing proteoglycans, the present observations reinforce the adhesive activities of LBP/Hlp, which can be therefore considered as a multifaceted mycobacterial adhesin, playing an important role in both leprosy and tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  8. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori adhesin thiol peroxidase (HP0390) purified from Escherichia coli

    Huyen Thi Minh Nguyen; Kwang-Ho Nam; Yasar Saleem; Key-Sun Kim

    2010-06-01

    The antioxidant protein, adhesin thiol peroxidase (HpTpx or HP0390), plays an important role in enabling Helicobacter pylori to survive gastric oxidative stress. The bacterium colonizes the host stomach and produces gastric cancer. However, little information is available about the biochemical characteristics of HpTpx. We expressed recombinant HpTpx in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized it. The results showed that HpTpx existed in a monomeric hydrodynamic form and the enzyme fully retained its peroxidase and antioxidant activities. The catalytic reaction of the enzyme was similar to an atypical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin (Prx). The conformation of the enzyme was observed in the presence and absence of dithiothreitol (DTT); similar to other known thiol peroxidases, conformational change was observed in HpTpx by the addition of DTT.

  9. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    Ping Liu

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GIwas also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01 while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05. An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis.

  10. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (pgingivitis group than in health people (pgingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis. PMID:24416378

  11. The pancreatic zymogen granule membrane protein, GP2, binds Escherichia coli type 1 Fimbriae

    Lowe Anson W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GP2 is the major membrane protein present in the pancreatic zymogen granule, and is cleaved and released into the pancreatic duct along with exocrine secretions. The function of GP2 is unknown. GP2's amino acid sequence is most similar to that of uromodulin, which is secreted by the kidney. Recent studies have demonstrated uromodulin binding to bacterial Type 1 fimbria. The fimbriae serve as adhesins to host receptors. The present study examines whether GP2 also shares similar binding properties to bacteria with Type 1 fimbria. Commensal and pathogenic bacteria, including E. coli and Salmonella, express type 1 fimbria. Methods An in vitro binding assay was used to assay the binding of recombinant GP2 to defined strains of E. coli that differ in their expression of Type 1 fimbria or its subunit protein, FimH. Studies were also performed to determine whether GP2 binding is dependent on the presence of mannose residues, which is a known determinant for FimH binding. Results GP2 binds E. coli that express Type 1 fimbria. Binding is dependent on GP2 glycosylation, and specifically the presence of mannose residues. Conclusion GP2 binds to Type 1 fimbria, a bacterial adhesin that is commonly expressed by members of the Enterobacteriacae family.

  12. Cilium adhesin P216 (MHJ_0493) is a target of ectodomain shedding and aminopeptidase activity on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Tacchi, Jessica L; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Jarocki, Veronica M; Berry, Iain J; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    MHJ_0493 (P216) is a highly expressed cilium adhesin in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. P216 undergoes cleavage at position 1074 in the S/T-X-F↓-X-D/E-like motif (1072)T-N-F↓Q-E(1076) generating N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of 120 kDa (P120) and 85 kDa (P85) on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. Here we show that several S/T-X-F↓X-D/E-like motifs exist in P216 but only (1072)T-N-F↓Q-E(1076) and (1344)I-T-F↓A-D-Y(1349) were determined to be bona fide processing sites by identifying semitryptic peptides consistent with cleavage at the phenylalanine residue. The location of S/T-X-F↓-X-D/E-like motifs within or abutting regions of protein disorder greater than 40 consecutive amino acids is consistent with our hypothesis that site access influences the cleavage efficiency. Approximately 20 cleavage fragments of P216 were identified on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae by LC-MS/MS analysis of biotinylated proteins and 2D SDS-PAGE. LC-MS/MS analysis of semitryptic peptides within P216 identified novel cleavage sites. Moreover, detection of a series of overlapping semitryptic peptides that differed by the loss a single amino acid at their N-terminus is consistent with aminopeptidase activity on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. P120 and P85 and their cleavage fragments bind heparin and cell-surface proteins derived from porcine epithelial-like cells, indicating that P216 cleavage fragments retain the ability to bind glycosaminoglycans. PMID:24804907

  13. Identification of Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte and HL-60 Cell Receptors for Adhesins of Streptococcus gordonii and Actinomyces naeslundii

    Ruhl, Stefan; Cisar, John O.; Sandberg, Ann L.

    2000-01-01

    Interactions of oral streptococci and actinomyces with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), mediated by sialic acid- and Gal/GalNAc-reactive adhesins, respectively, result in activation of the PMNs and thereby may contribute to the initiation of oral inflammation. Sialidase treatment of PMNs or HL-60 cells abolished adhesion of Streptococcus gordonii but was required for adhesion of Actinomyces naeslundii. The same effects of sialidase were noted for adhesion of these bacteria to a major 150-...

  14. Cloning and characterization of the S fimbrial adhesin II complex of an Escherichia coli O18:K1 meningitis isolate.

    Hacker, J; Kestler, H; Hoschützky, H; Jann, K; Lottspeich, F; Korhonen, T K

    1993-01-01

    S fimbrial adhesins (Sfa), which are able to recognize sialic acid-containing receptors on eukaryotic cells, are produced by Escherichia coli strains causing urinary tract infections or newborn meningitis. We recently described the cloning and molecular characterization of a determinant, termed sfaI, from the chromosome of an E. coli urinary tract infection strain. Here we present data concerning a S fimbria-specific gene cluster, designated sfaII, of an E. coli newborn meningitis strain. Lik...

  15. Comparison of the Common Adhesin Coding Operons Distribution in Uropathogenic and Phylogenetic Group B2 and A Escherichia coli Isolates

    Rahdar; Rashki; Miri

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is one of the most causative pathogen of urinary tract infection. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common cause of morbidity and remain a serious health concern among the clinicians. The severity of UTI caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) is due to the expression of a wide spectrum of virulent factors such as adhesin coding operons. Little is known about the relationship between the E. coli genetic background and the acquisition o...

  16. An Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter adhesin reaped from cells exhibits its nonspecific stickiness via a highly stable 3D structure

    Shogo Yoshimoto; Hajime Nakatani; Keita Iwasaki; Katsutoshi Hori

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs), cell surface proteins of Gram-negative bacteria, mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific, high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. AtaA is a homotrimer of polypeptides comprising 3,630 amino acids and forms long nanofibers; therefore, it is too large and structurally complex to be produced...

  17. First Analysis of a Bacterial Collagen-Binding Protein with Collagen Toolkits: Promiscuous Binding of YadA to Collagens May Explain How YadA Interferes with Host Processes▿ †

    Jack C. Leo; Elovaara, Heli; Bihan, Dominique; Pugh, Nicholas; Kilpinen, Sami K.; Raynal, Nicolas; Skurnik, Mikael; Farndale, Richard W.; Goldman, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    The Yersinia adhesin YadA mediates the adhesion of the human enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica to collagens and other components of the extracellular matrix. Though YadA has been proposed to bind to a specific site in collagens, the exact binding determinants for YadA in native collagen have not previously been elucidated. We investigated the binding of YadA to collagen Toolkits, which are libraries of triple-helical peptides spanning the sequences of type II and III human collagens. Yad...

  18. Infection by Helicobacter pylori expressing the BabA adhesin is influenced by the secretor phenotype.

    Azevedo, M; Eriksson, S; Mendes, N; Serpa, J; Figueiredo, C; Resende, L P; Ruvoën-Clouet, N; Haas, R; Borén, T; Le Pendu, J; David, L

    2008-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infects half the world's population and causes diverse gastric lesions, from gastritis to gastric cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the significance of secretor and Lewis status in infection and in vitro adherence by Hp expressing BabA adhesin. We enrolled 304 Hp-infected individuals from Northern Portugal. Gastric biopsies, blood and saliva were collected. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunofluorescence were used to detect BabA+ Hp in gastric biopsies. In vitro adherence by a BabA expressing Hp strain to gastric biopsies was performed. Secretor status was identified by Ulex, a lectin that recognizes secretor-dependent glycan structures in saliva and in gastric mucosa, and by Lewis(a/b) antibodies, and indirectly by identification of an inactivating mutation in the FUT2 gene (G428A). BabA status of infecting Hp was associated with CagA and VacAs1 (p < 0.05), intercellular localization of Hp (p < 0.01) and the presence of intestinal metaplasia (p < 0.05) and degenerative alterations (p < 0.005) in the biopsies. BabA was associated (p < 0.05) with Ulex staining of gastric biopsies and, although not significantly, to absence of homozygosity for FUT2 G428A inactivating polymorphism. In vitro Hp adherence was higher in cases wild-type or heterozygous for FUT2 G428A mutation (p < 0.0001), cases staining for Ulex (p < 0.0001) and a(-)b+ and a(-)b(-) secretor phenotypes (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BabA+ Hp infection/adhesion is secretor-dependent and associated with the severity of gastric lesions. PMID:18498114

  19. Novel Molecular Variants of Allele I of the Escherichia coli P Fimbrial Adhesin Gene papG

    Johnson, James R.; Stell, Adam L.; Kaster, Nicholas; Fasching, Claudine; O'Bryan, Timothy T.

    2002-01-01

    P fimbriae of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli mediate digalactoside-specific adherence via the tip adhesin molecule PapG, which occurs in three known variants (I to III), which are encoded by the corresponding three alleles of papG. In the present study, newly discovered variants of papG allele I and the respective wild-type source strains were characterized. One of the new papG allele I variants conferred a unique agglutination phenotype that combined the phenotypes associated wi...

  20. Evaluation of the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pili (MTP) as an adhesin, invasin, and cytokine inducer of epithelial cells

    Saiyur Ramsugit; Balakrishna Pillay; Manormoney Pillay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was undertaken in order to assess the involvement of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pili (MTP) as an adhesin, invasin, and cytokine inducer in the M. tuberculosis-epithelial cell interaction. A MTP-deficient strain of M. tuberculosis demonstrated a significant reduction of 69.39% (p = 0.047) and 56.20% (p = 0.033) in its ability to adhere to and invade A549 pulmonary epithelial cells, respectively, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Complementation of the MTP-deficient m...

  1. Upregulation of the Adhesin Gene EPA1 Mediated by PDR1 in Candida glabrata Leads to Enhanced Host Colonization.

    Vale-Silva, Luis A; Moeckli, Beat; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Sanglard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common Candida species causing disseminated infection, after C. albicans. C. glabrata is intrinsically less susceptible to the widely used azole antifungal drugs and quickly develops secondary resistance. Resistance typically relies on drug efflux with transporters regulated by the transcription factor Pdr1. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in PDR1 lead to a hyperactive state and thus efflux transporter upregulation. Our laboratory has characterized a collection of C. glabrata clinical isolates in which azole resistance was found to correlate with increased virulence in vivo. Contributing phenotypes were the evasion of adhesion and phagocytosis by macrophages and an increased adhesion to epithelial cells. These phenotypes were found to be dependent on PDR1 GOF mutation and/or C. glabrata strain background. In the search for the molecular effectors, we found that PDR1 hyperactivity leads to overexpression of specific cell wall adhesins of C. glabrata. Further study revealed that EPA1 regulation, in particular, explained the increase in adherence to epithelial cells. Deleting EPA1 eliminates the increase in adherence in an in vitro model of interaction with epithelial cells. In a murine model of urinary tract infection, PDR1 hyperactivity conferred increased ability to colonize the bladder and kidneys in an EPA1-dependent way. In conclusion, this study establishes a relationship between PDR1 and the regulation of cell wall adhesins, an important virulence attribute of C. glabrata. Furthermore, our data show that PDR1 hyperactivity mediates increased adherence to host epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo through upregulation of the adhesin gene EPA1. IMPORTANCE Candida glabrata is an important fungal pathogen in human diseases and is also rapidly acquiring drug resistance. Drug resistance can be mediated by the transcriptional activator PDR1, and this results in the upregulation of multidrug transporters. Intriguingly

  2. [Role of Bacterial Adhesin RAPA1 in Formation of Efficient Symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum with Bean Plants].

    Nigmatullina, L R; Lavina, A M; Vershinina, Z R; Baimiev, Al Kh

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesins, the proteins responsible for attachment of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to plant roots, are involved in formation of stable associative symbioses. In the present work enhanced expression of the rapA1 adhesin gene in Rhizobium leguminosarum PVu5 was shown to improve the efficiency of nodulation on bean roots inoculated with the modified strain. The rapA1 gene was cloned into the pJN105Turbo plasmid, this construct was used for transformation of R. leguminosarum PVu5, bean plants were inoculated by this transgenic strain, and efficiency of root nodule formation was determined. In the plants treated with rapA1-transgenic rhizobia, the number of root nodules was on average two times higher than in the plants inoculated with the original strain. Aggregation of R. leguminosarum was achieved when the rapA1 gene expression was enhanced either in rhizobia or in the co-cultured modified strain E. coli pJN105TurboRapA1. PMID:26964360

  3. Nanowire Arrays as Cell Force Sensors To Investigate Adhesin-Enhanced Holdfast of Single Cell Bacteria and Biofilm Stability.

    Sahoo, Prasana K; Janissen, Richard; Monteiro, Moniellen P; Cavalli, Alessandro; Murillo, Duber M; Merfa, Marcus V; Cesar, Carlos L; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Cotta, Monica A

    2016-07-13

    Surface attachment of a planktonic bacteria, mediated by adhesins and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), is a crucial step for biofilm formation. Some pathogens can modulate cell adhesiveness, impacting host colonization and virulence. A framework able to quantify cell-surface interaction forces and their dependence on chemical surface composition may unveil adhesiveness control mechanisms as new targets for intervention and disease control. Here we employed InP nanowire arrays to dissect factors involved in the early stage biofilm formation of the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa. Ex vivo experiments demonstrate single-cell adhesion forces up to 45 nN, depending on the cell orientation with respect to the surface. Larger adhesion forces occur at the cell poles; secreted EPS layers and filaments provide additional mechanical support. Significant adhesion force enhancements were observed for single cells anchoring a biofilm and particularly on XadA1 adhesin-coated surfaces, evidencing molecular mechanisms developed by bacterial pathogens to create a stronger holdfast to specific host tissues. PMID:27336224

  4. Evaluation of the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pili (MTP) as an adhesin, invasin, and cytokine inducer of epithelial cells.

    Ramsugit, Saiyur; Pillay, Balakrishna; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to assess the involvement of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pili (MTP) as an adhesin, invasin, and cytokine inducer in the M. tuberculosis-epithelial cell interaction. A MTP-deficient strain of M. tuberculosis demonstrated a significant reduction of 69.39% (p=0.047) and 56.20% (p=0.033) in its ability to adhere to and invade A549 pulmonary epithelial cells, respectively, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Complementation of the MTP-deficient mutant restored its adhesion and invasion capacity back to the wild-type levels. Overall, it was found that similar concentrations of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, G-CSF, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and TNF-α were induced in A549 cells infected with the MTP-proficient and MTP-deficient strains. However, at 48h post-infection, the MTP-deficient mutant induced significantly lower levels of TNF-α than the wild-type strain (p=0.033). Furthermore, at 72h post-infection, the mutant induced significantly higher levels of IL-8 than the wild-type (p=0.005). We conclude that MTP is an adhesin/invasin of epithelial cells and, while playing a role in M. tuberculosis entry, they do not appear to largely influence the epithelial cell cytokine response. PMID:26748229

  5. Exploiting chimeric human antibodies to characterize a protective epitope of Neisseria adhesin A, one of the Bexsero vaccine components.

    Bertoldi, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Galli, Barbara; Lo Surdo, Paola; Liguori, Alessia; Norais, Nathalie; Santini, Laura; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is one of the antigens of Bexsero, the recently licensed multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB). NadA belongs to the class of oligomeric coiled-coil adhesins and is able to mediate adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells. As a vaccine antigen, NadA has been shown to induce high levels of bactericidal antibodies; however, the domains important for protective response are still unknown. In order to further investigate its immunogenic properties, we have characterized the murine IgG1 mAb (6E3) that was able to recognize the 2 main antigenic variants of NadA on the surface of MenB strains. The epitope targeted by mAb 6E3 was mapped by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and shown to be located on the coiled-coil stalk region of NadA (aa 206-249). Although no serum bactericidal activity was observed for murine IgG1 mAb 6E3, functional activity was restored when using chimeric antibodies in which the variable regions of the murine mAb 6E3 were fused to human IgG3 constant regions, thus confirming the protective nature of the mAb 6E3 epitope. The use of chimeric antibody molecules will enable future investigations of complement-mediated antibody functionality independently of the Fc-mediated differences in complement activation. PMID:26304221

  6. Structural and Functional Analysis of Cell Wall-anchored Polypeptide Adhesin BspA in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Rego, Sara; Heal, Timothy J; Pidwill, Grace R; Till, Marisa; Robson, Alice; Lamont, Richard J; Sessions, Richard B; Jenkinson, Howard F; Race, Paul R; Nobbs, Angela H

    2016-07-29

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the predominant cause of early-onset infectious disease in neonates and is responsible for life-threatening infections in elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Clinical manifestations of GBS infection include sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Here, we describe BspA, a deviant antigen I/II family polypeptide that confers adhesive properties linked to pathogenesis in GBS. Heterologous expression of BspA on the surface of the non-adherent bacterium Lactococcus lactis confers adherence to scavenger receptor gp340, human vaginal epithelium, and to the fungus Candida albicans Complementary crystallographic and biophysical characterization of BspA reveal a novel β-sandwich adhesion domain and unique asparagine-dependent super-helical stalk. Collectively, these findings establish a new bacterial adhesin structure that has in effect been hijacked by a pathogenic Streptococcus species to provide competitive advantage in human mucosal infections. PMID:27311712

  7. Inhibition of Bifidobacterium Cell Wall 51.74 kDa Adhesin Isolated from Infants Feces Towards Adhesion of Enteric Phatogen E. coli on Enterocyte Balb/C Mice

    I Sukrama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine 51.74 kDa adhesin of Bifidobacterium sp cell wall isolated from infants feces as an anti adhesion of E. coli on enterocyte mice. Methods: Randomized Posttest-Only Control Group Design was employed to investigate adherence ability of this adhesin towards E.coli adhesion on mice entherocyte. Results: In this research, it was obtained, that the 51.74 kDa adhesin cell wall of Bifidobacterium sp has an ability to inhibit adhesion of E. coli on mice enterocyte. The ability was increased as an increase of adhsein concentration. Conclusions: that can be drawn from this research is the finding of 51.74 kDa adhesin cell wall of Bifidobacterium sp isolated from infants feces that can inhibit adhseion of E. coli on mice enterocyte. Future work that can be carried out are further researches concerning whether these protein can be applied to inhibit adherence of other pathogen bacteria

  8. RIFINs are adhesins implicated in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Goel, Suchi; Palmkvist, Mia; Moll, Kirsten;

    2015-01-01

    Rosetting is a virulent Plasmodium falciparum phenomenon associated with severe malaria. Here we demonstrate that P. falciparum–encoded repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) are expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs), where they bind to RBCs—preferentiall......Rosetting is a virulent Plasmodium falciparum phenomenon associated with severe malaria. Here we demonstrate that P. falciparum–encoded repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) are expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs), where they bind to RBCs......—preferentially of blood group A—to form large rosettes and mediate microvascular binding of iRBCs. We suggest that RIFINs have a fundamental role in the development of severe malaria and thereby contribute to the varying global distribution of ABO blood groups in the human population....

  9. Valency conversion in the type 1 fimbrial adhesin of Escherichia coli

    Sokurenko, E.V.; Schembri, Mark; Trintchina, E.; Kjærgaard, Kristian; Hasty, D.L.; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    FimH protein is a lectin-like adhesive subunit of type 1, or mannose-sensitive, fimbriae that are found on the surface of most Escherichia coli strains. All naturally occurring FimH variants demonstrate a conserved mannotriose-specific (i.e. multivalent) binding. Here, we demonstrate that replace...

  10. Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins Play an Essential Role in Signalling and Activation of Invasion into Human Erythrocytes.

    Wai-Hong Tham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most severe form of malaria in humans is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The invasive form of malaria parasites is termed a merozoite and it employs an array of parasite proteins that bind to the host cell to mediate invasion. In Plasmodium falciparum, the erythrocyte binding-like (EBL and reticulocyte binding-like (Rh protein families are responsible for binding to specific erythrocyte receptors for invasion and mediating signalling events that initiate active entry of the malaria parasite. Here we have addressed the role of the cytoplasmic tails of these proteins in activating merozoite invasion after receptor engagement. We show that the cytoplasmic domains of these type 1 membrane proteins are phosphorylated in vitro. Depletion of PfCK2, a kinase implicated to phosphorylate these cytoplasmic tails, blocks P. falciparum invasion of red blood cells. We identify the crucial residues within the PfRh4 cytoplasmic domain that are required for successful parasite invasion. Live cell imaging of merozoites from these transgenic mutants show they attach but do not penetrate erythrocytes implying the PfRh4 cytoplasmic tail conveys signals important for the successful completion of the invasion process.

  11. The Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae HMW1C-Like Glycosyltransferase Mediates N-Linked Glycosylation of the Haemophilus influenzae HMW1 Adhesin

    Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Grass, Susan; Paek, Seonghee; St. Geme, Joseph W.; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    The Haemophilus influenzae HMW1 adhesin is an important virulence exoprotein that is secreted via the two-partner secretion pathway and is glycosylated at multiple asparagine residues in consensus N-linked sequons. Unlike the heavily branched glycans found in eukaryotic N-linked glycoproteins, the modifying glycan structures in HMW1 are mono-hexoses or di-hexoses. Recent work demonstrated that the H. influenzae HMW1C protein is the glycosyltransferase responsible for transferring glucose and ...

  12. Detection of pap, sfa, afa, foc, and fim Adhesin-Encoding Operons in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates Collected From Patients With Urinary Tract Infection

    Rahdar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC with its virulence factors is the most prevalent cause of urinary tract infection (UTI. Objectives; This study aimed to determine the occurrence of fim, pap, sfa, and afa genes among 100 UPEC isolates collected from patients diagnosed with UTI. Materials and Methods A total of 100 UPEC isolates were obtained from urine samples of patients with UTI. The prevalence of 5 virulence genes encoding type 1 fimbriae (fimH, pili associated with pyelonephritis (pap, S and F1C fimbriae (sfa and foc and afimbrial adhesins (afa were determined through PCR method. We also investigated the phylogenetic background of all isolates. In addition, the distribution of adhesin-encoding operons between the phylogroups was assessed. Results The prevalence of genes encoding for fimbrial adhesive systems was 95% for fim, 57% for pap, 16% for foc, and 81% for sfa. The operons encoding for afa afimbrial adhesins were identified in 12% of isolates. The various combinations of detected genes were designated as virulence patterns. The fim gene, which occurred in strains from all phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D was evaluated and no significant differences were found among these groups. Conversely, significant differences were observed in relation to pap, afa, foc, and sfa operons. Conclusions These results indicate that the PCR method is a powerful genotypic assay for the detection of adhesin-encoding operons. Thus, this assay can be recommended for clinical use to detect virulent urinary E. coli strains, as well as epidemiological studies.

  13. Functional Characterization of a Mucus-Specific LPXTG Surface Adhesin from Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ▿

    von Ossowski, I; Satokari, R.; Reunanen, J.; Lebeer, Sarah; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid; Vanderleyden, Jos; DE VOS W.M.; Palva, A.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the wealth of clinical evidence supporting the health benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in humans, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its probiosis. Current knowledge suggests that the health-promoting effects of this probiotic strain might be partly dependent on its persistence in the intestine and adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG contains mucus-binding pili that might also explain the occupation of its ecological...

  14. Functional characterization of a mucus-specific LPXTG surface adhesin from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    Ossowski, von, I.; Vos, de, W.M.; Palva, A.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the wealth of clinical evidence supporting the health benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in humans, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its probiosis. Current knowledge suggests that the health-promoting effects of this probiotic strain might be partly dependent on its persistence in the intestine and adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG contains mucus-binding pili that might also explain the occupation of its ecological...

  15. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein.

    Devender Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d-/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration.

  16. Structure determination and analysis of a haemolytic gingipain adhesin domain from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Li, N.; Yun, P.; Nadkarni, M.A.; Ghadikolaee, N.B.; Nguyen, K.A.; Lee, M.; Hunter, N.; Collyer, C.A. (Sydney)

    2010-08-27

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is an obligately anaerobic bacterium recognized as an aetiological agent of adult periodontitis. P. gingivalis produces cysteine proteinases, the gingipains. The crystal structure of a domain within the haemagglutinin region of the lysine gingipain (Kgp) is reported here. The domain was named K2 as it is the second of three homologous structural modules in Kgp. The K2 domain structure is a 'jelly-roll' fold with two anti-parallel {beta}-sheets. This fold topology is shared with adhesive domains from functionally diverse receptors such as MAM domains, ephrin receptor ligand binding domains and a number of carbohydrate binding modules. Possible functions of K2 were investigated. K2 induced haemolysis of erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner that was augmented by the blocking of anion transport. Further, cysteine-activated arginine gingipain RgpB, which degrades glycophorin A, sensitized erythrocytes to the haemolytic effect of K2. Cleaved K2, similar to that found in extracted Kgp, lacks the haemolytic activity indicating that autolysis of Kgp may be a staged process which is artificially enhanced by extraction of the protein. The data indicate a functional role for K2 in the integrated capacity conferred by Kgp to enable the porphyrin auxotroph P. gingivalis to capture essential haem from erythrocytes.

  17. Trimeric autotransporter adhesins in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex: a multifunctional family of proteins implicated in virulence

    Arsénio Mendes Fialho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs are multimeric surface proteins, involved in various biological traits of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria including adherence, biofilm formation, invasion, survival within eukaryotic cells, serum resistance and cytotoxicity. TAAs have a modular architecture composed by a conserved membrane-anchored C-terminal domain and a variable number of stalk and head domains. In this study, a bioinformatic approach has been used to analyze the distribution and architecture of TAAs among Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc genomes. Fifteen genomes were probed revealing a total of 74 encoding sequences. Compared with other bacterial species, the Bcc genomes contain a disproportionately large number of TAAs (two genes to up to 8 genes, such as in B.cenocepacia. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the TAAs grouped into at least eight distinct clusters. TAAs with serine-rich repeats are clearly well separated from others, thereby representing a different evolutionary lineage. Comparative gene mapping across Bcc genomes reveals that TAA genes are inserted within conserved synteny blocks. We further focused our analysis on the epidemic strain B. cenocepacia J2315 in which 7 TAAs were annotated. Among these, 3 TAA-encoding genes (BCAM019, BCAM0223 and BCAM0224 are organized into a cluster and are candidates for multifunctional virulence factors. Here we review the current insights into the functional role of BCAM0224 as a model locus.

  18. A food-grade fimbrial adhesin FaeG expression system in Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei.

    Lu, W W; Wang, T; Wang, Y; Xin, M; Kong, J

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the major cause of diarrhea in neonatal piglets. The fimbriae as colonizing factor in the pathogenesis of ETEC constitute a primary target for vaccination against ETEC. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are attractive tools to deliver antigens at the mucosal level. With the safety of genetically modified LAB in mind, a food-grade secretion vector (pALRc or pALRb) was constructed with DNA entirely from LAB, including the replicon, promoter, signal peptide, and selection marker alanine racemase gene (alr). To evaluate the feasibility of the system, the nuclease gene (nuc) from Staphylococcus aureus was used as a reporter to be expressed in both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei. Subsequently, the extracellular secretion of the fimbrial adhesin FaeG of ETEC was confirmed by Western blot analysis. These results showed that this food-grade expression system has potential as the delivery vehicle for the safe use of genetically modified LAB for the development of vaccines against ETEC infection. PMID:26825016

  19. Staphylococcus epidermidis polysaccharide intercellular adhesin induces IL-8 expression in human astrocytes via a mechanism involving TLR2.

    Stevens, Niall T

    2009-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic biofilm-forming pathogen associated with neurosurgical device-related meningitis. Expression of the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) on its surface promotes S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Here we investigated the pro-inflammatory properties of PIA against primary and transformed human astrocytes. PIA induced IL-8 expression in a dose- and\\/or time-dependent manner from U373 MG cells and primary normal human astrocytes. This effect was inhibited by depletion of N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosamine polymer from the PIA preparation with Lycopersicon esculentum lectin or sodium meta-periodate. Expression of dominant-negative versions of the TLR2 and TLR4 adaptor proteins MyD88 and Mal in U373 MG cells inhibited PIA-induced IL-8 production. Blocking IL-1 had no effect. PIA failed to induce IL-8 production from HEK293 cells stably expressing TLR4. However, in U373 MG cells which express TLR2, neutralization of TLR2 impaired PIA-induced IL-8 production. In addition to IL-8, PIA also induced expression of other cytokines from U373 MG cells including IL-6 and MCP-1. These data implicate PIA as an important immunogenic component of the S. epidermidis biofilm that can regulate pro-inflammatory cytokine production from human astrocytes, in part, via TLR2.

  20. An Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter adhesin reaped from cells exhibits its nonspecific stickiness via a highly stable 3D structure.

    Yoshimoto, Shogo; Nakatani, Hajime; Iwasaki, Keita; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs), cell surface proteins of Gram-negative bacteria, mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific, high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. AtaA is a homotrimer of polypeptides comprising 3,630 amino acids and forms long nanofibers; therefore, it is too large and structurally complex to be produced as a recombinant protein. In this study, we isolated AtaA's passenger domain (AtaA PSD), which is translocated to the cell surface through the C-terminal transmembrane domain and exhibits biological functions, using a new method. We introduced a protease recognition site and reaped AtaA nanofibers 225 nm in length from the cell surface through proteolytic cleavage with a specific protease. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of the purified native AtaA PSD revealed that it has a stable structure under alkaline and acidic conditions. Temperatures above 80 °C, which disrupted AtaA's higher-order structure but maintained the full-length AtaA polypeptide, inactivated AtaA's nonspecific adhesiveness, suggesting that the stickiness of AtaA requires its 3D structure. This finding refutes the widespread but vague speculation that large unfolded polypeptides readily stick to various surfaces. PMID:27305955

  1. Glucans synthesized in situ in experimental salivary pellicle function as specific binding sites for Streptococcus mutans.

    Schilling, K M; Bowen, W H

    1992-01-01

    Many researchers have suggested that the role of glucan-mediated interactions in the adherence of Streptococcus mutans is restricted to accumulation of this cariogenic bacterium following its sucrose (i.e., glucan)-independent binding to saliva-coated tooth surfaces. However, the presence of enzymatically active glucosyltransferase in salivary pellicle suggests that glucans could also promote the initial adherence of S. mutans to the teeth. In the present study, the commonly used hydroxyapatite adherence assay was modified to include the incorporation of glucosyltransferase and the synthesis of glucans in situ on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads. Several laboratory strains and clinical isolates of S. mutans were examined for their ability to adhere to experimental pellicles, either with or without the prior formation of glucans in situ. Results showed that most strains of S. mutans bound stereospecifically to glucans synthesized in pellicle. Inhibition studies with various polysaccharides and fungal dextranase indicated that alpha 1,6-linked glucose residues were of primary importance in the glucan binding observed. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed direct binding of S. mutans to hydroxyapatite surface-associated polysaccharide and revealed no evidence of trapping or cell-to-cell binding. S. mutans strains also attached to host-derived structures in experimental pellicles, and the data suggest that the bacterial adhesins which recognize salivary binding sites were distinct from glucan-binding adhesins. Furthermore, glucans formed in experimental pellicles appeared to mask the host-derived components. These results support the concept that glucans synthesized in salivary pellicle can promote the selective adherence of the cariogenic streptococci which colonize human teeth. Images PMID:1530843

  2. Binding Procurement

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  3. Effect of simulated stages of the canine oestrous cycle on Escherichia coli binding to canine endometrium.

    Krekeler, N; Lodge, K M; Anderson, G A; Browning, G F; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2012-12-01

    Pyometra, a prevalent infectious uterine disease that affects intact middle-aged bitches, is typically associated with Escherichia coli. Our hypotheses were (i) that bacterial adhesion to canine endometrium differs between different stages of the oestrous cycle and (ii) that the adhesin FimH facilitates this adhesion. Twelve post-pubertal, ovariectomized greyhound bitches were treated with exogenous hormones to simulate different stages of the oestrous cycle. Tissue samples from each uterus were incubated with a pathogenic E. coli strain carrying the fimH gene, but no other adhesin genes (P4-wt)--or an E. coli strain in which fimH was insertionally inactivated (P4-∆fimH::kan)--or with phosphate-buffered saline as a negative control. After washing, tissue samples were homogenized for quantification of adherent bacteria. The differences in binding to canine endometrium at different stages of the oestrous cycle were not significant. However, the mean difference in binding of the P4-wt and the P4-∆fimH::kan across all stages of the simulated oestrous cycle was significant (p < 0.001 by paired t-test on geometric means). Individual differences in numbers of P4-wt bacteria bound between dogs might suggest genetic variations or epigenetic differences in FimH receptor expression by the endometrium, unrelated to the stage of the oestrous cycle. PMID:23279531

  4. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA with alum, CpG or imiquimod generates a persistent humoral immune response that recognizes the bacterial surface.

    Samo, Melissa; Choudhary, Neelima R; Riebe, Kristina J; Shterev, Ivo; Staats, Herman F; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2016-02-24

    The Ducreyi serum resistance A (DsrA) protein of Haemophilus ducreyi belongs to a large family of multifunctional outer membrane proteins termed trimeric autotransporter adhesins responsible for resistance to the bactericidal activity of human complement (serum resistance), agglutination and adhesion. The ability of DsrA to confer serum resistance and bind extracellular matrix proteins lies in its N-terminal passenger domain. We have previously reported that immunization with a recombinant form of the passenger domain of DsrA, rNT-DsrA, in complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant, protects against a homologous challenge in swine. We present herein the results of an immunogenicity study in mice aimed at investigating the persistence, type of immune response, and the effect of immunization route and adjuvants on surrogates of protection. Our results indicate that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with alum elicited antisera with comparable bacterial surface reactivity to that obtained with complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant. At that dose, high titers and bacterial surface reactivity persisted for 211 days after the first immunization. Administration of rNT-DsrA with CpG or imiquimod as adjuvants elicited a humoral response with similar quantity and quality of antibodies (Abs) as seen with Freund's adjuvant. Furthermore, intramuscular administration of rNT-DsrA elicited high-titer Abs with significantly higher reactivity to the bacterial surface than those obtained with subcutaneous immunization. All rNT-DsrA/adjuvant combinations tested, save CpG, elicited a Th2-type response. Taken together, these findings show that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with the adjuvants alum, CpG or imiquimod elicits high-quality Abs with reactivity to the bacterial surface that could protect against an H. ducreyi infection. PMID:26812077

  5. Structural Insights into Polymorphic ABO Glycan Binding by Helicobacter pylori.

    Moonens, Kristof; Gideonsson, Pär; Subedi, Suresh; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Romaõ, Ema; Mendez, Melissa; Nordén, Jenny; Fallah, Mahsa; Rakhimova, Lena; Shevtsova, Anna; Lahmann, Martina; Castaldo, Gaetano; Brännström, Kristoffer; Coppens, Fanny; Lo, Alvin W; Ny, Tor; Solnick, Jay V; Vandenbussche, Guy; Oscarson, Stefan; Hammarström, Lennart; Arnqvist, Anna; Berg, Douglas E; Muyldermans, Serge; Borén, Thomas; Remaut, Han

    2016-01-13

    The Helicobacter pylori adhesin BabA binds mucosal ABO/Le(b) blood group (bg) carbohydrates. BabA facilitates bacterial attachment to gastric surfaces, increasing strain virulence and forming a recognized risk factor for peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. High sequence variation causes BabA functional diversity, but the underlying structural-molecular determinants are unknown. We generated X-ray structures of representative BabA isoforms that reveal a polymorphic, three-pronged Le(b) binding site. Two diversity loops, DL1 and DL2, provide adaptive control to binding affinity, notably ABO versus O bg preference. H. pylori strains can switch bg preference with single DL1 amino acid substitutions, and can coexpress functionally divergent BabA isoforms. The anchor point for receptor binding is the embrace of an ABO fucose residue by a disulfide-clasped loop, which is inactivated by reduction. Treatment with the redox-active pharmaceutic N-acetylcysteine lowers gastric mucosal neutrophil infiltration in H. pylori-infected Le(b)-expressing mice, providing perspectives on possible H. pylori eradication therapies. PMID:26764597

  6. Investigation of 16 genes encoding adhesin in Staphylococcus spp%葡萄球菌属16种黏附素编码基因研究

    董筱莉; 韩兰秀; 周剑波; 金花; 张丽君; 王敏霞

    2014-01-01

    目的:调查一组凝固酶阳性葡萄球菌黏附素编码基因携带状况,分析黏附素编码基因及荚膜抗原编码基因检出率。方法收集2013年3-9月江苏省江阴市人民医院住院患者标本中分离的凝固酶阳性葡萄球菌共20株,用spa基因PCR检测作金黄色葡萄球菌的分子鉴定,再采用聚合酶链反应(PCR)的方法分析16种黏附素编码基因和荚膜抗原的型别编码基因(cap5、cap8)。结果20株凝固酶阳性葡萄球菌中13株为金黄色葡萄球菌,其余7株为非金黄色葡萄球菌;13株金黄色葡萄球菌黏附素编码基因每一株均有阳性检出,除 s as X基因阳性率低外,其余均较高;荚膜抗原编码基因12株有阳性检出;7株非金黄色葡萄球菌无任何黏附素与荚膜抗原编码基因检出。结论对金黄色葡萄球菌进行16种黏附素编码基因及2种荚膜抗原编码基因联合检测研究尚为国内外首次,13株金黄色葡萄球菌黏附素编码基因及荚膜抗原编码基因高检出率可能与菌株定植及感染相关。%OBJECTIVE To investigate the distribution of the genes encoding adhesin in a group of Staphylococcus spp and analyze the detection rate of the genes encoding adhesin and the genes encoding capsular antigen . METHODS A total of 20 strains of coagulase‐negative Staphylococcus were isolated from the specimens that were obtained from the hospitalized patients who were treated in the Jiangyin People's Hospital from Mar 2013 to Sep 2013 ,then the molecular identification of Staphylococcus aureus was performed by using spa PCR ,and the 16 genes encoding adhesion and the genes encoding capsular antigen (cap5、cap8) were analyzed by means of polymer‐ase‐chain‐reaction (PCR) .RESULTS Of the 20 strains of coagulase‐negative Staphylococcus ,13 strains were the S .aureus ,and the rest of 7 strains were non‐S .aureus;each of the 13 strains of S .aureus was tested positive for the gene

  7. Adaptaci??n del ???Cuestionario de Evaluaci??n de la Adhesi??n al Tratamiento antirretroviral??? (CEAT-VIH) para su uso en Per??

    Tafur-Valderrama, E.; Ortiz, C; Alfaro, C.O.; Garc??a-Jim??nez, Emilio; Faus D??der, Mar??a Jos??

    2008-01-01

    Objetivos: El objetivo de este estudio fue adaptar y validar el ???Cuestionario para evaluar la adhesi??n al tratamiento antirretroviral??? (CEAT-VIH) para su uso en el Per??, en pacientes VIH y SIDA en tratamiento antirretroviral de gran actividad (TARGA). M??todos: Se evalu?? la comprensi??n del cuestionario as?? como sus propiedades psicom??tricas en una muestra de 41 pacientes con VIH y SIDA en tratamiento antirretroviral de gran actividad (TARGA) por m??s de tres meses. El ...

  8. Adhesion to human cells by Escherichia coli lacking the major subunit of a digalactoside-specific pilus-adhesin.

    Uhlin, B E; Norgren, M; Båga, M; Normark, S

    1985-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria frequently possess pili with specific binding properties that allow them to attach to epithelial tissue. In Escherichia coli, the pili associated with pyelonephritis (Pap pili) bind to digalactoside-containing glycolipids on the uroepithelium. Transposon-insertion mutants and deletion mutants of the cloned genetic determinant encoding synthesis of such digalactoside-binding Pap pili have been studied in E. coli K-12. Mutants that completely lack synthesis of the major Pap ...

  9. Identification of salivary mucin MUC7 binding proteins from Streptococcus gordonii

    Thornton David J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The salivary mucin MUC7 (previously known as MG2 can adhere to various strains of streptococci that are primary colonizers and predominant microorganisms of the oral cavity. Although there is a growing interest in interaction between oral pathogens and salivary mucins, studies reporting the specific binding sites on the bacteria are rather limited. Identification and characterization of the specific interacting proteins on the bacterial cell surface, termed adhesins, are crucial to further understand host-pathogen interactions. Results We demonstrate here, using purified MUC7 to overlay blots of SDS-extracts of Streptococcus gordonii cell surface proteins, 4 MUC7-binding bands, with apparent molecular masses of 62, 78, 84 and 133 kDa from the Streptococcus gordonii strain, PK488. Putative adhesins were identified by in-gel digestion and subsequent nanoLC-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of resultant peptides. The 62 kDa and 84 kDa bands were identified as elongation factor (EF Tu and EF-G respectively. The 78 kDa band was a hppA gene product; the 74 kDa oligopeptide-binding lipoprotein. The 133 kDa band contained two proteins; alpha enolase and DNA-directed RNA polymerase, beta' subunit. Some of these proteins, for example alpha enolase are expected to be intracellular, however, flow cytometric analysis confirmed its location on the bacterial surface. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that S. gordonii expressed a number of putative MUC7 recognizing proteins and these contribute to MUC7 mucin binding of this streptococcal strain.

  10. Comparison of Surface Proteomes of Adherence Variants of Listeria Monocytogenes Using LC-MS/MS for Identification of Potential Surface Adhesins.

    Tiong, Hung King; Hartson, Steven D; Muriana, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to adhere and form biofilms leads to persistence in food processing plants and food-associated listeriosis. The role of specific surface proteins as adhesins to attach Listeria cells to various contact surfaces has not been well characterized to date. In prior research comparing different methods for surface protein extraction, the Ghost urea method revealed cleaner protein content as verified by the least cytoplasmic protein detected in surface extracts using LC-MS/MS. The same technique was utilized to extract and detect surface proteins among two surface-adherent phenotypic strains of L. monocytogenes (i.e., strongly and weakly adherent). Of 640 total proteins detected among planktonic and sessile cells, 21 protein members were exclusively detected in the sessile cells. Relative LC-MS/MS detection and quantification of surface-extracted proteins from the planktonic weakly adherent (CW35) and strongly adherent strains (99-38) were examined by protein mass normalization of proteins. We found that L. monocytogenes 99-38 exhibited a total of 22 surface proteins that were over-expressed: 11 proteins were detected in surface extracts of both sessile and planktonic 99-38 that were ≥5-fold over-expressed while another 11 proteins were detected only in planktonic 99-38 cells that were ≥10-fold over-expressed. Our results suggest that these protein members are worthy of further investigation for their involvement as surface adhesins. PMID:27196934

  11. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of NT-Als9-2, a fungal adhesin from Candida albicans

    Details of the expression and crystallization of the N-terminal fragment of Als9-2, an adhesin from the human commensal/pathogenic fungus C. albicans, are reported. Preliminary analysis of the collected X-ray data is also discussed. Candida albicans is a common human fungal commensal that can also cause a range of infections from skin/mucosal ‘thrush’ to severe systemic candidiasis. Adherence to host cells is one of the key determinants of Candida pathogenesis. The Als family of surface proteins has been implicated in adhesion of C. albicans, yet limited information has been published on the structure and mechanism of these fungal adhesins. The N-terminal region of these proteins has been shown to possess adhesive properties, making it a possible target for new therapeutic strategies. Recombinant NT-Als9-2 from C. albicans (residues 18–329) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 34.73, b = 68.71, c = 120.03 Å, α = β = γ = 90° and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Platinum-derivatized crystals belonged to the same space group, with similar unit-cell parameters, although they were not completely isomorphous

  12. Binding of glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae to fibrinogen promotes attachment to brain endothelium and the development of meningitis.

    Ho Seong Seo

    Full Text Available The serine-rich repeat glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS is thought to be an important adhesin for the pathogenesis of meningitis. Although expression of Srr1 is associated with increased binding to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC, the molecular basis for this interaction is not well defined. We now demonstrate that Srr1 contributes to GBS attachment to hBMEC via the direct interaction of its binding region (BR with human fibrinogen. When assessed by Far Western blotting, Srr1 was the only protein in GBS extracts that bound fibrinogen. Studies using recombinant Srr1-BR and purified fibrinogen in vitro confirmed a direct protein-protein interaction. Srr1-BR binding was localized to amino acids 283-410 of the fibrinogen Aα chain. Structural predictions indicated that the conformation of Srr1-BR is likely to resemble that of SdrG and other related staphylococcal proteins that bind to fibrinogen through a "dock, lock, and latch" mechanism (DLL. Deletion of the predicted latch domain of Srr1-BR abolished the interaction of the BR with fibrinogen. In addition, a mutant GBS strain lacking the latch domain exhibited reduced binding to hBMEC, and was significantly attenuated in an in vivo model of meningitis. These results indicate that Srr1 can bind fibrinogen directly likely through a DLL mechanism, which has not been described for other streptococcal adhesins. This interaction was important for the pathogenesis of GBS central nervous system invasion and subsequent disease progression.

  13. Crystal structure of the functional region of Uro-adherence factor A from Staphylococcus saprophyticus reveals participation of the B domain in ligand binding

    Matsuoka, Eriko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Makoto; Shouji, Yuko; Ohta, Toshiko; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococci use cell wall-anchored proteins as adhesins to attach to host tissues. Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a uropathogenic species, has a unique cell wall-anchored protein, uro-adherence factor A (UafA), which shows erythrocyte binding activity. To investigate the mechanism of adhesion by UafA, we determined the crystal structure of the functional region of UafA at 1.5 Å resolution. The structure was composed of three domains, designated as the N2, N3, and B domains, arranged in a tri...

  14. The Staphylococcus aureus lineage-specific markers collagen adhesin and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 distinguish multilocus sequence typing clonal complexes within spa clonal complexes.

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Rijnders, Michelle I A; Sebastian, Silvie; Welling, Maaike A; Beisser, Patrick S; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2009-10-01

    Spa typing/based upon repeat pattern (BURP) sometimes cannot differentiate multilocus sequence typing (MLST) clonal complexes (CCs) within spa-CCs. It has been observed previously that virulence factors, such as collagen adhesin (CNA) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), are associated with certain Staphylococcus aureus lineages. Analysis of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus by spa typing/BURP and detection of CNA and TSST-1 observed an association between CNA and MLST CC1, 12, 22, 30, 45, 51, and 239 and between TSST-1 and MLST CC30. In spa-CC 012, associated with MLST CC7, CC15, and CC30, MLST CC30 could be distinguished from MLST CC7 and CC15 with CNA and TSST-1 as lineage-specific markers. Lineage-specific markers can overcome clustering of nonrelated MLST CCs into 1 spa-CC. PMID:19748421

  15. Structural Context for Protein N-glycosylation in Bacteria: The Structure of PEB3, an Adhesin from Campylobacter Jejuni

    Rangarajan,E.; Bhatia, S.; Watson, D.; Munger, C.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Young, N.

    2007-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is unusual among bacteria in possessing a eukaryotic-like system for N-linked protein glycosylation at Asn residues in sequons of the type Asp/Glu-Xaa-Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr. However, little is known about the structural context of the glycosylated sequons, limiting the design of novel recombinant glycoproteins. To obtain more information on sequon structure, we have determined the crystal structure of the PEB3 (Cj0289c) dimer. PEB3 has the class II periplasmic-binding protein fold, with each monomer having two domains with a ligand-binding site containing citrate located between them, and overall resembles molybdate- and sulfate-binding proteins. The sequon around Asn90 is located within a surface-exposed loop joining two structural elements. The three key residues are well exposed on the surface; hence, they may be accessible to the PglB oligosaccharyltransferase in the folded state.

  16. A subset of group A-like var genes encodes the malaria parasite ligands for binding to human brain endothelial cells

    Claessens, Antoine; Adams, Yvonne; Ghumra, Ashfaq;

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most deadly manifestation of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The pathology of cerebral malaria is characterized by the accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) in the microvasculature of the brain caused by parasite adhesins on the surface of IEs binding to human...... receptors on microvascular endothelial cells. The parasite and host molecules involved in this interaction are unknown. We selected three P. falciparum strains (HB3, 3D7, and IT/FCR3) for binding to a human brain endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). The whole transcriptome of isogenic pairs of selected and.......029) but not by antibodies from controls with uncomplicated malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.58). This work describes a binding phenotype for virulence-associated group A P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variants and identifies targets for interventions to treat or prevent cerebral malaria....

  17. PbsP, a cell wall-anchored protein that binds plasminogen to promote hematogenous dissemination of group B Streptococcus.

    Buscetta, Marco; Firon, Arnaud; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Biondo, Carmelo; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Midiri, Angelina; Romeo, Letizia; Galbo, Roberta; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Kaminski, Pierre-Alexandre; Gominet, Myriam; Teti, Giuseppe; Speziale, Pietro; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a leading cause of invasive infections in neonates whose virulence is dependent on its ability to interact with cells and host components. We here characterized a surface protein with a critical function in GBS pathophysiology. This adhesin, designated PbsP, possesses two Streptococcal Surface Repeat domains, a methionine and lysine-rich region, and a LPXTG cell wall-anchoring motif. PbsP mediates plasminogen (Plg) binding both in vitro and in vivo and we showed that cell surface-bound Plg can be activated into plasmin by tissue plasminogen activator to increase the bacterial extracellular proteolytic activity. Absence of PbsP results in a decreased bacterial transmigration across brain endothelial cells and impaired virulence in a murine model of infection. PbsP is conserved among the main GBS lineages and is a major plasminogen adhesin in non-CC17 GBS strains. Importantly, immunization of mice with recombinant PbsP confers protective immunity. Our results indicate that GBS have evolved different strategies to recruit Plg which indicates that the ability to acquire cell surface proteolytic activity is essential for the invasiveness of this bacterium. PMID:26888569

  18. Emerging ST121/agr4 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities: trigger for MRSA pneumonia and fatal aspiration pneumonia in an influenza-infected elderly.

    Wan, T-W; Tomita, Y; Saita, N; Konno, K; Iwao, Y; Hung, W-C; Teng, L-J; Yamamoto, T

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) pneumonia in influenza-infected elderly individuals has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, a 92-year-old man infected with influenza developed CA-MRSA pneumonia. His CA-MRSA was an emerging type, originated in ST121/agr4 S. aureus, with diversities of Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)(-)/spat5110/SCCmecV(+) versus PVL(+)/spat159((etc.))/SCCmec (-), but with common virulence potentials of strong adhesin and cytolytic activities. Resistance to erythromycin/clindamycin (inducible-type) and gentamicin was detected. Pneumonia improved with the administration of levofloxacin, but with the subsequent development of fatal aspiration pneumonia. Hence, characteristic CA-MRSA with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities triggered influenza-related sequential complications. PMID:27358743

  19. Modulation of Fibronectin Adhesins and Other Virulence Factors in a Teicoplanin-Resistant Derivative of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Renzoni, Adriana; Francois, Patrice; Li, Dongmei; Kelley, William L; Lew, Daniel P.; Vaudaux, Pierre; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The impact of glycopeptide resistance on the molecular regulation of Staphylococcus aureus virulence and attachment to host tissues is poorly documented. We compared stable teicoplanin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain 14-4 with its teicoplanin-susceptible MRSA parent, strain MRGR3, which exhibits a high degree of virulence in a rat model of chronic foreign body MRSA infection. The levels of fibronectin-mediated adhesion and surface display of fibronectin-binding protein...

  20. The BBA33 lipoprotein binds collagen and impacts Borrelia burgdorferi pathogenesis

    Zhi, Hui; Weening, Eric H.; Barbu, Elena Magda; Hyde, Jenny A.; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Borrelia burgdorferi , the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, adapts to the mammalian hosts by differentially expressing several genes in the BosR and Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS dependent pathways, resulting in a distinct protein profile relative to that seen for survival in the Ixodes spp. tick. Previous studies indicate that a putative lipoprotein, BBA33, is produced in an RpoS-dependent manner under conditions that mimic the mammalian component of the borrelial lifecycle. However, the significance and function for BBA33 is not known. Given its linkage to the BosR/Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS regulatory cascade, we hypothesized that BBA33 facilitates B. burgdorferi infection in the mammalian host. The deletion of bba33 eliminated B. burgdorferi infectivity in C3H mice, which was rescued by genetic complementation with intact bba33. With regard to function, a combinatorial peptide approach, coupled with subsequent in vitro binding assays, indicated that BBA33 binds to collagen type VI and, to a lesser extent, collagen type IV. Whole cell binding assays demonstrated BBA33-dependent binding to human collagen type VI. Taken together, these results suggest that BBA33 interacts with collagenous structures and may function as an adhesin in a process that is required to prevent bacterial clearance. PMID:25560615

  1. The Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae HMW1C-like glycosyltransferase mediates N-linked glycosylation of the Haemophilus influenzae HMW1 adhesin.

    Kyoung-Jae Choi

    Full Text Available The Haemophilus influenzae HMW1 adhesin is an important virulence exoprotein that is secreted via the two-partner secretion pathway and is glycosylated at multiple asparagine residues in consensus N-linked sequons. Unlike the heavily branched glycans found in eukaryotic N-linked glycoproteins, the modifying glycan structures in HMW1 are mono-hexoses or di-hexoses. Recent work demonstrated that the H. influenzae HMW1C protein is the glycosyltransferase responsible for transferring glucose and galactose to the acceptor sites of HMW1. An Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae protein designated ApHMW1C shares high-level homology with HMW1C and has been assigned to the GT41 family, which otherwise contains only O-glycosyltransferases. In this study, we demonstrated that ApHMW1C has N-glycosyltransferase activity and is able to transfer glucose and galactose to known asparagine sites in HMW1. In addition, we found that ApHMW1C is able to complement a deficiency of HMW1C and mediate HMW1 glycosylation and adhesive activity in whole bacteria. Initial structure-function studies suggested that ApHMW1C consists of two domains, including a 15-kDa N-terminal domain and a 55-kDa C-terminal domain harboring glycosyltransferase activity. These findings suggest a new subfamily of HMW1C-like glycosyltransferases distinct from other GT41 family O-glycosyltransferases.

  2. AtaA, a new member of the trimeric autotransporter adhesins from Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 mediating high adhesiveness to various abiotic surfaces.

    Masahito Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 exhibits an autoagglutinating nature and noteworthy adhesiveness to various abiotic surfaces from hydrophobic plastics to hydrophilic glass and stainless steel. Although previous studies have suggested that bacterionanofibers on Tol 5 cells are involved in the adhesive phenotype of Tol 5, the fiber that directly mediates Tol 5 adhesion has remained unknown. Here, we present a new member of trimeric autotransporter adhesins designated AtaA, which we discovered by analyzing a less adhesive mutant of Tol 5, T1, obtained by transposon mutagenesis. AtaA forms thinner and shorter nanofibers than fimbriae on Tol 5 cells. We performed target disruption of ataA by allelic marker exchange, and the resulting ΔataA strain was complemented with ataA on the Escherichia coli-Acinetobacter shuttle vector, which was newly constructed. These results proved that AtaA is essential for Tol 5's autoagglutinating nature and high adhesiveness to surfaces of various materials. In addition, the adhesiveness to solid surfaces mediated by AtaA is notably higher than that mediated by YadA of Yersinia enterocolitica WA-314. Moreover, and importantly, these characteristics can be conferred to the non-adhesive, non-agglutinating bacterium Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 in trans by transformation with ataA, with expected applications to microbial immobilization.

  3. Allosteric Regulation of Fibronectin/α5β1 Interaction by Fibronectin-Binding MSCRAMMs

    Liang, Xiaowen; Garcia, Brandon L.; Visai, Livia; Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Meenan, Nicola A. G.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Humphries, Martin J.; Höök, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Adherence of microbes to host tissues is a hallmark of infectious disease and is often mediated by a class of adhesins termed MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules). Numerous pathogens express MSCRAMMs that specifically bind the heterodimeric human glycoprotein fibronectin (Fn). In addition to roles in adhesion, Fn-binding MSCRAMMs exploit physiological Fn functions. For example, several pathogens can invade host cells by a mechanism whereby MSCRAMM-bound Fn bridges interaction with α5β1 integrin. Here, we investigate two Fn-binding MSCRAMMs, FnBPA (Staphylococcus aureus) and BBK32 (Borrelia burgdorferi) to probe structure-activity relationships of MSCRAMM-induced Fn/α5β1integrin activation. Circular dichroism, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and dynamic light scattering techniques uncover a conformational rearrangement of Fn involving domains distant from the MSCRAMM binding site. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrate a significant enhancement of Fn/α5β1 integrin affinity in the presence of FnBPA or BBK32. Detailed kinetic analysis of these interactions reveal that this change in affinity can be attributed solely to an increase in the initial Fn/α5β1 on-rate and that this rate-enhancement is dependent on high-affinity Fn-binding by MSCRAMMs. These data implicate MSCRAMM-induced perturbation of specific intramolecular contacts within the Fn heterodimer resulting in activation by exposing previously cryptic α5β1 interaction motifs. By correlating structural changes in Fn to a direct measurement of increased Fn/α5β1 affinity, this work significantly advances our understanding of the structural basis for the modulation of integrin function by Fn-binding MSCRAMMs. PMID:27434228

  4. A multifaceted study of stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA)-like Arabidopsis lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) suggests diversified roles for these LTPs in plant growth and reproduction

    Chae, Keun; Gonong, Benedict J.; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kieslich, Chris A.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Balasubramanian, Shruthi; Lord, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    Lily stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA), a plant lipid transfer protein (LTP) which is secreted into the extracellular matrix, functions in pollen tube guidance in fertilization. A gain-of-function mutant (ltp5-1) for Arabidopsis LTP5, an SCA-like molecule, was recently shown to display defects in sexual reproduction. In the current study, it is reported that ltp5-1 plants have dwarfed primary shoots, delayed hypocotyl elongation, various abnormal tissue fusions, and display multibranch...

  5. Total iron binding capacity

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  6. Muc5ac gastric mucin glycosylation is shaped by FUT2 activity and functionally impacts Helicobacter pylori binding.

    Magalhães, Ana; Rossez, Yannick; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Maes, Emmanuel; Gomes, Joana; Shevtsova, Anna; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a thick and complex layer of mucus that protects the mucosal epithelium from biochemical and mechanical aggressions. This mucus barrier confers protection against pathogens but also serves as a binding site that supports a sheltered niche of microbial adherence. The carcinogenic bacteria Helicobacter pylori colonize the stomach through binding to host glycans present in the glycocalyx of epithelial cells and extracellular mucus. The secreted MUC5AC mucin is the main component of the gastric mucus layer, and BabA-mediated binding of H. pylori to MUC5AC confers increased risk for overt disease. In this study we unraveled the O-glycosylation profile of Muc5ac from glycoengineered mice models lacking the FUT2 enzyme and therefore mimicking a non-secretor human phenotype. Our results demonstrated that the FUT2 determines the O-glycosylation pattern of Muc5ac, with Fut2 knock-out leading to a marked decrease in α1,2-fucosylated structures and increased expression of the terminal type 1 glycan structure Lewis-a. Importantly, for the first time, we structurally validated the expression of Lewis-a in murine gastric mucosa. Finally, we demonstrated that loss of mucin FUT2-mediated fucosylation impairs gastric mucosal binding of H. pylori BabA adhesin, which is a recognized feature of pathogenicity. PMID:27161092

  7. Modulation of Fibronectin Adhesins and Other Virulence Factors in a Teicoplanin-Resistant Derivative of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Renzoni, Adriana; Francois, Patrice; Li, Dongmei; Kelley, William L.; Lew, Daniel P.; Vaudaux, Pierre; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The impact of glycopeptide resistance on the molecular regulation of Staphylococcus aureus virulence and attachment to host tissues is poorly documented. We compared stable teicoplanin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain 14-4 with its teicoplanin-susceptible MRSA parent, strain MRGR3, which exhibits a high degree of virulence in a rat model of chronic foreign body MRSA infection. The levels of fibronectin-mediated adhesion and surface display of fibronectin-binding proteins were higher in teicoplanin-resistant strain 14-4 than in its teicoplanin-susceptible parent or a teicoplanin-susceptible revertant (strain 14-4rev) that spontaneously emerged during tissue cage infection. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) showed four- and twofold higher steady-state levels of fnbA and fnbB transcripts, respectively, in strain 14-4 than in its teicoplanin-susceptible counterparts. Analysis of global regulatory activities by qRT-PCR revealed a strong reduction in the steady-state levels of RNAIII and RNAII in the teicoplanin-resistant strain compared to in its teicoplanin-susceptible counterparts. In contrast, sarA mRNA levels were more than fivefold higher in strain 14-4 than in MRGR3 and 14-4rev. Furthermore, the alternative transcription factor sigma B had a higher level of functional activity in the teicoplanin-resistant strain than in its teicoplanin-susceptible counterparts, as evidenced by significant increases in both the sigma B-dependent asp23 mRNA levels and the sarA P3 promoter-derived transcript levels, as assayed by qRT-PCR and Northern blotting, respectively. These data provide further evidence that the emergence of glycopeptide resistance is linked by still poorly understood molecular pathways with significant pleiotropic changes in the expression and regulation of some major virulence genes. These molecular and phenotypic changes may have a profound impact on the bacterial adhesion and colonization properties of such

  8. Plant Hormone Binding Sites

    Napier, Richard

    2004-01-01

    • Aims Receptors for plant hormones are becoming identified with increasing rapidity, although a frustrating number remain unknown. There have also been many more hormone‐binding proteins described than receptors. This Botanical Briefing summarizes what has been discovered about hormone binding sites, their discovery and descriptions, and will not dwell on receptor functions or activities except where these are relevant to understand binding.

  9. Probing the receptor recognition site of the FimH adhesin by fimbriae-displayed FimH-FocH hybrids

    Knudsen, Thomas Borch; Klemm, Per

    1998-01-01

    H. Surprisingly, it was also found that similar fusions containingbetween 56 and 66% FimH still conferred binding to yeast cells, D-mannose-BSA and D-mannose-beads but did not give riseto agglutination. The receptor binding capacity of fusions containing 50% or less of the FimH N-terminal region was...... virtuallyabolished. The results point to the presence of a D-mannose-receptor-binding core domain in FimH, the affinity of which ismodulated by other sectors of the protein to enable binding to extended mannose-containing targets....

  10. The knockdown of each component of the cysteine proteinase-adhesin complex of Entamoeba histolytica (EhCPADH) affects the expression of the other complex element as well as the in vitro and in vivo virulence.

    Ocádiz-Ruiz, Ramón; Fonseca, Wendy; Linford, Alicia S; Yoshino, Timothy P; Orozco, Esther; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite causative of human amoebiasis, disease responsible for 40 000-100 000 deaths annually. The cysteine proteinase-adhesin complex of this parasite (EhCPADH) is a heterodimeric protein formed by a cysteine protease (EhCP112) and an adhesin (EhADH) that plays an important role in the cytopathic mechanism of this parasite. The coding genes for EhCP112 and EhADH are adjacent in the E. histolytica genome, suggesting that their expression may be co-regulated, but this hypothesis has not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed the knockdown of EhCP112 and EhADH using gene-specific short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA), and the effect of these knockdowns on the expression of both complex components as well as on the in vitro and in vivo virulence was analysed. Results showed that the knockdown of one of the EhCPADH components produced a simultaneous downregulation of the other protein. Accordingly, a concomitant reduction in the overall expression of the complex was observed. The downregulation of each component also produced a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo virulence of trophozoites. These results demonstrated that the expression of EhCP112 and EhADH is co-regulated and confirmed that the EhCPADH complex plays an important role in E. histolytica virulence. PMID:26521708

  11. Python bindings for libcloudph++

    Jarecka, Dorota; Arabas, Sylwester; Del Vento, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This technical note introduces the Python bindings for libcloudph++. The libcloudph++ is a C++ library of algorithms for representing atmospheric cloud microphysics in numerical models. The bindings expose the complete functionality of the library to the Python users. The bindings are implemented using the Boost.Python C++ library and use NumPy arrays. This note includes listings with Python scripts exemplifying the use of selected library components. An example solution for using the Python ...

  12. DNS & Bind Cookbook

    Liu, Cricket

    2011-01-01

    The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. Following O'Reilly's popular problem-and-solution cookbook format, this title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, "How do I get BIND?" to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. It's full of BIND configuration files that yo

  13. Python bindings for libcloudph++

    Jarecka, Dorota; Del Vento, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This technical note introduces the Python bindings for libcloudph++. The libcloudph++ is a C++ library of algorithms for representing atmospheric cloud microphysics in numerical models. The bindings expose the complete functionality of the library to the Python users. The bindings are implemented using the Boost.Python C++ library and use NumPy arrays. This note includes listings with Python scripts exemplifying the use of selected library components. An example solution for using the Python bindings to access libcloudph++ from Fortran is presented.

  14. Choline Binding Proteins from Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Dual Role as Enzybiotics and Targets for the Design of New Antimicrobials.

    Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is an important pathogen responsible for acute invasive and non-invasive infections such as meningitis, sepsis and otitis media, being the major cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The fight against pneumococcus is currently hampered both by insufficient vaccine coverage and by rising antimicrobial resistances to traditional antibiotics, making necessary the research on novel targets. Choline binding proteins (CBPs) are a family of polypeptides found in pneumococcus and related species, as well as in some of their associated bacteriophages. They are characterized by a structural organization in two modules: a functional module (FM), and a choline-binding module (CBM) that anchors the protein to the choline residues present in the cell wall through non-covalent interactions. Pneumococcal CBPs include cell wall hydrolases, adhesins and other virulence factors, all playing relevant physiological roles for bacterial viability and virulence. Moreover, many pneumococcal phages also make use of hydrolytic CBPs to fulfill their infectivity cycle. Consequently, CBPs may play a dual role for the development of novel antipneumococcal drugs, both as targets for inhibitors of their binding to the cell wall and as active cell lytic agents (enzybiotics). In this article, we review the current state of knowledge about host- and phage-encoded pneumococcal CBPs, with a special focus on structural issues, together with their perspectives for effective anti-infectious treatments. PMID:27314398

  15. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  16. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  17. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  18. Enhanced immunogenicity of pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA in mice via fusion to recombinant human B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS

    Mambula Salamatu S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily of ligands that mediates its action through three known receptors. BLyS has been shown to enhance the production of antibodies against heterologous antigens when present at elevated concentrations, supporting an immunostimulatory role for BLyS in vivo. Methods We constructed a fusion protein consisting of human BLyS and Pneumococcal Surface Adhesin A (PsaA and used this molecule to immunize mice. The immunostimulatory attributes mediated by BLyS in vivo were evaluated by characterizing immune responses directed against PsaA. Results The PsaA-BLyS fusion protein was able to act as a co-stimulant for murine spleen cell proliferation induced with F(ab'2 fragments of anti-IgM in vitro in a fashion similar to recombinant BLyS, and immunization of mice with the PsaA-BLyS fusion protein resulted in dramatically elevated serum antibodies specific for PsaA. Mice immunized with PsaA admixed with recombinant BLyS exhibited only modest elevations in PsaA-specific responses following two immunizations, while mice immunized twice with PsaA alone exhibited undetectable PsaA-specific serum antibody responses. Sera obtained from PsaA-BLyS immunized mice exhibited high titers of IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3, but no IgA, while mice immunized with PsaA admixed with BLyS exhibited only elevated titers of IgG1 following two immunizations. Splenocytes from PsaA-BLyS immunized mice exhibited elevated levels of secretion of IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5, and a very modest but consistent elevation of IFN-γ following in vitro stimulation with PsaA. In contrast, mice immunized with either PsaA admixed with BLyS or PsaA alone exhibited modestly elevated to absent PsaA-specific recall responses for the same cytokines. Mice deficient for one of the three receptors for BLyS designated Transmembrane activator, calcium modulator, and cyclophilin ligand [CAML] interactor (TACI exhibited

  19. Potential use of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vector carrying the C-terminal portion of the P97 adhesin protein as a vaccine against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in swine.

    Okamba, Faust René; Arella, Maximilien; Music, Nedzad; Jia, Jian Jun; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Gagnon, Carl A

    2010-07-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae causes severe economic losses to the swine industry worldwide and the prevention of its related disease, enzootic porcine pneumonia, remains a challenge. The P97 adhesin protein of M. hyopneumoniae should be a good candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine because antibodies produced against P97 could prevent the adhesion of the pathogen to the respiratory epithelial cells in vitro. In the present study, a P97 recombinant replication-defective adenovirus (rAdP97c) subunit vaccine efficiency was evaluated in pigs. The rAdP97c vaccine was found to induce both strong P97 specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The rAdP97c vaccinated pigs developed a lower amount of macroscopic lung lesions (18.5 + or - 9.6%) compared to the unvaccinated and challenged animals (45.8 + or - 11.5%). rAdP97c vaccine reduced significantly the severity of inflammatory response and the amount of M. hyopneumoniae in the respiratory tract. Furthermore, the average daily weight gain was slightly improved in the rAdP97c vaccinated pigs (0.672 + or - 0.068 kg/day) compared to the unvaccinated and challenged animals (0.568 + or - 0.104 kg/day). A bacterin-based commercial vaccine (Suvaxyn MH-one) was more efficient to induce a protective immune response than rAdP97c even if it did not evoke a P97 specific immune response. These results suggest that immunodominant antigens other than P97 adhesin are also important in the induction of a protective immune response and should be taken into account in the future development of M. hyopneumoniae subunit vaccines. PMID:20472025

  20. Role of ARF6, Rab11 and external Hsp90 in the trafficking and recycling of recombinant-soluble Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (rNadA in human epithelial cells.

    Giuseppe Bozza

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA is a meningococcus surface protein thought to assist in the adhesion of the bacterium to host cells. We have previously shown that NadA also promotes bacterial internalization in a heterologous expression system. Here we have used the soluble recombinant NadA (rNadA lacking the membrane anchor region to characterize its internalization route in Chang epithelial cells. Added to the culture medium, rNadA internalizes through a PI3K-dependent endocytosis process not mediated by the canonical clathrin or caveolin scaffolds, but instead follows an ARF6-regulated recycling pathway previously described for MHC-I. The intracellular pool of rNadA reaches a steady state level within one hour of incubation and colocalizes in endocytic vesicles with MHC-I and with the extracellularly labeled chaperone Hsp90. Treatment with membrane permeated and impermeable Hsp90 inhibitors 17-AAG and FITC-GA respectively, lead to intracellular accumulation of rNadA, strongly suggesting that the extracellular secreted pool of the chaperone is involved in rNadA intracellular trafficking. A significant number of intracellular vesicles containing rNadA recruit Rab11, a small GTPase associated to recycling endosomes, but do not contain transferrin receptor (TfR. Interestingly, cell treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors, including the membrane-impermeable FITC-GA, abolished Rab11-rNadA colocalization but do not interfere with Rab11-TfR colocalization. Collectively, these results are consistent with a model whereby rNadA internalizes into human epithelial cells hijacking the recycling endosome pathway and recycle back to the surface of the cell via an ARF6-dependent, Rab11 associated and Hsp90-regulated mechanism. The present study addresses for the first time a meningoccoccal adhesin mechanism of endocytosis and suggests a possible entry pathway engaged by N. meningitidis in primary infection of human epithelial cells.

  1. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  2. BB0172, a Borrelia burgdorferi outer membrane protein that binds integrin α3β1.

    Wood, Elaine; Tamborero, Silvia; Mingarro, Ismael; Esteve-Gassent, Maria D

    2013-08-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystemic disorder caused by Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Upon infection, some B. burgdorferi genes are upregulated, including members of the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) protein family, which facilitate B. burgdorferi adherence to extracellular matrix components of the host. Comparative genome analysis has revealed a new family of B. burgdorferi proteins containing the von Willebrand factor A (vWFA) domain. In the present study, we characterized the expression and membrane association of the vWFA domain-containing protein BB0172 by using in vitro transcription/translation systems in the presence of microsomal membranes and with detergent phase separation assays. Our results showed evidence of BB0172 localization in the outer membrane, the orientation of the vWFA domain to the extracellular environment, and its function as a metal ion-dependent integrin-binding protein. This is the first report of a borrelial adhesin with a metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) motif that is similar to those observed in eukaryotic integrins and has a similar function. PMID:23687274

  3. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Caroline (Albany, CA)

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  4. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Nagy, J.O.; Spevak, W.R.; Dasgupta, F.; Bertozzi, C.

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10{sup 6} fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  5. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Caroline (Albany, CA)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  6. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Nagy, J.O.; Spevak, W.R.; Dasgupta, F.; Bertozzi, C.

    1999-11-16

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10{sup 6} fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  7. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA)

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  8. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  9. Technetium-99m labeling and fibronectin binding ability of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    The use of radionuclides has permitted advances in areas of clinical and scientific knowledge. Several molecules and cells have been labelled with Technetium-99m (99mTc). The stannous chloride (SnCl2) has a significant influence on the labeling and stability of 99mTc radiotracers. The frequent risk of diphtheria epidemics has intensified interest in the virulence factors of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Although studies have looked at potential adhesins including haemagglutinins and exposed sugar residues, the molecular basis of mechanisms of adherence remains unclear. Adherence of pathogens to mammalian tissues may be mediated by fibronectin (FN) found in body fluids, matrix of connective tissues, and cell surfaces. In the present study we evaluated the binding ability to human plasma FN by 99mTc labeled-C.diphtheriae. Due to adverse effects of stannous ions, microorganisms were submitted to survival and filamentation induction assays. Data showed a dose dependent susceptibility to SnCl2 bactericidal effects. Cell filamentation was observed for concentrations of SnCl2 > 110 μg/ml. Adherence levels of 99mTc labelled 241strain to coverslips coated with 20 μg/ml FN were higher (P = 0.0037) than coated with bovine serum albumin. FN binding by the sucrose fermenting 241 C. diphtheriae strain (8.9% + 2.6) was significantly lower (P=0.0139) than Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I strain (34.1% ± 1.2). Therefore, bacterial 99mTc labeling represents an additional tool that may contribute to the comprehension of C. diphtheriae interactions with host receptors such as FN that act as biological organizers by holding bacterial cells in position and guiding their migration. (author)

  10. Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0136 protein is heterogeneous among isolates and binds cellular and plasma fibronectin via its NH2-terminal end.

    Ke, Wujian; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Giacani, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Adherence-mediated colonization plays an important role in pathogenesis of microbial infections, particularly those caused by extracellular pathogens responsible for systemic diseases, such as Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the agent of syphilis. Among T. pallidum adhesins, TP0136 is known to bind fibronectin (Fn), an important constituent of the host extracellular matrix. To deepen our understanding of the TP0136-Fn interaction dynamics, we used two naturally-occurring sequence variants of the TP0136 protein to investigate which region of the protein is responsible for Fn binding, and whether TP0136 would adhere to human cellular Fn in addition to plasma Fn and super Fn as previously reported. Fn binding assays were performed with recombinant proteins representing the two full-length TP0136 variants and their discrete regions. As a complementary approach, we tested inhibition of T. pallidum binding to Fn by recombinant full-length TP0136 proteins and fragments, as well as by anti-TP0136 immune sera. Our results show that TP0136 adheres more efficiently to cellular Fn than to plasma Fn, that the TP0136 NH2-terminal conserved region of the protein is primarily responsible for binding to plasma Fn but that binding sites for cellular Fn are also present in the protein's central and COOH-terminal regions. Additionally, message quantification studies show that tp0136 is highly transcribed during experimental infection, and that its message level increases in parallel to the host immune pressure on the pathogen, which suggests a possible role for this protein in T. pallidum persistence. In a time where syphilis incidence is high, our data will help in the quest to identify suitable targets for development of a much needed vaccine against this important disease. PMID:25793702

  11. Induction of Fibronectin Adhesins in Quinolone-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Subinhibitory Levels of Ciprofloxacin or by Sigma B Transcription Factor Activity Is Mediated by Two Separate Pathways

    Li, Dongmei; Renzoni, Adriana; Estoppey, Tristan; Bisognano, Carmelo; Francois, Patrice; Kelley, William L; Lew, Daniel P.; Schrenzel, Jacques; Vaudaux, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported on the involvement of a RecA-LexA-dependent pathway in the ciprofloxacin-triggered upregulation of fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) by fluoroquinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The potential additional contribution of the transcription factor sigma B (SigB) to the ciprofloxacin-triggered upregulation of FnBPs was studied in isogenic mutants of fluoroquinolone-resistant strain RA1 (a topoisomerase IV gyrase double mutant of S. aureus NCTC strain 8325), which exh...

  12. DNA-binding residues and binding mode prediction with binding-mechanism concerned models

    Oyang Yen-Jen; Liu Yu-Cheng; Huang Chun-Chin; Huang Yu-Feng; Huang Chien-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-DNA interactions are essential for fundamental biological activities including DNA transcription, replication, packaging, repair and rearrangement. Proteins interacting with DNA can be classified into two categories of binding mechanisms - sequence-specific and non-specific binding. Protein-DNA specific binding provides a mechanism to recognize correct nucleotide base pairs for sequence-specific identification. Protein-DNA non-specific binding shows sequence indepe...

  13. Mapping the laminin-binding and adhesive domain of the cell surface-associated Hlp/LBP protein from Mycobacterium leprae.

    Soares de Lima, Cristiana; Zulianello, Laurence; Marques, Maria Angela de Melo; Kim, Heejin; Portugal, Michelle Iespa; Antunes, Sérgio Luiz; Menozzi, Franco Dante; Ottenhoff, Tom Henricus Maria; Brennan, Patrick Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2005-07-01

    Binding of Mycobacterium leprae to and invasion of Schwann cells (SC) represent a crucial step that initiates nerve damage in leprosy. We and others have described that M. leprae colonization of the peripheral nerve system may be mediated in part by a surface-exposed histone-like protein (Hlp), characterized as a laminin-binding protein (LBP). Hlp/LBP has also been shown to play a role in the binding of mycobacteria to alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages. In the present study we report that M. leprae expresses Hlp/LBP protein during the course of human infection. Additionally, we analyzed the interaction of Hlp/LBP with the extracellular matrix and host cell surface. We show that Hlp/LBP, besides laminin, also binds heparin and heparan sulfate. Testing truncated recombinant Hlp molecules corresponding to the N-terminal (rHlp-N) and the C-terminal (rHlp-C) domains of the protein, we established that interaction of Hlp/LBP with laminin-2 and heparin is mainly mediated by the C-terminal domain of the protein. Moreover, the same domain was found to be involved in Hlp/LBP-mediating bacterial binding to human SC. Finally, evidence is shown suggesting that M. leprae produces a post-translationally modified Hlp/LBP containing methyllysine residues. Methylation of the lysine residues, however, seems not to affect the adhesive properties of Hlp/LBP. Taken together, our observations reinforce the involvement of Hlp/LBP as an adhesin in mycobacterial infections and define its highly positive C-terminal region as the major adhesive domain of this protein. PMID:15919224

  14. IGD motifs, which are required for migration stimulatory activity of fibronectin type I modules, do not mediate binding in matrix assembly.

    Lisa M Maurer

    Full Text Available Picomolar concentrations of proteins comprising only the N-terminal 70-kDa region (70K of fibronectin (FN stimulate cell migration into collagen gels. The Ile-Gly-Asp (IGD motifs in four of the nine FN type 1 (FNI modules in 70K are important for such migratory stimulating activity. The 70K region mediates binding of nanomolar concentrations of intact FN to cell-surface sites where FN is assembled. Using baculovirus, we expressed wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations in (3FNI and (5FNI; (7FNI and (9FNI; or (3FNI, (5FNI, (7FNI, and (9FNI. Wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations were equally active in binding to assembly sites of FN-null fibroblasts. This finding indicates that IGD motifs do not mediate the interaction between 70K and the cell-surface that is important for FN assembly. Further, FN fragment N-(3FNIII, which does not stimulate migration, binds to assembly sites on FN-null fibroblast. The Ile-to-Ala mutations had effects on the structure of FNI modules as evidenced by decreases in abilities of 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations to bind to monoclonal antibody 5C3, which recognizes an epitope in (9FNI, or to bind to FUD, a polypeptide based on the F1 adhesin of Streptococcus pyogenes that interacts with 70K by the β-zipper mechanism. These results suggest that the picomolar interactions of 70K with cells that stimulate cell migration require different conformations of FNI modules than the nanomolar interactions required for assembly.

  15. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described

  16. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    Tanley, Simon W. M. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diederichs, Kay [University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Levy, Colin [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  17. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar

  18. Characterization of the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis laminin-binding/histone-like protein (Lbp/Hlp) which reacts with sera from patients with Crohn's disease.

    Lefrançois, Louise H; Pujol, Céline; Bodier, Christelle C; Teixeira-Gomez, Ana Paula; Drobecq, Hervé; Rosso, Marie-Laure; Raze, Dominique; Dias, André Alves; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raul G; Locht, Camille; Vidal Pessolani, Maria Cristina; Biet, Franck

    2011-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) causes a chronic enteric disease in ruminants, called paratuberculosis or Johne's disease. The current model proposes that after ingestion by the host, Map crosses the intestinal barrier via internalization by the M cells. Experimental observations suggest, however, that Map may also transcytose the intestinal wall via the enterocytes, but the mechanisms involved in this process remain poorly understood. Cytoadherence assays performed on epithelial cells with Map revealed that the addition of laminin to the cell culture increases adhesion. A Map protein was isolated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography and identified as a laminin-binding protein like. The gene encoding this protein named Lbp/Hlp was identified in the Map genome sequence at locus MAP3024 (annotated Hup B). The deduced Map Lbp/Hlp amino acid sequence reveals 80% identity with that reported for other mycobacteria. The C-terminal domain involved in adhesion is mainly composed of arginine and lysine residues modified by methylation. In vitro tests demonstrated that recombinant Lbp/Hlp binds laminin, heparin, collagen and epithelial cells. Interestingly, we found that this adhesin corresponds to the antigen described as the target of pANCA and serum antibodies of patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:21334452

  19. Melanin binding radiopharmaceuticals

    We have determined the biodistribution an uptake by the Greene melanoma in the Syrian golden hamster with 21 radiopharmaceuticals. Maximum % uptake and the time at which this occurred are listed. It is essential to know maximum tumor to background ration and the time after injection that this occurs to determine suitability for tumor scanning. The importance of species variation deserves mention. Detection of eye melanoma in humans was quite variable whereas in hamsters it was quite easy to obtain a positive scan with a single pinhole. We then looked at brain uptake in man and found it (the brain scan) to be significant. In addition, we found a high uptake by the lung, something not found in hamsters but not entirely unsuspected of a amine, such as 123I-4,3DMQ. Finally, our clinical experience has shown us some of the vagaries of melanoma-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. This reflects the complexity of melanin and melanin-binding and points out the necessity for a more detailed analysis of the mechanisms involved in melanin binding radionuclides

  20. Functional identification of galactosyltransferases (SCGs) required for species-specific modifications of the lipophosphoglycan adhesin controlling Leishmania major-sand fly interactions.

    Dobson, Deborah E; Scholtes, Luella D; Valdez, Kelli E; Sullivan, Deborah R; Mengeling, Brenda J; Cilmi, Salvatore; Turco, Salvatore J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2003-05-01

    Lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is an abundant surface molecule that plays key roles in the infectious cycle of Leishmania major. The dominant feature of LPG is a polymer of phosphoglycan (PG) (6Galbeta1,4Manalpha1-PO(4)) repeating units. In L. major these are extensively substituted with Gal(beta1,3) side chains, which are required for binding to midgut lectins and survival. We utilized evolutionary polymorphisms in LPG structure and cross-species transfections to recover genes encoding the LPG side chain beta1,3-galactosyltransferases (betaGalTs). A dispersed family of six SCG genes was recovered, whose predicted proteins exhibited characteristics of eukaryotic GalTs. At least four of these proteins showed significant LPG side chain betaGalT activity; SCG3 exhibited initiating GalT activity whereas SCG2 showed both initiating and elongating GalT activity. However, the activity of SCG2 was context-dependent, being largely silent in its normal genomic milieu, and different strains show considerable variation in the extent of LPG galactosylation. Thus the L. major genome encodes a family of SCGs with varying specificity and activity, and we propose that strain-specific LPG galactosylation patterns reflect differences in their expression. PMID:12604613

  1. Host iron binding proteins acting as niche indicators for Neisseria meningitidis.

    Philip W Jordan

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis requires iron, and in the absence of iron alters its gene expression to increase iron acquisition and to make the best use of the iron it has. During different stages of colonization and infection available iron sources differ, particularly the host iron-binding proteins haemoglobin, transferrin, and lactoferrin. This study compared the transcriptional responses of N. meningitidis, when grown in the presence of these iron donors and ferric iron, using microarrays.Specific transcriptional responses to the different iron sources were observed, including genes that are not part of the response to iron restriction. Comparisons between growth on haemoglobin and either transferrin or lactoferrin identified changes in 124 and 114 genes, respectively, and 33 genes differed between growth on transferrin or lactoferrin. Comparison of gene expression from growth on haemoglobin or ferric iron showed that transcription is also affected by the entry of either haem or ferric iron into the cytoplasm. This is consistent with a model in which N. meningitidis uses the relative availability of host iron donor proteins as niche indicators.Growth in the presence of haemoglobin is associated with a response likely to be adaptive to survival within the bloodstream, which is supported by serum killing assays that indicate growth on haemoglobin significantly increases survival, and the response to lactoferrin is associated with increased expression of epithelial cell adhesins and oxidative stress response molecules. The transferrin receptor is the most highly transcribed receptor and has the fewest genes specifically induced in its presence, suggesting this is the favoured iron source for the bacterium. Most strikingly, the responses to haemoglobin, which is associated with unrestricted growth, indicates a low iron transcriptional profile, associated with an aggressive phenotype that may be adaptive to access host iron sources but which may also

  2. Quarkonium Binding and Entropic Force

    Satz, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A Q-Qbar bound state represents a balance between repulsive kinetic and attractive potential energy. In a hot quark-gluon plasma, the interaction potential experiences medium effects. Color screening modifies the attractive binding force between the quarks, while the increase of entropy with Q-Qbar separation gives rise to a growing repulsion. We study the role of these phenomena for in-medium Q-Qbar binding and dissociation. It is found that the relevant potential for Q-Qbar binding is the free energy F; with increasing Q-Qbar separation, further binding through the internal energy U is compensated by repulsive entropic effects.

  3. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  4. BINDING TO AND RETENTION BY MUCOSAL CELLS OF THE TAMARINDUS INDICA SEED POLYSACCHARIDE: VISUAL EVALUATION BY MEANS OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC MARKERS

    P.C. Braga*, M. Dal Sasso, M. Culici

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using inorganic and organic markers to visualize the ability of the transparent polysaccharide (TSP polymer isolated from the endosperm of the seed kernel of Tamarindus indica, a tree that mainly grows in India and South-East Asia, to bind to human mucosal cells. A layer of human buccal cells was prepared on slides and overlaid by 0.2 ml of 0.6, 0.3, 0.15 and 0.075 % TSP solutions in phosphate buffer and then colloidal carbon black particles were deposited on the slides. The unbound colloidal carbon black particles were cleared by thoroughly washing the slides. The slides were then examined by means of Nomarski interference contrast microscopy in order to visualize the degree of surface retention of the black particles by the buccal cells. The same procedure was followed using Escherichia coli as organic markers. The clearly visible binding of black carbon particles to the cells treated with polymer revealed the presence of a thin layer of TSP covering the cells (untreated cells had no black carbon particles binding. The presence of the TSP has also been confirmed by a significant reduction in bacterial adhesiveness. Both markers made it possible to visualize the binding of the thin transparent layer of TSP and its retention, which was proportional to the degree of dilution. Using Escherichia coli it has been observed the possibility of counteracting the lock-and-key mechanism of micro-organism adhesion using the bioadhesive properties of this polymer to prevent possible contact between microorganism adhesins and complementary receptors.

  5. Alcohol Binding to the Odorant Binding Protein LUSH: Multiple Factors Affecting Binding Affinities

    Ader, Lauren; Jones, David N. M.; Lin, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Density function theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of alcohols to the odorant binding protein LUSH from Drosophila melanogaster. LUSH is one of the few proteins known to bind to ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations and where high-resolution structural information is available for the protein bound to alcohol at these concentrations. The structures of the LUSH–alcohol complexes identify a set of specific hydrogen-bonding interactions as cr...

  6. Induction of Fibronectin Adhesins in Quinolone-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Subinhibitory Levels of Ciprofloxacin or by Sigma B Transcription Factor Activity Is Mediated by Two Separate Pathways

    Li, Dongmei; Renzoni, Adriana; Estoppey, Tristan; Bisognano, Carmelo; Francois, Patrice; Kelley, William L.; Lew, Daniel P.; Schrenzel, Jacques; Vaudaux, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported on the involvement of a RecA-LexA-dependent pathway in the ciprofloxacin-triggered upregulation of fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) by fluoroquinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The potential additional contribution of the transcription factor sigma B (SigB) to the ciprofloxacin-triggered upregulation of FnBPs was studied in isogenic mutants of fluoroquinolone-resistant strain RA1 (a topoisomerase IV gyrase double mutant of S. aureus NCTC strain 8325), which exhibited widely different levels of SigB activity, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR of their respective sigB and SigB-dependent asp23 transcript levels. These mutants were Tn551 insertion sigB strain TE1 and rsbU+ complemented strain TE2, which exhibited a wild-type SigB operon. Levels of FnBP surface display and fibronectin-mediated adhesion were lower in sigB mutant TE1 or higher in the rsbU+-restored strain TE2 compared to their sigB+ but rsbU parent, strain RA1, exhibiting low levels of SigB activity. Steady-state fnbA and fnbB transcripts levels were similar in strains TE1 and RA1 but increased by 4- and 12-fold, respectively, in strain TE2 compared to those in strain RA1. In contrast, fibronectin-mediated adhesion of strains TE1, RA1, and TE2 was similarly enhanced by growth in the presence of one-eighth the MIC of ciprofloxacin, which led to a significantly higher increase in their fnbB transcript levels compared to the increase in their fnbA transcript levels. Increased SigB levels led to a significant reduction in agr RNAIII; in contrast, it led to a slight increase in sarA transcript levels. In conclusion, upregulation of FnBPs by increased SigB levels and ciprofloxacin exposure in fluoroquinolone-resistant S. aureus occurs via independent pathways whose concerted actions may significantly promote bacterial adhesion and colonization. PMID:15728884

  7. [3]tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for [3]tetrahydrotrazodone ([3] THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of [3]THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, [3] THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that [3]THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors

  8. Windows Presentation Foundation & Data Binding

    JANDA, Vilém

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is a course in the form of e-learning study materials for the interpretation of technology Data Binding in Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF). In the first, mostly theoretical part will be done a description and interpretation of the elements of technology, focusing on WPF Data Binding. In the second part, is available methodology and training course with their own interpretive audio-visual files for self-study. The lectures are supplemented by solved examples, and exa...

  9. Structural analysis of the full-length gene encoding a fibronectin-binding-like protein (CadF and its adjacent genetic loci within Campylobacter lari

    Millar B Cherie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combined sequences encoding a partial and putative rpsI open reading frame (ORF, non-coding (NC region, a putative ORF for the Campylobacter adhesin to fibronectin-like protein (cadF, a putative Cla_0387 ORF, NC region and a partial and putative Cla_0388 ORF, were identified in 16 Campylobacter lari isolates, using two novel degenerate primer pairs. Probable consensus sequence at the -35 and -10 regions were identified in all C. lari isolates, as a promoter. Results Thus, cadF (-like gene is highly conserved among C. lari organisms. Transcription of the cadF (-like gene in C. lari cells in vivo was also confirmed and the transcription initiation site was determined. A peptidoglycan-associating alpha-helical motif in the C-terminal regions of some bacterial cell-surface proteins was completely conserved amongst the putative cadF (-like ORFs from the C. lari isolates. Conclusion The putative cadF (-like ORFs from all C. lari isolates were nine amino acid larger than those from C. jejuni, and showed amino acid residues 137 -140 of FALG (50% identity, instead of the FRLS residues of the maximal fibronectin-binding activity site demonstrated within C. jejuni CadF. A neighbor joining tree constructed based on cadF (-like gene sequence information formed a major cluster consisting of C. lari isolates, separating from the other three thermophilic campylobacters.

  10. The pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA) protein and its application in conjugate vaccine%肺炎球菌PsaA抗原及其在结合疫苗中的应用

    樊小英; 薛红刚; 郭蓉; 胡菁; 卢佳丽; 朱越雄

    2011-01-01

    目的 应用基因工程技术表达和制备肺炎链球菌表面黏附素A(pneumococcal surface adhesin A,PsaA),并与细菌荚膜多糖耦联制备成多糖蛋白结合疫苗,探讨PsaA作为肺炎球菌蛋白载体在增强结合疫苗中其他细菌多糖抗原的免疫原性的同时,还能获得对肺炎球菌的抗体反应,从而达到用一种结合疫苗能诱导出针对两种细菌的抗体免疫应答的目的 .方法 从肺炎链球菌基因组中扩增psaA基因,将目的 基因插入原核表达载体pET-28a,获得重组质粒pET28a-psaA,通过转化进入大肠杆菌BL21中,经IPTG诱导,采用DEAE-阴离子交换层析法纯化基因重组rPsaA蛋白.将纯化到的rPsaA蛋白与A群脑膜炎荚膜多糖(group A meningococcal polysaccharide,GAMP)耦联成多糖蛋白结合疫苗后,用小鼠动物模型进行免疫实验,检测该疫苗的免疫原性,用ELISA法测定该疫苗在小鼠体内产生的针对肺炎球菌和脑膜炎球菌两种病原菌特异性抗原的抗体水平.结果 成功克隆基因重组表达质粒,而且表达的PsaA蛋白在载体上的组氨酸标签之前终止表达,不带有组氨酸标签,保证疫苗的安全性.SDS-PAGE技术分析表明:rPsaA蛋白高效表达,约为菌体蛋白的60%,蛋白质相对分子质量约为37×103,而且蛋白的可溶性好,不形成包涵体,用DEAE-阴离子交换层析法纯化其纯度可达80%以上.纯化到的PsaA蛋白与荚膜多糖耦联成功,应用于小鼠免疫实验,PsaA蛋白载体能显著增强A群脑膜炎荚膜多糖抗原的免疫原性,并同时产生针对肺炎球菌蛋白抗原和脑膜炎球菌多糖抗原的特异性抗体.结论 利用基因工程技术获得无组氨酸标签的PsaA蛋白,并将它与A群脑膜炎荚膜多糖耦联,可以在增强荚膜多糖抗原免疫原性的同时,提高疫苗的免疫保护效果,探讨了给儿童接种一种疫苗能同时预防肺炎和脑膜炎两种传染病的可能性.%Objective To express and purify the

  11. Fibronectin binding proteins contribute to the adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to intact endothelium in vivo

    Kerdudou, Sylvain; Laschke, Matthias W; Sinha, Bhanu; Preissner, Klaus T; Menger, Michael D; Herrmann, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcal adhesins mediate attachment to matrix proteins and endothelial cells in vitro, yet, their role in primary adherence to the physiologic vessel wall has not been studied in vivo, and complex endocarditis models yielded ambiguous results. Recently, we developed a hamster model to study i

  12. Water binding in legume seeds

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  13. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan;

    2005-01-01

    to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is...

  14. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  15. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Mike Gillard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  16. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Gillard, Mike, E-mail: m.n.gillard@leeds.ac.uk; Harland, Derek, E-mail: d.g.harland@leeds.ac.uk; Speight, Martin, E-mail: speight@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  17. Fimbrial adhesins from extraintestinal Escherichia coli

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) represent an important subclass of E. coli that cause a wide spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. Fimbriae are key virulence factors of ExPEC strains. These long surface located rod-shaped organelles mediate receptor-specific attachment...

  18. BINDING ISOTHERMS SURFACTANT-PROTEINS

    Elena Irina Moater; Cristiana Radulescu; Ionica Ionita

    2011-01-01

    The interactions between surfactants and proteins shows some similarities with interactions between surfactants and polymers, but the hydrophobic amphoteric nature of proteins and their secondary and tertiary structure components make them different from conventional polymer systems. Many studies from the past about surfactant - proteins bonding used the dialysis techniques. Other techniques used to determine the binding isotherm, included ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, potentiometry, ...

  19. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M;

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection...

  20. Positive Emotion Facilitates Audiovisual Binding.

    Kitamura, Miho S; Watanabe, Katsumi; Kitagawa, Norimichi

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that positive emotions can facilitate integrative and associative information processing in cognitive functions. The present study examined whether emotions in observers can also enhance perceptual integrative processes. We tested 125 participants in total for revealing the effects of emotional states and traits in observers on the multisensory binding between auditory and visual signals. Participants in Experiment 1 observed two identical visual disks moving toward each other, coinciding, and moving away, presented with a brief sound. We found that for participants with lower depressive tendency, induced happy moods increased the width of the temporal binding window of the sound-induced bounce percept in the stream/bounce display, while no effect was found for the participants with higher depressive tendency. In contrast, no effect of mood was observed for a simple audiovisual simultaneity discrimination task in Experiment 2. These results provide the first empirical evidence of a dependency of multisensory binding upon emotional states and traits, revealing that positive emotions can facilitate the multisensory binding processes at a perceptual level. PMID:26834585

  1. Radioligand Binding at Muscarinic Receptors

    El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 37-68. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * radioligand binding Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  2. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins

    Reeja Maria Cherian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b, CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1, core 3 (B3GNT6, core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6, or extended core 1 (B3GNT3 chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galb3GlcNAc or type 2 (Galb4GlcNAc outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins.

  3. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins.

    Cherian, Reeja Maria; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galb3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galb4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins. PMID:26274979

  4. Antimicrobial Peptide-Lipid Binding Interactions and Binding Selectivity

    Lad, Mitaben D.; Birembaut, Fabrice; Clifton, Luke A.; Frazier, Richard A.; Webster, John R. P.; Green, Rebecca J.

    2007-01-01

    Surface pressure measurements, external reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and neutron reflectivity have been used to investigate the lipid-binding behavior of three antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin II, and cecropin P1. As expected, all three cationic peptides were shown to interact more strongly with the anionic lipid, 1,2 dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-(phosphor-rac-(1-glycerol)) (DPPG), compared to the zwitterionic lipid, 1,2 dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocho...

  5. Characteristics of human erythrocyte insulin binding sites.

    Okada, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    Insulin and human erythrocyte cell membrane interactions were studied with respect to binding and dissociation. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin to erythrocytes was directly proportional to the cell concentration. The optimum pH for binding was 8.1. The initial binding rate was directly proportional to, and the steady state insulin binding was reversely proportional to, the incubation temperature. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin was 12.10 +/- 1...

  6. Dissection of the Critical Binding Determinants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II by Mutagenesis and Fluorescence Binding Assay

    Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Crist, Rachael M.; Vaezeslami, Soheila; Goins, Sarah M.; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2009-01-01

    The binding of retinoic acid to mutants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II (CRABPII) was evaluated to better understand the importance of the direct protein/ligand interactions. The important role of Arg111 for the correct structure and function of the protein was verified and other residues that directly affect retinoic acid binding have been identified. Furthermore, retinoic acid binding to CRABPII mutants that lack all previously identified interacting amino acids was rescued by ...

  7. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... profile of the integrin-linked kinase associated phosphatase (ILKAP), a member of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family. Phosphatases can potentially dephosphorylate these phosphopeptide substrates but, interestingly, performing the binding studies at 4 °C allowed efficient binding to phosphopeptides......, without the need for phosphopeptide mimics or phosphatase inhibitors. As no proven ILKAP substrates were available, we selected phosphopeptide substrates among known PP2Cδ substrates including the protein kinases: p38, ATM, Chk1, Chk2 and RSK2 and synthesized directly on PEGA solid supports through a BAL...

  8. Optical binding of unlike particles

    Karásek, Vítězslav; Zemánek, Pavel

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2012, 86970T: 1-6. ISBN 978-0-8194-9481-8. [CPS 2012. Czech-Polish-Slovak Optical Conference on Wave and Quantum Aspects of Contemporary Optics /18./. Ostravice (CZ), 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/12/P868 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Optical binding * Optical tweezers * self-arrangement * colloids Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  9. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  10. Binding effects and nuclear shadowing

    Indumathi, D.; Wei ZHU

    1996-01-01

    The effects of nuclear binding on nuclear structure functions have so far been studied mainly at fixed target experiments, and there is currently much interest in obtaining a clearer understanding of this phenomenon. We use an existing dynamical model of nuclear structure functions, that gives good agreement with current data, to study this effect in a kinematical regime (low $x$, high $Q^2$) that can possibly be probed by an upgrade of {\\sc hera} at {\\sc desy} into a nuclear accelerator.

  11. Positive Emotion Facilitates Audiovisual Binding

    Kitamura, Miho S.; Watanabe, Katsumi; Kitagawa, Norimichi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that positive emotions can facilitate integrative and associative information processing in cognitive functions. The present study examined whether emotions in observers can also enhance perceptual integrative processes. We tested 125 participants in total for revealing the effects of emotional states and traits in observers on the multisensory binding between auditory and visual signals. Participants in Experiment 1 observed two identical visual disks moving toward each oth...

  12. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  13. Anion binding in biological systems

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  14. Anion binding in biological systems

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  15. Solute-vacancy binding in aluminum

    Previous efforts to understand solute-vacancy binding in aluminum alloys have been hampered by a scarcity of reliable, quantitative experimental measurements. Here, we report a large database of solute-vacancy binding energies determined from first-principles density functional calculations. The calculated binding energies agree well with accurate measurements where available, and provide an accurate predictor of solute-vacancy binding in other systems. We find: (i) some common solutes in commercial Al alloys (e.g., Cu and Mg) possess either very weak (Cu), or even repulsive (Mg), binding energies. Hence, we assert that some previously reported large binding energies for these solutes are erroneous. (ii) Large binding energies are found for Sn, Cd and In, confirming the proposed mechanism for the reduced natural aging in Al-Cu alloys containing microalloying additions of these solutes. (iii) In addition, we predict that similar reduction in natural aging should occur with additions of Si, Ge and Au. (iv) Even larger binding energies are found for other solutes (e.g., Pb, Bi, Sr, Ba), but these solutes possess essentially no solubility in Al. (v) We have explored the physical effects controlling solute-vacancy binding in Al. We find that there is a strong correlation between binding energy and solute size, with larger solute atoms possessing a stronger binding with vacancies. (vi) Most transition-metal 3d solutes do not bind strongly with vacancies, and some are even energetically strongly repelled from vacancies, particularly for the early 3d solutes, Ti and V

  16. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  17. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    Clemons, Gisela K. (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  18. Binding of quasi two-dimensional biexcitons

    Birkedal, Dan; Singh, J; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    Summary form only given. In this presentation we report on a determination of the biexciton binding energies in GaAs-AlGaAs quantum wells of different widths and the results of a theoretical calculation of the ratio of the biexciton binding energy to that of the exciton. We determine the binding ...

  19. Glucocorticoid receptor transformation and DNA binding

    The overall goal is to probe the mechanism whereby glucocorticoid receptors are transformed from a non-DNA-binding form to their active DNA-binding form. The author has examined the effect of an endogenous inhibitor purified from rat liver cytosol on receptor binding to DNA. The inhibitor binds to transformed receptors in whole cytosol and prevent their binding to DNA. He also examined the role of sulfhydryl groups in determining the DNA binding activity of the transformed receptor and in determining the transformation process. Treatment of rat liver cytosol containing temperature-transformed, [3H]dexamethasone-bound receptors at 00C with the sulfhydryl modifying reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate inhibits the DNA-binding activity of the receptor, and DNA-binding activity is restored after addition of dithiothreitol. In addition, he has examined the relationship between receptor phosphorylation and DNA binding. Untransformed receptor complexes purified from cytosol prepared from mouse L cells grown in medium containing [32P]orthophosphate contain two components, a 100 k-Da and a 90-kDa subunit, both of which are phosphoproteins. On transformation, the receptor dissociates from the 90-kDa protein. Transformation of the complex under cell free conditions does not result in a dephosphorylation of the 100-kDa steroid-binding protein. Transformed receptor that has been bound to DNA and purified by monoclonal antibody is still in a phosphorylated form. These results suggest that dephosphorylation is not required for receptor binding to DNA

  20. Drug binding properties of neonatal albumin

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal and adult albumin was isolated by gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, from adult and umbilical cord serum, respectively. Binding of monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone, warfarin, sulfamethizole, and diazepam was studied by means of equilibrium dialysis and the binding data were analyzed...... by the method of several acceptable fitted curves. It was found that the binding affinity to neonatal albumin is less than to adult albumin for monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone and warfarin. Sulfamethizole binding to the neonatal protein is similarly reduced when more than one molecule of the drug...... is bound per albumin molecule, and binding of the first sulfamethizole molecule is possibly reduced as well. Diazepam binds with equal affinity to the fetal and adult proteins. Among the two main albumin drug-binding functions, for warfarin and diazepam, the former is thus compromised in the newborn...

  1. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  2. Erythropoietin binding sites in human foetal tissues

    Using 125I labelled recombinant DNA human erythropoietin (EP), we have explored the presence and properties of EP binding sites in foetal human tissues. The EP binding site is present in the foetal liver already during the first trimester of pregnancy. The binding site has a equilibrium association constant of 4.1-6.2 x 109l/mol and is specific for EP. The cross-reactivities of FSH, TSH, hCG, insulin and renin substrate were less than 0.01%. The EP binding capacity of foetal liver was 5.4-16 fmol/mg membrane protein. In foetal lung tissue, a slight EP binding activity was observed, whereas foetal spleen, muscle, brain, thyroid and placental tissues were virtually devoid of EP binding capacity. The same level of binding was reached at 37 deg. C in 1 h and at 4 deg. C in 24 h. The binding was pH-dependent with maximal specific binding at pH 7.7. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis analysis of covalently cross-linked 125I-EP to foetal liver membranes suggested that the EP binding site was composed of two subunits with an apparent mol wt of 41000 and 86000 dalton, respectively. (author)

  3. Erythropoietin binding sites in human foetal tissues

    Pekonen, F.; Rosenloef, K.; Rutanen, E.-M.

    1987-01-01

    Using /sup 125/I labelled recombinant DNA human erythropoietin (EP), we have explored the presence and properties of EP binding sites in foetal human tissues. The EP binding site is present in the foetal liver already during the first trimester of pregnancy. The binding site has a equilibrium association constant of 4.1-6.2 x 10/sup 9/l/mol and is specific for EP. The cross-reactivities of FSH, TSH, hCG, insulin and renin substrate were less than 0.01%. The EP binding capacity of foetal liver was 5.4-16 fmol/mg membrane protein. In foetal lung tissue, a slight EP binding activity was observed, whereas foetal spleen, muscle, brain, thyroid and placental tissues were virtually devoid of EP binding capacity. The same level of binding was reached at 37 deg. C in 1 h and at 4 deg. C in 24 h. The binding was pH-dependent with maximal specific binding at pH 7.7. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis analysis of covalently cross-linked /sup 125/I-EP to foetal liver membranes suggested that the EP binding site was composed of two subunits with an apparent mol wt of 41000 and 86000 dalton, respectively.

  4. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of [125I]insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine

  5. The pavA gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae encodes a fibronectin-binding protein that is essential for virulence

    Holmes, AR; McNab, R; Millsap, KW; Rohde, M; Hammerschmidt, S; Mawdsley, JL; Jenkinson, HF

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx in up to 40% of healthy subjects, and is a leading cause of middle ear infections (otitis media), meningitis and pneumonia. Pneumococci adhere to glycosidic receptors on epithelial cells and to immobilized fibronectin, but the bacterial adhesins med

  6. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    Jiang, Tian

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the principal components of most gram-negative bacteria's outer membrane, is a type of contaminant that can be frequently found in recombinant DNA products. Because of its strong and even lethal biological effects, selective LPS removal from bioproducts solution is of particular importance in the pharmaceutical and health care industries. In this thesis, for the first time, a proof-of-concept study on preparing LPS-binding hydrogel-like NPs through facile one-step free-radical polymerization was presented. With the incorporation of various hydrophobic (TBAm), cationic (APM, GUA) monomers and cross-linkers (BIS, PEG), a small library of NPs was constructed. Their FITC-LPS binding behaviors were investigated and compared with those of commercially available LPS-binding products. Moreover, the LPS binding selectivity of the NPs was also explored by studying the NPs-BSA interactions. The results showed that all NPs obtained generally presented higher FITC-LPS binding capacity in lower ionic strength buffer than higher ionic strength. However, unlike commercial poly-lysine cellulose and polymyxin B agarose beads' nearly linear increase of FITC-LPS binding with particle concentration, NPs exhibited serious aggregation and the binding quickly saturated or even decreased at high particle concentration. Among various types of NPs, higher FITC-LPS binding capacity was observed for those containing more hydrophobic monomers (TBAm). However, surprisingly, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM exhibited decreased FITC-LPS binding in high ionic strength conditions. Additionally, when new cationic monomer and cross-linker, GUA and PEG, were applied to replace APM and BIS, the obtained NPs showed improved FITC-LPS binding capacity at low NP concentration. But compared with APM- and BIS-containing NPs, the FITC-LPS binding capacity of GUA- and PEG-containing NPs saturated earlier. To investigate the NPs' binding to proteins, we tested the NPs

  7. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Bairen Zhu; Xi Chen; Xiaodong Cui

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach toward measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone. The trion binding energy of 34meV, two-photon absorption cross s...

  8. A computational model for feature binding

    SHI ZhiWei; SHI ZhongZhi; LIU Xi; SHI ZhiPing

    2008-01-01

    The "Binding Problem" is an important problem across many disciplines, including psychology, neuroscience, computational modeling, and even philosophy. In this work, we proposed a novel computational model, Bayesian Linking Field Model, for feature binding in visual perception, by combining the idea of noisy neuron model, Bayesian method, Linking Field Network and competitive mechanism.Simulation Experiments demonstrated that our model perfectly fulfilled the task of feature binding in visual perception and provided us some enlightening idea for future research.

  9. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity

    Hijiri Hasegawa; Nasa Savory; Koichi Abe; Kazunori Ikebukuro

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of a...

  10. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-01-01

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do no...