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Sample records for adherent human polymorphonuclear

  1. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes in Crohn's disease and ulcerative proctocolitis: association between enhanced adherence to nylon fibre and disease variables.

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R. A.; Thompson, R P

    1988-01-01

    The adherence of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) to nylon fibre was investigated in patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative proctocolitis, and anorexia nervosa, and compared with changes of circulating PMNs, C reactive protein concentrations, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and clinical assessment of disease activity. PMN adherence was in excess of the maximum value detected for healthy subjects in 14 of 25 patients with Crohn's disease and two of 10 with proctocolitis, but it was withi...

  2. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes in Crohn's disease and ulcerative proctocolitis: association between enhanced adherence to nylon fibre and disease variables.

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Thompson, R P

    1988-03-01

    The adherence of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) to nylon fibre was investigated in patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative proctocolitis, and anorexia nervosa, and compared with changes of circulating PMNs, C reactive protein concentrations, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and clinical assessment of disease activity. PMN adherence was in excess of the maximum value detected for healthy subjects in 14 of 25 patients with Crohn's disease and two of 10 with proctocolitis, but it was within the normal range for all eight with anorexia nervosa. High adherence in Crohn's disease, however, was not associated with quantitative or qualitative changes of PMN populations, absolute concentrations of C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, disease severity, drug regimens, malnutrition, or zinc deficiency. High PMN adherence in Crohn's disease may therefore reflect the activation in vivo of normal PMN by humoral factors. PMID:3360954

  3. Effect of plastic catheters on the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    López-López, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1990-05-01

    The effect of five kinds of plastic catheters (polyvinyl chloride, Teflon, polyurethane, Vialon and siliconized latex) on the phagocytic and bactericidal function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was evaluated. In the presence of the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters, superoxide radical production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes was significantly inhibited. The effect of the siliconized latex catheter was presumably mediated by products eluted from the catheter into the medium, since the incubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in eluates obtained from the incubation of this catheter in buffer induced a similar inhibitory effect. This phenomenon was not observed with polyurethane or Vialon catheters. Neither the catheters evaluated nor their eluates affected the uptake of opsonized Staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is concluded that the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters used in this study could impair the respiratory burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:2164932

  4. Uptake of antibiotics by human polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytoplasts

    Hand, W.L.; King-Thompson, N.L. (Veterans Administration Medical Center (Atlanta), Decatur, GA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Enucleated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN cytoplasts), which have no nuclei and only a few granules, retain many of the functions of intact neutrophils. To better define the mechanisms and intracellular sites of antimicrobial agent accumulation in human neutrophils, we studied the antibiotic uptake process in PMN cytoplasts. Entry of eight radiolabeled antibiotics into PMN cytoplasts was determined by means of a velocity gradient centrifugation technique. Uptakes of these antibiotics by cytoplasts were compared with our findings in intact PMN. Penicillin entered both intact PMN and cytoplasts poorly. Metronidazole achieved a concentration in cytoplasts (and PMN) equal to or somewhat less than the extracellular concentration. Chloramphenicol, a lipid-soluble drug, and trimethoprim were concentrated three- to fourfold by cytoplasts. An unusual finding was that trimethroprim, unlike other tested antibiotics, was accumulated by cytoplasts more readily at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. After an initial rapid association with cytoplasts, cell-associated imipenem declined progressively with time. Clindamycin and two macrolide antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin) were concentrated 7- to 14-fold by cytoplasts. This indicates that cytoplasmic granules are not essential for accumulation of these drugs. Adenosine inhibited cytoplast uptake of clindamycin, which enters intact phagocytic cells by the membrane nucleoside transport system. Roxithromycin uptake by cytoplasts was inhibited by phagocytosis, which may reduce the number of cell membrane sites available for the transport of macrolides. These studies have added to our understanding of uptake mechanisms for antibiotics which are highly concentrated in phagocytes.

  5. Comparison of adherent and non-adherent staphylococci in the induction of polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation in vitro

    Riber, U; Espersen, F; Kharazmi, A

    1995-01-01

    the induction of chemiluminescence by planktonic bacteria, S. epidermidis induced a lower response than S. aureus, while when adherent to the catheter segments the bacteria induced similar responses. These responses were only 15 to 20% of those induced by planktonic bacteria and only slightly higher......The ability to consume complement and activate neutrophils was investigated for staphylococci adherent to silicone surfaces and non-adherent staphylococci. Staphylococcus epidermidis strain ATCC 14990 and Staphylococcus aureus strain E 2371 were used in this study. The bacteria were allowed to...... 37 degrees C. The bacteria consumed complement to approximately the same extent when adherent to the catheter segments, but more slowly in comparison with planktonic bacteria. When planktonic bacteria were compared, complement was consumed more quickly by S. epidermidis than by S. aureus. Measuring...

  6. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  7. Viricidal effect of polymorphonuclear leukocytes on human immunodeficiency virus-1. Role of the myeloperoxidase system.

    Klebanoff, S J; Coombs, R W

    1992-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), H2O2, and chloride form an antimicrobial system in neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) effective against a variety of microorganisms. Normal human PMN, when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate or opsonized zymosan, are viricidal to HIV-1. The viricidal effect was lost when chloride was replaced by sulfate and was inhibited by the peroxidase inhibitor azide and by catalase, but not by heated catalase or superoxide dismutase, implicating H2O2. Stimulated...

  8. EFFECTS OF FRUITS OF BARRINGTONIA RACEMOSA LINN. ON HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR CELL

    Sudha Patil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study was to investigate Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and hydroalcoholic extracts of B. racemosa fruits in vitro on human polymorphonuclear (PMN cells to screen their effects on phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Ethyl acetate extract of B. racemosa fruits was found to be a stimulant of PMN cell phagocytosis of Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT dye and candida albicans. It also stimulated intracellur killing capacity of PMN cells. It was further found to increase the chemotaxis of human PMN cells. While, petroleum ether extract and hydroalcoholic extract were lesser active as far as these activities are concerned.

  9. The essential oil of bergamot stimulates reactive oxygen species production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Cosentino, Marco; Luini, Alessandra; Bombelli, Raffaella; Corasaniti, Maria T; Bagetta, Giacinto; Marino, Franca

    2014-08-01

    Bergamot (Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia) essential oil (BEO) is used in folk medicine as an antiseptic and anthelminthic and to facilitate wound healing. Evidence indicates that BEO has substantial antimicrobial activity; however its effects on immunity have never been examined. We studied the effects of BEO on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the role of Ca(2+) in the functional responses evoked by BEO in these cells. Results show that BEO increased intracellular ROS production in human PMN, an effect that required the contribution of extracellular (and, to a lesser extent, of intracellular) Ca(2+) . Bergamot essential oil also significantly increased ROS production induced by the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and reduced the response to the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. In conclusion, this is the first report showing the ability of BEO to increase ROS production in human PMN. This effect could both contribute to the activity of BEO in infections and in tissue healing as well as underlie an intrinsic proinflammatory potential. The relevance of these findings for the clinical uses of BEO needs careful consideration. PMID:24458921

  10. Effect of aspirin on the metabolism of exogenous arachidonic acid in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Punnonen, K.; Uotila, P.

    1984-08-01

    When human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) were incubated with exogenous /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid (/sup 14/C-AA), both lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase metabolites were detected. The amount of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolites formed, including 5-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), was small. The amount of other mono-HETE's (migrating in the vicinity of 12-HETE) was greater, but this was obviously mainly due to the small amount of contaminating platelets. In the presence of calcium ionophore A23187 the rate of formation of 5-HETE was increased, but the formation of other metabolites remained unchanged. When PMNL were incubated with aspirin in the presence of A23187 the formation of the cyclo-oxygenase products was decreased but that of 5-HETE was unchanged. The present study indicates that the calcium ionophore A23187 stimulates specifically the 5-lipoxygenase in human PMNL and that aspirin has no effect on the formation of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid in human PMNL.

  11. CD66 carcinoembryonic antigens mediate interactions between Opa-expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae and human polymorphonuclear phagocytes.

    Gray-Owen, S D; Dehio, C; Haude, A; Grunert, F; Meyer, T F

    1997-06-16

    Colonization of urogenital tissues by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is characteristically associated with purulent exudates of polymorphonuclear phagocytes (PMNs) containing apparently viable bacteria. Distinct variant forms of the phase-variable opacity-associated (Opa) outer membrane proteins mediate the non-opsonized binding and internalization of N. gonorrhoeae by human PMNs. Using overlay assays and an affinity isolation technique, we demonstrate the direct interaction between Opa52-expressing gonococci and members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family which express the CD66 epitope. Gonococci and recombinant Escherichia coli strains synthesizing Opa52 showed specific binding and internalization by transfected HeLa cell lines expressing the CD66 family members BGP (CD66a), NCA (CD66c), CGM1 (CD66d) and CEA (CD66e), but not that expressing CGM6 (CD66b). Bacterial strains expressing either no opacity protein or the epithelial cell invasion-associated Opa50 do not bind these CEA family members. Consistent with their different receptor specificities, Opa52-mediated interactions could be inhibited by polyclonal anti-CEA sera, while Opa50 binding was instead inhibited by heparin. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we observed a marked recruitment of CD66 antigen by Opa52-expressing gonococci on both the transfected cell lines and infected PMNs. These data indicate that members of the CEA family constitute the cellular receptors for the interaction with, and internalization of, N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9218786

  12. Effect of staphylococcal delta-toxin and bee venom peptide melittin on leukotriene induction and metabolism of human polymorphonuclear granulocytes.

    Raulf, M; Alouf, J E; König, W

    1990-01-01

    The abilities of delta-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus and melittin to induce and modulate the generation of leukotriene from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) were studied. Stimulation of PMNs with melittin (10 micrograms) induced leukotriene formation, whereas stimulation with delta-toxin did not. Preincubation of the PMNs with delta-toxin modulated the subsequent generation of leukotriene from PMNs induced by Ca ionophore A23187 or opsonized zymosan. The generation of leukotrien...

  13. Localization of NADH oxidase on the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes by a new cytochemical method.

    Briggs, R T; Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L; Karnovsky, M J

    1975-12-01

    The ultrastructural localization of NADH oxidase, a possible enzyme in the increased oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) during phagocytosis, was studied. A new cytochemical technique for the localization of H2O2, a product of NADH oxidase activity, was developed. Cerous ions, in the presence of peroxide, form an electron-dense precipitate. Resting and phagocytically stimulated PMN were exposed to cerous ions at pH 7.5 to demonstrate sites of NADH-dependent, cyanide-insensitive H2O2 production. Resting PMN exhibites slight activity on the plasma membrane; phagocytizing PMN had extensive deposits of reaction product localized within the phagosome and on the plasma membrane. Peroxide involvement was demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of catalase on cerium precipitation; the surface localization of the enzyme responsible was confirmed by using nonpenetrating inhibitors of enzymatic activity. A correlative study was performed with an NADH-dependent, tetrazolium-reduction system. As with cerium, formazan deposition on the surface of the cell was NADH dependent, cyanide insensitive, and stimulated by phagocytosis. Superoxide dismutase did not inhibit tetrazolium reduction, as observed cytochemically, indicating direct enzymatic dye reduction without superoxide interposition. These findings, combined with oxygen consumption studies on resting and stimulated PMN in the presence or absence of NADH, indicate that NADH oxidase is a surface enzyme in human PMN. It is internalized during phagocytosis and retains its peroxide-generating capacity within the phagocytic vacuole. PMID:407

  14. Evaluation of human polymorphonuclear behavior on textured titanium and calcium-phosphate coated surfaces

    Few studies have evaluated the effects of titanium (Ti) surface modifications on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Human PMNs' viability and release of key mediators—such as IL1β, IL6, TNFα, IL12, IL10, IL4, TGFβ1, IL8, IP-10, and Mig—were evaluated on three different Ti surface treatments: (1) machined Ti; (2) alumina-blasted and acid-etched Ti (AB/AE); and (3) calcium phosphate coating of 300–500 nm by ion beam onto the AB/AE Ti surface (CaP). A polystyrene surface was used as a negative control. The PMNs were purified from whole human blood and cultured for 6 h. Cell viability was determined by flow cytometry, and the supernatant was evaluated to determine the levels of cytokines and chemokines. Results showed that the percentage of viable cells was significantly lower on the CaP surface compared to the control (p < 0.05) relative to the other groups. No differences in the levels of IL8, MIG, and IP10 were detected between groups. Significantly higher levels of IL1β (p = 0.046) and TNFα (p = 0.016) were detected for the CaP surfaces compared to AB/AE surface only. The levels of IL4, IL10, and TGFβ1 secreted from the PMNs in the CaP group were significantly lower than in the control and machined groups (p < 0.05) that were statistically comparable to AB/AE. Overall, the addition of a thin CaP coating to the AB/AE Ti surface influenced the secretion profile of pro-inflammatory cytokines due to the higher release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1β and TNFα) on these surfaces. (paper)

  15. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When [3H] AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of [3H]AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of [3H]AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate)

  16. Resistance of Capnocytophaga canimorsus to killing by human complement and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Shin, Hwain; Mally, Manuela; Meyer, Salome; Fiechter, Chantal; Paroz, Cécile; Zaehringer, Ulrich; Cornelis, Guy R

    2009-06-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a bacterium of the canine oral flora known since 1976 to cause rare but severe septicemia and peripheral gangrene in patients that have been in contact with a dog. It was recently shown that these bacteria do not elicit an inflammatory response (H. Shin, M. Mally, M. Kuhn, C. Paroz, and G. R. Cornelis, J. Infect. Dis. 195:375-386, 2007). Here, we analyze their sensitivity to the innate immune system. Bacteria from the archetype strain Cc5 were highly resistant to killing by complement. There was little membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition in spite of C3b deposition. Cc5 bacteria were as resistant to phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) as Yersinia enterocolitica MRS40, endowed with an antiphagocytic type III secretion system. We isolated Y1C12, a transposon mutant that is hypersensitive to killing by complement via the antibody-dependent classical pathway. The mutation inactivated a putative glycosyltransferase gene, suggesting that the Y1C12 mutant was affected at the level of a capsular polysaccharide or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure. Cc5 appeared to have several polysaccharidic structures, one being altered in Y1C12. The structure missing in Y1C12 could be purified by classical LPS purification procedures and labeled by tritiated palmitate, indicating that it is more likely to be an LPS structure than a capsule. Y1C12 bacteria were also more sensitive to phagocytosis by PMNs than wild-type bacteria. In conclusion, a polysaccharide structure, likely an LPS, protects C. canimorsus from deposition of the complement MAC and from efficient phagocytosis by PMNs. PMID:19307219

  17. Effect of the histaminergic system on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte aggregation and respiratory burst in vitro

    Nosáľ, R.; Drábiková, K.; Jančinová, V.; Číž, Milan; Lojek, Antonín

    Singapore: World Scientific, 2002 - (Stanley, P.; Kricka, L.), s. 285-288 ISBN 981-238-156-2. [Symposium on Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence /12./. Cambridge (GB), 05.04.2002-09.04.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/00/1223 Grant ostatní: VEGA SR(SK) 2/1012/21 Keywords : histamine * dithiaden * polymorphonuclear leukocytes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  18. Hydrogen peroxide signals E. coli phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear cells; up-stream and down-stream pathway.

    Petropoulos, Michalis; Karamolegkou, Georgia; Rosmaraki, Eleftheria; Tsakas, Sotiris

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (Η2Ο2) is produced during a variety of cellular procedures. In this paper, the regulatory role of Η2Ο2, in Escherichia coli phagocytosis by the human polymorphonuclears, was investigated. White blood cells were incubated with dihydrorhodamine (DHR) in order to study H2O2 synthesis and E. coli-FITC to study phagocytosis. Flow cytometry revealed increased synthesis of H2O2 in polymorphonuclears which incorporated E. coli-FITC. The blocking of H2O2 synthesis by specific inhibitors, N-ethylmaleimide (ΝΕΜ) for NADPH oxidase and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) for superoxide dismutase (SOD), decreased E. coli phagocytosis, as well. Immunoblot analysis of white blood cell protein extracts revealed that the blocking of NADPH oxidase and SOD decreased ERK-1/2 phosphorylation, while it had no effect on JNK and p38. Confocal microscopy showed that phosphorylation of MAPKs and phagocytosis solely occur in the polymorphonuclear and not in mononuclear cells. The use of specific MAPKs inhibitors showed that all of them are necessary for phagocytosis, but only phospho-p38 affects H2O2 synthesis. The blocking of JNK phosphorylation, in the presence of E. coli, evoked a further decrease of cytoplasmic p47 thus increasing its translocation onto the plasma membrane for the assembly of NADPH oxidase. It appears that newly synthesised H2O2 invigorates the phosphorylation and action of ERK-1/2 in E. coli phagocytosis, while phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 appear to regulate H2O2 production. PMID:26204503

  19. Characterization of the interaction between recombinant human interferon-gamma and its receptor on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    The interaction of human recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) with human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) was investigated. Bolton-Hunter radioiodinated rIFN-gamma bound to PMN in a specific and saturable manner. Eleven hundred binding sites were observed with a Ka of 0.56 x 10(10) M-1. Binding to PMN was rapid with a K1 of 9 x 10(5) M-1 sec-1 at 4 degree C. At 37 degree C binding was complete within 6 min. About 50% of bound ligand was internalized within 30 min at 37 degree C. The receptor demonstrated moderate lability at 37 degree C in culture. After 1 h at 37 degree C, PMN lost 80% of their 125I-rIFN-gamma binding sites. This loss was reversed in part by the presence of interleukin-1 in the culture, but not tumor necrosis factor. These studies provide a framework for further investigation into the signalling process of rIFN-gamma on PMN

  20. Modulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes function by incubation with human serum from oxidant-challenged individuals

    E Hoffer; T Machamid; A Tabak; Y Baum; A Tamir; Y Lerman

    2003-02-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were tested for stimulated release of superoxide anions after being incubated with serum of welders and of a group of unexposed individuals. These two groups were further subdivided either according to age or to smoking habits. The experiments showed that stimulated superoxide production from PMN was inhibited ( < 0.05) by serum from young smokers as compared to that of young nonsmokers, both from the unexposed group. Incubation of PMN with serum from elderly nonsmoking individuals decreased superoxide production as compared to incubation with serum from young nonsmoking individuals, both from the unexposed group. A decrease in superoxide production by incubation with serum of welders as compared to that of unexposed individuals was significant only when the comparison was carried out between the young, non-smoking subgroups. These findings suggest that age, smoking, and exposure to oxidants induce appearance in serum of factors that affect the PMN function.

  1. Possible in vivo tolerance of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil to low-grade exercise-induced endotoxaemia

    G. Camus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the question of whether translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the blood could be involved in the process of exercise-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN activation, 12 healthy male subjects who took part in a sprint triathlon (1.5 km river swim, 40 km bicycle race, 10 km road race were studied. While there was no detectable amount of endotoxin in the blood samples drawn at rest, exercise was followed by the appearance of circulating endotoxin molecules at the end of competition in four subjects, and after one and 24 h recovery in three and seven athletes, respectively. The concentrations of plasma granulocyte myeloperoxidase ([MPO], were significantly higher immediately after exercise and one hour later than baseline values (P<0.001. This variable returned to pre-race levels the day after exercise, despite the presence of detectable amounts of LPS, at that time, in seven athletes. The absence of significant correlation (r=0.26;P=0.383 and temporal association between [MPO]and plasma endotoxin levels led us to conclude that endotoxaemia was not involved in the process of exercise-induced PMN degranulation observed in our subjects.

  2. Effects of 60Co gamma radiation on defense function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    The effects of radiation on defense function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were studied following irradiation with 60Co γ radiation (30 - 3,000 rad) using PMN separated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. The migration distances for all three measures of chemotaxis to fMet-Leu-Phe (10-8 M), chemokinesis induced by fMet-Leu-Phe, and random migration tended to decrease with increasing dose, showing 0.0054 μm/rad (p -5 M) in conjunction with cytochalasin B (CB, 5 μg/ml) there was a significant dose trend, showing the dose effects of decreasing 0.0022 % release/rad for BGL and 0.0030 % release/rad for LYZ with increasing dose. In superoxide anion (O2-) production, a slight and marginally significant linear dose trend was found. These results suggest that the defense function of PMN is not so resistant to radiation as predicted from the fact that PMN in the peripheral blood are differentiated and mature. It is thought that radiation inflicts substantially harmful effects on the defense function of peripheral PMN. (author)

  3. In vitro phagocytosis of methicillin resistant and methicillin sensitive staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    Staphylococcus aureus is a gram positive bacterium that causes a number of diseases such as abscesses, infective endocarditis, septic arthritis, etc. It is acquiring resistance against many antibiotics like methicillin; therefore its control is becoming increasingly difficult. Peripheral blood phagocytes particularly polymorphonuclear leucocytes play an important role in the protective mechanisms against these organisms. Phagocytes interact with bacteria and phagocytose these microorganisms to kill them. Phenotypically different isolates of Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) were collected from various hospitals of Lahore, Pakistan. Fresh polymorphonuclaer leucocytes were obtained from healthy individuals by centrifugation using Ficol-Hypaque gradient combined with dextran sedimentation. Microbiological method was used for the determination of phagocytic index of phenotypic variants of Staphylococcus aureus. A significant difference was observed between the phagocytic index of both bacterial groups. MSSA group showed the Mean+-SD of 79.46%+-3.9 while MRSA group showed 72.35%+-2.5. Significant difference in phagocytic index indicates that it can be one of the mechanisms of MRSA to evade host immune system as compare to MSSA. (author)

  4. A Novel Murine Anti-Lactoferrin Monoclonal Antibody Activates Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes through Membrane-Bound Lactoferrin and TLR4

    Xiao-Min Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble lactoferrin (LTF is a versatile molecule that not only regulates the iron homeostasis, but also harbors direct microbicidal and immunomodulating abilities in mammalian body fluids. In contrast, little is known about the function of membrane-bound LTF (mbLTF, although its expression on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (huPMNs has been reported for decades. Given that LTF/anti-LTF antibodies represent a potential diagnostic/prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in patients with immune disorders, we wished, in the present study, to generate a novel human LTF- (huLTF- specific mAb suitable for detailed analyses on the expression and function of mbLTF as well as for deciphering the underlying mechanisms. By using the traditional hybridoma cell fusion technology, we obtained a murine IgG1 (kappa mAb, M-860, against huLTF. M-860 recognizes a conformational epitope of huLTF as it binds to natural, but not denatured, huLTF in ELISA. Moreover, M-860 detects mbLTF by FACS and captures endogenous huLTF in total cell lysates of huPMNs. Functionally, M-860 induces the activation of huPMNs partially through TLR4 but independently of phagocytosis. M-860 is thus a powerful tool to analyze the expression and function of human mbLTF, which will further our understanding of the roles of LTF in health and disease.

  5. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. [3H]Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes

  6. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. (Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  7. Subcellular localisation and properties of histone phosphate phosphatase in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: alterations in pregnancy and chronic granulocytic leukaemia and relationship to alkaline phosphatase

    Using [32P]histone as substrate, an assay for histone phosphate phosphatase was optimised for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Kinetic studies showed that the activity was optimal at pH 6.8, was stimulated by Mn2+ and Co2+, and inhibited by sodium sulphite and zinc chloride. The apparent Ksub(m) of the enzyme for histone phosphate was 0.89 μmol/l. (Auth.)

  8. The role of oxidative metabolism in human polymorphonuclear leucocyte functions mediated by the specific receptor for N-formyl peptides

    Studies on the effects of auto-oxidation on the function of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) were performed on PMNL purified on ficoll-metrizoate cushions at room temperature. Auto-oxidation of PMNL was simulated. N-formyl peptide-dependent chemotaxis, chemokinesis and respiratory burst were inhibited by PMNL auto-oxidation. The oxidising system caused iodination as well as sulphydryl oxidation of PMNL. These effects were all prevented and reversed by antioxidants. Lysozyme release as well as total binding of radiolabelled peptide were increased by PMNL auto-oxidation. Whole PMNL and specific granules were covalently linked to an iodinated N-formyl peptide. After electrophoresis and autoradiography a diffuse band was common to both PMNL and granules, while PMNL displayed three additional bands and granules one additional band. Pre-incubation of PMNL at 37 degrees Celsius revealed most intense labelling of the diffuse band. Thin-layer chromatography of radiolabelled N-formyl peptides revealed a methionine-independent structural alteration mediated by PMNL and supernatants from stimulated PMNL. Tritium, Carbon 14 and Iodine 125 were used in these experiments for radiolabelling compounds

  9. Potentiation of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes respiratory burst and phagocytosis by a standardized liver and spleen fraction of peptides.

    Cramer, R; Dri, P; Spessotto, P; Mittenzwei, H; Patriarca, P

    1993-06-01

    The effect of Factor AF2 (AF2), a xenogeneic fraction of peptides with a molecular weight of < 10,000 Dalton obtained from livers and spleens of newborn lambs, on the oxygen consumption and the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was studied. AF2 increased the oxygen uptake of PMN exposed both to serum-treated zymosan (STZ), a phagocytosable stimulus, and phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA), a soluble stimulus. The potentiating effect of the drug was dose-dependent and more pronounced when suboptimal amounts of either stimulus were used. The phagocytic activity of PMN, as measured by the rate of mineral oil particles ingestion, was also increased by AF2 in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the drug may influence PMN behaviour in at least two ways: 1. by increasing the rate of phagocytosis, and 2. by potentiating the respiratory burst induced by soluble and particulate stimuli. The results are discussed in relation to the beneficial effects of AF2 in cancer patients under chemotherapy or radiation treatment. PMID:8352824

  10. Human plasma fibronectin inhibits adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane.

    Courtney, H S; Ofek, I.; Simpson, W A; Whitnack, E; Beachey, E H

    1985-01-01

    The effect of human plasma fibronectin on the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane droplets was investigated. Fibronectin blocked the adherence of streptococci to hexadecane in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect resulted from the binding of fibronectin to the streptococcal cells; radiolabeled fibronectin failed to bind to the hexadecane but bound readily to untreated streptococci. Chemical treatments of streptococci that decreased streptococcal binding of fibronectin ...

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  12. Gene Expression in HL60 Granulocytoids and Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Exposed to Candida albicans†

    Mullick, Alaka; Elias, Miria; Harakidas, Penelope; Marcil, Anne; Whiteway, Malcolm; Ge, Bing; Hudson, Thomas J.; Caron, Antoine W; Bourget, Lucie; Picard, Serge; Jovcevski, Orce; Massie, Bernard; Thomas, David Y.

    2004-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen causing both superficial and disseminated diseases. It is a dimorphic fungus, switching between yeast and hyphal forms, depending on cues from its microenvironment. Hyphae play an important role in the pathogenesis of candidiasis. The host's response to Candida infection is multifaceted and includes the participation of granulocytes as key effector cells. The aim of this investigation was to study host gene expression during granulocyte-Cand...

  13. Leukotriene B4 modulates human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) phospholipid (PL) methylation

    Formation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is required for transduction of chemotactic factor messages in phagocytic cells, including the development of a motile configuration and release of arachidonic acid (AA) from PL. The authors examined PL methylation in human peripheral blood PMN following stimulation by leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent chemotactic lipid metabolite of AA that is produced by human PMN. [3H]-methionine, in the presence or absence of LTB4, was added directly to the cells without a preloading period. [3H]-methyl mono- and di-methylated PE, PC and lyso PC were separated by thin layer chromatography. PL methylation in human PMN is dependent on time of incubation, LTB4 concentration and methionine concentration. The optimal LTB4 concentration is 10-7 M, the same concentration that induces a maximal chemotactic response in PMN. At early time points (2-10 min), formation of methylated PL is enhanced following LTB4 stimulation. In contrast, at later time points (20-60 min), methylated PL synthesis in LTB4 treated cells is depressed or the same as control cells. Synthesis of PC by the choline transferase pathway is not affected by LTB4 stimulation. This data shows that, at early time points following LTB4 stimulation, PL methylation is enhanced. This correlates with other reports of calcium mobilization and chemotaxis in PMN at early time points following LTB4 stimulation

  14. Effects of Montelukast on free radical production in whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children

    Al Saadi, Muslim M.; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Mustafa, Ali; Shafi, Ahmed; Tuwajri, Ali S. Al

    2011-01-01

    Montelukast is a highly selective leukotriene-receptor antagonist (LTRA). It is widely used in the treatment of bronchial asthma, primarily as an adjunct to corticosteroids. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and oxidative stress contributing to the initiation and worsening of inflammatory respiratory disorders, such as asthma. Antioxidant drugs may have a role in minimizing or preventing damage in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant effect of montelukast on the production of free radicals in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children. A group of 48 (38 males and 10 females), apparently healthy asthmatic children were recruited with ages ranging between 6 and 14 years. In asthmatic children, base line (premedication) and post medication free radicals activity in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was determined by measuring chemiluminescence (CL) response through chemiluminescence luminometer. Free radical productions were significantly decreased in the whole blood, when stimulated with Phorbol Myristate Acetate (p < 0.04) and Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05). The free radicals were also significantly decreased in isolated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) when stimulated with Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05) after the post medication treatment of montelukast in asthmatic children. Montelukast decreased the reactive oxygen species production, both in the whole blood as well as isolated PMNs in asthmatic children. PMID:23960762

  15. Immunosenescence of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    Inga Wessels

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available All immune cells are affected by aging, contributing to the high susceptibility to infections and increased mortality observed in the elderly. The effect of aging on cells of the adaptive immune system is well documented. In contrast, knowledge concerning age-related defects of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is limited. During the past decade, it has become evident that in addition to their traditional role as phagocytes, neutrophils are able to secrete a wide array of immunomodulating molecules. Their importance is underlined by the finding that genetic defects that lead to neutropenia increase susceptibility to infections. Whereas there is consistence about the constant circulating number of PMN throughout aging, the abilities of tissue infiltration, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst of PMN from aged donors are discussed controversially. Furthermore, there are numerous discrepancies between in vivo and in vitro results, as well as between results for murine and human PMN. Most of the reported functional changes can be explained by defective signaling pathways, but further research is required to get a detailed insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. This could form the basis for drug development in order to prevent or treat age-related diseases, and thus to unburden the public health systems.

  16. Relationship between germination of Candida albicans and increased adherence to human buccal epithelial cells.

    Kimura, L H; Pearsall, N N

    1980-01-01

    A strong correlation was shown between germination and increased adherence of Candida albicans to human buccal epithelial cells, indicating that germination or other changes in the fungi accompanying germination were responsible for enhanced adherence. Partial inhibition of germination by cysteine resulted in a comparably lower adherence. Preferential adherence of germinated fungi occurred in competition assays with nongerminated and germinated fungi. The enhanced adherence to human mucosal c...

  17. A quantitative in vitro assay of polymorphonuclear leukocyte migraton through human amnion membrane utilizing 111In-oxine

    A modified amnion chemotaxis assay is described for measurement of polymorphonuclear leukocyte(s) (PMNL) migration (random and directed) into a viable membrane. The primary modifications are the use of 111In-oxine-labelled PMNL and replacement of the nitrocellulose 'trap' filter with a type I collagen sponge. The modifications resulted in four important benefits: (1) the quantification of PMNL migration was simplified; (2) reader subjectivity was eliminated; (3) the information gained of the migration process was enhanced; and (4) the assay time was decreased. The amnion chemotaxis assay with the modifications reported should provide the means of evaluating several aspects of the inflammatory response of PMNL. (Auth.)

  18. Adherence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 to human epithelial cells and to hexadecane.

    Rosenberg, M; Perry, A; Bayer, E A; Gutnick, D. L.; Rosenberg, E.; Ofek, I.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 to adhere to human epithelial cells was investigated and compared with its ability to adhere to a test hydrocarbon (hexadecane). RAG-1, a microorganism originally isolated for growth on hydrocarbon, adhered to epithelial cells when grown under conditions which promote its adherence to hexadecane; similarly, RAG-1 cells adhered poorly to epithelial cells when grown under conditions which cause the cells to possess low affinity towards hexadecane...

  19. A 220-kilodalton glycoprotein in yeast extract inhibits Staphylococcus aureus adherence to human endothelial cells.

    Elliott, D.A.; Hatcher, V B; Lowy, F D

    1991-01-01

    A 220-kDa glycoprotein from yeast extract causes a twofold decrease in S. aureus adherence to human endothelial cells in vitro. Medium constituents can have a significant effect on bacterial adherence interactions.

  20. Human Insulin Modulation of Escherichia coli Adherence and Chemotaxis

    Karolina Klosowska

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli exhibited increased hydrophobicity and mannose-resistant epithelial cell adherence after growth in the presence of human insulin (2 µU mLˉ1 or 200 µUmLˉ1 insulin, respectively with glucose (100 mg dLˉ1. Capsule production and hemagglutination were unaffected by insulin and glucose. Chemotactic attraction to glucose as compared to insulin or glucose alone was enhanced by the presence of insulin. Insulin alone (200 µU mLˉ1 was a chemorepellent and inhibited flagellar tethering to glass. These findings indicate that human insulin can modulate E. coli’s expression of factors associated with pathogenesis in a manner that is modifiable by the presence of glucose.

  1. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  2. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to primary human gastrointestinal cells.

    Clyne, M.; Drumm, B

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori adheres only to gastric cells in vivo. However, the organism adheres to a wide variety of nongastric cells in vitro. In this study, we have used flow cytometry to assess the adherence of H. pylori to primary epithelial cells isolated from gastric, duodenal, and colonic biopsy specimens by collagenase digestion. After incubation of bacteria and cells together and subsequent staining with a two-stage fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled H. pylori antibody method, cells with a...

  3. Promotion of DNA strand breaks in cocultured mononuclear leukocytes by protein kinase C-dependent prooxidative interactions of benoxaprofen, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and ultraviolet radiation

    At concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml and greater the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug benoxaprofen caused dose-related activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Benoxaprofen-mediated activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence by PMNL was increased by UV radiation and was particularly sensitive to inhibition by the selective protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. To identify the molecular mechanism of the prooxidative activity of benoxaprofen, the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug on the activity of purified protein kinase C in a cell-free system were investigated. Benoxaprofen caused a dose-related activation of protein kinase C by interaction with the binding site for the physiological activator phosphatidylserine, but could not replace diacylglycerol. When autologous mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) were cocultured with PMNL and benoxaprofen in combination, but not individually, the frequency of DNA strand breaks in MNL was markedly increased. UV radiation significantly potentiated damage to DNA mediated by benoxaprofen and PMNL. Inclusion of superoxide dismutase, H-7, and, to a much lesser extent, catalase during exposure of MNL to benoxaprofen-activated PMNL prevented oxidant damage to DNA. These results clearly demonstrate that potentially carcinogenic prooxidative interactions, which are unlikely to be detected by conventional assays of mutagenicity, may occur between phagocytes, UV radiation, and certain pharmacological agents

  4. Promotion of DNA strand breaks in cocultured mononuclear leukocytes by protein kinase C-dependent prooxidative interactions of benoxaprofen, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and ultraviolet radiation

    Schwalb, G.; Beyers, A.D.; Anderson, R.; Nel, A.E.

    1988-06-01

    At concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml and greater the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug benoxaprofen caused dose-related activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Benoxaprofen-mediated activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence by PMNL was increased by UV radiation and was particularly sensitive to inhibition by the selective protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. To identify the molecular mechanism of the prooxidative activity of benoxaprofen, the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug on the activity of purified protein kinase C in a cell-free system were investigated. Benoxaprofen caused a dose-related activation of protein kinase C by interaction with the binding site for the physiological activator phosphatidylserine, but could not replace diacylglycerol. When autologous mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) were cocultured with PMNL and benoxaprofen in combination, but not individually, the frequency of DNA strand breaks in MNL was markedly increased. UV radiation significantly potentiated damage to DNA mediated by benoxaprofen and PMNL. Inclusion of superoxide dismutase, H-7, and, to a much lesser extent, catalase during exposure of MNL to benoxaprofen-activated PMNL prevented oxidant damage to DNA. These results clearly demonstrate that potentially carcinogenic prooxidative interactions, which are unlikely to be detected by conventional assays of mutagenicity, may occur between phagocytes, UV radiation, and certain pharmacological agents.

  5. A new combined assay of phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Escherichia coli by polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    A new combined radiometric assay is described in which adherence, and phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) are simultaneously measured in the same sample. Pure monolayers of PMN in Petri dishes are allowed to ingest [14C]phenylalanine labelled E. coli and excess bacteria are removed by washing. A period of incubation allows intracellular killing to occur while polymyxin-B is added to half the dishes to kill extracellular bacteria. The remaining viable bacteria in all dishes are labelled with [3H]thymidine. The number of ingested bacteria and the percentage of intracellular organisms killed is determined from the 14C and 3H counts by a simple subtraction technique. By performing protein assays on representative monolayers, the number of PMN adhered in the monolayers and hence the mean bacterial uptake per PMN is estimated. The assay detected killing efficiencies reduced below the normal range, in monolayers treated with sodium azide, phenylbutazone, in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, and in immature neutrophils from the promyelocytic leukaemic cell line, HL60. The assay was adapted to measure phagocytosis and killing by cells in suspension. (Auth.)

  6. Release of human immunodeficiency virus by THP-1 cells and human macrophages is regulated by cellular adherence and activation.

    Shattock, R.J.; Friedland, J S; Griffin, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    Macrophage adherence, an important regulatory signal, has the potential to affect human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production either directly or by priming monocytes to respond to other activating signals. We have investigated the role of adherence as an activator of HIV-1 transcription and release. The effects of adherence on HIV-1 transcription were examined by using THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, transfected with HIV long terminal repeat (LTR)-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase...

  7. Enhanced adherence of Strontococcus pneumoniae to human epithelial cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus

    Hament, JM; Aerts, PC; Fleer, A; Van Dijk, H; Kimpen, JLL; Wolfs, TFW

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the effect of a preceding respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of human respiratory epithelial cells on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae tested by means of a cytometric fluorescence assay. Adherence of clinically relevant pneumococcal serotypes 3, 9,

  8. Measurement of arachidonic acid release from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and platelets: comparison between gas chromatographic and radiometric assays

    a simple gas chromatographic method for the assay of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) has been described in which arachidonic acid released from endogenous phospholipid pools is measured following its extraction and derivatization to pentafluorobenzyl esters. Using this assay, PLA2 activities in control and calcium ionophore-stimulated human neutrophils, as well as in control, thrombin, and calcium ionophore stimulated human platelets, have been measured. These values are compared with those obtained by monitoring the release of radioactivity from 3H- or 14Carachidonic acid prelabeled cells. While the radiometric assay measures only the release of exogenously incorporated radioactive arachidonic acid, the gas chromatographic assay measures arachidonic acid released from all the endogenous pools. Thus, the apparent increase in PLA2 activity in stimulated cells measured by the gas chromatographic assay is four- to fivefold higher than that by the radiometric assay. Inclusion of fatty acid free bovine serum albumin in the reaction buffer significantly increases the amount of arachidonic acid that is measured by gas chromatography. The gas chromatographic method has also been successfully utilized for measuring PLA2 activity in cell-free preparations derived from physically disrupted human neutrophils

  9. Study of the inhibition by polymorphonuclear leukocytes of TNF-α release from human mononuclear cells and its mechanism

    2001-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of human PMNs on the production of TNF-α by the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and to elucidate its tentative mechanism. Human PMNs and PBMCs were isolated from the venous blood of healthy donors by dextran sedimentation and density gradient centrifugation. In the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PMNs and PBMCs were cocultured at the ratio of 2:1 for 20 h and the concentration of TNF-α in the supernatant was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The binding rate of monocytes with the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled LPS (FITC-LPS) and the mean surface fluorescence intensity of monocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results showed that PMNs were capable of inhibiting the TNF-α release from PBMCs (P<0.05). PMNs suppressed the TNF-α release from PBMCs by 45% on average when PMNs and PBMCs cocultured at the ratio of 2:1. Paraformaldehyde-fixed PMNs still demonstrated the same inhibition (P<0.05),which proved that the inhibition was dependent on cell-to-cell contact and suggested that effector molecules responsible for this effect existed on the cell surface of PMNs. In the presence of PMNs, the binding rate of monocytes with the FITC-LPS and the mean surface fluorescence intensity of monocytes were not affected compared with PBMCs alone (P>0.05). As incubation time was prolonged, the binding of FITC-LPS to monocytes increased (P<0.05). Thus PMNs did not block the binding of LPS with monocytes. It was concluded that PMNs suppressed the TNF-α release from PBMCs via cell-to-cell interaction. In a cell-contact dependent manner, PMNs might interfere with the signal transduction pathway through which LPS activated PBMCs, thus attenuating the response of PBMCs to LPS and downregulating the TNF-α release.

  10. Antiretroviral regimen and suboptimal medication adherence are associated with low-level human immunodeficiency virus viremia.

    Konstantopoulos, Christina; Ribaudo, Heather; Ragland, Kathleen; Bangsberg, David R; Li, Jonathan Z

    2015-01-01

    Episodes of human immunodeficiency virus low-level viremia (LLV) are common in the clinical setting, but its association with antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen and adherence remains unclear. Antiretroviral therapy adherence was evaluated in participants of the Research on Access to Care in the Homeless cohort by unannounced pill counts. Factors associated with increased risk of LLV include treatment with a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen (ritonavir-boosted PI vs nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor: adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 3.1; P = .01) and lower ART adherence over the past 3 months (HR, 1.1 per 5% decreased adherence, adjusted; P = .050). Patients with LLV may benefit from ART adherence counseling and potentially regimen modification. PMID:25884007

  11. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E.; Rosso, A.; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G.; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the for...

  12. The requirements for transferrin-dependent adherence of human granulocytes to pollen grains

    Human granulocyte/pollen binding protein (GPBP), previously identified as serum transferrin, promoted prolonged firm adherence of neutraphils to Timothy grass pollen. Some characteristics of this adherence reaction are reported. GPBP-induced binding was time-, temperature- and concentration-dependent. Maximal adherence was observed by 2 h and was only slightly decreased at 18 h. The optimal temperature for adherence was 37 deg C. Concentrations og GPBP as low as 1.25 μg/ml gave significantly greater binding than the albumin or lactoferrin control. Eosinophils, monocytes and lymphocytes did not appear to participate in GPBP-induced pollen binding reactions at concentrations up to 300 μg/ml. In the presence of GPBP, neutrophils adhered to a range of grass, weed and tree pollens. These included timothy, meadow, false oat, rye, giant and short ragweed, plantain, silver birch and ash. GPBP did not facilitate the adherence of granulocytes to inert particles of similar size such as Sephadex beads and agarose. The adherence was Mg++- but not Ca++-dependent and was not inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to the transferrin receptor (OKT9). Transferrin/GPBP did not bind to either neutrophils or pollen grains. A Purified commercial transferrin reacted in all respects like GPBP in these pollen binding studies. These observations indicate that GPBP/transferrin-induced adherence of granulocytes to pollen grains is a hitherto unrecognized property of transferrin which appears unrelated to iron transport or the conventional transferrin receptor. (author)

  13. 111In)oxine labelling of polymorphonuclear leucocytes: doubts concerning elution and effects on cell behaviour

    Sheehan, N.J.; Brown, K.A.; Camacho, A.; Dumonde, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) from normal human subjects were labelled with (111In)oxine (20 muCi 10(8) cells). In the presence of 20% autologous serum (AS), dissociation of 111In from the cells resulted in mean losses of radioactivity of 13% at 3 h and 30% at 24 h. Adherence of 111In-labelled PMN to cultured porcine endothelial monolayers was increased by 40.7 +/- 31.6% after 60 min incubation in 20% AS at 37 degrees C when compared with unlabelled cells. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Candida albicans were unaltered by labelling. Elution of 111In from labelled PMN together with enhanced adhesiveness may have important implications for the study of PMN kinetics and the investigation of inflammatory disease.

  14. Killing of Proteus mirabilis by polymorphonuclear leukocyte granule proteins: evidence for species specificity by antimicrobial proteins.

    Shafer, W M; Engle, S A; Martin, L E; Spitznagel, J K

    1988-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (Mr, ca. 3,800) polypeptides containing human defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 (T. Ganz, M. S. Selsted, D. Szlarek, S. L. Harwig, K. Daher, D. F. Bainton, and R. I. Lehrer, J. Clin. Invest. 76:1427-1434, 1985) prepared in our laboratory from acid extracts of human polymorphonuclear granulocyte granules and purified human defensins were found to exert potent bactericidal action against Proteus mirabilis. The antimicrobial action of the extracts of human polymorphonuclear leukocyt...

  15. Kinetics of staphylococcal opsonization, attachment, ingestion and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: a quantitative assay using [3H]thymidine labelled bacteria

    A method has been developed for studying quantitatively the separate processes of bacterial opsonization, phagocytosis and killing by hyman polymorphonuclear leukocytes using [3H]thymidine labelled staphylococcus aureus. Phagocytosis is determined by assaying for leukocytes-associated radioactivity after different centrifugation and washing the leukoctes. Opsonization is studied by incubating bacteria with an opsonic source for varying durations and then adding leukocytes. By treatment of samples with the muralytic enzyme, lysostaphin, the attachment and ingestion phases of phagocytosis can be separated. Sampling for colony forming units after disruption of the leukocytes permits the measurement of gacterial killing. Using this method, differences in the kinetics of staphylococcal opsonization by normal and C2 deficient sera were defined, opsonic influences on the attachment and ingestion phases of phagocytosis were delineated, and the influences of different opsonins and leukocyte populations on killing were determined

  16. Adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis

    CHAO GU; JIN YING CHEN; MIN HOU; JING DONG HE; JI WU CHANG

    2006-01-01

    Human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis was established to investigate the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to this cell line, in which the primary cell culture was performed by using cultivation of the normal epithelium of renal pelvis in keratinocyte serum free medium (K-SFM)with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and bovine pituitary extract (BPE). Both UPEC132 obtained from urine specimen of patients with pyelonephritis and the pilus-free representative strain E. coli K-12p678-54 were used to study the adherence of these strains on human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis.The UPEC adherence was performed with observation on the morphological changes of the adhered cells,while the adhesion rates and indices were calculated in different times of experiment. In addition, the virulence genes hly and cnf1 of UPEC132 were detected by multiplex PCR assay. In this study, the human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis was found to exhibit the character of the transitional epithelial cells. Compared with the control group, the adhesion rates and indices began to increase from 15 min of the experiment time and reached its peak in 120 min. The adhesion rate and index of UPEC132 to human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis were 74.4% and 34.0 respectively. Many microscopic changes in the primary cells adhered with UPEC132 could be detected, such as rounding or irregularity in shape,unevenness in staining and the cytoplasmic and nuclear changes. It suggests that human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis can be used for the experiment on UPEC adhesion, thus providing a basis for the further study on the pathogenesis of UPEC.

  17. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Alistair eWalsham; Donald eMacKenzie; Vivienne eCook; Simon eWemyss-Holden; Claire eHews; Nathalie eJuge; Stephanie eSchüller

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small ...

  18. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    Kekwaletswe CT; Morojele NK

    2014-01-01

    Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a...

  19. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro.

    Farowski, Fedja; Cornely, Oliver A; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-06-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time. PMID:27021317

  20. Filamentous hemagglutinin has a major role in mediating adherence of Bordetella pertussis to human WiDr cells.

    Urisu, A; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1986-01-01

    [35S]methionine-labeled Bordetella pertussis adhered to monolayers of WiDr cells, an epitheliumlike cell line from a human intestinal carcinoma. Adherence was proportional to the density of the WiDr cells and to the concentration of B. pertussis in the assay. Adherence of virulent phase I strains Tohama phase I, 114, and BP338 was much greater than adherence of avirulent strains Tohama phase III and 423 phase IV. Mutants deficient in the production of the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) were ...

  1. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Walsham, Alistair D. S.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L.; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as hum...

  2. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium.

    Walsham, Alistair D S; MacKenzie, Donald A; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26973622

  3. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Alistair eWalsham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC A/E lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains.

  4. Human Insulin Modulation of Escherichia coli Adherence and Chemotaxis

    Karolina Klosowska; Plotkin, Balbina J.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli exhibited increased hydrophobicity and mannose-resistant epithelial cell adherence after growth in the presence of human insulin (2 µU mLˉ1 or 200 µUmLˉ1 insulin, respectively) with glucose (100 mg dLˉ1). Capsule production and hemagglutination were unaffected by insulin and glucose. Chemotactic attraction to glucose as compared to insulin or glucose alone was enhanced by the presence of insulin. Insulin alone (200 µU mLˉ1) was a chemorepellent and inhibit...

  5. Labeled polymorphonuclear leukocytes: a comparison of methodology

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes were separated from anti-coagulated whole blood using three techniques. The methods employed included volex sedimentation (VS), volex sedimentation with hypotonic lysis (VSHL), and Ficoll-Hypaque gradient separation (FH). The cells were labeled with 111In-oxine and 111In-tropolone. Studies were done with both blood from normal human volunteers and with canine blood. From the cell counts and differential, the harvested granulocytes, platelets, and red blood cells per milliliter of whole blood were calculated. Using the granulocyte chemotactic response to E. coli in agarose plates, the ratio of chemotactic migration to random migration (c./r.m.) was determined. Survival time for 111In labeled granulocytes were also determined in a canine model. The studies demonstrated that all procedures yielded 100% viability by the Trypan blue exclusion test. Chemotactic migration and leukocyte survival times were similar amongst all techniques. With the VSHL technique, there were significantly fewer red blood cells and platelets in the final preparation approaching the results of FH separation. The results suggest that, for a relatively pure granulocyte preparation, VSHL is an acceptable alternative to FH. (author)

  6. A comparison of the adherence of fimbriated and nonfimbriated Haemophilus influenzae type b to human adenoids in organ culture.

    Loeb, M R; Connor, E; Penney, D

    1988-01-01

    Adherence of fimbriated and nonfimbriated variants of a single strain of Haemophilus influenzae type b to organ cultures of human adenoidal tissue was measured by three assays, two of which were quantitative. In one assay, the adherence of radioactively labeled bacteria was measured; the numbers of CFU of bacteria per gram of adenoidal tissue were 16.0 +/- 6.7 for fimbriated bacteria and 10.2 +/- 4.0 for nonfimbriated bacteria (P less than 0.05). In the second assay, adherent CFU were determi...

  7. Fibrinogen acts as a bridging molecule in the adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to cultured human endothelial cells.

    Cheung, A L; Krishnan, M.; Jaffe, E A; Fischetti, V A

    1991-01-01

    The propensity of Staphylococcus aureus to cause acute endovascular infections during transient bacteremia is poorly understood. To examine the events leading to the attachment of staphylococci to endothelium, adherence assays were developed to study the role of blood factors in the mediation of staphylococcal adherence to cultured human umbilical vein endothelium in vitro. Results indicate that the preferential attachment of S. aureus to endothelial cells is mediated by fibrinogen adsorbed f...

  8. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with 3H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P 0C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP

  9. Human responses to Florida red tides: policy awareness and adherence to local fertilizer ordinances.

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kohler, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Scheller, Karen; Reich, Andrew; Hitchcock, Gary; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Ullmann, Steven; Hoagland, Porter

    2014-09-15

    To mitigate the damages of natural hazards, policy responses can be beneficial only if they are effective. Using a self-administered survey approach, this paper focuses on the adherence to local fertilizer ordinances (i.e., county or municipal rules regulating the application of fertilizer to private lawns or facilities such as golf courses) implemented in jurisdictions along the Southwest Florida coast in response to hazardous blooms of Florida red tides (Karenia brevis). These ordinances play a role in the context of evolving programs of water pollution control at federal, state, water basin, and local levels. With respect to policy effectiveness, while the strength of physical linkages is of critical importance, the extent to which humans affected are aware of and adhere to the relevant rules, is equally critical. We sought to understand the public's depth of understanding about the rationales for local fertilizer ordinances. Respondents in Sarasota, Florida, were asked about their fertilizer practices in an area that has experienced several major blooms of Florida red tides over the past two decades. A highly educated, older population of 305 residents and "snowbirds" reported relatively little knowledge about a local fertilizer ordinance, its purpose, or whether it would change the frequency, size, or duration of red tides. This finding held true even among subpopulations that were expected to have more interest in or to be more knowledgeable about harmful algal blooms. In the face of uncertain science and environmental outcomes, and with individual motivations at odds with evolving public policies, the effectiveness of local community efforts to decrease the impacts of red tides may be compromised. Targeted social-science research on human perceptions about the risks of Florida red tides and education about the rationales for potential policy responses are warranted. PMID:25003583

  10. Adherence and acceptability of once daily Lamivudine and abacavir in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infected children.

    LePrevost, M.; Green, H.; Flynn, J.; Head, S.; Clapson, M.; Lyall, H.; Novelli, V.; Farrelly, L.; Walker, A.S.; Burger, D.M.; Gibb, D.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on adherence to and acceptability of once daily lamivudine and abacavir are few. METHODS: Twenty-four U.K. human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infected children 2-13 years of age participated in the Pediatric European Network for the Treatment of AIDS (PENTA) 13 single arm, open lab

  11. ADAM9 Is a Novel Product of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    Roychaudhuri, Robin; Hergrueter, Anja H; Polverino, Francesca;

    2014-01-01

    A disintegrin and a metalloproteinase domain (ADAM) 9 is known to be expressed by monocytes and macrophages. In this study, we report that ADAM9 is also a product of human and murine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). ADAM9 is not synthesized de novo by circulating PMNs. Rather, ADAM9 protein is...... stored in the gelatinase and specific granules and the secretory vesicles of human PMNs. Unstimulated PMNs express minimal quantities of surface ADAM9, but activation of PMNs with degranulating agonists rapidly (within 15 min) increases PMN surface ADAM9 levels. Human PMNs produce small quantities of...... soluble forms of ADAM9. Surprisingly, ADAM9 degrades several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including fibronectin, entactin, laminin, and insoluble elastin, as potently as matrix metalloproteinase-9. However, ADAM9 does not degrade types I, III, or IV collagen or denatured collagens in vitro. To...

  12. An in vitro adherence assay reveals that Helicobacter pylori exhibits cell lineage-specific tropism in the human gastric epithelium.

    Falk, P; Roth, K A; Borén, T; Westblom, T U; Gordon, J I; Normark, S

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic bacterium found in the stomach of asymptomatic humans as well as patients with acid peptic disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. We have developed an in situ adherence assay to examine the cell lineage-specific nature of binding of this organism and to characterize the nature of cell surface receptors that recognize its adhesin. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled H. pylori strains were bound to surface mucous cells present in the pit region of human and ...

  13. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Verônica Fernandes Vianna; Danielle Cabral Bonfim; Amanda dos Santos Cavalcanti; Marco Cury Fernandes; Suzana Assad Kahn; Priscila Ladeira Casado; Inayá Correa Lima; Murray, Samuel S.; Elsa J. Brochmann Murray; Maria Eugenia Leite Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we...

  14. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 TFs and others Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 TFs and others Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 TFs and others Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  12. The influence of dietary carbohydrates on in vitro adherence of four Candida species to human buccal epithelial cells

    Abu-Elteen, Khaled H.

    2011-01-01

    The adherence of four Candida species to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) following treatment with the most commonly consumed dietary carbohydrates was investigated in vitro. Adhesion of C. albicans , C. tropicalis , C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis was significantly promoted by incubation in minimal medium containing a high concentration (500 mM) of fructose, galactose, glucose, maltose, sorbitol or sucrose (p<0.001). C. albicans grown in galactose elicited maximal increase in adhesion...

  13. Human Placenta-Derived Adherent Cells Improve Cardiac Performance in Mice With Chronic Heart Failure

    Chen, Hong-Jung; Chen, Chien-Hsi; Chang, Ming-Yao; Tsai, Da-Ching; Baum, Ellen Z.; Hariri, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Human placenta-derived adherent cells (PDACs) are a culture-expanded, undifferentiated mesenchymal-like population derived from full-term placental tissue, with immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and neuroprotective properties. PDA-001 (cenplacel-L), an intravenous formulation of PDAC cells, is in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We tested the therapeutic effects of PDA-001 in mice with chronic heart failure (CHF). Three weeks after transaortic constriction surgery to induce CHF, the mice underwent direct intramyocardial (IM) or i.v. injection of PDA-001 at a high (0.5 × 106 cells per mouse), medium (0.5 × 105 cells per mouse), or low (0.5 × 104 cells per mouse) dose. The mice were sacrificed 4 weeks after treatment. Echocardiography and ventricular catheterization showed that IM injection of PDA-001 significantly improved left ventricular systolic and diastolic function compared with injection of vehicle or i.v. injection of PDA-001. IM injection of PDA-001 also decreased cardiac fibrosis, shown by trichrome staining in the vicinity of the injection sites. Low-dose treatment showed the best improvement in cardiac performance compared with the medium- and high-dose groups. In another independent study to determine the mechanism of action with bromodeoxyuridine labeling, the proliferation rates of endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes were significantly increased by low or medium IM dose PDA-001. However, no surviving PDA-001 cells were detected in the heart 1 month after injection. In vivo real-time imaging consistently revealed that the PDA-001 cells were detectable only within 2 days after IM injection of luciferase-expressing PDA-001. Together, these results have demonstrated the cardiac therapeutic potential of PDA-001, likely through a paracrine effect. PMID:25673767

  14. Human cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells reduce murine acute Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    Kapka Miteva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Under conventional heart failure therapy, inflammatory cardiomyopathy typically has a progressive course, indicating a need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term outcomes. We recently isolated and identified novel cardiac-derived cells from human cardiac biopsies: cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells (CAPs. They have similarities with mesenchymal stromal cells, which are known for their anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory properties. We explored whether CAPs application could be a novel strategy to improve acute Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3-induced myocarditis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the safety of our approach, we first analyzed the expression of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR and the co-receptor CD55 on CAPs, which are both required for effective CVB3 infectivity. We could demonstrate that CAPs only minimally express both receptors, which translates to minimal CVB3 copy numbers, and without viral particle release after CVB3 infection. Co-culture of CAPs with CVB3-infected HL-1 cardiomyocytes resulted in a reduction of CVB3-induced HL-1 apoptosis and viral progeny release. In addition, CAPs reduced CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation. All CAPs-mediated protective effects were nitric oxide- and interleukin-10-dependent and required interferon-γ. In an acute murine model of CVB3-induced myocarditis, application of CAPs led to a decrease of cardiac apoptosis, cardiac CVB3 viral load and improved left ventricular contractility parameters. This was associated with a decline in cardiac mononuclear cell activity, an increase in T regulatory cells and T cell apoptosis, and an increase in left ventricular interleukin-10 and interferon-γ mRNA expression. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that CAPs are a unique type of cardiac-derived cells and promising tools to improve acute CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  15. Deleterious effect of ultraviolet-B radiation on accessory function of human blood adherent mononuclear cells

    The effects of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) on accessory function of human blood adherent mononuclear cells (ADH) for antigen and mitogen-induced responses, and production by ADH of the amplifying cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) were examined. Responder lymphocytes were rendered accessory cell dependent by treatment of nonadherent cells with OKIal + complement. UV-B depressed accessory function of ADH in a dose-dependent manner. UV-B decreased accessory function of ADH for tetanus toxoid-induced responses and phytohaemagglutinin-induced responses. UV-B also decreased accessory activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells but not Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells for a PPD-reactive T cell line. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) activity of supernatants of ADH was assayed on C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes. Pretreatment of ADH with UV-B decreased lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-1 activity. Lysates of UV-B irradiated, LPS-stimulated ADH had no discernible IL-1 activity. Addition of IL-1 partially restored accessory activity of UV-B irradiated ADH for lymphocyte responses to TT. Exposure of ADH to TT or PHA for 30 min before irradiation blocked the inhibitory effect of UV-B on accessory activity. Thus, low doses of UV-B are deleterious to accessory function and to production of IL-1 by ADH. Interference with production of cytokines and with initial interactions of accessory cells with antigen and mitogen may be critical to the effects of UV-B on immunoregulatory function of ADH. (author)

  16. Adherence to antiretrovirals in people coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis1

    Lemos, Larissa de Araújo; Fiuza, Maria Luciana Teles; Reis, Renata Karina; Ferrer, André Carvalho; Gir, Elucir; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: assess the adherence levels to antiretroviral therapy in people coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis and correlate these levels with the sociodemographic and clinical variables of the study population. Method: cross-sectional study involving 74 male and female adults coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis. For the data collection, a sociodemographic and clinical assessment form and the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Assessment Questionnaire were used. For the data analysis, the software STATA version 11 was used, through descriptive statistics, Fisher's chi-square exact test and the probability test. Results: men were predominant (79.7%), between 30 and 39 years of age (35.1%), low income (75.7%) and pulmonary tuberculosis (71.6%). Adherence to antiretroviral therapy was inappropriate in 78.1% of the men; 61.0% of single people; 47.0% unemployed and 76.5% among people gaining less than one minimum wage. A significant difference was observed between compliance and length of use of antiretrovirals (p=0.018), sexual orientation (p=0.024) and number of children (p=0.029). Conclusion: the coinfected patients presented inappropriate adherence to the antiretrovirals, a fact that negatively affects the health conditions of the people living with HIV/tuberculosis coinfection. A statistically significant correlation was found between the levels of adherence and some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. PMID:27192416

  17. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Vianna, Verônica Fernandes; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; Cavalcanti, Amanda dos Santos; Fernandes, Marco Cury; Kahn, Suzana Assad; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Lima, Inayá Correa; Murray, Samuel S.; Murray, Elsa J. Brochmann; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells) and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells). Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics. PMID:23710460

  18. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Verônica Fernandes Vianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells. Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics.

  19. Human podocytes adhere to the KRGDS motif of the alpha3alpha4alpha5 collagen IV network.

    Borza, Corina M; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Pedchenko, Vadim; Saleem, Moin A; Mathieson, Peter W; Sado, Yoshikazu; Hudson, Heather M; Pozzi, Ambra; Saus, Juan; Abrahamson, Dale R; Zent, Roy; Hudson, Billy G

    2008-04-01

    Podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is required for proper function of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, the mechanism whereby podocytes adhere to collagen IV networks, a major component of the glomerular basement membrane, is poorly understood. The predominant collagen IV network is composed of triple helical protomers containing the alpha3alpha4alpha5 chains. The protomers connect via the trimeric noncollagenous (NC1) domains to form hexamers at the interface. Because the NC1 domains of this network can potentially support integrin-dependent cell adhesion, it was determined whether individual NC1 monomers or alpha3alpha4alpha5 hexamers support podocyte adhesion. It was found that, although human podocytes did not adhere to NC1 domains proper, they did adhere via integrin alphavbeta3 to a KRGDS motif located adjacent to alpha3NC1 domains. Because the KRGDS motif is a site of phosphorylation, its interactions with integrin alphavbeta3 may play a critical role in cell signaling in physiologic and pathologic states. PMID:18235087

  20. Type 2 fimbrial lectin-mediated phagocytosis of oral Actinomyces spp. by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Sandberg, A L; Mudrick, L L; Cisar, J O; Brennan, M J; Mergenhagen, S. E.; Vatter, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    Phagocytosis of Actinomyces viscosus T14V and A. naeslundii WVU45 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the absence of antibody or complement was mediated by the lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of these bacteria. This effect was markedly enhanced by exogenous sialidase, an enzyme also secreted by these actinomyces. Since sialidase treatment of the bacteria did not result in increased phagocytosis, this enzyme presumably acts by unmasking receptors for the fimbrial lectin on phag...

  1. Effect of Ciprofloxacin on Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    Cacchillo, David A.; Walters, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a pathogen associated with aggressive periodontitis, resists phagocytic killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). It is susceptible to ciprofloxacin, which PMNs actively accumulate. This study tested the hypothesis that ciprofloxacin-loaded PMNs are more effective at killing A. actinomycetemcomitans than control PMNs. Isolated human PMNs were loaded by brief incubation with 0.5 μg of ciprofloxacin/ml. Opsonized bacteria (ATCC 43718) were incubated a...

  2. Differential effect of extracellular calcium on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in intact polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes

    Petersen, R H; Knudsen, T; Johansen, Torben

    1991-01-01

    The effect of extracellular calcium on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes was studied and compared with the activity in mixed peritoneal leucocytes from rats. While there was maximal decrease in the pump activity (25-30%) of leucocytes from both rat ...

  3. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 107 CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels

  4. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Conceição, R.A. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ludovico, M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Andrade, C.G.T.J. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Yano, T. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 10{sup 7} CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  5. Rethinking adherence.

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform. PMID:23070491

  6. Nuclear p120 catenin unlocks mitotic block of contact-inhibited human corneal endothelial monolayers without disrupting adherent junctions.

    Zhu, Ying-Ting; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2012-08-01

    Contact inhibition ubiquitously exists in non-transformed cells that are in contact with neighboring cells. This phenomenon explains the poor regenerative capacity of in vivo human corneal endothelial cells during aging, injury and surgery. This study demonstrated that the conventional approach of expanding human corneal endothelial cells by disrupting contact inhibition with EDTA followed by bFGF activated canonical Wnt signaling and lost the normal phenotype to endothelial-mesenchymal transition, especially if TGFβ1 was added. By contrast, siRNA against p120 catenin (CTNND1) also uniquely promoted proliferation of the endothelial cells by activating trafficking of p120 catenin to the nucleus, thus relieving repression by nuclear Kaiso. This nuclear p120-catenin-Kaiso signaling is associated with activation of RhoA-ROCK signaling, destabilization of microtubules and inhibition of Hippo signaling, but not with activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling. Consequently, proliferating human corneal endothelial cells maintained a hexagonal shape, with junctional expression of N-cadherin, ZO-1 and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Further expansion of human corneal endothelial monolayers with a normal phenotype and a higher density was possible by prolonging treatment with p120 catenin siRNA followed by its withdrawal. This new strategy of perturbing contact inhibition by selective activation of p120-catenin-Kaiso signaling without disrupting adherent junction could be used to engineer surgical grafts containing normal human corneal endothelial cells to meet a global corneal shortage and for endothelial keratoplasties. PMID:22505615

  7. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1alpha mediates Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 enhancement in human adherent monocytes fed with malarial pigment

    Giuliana Giribaldi; Elena Valente; Amina Khadjavi; Manuela Polimeni; Mauro Prato

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) in the detrimental enhancement of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)expression, release and activity induced by phagocytosis of malarial pigment (haemozoin,HZ) in human monocytes. Methods: Human adherent monocytes were unfed/fed with nativeHZ for 2 h. After 24 hours, MIP-1alpha production was evaluated by ELISA in cell supernatants. Alternatively,HZ-unfed/fed monocytes were treated in presence/absence of anti-humanMIP-1alpha blocking antibodies or recombinant humanMIP-1alpha for15 h (RNA studies) or 24 h (protein studies); therefore,MMP-9mRNA expression was evaluated in cell lysates by Real TimeRT-PCR, whereas proMMP-9and activeMMP-9protein release were measured in cell supernatants by Western blotting and gelatin zymography.Results: Phagocytosis ofHZ by human monocytes increased production ofMIP-1alpha, mRNA expression ofMMP-9and protein release of proMMP-9 and activeMMP-9. All theHZ-enhancing effects onMMP-9 were abrogated by anti-humanMIP-1alpha blocking antibodies and mimicked by recombinant humanMIP-1alpha.Conclusions:The present work suggests a role for MIP-1alpha in theHZ-dependent enhancement ofMMP-9 expression, release and activity observed in human monocytes, highlighting new detrimental effects ofHZ-triggered proinflammatory response by phagocytic cells in falciparum malaria.

  8. Interactions between Periodontal Bacteria and Human Oral Epithelial Cells: Fusobacterium nucleatum Adheres to and Invades Epithelial Cells

    Han, Yiping W.; Shi, Wenyuan; Huang, George T.-J.; Kinder Haake, Susan; Park, No-Hee; Kuramitsu, Howard; Genco, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria are causative agents of periodontal diseases. Interactions between oral bacteria and gingival epithelial cells are essential aspects of periodontal infections. Using an in vitro tissue culture model, a selected group of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria frequently associated with periodontal diseases, including Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter curvus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, were examined for their ability to adhere to and invade primary cultures of human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC). The effects of these bacteria on the production of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory chemokine, were also measured. These studies provided an initial demonstration that F. nucleatum adhered to and invaded HGEC and that this was accompanied by high levels of IL-8 secretion from the epithelial cells. The attachment and invasion characteristics of F. nucleatum were also tested using KB cells, an oral epithelial cell line. The invasion was verified by transmission electron microscopy and with metabolic inhibitors. Invasion appeared to occur via a “zipping” mechanism and required the involvement of actins, microtubules, signal transduction, protein synthesis, and energy metabolism of the epithelial cell, as well as protein synthesis by F. nucleatum. A spontaneous mutant, lam, of F. nucleatum, isolated as defective in autoagglutination, was unable to attach to or invade HGEC or KB cells, further indicating the requirement of bacterial components in these processes. Sugar inhibition assays indicated that lectin-like interactions were involved in the attachment of F. nucleatum to KB cells. Investigation of these new virulence phenotypes should improve our understanding of the role of F. nucleatum in periodontal infections. PMID:10816455

  9. Sjogren's Syndrome Antigen B Acts as an Endogenous Danger Molecule to Induce Interleukin-8 Gene Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils.

    Cheng-Han Wu

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome antigen B is expressed in the nucleus and surface membrane of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is released after cell death. However, its biological role is not clear. This study is aimed to investigate the effect of Sjögren's syndrome antigen B on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.Human recombinant Sjögren's syndrome antigen B (rSSB purified from E. coli was incubated with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils as well as retinoid acid-induced granulocytic differentiated HL-60 cells, HL-60 (RA. Interleukin (IL-8 protein production and mRNA expressions were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-rSSB was assessed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways and nuclear factor-kappaB activation were investigated.Human rSSB stimulated IL-8 production from normal human neutrophils and HL-60 (RA cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This IL-8-stimulated activity was blocked by chloroquine and NH4Cl, indicating that endosomal acidification is important for this effect. We found rSSB activated both MAPK pathway and nuclear factor-kappaB signaling to transcribe the IL-8 gene expression of cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α exerted an additive effect and rSSB-anti-SSB immune complex exhibited a synergistic effect on rSSB-induced IL-8 production.Sjögren's syndrome antigen B might act as an endogenous danger molecule to enhance IL-8 gene expression in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

  10. A Serine-Threonine Kinase (StkP Regulates Expression of the Pneumococcal Pilus and Modulates Bacterial Adherence to Human Epithelial and Endothelial Cells In Vitro.

    Jenny A Herbert

    Full Text Available The pneumococcal serine threonine protein kinase (StkP acts as a global regulator in the pneumococcus. Bacterial mutants deficient in StkP are less virulent in animal models of infection. The gene for this regulator is located adjacent to the gene for its cognate phosphatase in the pneumococcal genome. The phosphatase dephosphorylates proteins phosphorylated by StkP and has been shown to regulate a number of key pneumococcal virulence factors and to modulate adherence to eukaryotic cells. The role of StkP in adherence of pneumococci to human cells has not previously been reported. In this study we show StkP represses the pneumococcal pilus, a virulence factor known to be important for bacterial adhesion. In a serotype 4 strain regulation of the pilus by StkP modulates adherence to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung epithelial cells. This suggests that the pneumococcal pilus may play a role in adherence during infections such as meningitis and pneumonia. We show that regulation of the pilus occurs at the population level as StkP alters the number of pili-positive cells within a single culture. As far as we are aware this is the first gene identified outside of the pilus islet that regulates the biphasic expression of the pilus. These findings suggest StkPs role in cell division may be linked to regulation of expression of a cell surface adhesin.

  11. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 All antigens Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes SRX1016679,SRX1016682,SRX1016681,SRX1016680 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 No description Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes SRX1016682,SRX1016679,SRX1016681,SRX1016680 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 All antigens Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes SRX1016682,SRX1016679,SRX1016680,SRX1016681 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  3. Respiratory burst facilitates the digestion of Escherichia coli killed by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Weiss, J; Kao, L; Victor, M; Elsbach, P

    1987-01-01

    We examined factors that may limit degradation of bacterial protein of Escherichia coli S15 killed by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). Both human and rabbit PMN degraded up to 40% of [14C]amino acid-labeled protein of ingested and killed E. coli in 2 h as determined by loss of acid-precipitable radioactivity. In contrast, equally bactericidal broken-PMN preparations or isolated granules degraded only about 10% of bacterial protein regardless of pH. To determine whether activation of the re...

  4. Differences in the effect of arachidonic acid on polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocyte function

    Nijkamp, F.P.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Tol, M.E. van der; Kats-Renaud, J. H. van; Verhoef, J.

    1984-01-01

    Incubation of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in a stimulation of the oxidative metabolism of the cells. Upon stimulation with 80 μM arachidonic acid, neutrophils (5·106 cells/ml) produced superoxide (53±8 nmol/5·106 cells per 15 min), generated chemiluminescence (1211 100±157 000 cpm) and consumed oxygen (20±1 nmol/106 cells per 5 min). The stimulation of the cell metabolism could be reduced 40–60% by prior incubation of the cells with 10 μM indomethacin. In...

  5. cGMP-Compliant Expansion of Human iPSC Cultures as Adherent Monolayers.

    Parr, Ann M; Walsh, Patrick J; Truong, Vincent; Dutton, James R

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic uses of cells differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), either embryonic stem (ES) cells or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are now being tested in clinical trials, and it is likely that this will lead to increased commercial interest in the clinical translation of promising hPSC research. Recent technical advances in the use of defined media and culture substrates have significantly improved both the simplicity and predictability of growing hPSCs, allowing a much more straightforward application of current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) to the culture of these cells. In addition, the adoption of cGMP-compliant techniques in research environments will both improve the replication of results and make the transition of promising investigations to the commercial sector significantly less cumbersome. However, passaging methods for hPSCs are inherently unpredictable and rely on operator experience and expertise. This is problematic for the cell manufacturing process where operator time and process predictability are often determining cost drivers. We have adopted a human iPSC system using defined media and a recombinant substrate that employs cell dissociation with a hypertonic citrate solution which eliminates variability during hPSC cell expansion and provides a simple cGMP-compliant technique for hiPSC cultivation that is appropriate in both research and commercial applications. PMID:25863788

  6. Cryptococcal Antigenemia in Nigerian Patients With Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Influence of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence

    Oladele, Rita O.; Akanmu, Alani S.; Nwosu, Augustina O.; Ogunsola, Folasade T.; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Denning, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningitis has a high mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. This is preventable with early screening and preemptive therapy. We evaluated the prevalence of cryptococcal disease by antigen testing, possible associated factors, and outcomes in HIV-infected patients being managed in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods. Sera were collected from 214 consenting HIV-infected participants with CD4+ counts therapy (ART) status, between November 2014 and May 2015. A cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) lateral flow assay was used for testing. Pertinent clinical data were obtained from patients and their case notes. Results. Of the 214 participants, females (124; 57.9%) outnumbered males. Mean age was 41.3 ± 9.4 (standard deviation) years. The majority (204; 95.3%) were ART experienced. The median CD4+ cell count was 160 cells/mm3 (interquartile range, 90–210). The overall seroprevalence of cryptococcal antigenemia was 8.9% (19 of 214); 6 of 61 (9.8%) in those with CD4+ cell counts ART-naive patients, 1 of 10 (10%) was CrAg positive. Twenty-seven of 214 (12.6%) had associated oral thrush. Potential baseline meningitis symptoms (3 of 214 [1.4%] experienced neck pain or stiffness and 21 of 214 [9.8%] experienced headache) were common in the study group, but the result was not statistically significant in relation to CrAg positivity. Two of 19 (10.5%) CrAg-positive patients died, 10 of 19 (52.6%) were lost to follow up, and 7 of 19 (36.8%) were alive. Empirical fluconazole was routinely given to those with low CD4 counts ART.

  7. HIV Medication Adherence

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  8. Identification of a Surface Protein from Lactobacillus reuteri JCM1081 That Adheres to Porcine Gastric Mucin and Human Enterocyte-Like HT-29 Cells

    Wang, Bin; Wei, Hong; Yuan, Jing; Li, Qiurong; Li, Yousheng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion of lactobacilli to the host gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered an important factor in health-promoting effects. However, studies addressing the molecular mechanisms of the adhesion of lactobacilli to the host GI tract have not yet been performed. The aim of this work was to identify Lactobacillus reuteri surface molecules mediating adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucins. Nine strains of lactobacilli were tested for their ability to adhere to human enterocyte-like H...

  9. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes

    Latronico, Francesca; Moodley, Arshnee; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2014-01-01

    characterized with respect to genetic background and cell wall-anchored protein (CWAP) gene content. Seventy-seven strain-corneocyte combinations were tested using both exponential- and stationary-phase cultures. Negative binomial regression analysis of counts of bacterial cells adhering to corneocytes revealed...

  10. Arachidonic acid metabolism in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    Smith, D. M.; Walsh, C E; DeChatelet, L R; Waite, M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the calcium ionophore A23187 on the release and metabolism of [3H]arachidonic acid was examined in normal polymorphonuclear leukocytes and those obtained from patients with chronic granulomatous disease. The ionophore A23187 which stimulates oxidative metabolism in normal polymorphonuclear leukocytes was ineffective in increasing oxidative metabolism (chemiluminescence) in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease. However, the ionophore A2318...

  11. Adherence of human mesenchymal stem cells on Ti and TiO{sub 2} nano-columnar surfaces fabricated by glancing angle sputter deposition

    Motemani, Yahya, E-mail: yahya.motemani@rub.de [Institute for Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Greulich, Christina, E-mail: Christina.Greulich@rub.de [Bergmannsheil University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Surgical Research, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany); Khare, Chinmay; Lopian, Michael; Buenconsejo, Pio John S. [Institute for Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Schildhauer, Thomas A. [Bergmannsheil University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Surgical Research, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany); Ludwig, Alfred, E-mail: alfred.ludwig@rub.de [Institute for Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Köller, Manfred, E-mail: Manfred.Koeller@rub.de [Bergmannsheil University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Surgical Research, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The interaction of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with Ti and TiO{sub 2} nano-columnar surfaces fabricated using glancing angle sputter deposition was investigated. The adherence and proliferation of hMSCs on different nano-columnar surfaces, including vertical columns, slanted columns and chevrons, were examined with calcein-acetoxymethyl ester fluorescence staining and scanning electron microscopy. For comparison, adherence of hMSCs on compact, dense films was also studied. After 24 h and 7 days, adherent and viable cells were observed on both, Ti nano-columns as well as dense Ti films, which confirms the biocompatibility of these nanostructures. Very small pseudopodia with width of approximately 20–35 nm and length varying from 20 to 200 nm were observed between the nano-columns, independent of the type of the nano-columnar morphology. Large inter-column spacing and effectively increased surface area make these nanostructures promising candidates for bio-functionalization or drug loading on the surface of Ti-based implants.

  12. Contributions of NanI Sialidase to Caco-2 Cell Adherence by Clostridium perfringens Type A and C Strains Causing Human Intestinal Disease

    Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains...

  13. Pulmonary accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the adult respiratory distress syndrome

    The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) plays an integral role in the development of permeability pulmonary edema associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This report describes 3 patients with ARDS secondary to systemic sepsis who demonstrated an abnormal diffuse accumulation of Indium (111In)-labeled PMNs in their lungs, without concomitant clinical or laboratory evidence of a primary chest infection. In one patient, the accumulation of the pulmonary activity during an initial pass suggested that this observation was related to diffuse leukoaggregation within the pulmonary microvasculature. A 4th patient with ARDS was on high-dose corticosteroids at the time of a similar study, and showed no pulmonary accumulation of PMNs, suggesting a possible reason for the reported beneficial effect of corticosteroids in human ARDS

  14. Adherence to Antidepressant Medication

    Åkerblad, Ann-Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Non-adherence to medication is a major obstacle in the treatment of depression. The objectives of the present study were to explore the effect of two interventions aiming to increase antidepressant treatment adherence, and to examine long-term consequences and costs of depression in adherent and non-adherent primary care patients. A randomised controlled design was used to assess the respective effects of a written educational adherence enhancing programme and therapeutic drug monitoring in ...

  15. Phagocytosis-induced 45calcium efflux in polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    The role of calcium ions in regulating the structure and function of non-muscle cells is a subject of intense study. Several lines of evidence that calcium may be essential in the function of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) and an important control element in the process of phagocytosis. Direct studies of calcium distribution and fluxes have only recently been undertaken. To our knowledge, no report of calcium movements during normal phagocytosis has been published. In the context of an overall study of calcium dynamics in the PMNL, we report here initial studies on 45Ca efflux in prelabelled guinea pig PMNL. The results demonstrate the energy-dependence of resting calcium efflux and an increased efflux upon addition of phagocytic particles which is not dependent on particle internalization

  16. Re-evaluation of the culture condition of polymorphonuclear cells for the study of apoptosis induction.

    Hiroi, M; Tajima, M; Shimojima, T; Kashimata, M; Miyata, T; Sakagami, H

    1998-01-01

    The culture conditions of human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the study of apoptosis induction were re-evaluated. The changes in the relative viable cell number of PMNs after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) treatment were colorimetrically investigated using a cell counting kit. The relative potency of PMNs to produce the superoxide anion (O2-) was measured as the reduction of color intensity by addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD). When the PMNs were cultured in conventional RPMI1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), the stimulation effect of TNF on O2- generation by PMNs was observed only for the first 6 hours. When FBS was replaced with human serum, the effect of TNF was maintained for longer incubation periods. Prolonged incubation of PMNs spontaneously produced large DNA fragments, and the extent of DNA fragmentation was relatively smaller in human serum-containing medium. TNF, LPS, hyperthermia or potassium thiocyanate slightly accelerated the production of large DNA fragments, as well as the induction of trace amounts of internucleosomal DNA cleavage in PMNs, which became detectable only after concentration by fractional isopropanol precipitation. The present study suggests the importance of the use of human serum rather than conventional FBS for the study of apoptosis induction in PMNs. PMID:9673409

  17. Characterization of the adherence properties of Streptococcus salivarius.

    Weerkamp, A H; McBride, B C

    1980-01-01

    The adherence and aggregation properties of 46 human oral Streptococcus salivarius isolates were examined. A total of 41% of the isolates aggregated with whole human saliva, 50% aggregated with human erythrocytes, and 85% adhered to human buccal epithelial cells. Strains that aggregated with saliva and erythrocytes usually reacted with Streptococcus group K typing serum whereas the non-hemagglutinating strains did not. K+ strains also adhered more strongly to human buccal epithelial cells tha...

  18. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils in periodontitis and their possible modulation as a therapeutic approach.

    Nicu, Elena A; Loos, Bruno G

    2016-06-01

    The main focus of this review is polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils play a pivotal role in normal host resistance to subgingival dental-plaque biofilm. Both hyper- and hypo-responsiveness of the immune system toward the microbial challenge in periodontitis have been described. We review polymorphonuclear neutrophil physiology with emphasis on the role of neutrophil functions and dysfunctions in periodontitis. Text boxes are given at the end of each subsection, which present the current knowledge on neutrophil-modulating agents as a potential therapeutic approach in periodontitis. PMID:27045435

  19. Bovine polymorphonuclear neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis and an immunoglobulin G2 protease produced by Porphyromonas levii.

    Lobb, D A; Loeman, H J; Sparrow, D G; Morck, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    Acute interdigital phlegmon (AIP) is a commonly occurring anaerobic bacterial infection in cattle. This study examined in vitro the interaction of bovine polymorphonuclear granulocytic neutrophils (PMN) from blood with bacterial species involved in AIP. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils were purified from whole bovine blood, exposed to one of the three putative etiologic agents of AIP and comparatively assessed for phagocytosis using light microscopy. Fusobacterium necrophorum and Prevotella inte...

  20. Effects of in vivo dexamethasone administration on in vitro bovine polymorphonuclear leukocyte function.

    Roth, J A; Kaeberle, M L

    1981-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte function was evaluated in vitro after in vivo administration of a single dose of dexamethasone to cattle. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes from dexamethasone-treated cattle displayed enhanced random migration under agarose but impaired ingestion of Staphylococcus aureus, Nitro Blue Tetrazolium reduction, chemiluminescence, iodination, and antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The depression of iodination may have been related to a drop in the proport...

  1. Contributions of NanI sialidase to Caco-2 cell adherence by Clostridium perfringens type A and C strains causing human intestinal disease.

    Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. PMID:25135687

  2. A direct assessment of human prion adhered to steel wire using real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    Mori, Tsuyoshi; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Furukawa, Kana; Takatsuki, Hanae; Satoh, Katsuya; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ishibashi, Daisuke; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accidental transmission of prions during neurosurgery has been reported as a consequence of re-using contaminated surgical instruments. Several decontamination methods have been studied using the 263K-hamster prion; however, no studies have directly evaluated human prions. A newly developed in vitro amplification system, designated real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC), has allowed the activity of abnormal prion proteins to be assessed within a few days. RT-QuIC using human recombinant prion protein (PrP) showed high sensitivity for prions as the detection limit of our assay was estimated as 0.12 fg of active prions. We applied this method to detect human prion activity on stainless steel wire. When we put wires contaminated with human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain tissue directly into the test tube, typical PrP-amyloid formation was observed within 48 hours, and we could detect the activity of prions at 50% seeding dose on the wire from 10(2.8) to 10(5.8) SD50. Using this method, we also confirmed that the seeding activities on the wire were removed following treatment with NaOH. As seeding activity closely correlated with the infectivity of prions using the bioassay, this wire-QuIC assay will be useful for the direct evaluation of decontamination methods for human prions. PMID:27112110

  3. A direct assessment of human prion adhered to steel wire using real-time quaking-induced conversion

    Mori, Tsuyoshi; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Furukawa, Kana; Takatsuki, Hanae; Satoh, Katsuya; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ishibashi, Daisuke; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accidental transmission of prions during neurosurgery has been reported as a consequence of re-using contaminated surgical instruments. Several decontamination methods have been studied using the 263K-hamster prion; however, no studies have directly evaluated human prions. A newly developed in vitro amplification system, designated real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC), has allowed the activity of abnormal prion proteins to be assessed within a few days. RT-QuIC using human recombinant prion protein (PrP) showed high sensitivity for prions as the detection limit of our assay was estimated as 0.12 fg of active prions. We applied this method to detect human prion activity on stainless steel wire. When we put wires contaminated with human Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease brain tissue directly into the test tube, typical PrP-amyloid formation was observed within 48 hours, and we could detect the activity of prions at 50% seeding dose on the wire from 102.8 to 105.8 SD50. Using this method, we also confirmed that the seeding activities on the wire were removed following treatment with NaOH. As seeding activity closely correlated with the infectivity of prions using the bioassay, this wire-QuIC assay will be useful for the direct evaluation of decontamination methods for human prions. PMID:27112110

  4. Antibody-dependent cytolysis of Trypanosoma cruzi by polymorphonuclear leucocytes: dependence on the respiratory burst

    Human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) lysed antibody-coated Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes under in vitro conditions. Cytotoxicity mediated by PMN, evaluated by the release of 3H-uridine-labelled RNA from T. cruzi, required specific, anti-T. cruzi antibody for target binding and triggering of the cytotoxic response. Cytotoxicity was negligible in the absence of serum. To determine if the respiratory burst and active oxygen species production could be triggered by contact with antibody-coated T. cruzi epimastigotes, oxygen consumption, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide release were measured under conditions of T. cruzi lysis by PMN. All three parameters of activation of the respiratory burst were increased in the presence of antibody-coated T. cruzi epimastigotes. Antibody or T. cruzi, added separately, caused no significant activation. An increase in the O2 consumption was also observed when human PMN were incubated in the presence of T. cruzi trypomastigotes coated with antibody present in the serum of chronic Chagas' disease patients. Electron microscopy examination of PMN exposed to diaminobenzidine and T. cruzi showed the parasites inside the PMN phagosomes and an electron-dense reaction product between the two membranes which reveals the presence of myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The reaction product was blocked by aminotriazole and cyanide. These data indicate that oxygen-radical production by PMN was increased under conditions of T. cruzi cell killing. (author)

  5. Adherence to antidepressants

    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  6. Effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    The effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were investigated, using male Long-Evans rats exposed to 1% lead acetate in the drinking water for varying periods of time to achieve blood lead levels ranging from 20-200 μg/dl. Studies of PMN bacterial and fungal killing activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis demonstrated that: 1) bactericidal activity of PMN from rats exposed to lead was not altered; 2) chemotactic activity remained within normal limits; 3) the phagocytic ability of the PMN also remained unaltered. In addition to these normal findings, one major abnormality was demonstrated: a significant decrease in the ability of PMN from rats exposed to lead to kill Candida albicans. This defect was not related to age or to length of exposure. It could not be produced by addition of lead to the test system in vitro. Further investigation revealed significant decreases in PMN glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalase, and myeloperoxidase activities. These data support two possible mechanisms for the abnormal fungicidal activity of PMN from lead-exposed rats: decrease in ability to reduce oxygen to active metabolites, or reduction in myeloperoxidase activity due to diminshed synthesis of the heme moiety required for its function

  7. Inhibition of Streptococcus pneumoniae adherence to human epithelial cells in vitro by the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    Wong, SS; Quan Toh, Z; Dunne, EM; Mulholland, EK; Tang, ML; Robins-Browne, RM; Licciardi, PV; Satzke, C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Colonization of the nasopharynx by Streptococcus pneumoniae is considered a prerequisite for pneumococcal infections such as pneumonia and otitis media. Probiotic bacteria can influence disease outcomes through various mechanisms, including inhibition of pathogen colonization. Here, we examine the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on S. pneumoniae colonization of human epithelial cells using an in vitro model. We investigated the effects of LGG administered b...

  8. A possible role for polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the defence against recrudescent herpes simplex virus infection in man

    A 51Cr release assay has been used to demonstrate that human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) can damage herpes simplex infected target cells sensitized with antiviral antibody. Effective sensitizing antibodies were found in both serum and saliva of all those persons tested who were subject to recurrent cold sores. PMNL were much less effective as killer cells than peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but as they are the predominant inflammatory cell within the HSVl lesion they may be, quantitatively, more important. The cytotoxic effects of both PMNL and mononuclear cells were significantly reduced by prostaglandin El as well as by several drugs that were tested. It is suggested that antibody dependent PMNL-mediated cytotoxicity may play a role in the human host defences against recrudescent herpes simplex infection. (author)

  9. Plasmodium vivax adherence to placental glycosaminoglycans.

    Kesinee Chotivanich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax infections seldom kill directly but do cause indirect mortality by reducing birth weight and causing abortion. Cytoadherence and sequestration in the microvasculature are central to the pathogenesis of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but the contribution of cytoadherence to pathology in other human malarias is less clear. METHODOLOGY: The adherence properties of P. vivax infected red blood cells (PvIRBC were evaluated under static and flow conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: P. vivax isolates from 33 patients were studied. None adhered to immobilized CD36, ICAM-1, or thrombospondin, putative ligands for P. falciparum vascular cytoadherence, or umbilical vein endothelial cells, but all adhered to immobilized chondroitin sulphate A (CSA and hyaluronic acid (HA, the receptors for adhesion of P. falciparum in the placenta. PvIRBC also adhered to fresh placental cells (N = 5. Pre-incubation with chondroitinase prevented PvIRBC adherence to CSA, and reduced binding to HA, whereas preincubation with hyaluronidase prevented adherence to HA, but did not reduce binding to CSA significantly. Pre-incubation of PvIRBC with soluble CSA and HA reduced binding to the immobilized receptors and prevented placental binding. PvIRBC adhesion was prevented by pre-incubation with trypsin, inhibited by heparin, and reduced by EGTA. Under laminar flow conditions the mean (SD shear stress reducing maximum attachment by 50% was 0.06 (0.02 Pa but, having adhered, the PvIRBC could then resist detachment by stresses up to 5 Pa. At 37 °C adherence began approximately 16 hours after red cell invasion with maximal adherence at 30 hours. At 39 °C adherence began earlier and peaked at 24 hours. SIGNIFICANCE: Adherence of P. vivax-infected erythrocytes to glycosaminoglycans may contribute to the pathogenesis of vivax malaria and lead to intrauterine growth retardation.

  10. CD44 mediates polymorphonuclear leukocyte motility on hyaluronan

    To investigate the behavior of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes on the extracellular matrix carbohydrate component hyaluronan(HA) in the presense and absence of the chemokine ,iterleukin-8(IL).The present study was conducted at the Department of Hematology, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom between the period 2000 to 2001. Polmorphonuclear cells were isolated from whole venous blood using Mono-Poly-Resolving Medium. Purified PMN were added alone or with IL-8 to HA-coated plates and the behavior of these cells monitored by time-lapse video microscopy over a period of 40 minutes. For the identification of surface receptor(s) mediating PMN migration on HA, PMN were incubated with blocking non-blocking antibodies against cluster of differntiation 44 (CD44) and Receptor for Hyaluronan Mediated Motility (RHAMM) prior to addition to HA-coated surfaces. Approximately 55% of PMN were found to interact and migrate on HA-coated plates with a mean speed of 6.4+-0.7um/min. Addition of IL-8 reduced both the percentage moving cells (7.5%) and the average speed of the remaining moving cells(2.0+-0.3um/min). The inhibitory effect of IL-8 on PMN migration was associated with organization of the cytoplasmic fibrillar form of action. Anti-CD44 blocking antibody substantially reduced the speed of PMN (2.5+-0.9um/min), while non-blocking anti-CD44and anti-RHAAM antibodies had no effect. The present study demonstrates for the first time that PMN are able to interact and migrate on the widely distributed extracellular matrix component ,HA, using the cell surface receptor,CD44.Such interaction is modified by the chemokine, IL-8 in a way that optimizes the host defence against invading pathogens. (author)

  11. Characterization of a distinct population of circulating human non-adherent endothelial forming cells and their recruitment via intercellular adhesion molecule-3.

    Sarah L Appleby

    Full Text Available Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133(+ population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38 together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31. These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8 or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14 which distinguishes them from 'early' endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs. Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis.

  12. Patient adherence to three dose completion of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in a private practice.

    Rubin, Rochelle F; Kuttab, Huda-Marie; Rihani, Rami S; Reutzel, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    The human papillomavirus quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) recombinant vaccine is effective in preventing cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer. Maximal protection is achieved with completion of all three recommended doses. A retrospective chart review was performed to (1) assess the current vaccine series completion rates in a private practice multispecialty suburban setting and (2) identify factors associated with failure to complete the vaccine series. Chi-square and independent samples t test were used for data analysis. A total of 4,117 patients out of 10,821 eligible patients received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine between October 1, 2006 and April 30, 2010. Overall, 69.5 % (n = 2,863) of patients who received one dose of the HPV vaccine completed all three doses in a valid time frame, representing 26.5 % of all eligible patients. Patients who completed the series were younger (16.8 vs. 18.2, p < 0.05), less likely to have a sexually transmitted disease diagnosis prior to initiation of the series (57.7 vs. 69.8 %, p < 0.05), and more likely to have visited the pediatrics department compared to family medicine, internal medicine, and OB/GYN departments (75.9, 65.7, 57.0, 60.9 %, respectively, p < 0.05). Deaths, pregnancies, and adverse drug reactions were not identified as independent factors impacting completion rates. The results indicate that adolescents, patients visiting the pediatrics department and those without a prior STD diagnosis completed the vaccination series more frequently than adults managed in family medicine, internal medicine, and OB/GYN departments. PMID:22752532

  13. On World Religion Adherence Distribution Evolution

    Ausloos, M.; Petroni, F.

    2008-01-01

    Religious adherence can be considered as a degree of freedom, in a statistical physics sense, for a human agent belonging to a population. The distribution, performance and life time of religions can thus be studied having in mind heterogeneous interacting agent modeling in mind. We present a comprehensive analysis of 58 so called religion (to be better defined in the main text) evolutions, as measured through their number of adherents between 1900 and 2000, - data taken from the World Christ...

  14. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  15. Fracture initiates systemic inflammatory response syndrome through recruiting polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    Li, Haipeng; Liu, Jia; Yao, Jianhua; Zhong, Jianfeng; Guo, Lei; Sun, Tiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Fracture, a common type injury in trauma patients, often results in the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Though the mechanism of the fracture-initiated SIRS still remains not well characterized, it is well documented that the polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) play an important role in the inflammatory process. We hypothesize that fractures recruit PMN to the local tissue, which is followed by an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and initiation of SIRS. In the current study, we established a closed femoral fracture rat model. We evaluated the levels of MPO, IL-1β and CINC-1 in fractured tissue homogenate, and we measured the levels of IL-6 and IL-10, the biomarkers for systemic inflammatory response, in the rat sera. In clinical part of the study, we collected blood from patients with isolated closed femoral fractures and evaluated PMN-related chemoattractants (IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF) and the number of peripheral PMN. We further evaluated the level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of the patients with fracture. In the animal model of closed femoral fracture, we found a significant recruitment of PMN to the local tissue after fracture, which correlates with the elevated MPO level. We also showed that the concentration of IL-1β and CINC-1 in local tissue is significantly increased and might be responsible for the PMN recruitment. Recruitment of PMN to the local tissue was accompanied with a significant increase in the systemic levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in serum. In the patients with closed femoral fracture, we observed an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and PMN-related chemoattractants, including IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF. The level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of patients were significantly higher compared to the healthy volunteers. Our data suggest that fracture released mitochondrial DNA into the local haematoma of

  16. Evidence for lipoxin formation by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes via triple dioxygenation of arachidonic acid

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Walstra, P.; Verhagen, J.; Vermeer, M.A.; Klerks, J.P.M.; Veldink, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Incubation of bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) with arachidonic acid leads to the formation of four lipoxins. The same lipoxins are also formed upon incubation of bovine PMNs with 5(S)-hydroperoxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, 5-hydroxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic aci

  17. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  18. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects. PMID:27435508

  19. Treatment adherence among adolescents with epilepsy: what really matters?

    Carbone, Loretta; Zebrack, Bradley; Plegue, Melissa; Joshi, Sucheta; Shellhaas, Renée

    2013-01-01

    Treatment adherence is often suboptimal among adolescents with epilepsy. Yet knowledge is lacking regarding factors that affect adherence. Empirical studies and theories of human development suggest that self-management skills, self-efficacy, and sense of control are related to adherence. Eighty-eight adolescents with epilepsy, and their parents, completed standardized measures assessing epilepsy knowledge and expectations, treatment self-management, sense of control, and self-efficacy. Bette...

  20. A large mobility of hydrophilic molecules at the outmost layer controls the protein adsorption and adhering behavior with the actin fiber orientation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Seo, Ji-Hun; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yui, Nobuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion behaviors of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are interestingly affected by the mobility of hydrophilic chains on the material surfaces. Surfaces with different molecular mobilities were prepared using ABA-type block copolymers consisting polyrotaxane (PRX) or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) central block (A block), and amphiphilic anchoring B blocks of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB). Two different molecular mobilities of the PRX chains were designed by using normal α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) or α-CD whose hydroxyl groups were converted to methoxy groups in a given ratio to improve its molecular mobility (PRX-PMB and OMe-PRX-PMB). The surface mobility of these materials was assessed as the mobility factor (Mf), which is measured by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring system. HUVECs adhered on OMe-PRX-PMB surface much more than PRX-PMB and PMB-block-PEG-block-PMB (PEG-PMB) surfaces. These different HUVEC adhesions were correlated with the density of cell-binding site of adsorbed fibronectin. In addition, the alignment of the actin cytoskeleton of adhered HUVECs was strongly suppressed on the PEG-PMB, PRX-PMB, and OMe-PRX-PMB in response to the increased Mf value. Remarkably, the HUVECs adhered on the OMe-PRX-PMB surface with much less actin organization. We concluded that not only the cell adhesion but also the cellular function are regulated by the molecular mobility of the outmost material surfaces. PMID:23796033

  1. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV

    Basavaprabhu Achappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS is now considered as a manageable chronic illness. There has been a dramatic reduction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV related morbidity and mortality due to antiretroviral therapy. A high level of adherence (>95% is required for antiretroviral therapy to be effective. There are many barriers to adherence in both developed and developing countries. Aim: The aim of our study was to determine adherence levels and factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV. Materials and Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, 116 HIV positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy for at least 1 year were interviewed using a semi structured questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed using Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS version 11.5. Chi-square test was done. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Of 116 participants, 63.7% reported adherence ≥ 95%. Mean adherence index was 91.25%. Financial constraints, forgetting to take medication, lack of family care, depression, alcohol use, social stigma and side effects to antiretroviral therapy were barriers for adherence in our study. Conclusion: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in south India is suboptimal. Intensive adherence counseling should be provided to all patients before initiation ofantiretroviral therapy. Health care providers must identify possible barriers to adherence at the earliest and provide appropriate solutions.

  2. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte dysfunction during short term metabolic changes from normo- to hyperglycemia in type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetic patients

    Kjersem, H; Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Wandall, Johan; Johansen, K S; Borregaard, N

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) ingestion of particles coated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli was compared to other PMN functions in seven patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) during short-term controlled metabolic changes from normo- to hyperglycemia wit...

  3. Medication adherence in the elderly

    Angela Frances Yap, BSc (Pharm) (Hons); Thiru Thirumoorthy, MBBS, FRCP (London), FAMS; Yu Heng Kwan, BSc (Pharm) (Hons)

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is a crucial component in the treatment of chronic diseases. In the elderly, clinicians are faced with a unique set of problems associated with adherence that they may not have been adequately trained for. In this paper, we demonstrate the importance of medication adherence in the elderly through a case study. The different factors affecting medication adherence in the elderly are highlighted: patient, medication, health care providers, health care system, and socioeconom...

  4. Membrane Potential Changes in Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes of Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Matsuura, Ryoji; Kobayashi, Masao; Usui, Tomofusa

    1984-01-01

    The activation of NADPH oxidase on the plasma membranes of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) follows the change of membrane potential. It is thought that the activation of NADPH oxidase is disturbed in the PMNL of patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). The change of membrane potential was examined in the PMNL of normal subjects and patients with CGD, with a lipophilic probe, di-O-C5(3). There was a disturbance in phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenyl...

  5. Phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes: effect of cystic fibrosis serum.

    Thomassen, M J; Demko, C A; Wood, R E; Sherman, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown previously that serum from chronically infected patients with cystic fibrosis inhibits the phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by both normal and cystic fibrosis alveolar macrophages. In the present study, the ability of peripheral monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes from normal volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients to phagocytize P. aeruginosa was shown not to be inhibited in the presence of serum from cystic fibrosis patients.

  6. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte function and previous yersinia arthritis: correlation of enhanced superoxide production with late manifestations.

    Repo, H; Koivuranta-Vaara, P; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) functions (migration in vitro, chemiluminescence, O-2 production, and aggregation) were studied in 32 patients with previous yersinia arthritis (YA). PMNs of 11 HLA-B27 positive patients who had chronic or recurrent inflammatory symptoms showed O-2 production significantly higher than that of PMNs of 11 HLA-B27 positive patients without late manifestations. Also, PMNs of both HLA-B27 positive and negative patients tended to show chemotactic and chemokinetic m...

  7. Effect of staphylococcal alpha-toxin on intracellular Ca2+ in polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Suttorp, N; Habben, E

    1988-01-01

    Staphylococcal alpha-toxin, a channel-forming protein, stimulates leukotriene B4 formation in rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) (N. Suttorp, W. Seeger, J. Zucker-Reimann, L. Roka, and S. Bhakdi, Infect. Immun. 55:104-110, 1987). The concept was advanced that transmembrane toxin pores act as Ca2+ gates allowing passive Ca2+ influx into the cell, thus initiating stimulus response coupling. A critical step in this hypothesis is the demonstration of an increase in the cytosolic free Ca2+ ...

  8. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and ...

  9. Double localization of F-actin in chemoattractant-stimulated polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    Lepidi, H; Benoliel, A M; Mege, J L; Bongrand, P; Capo, C

    1992-09-01

    Uniform concentrations of chemoattractants such as formylpeptides induced a morphological polarization of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) and a concentration of F-actin at the cell front. They also induced a transient increase in filamentous actin (F-actin) which preceded the cell shape change. We combined fluorescence microscopy and image analysis to study the localization of F-actin, as revealed by a specific probe (bodipyTM phallacidin) in suspended PMNs stimulated by chemoattractants. F-actin exhibited remarkable concentration in focal points after a 30 s exposure to 10(-8) M formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMet-Leu-Phe), although no shape change of PMNs was detectable. A 10-min incubation with formylpeptide (10(-6) to 10(-9) M) induced the morphological polarization of PMNs and the appearance of a principal focus of F-actin in the cell head region and a secondary focus in the cell posterior end. The distribution of F-actin-associated fluorescence in 2D images of polarized PMNs might be due to an actual concentration of F-actin in privileged areas, to a local concentration of plasma membrane drawing filamentous actin or to variations in the cell volume. Then, we studied the distribution of a cytoplasmic marker, fluorescein diacetate and a membrane probe, TMA-DPH, in unstimulated rounded PMNs and in spherical and morphologically polarized PMNs stimulated by formylpeptide. The distribution of neither of these probes was correlated with F-actin distribution, especially in rounded PMNs stimulated 30 s with 10(-8) M fMet-Leu-Phe, suggesting that F-actin was concentrated in two foci located in the cell head region and in the cell posterior end. In addition, zymosan-activated serum induced the morphological polarization of PMNs and the appearance of two foci of filamentous actin, demonstrating that binding of formylpeptide to its specific receptor was not required for F-actin reorganization. We conclude that the accumulation of F-actin probably

  10. Patient adherence with COPD therapy

    C. S. Rand

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there are very few published studies on adherence to treatment regimens in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the evidence that exists suggests that, as with asthma therapy, adherence is poor. Patient beliefs about COPD, as well as their motivation and expectations about the likelihood of success of medical interventions, can influence adherence rates. Other critical factors include the patient's understanding of their illness and therapy, and the complexity of the prescribed treatment regimen. Incorrect inhaler technique is also a common failing. When prescribing in primary or specialist care, healthcare professionals should address adherence as a vital part of the patient consultation. Improved patient education may also increase adherence rates.

  11. 76 FR 12969 - Campaign To Improve Poor Medication Adherence (U18)

    2011-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Campaign To Improve Poor Medication Adherence (U18) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... ] importance of good medication adherence, a vital first step toward improved adherence behavior and...

  12. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  13. β2 integrins (CD11/18) are essential for the chemosensory adhesion and migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes on bacterial cellulose.

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Hana; Park, Hye Rim; Son, Gun Woo; Park, Cheung-Seog; Park, Yong Seek

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been studied widely for applications in biomedical materials such as prosthetic artificial blood vessels owing to its unique characteristics, which include nontoxicity and nonimmunogenicity as compared with synthetic biopolymers such as expanded polytetrafluorethylene (ePTFE). However, to date, studies on the relative effect of leukocytes on BC as a prosthetic vascular graft are insufficient. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) play a pivotal role in early-phase immune response to bacterial or periprosthetic infection. PMN recruitment at sites of infection or inflammation mediated by various integrins such as β2 integrin family (CD11/CD18 family). Therefore, we discuss our investigations into the mechanisms by which β2 integrins-mediated chemosensory adhesion and migration of PMN on the vascular graft surface, BC. Our results show that CD11b/CD18 components mainly mediate PMN adherence on BC. CD11b/CD18 displays weak coordination with the other two α subunits (CD11a and CD11c). Furthermore, it was found that the β subunit (CD18) plays a critical role in both the adhesion and migration of N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated PMN on BC. The activity of CD18 contrasts with that of the individual α subunits. Among these, only CD11b displayed inhibition of PMN migration on BC surfaces. PMID:25231265

  14. Fagocitose por neutrófilos no Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico The phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Wilma Carvalho Neves Forte

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a presença de imunocomplexos e a atividade fagocitária de polimorfonucleares neutrofílicos em pacientes com Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico (LES com e sem sinais e sintomas de atividade da doença. MÉTODOS: Analisou-se o sangue periférico de 55 indivíduos, sendo 10 pacientes com forma ativa da doença, 15 fora de atividade e 30 indivíduos sadios. Foi utilizada imunodifusão radial para identificação de imunocomplexos e estudada a etapa de ingestão da fagocitose por neutrófilos com partículas de zimosan. RESULTADOS: Observou-se a presença de crioprecipitado constituído por IgM, IgG, IgA, componentes C3 e C4 do complemento nos pacientes com LES. As médias aritméticas da ingestão por neutrófilos de partículas de zimosan incubado com soro homólogo e zimosan incubado com soro autólogo mostraram uma diminuição significativa (pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presence of immune complexes and the phagocytes by polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without disease activity. METHODS: The peripheral blood of 55 subjects was analyzed. Ten of those subjects had disease activity, 15 had not disease activity, and 30 were healthy. We used radial immune diffusion to detect immune complexes. The phagocytic function was estimated by the ingestion of zymosan by polymorphonuclear neutrophils. RESULTS: In this study we found the presence of immune complexes formatted of IgM, IgG, IgA, and complement component C3 and C4 in LES patients. The arithmetic average of zymosan particles ingested by the neutrophils incubated with homologous human serum and autologous human serum was significantly decreased (p<0.05 in the LES activity patients when we compare with the group without activity, and the control group. CONCLUSION: We conclude that there are immune complexes in the LES patients with and without disease activity, and there is a reduction in the digestive step of the phagocytes by

  15. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    Nischal K; Khopkar Uday; Saple D

    2005-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV infection into a treatable, chronic condition. However, the need to continue treatment for decades rather than years, calls for a long-term perspective of ART. Adherence to the regimen is essential for successful treatment and sustained viral control. Studies have indicated that at least 95% adherence to ART regimens is optimal. It has been demonstrated that a 10% higher level of adherence results in a 21% reduction in dise...

  16. The effect of apomorphine on exocytosis and metabolic burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Elferink, J G

    1987-01-01

    1 In rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) apomorphine at 10-100 microM inhibits fMet-Leu-Phe and A23187-induced exocytosis, and the phorbol myristate acetate- and fMet-Leu-Phe-induced activation of the metabolic burst. The secretory response was not restored by washing the cells after pretreatment with apomorphine. 2 The inhibitory effect of apomorphine was not prevented by the dopamine receptor antagonists haloperidol and pimozide, nor did dopamine itself inhibit fMet-Leu-Phe-induced ...

  17. Determination of phagocytosis of 32P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    A procedure for the measurement of phagocytosis by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) of 32P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was modified so that a larger number of samples could be compared in a single run, and smaller volumes of sample, PMN, and 32P-labeled S aureus could be used. Results were highly reproducible, with a coefficient of variation between duplicate determinations of less than or equal to 2%. Lysostaphin was prepared from the supernatant of S staphylolyticus and was compared with a commercially available preparation. Effects of lysostaphin on PMN and influence of incubation media on release of 32P from 32P-labeled S aureus by lysostaphin were examined

  18. Nitric oxide production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in infected cystic fibrosis sputum consumes oxygen

    Kolpen, Mette; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus Ernst;

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by persisting mucoid biofilms in hypoxic endobronchial mucus. These biofilms are surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs), which consume a major part of present molecular oxygen (O(2...... reactive oxygen species, the PMNs in CF sputum also consume O(2) for production of NO.......)) due to production of superoxide (O(2)(-)). In this study, we show that the PMNs also consume O(2) for production of nitric oxide (NO) by the nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in the infected endobronchial mucus. Fresh expectorated sputum samples (n = 28) from chronically infected CF patients (n = 22) were...

  19. Human neutrophil Fc receptor-mediated adhesion under flow: a hollow fibre model of intravascular arrest.

    D'Arrigo, C; Candal-Couto, J J; Greer, M; Veale, D J; Woof, J M

    1995-04-01

    Human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were found to adhere to a novel model of blood vessel wall-associated IgG. The internal surfaces of cellulose acetate hollow fibres, of comparable internal diameter to small blood vessels, were coated with normal serum human IgG, heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG), laminin or fibrinogen. Under conditions of flow mimicking those in a small vessel, PMN were found to adhere markedly only to immunoglobulin-coated fibres. Arrest on HAIgG was inhibited by excess soluble IgG but not by bovine serum albumin (BSA), demonstrating that the adhesion was IgG-specific and presumably mediated by Fc gamma R on the PMN surface. Pre-adsorption of serum components onto HAIgG-coated fibres enhanced PMN arrest, due most probably to fixation of complement components by immobilized HAIgG, resulting in additional potential to entrap PMN via complement receptors such as CR3. Treatment of PMN with the regulatory neuropeptide substance P also enhanced adhesion to HAIgG-coated fibres and caused increased surface expression of Fc gamma RI, Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII. A mouse cell line derived from L cells, hR4C6, stably transfected with human Fc gamma RII, was found to adhere under flow to HAIgG-coated fibres, whilst untransfected parent L cells did not. This adhesion was similarly inhibited by excess soluble IgG, confirming the capability of Fc gamma R to mediate cell arrest. The study strongly suggests that Fc gamma R may play an important role in intravascular PMN arrest and we speculate that in inflammatory diseases PMN may adhere via Fc gamma R to immobilized immunoglobulin on the vascular endothelium, with subsequent degranulation and tissue damage. PMID:7535210

  20. [Adherence to psychopharmacological treatment: Psychotherapeutic strategies to enhance adherence].

    Lencer, R; Korn, D

    2015-05-01

    Effective psychopharmacological medication with good tolerability represents the cornerstone of treatment for severe mental illness; however, the 1-year adherence rates are only approximately 50%. The term adherence emphasizes the collaborative responsibility of the clinician and the patient for a positive treatment outcome. Reasons for non-adherence are manifold and include patient-specific factors, such as self-stigmatization, lack of social and familial support, cognitive impairment and substance use besides insufficient effectiveness and the occurrence of side effects of the psychotropic drugs. To enhance adherence, both clinician and patient have to fully understand all the reasons for and against adherence to medication before a collaborative decision is made on future long-term treatment. A positive attitude towards medication critically depends on whether patients feel that the medication supports the attainment of the individual goals. PMID:25903501

  1. Improved adherence with contingency management.

    Rosen, Marc I; Dieckhaus, Kevin; McMahon, Thomas J; Valdes, Barbara; Petry, Nancy M; Cramer, Joyce; Rounsaville, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) based interventions that reinforce adherence to prescribed medications have shown promise in a variety of disadvantaged populations. Fifty-six participants with histories of illicit substance use who were prescribed antiretroviral medication but evidenced suboptimal adherence during a baseline assessment were randomly assigned to 16 weeks of weekly CM-based counseling or supportive counseling, followed by 16 additional weeks of data collection and adherence feedback to providers. The CM intervention involved review of data generated by electronic pill-bottle caps that record bottle opening (MEMS) and brief substance abuse counseling. CM participants were reinforced for MEMS-measured adherence with drawings from a bowl for prizes and bonus drawings for consecutive weeks of perfect adherence. Potential total earnings averaged $800. Mean MEMS-measured adherence to the reinforced medication increased from 61% at baseline to 76% during the 16-week treatment phase and was significantly increased relative to the supportive counseling group (p = 0.01). Furthermore, mean log-transformed viral load was significantly lower in the CM group. However, by the end of the 16-week follow-up phase, differences between groups in adherence and viral load were no longer significantly different. Proportions of positive urine toxicology tests did not differ significantly between the two groups at any phase. A brief CM-based intervention was associated with significantly higher adherence and lower viral loads. Future studies should evaluate methods to extend effects for longer term benefits. PMID:17263651

  2. Kruppel-Like Factor 4 Overexpression Initiates a Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition and Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Cells following Expansion in Long Term Adherent Culture.

    Kenneth R Muir

    Full Text Available A replenishable source of insulin-producing cells has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Attempts to culture and expand pancreatic β-cells in vitro have resulted in their transition from insulin-producing epithelial cells to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs with high proliferative capacity but devoid of any hormone production. The aim of this study was to determine whether the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4, could induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET of the cultured cells. Islet-enriched pancreatic cells, allowed to dedifferentiate and expand in adherent cell culture, were transduced with an adenovirus containing KLF4 (Ad-Klf4. Cells were subsequently analysed for changes in cell morphology by light microscopy, and for the presence of epithelial and pancreatic markers by immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT/PCR. Infection with Ad-Klf4 resulted in morphological changes, down-regulation of mesenchymal markers, and re-expression of both epithelial and pancreatic cell markers including insulin and transcription factors specific to β-cells. This effect was further enhanced by culturing cells in suspension. However, the effects of Ad-KLf4 were transient and this was shown to be due to increased apoptosis in Klf4-expressing cells. Klf4 has been recently identified as a pioneer factor with the ability to modulate the structure of chromatin and enhance reprogramming/transdifferentiation. Our results show that Klf4 may have a role in the redifferentiation of expanded pancreatic cells in culture, but before this can be achieved the off-target effects that result in increased apoptosis would need to be overcome.

  3. Adherence and Readiness to Antiretroviral Treatment

    Södergård, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy places extraordinarily high demands on adherence, since non-adherence affects both individuals and society due to the spread of resistant viral strains. The aims of the thesis were to investigate the prevalence of adherence in Swedish HIV-infected patients, changes in adherence over time, and factors associated with adherence, including patients’ readiness to adhere. Further, to investigate the collaboration between nurses, doctors and pharmacists after the introduction...

  4. Long-term multilayer adherent network (MAN) expansion, maintenance, and characterization, chemical and genetic manipulation, and transplantation of human fetal forebrain neural stem cells.

    Wakeman, Dustin R; Hofmann, Martin R; Redmond, D Eugene; Teng, Yang D; Snyder, Evan Y

    2009-05-01

    Human neural stem/precursor cells (hNSC/hNPC) have been targeted for application in a variety of research models and as prospective candidates for cell-based therapeutic modalities in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. To this end, the successful derivation, expansion, and sustained maintenance of undifferentiated hNSC/hNPC in vitro, as artificial expandable neurogenic micro-niches, promises a diversity of applications as well as future potential for a variety of experimental paradigms modeling early human neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and neurogenetic disorders, and could also serve as a platform for small-molecule drug screening in the CNS. Furthermore, hNPC transplants provide an alternative substrate for cellular regeneration and restoration of damaged tissue in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Human somatic neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC/NPC) have been derived from a variety of cadaveric sources and proven engraftable in a cytoarchitecturally appropriate manner into the developing and adult rodent and monkey brain while maintaining both functional and migratory capabilities in pathological models of disease. In the following unit, we describe a new procedure that we have successfully employed to maintain operationally defined human somatic NSC/NPC from developing fetal, pre-term post-natal, and adult cadaveric forebrain. Specifically, we outline the detailed methodology for in vitro expansion, long-term maintenance, manipulation, and transplantation of these multipotent precursors. PMID:19455542

  5. Characterization of a Distinct Population of Circulating Human Non-Adherent Endothelial Forming Cells and Their Recruitment via Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-3

    Appleby, Sarah L.; Cockshell, Michaelia P.; Pippal, Jyotsna B.; Thompson, Emma J.; Barrett, Jeffrey M.; Katie Tooley; Shaundeep Sen; Wai Yan Sun; Randall Grose; Ian Nicholson; Vitalina Levina; Ira Cooke; Gert Talbo; Lopez, Angel F.; Bonder, Claudine S.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133(+) popul...

  6. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    Nischal K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has transformed HIV infection into a treatable, chronic condition. However, the need to continue treatment for decades rather than years, calls for a long-term perspective of ART. Adherence to the regimen is essential for successful treatment and sustained viral control. Studies have indicated that at least 95% adherence to ART regimens is optimal. It has been demonstrated that a 10% higher level of adherence results in a 21% reduction in disease progression. The various factors affecting success of ART are social aspects like motivation to begin therapy, ability to adhere to therapy, lifestyle pattern, financial support, family support, pros and cons of starting therapy and pharmacological aspects like tolerability of the regimen, availability of the drugs. Also, the regimen′s pill burden, dosing frequency, food requirements, convenience, toxicity and drug interaction profile compared with other regimens are to be considered before starting ART. The lack of trust between clinician and patient, active drug and alcohol use, active mental illness (e.g. depression, lack of patient education and inability of patients to identify their medications, lack of reliable access to primary medical care or medication are considered to be predictors of inadequate adherence. Interventions at various levels, viz. patient level, medication level, healthcare level and community level, boost adherence and overall outcome of ART.

  7. Soluble Pityrosporum-derived chemoattractant for polymorphonuclear leukocytes of psoriatic patients.

    Bunse, T; Mahrle, G

    1996-01-01

    The chemoattraction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) from psoriatic patients, atopic patients and healthy control persons by Pityrosporum orbicularelovale was investigated using the Boyden chamber method. The chemotactical attraction of PMNs from psoriatic patients by Pityrosporum (stimulation index SI = 58 +/- 50) was significantly increased (p < 0.05) compared to PMNs from atopic patients (SI = 20 +/- 17) and control persons (SI = 26 +/- 24). This effect seems to be specific for Pityrosporum, since the chemotactical response to Staphylococcus epidermidis was not increased in psoriasis. The chemotactical factor produced by Pityrosporum is hydrophilic and is destroyed by acid hydrolysis, indicating its protein nature. The yeast Pityrosporum may thus play a role in the koebnerization of psoriasis. PMID:8721481

  8. Chemotaxis of horse polymorphonuclear leukocytes to N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine.

    Zinkl, J G; Brown, P D

    1982-04-01

    Horse polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) isolated from horse blood by sedimentation and isotonic lysis and having about 25% accompanying lymphocytes were as effective at chemotaxis as nearly pure PMN isolated by density gradient techniques. N-Formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP), used as a representative of the formylmethionyl peptides (produced by prokaryocytic organisms), was effective as a chemoattractant only at the high concentration of 10(-4) M. When serum was preincubated with FMLP at concentrations as low as 10(-8) M, the serum attracted horse PMN. This activity was not generated when heat-inactivated (56 to 60 C for 30 minutes) serum was used. A combination of FMLP and zymosan was no more effective than zymosan alone in generating serum chemoattractants. The results of this study indicate that the FMLP is a weak chemoattractant for horse PMN, but that FMLP has the capability similar to that of zymosan to activate complement to produce PMN chemoattractants. PMID:7073083

  9. Determination of phagocytosis of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Dulin, A.M.; Paape, M.J.; Weinland, B.T.

    1984-04-01

    A procedure for the measurement of phagocytosis by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was modified so that a larger number of samples could be compared in a single run, and smaller volumes of sample, PMN, and /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus could be used. Results were highly reproducible, with a coefficient of variation between duplicate determinations of less than or equal to 2%. Lysostaphin was prepared from the supernatant of S staphylolyticus and was compared with a commercially available preparation. Effects of lysostaphin on PMN and influence of incubation media on release of /sup 32/P from /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus by lysostaphin were examined.

  10. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2013-07-15

    trapping. • Human peripheral blood leukocytes capture and concentrate quinacrine. • Polymorphonuclear leukocytes do so with higher apparent affinity. • Polymorphonuclear are also more competent than lymphocytes for pinocytosis.

  11. Points of control exerted along the macrophage-endothelial cell-polymorphonuclear neutrophil axis by PECAM-1 in the innate immune response of acute colonic inflammation.

    Sugimoto, Naohito; Rui, Tao; Yang, Min; Bharwani, Sulaiman; Handa, Osamu; Yoshida, Norimasa; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Kvietys, Peter R

    2008-08-01

    PECAM-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and leukocytes. Its extracellular domain has been implicated in leukocyte diapedesis. In this study, we used PECAM-1(-/-) mice and relevant cells derived from them to assess the role of PECAM-1 in an experimental model of acute colonic inflammation with a predominant innate immune response, i.e., 2,4,6-trinitrobenzine sulfonic acid (TNBS). Using chimeric approaches, we addressed the points of control exerted by PECAM-1 along the macrophage-endothelial cell-polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) axis. In vivo, TNBS-induced colitis was ameliorated in PECAM-1(-/-) mice, an event attributed to PECAM-1 on hematopoietic cells rather than to PECAM-1 on endothelial cells. The in vivo innate immune response was mimicked in vitro by using a construct of the vascular-interstitial interface, i.e., PMN transendothelial migration was induced by colonic lavage fluid (CLF) from TNBS mice or macrophages (MPhi) challenged with CLF. Using the construct, we confirmed that endothelial cell PECAM-1 does not play a role in PMN transendothelial migration. Although MPhi activation (NF-kappaB nuclear binding) and function (keratinocyte-derived chemokine production) induced by CLF was diminished in PECAM-1(-/-) MPhi, this did not affect their ability to promote PMN transendothelial migration. By contrast, PECAM-1(-/-) PMN did not adhere to or migrate across endothelial cell monolayers in response to CLF. Further, as compared with PECAM-1(+/+) PMN, PECAM-1(-/-) PMN were less effective in orientating their CXCR2 receptors (polarization) in the direction of a chemotactic gradient. Collectively, our findings indicate that PECAM-1 modulation of PMN function (at a step before diapedesis) most likely contributes to the inflammation in a colitis model with a strong innate immune component. PMID:18641353

  12. Regulatory peptides modulate adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to bronchial epithelial cells through regulation of interleukins, ICAM-1 and NF-kappaB/IkappaB.

    Zhang, Jian-Song; Tan, Yu-Rong; Xiang, Yang; Luo, Zi-Qiang; Qin, Xiao-Qun

    2006-02-01

    A complex network of regulatory neuropeptides controls airway inflammation reaction, in which airway epithelial cells adhering to and activating leukocytes is a critical step. To study the effect of intrapulmonary regulatory peptides on adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) and its mechanism, several regulatory peptides including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), epidermal growth factor (EGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), were investigated. The results demonstrated that VIP and EGF showed inhibitory effects both on the secretion of IL-1, IL-8 and the adhesion of PMNs to BECs, whereas ET-1 and CGRP had the opposite effect. Anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) antibody could block the adhesion of PMNs to ozone-stressed BECs. Using immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), it was shown that VIP and EGF down-regulated the expression of ICAM-1 in BECs, while ET-1 and CGRP up-regulated ICAM-1 expression. NF-kappaB inhibitor MG132 blocked ICAM-1 expression induced by ET-1 and CGRP. Furthermore, in electric mobility shift assay (EMSA), VIP and EGF restrained the binding activity of NF-kappaB to the NF-kappaB binding site within the ICAM-1 promoter in ozone-stressed BECs, while CGRP and ET-1 promoted this binding activity. IkappaB degradation was consistent with NF-kappaB activation. These observations indicate that VIP and EGF inhibit inflammation, while ET-1 and CGRP enhance the inflammation reaction. PMID:16474903

  13. Phagocytosis of haemozoin (malarial pigment enhances metalloproteinase-9 activity in human adherent monocytes: Role of IL-1beta and 15-HETE

    Giribaldi Giuliana

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown previously that human monocytes fed with haemozoin (HZ or trophozoite-parasitized RBCs displayed increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 enzyme activity and protein/mRNA expression and increased TNF production, and showed higher matrix invasion ability. The present study utilized the same experimental model to analyse the effect of phagocytosis of: HZ, delipidized HZ, beta-haematin (lipid-free synthetic HZ and trophozoites on production of IL-1beta and MMP-9 activity and expression. The second aim was to find out which component of HZ was responsible for the effects. Methods Native HZ freshly isolated from Plasmodium falciparum (Palo Alto strain, Mycoplasma-free, delipidized HZ, beta-haematin (lipid-free synthetic HZ, trophozoites and control meals such as opsonized non-parasitized RBCs and inert latex particles, were fed to human monocytes. The production of IL-1beta by differently fed monocytes, in presence or absence of specific MMP-9 inhibitor or anti-hIL-1beta antibodies, was quantified in supernatants by ELISA. Expression of IL-1beta was analysed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. MMP-9 activity and protein expression were quantified by gelatin zymography and Western blotting. Results Monocytes fed with HZ or trophozoite-parasitized RBCs generated increased amounts of IL-1beta and enhanced enzyme activity (in cell supernatants and protein/mRNA expression (in cell lysates of monocyte MMP-9. The latter appears to be causally related to enhanced IL-1beta production, as enhancement of both expression and enzyme activity were abrogated by anti-hIL-1beta Abs. Upregulation of IL-1beta and MMP-9 were absent in monocytes fed with beta-haematin or delipidized HZ, indicating a role for HZ-attached or HZ-generated lipid components. 15-HETE (15(S,R-hydroxy-6,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid a potent lipoperoxidation derivative generated by HZ from arachidonic acid via haem-catalysis was identified as one mediator

  14. Treatment adherence to an antiretroviral regime: the lived experience of Native Hawaiians and kokua.

    Ka'opua, L

    2001-09-01

    Treatment adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is a critical issue in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care. HAART can extend the longevity of people living with HIV, but treatment efficacy relies on strict adherence that is difficult for many consumers to manage. Results presented in this article are based on semi-structured in-depth interviews with Native Hawaiian consumers (n = 6) who reported moderate to low levels of overall HAART adherence, and based on their kokua, or primary support. All interviews were recorded on audiotape, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using Grounded Theory methods. Research questions that guided the inquiry, included: What are the challenges of Hawaiians who report moderate to low levels of HAART adherence? How does non-adherence occur? What is the role of the kokua (primary caregiver) and/or family members in treatment adherence? What types of support enhance adherence? The unpredictability of living with HIV was a major challenge to adherence. Symptom distress and active use of alcohol and other drugs interfered with the capacity to appropriately adhere. Two patterns of non-adherence were identified: interrupted regime and intermittent use. Tangible and emotional types of support, sometimes delivered in culture-specific ways, were viewed as helpful in maintaining compliance and in resuming the regime when difficulties arose. The findings complement extant research on HAART by providing an understanding of adherence as a lived experience among Native Hawaiians and their kokua. PMID:12180508

  15. The development of the ProMAS: a Probabilistic Medication Adherence Scale

    Kleppe M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mieke Kleppe,1,2 Joyca Lacroix,2 Jaap Ham,1 Cees Midden1 1Human Technology Interaction, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; 2Behavior, Cognition and Perception, Philips Research, Eindhoven, the Netherlands Abstract: Current self-report medication adherence measures often provide heavily skewed results with limited variance, suggesting that most participants are highly adherent. This contrasts with findings from objective adherence measures. We argue that one of the main limitations of these self-report measures is the limited range covered by the behaviors assessed. That is, the items do not match the adherence behaviors that people perform, resulting in a ceiling effect. In this paper, we present a new self-reported medication adherence scale based on the Rasch model approach (the ProMAS, which covers a wide range of adherence behaviors. The ProMAS was tested with 370 elderly receiving medication for chronic conditions. The results indicated that the ProMAS provided adherence scores with sufficient fit to the Rasch model. Furthermore, the ProMAS covered a wider range of adherence behaviors compared to the widely used Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS instrument, resulting in more variance and less skewness in adherence scores. We conclude that the ProMAS is more capable of discriminating between people with different adherence rates than the MARS. Keywords: questionnaire design, probabilistic models, methodology

  16. Effect of Legionella pneumophila sonicate on killing of Listeria monocytogenes by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes

    Rechnitzer, C; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H

    1993-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila shares with other intracellular pathogens the ability to resist intracellular killing within phagocytes. An increasing number of cellular components of L. pneumophila are proposed as pathogenic factors of the organism. At the site of infection, the phagocytic cells will be ...

  17. SERUM INHIBITION OF THE OXIDATIVE BURST IN HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. (R827354C003)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. SERUM INHIBITION OF THE OXIDATIVE BURST IN HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. (R826781)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. The challenge of patient adherence.

    Martin, Leslie R; Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; Dimatteo, M Robin

    2005-09-01

    Quality healthcare outcomes depend upon patients' adherence to recommended treatment regimens. Patient nonadherence can be a pervasive threat to health and wellbeing and carry an appreciable economic burden as well. In some disease conditions, more than 40% of patients sustain significant risks by misunderstanding, forgetting, or ignoring healthcare advice. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research studies agree that successful attempts to improve patient adherence depend upon a set of key factors. These include realistic assessment of patients' knowledge and understanding of the regimen, clear and effective communication between health professionals and their patients, and the nurturance of trust in the therapeutic relationship. Patients must be given the opportunity to tell the story of their unique illness experiences. Knowing the patient as a person allows the health professional to understand elements that are crucial to the patient's adherence: beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, cultural context, social supports, and emotional health challenges, particularly depression. Physician-patient partnerships are essential when choosing amongst various therapeutic options to maximize adherence. Mutual collaboration fosters greater patient satisfaction, reduces the risks of nonadherence, and improves patients' healthcare outcomes. PMID:18360559

  20. The effect of plant phenolics on the formation of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-DNA adducts and TPA-stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils chemiluminescence in vitro

    Phenolics, common plant constituents, form up an important part of human diet and are considered potential chemopreventive agents. In the present study, structurally diverse phenolics, such as tannic acid, protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid and resveratrol, were investigated for their inhibitory effects on covalent binding of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to DNA in vitro and the suppression of oxidative burst in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). 32P-postlabeling analysis of DNA incubated with DMBA in the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced microsomes produced three major adducts derived from anti-, syn- and anti-dihydrodiol epoxides through reactions with dGuo and dAdo, respectively. Phenolic compounds at the concentration of 150 μM reduced the levels of all DMBA-DNA adducts by 55-98%. The most dramatic effect was observed in case of tannic acid, which completely inhibited the formation of DMBA-dAdo adducts. Chlorogenic acid was the least effective inhibitor of DMBA-DNA adducts formation particularly syn-DMBADE-dAdo (20%). Human neutrophils showed a significant dose-related decrease of TPA-induced chemiluminescence after pretreatment with phenolic compounds. The most effective inhibitors were tannic acid and resveratrol with IC50=5.19 and 5.76 μM, respectively. These results suggest that the suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and carcinogen-DNA adducts formation may be important for anticarcinogenic activity of the examined phenolics

  1. Adherence with Preventive Medication in Childhood Asthma

    Scott Burgess

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal adherence with preventive medication is common and often unrecognised as a cause of poor asthma control. A number of risk factors for nonadherence have emerged from well-conducted studies. Unfortunately, patient report a physician's estimation of adherence and knowledge of these risk factors may not assist in determining whether non-adherence is a significant factor. Electronic monitoring devices are likely to be more frequently used to remind patients to take medication, as a strategy to motivate patients to maintain adherence, and a tool to evaluate adherence in subjects with poor disease control. The aim of this paper is to review non-adherence with preventive medication in childhood asthma, its impact on asthma control, methods of evaluating non-adherence, risk factors for suboptimal adherence, and strategies to enhance adherence.

  2. Macrophages are stimulated by muramyl dipeptide to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation in the peritoneal cavities of guinea pigs.

    Nagao, S; Nakanishi, M.; Kutsukake, H; Yagawa, K; Kusumoto, S; Shiba, T; Tanaka, A; Kotani, S.

    1990-01-01

    N-Acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide [MDP]) injected intraperitoneally significantly increased the number of cells entering the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs primed with liquid paraffin or thioglycollate. There was a close relationship between peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) accumulation and the uptake of glucosamine by macrophages in guinea pigs treated with a variety of bacterial cell surface components such as cell wall peptidoglycan subunits and bacte...

  3. Myeloperoxidase modulates the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes. Studies with cells from a myeloperoxidase-deficient patient.

    Stendahl, O.; Coble, B I; Dahlgren, C; Hed, J; Molin, L.

    1984-01-01

    Patients lacking the primary granulae enzyme, myeloperoxidase (MPO), do not usually show any increased susceptibility to infection or altered inflammatory response, in contrast to several other biochemical defects in polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We have now evaluated the role of MPO on phagocyte function in a patient with complete MPO deficiency suffering from generalized pustular psoriasis. We found that the MPO-deficient neutrophils showed enhanced phagocytosis (greater than 200% of norma...

  4. Identification of Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte and HL-60 Cell Receptors for Adhesins of Streptococcus gordonii and Actinomyces naeslundii

    Ruhl, Stefan; Cisar, John O.; Sandberg, Ann L.

    2000-01-01

    Interactions of oral streptococci and actinomyces with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), mediated by sialic acid- and Gal/GalNAc-reactive adhesins, respectively, result in activation of the PMNs and thereby may contribute to the initiation of oral inflammation. Sialidase treatment of PMNs or HL-60 cells abolished adhesion of Streptococcus gordonii but was required for adhesion of Actinomyces naeslundii. The same effects of sialidase were noted for adhesion of these bacteria to a major 150-...

  5. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Shukla SD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shakti D Shukla,1,* Rory L Fairbairn,1,* David A Gell,1 Roger D Latham,1 Sukhwinder S Sohal,1,2 Eugene H Walters,1 Ronan F O’Toole11Breathe Well Centre, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells.Objective: To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae.Methods: Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE. PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken.Results: PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial

  6. 78 FR 34109 - ``Script Your Future'' Medication Adherence Campaign

    2013-06-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration ``Script Your Future'' Medication Adherence Campaign AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...) called ``Script Your Future''. To continue and enhance this important public health initiative,...

  7. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  8. Dietary Adherence Monitoring Tool for Free-living, Controlled Feeding Studies

    Objective: To devise a dietary adherence monitoring tool for use in controlled human feeding trials involving free-living study participants. Methods: A scoring tool was devised to measure and track dietary adherence for an 8-wk randomized trial evaluating the effects of two different dietary patter...

  9. Kinetics of leukotriene A4 synthesis by 5-lipoxygenase from rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    When arachidonic acid is added to lysates of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes, it is oxidized to (5S)-hydroperoxy-6(E),8(Z),11(Z),14(Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE). The 5-HPETE then partitions between reduction to the 5-hydroxyeicosanoid and conversion to leukotriene A4 (LTA4). Both steps in the formation of LTA4 are catalyzed by the enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. When [3H]arachidonic acid and unlabeled 5-HPETE were incubated together with 5-lipoxygenase, approximately 20% of the arachidonic acid oxidized at low enzyme concentrations was converted to LTA4 without reduction of the specific radioactivity of the LTA4 by the unlabeled 5-HPETE. A significant fraction of the [3H]-5-HPETE intermediate that is formed from arachidonic acid must therefore be converted directly to LTA4 without dissociation of the intermediate from the enzyme. This result predicts that even in the presence of high levels of peroxidase activity, which will trap any free 5-HPETE by reduction, the minimum efficiency of conversion of 5-HPETE to LTA4 will be approximately 20%, and this prediction was confirmed. 5-HPETE was found to be a competitive substrate relative to arachidonic acid, so that it is likely that the two substrates share a common active site

  10. Thermodynamic determination of beta-hexosaminidase isoenzymes in mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocyte populations.

    Casal, J Antonio; Chabás, Amparo; Tutor, J Carlos

    2003-01-30

    Isoenzymes of beta-hexosaminidase (Hex) were determined in mononuclear (MN) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes, with a thermodynamic method using the chromogenic substrate sodio-3,3'-dichlorophenolsulfonphthaleinyl N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide. Imprecision was very satisfactory, and the results are very much in agreement with those obtained using the fluorogenic substrates 4-methylumbelliferyl N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide and 4-methylumbelliferyl N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide 6-sulfate. In 163 healthy individuals we found, for the proportion as a percentage of the Hex A isoenzyme, significantly higher values (P < 0.001) in PMN than in MN cells (71.56 +/- 0.30% vs. 54.28 +/- 0.24%), meaning that it would not appear advisable to use total leukocyte lysates for evaluating this variable. The method is fast, precise, and highly suitable for the biochemical diagnosis and heterozygote screening of GM2 gangliosidoses, and would be applicable in cases of thermolabile Hex B and for detecting the B1 variant. PMID:12503097

  11. Function of irradiated polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained by buffy-coat centrifugation

    Several studies suggest that transfusion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) may be beneficial in the treatment of septic neonatal patients. Because of expense, donor availability, and the technical effort involved in obtaining PMNs by intermittent or continuous flow leukapheresis, buffy coat centrifugation of whole blood has been suggested as an alternative source. An in vitro study was performed to determine whether PMNs collected by this method have adequate oxidative and migratory function measured by chemiluminescence (CL) and chemotaxis under agarose (CT), respectively. Whole blood samples from six adult volunteers were drawn into citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine-one and stored at 4 degrees C for 0 to 48 hours. One-half of each sample was irradiated with 1500 rads. PMNs isolated from the buffy coat of these samples had greater than 80 percent normal CT and CL following 0 to 28 hours of storage in whole blood. Irradiation caused no depression in function. Units of whole blood yielded 1.11 +/- 0.40 X 10(9) PMNs per unit. This study indicates that transfusion of radiated PMNs obtained from stored whole blood that is less than 28 hours old is reasonable to use in studies involving PMN transfusions

  12. Study on defense function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in A-bomb survivors, 4

    Included in this study were 222 A-bomb survivors, consisting of the exposed group (104 exposed to 0.5-6.0 Gy estimated on the basis of T65 DR) and the non-exposed group (118 exposed to 0 Gy). Regarding superoxide anion production, such as O2-·CF and O2-·F, there were significant differences between the exposed and non-exposed groups. Chemotaxis, natural migration, and chemokinesis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) tended to be increased in the exposed group. This was more marked in men than women. Chemotaxis, natural migration, and chemokinesis of PMN were significantly increased in A-bomb survivors aged 59 years or less (65.2±16.7 μml/45 min, 31.3±11.1, and 44.7±13.9, respectively) than those aged more than 59 years (59.5±18.5, 26.3±10.8, and 38.6±14.6, respectively). The group of patients aged 59 years or less tended to have higher values of O2-·CF and O2-·F. A significantly increased chemokinesis was associated with cigarette smoking. Regarding the other items, such as migration, chemotaxis, and superoxide anion production, the measurement values tended to be higher in the group of smokers than that of nonsmokers. (N.K.)

  13. Function of irradiated polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained by buffy-coat centrifugation

    Wheeler, J.G.; Abramson, J.S.; Ekstrand, K.

    Several studies suggest that transfusion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) may be beneficial in the treatment of septic neonatal patients. Because of expense, donor availability, and the technical effort involved in obtaining PMNs by intermittent or continuous flow leukapheresis, buffy coat centrifugation of whole blood has been suggested as an alternative source. An in vitro study was performed to determine whether PMNs collected by this method have adequate oxidative and migratory function measured by chemiluminescence (CL) and chemotaxis under agarose (CT), respectively. Whole blood samples from six adult volunteers were drawn into citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine-one and stored at 4 degrees C for 0 to 48 hours. One-half of each sample was irradiated with 1500 rads. PMNs isolated from the buffy coat of these samples had greater than 80 percent normal CT and CL following 0 to 28 hours of storage in whole blood. Irradiation caused no depression in function. Units of whole blood yielded 1.11 +/- 0.40 X 10(9) PMNs per unit. This study indicates that transfusion of radiated PMNs obtained from stored whole blood that is less than 28 hours old is reasonable to use in studies involving PMN transfusions.

  14. CCL2 Promotes Colorectal Carcinogenesis by Enhancing Polymorphonuclear Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Population and Function

    Eunyoung Chun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our study reveals a non-canonical role for CCL2 in modulating non-macrophage, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and shaping a tumor-permissive microenvironment during colon cancer development. We found that intratumoral CCL2 levels increased in patients with colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CRC, adenocarcinomas, and adenomas. Deletion of CCL2 blocked progression from dysplasia to adenocarcinoma and reduced the number of colonic MDSCs in a spontaneous mouse model of colitis-associated CRC. In a transplantable mouse model of adenocarcinoma and an APC-driven adenoma model, CCL2 fostered MDSC accumulation in evolving colonic tumors and enhanced polymorphonuclear (PMN-MDSC immunosuppressive features. Mechanistically, CCL2 regulated T cell suppression of PMN-MDSCs in a STAT3-mediated manner. Furthermore, CCL2 neutralization decreased tumor numbers and MDSC accumulation and function. Collectively, our experiments support that perturbing CCL2 and targeting MDSCs may afford therapeutic opportunities for colon cancer interception and prevention.

  15. Impact of an exercise program on adherence and fitness indicators.

    Carpenter, Roger; Gilleland, Diana

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to exercise is one of the most problematic health behaviors. This pilot study describes the impact of an exercise program on adherence to exercise and fitness indicators for overweight and obese adults enrolled in an insurance reimbursed exercise plan. Chart reviews were conducted retrospectively in a convenience sample of 77 subjects from a human performance lab (HPL) at a large southern university. Charts from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed for health history, fitness indicators (fitness level, weight, BMI, hip/waist ratio, % body fat, BP, HR, cholesterol), and adherence (number of exercise sessions/month). Exercise supervision was operationalized in two phases over 12months: Phase I (3months supervised exercise) and Phase II (9months unsupervised exercise). Fifty-eight participants completed Phase I, and 8 completed Phase II. Six-nine percent of those completing Phase I visited the gym at least 8 times/month with significant (α=.05) improvement in all fitness indicators. Those visiting job stress, and fitness level were not associated with adherence. Symptoms of swollen, stiff, painful joints, and swollen ankles and legs were associated with decreased adherence to exercise. Supervised exercise was positively related to adherence and improved fitness indicators. Adults with joint symptoms may require more support. Based on these pilot data, designing a study with a larger sample and the inclusion of barriers and facilitators for adherence to self-directed exercise would allow additional analysis. Innovative interventions are needed that mimic the supervised environment, shifting responsibility for the exercise plan from the supervisor to those exercising. PMID:27091276

  16. Introducing the Adherence Strategy Engineering Framework (ASEF)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg; Bertelsen, Olav W.

    2013-01-01

    resulting in reduced data quality and suboptimal treatment. Objectives: The aim of this paper is to introduce the Adherence Strategy Engineering Framework (ASEF) as a method for developing novel technology-based adherence strategies to assess and improve patient adherence levels in the unsupervised setting...

  17. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  18. Tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay values are associated with antimicrobial peptides expression in  polymorphonuclear cells during latent tuberculous infection

    Julio E Castañeda-Delgado

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that patients with progressive tuberculosis (TB express abundant amounts of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs cathelicidin (LL-37 and human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1 in circulating cells, whereas latent TB infected donors showed no differences when compared with purified protein derivative (PPD and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether LL-37 and HNP-1 production correlates with higher tuberculin skin test (TST and QFT values in TB household contacts. Twenty-six TB household contact individuals between 26-58 years old TST and QFT positive with at last two years of latent TB infection were recruited. AMPs production by polymorphonuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry and correlation between TST and QFT values was analysed. Our results showed that there is a positive correlation between levels of HNP-1 and LL-37 production with reactivity to TST and/or QFT levels. This preliminary study suggests the potential use of the expression levels of these peptides as biomarkers for progression in latent infected individuals.

  19. Adherence and health care costs

    Iuga AO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aurel O Iuga,1,2 Maura J McGuire3,4 1Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Johns Hopkins University, 3Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Medication nonadherence is an important public health consideration, affecting health outcomes and overall health care costs. This review considers the most recent developments in adherence research with a focus on the impact of medication adherence on health care costs in the US health system. We describe the magnitude of the nonadherence problem and related costs, with an extensive discussion of the mechanisms underlying the impact of nonadherence on costs. Specifically, we summarize the impact of nonadherence on health care costs in several chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma. A brief analysis of existing research study designs, along with suggestions for future research focus, is provided. Finally, given the ongoing changes in the US health care system, we also address some of the most relevant and current trends in health care, including pharmacist-led medication therapy management and electronic (e-prescribing. Keywords: patient, medication, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, noncompliance, cost

  20. How can we improve adherence?

    Price, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with wound healing difficulties are also coping with the management of a chronic disease or chronic condition that requires them to make lifestyle behaviour changes, for example, managing glucose levels through diet and exercise and regular foot inspection. Many find it difficult to make such changes and often experience feelings of powerlessness when faced with a lifetime of behavioural and psychological change. This article will explore the importance of understanding the patient difficulties associated with adherence to a regime and how life changes can be difficult to maintain over sustained periods of time. However, the article will also discuss the importance of this topic in trying to understand the clinical evidence base for treatment--as many clinical trials investigating treatments for the diabetic foot do not include information on the extent to which patients in the trial conformed to the trial protocol. The article gives an overview of recent developments--including lessons we can learn from other chronic conditions where permanent life changes are required--in particular the need to keep health messages simple, tailored to the individual and repeated frequently. The evidence to date suggests that no one single form of adherence intervention will work with all patients; this is not surprising given complex and multifactorial nature of adherence and the myriad of barriers that exist that patients and health care professionals need to overcome. PMID:26453542

  1. Adherence and quality of care in IBD

    Bager, Palle; Julsgaard, Mette; Vestergaard, Thea;

    2016-01-01

    different aspects of adherence and to identify predictors of non-adherence, including the quality of care, for outpatients with IBD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An anonymous electronic questionnaire was used to investigate different aspects of adherence, the quality of care, patient involvement and shared...... decision making among 377 IBD outpatients. RESULTS: Three hundred (80%) filled in the questionnaire. The overall adherence rate was 93%. Young age (< 35 years old) and smoking were significantly associated with non-adherence (prevalence odds ratio (POR) 2.98, 95% CI 1.04-8.52, p < 0.05 and POR 3.88, 95% CI...

  2. Altered polymorphonuclear leukocyte Fc gamma R expression contributes to decreased candicidal activity during intraabdominal sepsis

    We investigated the effects of untreated intraabdominal sepsis on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) candicidal activity. Two groups of swine were studied. Group I (n=6) underwent sham laparotomy, group II (n=7) underwent cecal ligation and incision. Untreated intraabdominal sepsis resulted in a progressive decrease in PMN candicidal activity. Concomitant rosetting and phagocytosis assays demonstrated a decrease in both the attachment and phagocytosis of Candida albicans opsonized with both normal and septic swine serum by PMNs in group II. Iodine 125-labeled swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fluorescein isothioalanate (FITC)-labeled swine IgG were used to investigate Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions. Scatchard analyses demonstrated a progressive decline in both the binding affinity constant and number of IgG molecules bound per PMN. Stimulation of the oxidative burst markedly reduced 125I-labeled IgG binding in both group I and group II, with a greater decrement being seen in animals with intraabdominal sepsis. Further, in group II, PMN recycling of the Fc gamma receptor to the cell surface after generation of the oxidative burst was reduced by postoperative day 4. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fc gamma receptor II, but not Fc gamma receptor I/III markedly reduced intracellular candicidal activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a homogeneous pattern of FITC-IgG uptake by nearly all group I PMNs, whereas by postoperative day 8 a substantial number of PMNs from group II failed to internalize the FITC-IgG. These studies suggest that untreated intraabdominal sepsis reduces PMN candicidal activity and that this is due, in part, to altered PMN Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions

  3. Asthma and Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroids

    Bårnes, Camilla Boslev; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the cornerstone of maintenance asthma therapy. However, in spite of this, adherence to ICS remains low. The aim of this systematic literature review was to provide an overview of the current knowledge of adherence to ICS, effects of poor adherence, and means to...... was found to be between 22 and 63%, with improvement up to and after an exacerbation. Poor adherence was associated with youth, being African-American, having mild asthma, < 12 y of formal education, and poor communication with the health-care provider, whereas improved adherence was associated with...... asthma-related hospitalizations could be attributed to poor adherence. Most studies have reported an increase in adherence following focused interventions, followed by an improvement in quality of life, symptoms, FEV1, and oral corticosteroid use. However, 2 studies found no difference in health...

  4. Adherence to Methotrexate therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Arshad, Nasim; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Saira; Batool, Shabnam; Farman, Sumaira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and to identify factors that promote either adherence or non adherence. Methods: One hundred Rheumatoid Arthritis patients on MTX for at least two months were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by direct interview. Details recorded were, demographics (age, sex, education, monthly income), disease duration, duration on MTX and current dose. Disease Activity Score on 28 joint counts (DAS 28) at the current visit, concomitant drugs taken and number of doses of MTX missed in the previous 8 weeks were noted. Non adherence was defined as omission of any three or more prescribed doses of MTX in previous 8 week. Patients were asked for the factors that motivated their adherence to MTX as well as factors for non adherence. Presence of side effects due to MTX was also recorded. Result: Non adherence was found among 23% of cases. Patients of low socioeconomic group (p <0.0001) and on MTX for longer duration (p <0.001) had higher non adherence. Non adherent patients had significantly higher disease activity as measured by DAS 28 (p<0.001). Good counseling and education by the doctor was a strong predictor of adherence (p <0.001). Lack of affordability (p <0.001); lack of availability at local pharmacy (p <0.001); lack of family support (p <0.001) and lack of awareness regarding need and importance of MTX (p < 0.001were found as significant factors for non adherence. Conclusion: MTX non adherence in RA is noted in about one fourth of study group. Various economical and social issues lead to non adherence but good patient education and counseling by doctor could promote adherence in this study group.

  5. In vitro adherence patterns of Shigella serogroups to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells are similar to those of Escherichia coli O157

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Shigella species, which are human gastrointestinal pathogens, can adhere to cattle recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells using a recently standardized adherence assay, and to compare their adherence patterns to that of Escherichia coli O15...

  6. Sensitivity of locally recurrent rat mammary tumour cell lines to syngeneic polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis.

    Aeed, P. A.; Welch, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Using a recently developed model for studying the biology of locally recurrent (LR) mammary tumours in the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma system, we examined the sensitivity to polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis. The parental MTF7(T20) cell line; the 'primary' tumours which arose following subcutaneous inoculation into the mammary fat pad, sc1 and sc3; and the local recurrences (following surgical excision) LR1 and LR1a from sc1, and LR3 from sc3 were all...

  7. The crucial role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in resistance to Salmonella dublin infections in genetically susceptible and resistant mice

    Vassiloyanakopoulos, Antonis P.; OKAMOTO, SHARON; Fierer, Joshua

    1998-01-01

    Macrophages are considered to be the mediators of resistance to extra-intestinal Salmonella infections. Nevertheless, the initial cellular response to Salmonella infections consists primarily of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). To determine whether PMN serve an important function for the infected host, we made mice neutropenic with the rat mAb to RB6–8C5 and infected them i.v. with ≈103 Salmonella dublin or an isogenic derivative that lacks the virulence plasmid (LD842). We infected BALB/c...

  8. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens

  9. Impact of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome on antiretroviral therapy adherence

    Nachega JB

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jean B Nachega,1,2,4 Chelsea Morroni,1 Richard E Chaisson,2–4 Rene Goliath,1 Anne Efron,4 Malathi Ram,2 Gary Maartens11University of Cape Town, Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Cape Town, South Africa; 2Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Departments of International Health and Epidemiology, 3Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 4Johns Hopkins University, Center for Tuberculosis Research, Baltimore, Maryland, USAObjective: We determined the impact of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS on antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence in a cohort of 274 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected South African adults initiating ART.Methods: We carried out a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of partially supervised ART in Cape Town, South Africa. Monthly pill count adherence, viral suppression (HIV viral load < 50 c/mL, and IRIS events were documented. Poisson regression was used to identify variables associated with ART adherence below the median in the first 6 months of ART.Results: We enrolled 274 patients: 58% women, median age 34 years, median CD4 count 98 cells/µL, 46% World Health Organization clinical stage IV, and 40% on treatment for tuberculosis (TB. IRIS and TB-IRIS developed in 8.4% and 6.6% of patients, respectively. The median cumulative adherence at 6 months for those with an IRIS event vs no IRIS was 95.5% vs 98.2% (P = 0.04. Although not statistically significant, patients developing IRIS had a lower 6-month viral load suppression than those without IRIS (68% vs 80%, P = 0.32. ART adherence below the median of 98% was independently associated with alcohol abuse (relative risk [RR] 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–1.9; P = 0.003 and IRIS events (RR 1.7; 95% CI 1.2–2.2; P = 0.001.Conclusion: Although IRIS events were associated with slightly lower adherence rates, overall

  10. Early polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation correlates with the development of posttraumatic cerebral edema in rats

    To evaluate the role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in the development of posttraumatic cerebral edema, we quantitatively assessed the time course and magnitude of PMN accumulation and its relationship to cerebral edema formation after cerebral trauma in 78 rats. 111In-labeled PMN accumulation was measured in 26 rats in the first 8 h after right hemispheric percussive cerebral trauma or a sham control condition. 51Cr-labeled erythrocyte accumulation was measured simultaneously in 22 rats to assess the contribution of expansion of blood volume to early posttraumatic PMN accumulation. Edema formation [right-left (R-L) hemispheric difference in percent brain water], R-L hemispheric labeled-PMN accumulation, and blood volume index-adjusted PMN accumulation were measured between 0-2 h and 4-8 h posttrauma. PMN accumulation was elevated markedly in the first 2 h posttrauma compared with values in sham controls (13.45 +/- 2.53 vs -0.03 +/- 0.31, p less than 0.01) but not when adjusted for blood volume index (BVI), suggesting that PMN accumulation in the first 2 h posttrauma was due to expansion of blood volume. Between 4 and 8 h posttrauma, however, both total (2.56 +/- 0.82 vs -0.29 +/- 0.52) and BVI-adjusted (8.78 +/- 3.97 vs -0.48 +/- 0.79) PMN accumulation were elevated (p less than 0.05) compared with sham. Brain edema and total PMN accumulation were significantly correlated at both 2 h and 8 h posttrauma (r2 = 0.77, p less than 0.001, and r2 = 0.69, p less than 0.002, respectively), but a significant correlation between edema and BVI-adjusted PMN accumulation was observed only at 8 h posttrauma (r2 = 0.96, p less than 0.001). These data show that PMN accumulation after traumatic brain injury occurs with an initial phase explained by an increase in blood volume in the first 2 h posttrauma followed by a subsequent acute inflammatory phase

  11. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    Sharada P Wasti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. METHODS: A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. RESULTS: A total of 282 (85.5% respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014; alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035. Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription, followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. CONCLUSION: Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop

  12. Measurement complexity of adherence to medication

    Galato D; Schuelter-Trevisol F; Piovezan AP

    2012-01-01

    Dayani Galato, Fabiana Schuelter-Trevisol, Anna Paula PiovezanMaster Program in Health Sciences, University of Southern Santa Catarina (Unisul) Tubarão, Santa Catarina, BrazilAdherence to pharmacologic therapy is a major challenge for the rational use of medicines, particularly when it comes to antiretroviral drugs that require adherence to at least 95% of prescribed doses.1 Studies in this area are always important and contribute to medication adherence understanding, even though ...

  13. Factors that positively influence adherence to antiretroviral therapy by HIV and/or AIDS patients and their caregivers

    Ross, Andrew J.; Myint Aung; Laura Campbell; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The importance of dedicated adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is well documented. Multiple factors may affect adherence and this study explores patients’ and their caregivers’ perceptions of factors which may positively influence adherence to ART.Method: This study was a descriptive, qualitative study that used both free attitude interviews and focus-group discussions. Nineteen patients attending a busy ART-clinic a...

  14. Family interaction and treatment adherence after stroke.

    Evans, R L; Bishop, D S; Matlock, A L; Stranahan, S; Smith, G G; Halar, E M

    1987-08-01

    Caregivers of 60 stroke patients were assessed five months after patient discharge from a stroke care unit to determine the relationship between family function and poststroke treatment adherence. Areas of family interaction which were significantly related to ratings of treatment adherence included problem solving, communication, and affective involvement. Better functioning families were consistently high on signs of treatment adherence. Findings suggest that families with specific dysfunction may not be as capable of helping patients comply with rehabilitation efforts as families who function more effectively. Thorough family assessment to identify which areas of family interaction are most problematic in relation to adherence issues is recommended. PMID:3619615

  15. Characterization of the adherence properties of Streptococcus salivarius.

    Weerkamp, A H; McBride, B C

    1980-01-01

    The adherence and aggregation properties of 46 human oral Streptococcus salivarius isolates were examined. A total of 41% of the isolates aggregated with whole human saliva, 50% aggregated with human erythrocytes, and 85% adhered to human buccal epithelial cells. Strains that aggregated with saliva and erythrocytes usually reacted with Streptococcus group K typing serum whereas the non-hemagglutinating strains did not. K+ strains also adhered more strongly to human buccal epithelial cells than K- strains. All isolates coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum LF and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus 2D, 91% coaggregated with Veillonella alcalescens V1, and 50% coaggregated with Veillonella parvula V4. S. salivarius HB aggregated with saliva from 15 different human donors and aggregated with human erythrocytes irrespective of the blood group. This strain only weakly aggregated with rat saliva or rat erythrocytes. We isolated mutants which concomitantly lost the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes, aggregate with saliva, and bind to buccal epithelial cells, but retained their interbacterial aggregation properties. A second class of mutants lost the ability to coaggregate with Veillonella, but these mutants retained all of the other aggregation properties. Treatment of S. salivarius HB cells with pronase or subtilisin destroyed their ability to aggregate with saliva and erythrocytes and to bind to buccal epithelial cells. The unique characteristics of the aggregation and adherence reactions were suggested by differences in the rate of loss of activity during protease treatment and in the response to chemical modification. The presence of saliva did not affect hemagglutination and adherence to buccal epithelial cells. Binding of the salivary aggregating factor to the bacteria could be distinguished from aggregation on the basis that the latter required divalent cations. The factor involved in coaggregation with F. nucleatum LF was physicochemically different from the other

  16. Adherence to vitamin supplementation following adolescent bariatric surgery

    Modi, Avani C.; Zeller, Meg H.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.; Jenkins, Todd M.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents with extreme obesity, who have undergone bariatric surgery, must adhere to many lifestyle and nutritional recommendations, including multivitamin therapy. Little is know about multivitamin adherence following adolescent bariatric surgery. The present study aims to document self-reported and electronically-monitored adherence to multivitamins, determine convergence between self-report and electronic monitoring adherence for multivitamins, and identify barriers to multivitamin adher...

  17. Predicting asthma exacerbations employing remotely monitored adherence.

    Killane, Isabelle; Sulaiman, Imran; MacHale, Elaine; Breathnach, Aoife; Taylor, Terence E; Holmes, Martin S; Reilly, Richard B; Costello, Richard W

    2016-03-01

    This Letter investigated the efficacy of a decision-support system, designed for respiratory medicine, at predicting asthma exacerbations in a multi-site longitudinal randomised control trial. Adherence to inhaler medication was acquired over 3 months from patients with asthma employing a dose counter and a remote monitoring adherence device which recorded participant's inhaler use: n = 184 (23,656 audio files), 61% women, age (mean ± sd) 49.3 ± 16.4. Data on occurrence of exacerbations was collected at three clinical visits, 1 month apart. The relative risk of an asthma exacerbation for those with good and poor adherence was examined employing a univariate and multivariate modified Poisson regression approach; adjusting for age, gender and body mass index. For all months dose counter adherence was significantly (p research should focus on refining adherence and exacerbation measures. Decision-support systems based on remote monitoring may enhance patient-physician communication, possibly reducing preventable adverse events. PMID:27222733

  18. Interleukin-17/Interleukin-17 Receptor-Mediated Signaling Is Important for Generation of an Optimal Polymorphonuclear Response against Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    Kelly, Michelle N; Kolls, Jay K.; Happel, Kyle; Schwartzman, Joseph D.; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Combe, Crescent; Moretto, Magali; Khan, Imtiaz A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin-17 (IL-17)/IL-17 receptor (IL-17R)-mediated signaling in the protective immunity against Toxoplasma gondii. IL-17R−/− mice developed a normal adaptive immunity against the parasite. However, increased mortality in the knockout animals can be attributed to a defect in the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to infected sites during early infection.

  19. Combination of autoantibodies against different histone proteins influences complement-dependent phagocytosis of necrotic cell material by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Gullstrand, Birgitta; Lefort, Malin H; Tydén, Helena; Jönsen, Andreas; Lood, Christian; Johansson, Asa; Jacobsen, Søren; Truedsson, Lennart; Bengtsson, Anders A

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with autoantibody-coated engulfed necrotic cell material (NC) are frequently seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We evaluated the roles of complement, different antihistone antibodies (anti-H ab), and oxidative burst in the phagocytosis of NC by PMN, as...... well as association to disease activity and clinical phenotype in SLE....

  20. Limited patient adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection in an observational cohort study

    Nieuwkerk, PT; Sprangers, MAG; Burger, DM; Hoetelmans, RMW; Hugen, PWH; Danner, SA; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Schneider, MME; Schrey, G; Meenhorst, PL; Sprenger, HG; Kauffmann, RH; Jambroes, M; Chesney, MA; de Wolf, F; Lange, JMA

    2001-01-01

    Background: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency syndrome type 1 (HIV-1) infection is essential to sustain viral suppression and prevent drug resistance. We investigated adherence to HAART among patients in a clinical cohort study. Methods: Patients re

  1. The effect of socio-economic status on adherence to Anti-retroviral therapy

    Akindele, Rasaq Akintunde; Fasanu, Adeniyi Olanipekun; Mabayoje, Victor Olatunji; Adisa, Patricia Olukorede; Adeniran Samuel ATIBA; Babatunde, Samuel Olusegun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is a pandemic disease threatening public health for decades now. With the advent of antiretroviral drugs (ARDs) being taken on long term basis, it is important to examine factors that could affect adherence to these medicationsObjectives: To determine relationship between socio-economic status of sero-positive HIV patients on antiretroviral drugs and their adherence to these drugsMethods:  This is a descriptive cross sectional study. One hund...

  2. Factors Influencing Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in Nepal: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Wasti, Sharada P.; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth ...

  3. Expert Involvement and Adherence to Medical Evidence in Medical Mobile Phone Apps: A Systematic Review

    Subhi, Yousif; Bube, Sarah Hjartbro; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe; Skou Thomsen, Ann Sofia; Konge, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background Both clinicians and patients use medical mobile phone apps. Anyone can publish medical apps, which leads to contents with variable quality that may have a serious impact on human lives. We herein provide an overview of the prevalence of expert involvement in app development and whether or not app contents adhere to current medical evidence. Objective To systematically review studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phon...

  4. Macrophages are stimulated by muramyl dipeptide to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation in the peritoneal cavities of guinea pigs.

    Nagao, S; Nakanishi, M; Kutsukake, H; Yagawa, K; Kusumoto, S; Shiba, T; Tanaka, A; Kotani, S

    1990-02-01

    N-Acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide [MDP]) injected intraperitoneally significantly increased the number of cells entering the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs primed with liquid paraffin or thioglycollate. There was a close relationship between peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) accumulation and the uptake of glucosamine by macrophages in guinea pigs treated with a variety of bacterial cell surface components such as cell wall peptidoglycan subunits and bacterial or synthetic lipid A. The PMN accumulation was also facilitated by the intraperitoneal transfer of the peritoneal macrophages that had been stimulated by MDP in vitro. Furthermore, cell-free lavage fluids taken from the peritoneum of MDP-treated guinea pigs also initiated the influx of PMNs when introduced into the peritoneal cavities of liquid paraffin-pretreated guinea pigs. These results suggest that a soluble factor which attracts neutrophils is produced by MDP-treated macrophages. Partial characterization of the factor is described. PMID:2298491

  5. Bacterial pathogens modulate an apoptosis differentiation program in human neutrophils

    Kobayashi, Scott D.; Braughton, Kevin R.; Whitney, Adeline R.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Schwan, Tom G.; Musser, James M.; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2003-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils) are essential to the innate immune response against bacterial pathogens. Recent evidence suggests that PMN apoptosis facilitates resolution of inflammation during bacterial infection. Although progress has been made toward understanding apoptosis in neutrophils, very little is known about transcriptional regulation of this process during bacterial infection. To gain insight into the molecular processes that facilitate resolution of infe...

  6. Human anaplasmosis: the first Spanish case confirmed by PCR.

    García, J C; Núñez, M J; Castro, B; Fraile, F J; López, A; Mella, M C; Blanco, A; Sieira, C; Loureiro, E; Portillo, A; Oteo, J A

    2006-10-01

    We report a case of human anaplasmosis (HA) fulfilling the confirmation criteria: epidemiologic data and clinical picture compatible with HA; presence of a morulae within polymorphonuclear leukocyte; and positive PCR assay for Anaplasma phagocytophilum: This case report shows the presence of HA in Spain. PMID:17114773

  7. ASSESSMENT OF MEDICATION ADHERENCE AND FACTORS AFFECTING TO MEDIACTION ADHERENCE IN ASTHMA PATIENTS BY CLINICAL PHARMACIST

    Hinchageri S. S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a major public health problem affecting a large number of individuals of all ages. The effectiveness of medications depends not only on the efficacy and appropriateness of the drugs used, but also on patient adherence to the intended regimen. Adherence with medication regimens is essential for attaining maximal therapeutic benefits. The main objective of the study was to assess the medication adherence and to identify the reasons for non-adherence to prescribed therapy. The medication adherence was assessed by using Morisky Medication Adherence Assessment questionnaires. Assessment of patient’s adherence from baseline to first follow up showed a mean increase in medication adherence level of 2.735 ± 0.1762 and P < 0.0001 which is statistically significant. Assessment of patient’s adherence from baselines to second follow up shows a mean increase of 3.211 ± 0.172 and P < 0.0001 which is statistically significant. The study concludes that pharmacist provided patient counseling found to have significant influence on improvement in the patient’s adherence to prescribed therapy.

  8. Adenomyosis in pregnancy mimicking morbidly adherent placenta

    Tongsong, Theera; Khunamornpong, Surapan; Sirikunalai, Panarat; Jatavan, Thanate

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to illustrate a false-positive diagnosis of adherent placenta due to underlying adenomyosis. A 34-year-old woman was diagnosed for placenta previa totalis with adherent placenta at 33 weeks, based on the findings of loss of clear space or distinguishing outline separating the placenta and uterine wall, presence of intraplacental lacunae and densely atypical vessels in the lesion. Caesarean hysterectomy was performed at 35 weeks. Pathological findings revealed p...

  9. Motivational factors of adherence to cardiac rehabilitation

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Main suggested theories about patients’ adherence to treatment regimens recognize the importance of motivation in positive changes in behaviors. Since cardiac diseases are chronic and common, cardiac rehabilitation as an effective prevention program is crucial in management of these diseases. There is always concern about the patients’ adherence to cardiac rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to describe the motivational factors affecting the patients’ participation and compl...

  10. Adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis to intraocular lenses.

    Griffiths, P G; Elliot, T. S.; McTaggart, L

    1989-01-01

    We have demonstrated, with an in vitro model, that Staphylococcus epidermidis is able to colonise intraocular lenses. Adherent organisms were quantitated by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and viable counting. Bacterial adherence was associated with production of a polysaccharide glycocalyx. Organisms which were attached to the lenses were resistant to apparently bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics, as determined by conventional testing. We speculate on the role of colo...

  11. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    Jones Gareth; Hawkins Kim; Mullin Rebecca; Nepusz Tamás; Naughton Declan P; Sheeran Paschal; Petróczi Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95%) of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80%) of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investiga...

  12. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction.

    Woodsong, Cynthia; MacQueen, Kathleen; Amico, K Rivet; Friedland, Barbara; Gafos, Mitzy; Mansoor, Leila; Tolley, Elizabether; McCormack, Sheena

    2013-01-01

    After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1) Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2) Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3) Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4) Partner influence on use, (5) Retention and continuation and (6) Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs. PMID:23561044

  13. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction

    Cynthia Woodsong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1 Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2 Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3 Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4 Partner influence on use, (5 Retention and continuation and (6 Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs.

  14. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy adherence

    Valerie J. Ehlers; Esther Kip; Van der Wal, Dirk M.

    2009-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs) are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) is vital to improve the patient’s state of well-being and to prevent the development of strains of the human immunodef ciency virus (HIV) that are resistant to ART. Persons with ART-resistant strains of HIV can spread these to other people, requiring more expensive ART with more severe side-effects and poorer health outcomes. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive, q...

  15. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte function and previous yersinia arthritis: enhanced chemokinetic migration and oxygen radical production correlate with the severity of the acute disease.

    Koivuranta-Vaara, P; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Repo, H

    1987-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) functions (migration in vitro, chemiluminescence, O-2 production, binding of chemotactic peptide, and aggregation) were studied in HLA-B27 positive patients with previous yersinia arthritis (YA). PMNs of patients whose disease had been severe showed chemokinetic and chemiluminescence responses significantly higher than the PMNs of those with a mild disease. The results support the view that enhanced PMN function contributes to inflammatory symptoms in patient...

  16. Mode of action of staphylococcal leukocidin: effects of the S and F components on the activities of membrane-associated enzymes of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Noda, M; Kato, I.; Hirayama, T; Matsuda, F.

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxic action of the S component of leukocidin from Staphylococcus aureus on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes was supported by the following observations, (i) Leukocytes displayed a large chemotactic response to the S component (10(-10) M) as well as to the chemotactic factor N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (10(-11) M). (ii) The S component stimulated high levels of phospholipase A2 activity in the cell membranes, with concomitant synthesis and release of prostaglandins. (iii) ...

  17. Suppression of polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase in vitro: a study of the mechanisms and the correlation with ring abscess in pseudomonal keratitis.

    Ijiri, Y; Matsumoto, K.; Kamata, R; Nishino, N.; Okamura, R.; Kambara, T; Yamamoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria, or the culture supernatants of an elastase non-producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, elicited a chemotactic response from polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) in vitro. The chemoattractive capacity was diminished under the presence of Boc-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe, a receptor antagonist of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) which is a bacterial chemotactic peptide to PMN. This indicated that the chemoattractant derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was a fMLP-like molecule(s). In contrast, cul...

  18. Photosensitizer Adhered to Cell Culture Microplates Induces Phototoxicity in Carcinoma Cells

    Verena Ziegler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments in plastic receptacles are the basis of characterization of new photosensitizers (PSs for the photodynamic therapy. We recently reported that lipophilic PSs adhere to cell culture microplates in a kinetic-like manner (Engelhardt et al., 2011. In the current study, we examined the interaction and phototoxic effects of the microplate-adhered PS in cancer cells. Therefore, we preloaded microplates with hypericin, Foscan, PVP-hypericin, or aluminum (III phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPCS4 for 24 hours and measured the PS distribution after addition of A431 human carcinoma cells: following another 24 hours up to 68% of hypericin were detected in the cell fraction. The hydrophilic PVP-hypericin and AlPCS4 also diffused into the cells, but the quantities of PS adherence were considerably lower. Microplate-adhered Foscan appeared not to be redistributed. In contrast to the hydrophilic PSs, the cellular phototoxicity of microplate-adhered lipophilic PS was high, independent of whether the PS (i was pre-loaded onto microplates or (ii added simultaneously with the cells or (iii one day after cell seeding. Based on these results, we suggest testing lipophilic PS dyes for their adherence to microplates. Furthermore, the ability of plastic materials to (reversibly store PSs might represent a new approach for the PS delivery or the development of antimicrobial coatings.

  19. Equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically-vulnerable adolescents living with HIV in Uganda

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Jennings, Larissa; Ssewamala, Fred M.; Nabunya, Proscovia; Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that children made vulnerable by poverty have been disproportionately affected by HIV with many exposed via mother-to-child transmission. For youth living with HIV, adherence to life saving treatment regimens are likely to be affected by the complex set of economic and social circumstances that challenge their families and also exacerbate health problems. Using baseline data from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) funded Suubi+Adherence study, we examined the extent to which individual and composite measures of equity predict self-reported adherence among Ugandan adolescents aged 10–16 (n = 702) living with HIV. Results showed that greater asset ownership, specifically familial possession of seven or more tangible assets, was associated with greater odds of self-reported adherence (OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.00–2.85). Our analyses also indicated that distance to the nearest health clinic impacts youth’s adherence to an ARV regimen. Youth who reported living nearest to a clinic were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.92–2.40). Moreover, applying the composite equity scores, we found that adolescents with greater economic advantage in ownership of household assets, financial savings, and caregiver employment had higher odds of adherence by a factor of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07–2.70). These findings suggest that interventions addressing economic and social inequities may be beneficial to increase ART uptake among economically vulnerable youth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This is one of the first studies to address the question of equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically vulnerable youth with HIV. PMID:27392003

  20. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

    Scanlon ML

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael L Scanlon,1,2 Rachel C Vreeman1,21Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2USAID, Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH Partnership, Eldoret, KenyaAbstract: The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world’s HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a

  1. Equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically vulnerable adolescents living with HIV in Uganda.

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Jennings, Larissa; Ssewamala, Fred M; Nabunya, Proscovia; Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary

    2016-03-01

    Studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that children made vulnerable by poverty have been disproportionately affected by HIV with many exposed via mother-to-child transmission. For youth living with HIV, adherence to life-saving treatment regimens are likely to be affected by the complex set of economic and social circumstances that challenge their families and also exacerbate health problems. Using baseline data from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) funded Suubi+Adherence study, we examined the extent to which individual and composite measures of equity predict self-reported adherence among Ugandan adolescents aged 10-16 (n = 702) living with HIV. Results showed that greater asset ownership, specifically familial possession of seven or more tangible assets, was associated with greater odds of self-reported adherence (OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.00-2.85). Our analyses also indicated that distance to the nearest health clinic impacts youth's adherence to an ARV regimen. Youth who reported living nearest to a clinic were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.92-2.40). Moreover, applying the composite equity scores, we found that adolescents with greater economic advantage in ownership of household assets, financial savings, and caregiver employment had higher odds of adherence by a factor of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07-2.70). These findings suggest that interventions addressing economic and social inequities may be beneficial to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake among economically vulnerable youth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This is one of the first studies to address the question of equity in adherence to ART among economically vulnerable youth with HIV. PMID:27392003

  2. Use of videophone technology to address medication adherence issues in persons with HIV

    Michael J Skrajner

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Skrajner1, Cameron J Camp1, Jessica L Haberman1, Timothy G Heckman2, Arlene Kochman3, Cristina Frentiu11Hearthstone Alzheimer Care, Willoughby, OH, USA; 2Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Northfield, OH, USA; 3Callen-Lorde Community Health Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART medication regimens is vital to maintaining suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, but persons with HIV face many challenges to adhering consistently to HIV medication regimens. This is particularly true for persons who live in geographically-isolated areas or who have significant levels of cognitive compromise. A videophone-based version of Reynolds’ HAART CARE (HC telephone intervention for medication adherence was pilot-tested with 23 persons living with HIV residing in both urban and non-urban communities. The purpose of the pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptance of an adherence improvement intervention administered via videophones. Furthermore, the feasibility and acceptability of conducting HIV pill counts through videophones were assessed. The videophone version of HC produced significant increases in self-reported rates of medication adherence and was generally well-received by interventionists and participants. Pill counts conducted via videophone were also well-accepted by participants. Self-reported adherence levels were higher than videophone-based pill count adherence levels. Challenges to the use of videophones included the requirement that only analog landlines be used, poor quality of video and audio transmissions, and high cost for equipment. Methods to overcome these challenges are discussed.Keywords: videophone, HIV, HAART, adherence

  3. Impact of Adherence Counseling Dose on Antiretroviral Adherence and HIV Viral Load among HIV-Infected Methadone Maintained Drug Users

    Cooperman, Nina A.; Heo, Moonseong; Berg, Karina M.; Li, Xuan; Litwin, Alain H.; Nahvi, Shadi; Arnsten, Julia H.

    2012-01-01

    Adherence counseling can improve antiretroviral adherence and related health outcomes in HIV-infected individuals. However, little is known about how much counseling is necessary to achieve clinically significant effects. We investigated antiretroviral adherence and HIV viral load relative to the number of hours of adherence counseling received by 60 HIV-infected drug users participating in a trial of directly observed antiretroviral therapy delivered in methadone clinics. Our adherence couns...

  4. Improving medication adherence in patients with hypertension

    Hedegaard, Ulla; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Pottegård, Anton; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Lambrectsen, Jess; Hangaard, Jørgen; Hallas, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    medication adherence in hypertensive patients. Motivational interviewing was a key element of the intervention. METHODS: Patients (N=532) were recruited from 3 hospital outpatient clinics and randomized to usual care or a 6-month pharmacist intervention comprising collaborative care, medication review......, tailored adherence counselling including motivational interviewing and telephone follow-ups. The primary outcome was composite medication possession ratio (MPR) to antihypertensive and lipid-lowering agents, at one-year follow-up, assessed by analyzing pharmacy records. Secondary outcomes at 12 months...... included persistence to medications, blood pressure, hospitals admission and a combined clinical endpoint of cardiovascular death, stroke or acute myocardial infarction. RESULTS: At 12 months, 20.3% of the patients in the intervention group (N=231) were non-adherent (MPR < 0.80) compared with 30.2% in the...

  5. Protective Effect of Distillate and Redistillate of Cow's Urine in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Challenged With Established Genotoxic Chemicals

    K. KRISHNAMURTHI; DIPANWITA DUTTA; S. D. SIVANESAN; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2004-01-01

    From the ancient period cow's urine has been used as a medicine. In Veda, cow's urine was compared to the nectar. In Susrut, several medicinal properties of cow's urine have been mentioned and are known to cause weight loss, reversal of certain cardiac and kidney problems, indigestion, stomach ache, edema, etc. However, the literature and scripture did not mention the antigenotoxic properties of cow's urine. Methods In the present investigation, the antigenotoxic/ antioxidant properties of cow's urine distillate and redistillate were studied in vitro. The antioxidant status and volatile fatty acid levels were determined. Actinomycin-D (0.1 μmol/L) and hydrogen peroxide (150 μmol/L) were used for inducing DNA strand break with 0.1% DMSO as negative control. Dose for the antigenotoxic effect of cow's urine was chosen from the dose response study carried out earlier. Results Both actinomycin-D and H2O2 caused statistically significant DNA unwinding of 80% & 75% respectively (P<0.001) as revealed by fluorimetric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU), and the damage could be protected with the redistilled cow's urine distillate (1, 50 & 100 μL) in simultaneous treatment with genotoxic chemicals. Conclusion The redistillate of cow's urine was found to possess total antioxidant status of around 2.6 mmol, contributed mainly by volatile fatty acids (1500 mg/L) as revealed by the GC-MS studies. These fatty acids and other antioxidants might cause the observed protective effects.

  6. Effects of Montelukast on free radical production in whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children

    Al Saadi, Muslim M.; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; MUSTAFA, Ali; Shafi, Ahmed; Tuwajri, Ali S. Al

    2011-01-01

    Montelukast is a highly selective leukotriene-receptor antagonist (LTRA). It is widely used in the treatment of bronchial asthma, primarily as an adjunct to corticosteroids. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and oxidative stress contributing to the initiation and worsening of inflammatory respiratory disorders, such as asthma. Antioxidant drugs may have a role in minimizing or preventing damage in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was ...

  7. Effects of dietary supplementation of Chinese medicinal herbs on polymorphonuclear neutrophil immune activity and small intestinal morphology in weanling pigs.

    Huang, C W; Lee, T T; Shih, Y C; Yu, B

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary Chinese medicinal herbs (CMH) supplementation composed of Panax ginseng, Dioscoreaceae opposite, Atractylodes macrocephala, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Ziziphus jujube and Platycodon grandiflorum, on the performance, intestinal tract morphology and immune activity in weanling pigs. Two hundred and forty weaned pigs were assigned randomly to four dietary groups including the negative control (basal diet), 0.1% CMH, 0.3% CMH and 0.114% antibiotic (Chlortetracycline calcium Complex, Sulfathiazole and Procaine Penicillin G) supplementation groups for a 28-day feeding trial. Results indicated that both CMH supplementation groups had a better gain and feed/gain than control group (CT) during the first 2 weeks of the experimental period. The 0.3% CMH had a significant decrease in the diarrhoea score in first 10 days of experimental period when compared with other groups. The CMH supplementation groups had a higher villous height, increased lactobacilli counts in digesta of ileum and decreased coliform counts in colon compared with CT. The immune activities of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs), including the respiratory burst and Salmonella-killing ability, were significantly enhanced in CMH supplementation groups at day 7 of experiment period. The CMH and antibiotic supplementations increased the nutrient digestibility such as dietary dry matter, crude protein and gross energy in weanling pigs. In conclusion, the dietary CMH supplementation improved intestinal morphology and immune activities of PMNs, thus giving rise to nutrient digestibility and reduce diarrhoea frequency in weanling pigs. PMID:21535231

  8. Experimental studies on the pathogenesis of adult respiratory distress syndrome using 111In-labeled polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    This study was undertaken to clarify the mechanism of the development of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and to improve its treatment by studying the role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in an endotoxin shock model of rats. PMNs from a rat were labeled with 111In by the use of tropolone and were injected into rats pretreated with endotoxin. Then the biodistribution of PMNs was studied by either counting the radioactivity of excised organs or using a gamma scintillation camera on the anesthetized rats. The two methods facilitated to observe the distribution of PMNs faily a short time after the injection of endotoxin. There was a significantly higher radioactivity in the lungs of the endotoxin group than in the control group. The accumulation of PMNs into the lungs occurred immediately after endotoxin injection. In rats depleted of the complement by cobra venom factor (CVF), an increase in radioactivity in the lung was not observed. These results indicate that the complement system is involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS. When rats were injected with methylprednisolone, the pulmonary accumulation of 111In-PMNs by endotoxin were suppressed. This is an experimental support of possible beneficial effects of corticosteroids in the treatment of ARDS. (author)

  9. Recruitment of 99m-technetium- or 111-indium-labelled polymorphonuclear leucocytes in experimentally induced pyogranulomas in lambs

    The recruitment of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) during the development of experimental pyogranulomas induced by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis was followed in nine male lambs by scintigraphic examination. Autologous blood PMNs were labelled with 99m-technetium or 111-indium and were re-injected intravenously into infected lambs. The functional properties of the labelled cells were monitored (1) in vitro by measuring their phagocytic and bactericidal activity against C. pseudotuberculosis and their chemotaxis under agarose, and (2) in vivo by following scintigraphically their capacity to accumulate in an inflammatory focus induced by intradermal injection of latex beads coated with Salmonella abortus equi lipopolysaccharide. Following inoculation of corynebacteria into the right ear of lambs, radioactive foci were observed to be localized in the right ear and in the draining lymph nodes during the 4 days following inoculation. Histopathological examination performed 32 h after inoculation confirmed the intense accumulation of PMNs at these sites. With the exception of one animal, which presented visible foci in the neck 14 days postinoculation, no radioactive foci were observed during the later phases of experimental infection, despite the presence of multiple pyogranulomas which were confirmed by bacteriological examination after necropsy of the lambs. Histopathological examination of these lesions revealed layers of fibroblasts, lymphocytes, and macrophages surrounding a necrotic centre. The results of these studies suggest that the contribution of PMNs during the chronic phase of inflammation is considerably reduced in comparison with the acute inflammatory phase of the infectious process

  10. The migration of 111Indium-labelled polymorphonuclear leucocytes into the oral cavity in the rhesus monkey

    The route of migration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) from blood to the oral cavity was examined in rhesus monkeys. PMNL were isolated from the peripheral blood of eleven rhesus monkeys by dextran sedimentation, radiolabelled with 111Indium and administered intravenously. Sequential samples of crevicular fluid washings (CFW), mixed and parotid saliva and mucosal washings were taken after injection of the labelled PMNL and harvested on glass fibre discs. Highest numbers of labelled PMNL were detected in CFW. CEll-associated radioactivity was detected in CFW within 20 min of injection of labelled PMNL and reached a maximal level 1 hour after injection. PMNL were found in CFW from monkeys with clinically normal gingiva but the number of labelled PMNL in CFW increased with increasing gingival index. Significant number of PMNL migrated into mixed saliva within 30 min, and low numbers of PMNL were detected in mucosal washings and in parotid saliva after 30 min. The results indicate that the migration time of the PMNL from blood to the oral cavity is less than 30 min, irrespective of the gingival index, that the gingival crevice is the main route of entry of PMNL to the oral cavity and that the numbers of PMNL migrating to the crevice increase as the gingival index rises. (author)

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette; Hentzer, Morten; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hougen, Hans Petter; Calum, Henrik; Madsen, Kit G; Moser, Claus; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael Christian

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant to...

  12. [Adherence to statins: updates and practical proposals].

    Bauwens, Marine; Schneider, Marie-paule; Nanchen, David

    2016-03-01

    Statins are an established treatment for dyslipidemia, because they were shown to decrease the cardiovascular risk by 25%. However, one third of patients using statins don't take them regularly. Statin intolerance is an important risk factor for nonadherence, but health literacy and lack of education regarding the cardiovascular benefits are also important triggers for poor adherence to statins. A better communication between the caregiver and his patient, by taking patient's perspectives into account could help find effective solutions. This article reviews the issue of statins adherence and suggests solutions to improve it. PMID:27089601

  13. Comparative proteomics of uropathogenic Escherichia coli during growth in human urine identify UCA-like (UCL) fimbriae as an adherence factor involved in biofilm formation and binding to uroepithelial cells.

    Wurpel, Daniël J; Totsika, Makrina; Allsopp, Luke P; Webb, Richard I; Moriel, Danilo G; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-01-10

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in humans. For the successful colonisation of the human urinary tract, UPEC employ a diverse collection of secreted or surface-exposed virulence factors including toxins, iron acquisition systems and adhesins. In this study, a comparative proteomic approach was utilised to define the UPEC pan and core surface proteome following growth in pooled human urine. Identified proteins were investigated for subcellular origin, prevalence and homology to characterised virulence factors. Fourteen core surface proteins were identified, as well as eleven iron uptake receptor proteins and four distinct fimbrial types, including type 1, P, F1C/S and a previously uncharacterised fimbrial type, designated UCA-like (UCL) fimbriae in this study. These pathogenicity island (PAI)-associated fimbriae are related to UCA fimbriae of Proteus mirabilis, associated with UPEC and exclusively found in members of the E. coli B2 and D phylogroup. We further demonstrated that UCL fimbriae promote significant biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and mediate specific attachment to exfoliated human uroepithelial cells. Combined, this study has defined the surface proteomic profiles and core surface proteome of UPEC during growth in human urine and identified a new type of fimbriae that may contribute to UTI. PMID:26546558

  14. The Patient's Perspective: Adherence or Non-adherence to Asthma Controller Therapy?

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Backer, V; Soes-Petersen, U; Lange, Peter; Harving, H; Plaschke, PP

    2006-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Adherence with controller therapy poses a major challenge to the effective management of persistent asthma. The aim of this study was to explore the patient-related aspects of adherence among adult asthmatics. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: The participants (n = 509 adult asthmatics......), recruited from all parts of Denmark, answered the questionnaire concerning asthma knowledge, attitudes, adherence, and treatment through the Internet. RESULTS: A total of 67% of the patients were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). However, according to Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA...

  15. Adherence to physiotherapy clinical guideline acute ankle injury and determinants of adherence: a cohort study

    van Beers Hans

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical guidelines are considered important instruments to improve quality in health care. In physiotherapy, insight in adherence to guidelines is limited. Knowledge of adherence is important to identify barriers and to enhance implementation. Purpose of this study is to investigate the ability to adherence to recommendations of the guideline Acute ankle injury, and to identify patient characteristics that determine adherence to the guideline. Methods Twenty-two physiotherapists collected data of 174 patients in a prospective cohort study, in which the course of treatment was systematically registered. Indicators were used to investigate adherence to recommendations. Patient characteristics were used to identify prognostic factors that may determine adherence to the guideline. Correlation between patient characteristics and adherence to outcome-indicators (treatment sessions, functioning of patient, accomplished goals was calculated using univariate logistic regression. To calculate explained variance of combined patient characteristics, multivariate analysis was performed. Results Adherence to individual recommendations varied from 71% to 100%. In 99 patients (57% the physiotherapists showed adherence to all indicators. Adherence to preset maximum of six treatment sessions for patients with severe ankle injury was 81% (132 patients. The odds to receive more than six sessions were statistically significant for three patient characteristics: females (OR:3.89; 95%CI: 1.41–10.72, recurrent sprain (OR: 6.90; 95%CI: 2.34 – 20.37, co-morbidity (OR: 25.92; 95% CI: 6.79 – 98.93. All factors together explained 40% of the variance. Inclusion of physiotherapist characteristics in the regression model showed that work-experience reduced the odds to receive more than six sessions (OR: 0.2; 95%CI: 0.06 – 0.77, and increased explained variance to 45%. Conclusion Adherence to the clinical guideline Acute ankle sprain showed that the

  16. Isolation, culture and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells by using whole bone marrow adherence method%全骨髓贴壁法分离培养人骨髓间充质干细胞及成骨诱导分化

    张利铭; 陈智超; 邹萍; 李秋柏

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore a better method of isolation human bone marrow stem cells and study its potentiality of osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Methods Human bone marrow stem cells were isolated and cultured by using whole bone marrow adherence method. The cell morphology was observed under the inverted phase contrast microscope . The cell cycle and immunological phenotype were examined by flow cytometry. Osteogenic ability was examined by alkaline phosphatase( ALP) and alizarin red stain. Result:The passage cells were homogeneous in shape, similar to fibroblasts. The passage 3 cells were postive for CD90,CD13,CD105.CD44, but negative for CD34,CD45,CD14, and the overwhelming majority of cells were in Go/d phase. Following by 14, 21 days of osteogenic differentiation, the ALP and alizarin red stains were postive in osteoblasts. Conclusion: Whole bone marrow adherence method as a simple, cheap and high efficiency performance is a good culture method for human bone marrow stem cells.%[目的]:探讨体外分离骨髓间充质干细胞的方法及其成骨潜能.[方法]:应用全骨髓贴壁法分离培养人骨髓间充质干细胞,倒置显微镜下观察细胞形态,流式细胞仪检测细胞周期及免疫表型,碱性磷酸酶及茜素红染色检测成骨能力.[结果]:传代后的人骨髓间充质干细胞形态均一呈成纤维细胞样.第三代骨髓间充质干细胞免疫表型CD90、CD13、CD105、CD44阳性,CD34、CD45、CD14阴性.96.47%细胞处于G0/G1期,14 d、21 d成骨诱导培养后碱性磷酸酶及茜素红染色阳性.[结论]:应用全骨髓贴壁法体外分离培养人骨髓间充质干细胞简便、经济、高效.

  17. Primary non-adherence to prescribed medication in general practice

    Linnet, Kristján; Halldórsson, Matthías; Thengilsdóttir, Gudrún;

    2013-01-01

    Primary non-adherence refers to the patient not redeeming a prescribed medication at some point during drug therapy. Research has mainly focused on secondary non-adherence. Prior to this study, the overall rate of primary non-adherence in general practice in Iceland was not known.......Primary non-adherence refers to the patient not redeeming a prescribed medication at some point during drug therapy. Research has mainly focused on secondary non-adherence. Prior to this study, the overall rate of primary non-adherence in general practice in Iceland was not known....

  18. Hemozoin triggers tumor necrosis factor alpha-mediated re-lease of lysozyme by human adherent monocytes:new evi-dences on leukocyte degranulation in P.falciparum malaria

    Prato M; Giribaldi G; Arese P

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Avidly phagocytosed hemozoin (malarial pigment)alters several functions of human monocytes and stimulates generation of several cytokines.Recently,we showed that phagocytosis of hemozoin by human mono-cytes increases expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9,a proteolytic enzyme available in specific gelatinase granules,which contain several enzymes including lysozyme.Present work investigated active lyso-zyme release after phagocytosis of hemozoin and its dependence on production of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Methods:After phagocytosis of hemozoin,hemozoin-containing trophozoites or control meals (opsonized non-parasitized red blood cells and latex particles),monocyte supernatants were monitored for 2 hours,in presence of blocking anti-human tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies or recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha cytokine in selected experiments.Lysozyme release was evaluated by a specific spectrometric assay measuring lysozyme activity after coincubation of cell supernatants with suspensions of Mycrococcus Lysodeikticus,while levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor alpha were analyzed by specific enzyme-linked immunodsorbent assay. Results:Levels of lysozyme activity and soluble tumor necrosis factor alpha protein were increased in hemozo-in-or trophozoites-laden monocytes supernatants.Phagocytosis per se (control meals)also increased lysozyme release,but levels were significantly lower than those obtained after phagocytosis of hemozoin or trophozoites. Interestingly,all effects on lysozyme release observed after phagocytosis were abrogated by blocking anti-human tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies,while they were mimicked by recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha cytokine.Conclusions:Present work shows that phagocytosis of hemozoin promotes monocyte degranula-tion and enhances active lysozyme release.The effect requires tumor necrosis factor alpha mediation.

  19. Barriers to adherence in cystic fibrosis

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Danish patients with cystic fibrosis aged 14 to 25 years and their parents. Conclusions: The present study showed that the majority of adolescents with CF and their parents experienced barriers to treatment adherence. Patients and parents agreed that the three most common barriers encountered lack of...

  20. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis/contact, with at...

  1. Adherence to Exercise and Physical Activity: Preface.

    Morgan, William P.; Dishman, Rod K.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a collection of papers on adherence to exercise programs and physical activity from the 2000 American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education conference, which included research on middle school boys and girls, college men and women, and men and women in the later years, as well as on the more traditional subject of middle aged…

  2. Understanding adherence to web-based interventions

    Kelders, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Although eHealth technologies and especially web-based interventions for the promotion of health and health related behavior have been shown to be effective, the impact is hindered by non-adherence: while many eHealth interventions reach a large group of participants, not all of these participants c

  3. E-health strategies to support adherence

    Adherence to healthy behaviors and self-care strategies is a concern among clinicians. E-health applications, such as the internet, personal communication devices, electronic health records and web portals, and electronic games, may be a way to provide health information in a way that is reliable, c...

  4. Gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-like immunoreactivity in blood cells of human eosinophilic patients.

    Johansson, O; Virtanen, M; Hilliges, M; Hansson, L O

    1991-01-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of the peptide gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma-MSH) within human polymorphonuclear leucocytes of blood from eosinophilic patients is described. The gamma-MSH immunoreactivity was observed only in neutrophilic granulocytes leaving all other cell types immuno-negative. PMID:1805488

  5. Impact of a pharmaceutical care program on clinical evolution and antiretroviral treatment adherence: a 5-year study

    Hernández Arroyo MJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available María Jesús Hernández Arroyo,1 Salvador Enrique Cabrera Figueroa,2 Rosa Sepúlveda Correa,3 María de la Paz Valverde Merino,1 Alicia Iglesias Gómez,4 Alfonso Domínguez-Gil Hurlé5 On behalf of the Tormes Team 1Pharmacy Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 2Pharmacy Institute, University Austral of Chile, Valdivia, Chile; 3Department of Statistics, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 4Infectious Disease Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 5Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain Background: Antiretroviral treatments (ART form the basis of adequate clinical control in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and adherence plays a primary role in the grade and duration of the antiviral response. The objectives of this study are: (1 to determine the impact of the implementation of a pharmaceutical care program on improvement of ART adherence and on the immunovirological response of the patients; and (2 to detect possible correlations between different adherence evaluation measurements. Methods: A 60-month long retrospective study was conducted. Adherence measures used were: therapeutic drug monitoring, a simplified medication adherence questionnaire, and antiretroviral dispensation records (DR. The number of interviews and interventions related to adherence made for each patient in yearly periods was related to the changes in the adherence variable (measured with DR in these same yearly periods. The dates when the laboratory tests were drawn were grouped according to proximity with the study assessment periods (February–May, 2005–2010. Results: A total of 528 patients were included in the study. A significant relationship was observed between the simplified medication adherence questionnaire and DR over the 60-month study period (P < 0.01. Improvement was observed in the mean adherence level (P < 0.001, and there was a

  6. The Exercise–Affect–Adherence Pathway: An Evolutionary Perspective

    Lee, Harold H.; Emerson, Jessica A.; Williams, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The low rates of regular exercise and overall physical activity (PA) in the general population represent a significant public health challenge. Previous research suggests that, for many people, exercise leads to a negative affective response and, in turn, reduced likelihood of future exercise. The purpose of this paper is to examine this exercise–affect–adherence relationship from an evolutionary perspective. Specifically, we argue that low rates of physical exercise in the general population are a function of the evolved human tendency to avoid unnecessary physical exertion. This innate tendency evolved because it allowed our evolutionary ancestors to conserve energy for physical activities that had immediate adaptive utility such as pursuing prey, escaping predators, and engaging in social and reproductive behaviors. The commonly observed negative affective response to exercise is an evolved proximate psychological mechanism through which humans avoid unnecessary energy expenditure. The fact that the human tendencies toward negative affective response to and avoidance of unnecessary physical activities are innate does not mean that they are unchangeable. Indeed, it is only because of human-engineered changes in our environmental conditions (i.e., it is no longer necessary for us to work for our food) that our predisposition to avoid unnecessary physical exertion has become a liability. Thus, it is well within our capabilities to reengineer our environments to once again make PA necessary or, at least, to serve an immediate functional purpose. We propose a two-pronged approach to PA promotion based on this evolutionary functional perspective: first, to promote exercise and other physical activities that are perceived to have an immediate purpose, and second, to instill greater perceived purpose for a wider range of physical activities. We posit that these strategies are more likely to result in more positive (or less negative) affective responses to exercise

  7. Mechanisms of adherence of a probiotic Lactobacillus strain during and after in vivo assessment in ulcerative colitis patients

    Dunne, Colum; Kelly, Peter; O'Halloran, Sile; Soden, Declan; Bennett, Mary; von Wright, Atte; Vilpponen-Salmela, Terttu; Kiely, Barry; O'Mahony, Liam; Collins, J. Kevin; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Shanahan, Fergus

    2004-01-01

    In a pilot-scale, open-label study to determine the ability of well-characterized probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 cells to adhere to human epithelial cells in situ , the bacterial strain was administered to ulcerative colitis patients at approximately 109 CFU/day for 12 days. Microbiological analysis of biopsy specimens demonstrated that the ingested bacteria effectively adhered to both inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa of the large bowel in significant numbers. In previous report...

  8. Adherent bacterial populations on the bovine rumen wall: distribution patterns of adherent bacteria.

    McCowan, R P; Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1980-01-01

    Fourteen tissue sites from the bovine reticulo-rumen were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine the distribution patterns of bacterial populations adhering to the epithelium. Although diet variations did not appear to influence the total number of tissue-adherent bacteria present in adult Herefords, diet affected their distribution. It appeared that the distribution of the bacterial populations may be directly affected by the physical state of the digesta. The digesta may be m...

  9. An Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience on Improving Medication Adherence

    Darbishire, Patricia L.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Kiersma, Mary E.; White, Jessalynn K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of a medication adherence activity on introductory pharmacy practice experience students’ perceptions of patient adherence as well as student development of empathy and confidence in patient counseling.

  10. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans

  11. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F. [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Martínez-Castañón, G.A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.mx [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Téllez-Déctor, E.J. [Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Veracruzana campus Río Blanco, Mariano Abasolo S/N. Col. Centro. Río Blanco, Veracruz (Mexico); and others

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans.

  12. Understanding Patient Management: the Need for Medication Adherence and Persistence

    2008-01-01

    Poor patient adherence to medication is one of the major factors contributing to poor disease control, in particular in asymptomatic chronic diseases like hypertension and dyslipidaemia. The physical and economic burden on patients and the health care system as a result of non-adherence is great. It is estimated that poor adherence to hypertension medication accounts for as many as 7.1 million preventable deaths annually. Hence recognising and identifying non-adherence is the first step to ad...

  13. Predictors of Low Clopidogrel Adherence Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Muntner, Paul; Mann, Devin M.; Woodward, Mark; Choi, James W.; Stoler, Robert C; Shimbo, Daichi; Farkouh, Michael E.; Kim, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Few data are available on factors associated with low adherence or early clopidogrel discontinuation following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients (n=284) were evaluated prior to hospital discharge following PCI to identify factors associated with low adherence to clopidogrel 30 days later. Pre-PCI adherence to daily medications was assessed using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and categorized as low, medium, or high (scores

  14. Estimates of adherence to treatment of vivax malaria

    Almeida, Eduardo D; Rodrigues, Luiz Carlos S; Vieira, José Luiz F

    2014-01-01

    Background The relation between therapeutic failure and non-adherence to treatment of malaria has been clearly established. Several measures have been used to estimate adherence to Plasmodium vivax therapy, but few protocols have been validated to ensure reliability of the estimates of adherence. The objective of this study was to validate a five-item-reported-questionnaire derived from original Morisky four-item scale to estimate adherence to P. vivax malaria therapy. Methods A five-item-rep...

  15. Supporting patients : pharmacy based interventions to improve medication adherence

    Kooij, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    For many patients it is not easy to adhere to the agreed treatment with medication. Adherence has been defined as “the extent to which a person’s behaviour - taking medication - corresponds with agreed recommendations from a health care provider”. Numerous factors influence this taking behaviour and non-adherence must not be seen as the patients’ problem only. Health care providers, including pharmacists, should support patients to adhere. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate interv...

  16. Adherence to Diet in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Patton, Susana R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviewed current findings on dietary adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), discussed factors predicting dietary adherence, and presented directions for future research. The search terms were: type 1 diabetes mellitus; youth (0-22 years); diet; dietary adherence; nutrition; dietary intake; obesity; and complications. The studies involved youth with T1DM, presented dietary adherence data specifically, and/or described usual dietary patterns in youth. Articles that ...

  17. Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Transgender Women Living with HIV

    Sevelius, Jae M.; Carrico, Adam; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2010-01-01

    Despite disproportionate rates of HIV among transgender women and evidence that medication adherence is necessary for treatment success and increased likelihood of survival, there has been little investigation into antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence issues among transgender women. This study examined rates of self-reported ART adherence among transgender women on ART (n = 35) and well-established correlates of nonadherence including depression, adherence self-efficacy, patient perceptio...

  18. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Shukla SD; Fairbairn RL; Gell DA; Latham RD; Sohal SS; Walters EH; O’Toole RF

    2016-01-01

    Shakti D Shukla,1,* Rory L Fairbairn,1,* David A Gell,1 Roger D Latham,1 Sukhwinder S Sohal,1,2 Eugene H Walters,1 Ronan F O’Toole11Breathe Well Centre, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disea...

  19. Expert Involvement and Adherence to Medical Evidence in Medical Mobile Phone Apps

    Subhi, Yousif; Bube, Sarah Hjartbro; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both clinicians and patients use medical mobile phone apps. Anyone can publish medical apps, which leads to contents with variable quality that may have a serious impact on human lives. We herein provide an overview of the prevalence of expert involvement in app development and whether...... or not app contents adhere to current medical evidence. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phone apps. METHODS: We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library, and EMBASE......), and included studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phone apps. Two authors performed data extraction independently. Qualitative analysis of the included studies was performed. RESULTS: Based on inclusion criteria, 52 studies were...

  20. Evaluation of medication adherence in Lebanese hypertensive patients.

    Yassine, Mohammad; Al-Hajje, Amal; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Zein, Salam; Bawab, Wafa; Bou Zeid, Mayssam; El Hajj, Maya; Salameh, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    Controlling hypertension is essential in cardiovascular diseases. Poor medication adherence is associated with poor disease outcomes, waste of healthcare resources, and contributes to reduced blood pressure control. This study evaluates treatment adherence to antihypertensive therapy in Lebanese hypertensive patients by estimating the proportion of adherent hypertensive patients using a validated tool and investigates what factors predict this behavior. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 210 hypertensive outpatients selected from clinics located in tertiary-care hospitals and from private cardiology clinics located in Beirut. Adherence level was measured using a validated 8-item Modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMMAS). Among 210 patients, 50.5% showed high adherence, 27.1% medium adherence, and 22.4% low adherence to medication. Mean MMMAS score was 6.59±2.0. In bivariate analyses, having controlled blood pressure (p=0.003) and taking a combination drug (p=0.023) were predictors of high adherence. Forgetfulness (p<0.01), complicated drug regimen (p=0.001), and side effects (p=0.006) were predictors of low adherence after multiple liner regression. Logistic regression results showed that calcium channel blockers (p=0.030) were associated with increased adherence levels. In conclusion, developing multidisciplinary intervention programs to address the factors identified, in addition to educational strategies targeting healthcare providers, are necessary to enhance patient adherence. PMID:26232704

  1. Adhesion Forces and Composition of Planktonic and Adhering Oral Microbiomes

    Wessel, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Maitra, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Slomp, A. M.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiome consists of a planktonic microbiome residing in saliva and an adhering microbiome (the biofilm adhering to oral hard and soft tissues). Here we hypothesized that possible differences in microbial composition of the planktonic and adhering oral microbiome on teeth can be related t

  2. Analyzing Adherence to Prenatal Supplement: Does Pill Count Measure Up?

    Kristie E. Appelgren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if adherence as measured by pill count would show a significant association with serum-based measures of adherence. Methods. Data were obtained from a prenatal vitamin D supplementation trial where subjects were stratified by race and randomized into three dosing groups: 400 (control, 2000, or 4000 IU vitamin D3/day. One measurement of adherence was obtained via pill counts remaining compared to a novel definition for adherence using serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25-OH-D levels (absolute change in 25(OHD over the study period and the subject's steady-state variation in their 25(OHD levels. A multivariate logistic regression model examined whether mean percent adherence by pill count was significantly associated with the adherence measure by serum metabolite levels. Results. Subjects' mean percentage of adherence by pill count was not a significant predictor of adherence by serum metabolite levels. This finding was robust across a series of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions. Based on our novel definition of adherence, pill count was not a reliable predictor of adherence to protocol, and calls into question how adherence is measured in clinical research. Our findings have implications regarding the determination of efficacy of medications under study and offer an alternative approach to measuring adherence of long half-life supplements/medications.

  3. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    Jones Gareth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95% of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80% of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investigate a wide range of psychological and personality factors that may lead to adherence/non-adherence to medical treatment and exercise programmes. Methods HIV positive patients who are referred to the physiotherapist-led 10-week exercise programme as part of the standard care are continuously recruited. Data on social cognitive variables (attitude, intention, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and outcome beliefs about the goal and specific behaviours, selected personality factors, perceived quality of life, physical activity, self-reported adherence and physical assessment are collected at baseline, at the end of the exercise programme and again 3 months later. The project incorporates objective measures of both exercise (attendance log and improvement in physical measures such as improved fitness level, weight loss, improved circumferential anthropometric measures and medication adherence (verified by non-invasive hair analysis. Discussion The novelty of this project comes from two key aspects, complemented with objective information on exercise and medication adherence. The project assesses beliefs about both the underlying goal such as following prescribed treatment; and about the specific behaviours such as undertaking the exercise or taking the medication, using both implicit and explicit assessments of patients’ beliefs and attitudes. We predict that i the way people think about the underlying goal of their treatments explains medication and exercise

  4. Ethical Questions in Medical Electronic Adherence Monitoring.

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Eyal, Nir; Musiimenta, Angella; Haberer, Jessica E

    2016-03-01

    Electronic adherence monitors (EAMs) record and report an array of health behaviors, ranging from taking daily medications to wearing medical devices. EAMs are utilized in research worldwide and are being investigated for clinical use. However, there is also growing popular concern about the extent to which electronic devices may be used to monitor individuals, including allegations in the media that EAMs represent a move towards "Big Brother" in medicine. Here, we highlight the unique benefits as well as the potential ethical challenges that electronic adherence monitoring generates. These challenges surround autonomy, privacy and confidentiality, trust, and ancillary care obligations. We describe key questions within each of these domains that warrant further investigation, and present potential solutions to many of the concerns raised. PMID:26358284

  5. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  6. 氯吡格雷对人早期内皮祖细胞黏附、迁移及增殖功能的影响%Effects of clopidogrel on the adherence, migration and proliferation of early endothelial progenitor cells from human peripheral blood

    李鹏; 刘文娴; 张丽洁; 辛毅

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨氯吡格雷对人早期内皮祖细胞(EPCs)黏附、迁移及增殖功能的影响.方法 体外培养人外周血早期EPCs并进行鉴定;将含不同浓度(1×10-3~200×10-3 mmol·L-1)氯吡格雷的培养液与EPCs共培养24h,检测黏附、迁移及增殖功能;应用含浓度为20×10-3 mmol·L-1氯吡格雷的培养液与EPCs共培养0.5~72.0 h,检测EPCs上述功能.结果 培养EPCs第4天,早期EPCs呈典型长梭形;培养EPCs第7天数目增多,可摄取Dil标记的乙酰化低密度脂蛋白以及FITC标记的荆豆凝集素.氯吡格雷可使细胞明显增多;不同浓度的氯吡格雷可改善其黏附(F=56.54,P=0.00)、迁移(F =60.23,P=0.00)和增殖(F=1.45,P=0.16)功能;氯吡格雷浓度为20×10-3 mmol·L-1时,保护作用最强;当共培养不同时间后,其仍可改善EPCs黏附(F=127.03,P =0.00)、迁移(F=96.03,P=0.00)和增殖(F=10.46,P=0.00)功能;保护作用呈时间依赖性,但于24h后达到平台期.结论 氯吡格雷可改善人外周血早期EPCs的黏附、迁移及增殖功能,且具有浓度依赖性和时间依赖性.%Objective To evaluate the effect of clopidogrel on the adherence,migration and proliferation of early endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs) from human peripheral blood. Methods Early EPCs were cultured and characterized. Then, EPCs were cultured for 24 hours with medium containing clopidogrel of different concentrations (1 ×10-3-200×10-3 mmol · L-1),and the adherence, migration and proliferation were tested; furthermore, the EPCs were cultured with medium containing 20 × 10-3 mmol · L-1 clopidogrel for different time(0.5 -72.0 h) ,and analysed the adherence,migration and proliferation again. Results The EPCs became long spindle on the 4th day,and these cells increased on the 7th day. Moreover,EPCs could take in Dil-acetylated low density lipoprotein( Dil-acLDL) and FTTC-ulex europaeus agglutinin ( FITC-UEA-I). Clopidogrel could significantly increase the number of cell; the

  7. Improving diabetes medication adherence: successful, scalable interventions

    Zullig LL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Walid F Gellad,3,4 Jivan Moaddeb,2,5 Matthew J Crowley,1,2 William Shrank,6 Bradi B Granger,7 Christopher B Granger,8 Troy Trygstad,9 Larry Z Liu,10 Hayden B Bosworth1,2,7,11 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 3Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 5Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 6CVS Caremark Corporation; 7School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 8Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; 9North Carolina Community Care Networks, Raleigh, NC, USA; 10Pfizer, Inc., and Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA; 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Effective medications are a cornerstone of prevention and disease treatment, yet only about half of patients take their medications as prescribed, resulting in a common and costly public health challenge for the US healthcare system. Since poor medication adherence is a complex problem with many contributing causes, there is no one universal solution. This paper describes interventions that were not only effective in improving medication adherence among patients with diabetes, but were also potentially scalable (ie, easy to implement to a large population. We identify key characteristics that make these interventions effective and scalable. This information is intended to inform healthcare systems seeking proven, low resource, cost-effective solutions to improve medication adherence. Keywords: medication adherence, diabetes mellitus, chronic disease, dissemination research

  8. Effect of etizolam (Depas) on production of superoxide anion by platelet-activating factor and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Aratani, H; Nishida, Y; Terasawa, M; Maruyama, Y

    1988-06-01

    Effect of etizolam on platelet activating factor (PAF) and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced superoxide anion (O2-) production in guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) was investigated. Etizolam showed the inhibitory effect on PAF-induced O2- production concentration dependently, with an IC50 value of 4.7 microM, but it had no inhibitory effect on FMLP-induced O2- production at 100 microM. These results suggest that etizolam has a selectively strong inhibitory effect on PAF-induced O2- production in guinea pig PMNL. PMID:2848961

  9. The comparison of 8-hydroxyquinoline, tropolone, and acetylaceton as mediators in the labelling of polymorphonuclear leucocytes with indium-111: A functional study

    Tropolone forms a lipophilic complex with indium-111 which is capable of mediating the labelling of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) by this isotope; labelling efficiencies are comparable with the best achieved using 8-hydroxyquinoline and acetylacetone. However, in terms of PMN chemotaxis and phagocytosis, tropolone is significantly less toxic than either of the other ligands. 8-hydroxyquinoline was found to reduce PMN chemotaxis and phagocytosis to approximately 70% of the control values at a concentration of 20 μM. Tropolone may prove a superior labelling reagent. (orig.)

  10. Chemotaxins C5a and fMLP induce release of calprotectin (leucocyte L1 protein) from polymorphonuclear cells in vitro.

    Hetland, G.; Talgö, G J; Fagerhol, M K

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether the chemotaxins C5a and formyl peptide (fMLP) can stimulate the release of calprotectin, the major leucocyte protein of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). METHODS: A dose response curve for the uptake of 125I labelled rC5a and fMLP in PMN was determined by radioimmunoassay. The unlabelled chemotaxins were then incubated with PMN and the concentration of calprotectin in PMN lysates and supernatants was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Both rC5a and fMLP ...

  11. Can adherence to antihypertensive therapy be used to promote adherence to statin therapy?

    Richard H Chapman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard H Chapman1, Elise M Pelletier1, Paula J Smith1, Craig S Roberts21US Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health, Falls Church, VA, USA; 2Global Outcomes Research, Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USAObjective: To compare adherence with statin therapy in patients switching to single-pill amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium with patients adding a separate statin to their amlodipine regimen.Methods: We identified hypertensive patients prescribed amlodipine who switched to amlodipine/atorvastatin (switch or added a statin to their amlodipine regimen (add-on from July 2004 to June 2007. Propensity score matching (1 switch:3 add-on was applied based on ‘nearest neighbor’ approach. The primary adherence measure was patients with proportion of days covered (PDC ≥0.80 at 180 days; secondary measures included mean PDC and persistence. A sensitivity analysis was performed, accounting for total statin/amlodipine exposure.Results: Among 4556 matched patients (n = 1139 switch; n = 3417 add-on, mean age was 53.9 years and 52.1% were male. After 180 days, adherence with statin therapy was higher for the switch vs add-on cohort (50.8% vs 44.3%; P < 0.001. After adjusting for pre-index amlodipine adherence, the switch cohort was more likely to be adherent than the add-on cohort (odds ratio: 1.64 [95% confidence interval: 1.42 to 1.89]. Persistence was higher in the switch than the add-on cohort (127.6 vs 117 days; P < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypertensive patients taking amlodipine who initiated statin therapy via single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin were more likely to remain adherent to their statin than patients adding a separate statin to their antihypertensive regimen.Keywords: adherence, amlodipine, atorvastatin, cardiovascular disease, persistence, single-pill

  12. Adherent Raindrop Modeling, Detectionand Removal in Video.

    You, Shaodi; Tan, Robby T; Kawakami, Rei; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    Raindrops adhered to a windscreen or window glass can significantly degrade the visibility of a scene. Modeling, detecting and removing raindrops will, therefore, benefit many computer vision applications, particularly outdoor surveillance systems and intelligent vehicle systems. In this paper, a method that automatically detects and removes adherent raindrops is introduced. The core idea is to exploit the local spatio-temporal derivatives of raindrops. To accomplish the idea, we first model adherent raindrops using law of physics, and detect raindrops based on these models in combination with motion and intensity temporal derivatives of the input video. Having detected the raindrops, we remove them and restore the images based on an analysis that some areas of raindrops completely occludes the scene, and some other areas occlude only partially. For partially occluding areas, we restore them by retrieving as much as possible information of the scene, namely, by solving a blending function on the detected partially occluding areas using the temporal intensity derivative. For completely occluding areas, we recover them by using a video completion technique. Experimental results using various real videos show the effectiveness of our method. PMID:26485475

  13. [Adherence to chronic medication: also a frequent problem in Belgium!].

    Liekens, S; Hulshagen, L; Dethier, M; Laekeman, G; Foulon, V

    2013-12-01

    Medication adherence in chronic conditions such as asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer appears to be a frequent problem. However, the literature on adherence in patients who use inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), oral hypoglycemic agents, drugs for heart failure, antiretrovirals or oral chemotherapy, contains little or no relevant data for Belgium. In the context of a Master thesis in Pharmaceutical care at KU Leuven, a quantitative study was performed to determine the prevalence of adherence to chronic medication in Belgium. This retrospective, cross-sectional study used a database containing refill data of a regional pharmacists' association (KLAV). Out of the 603 pharmacies affiliated with this association, all 50 pharmacies where HIV medication was delivered, were selected. Dispensing data from the selected pharmacies were collected from 01/07/2008 to 31/12/2009 for five pathologies, i.e.; asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer. Adherence (TT) was calculated with the Medication Refill Adherence (MRA) method. In order to determine whether there were associations between age, gender, drug class and adherence, Chi-square tests were used. Compared with the other patients, cancer patients were the most adherent in taking their drugs (median adherence rate = 88%). In addition, this was the only group in which the median adherence rate was above the set limit of 80%. The patients who were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids were the least adherent (median adherence rate = 38%). More than 50% of patients with asthma/COPD, heart failure and diabetes were classified as "under-users". Furthermore, the results showed a significant association within asthma patients between gender and adherence. In asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure and HIV patients there was a significant relationship between age and adherence and drug class and adherence. As the current study has some limitations, the results should be handled with caution. Nevertheless

  14. Adherence to inhaled therapy, mortality and hospital admission in COPD

    Vestbo, J; Anderson, J A; Calverley, P M A;

    2009-01-01

    between adherence and mortality remained unchanged and statistically significant after adjusting for other factors related to prognosis (hazard ratio 0.40 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.46), p... adherence and hospital admission remained unchanged and significant in a multivariate analysis (rate ratio 0.58 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.73, p... was more pronounced in patients with good adherence than in those with poor adherence. CONCLUSION: Adherence to inhaled medication is significantly associated with reduced risk of death and admission to hospital due to exacerbations in COPD. Further research is needed to understand these strong...

  15. Adherence Characteristics of Cement Clinker on Basic Bricks

    GUO Zongqi; Michel Rigaud

    2002-01-01

    Based on the sandwich test, adherence mechanisms of cement clinker on various basic bricks were tackled by microstructural observations with help of cathodoluminescence technique. Doloma based bricks offer sufficient lime to react with clinker, forming C3 S rich layer and initializing superior adherence. However, clinker with low silica ratio leads to MgO agglomeration at the interface of doloma bricks, which reduces adherence strength. On magnesia spinel bricks, fine, crystalline spinel easily reacts with lime containing phases from clinker to form lowmelting phases and belite zone, which shows high adherence performance. Lack of fine spinel in magnesia spinel bricks results in poor adherence.

  16. Sharia Adherence Mosque Survey: Correlations between Sharia Adherence and Violent Dogma in U.S. Mosques

    Mordechai Kedar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A random survey of 100 representative mosques in the U.S. was conducted to measure the correlation between Sharia adherence and dogma calling for violence against non-believers.  Of the 100 mosques surveyed, 51% had texts on site rated as severely advocating violence; 30% had texts rated as moderately advocating violence; and 19% had no violent texts at all.  Mosques that presented as Sharia adherent were more likely to feature violence-positive texts on site than were their non-Sharia-adherent counterparts.  In 84.5% of the mosques, the imam recommended studying violence-positive texts.  The leadership at Sharia-adherent mosques was more likely to recommend that a worshipper study violence-positive texts than leadership at non-Sharia-adherent mosques.  Fifty-eight percent of the mosques invited guest imams known to promote violent jihad.  The leadership of mosques that featured violence-positive literature was more likely to invite guest imams who were known to promote violent jihad than was the leadership of mosques that did not feature violence-positive literature on mosque premises.  

  17. MAC-1 Glycoprotein Family mediates adherence of neutrophils to endothelial cells stimulated by leukotriene B4 and platelet activating factor

    The process of neutrophil (N) adhesion to and migration through endothelium (EC), an early event in the induction of the acute inflammatory response, has been attributed to the generation of extravascular chemoattractant peptides and lipids. Although both leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and platelet activating factor (PAF) enhance N adherence to EC, the mechanisms involved in this interaction are still not completely understood. Since the MAC-1 Glycoprotein (GP) Family has recently been shown to be required for a variety of adherence-dependent functions of stimulated N, the authors questioned whether these adherence-associated GP might be involved in N adherence to EC stimulated by LTB4 or PAF. Using a microtiter adherence assay with 111In labeled N, they assessed the ability of N from patients with MAC-1, LFA-1 Deficiency to adhere to monolayers of human omental microvascular or umbilical vein EC as well as to serum-coated plastic. Patient N exhibited markedly diminished adherence in response to LTB4 or PAF compared to normal controls. LTB4 and PAF enhanced expression of the MAC-1 GP Family on the surface of normal N as determined by flow cytofluorimetry using a monoclonal antibody (TS1/18) to the GP common beta subunit. In addition TS1/18 (20 μg/ml) completely inhibited N adherence stimulated by either LTB4 (10-8M) or PAF(10-11M). Thus, the MAC-1 GP Family appears to be important in chemotactic factor regulation of N adherence to EC

  18. Medication adherence among transgender women living with HIV.

    Baguso, Glenda N; Gay, Caryl L; Lee, Kathryn A

    2016-08-01

    Medication adherence is linked to health outcomes among adults with HIV infection. Transgender women living with HIV (TWLWH) in the US report suboptimal adherence to medications and are found to have difficulty integrating HIV medication into their daily routine, but few studies explore the factors associated with medication adherence among transgender women. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine demographic and clinical factors related to self-reported medication adherence among transgender women. This secondary analysis is based on data collected from the Symptom and Genetic Study that included a convenience sample of 22 self-identified transgender women, 201 non-transgender men, and 72 non-transgender women recruited in northern California. Self-reported medication adherence was assessed using the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Adherence Questionnaire. Gender differences in demographic and clinical variables were assessed, as were differences between transgender women reporting high and low adherence. Transgender women had lower adherence to medications compared to non-transgender males and non-transgender females (p = .028) and were less likely to achieve viral suppression (p = .039). Within the transgender group, Black/African-Americans reported better adherence than participants who were Whites/Caucasian or other races (p = .009). Adherence among transgender women was unrelated to medication count and estrogen therapy, but consistent with other reports on the HIV population as a whole; transgender women with high adherence were more likely to achieve viral suppression compared to the transgender women with low adherence. Despite the high incidence of HIV infection in the transgender population, few studies focus on TWLWH, either in regard to their adherence to antiretroviral therapies or to their healthcare in general. To address ongoing health disparities, more studies are needed focusing on the transgender population's continuum of care in

  19. Accurate reporting of adherence to inhaled therapies in adults with cystic fibrosis: methods to calculate normative adherence

    Hoo ZH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhe Hui Hoo,1,2 Rachael Curley,1,2 Michael J Campbell,1 Stephen J Walters,1 Daniel Hind,3 Martin J Wildman1,2 1School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR, University of Sheffield, 2Sheffield Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, 3Sheffield Clinical Trials Research Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Preventative inhaled treatments in cystic fibrosis will only be effective in maintaining lung health if used appropriately. An accurate adherence index should therefore reflect treatment effectiveness, but the standard method of reporting adherence, that is, as a percentage of the agreed regimen between clinicians and people with cystic fibrosis, does not account for the appropriateness of the treatment regimen. We describe two different indices of inhaled therapy adherence for adults with cystic fibrosis which take into account effectiveness, that is, “simple” and “sophisticated” normative adherence. Methods to calculate normative adherence: Denominator adjustment involves fixing a minimum appropriate value based on the recommended therapy given a person’s characteristics. For simple normative adherence, the denominator is determined by the person’s Pseudomonas status. For sophisticated normative adherence, the denominator is determined by the person’s Pseudomonas status and history of pulmonary exacerbations over the previous year. Numerator adjustment involves capping the daily maximum inhaled therapy use at 100% so that medication overuse does not artificially inflate the adherence level. Three illustrative cases: Case A is an example of inhaled therapy under prescription based on Pseudomonas status resulting in lower simple normative adherence compared to unadjusted adherence. Case B is an example of inhaled therapy under-prescription based on previous exacerbation history resulting in lower sophisticated normative adherence compared to unadjusted adherence and simple normative adherence

  20. Adherence and Blocking of Candida Albicans to Cultured Vaginal Epithelial Cells: Treatments to Decrease Adherence

    Bryan Larsen

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pathogenesis of mucosal microorganisms depends on adherence to the tissues they colonize and infect. For Candida albicans, cell surface hydrophobicity may play a significant role in tissue binding ability. Methods. A continuous cell line of vaginal epithelial cells (VEC was grown in keratinocyte serum-free medium (KSFM with supplements and harvested by trypsinization. VEC were combined with yeast cells to evaluate adherence and inhibition of adherence. In this experimental setup, yeast stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate were allowed to attach to VEC and the resulting fluorescent VEC were detected by flow cytometry. Results. VEC were cultured and examined daily after plating and showed morphology similar to basal epithelial cells. Culture media supplemented with estradiol showed increased VEC proliferation initially (first 24 h but cell morphology was not altered. Fluorescinated Candida cells bound effectively to the cultured VEC. Using fresh cells exposed to various preparations of K-Y, we showed that all formulations of the product reduced Candida binding to VEC by 25% to 50%. While VEC were generally harvested for use in experiments when they were near confluent growth, we allowed some cultures to grow beyond that point and discovered that cells allowed to become overgrown or stressed appeared to bind yeast cells more effectively. Conclusion. Flow cytometry is a useful method for evaluating binding of stained yeast cells to cultured VEC and has demonstrated that commercially available products have the ability to interfere with the process of yeast adherence to epithelial cells.

  1. Adherence to HAART : processes explaining adherence behavior in acceptors and non-acceptors

    Vervoort, Sigrid C. J. M.; Grypdonck, Mieke H. F.; de Grauwe, Annelies; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore and clarify the underlying processes which lead to (non)-adherence behavior in patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a qualitative study was conducted. Thirty-seven in-depth interviews were held with 30 Caucasian HIV-positive patients. Additional dat

  2. Side effects, adherence self-efficacy, and adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a mediation analysis in a Chinese sample.

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenping; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Yuejiao; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Stanton, Bonita

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment. To date, ART adherence is suboptimal for most patients in resource-poor settings. Previous research indicates that medication side effects are perceived to be a significant barrier of high ART adherence. Data regarding the role of adherence self-efficacy in mediating the relationship between side effects from ART and adherence to ART are limited; thus, this study examines this potential mediational role of self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey of 2987 people living with HIV aged ≥18 years was conducted in 2012-2013 in Guangxi Autonomous Region (Guangxi) which has one of the fastest-growing HIV rates in China. Of the total sample, 2146 (72.1%) participants had initiated ART. Participants reported the number of days of completing the daily dose of ART in the past month; adherence was defined as completing the daily dose at least 28 days in the last month (≥90%). Side effects were significantly negatively related to adherence to ART. Mediation analyses indicated that adherence self-efficacy significantly mediated the side effects-adherence relationship. Future interventions to increase adherence self-efficacy and effective coping with side effects among HIV patients are needed in order to improve their ART adherence. PMID:27010870

  3. Regulation of normal human polyrnorphonuclear leucocytes by carnitine

    Andrea Fattorossi; Roberto Biselli; Anna Casciaro; Sonia Tzantzoglou; Claudio De Simone

    1993-01-01

    The effect of carnitine, a drug that plays an essential role in mitochondria metabolism, on some of the most important human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) activation steps including modulation of adhesion molecule density, reactive oxygen species production, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production was investigated. The capability of carnitine in protecting PMN from deter ioration on storage was also studied. Data shows that carnitine exerts considerable effects on all PMN function...

  4. Adherence of Streptococcus salivarius HB and HB-7 to oral surfaces and saliva-coated hydroxyapatite.

    Weerkamp, A H; McBride, B C

    1980-01-01

    We compared the binding of Streptococcus salivarius HB and the mutant HB-7 to oral surfaces in vivo. Mutant HB-7 does not aggregate with saliva nor does it bind to buccal epithelium, but it does retain its ability to coaggregate with Veillonella and Fusobacterium. At 1 h after inoculation into the oral cavity of six volunteers, significantly more S. salivarius HB than HB-7 cells were found adhering to the buccal mucosa (P < 0.05) and to a cleaned tooth surface (P < 0.01); there was no significant difference in the numbers adhering to the tongue. The ratio of HB to HB-7 on the tongue increased in samples taken 1, 3, and 9 days after inoculation. The average time required to clear the mutant HB-7 from the oral cavity was 7 days, whereas that for the parent HB was greater than 20 days, and in some cases strain HB was still present 3 months after its inoculation. A representative S. salivarius serotype II strain, designated T3, behaved similarly to mutant HB-7 with respect to its adherence to the buccal mucosa. Strain HB adhered better to hydroxyapatite treated with human saliva than mutant HB-7; both strains adhered in similar numbers to untreated hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite treated with rat saliva bound less HB than hydroxyapatite treated with human saliva, corresponding to the lower aggregating activity of rat saliva. Extraction of saliva with aggregating strains of S. salivarius reduced the ability of saliva to mediate attachment of strain HB to hydroxyapatite. PMID:7439971

  5. Acoustic Analysis of Inhaler Sounds From Community-Dwelling Asthmatic Patients for Automatic Assessment of Adherence

    D'arcy, Shona; Costello, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalers are devices which deliver medication to the airways in the treatment of chronic respiratory diseases. When used correctly inhalers relieve and improve patients' symptoms. However, adherence to inhaler medication has been demonstrated to be poor, leading to reduced clinical outcomes, wasted medication, and higher healthcare costs. There is a clinical need for a system that can accurately monitor inhaler adherence as currently no method exists to evaluate how patients use their inhalers between clinic visits. This paper presents a method of automatically evaluating inhaler adherence through acoustic analysis of inhaler sounds. An acoustic monitoring device was employed to record the sounds patients produce while using a Diskus dry powder inhaler, in addition to the time and date patients use the inhaler. An algorithm was designed and developed to automatically detect inhaler events from the audio signals and provide feedback regarding patient adherence. The algorithm was evaluated on 407 audio files obtained from 12 community dwelling asthmatic patients. Results of the automatic classification were compared against two expert human raters. For patient data for whom the human raters Cohen's kappa agreement score was \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${>}{0.81}$\\end{document}, results indicated that the algorithm's accuracy was 83% in determining the correct inhaler technique score compared with the raters. This paper has several clinical implications as it demonstrates the feasibility of using acoustics to objectively monitor patient inhaler adherence and provide real-time personalized medical care for a chronic respiratory illness.

  6. Denial and Acceptance Coping Styles and Medication Adherence in Schizophrenia

    Aldebot, Stephanie; Weisman de Mamani, Amy G.

    2009-01-01

    Antipsychotics are often the first line of treatment for individuals with schizophrenia (Fialko et al., 2008). One challenge to effective treatment is lack of adherence to prescribed medication. Lower rates of adherence are associated with considerably higher rates of relapse and poorer course of illness. Therefore studying characteristics that may be related to medication adherence is important. Coping styles may be one such factor. Individuals utilize a variety of coping mechanisms to manag...

  7. Interventions for enhancing adherence to treatment in adults with bronchiectasis

    McCullough, Amanda; Ryan, Cristin; Bradley, Judy M.; O'Neill, Brenda; Elborn, Stuart; Hughes, Carmel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bronchiectasis is characterised by a widening of the airways, leading to excess mucus production and recurrent infection. It is more prevalent in women and those in middle age. Many patients with bronchiectasis do not adhere to treatments (medications, exercise and airway clearance) prescribed for their condition. The best methods to change these adherence behaviours have not been identified.Objectives: To assess the effects of interventions to enhance adherence to any aspect of tr...

  8. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Are Egyptian children adherent to maintenance therapy?

    Elhamy Rifky Abdel Khalek; Laila M Sherif; Naglaa Mohamed Kamal; Gharib, Amal F.; H M Shawky

    2015-01-01

    Background, Aims, Settings and Design: Poor adherence to oral maintenance chemotherapy can cause relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A multicenter study for the evaluation of adherence to oral 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) maintenance chemotherapy for childhood ALL in Egypt to identify contributing factors and possible steps to promote adherence. Materials and Methods: The study included 129 children with ALL in complete remission receiving 6-MP single daily oral dose in the evening....

  9. Health Literacy Explains Racial Disparities in Diabetes Medication Adherence

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Cavanaugh, Kerri; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Kripalani, Sunil; White, Richard O.; Elasy, Tom A.; Rothman, Russell L.

    2011-01-01

    While low health literacy and suboptimal medication adherence are more prevalent in racial/ethnic minority groups than Whites, little is known about the relationship between these factors in adults with diabetes, and whether health literacy or numeracy might explain racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes medication adherence. Previous work in HIV suggests health literacy mediates racial differences in adherence to anti-retroviral treatment, but no study to date has explored numeracy as a media...

  10. Interventions for enhancing adherence with physiotherapy: a systematic review

    McLean, S.; Burton, M.; L. Bradley(a); Littlewood, C

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is commonplace and may adversely affect outcomes, efficiency and healthcare cost. The aim of this systematic review was to identify strategies to improve adherence with musculoskeletal outpatient treatment. Five suitable studies were identified which provided moderate evidence that a motivational cognitive-behavioural programme can improve attendance at exercise-based clinic sessions. There was conflicting evidence that adherence interventions increase short-ter...

  11. Exploring the smartwatch as a tool for medical adherence

    Shrivastava, Akash

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to medication is generally described as a huge problem in the health care system. The term adherence is generally preferred by many health care providers as the word 'compliance' describes a patient who is passively taking medication as advised/ordered by the doctor. This thesis goes in depth in identifying the problems faced to achieve maximum adherence to medication and the important factors contributing to it. The objective is to come up with an alternative approach to help impro...

  12. Nitric oxide production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic lung infection

    Kolpen, Mette; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus;

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in CF patients is characterized by persisting mucoid biofilm in hypoxic endobronchial mucus. These biofilms are surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), which are the major consumers of O2 for production of O2-. In this s...

  13. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy: are we doing enough?

    Read, T; Mijch, A; Fairley, C K

    2003-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a powerful predictor of response to therapy. For optimal antiretroviral therapy response, individuals need to take more than 95% of their prescribed medication. The most widely used method for measuring adherence is self-report of the number of missed doses and this should be done at every clinic visit. There are several well-recognized predictors of poor adherence, such as illicit drug use, depression, limited knowledge or ambivalence about starting treatment. Adherence can be improved by addressing these issues or through other means such as pill boxes or electronic reminders. PMID:12752896

  14. The effect of reminder systems on patients' adherence to treatment

    Fenerty SD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah D Fenerty1, Cameron West1, Scott A Davis1, Sebastian G Kaplan3, Steven R Feldman1,2,41Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, 4Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USABackground: Patient adherence is an important component of the treatment of chronic disease. An understanding of patient adherence and its modulating factors is necessary to correctly interpret treatment efficacy and barriers to therapeutic success.Purpose: This meta-analysis aims to systematically review published randomized controlled trials of reminder interventions to assist patient adherence to prescribed medications.Methods: A Medline search was performed for randomized controlled trials published between 1968 and June 2011, which studied the effect of reminder-based interventions on adherence to self-administered daily medications.Results: Eleven published randomized controlled trials were found between 1999 and 2009 which measured adherence to a daily medication in a group receiving reminder interventions compared to controls receiving no reminders. Medication adherence was measured as the number of doses taken compared to the number prescribed within a set period of time. Meta-analysis showed a statistically significant increase in adherence in groups receiving a reminder intervention compared to controls (66.61% versus 54.71%, 95% CI for mean: 0.8% to 22.4%. Self-reported and electronically monitored adherence rates did not significantly differ (68.04% versus 63.67%, P = 1.0. Eight of eleven studies showed a statistically significant increase in adherence for at least one of the reminder group arms compared to the control groups receiving no reminder intervention.Limitations: The data are limited by imperfect measures of adherence due to variability in data collection methods. It is also likely

  15. Understanding patient management: the need for medication adherence and persistence.

    Chia, Yc

    2008-01-01

    Poor patient adherence to medication is one of the major factors contributing to poor disease control, in particular in asymptomatic chronic diseases like hypertension and dyslipidaemia. The physical and economic burden on patients and the health care system as a result of non-adherence is great. It is estimated that poor adherence to hypertension medication accounts for as many as 7.1 million preventable deaths annually. Hence recognising and identifying non-adherence is the first step to addressing this problem. Medication adherence can be measured in various ways including self-report to electronic monitoring. In order to be more successful in managing non-adherence, attention must be paid to barriers to adherence, namely the interplay of patient factors, the health care providers themselves and the health care system itself. Taking these into account will probably have the greatest impact on improving medication adherence. Consequently strategies to help overcome these barriers are of paramount importance. Some of these strategies will include education of patients, improving communication between patients and health care providers, improving dose scheduling, providing drugs with less adverse effects, and improving accessibility to health care. Poor mediation adherence continues to be a huge challenge. While the patient is ultimately responsible for the taking of medication, good communication, involving the patient in decision making about their care and simplifying drug regimens go a long way in improving it. PMID:25606104

  16. Impact of prescription size on statin adherence and cholesterol levels

    Mehler Phillip S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapy with 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Co-enzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins improve outcomes in a broad spectrum of patients with hyperlipidemia. However, effective therapy requires ongoing medication adherence; restrictive pharmacy policies may represent a barrier to successful adherence, particularly among vulnerable patients. In this study we sought to assess the relationship between the quantity of statin dispensed by the pharmacy with patient adherence and total cholesterol. Methods We analyzed a cohort of 3,386 patients receiving more than one fill of statin medications through an integrated, inner-city health care system between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2002. Our measure of adherence was days of drug acquisition divided by days in the study for each patient, with adequate adherence defined as ≥ 80%. Log-binomial regression was used to determine the relative risk of various factors, including prescription size, on adherence. We also assessed the relationship between adherence and total cholesterol using multiple linear regression. Results After controlling for age, gender, race, co-payment, comorbidities, and insurance status, patients who obtained a majority of fills as 60-day supply compared with 30-day supply were more likely to be adherent to their statin medications (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.28–1.55, P Conclusion In a healthcare system serving predominantly indigent patients, the provision of a greater quantity of statin medication at each prescription fill contributes to improved adherence and greater drug effectiveness.

  17. Immunomodulation by neutrophil myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide: differential susceptibility of human lymphocyte functions.

    el-Hag, A; Lipsky, P E; Bennett, M; Clark, R A

    1986-05-01

    The coexistence of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes in tumor masses and inflammatory tissues suggests the possibility of interaction between secreted neutrophil products and nearby lymphocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of neutrophil myeloperoxidase and H2O2 on lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to myeloperoxidase, an H2O2-generating system (glucose + glucose oxidase), and a halide, and were then tested for functional activities. Natural killer activity against K562 cells, lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were all susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The degree as well as the mechanism of suppression was dependent on the glucose oxidase concentration (i.e., the rate of H2O2 delivery). At low H2O2 flux, myeloperoxidase was essential for induction of lymphocyte suppression; as the rate of H2O2 generation increased, suppression became myeloperoxidase-independent and was mediated by H2O2 alone. Various lymphocyte functions were differentially susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The proliferative response to poke-weed mitogen was the least sensitive, whereas antibody formation was the most sensitive. Proliferative responses to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin as well as natural killer activity displayed intermediate degrees of susceptibility. In all assays, lymphocyte viability was greater than 90%. Removal of monocytes from mononuclear leukocytes by adherence to glass increased susceptibility of lymphocytes to oxidative injury. Monocytes in proportions within the range present in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes protected lymphocyte functions against oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. This study demonstrates a differential susceptibility of various immune functions to oxidative injury by the neutrophil products myeloperoxidase and H2O2, and shows, in

  18. A fibronectin receptor on Candida albicans mediates adherence of the fungus to extracellular matrix

    Klotz, S.A.; Smith, R.L. (Overton Brooks VA Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Binding of fibronectin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, to Candida albicans was measured, and adherence of the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins, fibronectin, laminin, types I and IV collagen, and subendothelial ECM was studied. 125I-labeled fibronectin was inhibited from binding to the fungus by unlabeled human plasma fibronectin and by Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser-Pro (GRGESP), and Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro (GRGDTP), but binding was not inhibited by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. Soluble fibronectin, RGD, GRGESP, and GRGDTP also inhibited fungal adherence to the individual immobilized ECM proteins in a complex pattern, but only soluble fibronectin (10(-7) M) inhibited fungal adherence to subendothelial ECM. Thus, C. albicans possesses at least one type of cell surface receptor for binding soluble fibronectin that can be inhibited with peptides. This receptor apparently is used to bind the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins and to subendothelial ECM and may play a role in the initiation of disseminated disease by bloodborne fungi by providing for adherence of the microorganisms to ECM proteins.

  19. Alexithymia, Assertiveness and Psychosocial Functioning in HIV: Implications for Medication Adherence and Disease Severity.

    McIntosh, Roger C; Ironson, Gail; Antoni, Michael; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Psychosocial function and adherence to antiretroviral regimen are key factors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease management. Alexithymia (AL) is a trait deficit in the ability to identify and describe feelings, emotions and bodily sensations. A structural equation model was used to test whether high levels of AL indirectly relate to greater non-adherent behavior and HIV disease severity via psychosocial dysfunction. Blood draws for HIV-1 viral load and CD4 T-lymphocyte, along with psychosocial surveys were collected from 439 HIV positive adults aged 18-73 years. The structural model supports significant paths from: (1) AL to non-active patient involvement, psychological distress, and lower social support, (2) psychological distress and non-active involvement to non-adherent behavior, and (3) non-adherence to greater HIV disease severity (CFI = .97, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). A second model confirmed the intermediary effect of greater patient assertiveness on the path from AL to social support and non-active patient involvement (CFI = .94, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). Altogether, AL is indirectly linked with HIV disease management through it's association with poor psychosocial function, however greater patient assertiveness buffers the negative impact of AL on relationship quality with healthcare providers and members of one's social support network. PMID:26143246

  20. A fibronectin receptor on Candida albicans mediates adherence of the fungus to extracellular matrix

    Binding of fibronectin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, to Candida albicans was measured, and adherence of the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins, fibronectin, laminin, types I and IV collagen, and subendothelial ECM was studied. 125I-labeled fibronectin was inhibited from binding to the fungus by unlabeled human plasma fibronectin and by Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser-Pro (GRGESP), and Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro (GRGDTP), but binding was not inhibited by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. Soluble fibronectin, RGD, GRGESP, and GRGDTP also inhibited fungal adherence to the individual immobilized ECM proteins in a complex pattern, but only soluble fibronectin (10(-7) M) inhibited fungal adherence to subendothelial ECM. Thus, C. albicans possesses at least one type of cell surface receptor for binding soluble fibronectin that can be inhibited with peptides. This receptor apparently is used to bind the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins and to subendothelial ECM and may play a role in the initiation of disseminated disease by bloodborne fungi by providing for adherence of the microorganisms to ECM proteins

  1. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy adherence

    Valerie J. Ehlers

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART is vital to improve the patient’s state of well-being and to prevent the development of strains of the human immunodef ciency virus (HIV that are resistant to ART. Persons with ART-resistant strains of HIV can spread these to other people, requiring more expensive ART with more severe side-effects and poorer health outcomes. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study was to determine nurses’ perspectives on Botswana patients’ anti-retroviral therapy (ART adherence, and to identify factors which could promote or hinder ART adherence. Four ART sites were randomly selected and all 16 nurses providing ART services at these sites participated in semi-structured interviews. These nurses indicated that patients’ ART adherence was inf uenced by service-related and patient-related factors. Service-related factors included the inaccessibility of ART clinics, limited clinic hours, health workers’ inability to communicate in patients’ local languages, long waiting times at clinics and delays in being informed about their CD4 and viral load results. Nurses could not trace defaulters nor contact them by phone, and also had to work night shifts, disrupting nurse-patient relationships. Patient-related factors included patients’ lack of education, inability to understand the significance of CD4 and viral load results, financial hardships, non-disclosure and non-acceptance of their HIV positive status, alcohol abuse, the utilisation of traditional medicines and side effects of ART. The challenges of lifelong ART adherence are multifaceted involving both patient-related and service-related factors. Supplying free ARVs does not ensure high levels of ART adherence.

    Opsomming

    Anti-retrovirale middels (ARMs word gratis verskaf in Botswana. Lewenslange getroue nakoming van ARM voorskrifte is

  2. ART adherence clubs: a long-term retention strategy for clinically stable patients receiving antiretroviral therapy

    Wilkinson, Lynne Susan

    2013-01-01

    The ART-adherence club model described here provides patient-friendly access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for clinically stable patients. It reduces the burden that stable patients place on healthcare facilities, increasing clinical human resources for new patients, and those clinically unstable and at risk of failing treatment. In the model, 30 patients are allocated to an ART club. The group meets either at a facility or community venue for less than an hour every 2 months. Group meeting...

  3. Characterization and Classification of Adherent Cells in Monolayer Culture using Automated Tracking and Evolutionary Algorithms

    Zhang, Z.; Bedder, M; Smith, S L; Walker, D; Shabir, S.; Southgate, J

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for tracking and characterizing adherent cells in monolayer culture. A system of cell tracking employing computer vision techniques was applied to time-lapse videos of replicate normal human uro-epithelial cell cultures exposed to different concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and a selective purinergic P2X antagonist (PPADS), acquired over a 24hour period. Subsequent analysis following feature extraction demonstrated the ability of the technique t...

  4. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Proteins in Adherence and Pathogenesis

    Armelle Ménard

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is one of the most successful human pathogens, which colonizes the mucus layer of the gastric epithelium of more than 50% of the world’s population. This curved, microaerophilic, Gram-negative bacterium induces a chronic active gastritis, often asymptomatic, in all infected individuals. In some cases, this gastritis evolves to more severe diseases such as peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori has developed a unique set of factors, actively supporting its successful survival and persistence in its natural hostile ecological niche, the human stomach, throughout the individual’s life, unless treated. In the human stomach, the vast majority of H. pylori cells are motile in the mucus layer lining, but a small percentage adheres to the epithelial cell surfaces. Adherence to the gastric epithelium is important for the ability of H. pylori to cause disease because this intimate attachment facilitates: (1 colonization and persistence, by preventing the bacteria from being eliminated from the stomach, by mucus turnover and gastric peristalsis; (2 evasion from the human immune system and (3 efficient delivery of proteins into the gastric cell, such as the CagA oncoprotein. Therefore, bacteria with better adherence properties colonize the host at higher densities. H. pylori is one of the most genetically diverse bacterial species known and is equipped with an extraordinarily large set of outer membrane proteins, whose role in the infection and persistence process will be discussed in this review, as well as the different receptor structures that have been so far described for mucosal adherence.

  5. Adherence to COPD guidelines in general practice

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Sørensen, Tina Brandt; Højmark, Torben Brunse;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The general practitioner (GP) is often the first healthcare contact for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AIMS: To determine whether participating in a standardised educational programme delivered in the GP's own practice is associated with adherence to COPD...... guidelines. METHODS: A nationwide register-based observational before and after study was undertaken with a control group of propensity-matched practices (follow-up period 6 months). COPD was defined as age 40+ years and at least two prescriptions for inhaled medication. The educational programme consisted...... were used to compare the rate of spirometry testing, preventive consultations, and influenza vaccinations provided to COPD patients and the rate of spirometry testing in non-COPD individuals, assumed to reflect diagnostic activity. RESULTS: Data for 102 participating GP practices were analysed...

  6. Modelling imperfect adherence to HIV induction therapy

    Smith? Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction-maintenance therapy is a treatment regime where patients are prescribed an intense course of treatment for a short period of time (the induction phase, followed by a simplified long-term regimen (maintenance. Since induction therapy has a significantly higher chance of pill fatigue than maintenance therapy, patients might take drug holidays during this period. Without guidance, patients who choose to stop therapy will each be making individual decisions, with no scientific basis. Methods We use mathematical modelling to investigate the effect of imperfect adherence during the inductive phase. We address the following research questions: 1. Can we theoretically determine the maximal length of a possible drug holiday and the minimal number of doses that must subsequently be taken while still avoiding resistance? 2. How many drug holidays can be taken during the induction phase? Results For a 180 day therapeutic program, a patient can take several drug holidays, but then has to follow each drug holiday with a strict, but fairly straightforward, drug-taking regimen. Since the results are dependent upon the drug regimen, we calculated the length and number of drug holidays for all fifteen protease-sparing triple-drug cocktails that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Conclusions Induction therapy with partial adherence is tolerable, but the outcome depends on the drug cocktail. Our theoretical predictions are in line with recent results from pilot studies of short-cycle treatment interruption strategies and may be useful in guiding the design of future clinical trials.

  7. Adherence of cell surface mutants of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and analyses of the cell surface proteins of the mutants.

    Fukayama, M; Calderone, R A

    1991-01-01

    Strains of Candida albicans, selected on the basis of their reduced agglutination with a polyclonal anti-Candida antiserum, were tested for their adherence to human buccal epithelial cells (BEC). Of four strains, one (A9V2) had reduced binding to BEC in vitro. Adherence of wild type (wt) yeast cells (A9), as measured by the percentage of BEC with adhering Candida cells, was 73.4% +/- 3.8% compared with 49.3% +/- 3.1% for A9V2 (P less than 0.01). From yeast cells of A9 and A9V2, whole-cell ext...

  8. Associations between patient factors and medication adherence: A Jordanian experience

    Basheti IA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of patient characteristics and health beliefs on their medication adherence. Methods: Patients (n=167 with chronic conditions (mean age 58.9; SD=13.54, 53% males were recruited from March 2009- to March 2010 using a cross sectional study design. Data collected included patients’ demographics, medical conditions, medications therapeutic regimen, frequency of physician visits and health beliefs. Patient self-reported adherence to medications was assessed by the researcher using a validated and published scale. Treatment related problems (TRPs were evaluated for each patient by competent clinical pharmacists. Associations between patient characteristics/health beliefs with adherence were explored. Results: About half of the patients (46.1% were non-adherent. A significant association was found between lower adherence and higher number of disease states (p<0.001, higher number of medications (p=0.001, and higher number of identified TRPs (p = 0.003. Patient adherence was positively affected by older age, higher educational level, and higher number of physician visits per month, while it was negatively affected by reporting difficulties with getting prescription refills on time. Conclusion: This study identified different factors that may negatively affect adherence, including higher number of medications and disease states, higher number of identified TRPs and inability to getting prescription refills on time. Hence, more care needs to be provided to patients with complex therapeutic regimens in order to enhance adherence.

  9. Adherence to Pharmacological Treatment for Juvenile Bipolar Disorder

    Drotar, Dennis; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Demeter, Christine A.; McNamara, Nora K.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Stange, Jonathan; Vijay, Priya; Findling, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of adherence to divalproex sodium (DVPX) and lithium carbonate (Li) combination treatment during the initial stabilization treatment phase. Method: Adherence to Li/DVPX combination therapy was measured by the presence or absence of minimum serum concentrations of…

  10. Clinical Supervision in Treatment Transport: Effects on Adherence and Outcomes

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    This nonexperimental study used mixed-effects regression models to examine relations among supervisor adherence to a clinical supervision protocol, therapist adherence, and changes in the behavior and functioning of youths with serious antisocial behavior treated with an empirically supported treatment (i.e., multisystemic therapy [MST]) 1 year…

  11. Component Analysis of Adherence in a Family Intervention

    Hill, Laura G.; Owens, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Most studies of adherence use a single global measure to examine the relation of adherence to outcomes. These studies inform us about effects of overall implementation but not about importance of specific program elements. Previous research on the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 has shown that outcomes were unrelated to global…

  12. Improving Adherence to Hand Hygiene among Health Care Workers

    Maskerine, Courtney; Loeb, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Increased adherence to hand hygiene is widely acknowledged to be the most important way of reducing infections in health care facilities. Despite evidence of benefit, adherence to hand hygiene among health care professionals remains low. Several behavioral and organizational theories have been proposed to explain this. As a whole, the success of…

  13. 14 CFR 1260.72 - Adherence to original budget estimates.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adherence to original budget estimates. 1260.72 Section 1260.72 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Post-Award Requirements § 1260.72 Adherence to original budget estimates....

  14. Development of adherence metrics for caloric restriction interventions

    Objective measures are needed to quantify dietary adherence during caloric restriction (CR) while participants are freeliving. One method to monitor adherence is to compare observed weight loss to the expected weight loss during a prescribed level of CR. Normograms (graphs)of expected weight loss ca...

  15. Development of adherence metrics for caloric restriction interventions

    Objective measures are needed to quantify dietary adherence during caloric restriction (CR) while participants are freeliving. One method to monitor adherence is to compare observed weight loss to the expected weight loss during a prescribed level of CR. Normograms (graphs) of expected weight loss c...

  16. Bromide as marker for drug adherence in hypertensive patients.

    Braam, R.L.; Uum, S.H.M. van; Lenders, J.W.M.; Thien, Th.

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: Insufficient drug adherence is an important reason for inadequate blood pressure control. Currently, methods that measure drug adherence objectively are lacking. Objective methods are needed to help improve blood pressure control and outcome in hypertensive

  17. Sublingual immunotherapy in youngsters : adherence in a randomized clinical trial

    Roder, E.; Berger, M. Y.; de Groot, H.; van Wijk, R. Gerth

    2008-01-01

    Background Adherence is essential for effective treatment. Although several trials on the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in youngsters have been published, few contain data on medication intake. Objective We aimed to quantify adherence both to study protocol and medication intake as wel

  18. Variation in guideline adherence in intrauterine insemination care.

    Haagen, Esther C; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Grol, Richard P T M; Braat, Didi D M; Hermens, Rosella P M G; Kremer, Jan A M

    2010-04-01

    Health-care delivery according to clinical practice guidelines is thought to be critical in achieving optimal outcomes. This study aimed to assess the extent to which practice performance in intrauterine insemination (IUI) care is consistent with guideline recommendations and to evaluate the association between guideline adherence and outcome of IUI care. In a retrospective cohort study, 1100 infertile couples who underwent IUI treatment at 10 Dutch hospitals were asked to grant access to their medical record for assessment of guideline adherence using 25 systematically developed guideline-based performance indicators. A total of 558 couples who started 2334 IUI cycles participated. Guideline adherence regarding 20 process and five structure aspects of IUI care was often substandard and varied considerably between hospitals. Out of 10 possible associations investigated, guideline adherence regarding sperm quality and guideline adherence regarding the total number of IUI cycles were associated with improved ongoing pregnancy rates after IUI. Thus, guideline adherence in IUI care is far from optimal and varies substantially between hospitals. As associations between guideline adherence and ongoing pregnancy after IUI were mainly non-significant, further research is needed to evaluate associations between guideline adherence and other outcomes of IUI care besides ongoing pregnancy, such as patient safety and cost effectiveness. PMID:20129823

  19. A Selective and Purification-Free Strategy for Labeling Adherent Cells with Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Yeo, David Chen Loong; Liao, Shanshan; Lans, Malin; Wang, Yaqi; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Goh, Bee Tin; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-16

    Cellular labeling with inorganic nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, and fluorescent silica nanoparticles is an important method for the noninvasive visualization of cells using various imaging modalities. Currently, this is mainly achieved through the incubation of cultured cells with the nanoparticles that eventually reach the intracellular compartment through specific or nonspecific internalization. This classic method is advantageous in terms of simplicity and convenience, but it suffers from issues such as difficulties in fully removing free nanoparticles (suspended in solution) and the lack of selectivity on cell types. This article reports an innovative strategy for the specific labeling of adherent cells without the concern of freely suspended nanoparticles. This method relies on a nanocomposite film that is prepared by homogeneously dispersing nanoparticles within a biodegradable polymeric film. When adherent cells are seeded on the film, they adhere, spread, and filtrate into the film through the micropores formed during the film fabrication. The pre-embedded nanoparticles are thus internalized by the cells during this infiltration process. As an example, fluorescent silica nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within a polycaprolactone film by utilizing cryomilling and heat pressing. Upon incubation within physiological buffer, no silica nanoparticles were released from the nanocomposite film even after 20 d of incubation. However, when adherent cells (e.g., human mesenchymal stem cells) were grown on the film, they became fluorescent after 3 d, which suggests internalization of silica nanoparticles by cells. In comparison, the suspension cells (e.g., monocytes) in the medium remained nonfluorescent no matter whether there was the presence of adherent cells or not. This strategy eventually allowed the selective and concomitant labeling of mesenchymal stem cells during their harvest from bone marrow aspiration

  20. Health Games - Modern Tools for Enhancing Patient Adherence

    Sameer Bhaskar GOKHALE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low patient adherence remains a major public health challenge globally and imposes a considerable economic burden on healthcare systems. It is critical to develop an effective intervention to improve patient adherence. Factors such as physician-patient relation, patient's health literacy, attitude, cultural variations, and patient’s involvement in decision making are responsible for improving adherence. Information technology has revolutionized almost all industries including healthcare but its use has not shown its full promise to boost adherence. Recent developments in smart phone market penetration, gamification, and easy to navigate user experience have made it possible for healthcare providers to effectively connect with patients using innovative ways enabled by technology. Leveraging on this fact, healthcare industry should be focusing on development and use of interactive health games. Indication-wise games can be developed in collaboration with physicians, academics, thought leaders and experienced media companies. In summary, gamification mayeffectively be used to improve patient adherence.

  1. Treatment adherence with the easypod™ growth hormone electronic auto-injector and patient acceptance: survey results from 824 children and their parents

    Larroque Sylvain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurately monitoring adherence to treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH enables appropriate intervention in cases of poor adherence. The electronic r-hGH auto-injector, easypod™, automatically records the patient's adherence to treatment. This study evaluated adherence to treatment of children who started using the auto-injector and assessed opinions about the device. Methods A multicentre, multinational, observational 3-month survey in which children received r-hGH as part of their normal care. Physicians reviewed the recorded dose history and children (with or without parental assistance completed a questionnaire-based survey. Children missing ≤2 injections per month (92% of injections given were considered adherent to treatment. Adherence was compared between GH treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced children. Results Of 834 recruited participants, 824 were evaluated. The median (range age was 11 (1-18 years. From the recorded dose history, 87.5% of children were adherent to treatment over the 3-month period. Recorded adherence was higher in treatment-naïve (89.7%, n = 445/496 than in treatment-experienced children (81.7%, n = 152/186 [Fisher's exact test FI(X = 7.577; p = 0.0062]. According to self-reported data, 90.2% (607/673 of children were adherent over 3 months; 51.5% (421/817 missed ≥1 injection over this period (mainly due to forgetfulness. Concordance between reported and recorded adherence was 84.3%, with a trend towards self-reported adherence being higher than recorded adherence. Most children liked the auto-injector: over 80% gave the top two responses from five options for ease of use (720/779, speed (684/805 and comfort (716/804. Although 38.5% (300/780 of children reported pain on injection, over half of children (210/363 considered the pain to be less or much less than expected. Given the choice, 91.8% (732/797 of children/parents would continue using the device. Conclusions

  2. Improving adherence to oral cancer therapy in clinical practice.

    McCue, Debbie A; Lohr, Lisa K; Pick, Amy M

    2014-05-01

    Adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens maximizes their effectiveness and minimizes any potential toxicities. Factors specifically related to the treatment, patient, and health care provider may influence medication adherence. Treatment-related factors include the complexity of the regimen, the cost of therapy, the possibility of side effects, and the delay in treatment benefits. Meanwhile, patients may not have an adequate support system or an understanding of the need for the medication, and providers may not fully succeed in communicating the importance of adherence and the types of side effects that may occur. Nonadherence may lead to an increased risk of toxicity, decreased effectiveness, and increased utilization of health care resources. Although various methods for measuring adherence are available, self-reporting is the most widely used. Studies describing adherence in a broad range of cancers are reviewed. Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia has been revolutionized by the development of oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are highly effective in managing the disease when taken consistently. However, nonadherence is relatively common and can lead to reduced rates of response and increased medical costs. Similar effects of nonadherence on outcome and cost have also been observed in patients with various other hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Interventions to improve adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens include communication about the importance of adherence and the potential consequences of nonadherence, simplification of the patient's medication schedule (if possible), and inclusion of a caregiver or family member in the conversation. Written materials should always be provided to accompany verbal instructions. This review summarizes factors influencing medication adherence, impact of nonadherence on patient outcomes, methods for measuring adherence, previous studies of nonadherence in patients with cancer, common barriers to access, and

  3. "That is why I stopped the ART": Patients' & providers' perspectives on barriers to and enablers of HIV treatment adherence in a South African workplace programme

    Kielmann Karina; Fielding Katherine; Hamilton Robin; Charalambous Salome; Dahab Mison; Churchyard Gavin J; Grant Alison D

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background As ART programmes in African settings expand beyond the pilot stages, adherence to treatment may become an increasing challenge. This qualitative study examines potential barriers to, and facilitators of, adherence to ART in a workplace programme in South Africa. Methods We conducted key informant interviews with 12 participants: six ART patients, five health service providers (HSPs) and one human resources manager. Results The main reported barriers were denial of existen...

  4. Creating Effective Mobile Phone Apps to Optimize Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence: Perspectives From Stimulant-Using HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Horvath, Keith J.; Alemu, Dawit; Danh, Thu; Baker, Jason V; Carrico, Adam W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of stimulant drugs among men who have sex with men (MSM) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with decreased odds of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and elevated risk of forward HIV transmission. Advancing tailored and innovative mobile phone–based ART adherence app interventions for stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM requires greater understanding of their needs and preferences in this emerging area. Objective The purpose of this study is to (1) asses...

  5. Viral suppression and adherence among HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy: results of a multicenter study

    Maria L.S. Cruz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate treatment adherence among perinatally-infected pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients followed in pediatric centers in Brazil. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional multicenter study. Medical records were reviewed and adherence scale, assessment of caregivers' quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF, anxiety, depression, and alcohol/substances use/abuse were assessed. Outcomes included self-reported 100% adherence in the last three days and HIV viral load (VL < 50 copies/mL. Statistical analyses included contingency tables and respective statistics, and multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: 260 subjects were enrolled: 78% children and 22% adolescents; 93% of caregivers for the children and 77% of adolescents reported 100% adherence; 57% of children and 49% of adolescents had VL < 50 copies/mL. In the univariate analyses, HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection, lower caregiver scores for anxiety, and higher scores in physical and psychological domains of WHOQOL-BREF were associated with 100% adherence. Shorter intervals between pharmacy visits were associated with VL < 50 copies/mL (p ≤ 0.01. Multivariable regression demonstrated that caregivers who did not abuse alcohol/other drugs (OR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.27-0.89 and median interval between pharmacy visits < 33 days (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.98 were independently associated with VL < 50 copies/mL; whereas lower caregiver scores for anxiety (OR = 2.57; 95% CI: 1.27-5.19 and children's HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection (OR = 2.25; 95% CI: 1.12-4.50 were found to be independently associated with 100% adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric HIV programs should perform routine assessment of caregivers' quality of life, and anxiety and depression symptoms. In this setting, pharmacy records are essential to help identify less-than-optimal adherence.

  6. The influence of cultural and religious orientations on social support and its potential impact on medication adherence

    Hatah E

    2015-04-01

    , only age, duration of treatment, organizational religious activity, and disease type (human immunodeficiency virus were found to significantly influence patients’ adherence to medications (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.05, P=0.002; OR 0.99, P=0.025; OR 1.19, P=0.038; and OR 9.08, P<0.05, respectively. Conclusion: When examining religious practice and cultural orientation, social support was not found to have significant influence on patients’ medication adherence. Only age, duration of treatment, organizational religious activity, and disease type (human immunodeficiency virus had significant influence on patients’ adherence. Keywords: group orientation, power distance, religiosity

  7. Limits to the adherence of oxide scales

    Fracture mechanics is used to identify criteria under which uniform oxide scales may be expected to fail due to rapidly applied strains. The most common failure mode occurs when the strain, ε, builds up in the scale until the strain energy density per unit area exceeds the fracture surface energy, γ, of the oxide. This produces spalling when ε > (2γ/hE)1/2, where h is the scale thickness and E is the oxide Youngs modulus. In thin scales, as the external strain is applied to the oxide via the metal substrate, it is clear that no further strain can be applied to the oxide if the substrate has itself been strained beyond yield. This gives rise to extended oxide adherence in which the oxide cracks and forms a series of islands but remains attached to the deformed metal. When the oxide thickness is less than its comminution limit, the flaw size necessary for brittle fracture exceeds the oxide thickness and the oxide yields in a ductile manner without cracking. The results are presented as maps of failure strain versus oxide thickness for various oxide systems such as Fe3O4, Cr2O3, Al2O3, SiO2 and NiO. The observed cases of spalling are found to lie within the predicted regions. (author)

  8. Challenges of treatment adherence in older patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L; Ruscin, J Mark

    2009-01-01

    Patient adherence to a medication regimen is critical to treatment outcome, quality of life and future healthcare costs. For elderly patients with Parkinson's disease, obstacles to adherence can be particularly complex. Beyond age-related and economic factors, elderly patients with Parkinson's disease often require complicated dosing or titration schedules and have multiple co-morbidities that necessitate administration of therapies from multiple drug classes. In addition, neuropsychiatric disturbances and cognitive impairment, which are often part of the disease process, can affect adherence, as can variable responses to anti-parkinsonian agents as the disease progresses. Several recent studies in patients with Parkinson's disease point to the need for establishing good adherence patterns early and maintaining these throughout the course of treatment. To achieve optimal adherence in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease, a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches appears to be the best strategy for success. Examples include a strong provider-patient relationship, educational intervention by phone or face-to-face contact, simplified dosing and administration schedules, management and understanding of medication adverse events, and the use of adherence aids such as pill boxes and hour-by-hour organizational charts. Research into new avenues that include improved drug monitoring, pharmacogenetics and neuroprotective regimens may give rise to better adherence in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease in the future. PMID:19220071

  9. [Concept analysis of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease].

    Huang, Jen-Ying; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy plays an important role in the management of chronic diseases. However, many patients with chronic disease do not adhere to their medication regimen. This results in worsening symptoms and frequent re-hospitalizations. As a result, healthcare providers may view these patients as bad. Medication adherence is a complex concept. Analyzing this concept may assist nurses to improve patient-centered care. This paper uses Walker & Avant's method to conduct a concept analysis of medication adherence. Results show the defining attributes of medication adherence as: (1) knowing and agreeing to the medication; (2) communicating and negotiating the regimen; and (3) active, continuous involvement in and appraisal of the treatment effect. Identified antecedents of medication adherence included the patient having: (1) a prescribed medication regimen; (2) cognitive and action abilities in her / his role as a patient; and (3) level of preparation for medication treatment. Identified consequences of medication adherence include: (1) improving symptom control; (2) decreasing re-hospitalizations and mortality; (3) reducing medical care costs; (4) restoring self-esteem; and (5) diminishing depression. It is hoped that this concept analysis provides a reference for nurses to achieve a better understanding of medication adherence and further improve nursing practice. PMID:24899565

  10. Bacterial adherence to extended wear soft contact lenses

    The authors studied the adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus to extended wear soft contact lenses (EWSCLs) with and without focal deposits using both a radiolabeling technique and electron microscopy. P. aeruginosa showed significant adherence to contact lenses in vitro. In contrast, S. aureus failed to show significant adherence to contact lenses in vitro (i.e., the radioactive uptake was not significantly above background). The extent of adherence of Pseudomonas was proportional to the number of focal deposits on the lenses. Results of electron microscopic examination showed the bacteria to be adherent primarily to large focal deposits (greater than or equal to 150 microns). There was no pseudomonal adherence to the small focal deposits (less than or equal to 50 microns) and little adherence to the areas in between the focal deposits. The authors hypothesize that worn lenses, especially those with large focal deposits, serve as a vehicle for the transport of P. aeruginosa to the cornea. This hypothesis could be a partial explanation for the high incidence of keratitis caused by P. aeruginosa in EWSCL patients

  11. A fully automated system for adherent cells microinjection.

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an automated robotic system to perform cell microinjections to relieve human operators from this highly difficult and tedious manual procedure. The system, which uses commercial equipment currently found on most biomanipulation laboratories, consists of a multitask software framework combining computer vision and robotic control elements. The vision part features an injection pipette tracker and an automatic cell targeting system that is responsible for defining injection points within the contours of adherent cells in culture. The main challenge is the use of bright-field microscopy only, without the need for chemical markers normally employed to highlight the cells. Here, cells are identified and segmented using a threshold-based image processing technique working on defocused images. Fast and precise microinjection pipette positioning over the automatically defined targets is performed by a two-stage robotic system which achieves an average injection rate of 7.6 cells/min with a pipette positioning precision of 0.23 μm. The consistency of these microinjections and the performance of the visual targeting framework were experimentally evaluated using two cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK) and over 500 cells. In these trials, the cells were automatically targeted and injected with a fluorescent marker, resulting in a correct cell detection rate of 87% and a successful marker delivery rate of 67.5%. These results demonstrate that the new system is capable of better performances than expert operators, highlighting its benefits and potential for large-scale application. PMID:24403406

  12. Spillover adherence effects of fixed-dose combination HIV therapy

    Kauf TL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Teresa L Kauf1, Keith L Davis2, Stephanie R Earnshaw2, E Anne Davis31Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Independent consultant, Pittsboro, NC, USAAbstract: The impact of fixed-dose combination (FDC products on adherence to other, non-fixed regimen components has not been examined. We compared adherence to a third antiretroviral (ART component among patients receiving a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI backbone consisting of the FDC Epzicom®, GlaxoSmithKline Inc, Research Triangle Park, NC (abacavir sulfate 600 mg + lamivudine 300 mg; FDC group versus NRTI combinations taken as two separate pills (NRTI Combo group using data from a national sample of 30 health plans covering approximately 38 million lives from 1997 to 2005. Adherence was measured as the medication possession ratio (MPR. Multivariate logistic regression compared treatment groups based on the likelihood of achieving ≥95% adherence, with sensitivity analyses using alternative thresholds. MPR was assessed as a continuous variable using multivariate linear regression. Covariates included age, gender, insurance payer type, year of study drug initiation, presence of mental health and substance abuse disorders, and third agent class. The study sample consisted of 650 FDC and 1947 NRTI Combo patients. Unadjusted mean adherence to the third agent was higher in the FDC group than the NRTI Combo group (0.92 vs 0.85; P < 0.0001. In regression analyses, FDC patients were 48% and 39% more likely to achieve 95% and 90% third agent adherence, respectively (P ≤ 0.03. None of the other MPR specifications achieved comparable results. Among managed care patients, use of an FDC appears to substantially improve adherence to a third regimen component and thus the likelihood of achieving the accepted standard for adherence to HIV therapy of 95%.Keywords

  13. Histamine-induced inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis in human neutrophils: involvement of the H2 receptor and cAMP

    Flamand, Nicolas; Plante, Hendrick; Picard, Serge; Laviolette, Michel; Borgeat, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Histamine is generally regarded as a pro-inflammatory mediator in diseases such as allergy and asthma. A growing number of studies, however, suggest that this autacoid is also involved in the downregulation of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) functions and inflammatory responses through activation of the Gs-coupled histamine H2 receptor.We report here that histamine inhibits thapsigargin- and ligand (PAF and fMLP)-induced leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis in human PMN in a dose-dependent m...

  14. Understanding factors related to women's adherence to colposcopy.

    Pritham, Ursula A; Brigdon, Ashley; Jones, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Early detection can prevent death from cervical cancer, but success is dependent on women with abnormal cytology attending follow-up procedures, including colposcopy. Factors that influence adherence to colposcopy include age, race, education, socioeconomic status, smoking, chemical dependence, intimate partner violence and anxiety. Comprehension of abnormal Pap smear results and knowledge of current treatment guidelines and follow-up is important in the prevention of cervical cancer. Understanding factors that could inhibit adherence to colposcopy will allow for tailored communication and individualized treatment to prevent colposcopy default. Implementation of colposcopy clinics with designated nurses to track and monitor adherence could help. PMID:25316540

  15. Adherence discourse among African-American women taking HAART

    A. Sankar; Luborsky, M.; Schuman, P.; Roberts, G.

    2002-01-01

    Low adherence is the single most important challenge to controlling HIV through the use of high acting anti-retrovirals (HAART). Non-adherence poses an immediate threat to individuals who develop resistant forms of the virus as well as a public health threat if those individuals pass on treatment-resistant forms of the virus. To understand the concerns and perceptions that promote or deter adherence to antiretroviral medication by HIV-positive African-American women, we conducted in-depth int...

  16. A Review of the Effects of Medication Delivery Systems on Treatment Adherence in Children with Asthma

    Cohn, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Background: A patient's adherence to an appropriate treatment regimen is necessary to minimize morbidity and mortality associated with childhood asthma. Many factors influence the success of treatment adherence.

  17. Microfabricated mobile microplates for handling single adherent cells

    This paper describes a method for manipulating adherent cells using microfabricated mobile microplates. This method allows us to change the positions of the cells without detaching them from the plates. A variable number of adherent cells ranging from one to a few cells were patterned on microplates (50–75 µm in diameter and 2 µm in thickness) that were fixed to a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sheet. The cell-patterned microplates were released by physical means without the use of chemicals and were manipulated using the flow of the surrounding liquid while the cells were alive. Using this technique, manual handling of two different types of adherent cells, NIH/3T3 and HepG2, was demonstrated in a culture dish. Key advantages of our cell-handling technique using mobile microplates include the ability to move adherent cells as if they were floating cells and to handle multiple numbers of different types of cells on a substrate

  18. Method of detaching adherent cells for flow cytometry

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2015-12-24

    In one aspect, a method for detaching adherent cells can include adding a cell lifting solution to the media including a sample of adherent cells and incubating the sample of adherent cells with the cell lifting solution. No scraping or pipetting is needed to facilitate cell detachment. The method do not require inactivation of cell lifting solution and no washing of detaching cells is required to remove cell lifting solution. Detached cells can be stained with dye in the presence of cell lifting solution and are further analyzed using flow cytometer. The method has been tested using 6 different cell lines, 4 different assays, two different plate formats (96 and 384 well plates) and two different flow cytometry instruments. The method is simple to perform, less time consuming, with no cell loss and makes high throughput flow cytometry on adherent cells a reality.

  19. Attrition and adherence in the online treatment of chronic insomnia.

    Hebert, Elizabeth A; Vincent, Norah; Lewycky, Samantha; Walsh, Kaitlyn

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the ability of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1985) and the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change (TTM; Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983) to explain adherence and attrition in an online treatment program for chronic insomnia. Responses to questionnaire measures of the TPB and TTM were used to predict adherence and dropout over the subsequent 5 weeks of treatment. Results showed that there was a 17% dropout rate and that perceived behavioral control, social support, and intention to complete the program were significantly associated with adherence to sleep hygiene homework. Attrition was predicted only by symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidity. Implications are that these models should be considered to maximize adherence. PMID:20582757

  20. Copper and nickel adherently electroplated on titanium alloy

    Brown, E. E.

    1967-01-01

    Anodic treatment of titanium alloy enables electroplating of tightly adherent coatings of copper and nickel on the alloy. The alloy is treated in a solution of hydrofluoric and acetic acids, followed by the electroplating process.

  1. Older Adults' Uptake and Adherence to Exercise Classes: Instructors' Perspectives.

    Hawley-Hague, Helen; Horne, Maria; Skelton, Dawn A; Todd, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Exercise classes provide a range of benefits for older adults, but adherence levels are poor. We know little of instructors' experiences of delivering exercise classes to older adults. Semistructured interviews, informed by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), were conducted with instructors (n = 19) delivering multicomponent exercise classes to establish their perspectives on older adults' uptake and adherence to exercise classes. Analysis revealed 'barriers' to uptake related to identity, choice/control, cost, and venue, and 'solutions' included providing choice/control, relating exercise to identity, a personal touch, and social support. Barriers to adherence included unrealistic expectations and social influences, and solutions identified were encouraging commitment, creating social cohesion, and an emphasis on achieving outcomes. Older adults' attitudes were an underlying theme, which related to all barriers and solutions. The instructor plays an important, but not isolated, role in older adults' uptake and adherence to classes. Instructors' perspectives help us to further understand how we can design successful exercise classes. PMID:26214265

  2. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  3. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    Pei, Qiuling, E-mail: 924969007@qq.com [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Ma, Ning [Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, 510-0293 (Japan); Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Mu, Jinjun [The Second Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Li, Yuanfei [The First Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China)

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  4. Epic Allies: Development of a Gaming App to Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Young HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Muessig, Kathryn Elizabeth; McNulty, Tobias; Soni, Karina; Knudtson, Kelly; Lemann, Alex; Nwoko, Nkechinyere; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2016-01-01

    Background In the United States, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disproportionately affects young men who have sex with men (YMSM). For HIV-positive individuals, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for achieving optimal health outcomes and reducing secondary transmission of HIV. However, YMSM often struggle with ART adherence. Novel mobile phone apps that incorporate game-based mechanics and social networking elements represent a promising intervention approach for improving ART adherence among YMSM. Objective This study used a multiphase, iterative development process to create an ART adherence app for YMSM. Methods The three-phase development process included: (1) theory-based concept development jointly by public health researchers and the technology team, (2) assessment of the target population’s ART adherence needs and app preferences and development and testing of a clickable app prototype, and (3) development and usability testing of the final app prototype. Results The initial theory-based app concept developed in Phase One included medication reminders, daily ART adherence tracking and visualization, ART educational modules, limited virtual interactions with other app users, and gamification elements. In Phase Two, adherence needs, including those related to information, motivation, and behavioral skills, were identified. Participants expressed preferences for an ART adherence app that was informational, interactive, social, and customizable. Based on the findings from Phase Two, additional gaming features were added in Phase Three, including an interactive battle, superhero app theme, and app storyline. Other features were modified to increase interactivity and customization options and integrate the game theme. During usability testing of the final prototype, participants were able to understand and navigate the app successfully and rated the app favorably. Conclusions An iterative development process was critical for the

  5. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    Shergill B

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bav Shergill,1 Simon Zokaie,2 Alison J Carr3 1Department of Dermatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, Elm Grove, Brighton, UK; 2Leo Pharma, Princes Risborough, 3Hamell, London, UK Background: There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK. Objectives: To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results: This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305 of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01: 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved

  6. Overactive bladder: strategies to ensure treatment compliance and adherence

    Dhaliwal P; Wagg A

    2016-01-01

    Prabhpreet Dhaliwal, Adrian Wagg Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Abstract: Overactive bladder is a common, debilitating condition for many patients who may benefit from pharmacological management of their condition. However, adherence to medication in this condition is markedly worse than other chronic medical conditions. This review explores what is known about persistence and the factors which influence medication adherence for overactive bladder, those fac...

  7. Adherence to antihypertensive therapy among heart transplant recipients

    Wasilewski, Grzegorz Jan; Milaniak, Irena; Janik, Łukasz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Przybyłowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to therapeutic recommendations, concerning in particular drug administration, diet and healthy life style, is essential to obtain optimal medical treatment effects. Elevated blood pressure is an extremely important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure and stroke, as well as chronic kidney disease. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the level of adherence among heart transplant recipients and to explain the re...

  8. Exploring self-management and adherence in haemophilia

    Schrijvers, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout life, a patient with severe haemophilia is confronted with many treatment-related challenges. Insight into self-management and non-adherence could improve the quality of care for these patients. The aim of this thesis was to provide an overview of a series of studies on self-management and adherence to prophylaxis in haemophilia. Based on series of studies, aspects of treatment were explored: learning and performing self-infusion, achieving self-management skills in adolescence, ad...

  9. Clinical Supervision in Treatment Transport: Effects on Adherence and Outcomes

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    This non-experimental study used Mixed-Effects Regression Models (MRMs) to examine relations among supervisor adherence to a clinical supervision protocol, therapist adherence, and changes in the behavior and functioning of youth with serious antisocial behavior treated with an empirically supported treatment (i.e., Multisystemic Therapy), one-year post treatment. Participants were 1979 youth and families treated by 429 clinicians across 45 provider organizations in North America. Four dimens...

  10. Adherence to treatment after coronary bypass surgery: Psychological aspects

    Maria V. Iakovleva

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a problem of great importance and striking magnitude. Its consequences are increased health care costs and poor health outcomes. It defined the objective of this research, which is the study of psychological characteristics of patients with different degrees of adherence to rehabilitation treatment after coronary bypass surgery. Ninety male and female patients with CHD, aged 46---71, were examined. The study was carried out using the questionnaire of wa...

  11. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad; Wissam Chatila; Matthew R. Lammi; Irene Swift; Gilbert E. D’Alonzo; Krachman, Samuel L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53 ± 11 yrs; body mass index (BMI) = 45 ± 9 ...

  12. The Relationship Between Exercise Motivation, Exercise Adherence and Mental Health

    Kahaerjiang Abula; Zhongkai He

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the relationship among college students` exercise motivation, exercise adherence and the level of their mental health. 217 undergraduate college students participated in this research. College Students` Mental Health Scale (CSMHS) and a scale created by authors were applied to investigate college students` mental health condition on six dimensions as well as exercise adherence, exercise motivation and exercise barriers .The results show that: (1) individu...

  13. Immunosuppressants and the renal transplant recipient: factors affecting adherence

    Cairns, Jasmin

    2012-01-01

    In renal transplantation, immunosuppressants are prescribed to patients to prevent graft loss. Although the extent of adherence required for such treatment to prevent graft loss has not been determined, it is thought to be high. Despite this, research suggests adherence rates for renal transplant recipients to be only between 50% and 95%. Considering the impact of graft loss on the renal patient, the national healthcare budget and on the limited resource of donor organs, it is important to id...

  14. Maintaining Adherence Programme: evaluation of an innovative service model

    Lewis, Llewellyn; O'Keeffe, Christine; Smyth, Ian; Mallalieu, Judi; Baldock, Laura; Oliver, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method The Maintaining Adherence Programme (MAP) is a new model of care for patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar affective disorder which aims to encourage adherence and prevent relapse. This evaluation, conducted by retrospective and prospective data collection (including patient questionnaires and staff interviews), aimed to describe MAP's impact on healthcare resource use, clinical measures and patient and staff satisfaction, following its implementati...

  15. Medical adherence to topical corticosteroid preparations prescribed for psoriasis

    Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Andersen, Flemming; Hansen, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Topical corticosteroids and corticosteroid combinations are the principal treatments in psoriasis. The aim of this study was to investigate published literature dealing with medical adherence to topical corticosteroid or corticosteroid combinations in patients with psoriasis. MATERIALS...... improve health outcome in topical treatment of psoriasis, further studies should be conducted addressing determinants of nonadherence and test interventions to improve adherence. Validated measurements of medical nonadherence, prescription registers, or medication-weight are needed....

  16. Family Social Status and Dietary Adherence of Patients with Phenylketonuria

    Latif Gachkar; Gelareh Asadzadeh-Totonchi; Mohammadreza Alaei; Shirin Farivar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:There are several problems associated to the management of patients with phenylketonuria (PKU). Social status could be one of the affecting factors on dietary adherence in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate family social status and dietary adherence of PKU patients in Iranian population. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we studied 105 Iranian PKU patients (born 1984 to 2010), treated and followed at Mofid Childrens Hospital, Tehran. Social status was defined b...

  17. Dietary Adherence During Weight Loss Predicts Weight Regain

    Corral, Pedro Del; Bryan, David R.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Gower, Barbara A.; Gary R. Hunter

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between previous dietary adherence during a low-calorie diet weight loss intervention and subsequent weight change during a 2-year follow-up for weight maintenance. One hundred and sixteen healthy, recently weight reduced (lost ~12 kg, BMI 22–25 kg/m2) premenopausal women were studied. Dietary adherence was assessed by doubly labeled water (DLW) and body composition change. Comparisons were made between the upper and lower tertiles for previous dietary adh...

  18. Social factors affecting ART adherence in rural settings in Zambia

    Nozaki, Ikuma; Dube, Christopher; Kakimoto, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Norio; Simpungwe, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the factors that influence ART adherence arising in rural settings in Zambia. A survey was conducted with face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire and written informed consent was obtained at ART sites in Mumbwa District in rural Zambia. The questionnaire included items such as the socio-demographic characteristics of respondents, support for adherence, ways to remember when to take ARVs at scheduled times, and the current status of...

  19. Medication adherence: the critical step towards better patient outcome

    Anish Desai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence is defined as patient's adherence to take their medications as prescribed and continue to take the prescribed medication for stipulated time frame. Medication non-adherence is a growing concern to physicians, healthcare systems, and other stakeholders (e.g., payers and there is an increasing evidence of its prevalence and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes eventually resulting into higher costs of care. The cost of non-adherence has been estimated at $100 billion to $300 billion annually, including costs from avoidable hospitalizations, nursing home admissions, and premature deaths. Improving adherence to medication is critical to improve the quality of health care, to encourage better chronic care management, and promote better health outcomes. Reasons for non-adherence are multiple and complex. Studies have reported that poor adherence to drug dosage is due to patient perception that the disease is non-significant, adverse drug effects, lack of treatment effectiveness, and the patient's poor or incomplete knowledge of the disease and (cost. A multifactorial approach is required to tackle this complex problem as a single approach will be ineffective for all patients. The most effective intervention is to use a combination of approaches and address literacy, behavior, and organizational issues. There are challenges as well as opportunities in addressing the public health issue of medication adherence. Changing healthcare reforms, advances in digital health media, social media and modern technologies can now provide alternatives to tackle this issue. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 748-754

  20. Treatment non-adherence in pseudo-refractory epilepsy.

    Brodtkorb, Eylert; Samsonsen, Christian; Sund, Janne Kutschera; Bråthen, Geir; Helde, Grethe; Reimers, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Non-adherence to antiepileptic drug treatment strongly affects the outcome of epilepsy and is frequently clinically unrecognized. This review addresses current knowledge on medication-taking behavior in people with epilepsy, as well as the importance of tailoring interventions to the individual patterns of non-adherence. Non-adherence can be categorized as non-initiation, poor execution (accidental or intentional) or non-persistence and are related to clinical characteristics and health care barriers. All available methods to assess adherence are hampered by shortcomings. Self-reports are indirect and subjective. Pill-counts, electronic bottle-tops and pharmacy records are objective, but indirect measures of drug ingestion. Therapeutic drug monitoring is both direct and objective, but pharmacokinetic and diurnal variability must be taken into account. Young adults with generalized epilepsy may be particularly vulnerable to non-adherence. The drug burden in the form of polytherapy, multiple dosing and side effects are obvious obstacles. Poor understanding of the principles of prophylactic treatment as well as drug costs may be important in people with low socioeconomic status. Depression is also associated with low adherence. In people with multihandicaps, failed oral intake may be due to behavioral or physical problems, as well as insufficient education of the caregivers. Non-adherence often results in seizure breakthrough and hospital admissions, but the consequences may be more dramatic. It is the leading cause of status epilepticus in people with epilepsy, and the association with sudden death (SUDEP) is clear. The management of poor drug-taking behavior should be based on the identification of the specific causes in each individual and corresponding multiprofessional interventions. Non-adherence to antiepileptic drugs needs more clinical and scientific attention. PMID:26897547

  1. Patient adherence to aromatase inhibitor treatment in the adjuvant setting

    Verma, S.; Madarnas, Y.; Sehdev, S.; Martin, G; Bajcar, J.

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in adjuvant systemic therapy and detection of early disease have resulted in a decline of breast cancer death rates across all patient age groups in Canada. Non-adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy in the setting of early breast cancer may significantly affect patient outcome. Factors associated with medication adherence are complex and may be patient-related, therapy-related, and health care provider–related. To date, there is a gap in the literature concerning a comprehensive...

  2. relA Enhances the Adherence of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Beny Spira; Gerson Moura Ferreira; Luiz Gustavo de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a known causative agent of diarrhea in children. In the process of colonization of the small intestine, EPEC synthesizes two types of adhesins, the bundle-forming pilus (BFP) and intimin. The BFP pilus is an adhesin associated with the initial stages of adherence of EPEC to epithelial cells, while the outer membrane protein intimin carries out the intimate adherence that takes place at the third stage of infection. BFP is encoded by the bfp operon l...

  3. Adherence to Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Copp, Hillary L.; Esequiel Rodriguez; Weiss, Dana A.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) affects approximately 1% of children and may predispose a child with a bladder infection to develop pyelonephritis and renal scarring. To prevent these potential sequelae, one accepted treatment option for VUR includes low-dose continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) to maintain urine sterility until the condition resolves. Despite the widespread use of CAP, little data exists regarding adherence to long-term antibiotic therapy. Not only will poor adherence to CAP ...

  4. Characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimen and treatment adherence

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimens and treatment adherence was studied in adolescent and adult patients who underwent antiretroviral therapy from January 1998 to September 2000, at the Service for Specialized Assistance in Pelotas. The patients were interviewed on two occasions, and the use of antiretrovirals during the previous 48 hours was investigated by a self-report. Adherence was defined as use of 95% or more of the prescribed medication. Social-demo...

  5. Allopurinol use in a New Zealand population: prevalence and adherence.

    Horsburgh, Simon; Norris, Pauline; Becket, Gordon; Arroll, Bruce; Crampton, Peter; Cumming, Jacqueline; Keown, Shirley; Herbison, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Allopurinol is effective for the control of gout and its long-term complications when taken consistently. There is evidence that adherence to allopurinol therapy varies across population groups. This may exacerbate differences in the burden of gout on population groups and needs to be accurately assessed. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of allopurinol use in a region of New Zealand using community pharmacy dispensing data and to examine the levels of suboptimal adherence in various population groups. Data from all community pharmacy dispensing databases in a New Zealand region were collected for a year covering 2005/2006 giving a near complete picture of dispensings to area residents. Prevalence of allopurinol use in the region by age, sex, ethnicity and socioeconomic position was calculated. Adherence was assessed using the medication possession ratio (MPR), with a MPR of 0.80 indicative of suboptimal adherence. Multiple logistic regression was used to explore variations in suboptimal adherence across population groups. A total of 953 people received allopurinol in the study year (prevalence 3%). Prevalence was higher in males (6%) than in females (1%) and Māori (5%) than non-Māori (3%). The overall MPR during the study was 0.88, with 161 (22%) of patients using allopurinol having suboptimal adherence. Non-Māori were 54% less likely to have suboptimal allopurinol adherence compared to Māori (95% CI 0.30-0.72, p = 0.001). These findings are consistent with those from other studies nationally and internationally and point to the important role for health professionals in improving patient adherence to an effective gout treatment. PMID:24390636

  6. Apoptosis induced by a human milk protein.

    Håkansson, A; Zhivotovsky, B; Orrenius, S; Sabharwal, H; Svanborg, C

    1995-01-01

    To the breast-fed infant, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of molecules that restrict microbes, such as antibodies, bactericidins, and inhibitors of bacterial adherence. However, it has rarely been considered that human milk may also contain substances bioactive toward host cells. While investigating the effect of human milk on bacterial adherence to a human lung cancer cell line, we were surprised to discover that the milk killed the cells. Analysis of...

  7. Modulation of Human Neutrophil Functions In Vitro by Treponema denticola Major Outer Sheath Protein

    Puthengady Thomas, Bina; Sun, Chun Xiang; Bajenova, Elena; Ellen, Richard P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this study of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), pretreatment with Treponema denticola major outer sheath protein (Msp) inhibited formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced chemotaxis, phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G-coated microspheres, fMLP-stimulated calcium transients, and actin assembly. Msp neither altered oxidative responses to phorbol myristate or fMLP nor induced apoptosis. Msp selectively impairs chemotaxis and phagocytosis by impacting the PMN cytoskeleton.

  8. Medication Days Supply, Adherence, Wastage, and Cost

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In an attempt to contain Medicaid pharmacy costs, nearly all states impose dispensing limits on medication days supply. Although longer days supply appears to...

  9. In vitro adherence of bacteria to prosthetic grafting materials

    Adherence of bacteria to prosthetic grafting material is thought to play an important role in the ultimate development of prosthetic infections. To evaluate the role of bacterial adherence in the initiation and colonization of prosthetic materials, Proplast II, Gore-Tex, and silicone were evaluated for adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Bacteria were radiolabeled and incubated with the study material. Adherence was determined by scintillation. Adherence to Proplast II and Gore-Tex reached a maximum at approximately 45 minutes of incubation and demonstrated a detachment phenomenon with E. coli. Similar results were noted with S. aureus, but with a maximal attachment at approximately 30 minutes. Interestingly, bacterial attachment to silicone continued to increase throughout the time of the incubation. In addition, adherence of S. aureus was at a faster rate than E. coli. Attachment of bacteria is a multifactorial process. However, the PTFE graft demonstrates a slower rate of attachment, lower total number of attached bacteria, and faster detachment. The importance of this phenomenon may help explain the foreign body effect of increased susceptibility to infection of foreign materials

  10. Procoagulant activity on platelets adhered to collagen or plasma clot.

    Ilveskero, S; Siljander, P; Lassila, R

    2001-04-01

    In a new 2-stage assay of platelet procoagulant activity (PCA), we first subjected gel-filtered platelets to adhesion on collagen (as a model of primary hemostasis) or plasma clots (as a model of preformed thrombus) for 30 minutes, and then the adherent platelets were supplemented with pooled, reptilase-treated, diluted plasma. Defibrinated plasma provided coagulation factors for assembly on platelet membranes without uncontrolled binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen). Platelet adhesion to both surfaces showed modest individual variation, which increased at platelet densities that allowed aggregation. However, adhesion-induced PCA varied individually and surface-independently >3-fold, suggesting a uniform platelet procoagulant mechanism. Permanently adhered platelets showed markedly enhanced PCA when compared with the platelet pool in suspension, even after strong activation. The rate of thrombin generation induced by clot-adherent platelets was markedly faster than on collagen-adherent platelets during the initial phase of coagulation, whereas collagen-induced PCA proceeded slowly, strongly promoted by tissue thromboplastin. Therefore at 10 minutes, after adjustment for adhered platelets, collagen supported soluble thrombin formation as much as 5 times that of the thrombin-retaining clots. Activation of platelets by their firm adhesion was accompanied by formation of microparticles, representing about one third of the total soluble PCA. Collagen-adhered platelets provide soluble thrombin and microparticles, whereas the preformed clot serves to localize and accelerate hemostasis at the injury site, with the contribution of retained thrombin and microparticles. PMID:11304482

  11. The functions of the variable lipoprotein family of Mycoplasma hyorhinis in adherence to host cells.

    Xiong, Qiyan; Wang, Jia; Ji, Yan; Ni, Bo; Zhang, Bixiong; Ma, Qinghong; Wei, Yanna; Xiao, Shaobo; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Shao, Guoqing

    2016-04-15

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) is a swine pathogen that is associated with various human cancers and contamination in cell cultures. However, no studies on the adhesion molecules of this pathogen have yet been reported. The variable lipoprotein (Vlp) family is an important surface component of M. hyorhinis. Herein, we performed several experiments to identify the function of the Vlp family in adherence to host cells. Seven recombinant Vlp (rVlp) proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The potential role of rVlp adherence to pig kidney (PK-15) and swine tracheal epithelial (STEC) cells was then studied by indirect immunofluorescence assay and microtiter plate adherence assay. Adhesion of M. hyorhinis to PK-15 and STEC cells was specifically inhibited by the addition of a cocktail of rVlp proteins. The rVlp protein mixture was shown to bind to both PK-15 and STEC cells. The binding increased in a dose-dependent manner and could be blocked by antisera against the rVlp proteins. Most of the rVlp proteins could bind individually to both PK-15 and STEC cells except for rVlpD and rVlpF, which bound only to STEC cells. Because Vlp members vary in size among different strains and generations, they may vary in their cytoadhesion capabilities in various strains. In summary, the present results indicate that the Vlp family functions as adhesins of M. hyorhinis. PMID:27016761

  12. Age, Stigma, Adherence and Clinical Indicators in HIV-Infected Women

    McCoy, Katryna; Higgins, Melinda; Zuñiga, Julie Ann; Holstad, Marcia McDonnell

    2016-01-01

    Stigma has become a gendered phenomenon that affects increasing numbers of HIV-infected women worldwide. This study examined the role of age as a possible moderator of the relationship between stigma and antiretroviral therapy adherence, CD4% and viral load among 120 HIV-infected women. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the Keeping Healthy and Active with Risk Reduction and Medication Adherence (KHARMA) Project, an National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded randomized controlled trial to improve Antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence and reduce risky behaviors in HIV-infected women at five clinical sites in a South-eastern city from 2005 to 2008. Stigma was measured using the Perceived Personal Stigma of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) scale. Among participants 50 years old, age was not significantly associated with viral load, stigma or CD4%, and there was no significant association between stigma and CD4% (r=.07, p=.70). These findings indicate the need for further study regarding this potential moderating effect and possible interventions to address the susceptibility of younger women to the harmful effects of stigma.

  13. The expression of nonagglutinating fimbriae and its role in Proteus mirabilis adherence to epithelial cells.

    Tolson, D L; Harrison, B A; Latta, R K; Lee, K K; Altman, E

    1997-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common causative agent of human urinary tract infections, especially in catheterized patients and in those patients with structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. In addition to the production of hemolysin and urease, fimbriae-mediated adherence to uroepithelial cells and kidney epithelium may be essential for virulence of P. mirabilis. A single P. mirabilis strain is capable of expressing several morphologically distinct fimbrial species, which can each be favoured by specific in vitro growth conditions. The fimbrial species reported to date include mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbriae, ambient temperature fimbriae, P. mirabilis fimbriae, and nonagglutinating fimbriae (NAF). Here, using intact bacteria or purified NAF as immunogens, we have generated the first reported NAF-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Bacteria expressing NAF as their only fimbrial species adhered strongly to a number of cell lines in vitro, including uroepithelial cell lines. Binding of P. mirabilis was markedly reduced following preincubation with NAF-specific mAbs and Fab fragments. The presence of NAF with highly conserved N-terminal sequences on all P. mirabilis strains so far examined, combined with the ability of both anti-NAF mAbs and purified NAF molecules to inhibit P. mirabilis adherence in vitro, suggests that NAF may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. mirabilis. PMID:9304781

  14. Prevention is better than cure – the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment

    Leith Kwaan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The much-used phrase ‘prevention is better than cure’ is applicable to many circumstances, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. In recent years suggestions have been made for a move towards treatment strategies that emphasise prevention of foreseeable adherence problems on a patient-by-patient basis, through focused patient preparation before commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART. This is well elucidated in a statement made in 2004 by Coetzee et al.:1 ‘As it is difficult to ascertain robust predictors of adherence, there has been a move to concentrate on patient preparation before the initiation of ART rather than the use of non-clinical predictors of adherence or selection criteria. A paradigm focused on preparation rather than selection is better suited to the aggressive targets for the scaling up of ART in countries with large epidemics (such as in South Africa, where the view of ART as a very expensive rationed intervention is rapidly changing.’

  15. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis.

  16. Anaerobic induction of adherence to laminin in Lactobacillus gasseri strains by contact with solid surface.

    Horie, Masanori; Murakami, Takatomo; Sato, Takumi; Tarusawa, Yukiko; Nakamura, Shingo; Toba, Takahiro

    2005-10-01

    The effect of growth conditions on adhesion was studied in six species belonging to Lactobacillus acidophilus homology groups. Namely, 17 strains including 6 fresh isolates of L. gasseri from human feces were assessed for their adherence to immobilized fibronectin, laminin, and type IV collagen. These extracellular matrix proteins were used as a model of damaged intestinal mucosa. When the bacteria were grown on MRS agar under anaerobic conditions, all eight L. gasseri strains and one L. johnsonii strain showed strong adhesiveness to laminin, but not when grown in static MRS broth. A similar pattern was observed in four L. gasseri strains in terms of adherence to fibronectin. No L. gasseri or L. johnsonii strains exhibited adhesion to type IV collagen under either growth condition. Adhesion of L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, and L. gallinarum was not affected by the growth conditions. Although protease treatment of L. gasseri cells abolished the adhesion, periodate oxidation of the cells increased it except in one strain. The adherence of L. gasseri cells was diminished by periodate and alpha-mannosidase treatments of immobilized laminin. The above results suggest that mannose-specific proteinaceous adhesion can be induced in L. gasseri by contact with a mucosal surface in the anaerobic intestinal lumen. PMID:16086101

  17. Associations between patients' adherence and GPs' attitudes towards risk, statin therapy and management of non-adherence

    Barfoed, Benedicte L; Paulsen, Maja S; Christensen, Palle M;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that doctors' personal lifestyle, risk taking personality and beliefs about risk reducing therapies may affect their clinical decision-making. Whether such factors are further associated with patients' adherence with medication is largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: T...

  18. Inactivation of the rhlA gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa prevents rhamnolipid production, disabling the protection against polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    Many of the virulence factors produced by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are quorum-sensing (QS) regulated. Among these are rhamnolipids, which have been shown to cause lysis of several cellular components of the human immune system, e.g. monocyte-derived macrophages and...... biofilms to PMNs. In the present study, we demonstrate the importance of the production of rhamnolipids in the establishment and persistence of P. aeruginosa infections, using an in vitro biofilm system, an intraperitoneal foreign-body model and a pulmonary model of P. aeruginosa infections in mice. Our...

  19. Self-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ population from Bata, Equatorial Guinea.

    Salmanton-García, Jon; Herrador, Zaida; Ruiz-Seco, Pilar; Nzang-Esono, Jesús; Bendomo, Veronica; Bashmakovic, Emma; Nseng-Nchama, Gloria; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) represent a serious public health problem in Equatorial Guinea, with a prevalence of 6.2% among adults. the high-activity antiretroviral treatment (HAART) coverage data is 10 points below the overall estimate for Sub-Saharan Africa, and only 61% patients continue with HAART 12 months after it started. This study aims to assess HAART adherence and related factors in Litoral Province of Equatorial Guinea. In this cross-sectional study, socio-demographic and clinical data were collected at Regional Hospital of Bata, during June-July 2014. Adherence to treatment was assessed by using the Spanish version of CEAT-VIH. Bivariate and linear regression analyses were employed to assess HAART adherence-related factors. We interviewed 50 men (35.5%) and 91 women (64.5%), with a mean age of 47.7 ± 8.9 and 36.2 ± 11.2, respectively (p VIH score varied by ethnic group (p = .005). There was a positive correlation between CEAT-VIH score and current CD4 T-cells count (p = .013). The Cronbach's α value was 0.52. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess HAART adherence in Equatorial Guinea. Internal reliability for CEAT-VIH was low, nonetheless the positive correlation between the CEAT-VIH score and the immunological status of patients add value to our findings. Our results serve as baseline for future research and will also assist stakeholders in planning and undertaking contextual and evidence-based policy initiatives. PMID:26698540

  20. A Systematic Review of CPAP Adherence Across Age Groups: Clinical and Empiric Insights for Developing CPAP Adherence Interventions

    Sawyer, A.M.; Gooneratne, N.; Marcus, C.L.; Ofer, D.; Richards, K.C.; Weaver, T E

    2011-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a highly efficacious treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) but adherence to the treatment limits its overall effectiveness across all age groups of patients. Factors that influence adherence to CPAP include disease and patient characteristics, treatment titration procedures, technological device factors and side effects, and psychological and social factors. These influential factors have guided the development of interventions to promote CP...

  1. Evaluating adherence to ocular hypotensives using the Travatan dosing aid

    O'Dell L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leslie O'Dell1, Amy L Hennessy2,3, Alan L Robin2–41May Eye Care Center, Hanover, PA, USA; 2Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Glaucoma Specialists, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAPurpose: The Travatan™ Dosing Aid (TDA is the first commercially available device designed to aid in patients' adherence to their glaucoma therapies and to record patients' eyedrop administration, so that doctors can better assess adherence. No prior studies have objectively evaluated adherence to glaucoma medications and its relationship to the severity of glaucoma or the use of multiple systemic medications.Methods: We enrolled 100 consecutive subjects from a private glaucoma practice, all currently using topical travoprost 0.004%. Each subject was issued a TDA to record the time and date of each drop instilled. Informed consents were signed and the subjects were aware that their medication use was being monitored. Patients returned for follow-up 30–60 days after their initial exam.Results: 89 subjects completed the study: 44 were male, with a mean age of 67 years, and 69.7% were Caucasian. Overall, patient adherence was 74.8% (range 22%–100% improving to 85.4% on the day prior to follow-up. The mean number of missed doses per month was 6.24 ± 5.9. Only 7.9% of the study population never missed a dose and 23.6% ± 4.3% missed more than ten drops per month. No marked association was observed between the severity of glaucoma, race, or the number of systemic medications and adherence. A marked improvement in adherence was noted in patients using travoprost 0.004% as monocular therapy rather than binocular therapy, 84.0% ± 17.1% vs 67.4% ± 23.5% (P < 0.005.Conclusion: Patient adherence to glaucoma medical therapy is a major barrier in the management and treatment of glaucoma patients given the chronic nature and asymptomatic course of the disease. Until recently

  2. Mannose binding lectin plays a crucial role in innate immunity against yeast by enhanced complement activation and enhanced uptake of polymorphonuclear cells

    Herpers Bjorn L

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose binding lectin (MBL is an important host defence protein against opportunistic fungal pathogens. This carbohydrate-binding protein, an opsonin and lectin pathway activator, binds through multiple lectin domains to the repeating sugar arrays displayed on the surface of a wide range of clinically relevant microbial species. We investigated the contribution of MBL to antifungal innate immunity towards C. parapsilosis in vitro. Results High avidity binding was observed between MBL and C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. Addition of MBL to MBL deficient serum increased the deposition of C4 and C3b and enhanced the uptake of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and acapsular C. neoformans by polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs. Compared to other microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Cryptococcus neoformans, C. parapsilosis and Candida albicans were potent activators of the lectin pathway. Conclusion Our results suggest that MBL plays a crucial role in the innate immunity against infections caused by yeast by increasing uptake by PMN.

  3. Detection of effect cytotoxic of the alpha hemolysin of E. Coli (HLY A) in leukocytes polymorphonuclear neutrophils by means of cytometry of flow

    Cell viability of Hly A exposed polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) was assessed by propidium uptake, measured by flow cytometry. Hemolytic supernatant, but not the non hemolytic controls, caused a dose-dependent fluorescence signal in PMN. Cells exposed to low hemolytic activities (bellow 0.5 HU50/ml) did not fluoresce, although cell size, estimate by Forward Scatter (FSC), increased slightly, and returned to normal within 30-60 minutes suggesting both membrane damage in absence of propodium uptake and term cell recovery from the effects of Hly A. The fluorescent signal from permeated PMN decrease 15 minutes after exposure to Hly a, a decrease which was prevented by chelation ok extracellular Ca+2 with EGTA. Whereas Ca+2 entry into the cell is responsible for triggering mechanisms leading to loss of fluorescence, low or chelated extracelular Ca+2 facilitate propidium uptake, but the fluorescent signal does not decrease only when both intracellular and extracellular Ca+2 are chelated. The findings of this study, together whit data from other authors, are taken as basis to formulate a hypothetical sequence of events to explain the cytometric data obtained from Hly A exposed PMN, including the significance of increases in cell size without propidium uptake. (Author)

  4. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are increased and exert immunosuppressive activity together with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell population, including myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, able to inhibit T cells activity. We identified a significantly expanded MDSCs population in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis that decreased to normal levels after imatinib therapy. In addition, expression of arginase 1 (Arg1 that depletes microenvironment of arginine, an essential aminoacid for T cell function, resulted in an increase in patients at diagnosis. Purified CML CD11b+CD33+CD14-HLADR- cells markedly suppressed normal donor T cell proliferation in vitro. Comparing CML Gr-MDSCs to autologous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs we observed a higher Arg1 expression and activity in PMNs, together with an inhibitory effect on T cells in vitro. Our data indicate that CML cells create an immuno-tolerant environment associated to MDSCs expansion with immunosuppressive capacity mediated by Arg1. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time also an immunosuppressive activity of CML PMNs, suggesting a strong potential immune escape mechanism created by CML cells, which control the anti-tumor reactive T cells. MDSCs should be monitored in imatinib discontinuation trials to understand their importance in relapsing patients.

  5. Accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in reperfused ischemic canine myocardium: relation with tissue viability assessed by fluorine-18-2-deoxyglucose uptake

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes may participate in reperfusion injury. Whether leukocytes affect viable or only irreversibly injured tissue is not known. Therefore, we assessed the accumulation of 111In-labeled leukocytes in tissue samples characterized as either ischemic but viable or necrotic by metabolic, histochemical, and ultrastructural criteria. Six open-chest dogs received left anterior descending coronary occlusion for 2 hr followed by 4 hr reperfusion. Myocardial blood flow was determined by microspheres and autologous 111In-labeled leukocytes were injected intravenously. Fluorine-18-2-deoxyglucose, a tracer of exogenous glucose utilization, was injected 3 hr after reperfusion. The dogs were killed 4 hr after reperfusion. The risk and the necrotic regions were assessed following in vivo dye injection and postmortem tetrazolium staining. Myocardial samples were obtained in the ischemic but viable, necrotic and normal zones, and counted for 111In and 18F activity. Compared to normal, leukocytes were entrapped in necrotic regions (111In activity: 207 +/- 73%) where glucose uptake was decreased (26 +/- 15%). A persistent glucose uptake, marker of viability, was mainly seen in risk region (135 +/- 85%) where leukocytes accumulation was moderate in comparison to normal zone (146 +/- 44%). Thus, the glucose uptake observed in viable tissue is mainly related to myocytes metabolism and not to leukocytes metabolism

  6. Relationship between polymorphonuclear leukocyte count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bacterial content in Gram's stain and bacterial content in final microbiological report.

    Cavrić, Gordana; Mihalić, Slavica Naumovski; Tesanović, Sanda Janković; Dvorsćak, Matea Bogdanović; Erceg, Gorjana; Krkusek, Marijana Rehorić; Bartolek, Dubravka; Jurić, Klara; Nassabain, Khaled; Budimir, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    Eighty samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were obtained from the total of 48 patients (22 females and 26 males) and analyzed. Eighteen of those patients were organ transplant recipients. The relationship between polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) count in direct sample and semi quantitative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial content were analyzed in BALF samples. PMN count in direct sample and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial content of the final microbiological report was compared as well. On the total number of samples PMN count in direct samples of BALF was statistically significant regarding the presence of Gram-positive bacteria in the same sample; it was nearly significant regarding the presence of Gram-negative bacteria; and it was statistically significant for the total bacterial content. If BALF samples are divided into those obtained from organ-transplant and those obtained from non-organ-transplant patients, positive, statistically significant relationship is found in the organ-transplant group, more specifically for the relationship between PMNs and total bacterial content. When PMN count in direct microbiological sample was compared with the results of the final microbiological report, statistically significant relationship was found neither with respect to all BALF samples, nor after dividing them into "organ-transplant" and "non-organ-transplant" group. We did not find differences caused by gender. PMID:20437633

  7. ART adherence changes among patients in community substance use treatment: a preliminary analysis from MACH14

    Rosen, Marc I.; Black, Anne C.; ARNSTEN, JULIA H.; Simoni, Jane M; Wagner, Glann J; Goggin, Kathleen; Remien, Robert H.; Golin, Carol E.; Wang, Yan; Bangsberg, David; Liu, Honghu H.; ,

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Opiate substitution treatment has been associated with better adherence to lifesaving antiretroviral medications, but the impact of other substance abuse treatment on adherence is unknown. Findings In this study, 215 patients who had been in adherence-focused research studies provided electronically-measured adherence data and a measure of whether the patient had recently ...

  8. Adherence to immunosuppression in adult lung transplant recipients : Prevalence and risk factors

    Bosma, Otto H.; Vermeulen, Karin M.; Verschuuren, Erik A.; Erasmus, Michiel E.; van der Bij, Wim

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adherence to medication is a favourable with regard to survival after kidney, heart and liver transplantation. Little is known about adherence to medication in lung transplant recipients. To determine the prevalence of adherence and identify risk factors of non-adherence (NA) we evaluate

  9. Interaction of the legionnaires' disease bacterium (legionella pneumophila) with human phagocytes. I. L. pneumophila resists killing by polymorphonuclearleukocytes, antibody, and complement

    Horwitz, MA; Silverstein, SC

    1981-01-01

    We have previously reported that virulent egg yolk-grown Legionella pneumophila, Philadelphia 1 strain, multiplies intracellularly in human blood monocytes. We now report on the interaction between virulent L. pneumophila and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), antibody, and complement, in vitro, under antibiotic-free conditions. L. pneumophila in concentrations ranging from 10(3) to 10(6) colony forming units (CFU)/ml are completely resistant to the bactericidal effects of 0-50 percent...

  10. Factors affecting insulin adherence to type I glass bottles

    Some physicochemical factors that could account for insulin adherence to type I glass bottles from admixtures of insulin with 5% dextrose (D5W) and 0.9% sodium chloride (NS) injections were studied. Samples of three volumes of NS or D5W containing insulin 125I were mixed in three sizes of bottles to test the effect of surface area and volume. Appropriate volumes of insulin were combined with insulin 125I and D5W or NS to yield solutions containing nine concentrations of insulin to test the effect of insulin concentration. Appropriate volumes of KCl injection to yield six concentrations were combined with insulin 125I and NS or D5W to test the effect of KCl concentration. All samples were assayed by gamma scintillation. In general, there was a direct relationship between the percentage of insulin adhering and the container surface area. In D5W admixtures, as the fill volume at constant insulin 125I concentration was doubled and quadrupled, the adherence of insulin decreased in all three bottle sizes (200, 250, and 500 ml). In NS admixtures, however, this effect was seen only with the 250-ml bottle. Increasing insulin concentrations over the range of 50-300 units/liter in D5W and 0-50 units/liter in NS resulted in decreased adherence. The addition of 1-60 meq/liter of KCl resulted in a significant decrease of insulin adhering from D5W and an insignificant decrease from NS admixtures. The percentage of insulin adhering to type I glass surfaces may be reduced to 25% or less by preparing i.v. admixtures in full bottles of D5W or NS at insulin concentrations of 25 to 300 units/liter. The addition of KCl, when therapeutically appropriate, will further decrease the extent of insulin adherence

  11. Adherence of older women with strength training and aerobic exercise

    Picorelli AMA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alexandra Miranda Assumpção Picorelli, Daniele Sirineu Pereira, Diogo Carvalho Felício, Daniela Maria Dos Anjos, Danielle Aparecida Gomes Pereira, Rosângela Corrêa Dias, Marcella Guimarães Assis, Leani Souza Máximo Pereira Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Physical Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil Background: Participation of older people in a program of regular exercise is an effective strategy to minimize the physical decline associated with age. The purpose of this study was to assess adherence rates in older women enrolled in two different exercise programs (one aerobic exercise and one strength training and identify any associated clinical or functional factors. Methods: This was an exploratory observational study in a sample of 231 elderly women of mean age 70.5 years. We used a structured questionnaire with standardized tests to evaluate the relevant clinical and functional measures. A specific adherence questionnaire was developed by the researchers to determine motivators and barriers to exercise adherence. Results: The adherence rate was 49.70% in the aerobic exercise group and 56.20% in the strength training group. Multiple logistic regression models for motivation were significant (P=0.003 for the muscle strengthening group (R2=0.310 and also significant (P=0.008 for the aerobic exercise group (R2=0.154. A third regression model for barriers to exercise was significant (P=0.003 only for the muscle strengthening group (R2=0.236. The present study shows no direct relationship between worsening health status and poor adherence. Conclusion: Factors related to adherence with exercise in the elderly are multifactorial. Keywords: older women, adherence, therapeutic exercises

  12. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  13. Dual role for pilus in adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Yoan Konto-Ghiorghi; Emilie Mairey; Adeline Mallet; Guillaume Duménil; Elise Caliot; Patrick Trieu-Cuot; Shaynoor Dramsi

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a common human commensal and a major life-threatening pathogen in neonates. Adherence to host epithelial cells is the first critical step of the infectious process. Pili have been observed on the surface of several gram-positive bacteria including S. agalactiae. We previously characterized the pilus-encoding operon gbs1479-1474 in strain NEM316. This pilus is composed of three structural subunit proteins: Gbs1478 (PilA), Gbs1477 (PilB), and Gbs1474 (PilC), and its ...

  14. Aggregative adherent strains of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum enter and survive within HEp-2 epithelial cells

    Monica Cristina de Souza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum is a well-known human pathogen that mainly causes respiratory disease and is associated with high mortality in compromised hosts. Little is known about the virulence factors and pathogenesis of C. pseudodiphtheriticum. In this study, cultured human epithelial (HEp-2 cells were used to analyse the adherence pattern, internalisation and intracellular survival of the ATCC 10700 type strain and two additional clinical isolates. These microorganisms exhibited an aggregative adherence-like pattern to HEp-2 cells characterised by clumps of bacteria with a "stacked-brick" appearance. The differences in the ability of these microorganisms to invade and survive within HEp-2 cells and replicate in the extracellular environment up to 24 h post infection were evaluated. The fluorescent actin staining test demonstrated that actin polymerisation is involved in the internalisation of the C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains. The depolymerisation of microfilaments by cytochalasin E significantly reduced the internalisation of C. pseudodiphtheriticum by HEp-2 cells. Bacterial internalisation and cytoskeletal rearrangement seemed to be partially triggered by the activation of tyrosine kinase activity. Although C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains did not demonstrate an ability to replicate intracellularly, HEp-2 cells were unable to fully clear the pathogen within 24 h. These characteristics may explain how some C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains cause severe infection in human patients.

  15. Adherence of Salmonella typhimurium to small-intestinal enterocytes of the rat.

    Lindquist, B L; Lebenthal, E; Lee, P C; Stinson, M. W.; Merrick, J M

    1987-01-01

    The adherence of radiolabeled Salmonella typhimurium to freshly isolated enterocytes of rats was studied. The results established that type 1 fimbriated strains adhered in significantly higher numbers than did related nonfimbriated strains. Adherence was inhibited by D-mannose and methyl alpha-D-mannoside. Results of kinetic studies indicated that adherence was biphasic; the number of bacteria that adhered per enterocyte remained constant for approximately 20 min and then increased rapidly un...

  16. Association of knowledge on ART line of treatment, scarcity of treatment options and adherence

    Ramadhani, Habib O.; Muiruri, Charles; Maro, Venance P.; Omondi, Michael; Mushi, Julian B.; Lirhunde, Eileen S.; Bartlett, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) is critical piece in the management of HIV infected patients. Despite the benefits of ART, non-adherence to ART persists. This study explores association between patient’s knowledge of the ART line of treatment, availability of future treatment options and adherence. Methods A cross sectional survey of HIV infected adolescent and adults was conducted. Cumulative optimal and sub-optimal adherence was defined as percentage adherence of ≥ 95 %...

  17. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Awachana Jiamsakul

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods: As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI (0.55 to 0.90, p=0.006, compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00, p=0.004 and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71, p<0.001. Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67, p=0.001 compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001. Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions: We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  18. Approaches to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia

    Shuler KM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly M Shuler Shuler Counseling and Consulting, Fayetteville, AR, USA Purpose: In patients with schizophrenia, nonadherence to prescribed medications increases the risk of patient relapse and hospitalization, key contributors to the costs associated with treatment. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the impact of nonadherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia as it relates to health care professionals, particularly social workers, and to identify effective team approaches to supporting patients based on studies assessing implementation of assertive community treatment teams. Materials and methods: A systematic review of the medical literature was conducted by searching the Scopus database to identify articles associated with treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia. Articles included were published from January 1, 2003, through July 15, 2013, were written in English, and reported findings concerning any and all aspects of nonadherence to prescribed treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Results: Of 92 unique articles identified and formally screened, 47 met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. The burden of nonadherence in schizophrenia is significant. Factors with the potential to affect adherence include antipsychotic drug class and formulation, patient-specific factors, and family/social support system. There is inconclusive evidence suggesting superior adherence with an atypical versus typical antipsychotic or with a long-acting injectable versus an oral formulation. Patient-specific factors that contribute to adherence include awareness/denial of illness, cognitive issues, stigma associated with taking medication, substance abuse, access to health care, employment/poverty, and insurance status. Lack of social or family support may adversely affect adherence, necessitating the assistance of health care professionals, such as social workers. Evidence supports the concept that an

  19. The therapeutic relationship and adherence to antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia.

    Rosemarie McCabe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Previous research has shown that a better therapeutic relationship (TR predicts more positive attitudes towards antipsychotic medication, but did not address whether it is also linked with actual adherence. This study investigated whether the TR is associated with adherence to antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: 134 clinicians and 507 of their patients with schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder participated in a European multi-centre study. A logistic regression model examined how the TR as rated by patients and by clinicians is associated with medication adherence, adjusting for clinician clustering and symptom severity. RESULTS: Patient and clinician ratings of the TR were weakly inter-correlated (r(s = 0.13, p = 0.004, but each was independently linked with better adherence. After adjusting for patient rated TR and symptom severity, each unit increase in clinician rated TR was associated with an increase of the odds ratio of good compliance by 65.9% (95% CI: 34.6% to 104.5%. After adjusting for clinician rated TR and symptom severity, for each unit increase in patient rated TR the odds ratio of good compliance was increased by 20.8% (95% CI: 4.4% to 39.8%. CONCLUSIONS: A better TR is associated with better adherence to medication among patients with schizophrenia. Patients' and clinicians' perspectives of the TR are both important, but may reflect distinct aspects.

  20. Adherence With Therapeutic Regimens: Behavioral and Pharmacoeconomic Perspectives.

    Giannetti, Vincent J; Kamal, Khalid M

    2016-04-01

    There is an extensive literature regarding nonadherence with both therapeutic regimens and medication. This literature includes reviews of empirical research regarding the factors associated with nonadherence. Health care system, provider, and patient factors as well as the nature of the illness and therapeutic regimen all effect adherence rates. Different behavioral models for adherence counseling such as the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Medication Interest Model, and Motivational Interviewing have also been reported in the research literature. This article will discuss the development of a brief model for patient counseling with specific techniques illustrated for pharmacists based on empirical findings that have demonstrated effectiveness in the adherence research literature. In addition, the article will address the measurement of the economic impact of medication nonadherence and propose a framework for assessing the cost-effectiveness of pharmacist counseling to increase adherence. The problem of nonadherence has significant effects upon health care expenditures through increase in physician's visits, emergency department incidents, rehospitalizations, and nursing home readmissions. Thus, the overall goal is to assist the pharmacist in developing a brief adherence counseling program in community pharmacy and evaluating the economic feasibility of the intervention demonstrating the value-added proposition of pharmacist intervention. PMID:25292442

  1. Effect of plastic catheter material on bacterial adherence and viability.

    Lopez-Lopez, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1991-06-01

    The kinetics of adherence of single isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli to catheters made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Teflon, siliconised latex, polyurethane and Vialon was evaluated by a radiometric assay. Radiolabelled bacteria (10(8) cfu/ml) were incubated in vials containing 1-cm lengths of catheter for up to 3 days. The peak of maximal adherence to each biomaterial was reached after 24 h for P. aeruginosa and after 72 h for the other strains. Bacterial adherence to PVC and siliconised latex was significantly higher (2-6 times; p less than 0.05) than to the other biomaterials for all the strains. The lowest values of adherence were observed with polyurethane and Vialon for the staphylococci but with Teflon for E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Bacterial viability and growth was evaluated in eluates obtained from incubation of segments of each catheter in buffer for 24 h. None of the eluates affected the viability of the staphylococci. However, all of them, significantly increased the growth of E. coli and P. aeruginosa with the exception of the eluate from siliconised latex, in which the inoculum count was reduced to an undetectable level for E. coli. We conclude that bacterial adherence to catheters may depend in part on the nature of the biomaterial and that certain substances eluted from the catheters may affect the viability and growth of different micro-organisms. PMID:1905357

  2. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53±11 yrs; body mass index (BMI=45±9 kg/m2 with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI 33±30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P=0.006, income level (P<0.001, and employment status (P=0.03 between the groups, these did not influence CPAP adherence. Instead, overall improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P=0.03, P=0.004, and P=0.001, resp., as well as in Hispanics (P=0.02, P=0.02, P=0.03, resp.. Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence.

  3. Adherence to Tobacco Dependence Treatment Among HIV-Infected Smokers.

    Browning, Kristine K; Wewers, Mary Ellen; Ferketich, Amy K; Diaz, Philip; Koletar, Susan L; Reynolds, Nancy R

    2016-03-01

    High prevalence of tobacco use and low success in quitting remain significant problems for reducing disease burden among HIV-infected persons. This study's purpose was to examine participant responsiveness and tobacco dependence treatment adherence and their influences on tobacco abstinence among HIV-infected patients. This non-randomized study included HIV-infected smokers 18 years of age or older, who smoked at least 5 cigarettes per day, and had an interest in quitting smoking in the next 30 days. HIV-infected smokers (n = 247) received a 12-week tobacco dependence treatment intervention that included pharmacotherapy and telephone counseling. Younger age and non-White race were associated with lower adherence to pharmacotherapy. Younger age, non-White race, and increased monthly binge drinking were associated with lower adherence to telephone counseling. High participant responsiveness was associated with adherence to pharmacotherapy, counseling, and abstinence. Development and testing of interventions to improve adherence to evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment is warranted. PMID:25855045

  4. Correlation between lamivudine plasma concentrations and patient self-reported adherence to antiretroviral treatment in experienced HIV patients

    Minzi OM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available OM Minzi1, V Mugoyela2, LL Gustafsson31Unit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; 3Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART is important to achieve treatment success in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. Most HIV clinics apply the patient self-report (PSR method. However, the reliability of this method in experienced HIV patients remains questionable.Purpose: To validate the PSR method for measuring adherence to ART using lamivudine (3TC plasma concentrations in experienced HIV patients.Methods: The study was conducted in Dar Es Salaam and involved 220 patients who were receiving ART services at HIV clinics for more than 12 months. Self-reported adherence information to ART was obtained on the day of HIV clinic visit. The patients were asked to mention the number of doses missed within the past 7 days. In addition, blood samples (2 mL were collected from each patient on the same day. The blood samples were determined for 3TC plasma concentrations. The target 3TC plasma concentration as indicator concentration for adherent patients was determined in 20 patients who took their evening dose of antiretrovirals under supervision. The blood from these patients was drawn 3 hours after drug administration.Results: Complete drug levels of 3TC and self-reported adherence data was obtained in 200 treatment-experienced HIV patients. Lamivudine plasma concentrations obtained in these patients ranged between 0.02–17.36 µg/mL. The mean time from dose administration to blood drawing was 3.1 ± 1.2 hours with coefficient of variation >39%. The mean 3TC plasma concentration obtained in 20 patients who took their antiretroviral dose under supervision was

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant to...... that biofilm bacteria in which QS is blocked either by mutation or by administration of QS inhibitory drugs are sensitive to treatment with tobramycin and H2O2, and are readily phagocytosed by PMNs, in contrast to bacteria with functional QS systems. In contrast to the wild-type, QS-deficient biofilms...

  6. [Adherence and fidelity in patients treated with intragastric balloon].

    Mazure, R A; Cancer, E; Martínez Olmos, M A; De Castro, M L; Abilés, V; Abilés, J; Bretón, I; Álvarez, V; Peláez, N; Culebras, J M

    2014-01-01

    A correct treatment of obesity needs a program of habits modification regardless of the selected technique, especially if it is minimally invasive as the intragastric balloon (BIG). The adherence of the obese patients with regard to recommended drugs measures to medium- and long-term is less than 50%. Given that the results obtained using the technique of gastric balloon must be seen influenced by adherence to the modification of habits program and its fulfillment, we reviewed series published in attention to the program proposed with the BIG. The series published to date provide few details about the used Therapeutic Programs as well as the adherence of patients to them, and even less concerning the Monitoring Plan and the loyalty of the patient can be seen. We conclude the convenience to agree on a follow-up strategy, at least the 6 months during which the BIG remain in the stomach. PMID:24483961

  7. The effects of psychological factors in sports medicine rehabilitation adherence.

    Lampton, C C; Lambert, M E; Yost, R

    1993-09-01

    This study investigated the influence of achievement motivation and self-esteem on injury treatment adherence in a general sample of injured patients receiving treatment in a sports medicine clinic. Subjects consisted of both injured athletes and workers who had incurred an on-the-job injury. Based on scales of self-esteem and achievement motivation, patients were categorized as either high or low in self-esteem certainty, self-esteem level, tendency to be task-involved, and tendency to ego-involved in tasks. Treatment adherence was measured by number of missed appointments and by physical therapist ratings of effort and progress. It was found that patients low in self-esteem certainty and high in ego-involvement tended to miss the most treatment appointments. Contrary to previous findings, task-involvement was not found to be related to treatment adherence. PMID:8107483

  8. Women victims of sexual violence: adherence to chemoprevention of HIV.

    Diniz, Normélia Maria Freire; de Almeida, Lílian Conceição Guimarães; dos S Ribeiro, Bárbara Cristina; de Macêdo, Valéria Góes

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the adherence of women victims of sexual violence, to AIDS chemoprevention treatment. A quantitative study was carried out at a care service to victims of sexual violence in Salvador (Bahia, Brazil). Study participants were 172 women. Data were collected through interviews with forms and consultation of patient files. The results showed that 45.4% of the abused women were teenagers and 40.7% of the attended women were raped. Only 54% of the women were advised to use antiretrovirals to prevent HIV. Adherence to treatment occurred in 57.4% of cases and discontinuity corresponded to 42.6%. Non-adherence to treatment was attributed to psychological or emotional disorders and non-understanding of the established treatment. Therefore, it is important that professionals pay careful attention in order to perceive the conditions that might increase women's vulnerability to the infection. PMID:17375226

  9. Clinic Attendance for Medication Refills and Medication Adherence amongst an Antiretroviral Treatment Cohort in Uganda: A Prospective Study

    Setor Kunutsor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regular clinic attendance for antiretroviral (ARV drug refills is important for successful clinical outcomes in HIV management. Methods. Clinic attendance for ARV drug refills and medication adherence using a clinic-based pill count in 392 adult patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in a district hospital in Uganda were prospectively monitored over a 28-week period. Results. Of the 2267 total scheduled clinic visits, 40 (1.8% were missed visits. Among the 392 clients, 361 (92% attended all appointments for their refills (regular attendance. Clinic attendance for refills was statistically significantly associated with medication adherence with regular attendant clients having about fourfold greater odds of achieving optimal (≥95% medication adherence [odds ratio (OR=3.89, 95% CI: 1.48 to 10.25, exact P=.013]. In multivariate analysis, clients in age category 35 years and below were less likely to achieve regular clinic attendance. Conclusion. Monitoring of clinic attendance may be an objective and effective measure and could be a useful adjunct to an adherence measure such as pill counting in resource-constrained settings. Where human resource constraints do not allow pill counts or other time-consuming measures, then monitoring clinic attendance and acting on missed appointments may be an effective proxy measure.

  10. Adherence issues related to sublingual immunotherapy as perceived by allergists

    Silvia Scurati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Scurati1, Franco Frati1, Gianni Passalacqua2, Paola Puccinelli1, Cecile Hilaire1, Cristoforo Incorvaia3, Italian Study Group on SLIT Compliance 1Scientific and Medical Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 2Allergy and Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Genoa; 3Allergy/Pulmonary Rehabilitation, ICP Hospital, Milan, ItalyObjectives: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT is a viable alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy to treat allergic rhinitis and asthma, and is widely used in clinical practice in many European countries. The clinical efficacy of SLIT has been established in a number of clinical trials and meta-analyses. However, because SLIT is self-administered by patients without medical supervision, the degree of patient adherence with treatment is still a concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception by allergists of issues related to SLIT adherence.Methods: We performed a questionnaire-based survey of 296 Italian allergists, based on the adherence issues known from previous studies. The perception of importance of each item was assessed by a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10.Results: Patient perception of clinical efficacy was considered the most important factor (ranked 1 by 54% of allergists, followed by the possibility of reimbursement (ranked 1 by 34%, and by the absence of side effects (ranked 1 by 21%. Patient education, regular follow-up, and ease of use of SLIT were ranked first by less than 20% of allergists.Conclusion: These findings indicate that clinical efficacy, cost, and side effects are perceived as the major issues influencing patient adherence to SLIT, and that further improvement of adherence is likely to be achieved by improving the patient information provided by prescribers.Keywords: adherence, sublingual immunotherapy, efficacy, cost, side effects

  11. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence.

    James R Warren

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins.We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR and usual provider continuity index (UPI for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR and 95% confidence interval (CI for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample.36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04-1.06 for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15-1.54.Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors.

  12. Characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimen and treatment adherence

    Vera Lúcia da Silveira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimens and treatment adherence was studied in adolescent and adult patients who underwent antiretroviral therapy from January 1998 to September 2000, at the Service for Specialized Assistance in Pelotas. The patients were interviewed on two occasions, and the use of antiretrovirals during the previous 48 hours was investigated by a self-report. Adherence was defined as use of 95% or more of the prescribed medication. Social-demographic variables were collected through direct questionnaires. The antiretroviral regimen and clinical data were copied from the patients' records. Associations between the independent variables and adherence were analyzed by means of logistic regression. The multivariate analysis included characteristics of the antiretroviral regimens, social-demographic variables, as well as perception of negative effects, negative physiological states, and adverse effects of the treatment. Among the 224 selected patients, 194 participated in our study. Their ages varied from 17 to 67 years; most patients were men, with few years of schooling and a low family income. Only 49% adhered to the treatment. Adherence to treatment regimens was reduced when more daily doses were indicated: three to four doses (odds ratio of adherence to treatment (OR=0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.22-1.01 and five to six (OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.62; two or more doses taken in a fasting state (OR=0.59, 95% CI 0.11-0.68, and for patients who reported adverse effects to the treatment (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.19-0.77. Most of the regimens with more than two daily doses of medication included at least one dose apart from mealtimes. The results suggest that, if possible, regimens with a reduced number of doses should be chosen, with no compulsory fasting, and with few adverse effects. Strategies to minimize these effects should be discussed with the patients.

  13. Regulation of Adherence and Virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica Lectin Cytoplasmic Domain, Which Contains a β2 Integrin Motif

    Vines, Richard R.; Ramakrishnan, Girija; Rogers, Joshua B.; Lockhart, Lauren A.; Mann, Barbara J.; Petri, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the β2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediat...

  14. Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Phenotype Displayed by Intestinal Pathogenic E. coli Strains from Cats, Dogs, and Swine ▿

    Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Garcia-Gil, Jesus; Barnich, Nicolas; Lothar H Wieler; Ewers, Christa

    2011-01-01

    The adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) pathotype, which has been associated with Crohn's disease, shows similar traits to human and animal extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) with respect to their phylogenetic origin and virulence gene profiles. Here, we demonstrate that animal ExPEC strains generally do not share the AIEC phenotype. In contrast, this phenotype is very frequent among animal intestinal pathogenic E. coli (InPEC) strains, particularly of feline and canine origin, ...

  15. A 160-kilodalton epithelial cell surface glycoprotein recognized by plant lectins that inhibit the adherence of Actinomyces naeslundii.

    Brennan, M J; Cisar, J O; Sandberg, A L

    1986-01-01

    The adherence of Actinomyces naeslundii to human epithelial (KB) cells is mediated by the interaction of a fimbrial lectin on this oral bacterium with epithelial cell receptors exposed by sialidase. The D-galactose- and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-reactive plant lectins from peanut and from Bauhinia purpurea inhibit this interaction. This report describes the partial purification and characterization of a 160-kilodalton (kDa) cell surface glycoprotein which is the principal receptor for these le...

  16. Older Adults’ Uptake and Adherence to Exercise Classes: Instructors’ Perspectives

    Hawley-Hague, H. Horne, S. Skelton, D.A. Todd, C

    2016-01-01

    Exercise classes provide a range of benefits for older adults, but adherence levels are poor. We know little of instructors’ experiences of delivering exercise classes to older adults. Semi-structured interviews,informed by the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), were conducted with instructors (n=19) delivering multi-component exercise classes to establish their perspectives on older adults’ uptake and adherence to exercise classes. Analysis revealed ‘barriers’ related t...

  17. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence

    M Y H Moosa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine changes in adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-positive patients with depression, following treatment with an antidepressant or psychotherapy. Methods. The study was prospective, randomised and controlled. Consenting volunteers aged ≥18 years and stable on ART for ≥6 months were included in the study. Sociodemographic data were obtained, and a clinical diagnostic evaluation and the Hamilton Depression rating scale (HAMD were performed on all subjects at entry to and at the end of the study. Participants found to be depressed were randomly assigned antidepressant treatment (20 mg citalopram or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT (5 sessions. Medication was dispensed at each visit and patients were asked to return all unused medication to determine ART adherence. The study was approved by the University of the Witwatersrand. Results. Sixty-two HIV-positive persons receiving ART participated; 30 were not depressed (control group and 32 were depressed (patient group. No significant differences in demographic characteristics existed between the control and patient groups. Mean ART adherence at the start of the study was 99.5% (standard error (SE ±0.46 and 92.1% (SE ±1.69 in the control and patients groups, respectively. Mean ART adherence at the end of the study changed marginally in the control group (99.7%; SE ±0.46 and increased significantly in the patient group (99.5%; SE± 0.13 (p>0.05. The mean ART adherence rate of patients who received pharmacotherapy increased from 92.8% to 99.5%, and of those who received psychotherapy increased from 91.1% to 99.6% (p>0.05. There was no significant association between the increased adherence in the patient group and baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, irrespective of antidepressant therapy or IPT (p>0.05. Conclusion. Successful treatment of depression with an antidepressant or psychotherapy was associated with improved ART adherence, independent of the type

  18. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet

    Link, Lilli B.; Jacobson, Judith S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be ≥80% raw ve...

  19. Socio-economic status and adherence to tuberculosis treatment

    Mishra, P; Hansen, E H; Sabroe, S;

    2005-01-01

    analysis showed that the risk of non-adherence to TB treatment was significantly associated with unemployment (odds ratio [OR] 9.2), low status occupation (OR 4.4), low annual income (OR 5.4), and cost of travel to the TB treatment facility (OR 3.0). Factors significant in the bivariate analyses......--living conditions, literacy and difficulty in financing treatment--were not found to be significantly associated with non-adherence when adjusted for other risk factors in the multivariate regression model. CONCLUSION: Low socio-economic status and particularly lack of money are important risk factors for non...

  20. Adherence and neurocognitive screening in Romanian HIV patients

    M Arbune

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adherence is critical for the effectiveness of antiretroviral HIV therapy (ART, accordingly decreasing the opportunistic diseases and increasing the quality of life. Neurocognitive disorders (NCD are still frequent in ART era and could impair the adherence, but how ethical is to refer ART in patients with NCD? Objective: To assess the relation between NCD and adherence in HIV Romanian patients. Material and methods: Cross-sectional screening study on 151 patients under ART, no drug users, from HIV Clinic - Galati, assessed by HIV-Associated Dementia Scale (HDS, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS [1], ART CNS-effectiveness Letendre scores [2] and adherence assessment questionnaire CNLAS- Romania. Normal values: HDS >10; anxiety/ depression <8. Statistical analysis performed: Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney test, with 5% significance level. Results: Characteristics of the patients: median age 22 [20; 56] years old; sex ratio F/M 1.17; median educational level 8 [0; >12] years; HBV co-infection 27.8%; AIDS stage 85.3%; current median CD4 526/mm3 [8; 1605] and 65% undetectable HIV-RNA levels. 49.6% (75/151 patients attain HDS scores <10 and imply probable NCD. Scores below 8 for anxiety are more frequent than for depression: 24% vs 13%. The median ART CNS penetration score is 8 [5; 12]. Adherence is considered for 66% patients and is correlating with CD4 number (p=0.001, educational level >4 years (p=0.001; OR=4.2, HDS >10 (p=0.01; OR=2.4 and ART-CNS penetration score >7 (p=0.023; OR=2.4. Low HDS are influenced by old age (p=0.003, depression (p=0.02 and ART-CNS penetration scores <7 (p=0.01. Anxiety is related neither with adherence nor with NCD by HDS, but females are obvious anxious than males (p<0.001. Conclusions: Basic educational level is sufficient for developing ART adherence. High scores of HDS screening should be predictors for ART adherence. Referring ART as well to patients with low HDS scores is rational and

  1. Adherence to European Association of Urology Guidelines on Prophylactic Antibiotics

    Cai, Tommaso; Verze, Paolo; Brugnolli, Anna;

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli to piperacillin/tazobactam (9.1% vs. 5.4%; p=0.03), gentamicin (18.3% vs. 11.2%; p=0.02), and ciprofloxacin (32.3% vs. 19.1%; p=0.03) decreased significantly after protocol introduction. The defined daily dose (DDD) use of ciprofloxacin fell from 4.2 to 0.2 DDD per 100 patient-days after....... We found that adherence to the guidelines reduced the rate of bacterial resistance, in particular against piperacillin/tazobactam, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin, and reduced costs without increasing the risk of postoperative infection after urologic procedures. We recommend adherence to the...

  2. Effect of diclofenac alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol on the oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in healthy and osteoartheritic individuals

    To ivestigate the effects of diclofenac alone or when combined with alpha-tocopherol on the oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in healthy and osteoartheritic (OA) patients. The study was carried out at the College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, KIgdom of Saudi Arabia, over the period 1999 to 2000. 12 healthy controls and 12 osteoartheritic patients were recruited to the study. They were given diclofenac 50mg thricedaily orally, initially for 5 days then alpha-tocopherol at 200mg thrice daily orally, was added for another 5 days. Blood samples were drawn before the start of study and at 5 days following treatmentwith diclofenac alone and 10 days following treatment with diclophenac and alpha-tocopherol. Chemiluminescence (CL)reponse was measured for wohle blood and isolated (PMNs) on all samples. Diclofenac enhanced CL response of whole blood and PMNs of healthy controls when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan (OPZ). Cotreatment with alpha-tocopherol resulted in no appreciable change in the CL response of whole blood when stimulated with PMA or OPZ but a further significant enhancement of CL response of isolated PMNs when these cells were stimulated by either PMA or OPZ. In osteoartheritic patients, diclofenac alone and when combined with alpha-tocopherol showed no significant change in CL response of the whole blood.The CL response of PMNs from OA patients was decreased by diclofenac alone. However the inhibitory effect was not observed when alpha-tocopherol was used together with diclofenac. The effect of diclofenac alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol did not produce a consistent effect on the CL response of whole blood or isolated PMNs of healthy or osteoartheritic patients. (author)

  3. Adherence Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Strains to HEp-2 Cells by Mannan Oligosaccharides and a High-Molecular-Weight Component of Cranberry Extract.

    Ramirez-Hernandez, Alejandra; Rupnow, John; Hutkins, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Campylobacter infections are a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States and are a major cause of diarrheal disease throughout the world. Colonization and subsequent infection and invasion of Campylobacter require that the bacteria adhere to the surface of host cells. Agents that inhibit adherence could be used prophylactically to reduce Campylobacter carriage and infection. Mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) have been used as a feed supplement in livestock animals to improve performance and to replace growth-promoting antibiotics. However, MOS and other nondigestible oligosaccharides may also prevent pathogen colonization by inhibiting adherence in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, plant extracts, including those derived from cranberries, have been shown to have antiadherence activity against pathogens. The goal of this study was to assess the ability of MOS and cranberry fractions to serve as antiadherence agents against strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Adherence experiments were performed using HEp-2 cells. Significant reductions in adherence of C. jejuni 29438, C. jejuni 700819, C. jejuni 3329, and C. coli 43485 were observed in the presence of MOS (up to 40 mg/ml) and with a high-molecular-weight fraction of cranberry extract (up to 3 mg/ml). However, none of the tested materials reduced adherence of C. coli BAA-1061. No additive effect in adherence inhibition was observed for an MOS-cranberry blend. These results suggest that both components, MOS and cranberry, could be used to reduce Campylobacter colonization and carriage in livestock animals and potentially limit human exposure to this pathogen. PMID:26219363

  4. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY Antibodies Induce Specific Bacterial Aggregation and Internalization in Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    Thomsen, K.; Christophersen, L.; Bjarnsholt, T.;

    2015-01-01

    P. aeruginosa by augmenting the phagocytic competence of PMNs may postpone the deteriorating chronic biofilm infection. Anti-P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies significantly increase the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa in vitro. The mode of action is...... attributed to IgY-facilitated formation of immobilized bacteria in aggregates, as visualized by fluorescence microscopy andthe induction of increased bacterial hydrophobicity. Thus, the present study demonstrates that avian egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) targeting P. aeruginosa modify bacterial fitness...

  5. Development of new concepts of non-adherence measurements among users of antihypertensives medicines

    Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Bjerrum, Lars; Herborg, Hanne;

    2011-01-01

    measures of non-adherence resulted in prevalence between 2.2 and 39.6%. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that concepts of non-adherence measurements could be determined including self-efficacy aspects, unintentional non-adherence and intentional non-adherence related to self-regulation and effect concerns...... with the developed concepts. RESULTS: 1,426 (49%) participants answered the questionnaires. The analyses resulted in two sets of components: three adherence behaviour measures and two self-efficacy measures which showed similarities in concepts. The adherence behaviour measures included two concepts of intentional...... nonadherence (associated with aspects of self-regulation and effect concerns, respectively) and one measure of non-intentional non-adherence. Prevalence of the developed measures of behaviour related non-adherence ranged from 10.3 to 34.9% depending on which type of non-adherence measure was used. Established...

  6. Promoting adherence to nebulized therapy in cystic fibrosis: poster development and a qualitative exploration of adherence

    Jones S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Jones,1 Nathan Babiker,2 Emma Gardner,2,3 Jane Royle,2 Rachael Curley,3,4 Zhe Hui Hoo,3,4 Martin J Wildman3,4 1Psychology Department, University of Sheffield, 2Psychological Services, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 3Adult Cystic Fibrosis Unit, Northern General Hospital, 4School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF health care professionals recognize the need to motivate people with CF to adhere to nebulizer treatments, yet little is known about how best to achieve this. We aimed to produce motivational posters to support nebulizer adherence by using social marketing involving people with CF in the development of those posters. Methods: The Sheffield CF multidisciplinary team produced preliminary ideas that were elaborated upon with semi-structured interviews among people with CF to explore barriers and facilitators to the use of nebulized therapy. Initial themes and poster designs were refined using an online focus group to finalize the poster designs. Results: People with CF preferred aspirational posters describing what could be achieved through adherence in contrast to posters that highlighted the adverse consequences of nonadherence. A total of 14 posters were produced through this process. Conclusion: People with CF can be engaged to develop promotional material to support adherence, providing a unique perspective differing from that of the CF multidisciplinary team. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these posters to support nebulizer adherence. Keywords: behavior change, social marketing, patient participation, nebulizers, medication adherence

  7. Severe asthma patients in Korea overestimate their adherence to inhaled corticosteroids.

    Bae, Yun-Jeong; Kim, Tae-Bum; Jee, Young-Koo; Park, Heung-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Cho, You Sook; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2009-08-01

    Good adherence to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy is essential for effective asthma control. The factors affecting ICS therapy adherence vary among individuals and countries. As few data on adherence have been reported in Korea, the factors influencing such adherence, and the clinical implications thereof, were evaluated in Korean asthma patients. A total of 185 asthma patients who had taken ICS regularly for over 1 year were randomly selected from the recently established domestic adult asthma cohort, COREA (Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma Korea). To obtain adherence to ICS, both prescription refill adherence and self-reported adherence over 1 year (these are objective and subjective measurements respectively) were assessed without any interventions that might affect patients' adherence to ICS. Patients' information such as age, sex, smoking history and number of medication taken, was collected. Assessment of asthma severity, pulmonary function tests, and asthma symptom score were performed to evaluate the possible clinical implication of adherence to ICS. Approximately half of the patients (50.9%) showed less than 80% of prescription refill adherence. There was a considerable discrepancy between prescription refill adherence and self-reported adherence especially in the patients whose refill adherence was under than 50%. Younger asthma patients showed lower adherence to ICS than did older (> or = 60 years old) patients. Higher asthma severity was significantly associated with lower refill adherence to ICS. However, asthma symptom scores and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) values were not directly related with refill adherence. To improve asthma control in Korea, enhancement of adherence to ICS is critical: our findings emphasize the need to use objective measurements when adherence to asthma medication is to be assessed in clinical practice. PMID:19657900

  8. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  9. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10μg/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4μg/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated

  10. Adherence of paclitaxel drug in magnetite chitosan nanoparticles

    Escobar Zapata, Edna V.; Martinez Perez, Carlos A.; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Claudia A.; Castro Carmona, Javier S. [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Ave. Del Charro 610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320, Cd. Juarez Chihuahua (Mexico); Quevedo Lopez, Manuel A. [Departamento de Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Garcia-Casillas, Perla E., E-mail: pegarcia@uacj.mx [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Ave. Del Charro 610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320, Cd. Juarez Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitosan silica magnetite adsorbs antineoplastic drug. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica coating improve the drug adherence. - Abstract: Cancer treatment is a big challenge in medicine where chemotherapies and radiotherapies are aggressive and poorly effective having side effects as delirium, fatigue, insomnia, nausea and vomiting which are common problems for cancer patients. For this reason, during the last two decades, many researchers have developed several techniques to improve the current therapies; one of them is the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with an average crystallite size 21.8 nm were covered in a core/shell type; magnetite/silica, magnetite/chitosan, and a double shell magnetite/silica/chitosan were developed for attaching an antineoplastic drug. The mechanism for the functionalization of the nanoparticles with a single and double shell was studied with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adherence of an antineoplastic drug, paclitaxel, onto functionalized nanoparticles was analyzed with a UV-Visible spectroscopy at a wavelength of 253 nm. It was found that the adherence of the drug is improved up to 18% when magnetite nanoparticles are coated with a single chitosan shell, and when the nanoparticles are coated with a silica/chitosan shell the adherence increases up to 29%.

  11. Noninfectious uveitis: strategies to optimize treatment compliance and adherence

    Dolz-Marco R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosa Dolz-Marco,1 Roberto Gallego-Pinazo,1 Manuel Díaz-Llopis,2 Emmett T Cunningham Jr,3–6 J Fernando Arévalo7,8 1Unit of Macula, Department of Ophthalmology, University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, Spain; 3Department of Ophthalmology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, 5The Francis I Proctor Foundation, University of California San Francisco Medical Center, 6West Coast Retina Medical Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 7Vitreoretina Division, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 8Retina Division, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Noninfectious uveitis includes a heterogenous group of sight-threatening ocular and systemic disorders. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of noninfectious uveitis in recent years, particularly with regard to the effective use of corticosteroids and non-corticosteroid immunosuppressive drugs, including biologic agents. All of these therapeutic approaches are limited, however, by any given patient’s ability to comply with and adhere to their prescribed treatment. In fact, compliance and adherence are among the most important patient-related determinants of treatment success. We discuss strategies to optimize compliance and adherence. Keywords: noninfectious uveitis, intraocular inflammation, immunosuppressive treatment, adherence, compliance, therapeutic failure

  12. Psychosocial interventions and medication adherence in bipolar disorder

    Depp, Colin A.; Moore, David J.; Thomas L. Patterson; Lebowitz, Barry D.; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that psychosocial interventions can have a valuable role in reducing the substantial psychosocial disability associated with bipolar disorder. Randomized controlled trials of these interventions indicate that improvements are seen in symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and treatment adherence. These interventions systematically presented in the form of standardized treatment manuals, vary in format, duration, and theoretical basis. All are meant to augment pharma...

  13. Saul Bellow’s Adherence and Breakthrough to Jewish Tradition

    刘晓艳

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most significant American Jewish writers in the 20th century, Saul Bellow was influenced by the Jewish tradition and American mainstream thoughts in his writing creations. The conflicts and amalgamation between these two different cultures in his novels indicate that Bellow not only adheres to the Jewish traditional culture, but also breaks through the narrow-mindedness of it.

  14. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Diaz-Abad, Montserrat; Chatila, Wissam; Lammi, Matthew R; Swift, Irene; D'Alonzo, Gilbert E; Krachman, Samuel L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53 ± 11 yrs; body mass index (BMI) = 45 ± 9 kg/m(2)) with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 33 ± 30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P = 0.006), income level (P improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P = 0.03, P = 0.004, and P = 0.001, resp.), as well as in Hispanics (P = 0.02, P = 0.02, P = 0.03, resp.). Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence. PMID:24649371

  15. Paradigm Adherence and Personality Correlates across Mental Health Professions

    Rauscher, Laura Anne

    2012-01-01

    Paradigm adherence has been developed as a meta-theoretical approach to organize and to classify the multitude of different theories of counseling and psychotherapy. Four paradigms have been identified in the literature: The Organic-Medical, The Psychological, The Systemic-Relational, and the Social Constructivist paradigms. Only one other study…

  16. When weight management lasts. Lower perceived rule complexity increases adherence.

    Mata, Jutta; Todd, Peter M; Lippke, Sonia

    2010-02-01

    Maintaining behavior change is one of the major challenges in weight management and long-term weight loss. We investigated the impact of the cognitive complexity of eating rules on adherence to weight management programs. We studied whether popular weight management programs can fail if participants find the rules too complicated from a cognitive perspective, meaning that individuals are not able to recall or process all required information for deciding what to eat. The impact on program adherence of participants' perceptions of eating rule complexity and other behavioral factors known to influence adherence (including previous weight management, self-efficacy, and planning) was assessed via a longitudinal online questionnaire given to 390 participants on two different popular weight management regimens. As we show, the regimens, Weight Watchers and a popular German recipe diet (Brigitte), strongly differ in objective rule complexity and thus their cognitive demands on the dieter. Perceived rule complexity was the strongest factor associated with increased risk of quitting the cognitively demanding weight management program (Weight Watchers); it was not related to adherence length for the low cognitive demand program (Brigitte). Higher self-efficacy generally helped in maintaining a program. The results emphasize the importance of considering rule complexity to promote long-term weight management. PMID:19751781

  17. Factors influencing adherence to an emergency department national protocol.

    Ebben, R.H.A.; Vloet, L.C.M.; Groot, J.M. de; Achterberg, T. van

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that influence emergency nurses' adherence to an emergency department national protocol (EDNP). A survey of emergency nurses (n=200) and physicians with medical end responsibility on an emergency department (n=103) was carried out. Emergency nurses

  18. Can Urine Lamivudine Be Used to Monitor Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence?

    Kumar Agibothu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patient adherence to treatment is an important factor in the effectiveness of antiretroviral regimens. Adherence to treatment could be monitored by estimation of antiretroviral drugs in biological fluids. We aimed to obtain information on the quantity and duration of excretion of lamivudine in urine following oral administration of a single dose of 300 mg and to assess its suitability for adherence monitoring purposes. Spot urine samples were collected before dosing and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 28, 32, 48, 72, and 96 hours post dosing from 10 healthy subjects, and lamivudine was estimated by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Lamivudine values were expressed as a ratio of urine creatinine. About 91% of the ingested drug was excreted by 24 hours, and the concentration thereafter in urine was very negligible. A lamivudine value of 0.035 mg/mg creatinine or less at 48 hours is suggestive of a missed dose in the last 24 hours. The study findings showed that estimation of urine lamivudine in spot specimens could be useful in monitoring patient adherence to antiretroviral treatment. However, this needs to be confirmed on a larger sample size and among patients on once-daily and twice-daily treatment regimens.

  19. Meaning of Adherence in Hepatitis C-Infected Military Veterans.

    Phillips, Frances H; Barnes, Donelle M

    2016-01-01

    Among United States (U.S.) veterans, the prevalence of chronic hepatitis C infection is three times that of the general U.S. population. Treatment success is proportionate to the degree of treatment adherence. There has been little research dedicated to the systematic exploration of issues related to treatment adherence. The purpose of this study was to describe factors that influenced adherence in infected military veterans. Phenomenological research emphasizes a rich description. A convenience sample of 21 veterans was recruited from a clinic in north Texas. One-time in-depth interviews explored reasons for remaining in treatment despite difficult side effects. Analysis included immersion, data transformation, thematic analysis, and summary. Cognitive strategies to stay on medication include making a commitment to treatment, "not ready to leave this world," conserving energy and staying busy, looking forward, and starting over. Veterans utilize previously learned military discipline to stay on medications and follow providers' orders. They are not ready to die and have plans for life after treatment. Patient education should focus on side effect management, rather than on genotypes or viral load. Treatment teams should include substance abuse specialists and gastroenterology providers. Future studies need to develop a measurement tool for adherence during antiviral treatment. PMID:26825560

  20. Enhancing antiepileptic drug adherence: a randomized controlled trial.

    Brown, Ian; Sheeran, Paschal; Reuber, Markus

    2009-12-01

    Suboptimal adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is commonplace, and increases the risk of status epilepticus and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. This randomized controlled trial was designed to demonstrate whether an implementation intention intervention involving the completion of a simple self-administered questionnaire linking the intention of taking medication with a particular time, place, and other activity can improve AED treatment schedule adherence. Of the 81 patients with epilepsy who were randomized, 69 completed a 1-month monitoring period with an objective measure of tablet taking (electronic registration of pill bottle openings, Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS]). Intervention participants showed improved adherence relative to controls on all three outcomes: doses taken in total (93.4% vs. 79.1%), days on which correct dose was taken (88.7% vs. 65.3%), and doses taken on schedule (78.8% vs. 55.3%) (Pintention intervention may be an easy-to-administer and effective means of promoting AED adherence. PMID:19864187

  1. Adherence of paclitaxel drug in magnetite chitosan nanoparticles

    Highlights: ► Chitosan silica magnetite adsorbs antineoplastic drug. ► Silica coating improve the drug adherence. - Abstract: Cancer treatment is a big challenge in medicine where chemotherapies and radiotherapies are aggressive and poorly effective having side effects as delirium, fatigue, insomnia, nausea and vomiting which are common problems for cancer patients. For this reason, during the last two decades, many researchers have developed several techniques to improve the current therapies; one of them is the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with an average crystallite size 21.8 nm were covered in a core/shell type; magnetite/silica, magnetite/chitosan, and a double shell magnetite/silica/chitosan were developed for attaching an antineoplastic drug. The mechanism for the functionalization of the nanoparticles with a single and double shell was studied with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adherence of an antineoplastic drug, paclitaxel, onto functionalized nanoparticles was analyzed with a UV–Visible spectroscopy at a wavelength of 253 nm. It was found that the adherence of the drug is improved up to 18% when magnetite nanoparticles are coated with a single chitosan shell, and when the nanoparticles are coated with a silica/chitosan shell the adherence increases up to 29%.

  2. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal β III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders

  3. Alcohol-antiretroviral therapy interactive toxicity beliefs and daily medication adherence and alcohol use among people living with HIV.

    Pellowski, Jennifer A; Kalichman, Seth C; Kalichman, Moira O; Cherry, Chauncey

    2016-08-01

    Alcohol-antiretroviral therapy (ART) interactive toxicity beliefs reflect perceived adverse outcomes of mixing alcohol and ART. Previous research has shown a significant relationship between alcohol-ART interactive toxicity beliefs and ART non-adherence, over and above other correlates of non-adherence such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)symptoms and frequency of alcohol use. Most past studies have collected data over extended periods and have not determined if alcohol use and missed medications occur at the day-level among people holding interactive toxicity beliefs. Previous daily analyses, however, have been limited by self-reported adherence and relatively short periods of observation. To address these gaps in the literature, men and women living with HIV in Atlanta, GA, were enrolled in a 45-day observational cohort study. Daily alcohol use was collected using two-way interactive text message surveys and daily adherence was collected via the Wisepill device. Fifty-seven participants completed a measure of alcohol-ART interactive toxicity beliefs and contributed 2565 days of daily data. Participants who endorsed high levels of interactive toxicity beliefs had significantly more days when they missed doses of medication. Alcohol-antiretroviral toxicity beliefs predicted missing doses of medication on days when participants were drinking and on days when they were not drinking. Multilevel multivariate regressions showed that these toxicity beliefs predicted daily missed doses of medication over and above quantity of alcohol consumed, depression and general medication concerns. This study replicates and extends previous literature and indicates the necessity of addressing alcohol-ART toxicity beliefs within adherence interventions. PMID:26964014

  4. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C

    Larrey D

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dominique Larrey,1,2 Marie-Pierre Ripault,1 Georges-Philippe Pageaux11Département d'Hépato-Gastroentérologie et Transplantation, Hôpital Saint Eloi, 2IRB-INSERM1040, Montpellier, FranceAbstract: The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education.Keywords: adherence to treatment, quality of life, therapeutic education, hepatitis C

  5. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management

    Pamela L. Ostby

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL, a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005–2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens.

  6. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management.

    Ostby, Pamela L; Armer, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005-2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens. PMID:26580657

  7. Adherence to a Yoga Program in Older Women with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Cheung, Corjena; Wyman, Jean F; Savik, Kay

    2016-04-01

    Yoga is beneficial for osteoarthritis (OA) management in older adults; however, adherence to yoga practice is unknown. The purposes of this secondary analysis were to examine: (1) yoga adherence during the intervention and follow-up periods; (2) the relationship between social cognitive theory (SCT) constructs and adherence; and (3) the impact of adherence on OA-related symptoms in 36 community-dwelling older women with knee OA. SCT was used as a framework to promote adherence to a yoga intervention program that included both group/homebased practices. Adherence to yoga was high during the intervention period but decreased over time. Although SCT was a useful framework for reducing attrition during the intervention, self-efficacy was the only construct that correlated with class attendance. Higher yoga adherence was correlated with improved symptoms, physical function, sleep quality, and quality of life. Yoga adherers were likely to be older, less educated, and had a lower body mass index than nonadherers. PMID:26214142

  8. Evaluation of medication adherence methods in the treatment of malaria in Rwandan infants

    Stichele Robert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To compare three methods for evaluating treatment adherence in a 7-day controlled treatment period for malaria in children in Rwanda. Methods Fifty-six children ( Results Medication adherence data were available for 54 of the 56 patients. Manual pill count and patient self-report yielded a medication adherence of 100% for the in- and out-patient treatment periods. Based on electronic pill-box monitoring, medication adherence during the seven-day treatment period was 90.5 ± 8.3%. Based on electronic pill-box monitoring inpatient medication adherence (99.3 ± 2.7% was markedly higher (p Conclusion Health workers' medication adherence was good. However, a significant lower medication adherence was observed for consumers' adherence in the outpatient setting. This was only detected by electronic pill-box monitoring. Therefore, this latter method is more accurate than the two other methods used in this study.

  9. Physicians should increase focus on poor medicine adherence among chronically ill patients

    Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Topp, Marie; Ingebrigtsen, Truls Sylvan; Lange, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Non-adherence to medicine is common in patients with chronic diseases, contributing to significant worsening of disease, increased mortality and health expenditure. Methods of measuring adherence include self report, prescription refill rates, biomarkers, electronic monitoring and therapeutic...

  10. Evaluation of adherence, hemagglutination, and presence of genes codifying for virulence factors of Acinetobacter baumannii causing urinary tract infection

    Graziela Braun

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a strictly aerobic bacterium which causes severe infections, however its pathogenic characteristics are not well defined. Thirteen A. baumannii strains isolated from urine of hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients with different ages were investigated for the presence of virulence factors. The isolates belonged to biotypes 2, 6, and 9 and were sensitive to imipenem. The majority of them showed resistance to amikacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, norfloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. None of A. baumannii strains presented genes codifying for 17 different virulence factors previously described in uropathogenic Escherichia coli, when tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Nine isolates agglutinated human group AB erythrocytes, in presence of mannose, but none of them agglutinated group O erythrocytes. Adherence to polystyrene was observed in 7 isolates, and this result did not correlate with that obtained in hemagglutination assay. All the isolates were able to grow in iron-limiting conditions, showing that A. baumannii produces some type of siderophore. However, the genes iutA and fyuA, from iron uptake system of E. coli and Yersinia sp., respectively, were not present in the isolates, suggesting the presence of a different type of siderophore. The fimbriae of A. baumannii strains that mediates the adherence are possibly mannose-resistant, eventhough the mechanism of adherence to human epithelial cells still remains to be elucidated.

  11. Differences in intracellular calcium dynamics cause differences in α-granule secretion and phosphatidylserine expression in platelets adhering on glass and TiO2.

    Gupta, Swati; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the activation of purified human platelets due to their adhesion on glass and TiO2 in the absence of extracellular calcium was investigated. Differences in α-granule secretion between platelets adhering on the two surfaces were detected by examining the expression and secretion of the α-granule markers P-selectin (CD62P) and β-thromboglobulin. Similarly, differences in the expression of phosphatidylserine (PS), and in the activation of the major integrin GPIIb/IIIa, on the surfaces of the adhering platelets, were also observed. While all of these activation markers were expressed in platelets adhering on glass, the surface markers were not expressed in platelets adhering on TiO2, and β-thromboglobulin secretion levels were substantially reduced. Differences in marker expression and secretion correlated with differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics. Calcium ionophore treatment triggered α-granule secretion and PS expression in TiO2-adhering platelets but had no effect on the activation of GPIIb/IIIa. These results demonstrate specificity in the way surfaces of artificial materials activate platelets, link differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics observed in the platelets adhering on the two surfaces to the differences in some of the platelet responses (α-granule secretion and PS expression), but also highlight the involvement of synergistic, calcium-independent pathways in platelet activation. The ability to control activation in surface-adhering platelets makes this an attractive model system for studying platelet signaling pathways and for tissue engineering applications. PMID:27124595

  12. Three types of self-efficacy associated with medication adherence in patients with co-occurring HIV and substance use disorders, but only when mood disorders are present

    Reif S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Reif,1 Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell,1,2 Jia Yao,1 Sara LeGrand,1,2 Anna Uehara,2 Edgar Asiimwe,2 Evelyn Byrd Quinlivan31Duke Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, 2Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, 3Center for Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Adherence with medication regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a life-saving behavior for people with HIV infection, yet adherence is challenging for many individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. Medication-taking self-efficacy, which is the confidence that one can take one's medication as prescribed, is associated with better adherence with HIV medication. However, little is known about the influence that other kinds of self-efficacy have on adherence with HIV medication, especially among HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. We sought to examine the relationship between adherence with HIV medication among substance users and three specific kinds of self-efficacy, ie, one's confidence that one can communicate with medical providers, get support, and manage one's mood. We further sought to examine whether symptoms of depression and anxiety moderate these relationships.Methods: Patients were recruited from three HIV clinics in the southeastern United States as part of an integrated study of treatment for HIV and substance use.Results: We interviewed 154 patients with HIV and substance use who reported taking HIV medications. Based on symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, 63% had probable depression and/or anxiety. Higher levels of self-efficacy in provider communication (β = 3.86, P < 0.01, getting needed support (β = 2.82, P < 0.01, and mood management (β = 2.29, P < 0.05 were related to better self-reported adherence with HIV

  13. Which psychosocial factors are related to chelation adherence in thalassemia? A systematic review

    Evangeli, M.; Mughal, K.; Porter, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    Good adherence to iron chelation therapy in thalassemia is crucial. Although there is evidence that adherence is related to regimen factors, there has been less emphasis on the relationship between psychosocial (psychological, demographic and social) factors and adherence. We present a systematic review of psychosocial correlates of chelation adherence in thalassemia. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Information was extracted regarding the study characteristics and the relationship be...

  14. ART adherence changes among patients in community substance use treatment: a preliminary analysis from MACH14

    Rosen Marc I; Black Anne C; Arnsten Julia H; Simoni Jane M; Wagner Glann J; Goggin Kathleen; Remien Robert H; Golin Carol E; Wang Yan; Bangsberg David; Liu Honghu H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Opiate substitution treatment has been associated with better adherence to lifesaving antiretroviral medications, but the impact of other substance abuse treatment on adherence is unknown. Findings In this study, 215 patients who had been in adherence-focused research studies provided electronically-measured adherence data and a measure of whether the patient had recently been in substance abuse treatment. Recent engagement in substance abuse treatment was independently as...

  15. Practical Strategies for Enhancing Adherence to Treatment Regimen in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Greenley, Rachel N.; Kunz, Jennifer H.; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, an...

  16. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for Future Interventions

    Weaver, Terri E; Sawyer, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a critical problem with adherence rates ranging from 30–60%. Poor adherence to CPAP is widely recognized as a significant limiting factor in treating OSA, reducing the overall effectiveness of the treatment and leaving many OSA patients at heightened risk for comorbid conditions, impaired function and quality of life. The extant literature examining adherence to CPAP provides critical insigh...

  17. Significant improvement in statin adherence and cholesterol levels after acute myocardial infarction

    Brogaard, Hilde Vaiva Tonstad; Køhn, Morten Ganderup; Berget, Oline Sofie; Hansen, Henrik Steen; Gerke, Oke; Mickley, Hans; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2012-01-01

    Not all patients recovering from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are optimally treated with statin, and their adherence to statin treatment may be inadequate. We set out to describe changes in statin treatment adherence and cholesterol values over time.......Not all patients recovering from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are optimally treated with statin, and their adherence to statin treatment may be inadequate. We set out to describe changes in statin treatment adherence and cholesterol values over time....

  18. Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Northern Tanzania:A comprehensive Picture from the Patient Perspective.

    Lyimo Ramsey A; de Bruin Marijn; van den Boogaard Jossy; Hospers Harm J; van der Ven André; Mushi Declare

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To design effective, tailored interventions to support antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, a thorough understanding of the barriers and facilitators of ART adherence is required. Factors at the individual and interpersonal level, ART treatment characteristics and health care factors have been proposed as important adherence determinants. Methods To identify the most relevant determinants of adherence in northern Tanzania, in-depth interviews were carried out with 61 tr...

  19. Adherence to treatment for diabetes mellitus: validation of instruments for oral antidiabetics and insulin1

    Lilian Cristiane Gomes-Villas Boas; Maria Luisa Soares Almeida Pedroso de Lima; Ana Emilia Pace

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to verify the face validity, criterion-related validity and the reliability of two distinct forms of presentation of the instrument Measurement of Adherence to Treatment, one being for ascertaining the adherence to the use of oral antidiabetics and the other for adherence to the use of insulin, as well as to assess differences in adherence between these two modes of drug therapy. METHOD: a methodological study undertaken with 90 adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The crite...

  20. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    Costa E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Elísio Costa,1 Anna Giardini,2 Magda Savin,3 Enrica Menditto,4 Elaine Lehane,5 Olga Laosa,6 Sergio Pecorelli,7,8 Alessandro Monaco,7 Alessandra Marengoni9On behalf of the A1 Action group “Prescription and Adherence to Medical Plans”, European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing1UCIBIO, REQUIMTE, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 2Psychology Unit, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Scientific Institute of Montescano (PV, Pavia, Italy; 3European Association of Pharmaceutical Full-line Wholesalers, Brussels, Belgium; 4CIRFF/Center of Pharmacoeconomics, School of Pharmacy, University of Naples FedericoII, Nápoles, Italy; 5Catherine McAuley School of Nursing and Midwifery, Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 6Centro de Investigación Clínica del Anciano Fundación para la Investigación Biomédica, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Madrid, Spain; 7Italian Medicines Agency – AIFA, Rome, Italy; 8University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy; 9Department of Clinical and Experimental Science, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we