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Sample records for adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

  1. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    A 18-year-old man had a painless swelling in the right anterior portion of maxilla for 2 years. On radiographic examination, a radiolucent region that was not associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Small scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the cystic lumen. At second case, a 16-year-old girl had a painless swelling in the anterior portion of maxilla for 3 years. On radio graphic examination, a radiolucent region that associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Multiple scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the radiolucent cystic lumen. With the patient under local anesthesia, well encapsulated tumors were enucleated. The diagnosis made in the pathologist's report was Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor, benign lesion often having distinct clinical and radiographic features.

  2. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in mandibular region

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is an uncommon neoplasm derivative of the odontogenic epithelium containing canalicular structures with inductor modifications of variable intensity in the conjunctival tissue. It is a slow growth lesion and no much invasive but that may to be similar to other odontogenic lesions more aggressive including the dentigerous cyst and the ameloblastoma among others. Its classical location (upper canine area) guides us to diagnosis and its duct histological pattern is very typical of this tumor. Other tumors included in this group are the ameloblastic fibroma, the ameloblastic odontoma, the calcified odontogenic cyst and composed and complex odontomas. This group of lesions may or not to have formations of hard tissue inside. Thus, authors present the case of a patient presenting with this type of tumor making a histopathology study, a literature review on this benign odontogenic tumor and its clinical radiographic features, treatment, as well as the differential diagnoses to be into account. (author)

  3. A Huge Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor of Maxilla

    2012-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a benign, nonneoplastic (hamartomatous) lesion with a slow progressing growth. It occurs in both intraosseous and peripheral forms. This paper reports the case of a female aged 16 years who presented with a swelling in anterior maxilla; canine was missing, and a supernumerary tooth was present in the mid line. Radiology revealed a well-defined radiolucent area associated with impacted canine and root resorption of adjacent teeth, which was diagnosed ...

  4. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    Lee, Suk Keun; Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The ...

  5. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in jaw: case report and literature review

    Female patient of 15 years old is presented with an enlargement in the left mandibular parasymphyseal area. An orthopantomography was taken and a preliminary diagnosis of dentigerous cyst is suggested. The lesion is resected and sample is sent to the pathology laboratory. A diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is determined histopathologically. A literature review is conducted recently about that type of tumor. The importance of histological analysis of biopsies is highlighted. (author)

  6. A case report of Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in the mandibular anterior region

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a tumor of odontogenic epithelium with varying degrees of inductive changes in the connective tissue. The common radiographic appearance of AOT is a unilocular radiolucency associated with an unerupted tooth. Detectable radiopacities are reported in many cases. We present a case of AOT in a 9-year old-female patient. Cystic lesion with numerous, punctuate radiopaque foci was seen on the anterior region of the mandible. These radiopacities mostly were situated on the buccal side of impacted tooth on the multiplanar images of cone beam computed tomograph. Characteristic duct like structures and amyloid like material were observed on histopathologic finding.

  7. A case report of Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in the mandibular anterior region

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Kwon, Kyung Hwan; Paeng, Jun Young [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a tumor of odontogenic epithelium with varying degrees of inductive changes in the connective tissue. The common radiographic appearance of AOT is a unilocular radiolucency associated with an unerupted tooth. Detectable radiopacities are reported in many cases. We present a case of AOT in a 9-year old-female patient. Cystic lesion with numerous, punctuate radiopaque foci was seen on the anterior region of the mandible. These radiopacities mostly were situated on the buccal side of impacted tooth on the multiplanar images of cone beam computed tomograph. Characteristic duct like structures and amyloid like material were observed on histopathologic finding.

  8. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in the maxillary antrum: A rare case entity

    Kavitha Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is an uncommon benign tumor of odontogenic origin. It occurs in the second decade of life. Females are more commonly affected than males. AOT has a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla; however, very few cases have been reported to occur in the maxillary antrum. This is a case report of a 17-year-old male presented with a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the right maxillary antrum, which was clinically diagnosed as dentigerous cyst. The histopathological examination revealed the presence of AOT.

  9. Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) Originating in a Unicystic Ameloblastoma: A Case Report

    Jivan, Vibha; Altini, Mario; Meer, Shabnum; Mahomed, Farzana

    2007-01-01

    The follicular variant of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is thought to originate from the reduced enamel epithelium of the dental follicle. The origin of the extra-follicular variant however, remains less clear. This paper presents a case of an extra-follicular AOT, which we believe originated from the epithelial lining of a unicystic ameloblastoma, and reviews the literature. The available evidence seems to indicate that some extra-follicular AOTs might arise as secondary phenomena ...

  10. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma: a case report and critical review of the literature

    GOMEZ, RICARDO SANTIAGO; Castro, Wagner Henriques; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) associated with odontoma occurring in the posterior mandible of a 32-year-old man. Although calcifications are commonly found in the AOT, the presence of rudimentary dental structures is a very rare phenomenon. Cases with similar aspects have been described as ameloblastic dentinoma, ameloblastic odontoma, adenoameloblastic odontoma and AOT associated with odontoma. After a careful analysis of the literature we describe the clinical as...

  11. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of the mandible with unusual radiographic features: A case report

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) usually presents as a unilocular, pericoronal radiolucency in the maxillary anterior region in adolescent females. Very few conditions occur in such a narrow age range and at such a restrictive site. Rarely, these tumors present with varied clinical features. A case of AOT of the mandible is reported with unusual features such as large size, multilocular appearance, and aggressive behavior. The role of radiology in diagnosis of atypical AOT is extremely important. The unique radiological manifestations of the lesion helped in the diagnosis, and it was managed conservatively with no evidence of recurrence.

  12. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of the mandible with unusual radiographic features: A case report

    Narayanan, Veena S. [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Coorg Institute of Dental Sciences, Virajpe (India); Naidu, Giridhar; Haldar, Maya [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Peoples' Dental Academy, Bhopal (India); Ragavendra, Raju; Mhaske-Jedhe, Shubang [Dept. of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Peoples' Dental Academy, Bhopal (India)

    2013-06-15

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) usually presents as a unilocular, pericoronal radiolucency in the maxillary anterior region in adolescent females. Very few conditions occur in such a narrow age range and at such a restrictive site. Rarely, these tumors present with varied clinical features. A case of AOT of the mandible is reported with unusual features such as large size, multilocular appearance, and aggressive behavior. The role of radiology in diagnosis of atypical AOT is extremely important. The unique radiological manifestations of the lesion helped in the diagnosis, and it was managed conservatively with no evidence of recurrence.

  13. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with dentigerous cyst in posterior maxilla: A case report and review of literature

    John J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT-a benign (hamartomatous lesion of odontogenic origin-is an uncommon tumor which affects young individuals with a female predominance, mainly in the second decade. This lesion is most commonly located in the anterior maxilla and is usually associated with an impacted canine tooth. This is a case report of a 39-year-old female patient presented with a large AOT of the posterior maxilla associated with an impacted second molar - a very rare situation.

  14. Odontogenic Tumors

    TAHSİNOĞLU, Melih

    2013-01-01

    DefinitionThe neoplasms that consist of the cells considered specialized for odontogenesis, and their product (dentin, enamel, cementum) are called odontogenic tumors.ClassificationTo initiate odontogenesis, epithelium is a must. Same rule holds for the odontogenic tumors: without odontogenic epithelium, odontogenic tumors cannot be, without the induction of odontogenic epithelium odontogenic mesenchyme cannot develop.

  15. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour mimicking a periapical cyst in pregnant woman

    Kothari, Mohit; Bhandari, Neha

    2010-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (AOT) are uncommon odontogenic lesions characterized histologi-cally by duct-like structures derived from the epithelial component of the lesion and can be distinctly classified into follicular, extrafollicular and extraosseous variants (Neville BW, Damm DD, Allen ...

  16. Adenomatoid Tumor of Testis

    Amin, Waqas; Parwani, Anil V

    2009-01-01

    Adenomatoid tumors are responsible for 30% of all paratesticular masses. These are usually asymptomatic, slow growing masses. They are benign tumors comprising of cords and tubules of cuboidal to columnar cells with vacuolated cytoplasm and fibrous stroma. They are considered to be of mesothelial origin supported by histochemical studies and genetic analysis of Wilms tumor 1 gene expression. Excision biopsy is both diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The main clinical consideration is accur...

  17. Cytokeratin 14 and cytokeratin 18 expressions in reduced enamel epithelium and dentigerous cyst: Possible role in oncofetal transformation and histogenesis- of follicular type of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    D K Shruthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Odontogenic cysts and tumors arise from the structures and remnants associated with tooth development. Cysts and tumors derived from the odontogenic tissues constitute an unusually diverse group of lesions. This diversity reflects the complex development of the dental structures, since all these lesions originate through some alteration from the normal pattern of odontogenesis. Cytokeratin (CK 14 is the typical intermediary filament of odontogenic epithelium, CK 18 is the major components of the intermediate filaments of simple or single layered epithelial tissue; it is not expressed in stratified squamous epithelium. The present study was undertaken to understand the expression pattern of these cytokeratins in dentigerous cyst, dental follicular tissue, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT and unicystic ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: The present study consists of 60 specimens consisting of 20 samples of Dentigerous cyst, 20 samples of Reduced enamel epithelium/dental follicles, 10 samples of Follicular type of AOT, 10 samples of unicystic ameloblastoma. The sections of these specimens were stained for CK 14 and CK 18. The number of cells positive for CK 14 and CK 18 was counted per 100 cells. The cells were counted in four randomly selected high-power fields and the mean was calculated. Scoring of cytokeratin 14 expressions was done using Remmele score. Results: The highest expression of cytokeratin 14 was noted in AOT, least was seen in dental follicle/Reduced enamel epithelium (REE. CK18 was negative in all the cases included in the present study. Conclusion: In the present study, the expression of CK14 was noted in AOT, Dentigerous cyst (DC, Unicystic Ameloblastoma (UCA and Dental follicle/REE. The expressions between these lesions were compared. These expression pattern may provide an insight to the histogenesis of AOT.

  18. Adenomatoid tumor i binyre

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-01

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are...

  19. The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: an update of selected issues.

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Khongkhunthiang, Pathawee; Reichart, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this update was to present the recent notable progress within remaining questions relating to the adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT). Selected issues that were studied included the following: (i) AOT history and terminology, (ii) the so-called peripheral AOT, (iii) AOT and the gubernaculum dentis and (iv) the so-called adenomatoid odontogenic cyst (AOC). The earliest irrefutable European case of AOT was described in 1915 by Harbitz as 'cystic adamantoma'. Recently, Ide et al. have traced two Japanese cases with irrefutable proof described by Nakayama in 1903. The so-called peripheral (gingival) variant of AOT seems to cover a dual pathogenesis, both an 'erupted intraosseous' and an 'extraosseous' (gingival) one. In 1992, we theorized that the generally unnoticed gubernaculum dentis (cord and canal) seems to be involved in the development of AOT. Ide et al. have concluded that the dental lamina in the gubernacular cord seems to be an embryonic source of the vast majority of AOTs. The suggestion by Marx and Stern to change the nomenclature of AOT to adenomatoid odontogenic cyst (AOC) is critically discussed. The present authors agree on the background of the work of several groups of researchers and WHO/IARC classifications that the biology of the follicular variant of AOT is already fully explained and does not make room for any change in diagnostic terms. Further, there is no reason to change terminology in this case where improvements or conditions to better clinical management are not an issue. PMID:26865435

  20. Cytokeratin 14 and cytokeratin 18 expressions in reduced enamel epithelium and dentigerous cyst: Possible role in oncofetal transformation and histogenesis- of follicular type of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    D K Shruthi; Shivakumar, M. C.; Anand S Tegginamani; B Karthik; Chetan, B I

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Odontogenic cysts and tumors arise from the structures and remnants associated with tooth development. Cysts and tumors derived from the odontogenic tissues constitute an unusually diverse group of lesions. This diversity reflects the complex development of the dental structures, since all these lesions originate through some alteration from the normal pattern of odontogenesis. Cytokeratin (CK) 14 is the typical intermediary filament of odontogenic epithelium, CK 18 is the major...

  1. Report of Two Cases of Combined Odontogenic Tumors: Ameloblastoma with Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastic Fibroma with Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst.

    Neuman, Ashley Nicole; Montague, Lindsay; Cohen, Donald; Islam, Nadim; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2015-09-01

    Combined odontogenic neoplasms have rarely been documented. Such tumors have also been described by other researchers as "hybrid" lesions. The histologic features are often identical to other individually well-established odontogenic neoplasms such as ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Their clinical presentation is variable, ranging from cysts to neoplasms showing varying degrees of aggressive behavior. Most combined tumors contain features of one of the odontogenic tumors in combination with either a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) or a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. We present two new cases of combined odontogenic tumors: an ameloblastoma with an odontogenic keratocyst and an AF with COC. Predicting clinical outcome is challenging when a combination tumor is encountered due to the paucity of such lesions. One must understand salient features of these entities and differentiate them from the more common conventional neoplasms to expand classification and provide prognostic criteria. PMID:25552434

  2. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. PMID:26614700

  3. Study on the origin and nature of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumor by immunohistochemistry Estudo da origem e natureza do tumor odontogênico adenomatóide pela imunoistoquímica

    Marcelo Macedo Crivelini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is a clinically benign lesion. Discussions about the AOT hamartomatous or neoplastic nature, and the probable odontogenic epithelial cell it originates from still exist. This research aimed to study and discuss the subject by the immunohistochemical detection of cytokeratins, laminin, collagen IV, PCNA and p53 in 8 tumor samples and 8 dental follicle samples containing reduced enamel epithelium. The results have shown that CK14 labelling indicated differentiation grades for secreting ameloblasts or ameloblasts in the post-secreting stage in the adenomatoid structure of AOT. Laminin, found on the luminal surface of adenomatoid structures, was compatible with the reduced enamel epithelium during the "protective stage of amelogenesis". PCNA specifically labelled the spindled areas and peripheral cords of the AOT, indicating that these areas are responsible for tumor growth. After considerations about pathogenesis, the authors suggested that the nature of AOT is hamartomatous with histogenesis from the reduced enamel epithelium.O tumor odontogênico adenomatóide (TOA é uma lesão clinicamente benigna, cujas discussões acerca de sua natureza hamartomatosa ou neoplásica, e provável célula epitelial odontogênica de origem ainda existem. Este projeto de pesquisa teve por objetivo estudar o assunto através da detecção imuno-histoquímica das citoqueratinas, laminina, colágeno IV, PCNA e p53, utilizando-se para isso 08 amostras do tumor e 08 amostras de folículo pericoronário contendo epitélio reduzido do órgão do esmalte (EROE. Os resultados mostraram que a marcação da CK14 sinalizou graus de diferenciação para ameloblastos secretores ou pós-secretores nas estruturas adenomatóides do TOA, e a laminina presente em sua superfície luminal foi compatível com o EROE durante o "estágio protetor" da amelogênese. O PCNA marcou especificamente áreas enoveladas e cordões periféricos do TOA

  4. Análise imuno-histoquímica das citoqueratinas em ameloblastoma e tumor odontogênico adenomatóide Immunohistochemical analysis of cytokeratins in ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    Fernanda Ferreira Lopes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O presente trabalho teve por objetivo traçar o perfil das citoqueratinas (CKs 7, 8, 10, 13, 14, 18 e 19 em ameloblastomas e tumor odontogênico adenomatóide (TOA visando contribuir para o entendimento da histogênese desses tumores e somar com os resultados já relatados na literatura. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: do arquivo do Laboratório de Anatomia Patológica do Departamento de Odontologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN foi selecionada uma amostra com dez casos de ameloblastomas e oito de TOA para o estudo imuno-histoquímico, utilizando-se anticorpos anti-CKs pelo método da estreptoavidina-biotina. RESULTADOS: Observou-se que nos ameloblastomas a CK 14 esteve presente em todos os casos, enquanto a CK 19 foi observada nas células periféricas (oito casos e nas centrais (cinco casos. Para os TOA, observou-se imunopositividade para a CK 14 em todos os casos, enquanto a CK 19 esteve marcada predominantemente nas células ductais (seis casos. CONCLUSÃO: As citoqueratinas são expressas de forma variada nos ameloblastomas e nos TOA, os quais preservam CK típicas do germe dental em estágios avançados do desenvolvimento, confirmando sua origem exclusiva a partir do epitélio odontogênico e não se evidenciando CK características do epitélio escamoso.OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to describe the immunohistochemical expression of cytokeratins (CKs 7, 8, 10,13, 14, 18 and 19 in the epithelial components of ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT. The results were compared and histogenesis discussed. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Specimens of ten ameloblastomas and eight adenomatoid odontogenic tumors were examined by immunohistochemistry using streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method and anti-CKs antibody. The sample was obtained from Department of Oral Pathology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical reactivity for CK14 was detected in all cases of

  5. Evaluation of Amelotin Expression in Benign Odontogenic Tumors

    Daiana Paula Stolf

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Amelotin (AMTN is highly and selectively expressed by odontogenic epithelium-derived ameloblasts throughout the maturation stage of enamel formation. The protein is secreted and concentrated at the basal lamina interface between ameloblasts and the mineralized enamel matrix. Odontogenic tumors (OT are characterized by morphological resemblance to the developing tooth germ. OT vary from slowly expanding, encapsulated tumors to locally aggressive and destructive lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression profile of AMTN in benign odontogenic tumors and to correlate it with specific features of the lesions. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for AMTN was performed on human ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma (AF, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO, odontoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT. Results: Generally, ameloblastoma and AF did not stain for AMTN. A strong signal was detected in ameloblast-like layers of AFO and odontoma. Epithelial cells in AOT did not stain for AMTN, while calcifying areas of extracellular eosinophilic matrix were intensely stained. Interestingly, ghost cells present in odontomas and CCOT revealed variable staining, again in association with calcification foci. Conclusions: Amelotin expression was consistently detected in tumors presenting differentiated ameloblasts and obvious matrix deposition. Additionally, the presence of the protein in the eosinophilic matrix and small mineralized foci of AOT and calcification areas of ghost cells may suggest a role for AMTN in the control of mineralization events. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(5.000: 236-245

  6. Prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors among UAE population

    Natheer Hashim Al-Rawi; Manal Awad; Imad Eddin Al-Zuebi; Racha A Hariri; Eman W Salah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic cysts and tumors are lesions that tend to arise from the tooth apparatus or its remnants. Odontogenic cysts and tumors constitute an important aspect of oral maxillofacial pathology as they can be diagnosed in general dental practice. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors diagnosed in the UAE and to compare the results with findings in the literature. Materials and Methods: Data of odontogenic cysts diagnosed betw...

  7. Giant Pindborg Tumor (Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor): An Unusual Case Report with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation

    Satya Ranjan Misra; Sthitaprajna Lenka; Sujit Ranjan Sahoo; Sobhan Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors develop in the jaws from odontogenic tissues such as enamel organ, Hertwig epithelial root sheath, dental lamina, and so on. A variety of tumors unique to the maxilla and mandible are therefore seen. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare, aggressive, benign odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin accounting for only about 1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is eponymously called ′′Pindborg tumor′′, as it was first described by Pindborg in 1955. The origin of ...

  8. An Insight into cytopathology of odontogenic tumors: A review

    Vidyadevi Chandavarkar; Mithilesh Mishra; Deepak Bhargava; Sangeetha R; Radhika Gupta; Ritika Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors represent a spectrum of lesions ranging from dental hamartomas to malignant and benign neoplasms, all arising from odontogenic residues thereby present as jaw tumors. Occasionally an odontogenic tumor develops from a preexisting developmental cyst such as dentigerous cyst or dental primordium. Fine needle aspiration cytology has been used as a diagnostic tool in evaluating suspected lesions. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of jaw tumors has not been studied extensive...

  9. A 10-year retrospective study on odontogenic tumors in Iran

    Nasim Taghavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to review cases of odontogenic tumors diagnosed in two pathology centers in Tehran, Iran, during a 10-year period. Study Design: Patients′ records were seen at two teaching pathology Centre′s of Shahid Beheshti University between the months of March 2000 to 2010 with histologic diagnosis of any type of odontogenic tumors. The records were analyzed for frequency, age, sex, site, as well as clinical, radiographic and histopathologic findings. Results: Of 30706 biopsies, 4767 (15.5% cases were diagnosed as oral and maxillofacial lesions. Among these, 720 cases were tumoral with 188 (26.1% cases of odontogenic tumors. Tumors with odontogenic epithelium origin formed 70.2% of total numbers of odontogenic tumors. Mixed odontogenic tumors and tumors of odontogenic ectomesenchyme comprised 12.2% and 17.5% of the cases respectively. Ameloblastoma, with a frequency of 62.2% was the most common tumor in this review which was followed by odontoma and odontogenic myxoma. Conclusion: Although there are few studies on odontogenic tumors in literature, the comparison of our results with existing data shows significant differences in the distribution of tumors and age of patients, which may be due to ethnic features and geographic distribution of patients. Future studies on other ethnic groups are essential for further clarification of the findings in this research.

  10. Prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors among UAE population

    Natheer Hashim Al-Rawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Odontogenic cysts and tumors are lesions that tend to arise from the tooth apparatus or its remnants. Odontogenic cysts and tumors constitute an important aspect of oral maxillofacial pathology as they can be diagnosed in general dental practice. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors diagnosed in the UAE and to compare the results with findings in the literature. Materials and Methods: Data of odontogenic cysts diagnosed between 1990 and 2010 were collected from the files of the Oral Pathology Laboratory and Oral Surgery Department of Tawam Hospital, UAE. Results: Most of the prevalent odontogenic cysts are radicular cysts (69.1% - followed by dentigerous cysts (7.9%. Among the odontogenic tumors, the most prevalent is odontoma (12.2% followed by ameloblastoma (2.9%. The middle and posterior mandible was the most common anatomic site for the formation of cysts and tumors. In fact, 93.4% of patients over 40 years presented with odontogenic cysts, whereas 6.3% presented with odontogenic tumor. Odontoma as odontogenic tumor was seen mostly in the first and second decades of life. Conclusion: The prevalence of odontogenic cysts was similar to that reported in the literature, with inflammatory cysts occurring most frequently.

  11. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with ameloblastic fibro-odontoma of the anterior mandible.

    Lee, Jun; Song, Young-Gook; Moon, Seong-Yong; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Bong Chul; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, which was formerly named calcifying odontogenic cyst, is a benign odontogenic tumor containing clusters of ghost cells within ameloblastic epithelium. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors have been associated with other odontogenic tumors, a finding that is a rare event in other types of odontogenic cysts or tumors. This report describes a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastic fibroma-odontoma of the anterior mandible that occurred in a 4-year-old Korean girl. PMID:24785751

  12. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    Kavita Garg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/controllers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  13. Adenomatoid tumor of the uterus: report of a case and review of the literature

    Murao,Tsuyoshi

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of uterine adenomatoid tumor in a 47-year-old female was studied with both light and electron microscopes. The tumor was circumscribed, 2.5 cm in diameter, and located in the posterior wall of the uterus. In light microscopy, tumor cells showing "signet-ring" appearance arranged in cords or tubules. Hyaluronidase-sensitive acid mucopolysaccharide was present in the cells and luminal surfaces. Mucicarmine stain was negative and periodic acid-Schiff reaction was faintly positive. In electron microscopy, the tumor showed basal laminae, well-developed desmosomes and numerous microvilli. Intercellular spaces were present between adjacent cells. Small intercellular spaces were separated from the large lumens by desmosomes and tight junctions, while large spaces communicated with the tubular lumens. Forty-four reported cases of adenomatoid tumor in females were briefly reviewed.

  14. Adenomatoid tumor of the female genital tract: Report of three cases

    Filiz BOLAT

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid tumors are benign proliferations that are most often encountered in the female and male genital tracts. The mesothelial phenotype of these unusual tumors has been established by a variety of ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies, although their histogenesis is by no means certain. In this paper we report three cases that were diagnosed as genital tract adenomatoid tumors and discussed the clinical signs, origin and immunohistochemical characteristics of the this type of tumor. Immunohistochemical expression of calretinin, HBME-1, vimentin, pancytokeratin, EMA, and CD31 were analyzed in three ATs, using formaline-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissues. The age of the patients were ranging from 40 to 46 years with a median of 43.3. Tumors were located in uterus (one, and fallopian tube (two. Tumor sizes were ranging between 0.6-5 cm. Immunohistochemically all tumors exhibited strong and diffuse positivity for pancytokeratin, calretinin, HBME-1 and vimentin, but negativity for EMA, and CD31. The immunohistochemical results support histogenetic theories of the adenomatoid tumor that claim it as a type of benign mesothelioma. Immunohistochemical phenotypes can play an important role in the differential diagnosis.

  15. Primordial Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case.

    Slater, Lee J; Eftimie, Liviu F; Herford, Alan S

    2016-03-01

    Primordial odontogenic tumor (POT) was first described in 2014. It typically presents in the posterior mandible of a child or adolescent as a "dentigerous cyst-like" well-circumscribed radiolucency associated with an unerupted molar. POT consists of an ellipsoidal mass of dental papilla-like myxoid connective tissue entirely enveloped in a delicate membrane of ameloblastic epithelium. It shows features of a developing tooth with a huge dental papilla, and because it is devoid of dental hard tissue, it could be regarded a soft tissue odontoma. The lesion histologically mimics early (primordial) stages of tooth development. This report describes a case of POT and POT-like proliferations in an unrelated complex odontoma. PMID:26408843

  16. Posterior Mediastinal Adenomatoid Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Vishwas Parekh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid tumor is an uncommon benign neoplasm of mesothelial differentiation that distinctively arises in and around the genital organs. In rare instances, it has been described in extragenital locations. There have been only two reports documenting its occurrence in the anterior mediastinum, and no reports documenting its occurrence in the posterior mediastinum. We report the first case of posterior mediastinal adenomatoid tumor. A 37-year-old Caucasian woman presented with symptoms of bronchitis. Imaging studies identified a 2.0 cm posterior mediastinal mass abutting the T9 vertebral body, clinically and radiologically most consistent with schwannoma. Histologic sections revealed a lesion composed of epithelioid cells arranged in cords and luminal profiles embedded in a fibrotic to loose stroma and surrounded by a fibrous pseudocapsule. Lesional cells showed vacuolated eosinophilic cytoplasm and peripherally displaced nuclei with prominent nucleoli. There was focal cytologic atypia but no mitotic figures or necrosis was identified. The lesional cells expressed cytokeratin, calretinin, and nuclear WT1 but were negative for PAX8, TTF1, p53, chromogranin, CD31, and CD34, and Ki67 showed <2% proliferation rate, diagnostic of adenomatoid tumor. Three years after resection, the patient is in good health without tumor recurrence. Thus, our encounter effectively expands the differential diagnosis of posterior mediastinal neoplastic entities.

  17. Posterior Mediastinal Adenomatoid Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Parekh, Vishwas; Winokur, Thomas; Cerfolio, Robert J.; Stevens, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid tumor is an uncommon benign neoplasm of mesothelial differentiation that distinctively arises in and around the genital organs. In rare instances, it has been described in extragenital locations. There have been only two reports documenting its occurrence in the anterior mediastinum, and no reports documenting its occurrence in the posterior mediastinum. We report the first case of posterior mediastinal adenomatoid tumor. A 37-year-old Caucasian woman presented with symptoms of bronchitis. Imaging studies identified a 2.0 cm posterior mediastinal mass abutting the T9 vertebral body, clinically and radiologically most consistent with schwannoma. Histologic sections revealed a lesion composed of epithelioid cells arranged in cords and luminal profiles embedded in a fibrotic to loose stroma and surrounded by a fibrous pseudocapsule. Lesional cells showed vacuolated eosinophilic cytoplasm and peripherally displaced nuclei with prominent nucleoli. There was focal cytologic atypia but no mitotic figures or necrosis was identified. The lesional cells expressed cytokeratin, calretinin, and nuclear WT1 but were negative for PAX8, TTF1, p53, chromogranin, CD31, and CD34, and Ki67 showed <2% proliferation rate, diagnostic of adenomatoid tumor. Three years after resection, the patient is in good health without tumor recurrence. Thus, our encounter effectively expands the differential diagnosis of posterior mediastinal neoplastic entities. PMID:27293940

  18. Central granular cell odontogenic tumor: Report of an unusual case

    Mani Madan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central granular cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT is an unusual benign odontogenic neoplasm characterized by the presence of granular cells associated with apparently inactive odontogenic epithelium. These tumors tend to occur in the posterior mandible and usually present as well-defined unilocular or multilocular radiolucent lesions. So far, only <40 cases of CGCOT have been described in the literature under various terminologies. Though these tumors were not considered as distinct entity in the recent WHO classification of odontogenic tumors, long-term follow-up is recommended as malignant counterpart of CGCOT has already been reported. The main aim of this article is to report an additional case of CGCOT to the literature, occurring in a 73-year-old male.

  19. Clinical and pathological aspects on some odontogenic tumors

    Tie Jun Li

    2008-01-01

    @@ Odontogenic tumors constitute a very diverse group of lesions that reflects the complex processes of odontogenesis. Controversies over their classification/subtyping, terminology and diagnosis have been persisted, which has direct bearings on therapeutic and/or prognostic implications.

  20. Msx and Dlx Homeogene Expression in Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors

    Ruhin-Poncet, Blandine; Ghoul-Mazgar, Sonia; Hotton, Dominique; Capron, Frédérique; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Goubin, Gérard; Berdal, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial odontogenic tumors are rare jaw pathologies that raise clinical diagnosis and prognosis dilemmas notably between ameloblastomas and clear cell odontogenic carcinomas (CCOCs). In line with previous studies, the molecular determinants of tooth development—amelogenin, Msx1, Msx2, Dlx2, Dlx3, Bmp2, and Bmp4—were analyzed by RT-PCR, ISH, and immunolabeling in 12 recurrent ameloblastomas and in one case of CCOC. Although Msx1 expression imitates normal cell differentiation in these tumor...

  1. Bilateral keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A report of two cases

    Srivatsan, K. S.; Kumar, Vikas; Mahendra, Ashish; Singh, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    The designation “keratocyst” was used to describe any jaw cyst in which keratin was formed to a large extent. A rare incidence of bilateral mandibular cysts (odontogenic keratocysts) was related to third molar teeth. Herein, we report two cases of bilateral keratocystic odontogenic tumor in a 22-year-old male and 15-year-old female, which was diagnosed by a series of investigations and treated appropriately.

  2. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Clinicopathological aspects and treatment.

    Patricio Robles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen :El tumor odontogénico queratoquístico es una neoplasia intraósea benigna que deriva de restos de la lámina dental, y que se presenta con alta frecuencia. Sus características histológicas le confieren una elevada tasa de recidiva, siendo este uno de sus principales problemas terapéuticos. Presenta además una considerable agresividad local, la cual se expresa con la expansión de corticales óseas, retardo en la erupción y desplazamiento de dientes, vasos sanguíneos y nervios. En la actualidad existen diversos tratamientos, siendo el ideal aquel que presente el menor riesgo de recidiva con una baja morbilidad para el paciente. En la presente revisión se discuten los principales aspectos histopatológicos, clínicos y terapéuticos de esta patología oral Abstract: Keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign intraosseous neoplasm derived from remnants of the dental lamina, and that occurs with high frequency. Histological characteristics confer a high recurrence rate, this being one of its main therapeutic problems, also present a high local aggressiveness, which is expressed in cortical expansion, delayed eruption and displacement of teeth, blood vessels and nerves. At present there are various treatments, being the ideal one that present the lowest risk of recurrence with low morbidity for the patient. In this review the main histopathological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of oral pathology are discussed.

  3. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: case report with CT and ultrasonography findings

    Sumer, A Pinar; Sumer, Mahmut; Celenk, Peruze; Danaci, Murat [Faculty of Dentistry, University of Ondokuz Mayis, Samsun (Turkmenistan); Gunhan, Oemer [Gulhane Military Medicine Academy, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2012-03-15

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign odontogenic tumor with a potentially aggressive and infiltrative behavior. KCOT is most commonly occurred in mandible and demonstrate a unilocular, round, oval, scalloped radiolucent area, while large lesions may appear multilocular. An important characteristic of KCOT is its propensity to grow in an antero-posterior direction within medullary cavity of bone causing minimal expansion. Definitive diagnosis relies on histological examination. In this report, a KCOT that had an expansion both buccal and lingual cortical bone is described including its features in computed tomography and ultrasonographic exams. The lesion was removed surgically via an intraoral approach under local anesthesia and histologically reported as a KCOT.

  4. Evaluation of Neoplastic Nature of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Versus Ameloblastoma

    Although most of odontogenic tumors are benign, some of them will show locally destructive behavior, as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is now known as a benign but aggressive odontogenic neoplasm. The neoplastic characteristics in KCOT have been suggested from clinical as well as pathologic aspects. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is a gelatinase form of the MMPs family, which is a group of proteolytic enzymes that degrade many types of collagen. Cysteine aspartic acid-specific protease-3 (caspase-3) is the most downstream enzyme in the apoptosis-inducing protease pathway and is probably the most clearly associated with cell death. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the extracellular degradation potentiality (MMP-2) and apoptosis (caspase-3) of the epithelial lining in KCOT versus radicular cysts and ameloblastoma, in order to reinforce its classification as an odontogenic tumor. Material and Methods: Twenty-six surgical specimens including keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT; n=l 1), ameloblastoma (AB; n=8) and radicular cysts (RC; n=7) were examined for expression of MMP-2 and caspase-3 using the immunohistochemical method. Results: For MMP-2 immuno expression, AB showed the statistically significant highest mean area percentage, followed by KCOT, while RC showed the statistically significant lowest mean area percentage. As for caspase-3, there was no statistically significant difference between KCOT and AB, while RC showed the statistically significantly lowest mean area percentage. Conclusion: Overexpression of MMP-2 protein related to growth and progression of lesions analyzed and may be one of the factors enhancing the recurrence of KCOT and invasion of AB. In addition, the epithelial lining of KCOT showed a high cell turnover reinforcing its classification as an odontogenic tumor

  5. Squamous odontogenic tumor: A case report and review of literature

    Manjunath Badni; A Nagaraja; Kamath, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT) is a rare, benign, locally infiltrative neoplasm of the jaws that appears to originate from the rests of Malassez, gingival surface epithelium or from remnants of the dental lamina. SOT was first described by Pullon et al. (1975). Since then there has been paucity in the number of reported cases, especially in the Indian subcontinent. The tumor is often asymptomatic, although it can present with symptoms of pain and tooth mobility. The characteristic radio...

  6. Odontogenic tumors: a 14-year retrospective study in Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Grasieli de Oliveira Ramos; Juliana Cristina Porto; Daniella Serafim Couto Vieira; Filipe Modolo Siqueira; Elena Riet Correa Rivero

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are lesions that develop exclusively on maxillary bones, and form a heterogeneous group. They vary from hamartomatous lesions to benign and malign tumors. Although they are rarely observed in dentistry clinics, it is extremely important for the dentist to be aware of them. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of odontogenic tumors diagnosed in the population of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Cases of odontogenic tumors were selected from the ...

  7. Giant Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor: Three Cases and a Literature Review

    Alexandre Caixeta Guimarães

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign intra-bone mass originating from dental lamina or its residue. It represents 2–11% of jaw cysts, and has a slow but aggressive growth. The evaluation of molecular characteristics, immunohistochemistry, and genetic expression currently have no established classification regarding the evolution and pathophysiologic pattern of these lesions.   Materials and Methods: This is a clinical retrospective study with a full analysis of patient history regarding physical evaluation, radiologic images, pathology results, and surgical resection. We performed a major literature review concerning current concepts relating to its biological characterization.   Results: Three cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor were identified. Two of the cases were large, with aggressive behavior and significant bone destruction and recurrence, which had been overlooked for more than a decade. The third case had an early diagnosis, and the treatment led to full recovery and complete healing. Conclusion:  The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign lesion with slow growth, which lends itself to a more conservative treatment, even in cases of large lesions. A better understanding of these tumors, both at the biological and molecular level, could lead to guidelines for treatment and prognosis of such patients.

  8. Frequency of Odontogenic Tumors in Zahedan-Iran from 2000 to 2010

    Hamideh Kadeh; Shirin Saravani; Tahereh Nosratzehi; Feizorrahman Rasulizadeh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Odontogenic tumors constitute an important aspect of oral and maxillofacial pathology. Frequency of odontogenic tumors varies in different societies but no study has been done in Zahedan so far. The purpose of this study was to achieve the sex, location and age distribution of odontogenic tumors and frequency of each one in a period of ten years.Materials & Methods: In this study, documents in archive of maxillofacial pathology department of Zahedan dental school, Khatamolanbia,...

  9. Giant Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor: Three Cases and a Literature Review

    Alexandre Caixeta Guimarães; Mariana Dutra de Cassia Ferreira Santos; Guilherme Machado de Carvalho; Carlos Takahiro Chone; Leopoldo Nizam Pfeilsticker

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign intra-bone mass originating from dental lamina or its residue. It represents 2–11% of jaw cysts, and has a slow but aggressive growth. The evaluation of molecular characteristics, immunohistochemistry, and genetic expression currently have no established classification regarding the evolution and pathophysiologic pattern of these lesions.   Materials and Methods: This is a clinical retrospective study with a full analysis of patient ...

  10. Giant Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor: Three Cases and Literature Review

    Caixeta Guimarães, Alexandre; Dutra de Cassia Ferreira Santos, Mariana; Machado de Carvalho, Guilherme; Takahiro Chone, Carlos; Nizam Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign intra-bone mass originating from dental lamina or its residue. It represents 2–11% of jaw cysts, and has a slow but aggressive growth. The evaluation of molecular characteristics, immunohistochemistry, and genetic expression currently have no established classification regarding the evolution and pathophysiologic pattern of these lesions. Case Report: This is a clinical retrospective study with a full analysis of patient history regar...

  11. Odontogenic tumors in Iran, Isfahan: A study of 260 cases

    Mahsa Kowkabi; Sayed Mohammad Razavi; Negin Khosravi; Amir Arsalan Navabi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to record the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs), evaluate and analyze the epidemiological features of the lesions in patients referring to dental faculty of Isfahan and compare these data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: In this study, we reviewed the records of 6,860 lesions from 1988 to 2010 archived in the oral pathology department of dental faculty of Isfahan retrospectively and using criteria for histological typificatio...

  12. Odontogenic tumors: A review of 675 cases in Eastern Libya

    Saravana HL Goteti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005 classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2% was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2% and odontoma (19.9%. The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population.

  13. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors – Antecedents

    Aesha Imran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs. The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance.

  14. Defects of the Carney complex gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors.

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia F C; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-06-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as to facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene displays a loss of protein expression as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included in the study: six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial components of the tumors were separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around the PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations along with two 5'-UTR and four intronic mutations in mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, which indicates that additional genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of such tumors, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice do not show abnormalities, which indicates that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  15. Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in a non-syndromic minor patient: Report of an unusual case

    Shalu Rai; Rana, A. S.; Puneet Kalra; Deepak Gupta; Sumit Goel

    2013-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is developmental odontogenic cysts of epithelial origin known for their potentially aggressive behavior and significant rate of recurrences. Single odontogenic cysts are very well documented in the literature. Multiple (KCOT) are principle features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome). We report an intriguing case of multiple KCOT in a non-syndromic patient simultaneously occurring in maxil...

  16. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst Associated with an Impacted Upper Cuspid

    A 35-year-old man was referred to the department of Oral and maxillofacial surgery of Chonnam university hospital for the chief complaint of asymptomatic swelling on the buccal vestibule of upper right canine area. Radiographs revealed that the upper right canine was impacted and there was a well-circumscribed pericoronal radiolucency related with the canine. Multiple radiopaque foci were scattered in the radiolucent lesion, and the roots of the lateral incisor and the first premolar related to the lesion showed external resorption. The radiographic features of this lesion were typical of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, but considering the sex and age of the patient, the tentative diagnosis was made as calcifying odontogenic cyst. Microscopically this lesion was diagnosed as calcifying odontogenic cyst. Because calcifying odontogenic cyst has no pathognomonic feature of radiographs, to consider radiographic features with clinical findings is necessary in order to establish more correct diagnosis.

  17. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst Associated with an Impacted Upper Cuspid

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Lee, Young Seo; Yi, Jae Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    A 35-year-old man was referred to the department of Oral and maxillofacial surgery of Chonnam university hospital for the chief complaint of asymptomatic swelling on the buccal vestibule of upper right canine area. Radiographs revealed that the upper right canine was impacted and there was a well-circumscribed pericoronal radiolucency related with the canine. Multiple radiopaque foci were scattered in the radiolucent lesion, and the roots of the lateral incisor and the first premolar related to the lesion showed external resorption. The radiographic features of this lesion were typical of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, but considering the sex and age of the patient, the tentative diagnosis was made as calcifying odontogenic cyst. Microscopically this lesion was diagnosed as calcifying odontogenic cyst. Because calcifying odontogenic cyst has no pathognomonic feature of radiographs, to consider radiographic features with clinical findings is necessary in order to establish more correct diagnosis.

  18. Cyst or tumor in the buccomaxillary region: Review of literature and a case report.

    Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Kujan, Omar Bashar; Dwedary, Hisham Mohammed Najeeb; Sikander, Mohammed Hilal; Mankar, Sunil; Amrin, M Nidha

    2015-08-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) include entities of a hamartomatous nature, such as odontoma, benign neoplasms like an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), some benign neoplasms are aggressive as in the case of ameloblastoma. The AOT is a rare odontogenic tumor constituting only 3% of all the OT and very often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. We report a case of an intra-osseous type of AOT occurred in a young 16-year-old female located in the anterior maxilla along with the clinical, radiological, histological features, and literature review related to the tumor affecting the patient. PMID:26538960

  19. Peripheral Tumor with Osteodentin and Cementum-like Material in an Infant: Odontogenic Hamartoma or Odontoma?

    Sfakianou, Aikaterini; Emmanouil, Dimitris E; Tosios, Konstantinos I; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a peripheral tumor on the mandibular alveolar ridge of a seven-month-old Caucasian boy, consisting of ectomesencymal odontogenic tissues, in particular osteodentin and cementum-like material, in a cellular or loose vascular connective tissue stroma. This case may be considered either a peripheral odontogenic hamartoma or a peripheral odontoma. PMID:27098720

  20. Defects of the Carney complex's gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia FC; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in their pathogenesis may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene shows loss of protein expression, as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, LOH analysis and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included, being six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial component of the tumors was separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a+/− mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations, besides two 5’-UTR and four intronic mutations in the mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a+/− mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, suggesting that additional genes may be involved in their pathogenesis, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A's expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a+/− mice do not show abnormalities, suggesting that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  1. Morphometric evaluation of keratocystic odontogenic tumor before and after marsupialization

    Deborah Campos Telles

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the morphometric evaluation of the epithelial lining and fibrous capsule in histological specimens of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs before and after marsupialization. Histological sections from six KOTs that had undergone marsupialization followed by enucleation were photographed. The thickness and features of the capsule and of the epithelial lining of the tumor were evaluated upon marsupialization and upon subsequent enucleation using Axion Vision software. The histological specimens taken upon marsupialization presented an epithelial lining that is typical of KOTs. After marsupialization, the enucleated specimens had a modified epithelial lining and a fibrous capsule that both presented a greater median thickness (p = 0.0277 and p = 0.0212, respectively, morphological changes, and significant enlargement. These modifications can facilitate full surgical treatment and may well be related to a low KOT recurrence rate.

  2. Frequency of Odontogenic Tumors in Zahedan-Iran from 2000 to 2010

    Hamideh Kadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Odontogenic tumors constitute an important aspect of oral and maxillofacial pathology. Frequency of odontogenic tumors varies in different societies but no study has been done in Zahedan so far. The purpose of this study was to achieve the sex, location and age distribution of odontogenic tumors and frequency of each one in a period of ten years.Materials & Methods: In this study, documents in archive of maxillofacial pathology department of Zahedan dental school, Khatamolanbia, Tamin ejtemaei Hospital and private laboratories were reviewed from 2000 to 2010. Data about age, sex, location of tumors and relation with impacted tooth were extracted and were submitted in the forms.Results: In this study, among the 1125 cases of the oromaxillofacial lesions, 50 cases of odontogenic tumors were found. Among the different tumors, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KOT was the most common odontogenic tumor (48%, followed by ameloblastoma and odontoma with frequency of 24% and 12%, respectively. There were no cases of malignancy. The incidence of these lesions was 52% in women and 48% in men. The most common location of tumors was posterior of mandible and tumors were more frequent in the third decade of life. In 12 cases, the lesions were accompanied by impacted teeth.Conclusion: In this study the most frequent tumors were KOT, Ameloblastoma and odontoma respectively.

  3. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: report of a recurrent destructive case with review of literature.

    Ramin Foroughi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT is an uncommon odontogenic tumor with well-known histopathological features and a challenging treatment plan. Although some investigators advocate conservative approach as the treatment of choice, others believe in radical surgical excision to avoid recurrence or malignant transformation. The main objective of this case report is presenting an unusual destructive recurrence of CEOT after 8 years in a 34-year-old woman, and discussing an effective treatment plan for this tumor.

  4. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report

    Vidya Rani; Mahaboob Kadar Masthan; Babu Aravindha; Sankari Leena

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucos...

  5. Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in a non-syndromic minor patient: Report of an unusual case

    Shalu Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is developmental odontogenic cysts of epithelial origin known for their potentially aggressive behavior and significant rate of recurrences. Single odontogenic cysts are very well documented in the literature. Multiple (KCOT are principle features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. We report an intriguing case of multiple KCOT in a non-syndromic patient simultaneously occurring in maxilla as well as in mandible with brief highlight on molecular data and the treatment modality.

  6. Odontogenic tumors: a 14-year retrospective study in Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Grasieli de Oliveira Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors (OTs are lesions that develop exclusively on maxillary bones, and form a heterogeneous group. They vary from hamartomatous lesions to benign and malign tumors. Although they are rarely observed in dentistry clinics, it is extremely important for the dentist to be aware of them. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of odontogenic tumors diagnosed in the population of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Cases of odontogenic tumors were selected from the anatomopathological diagnostic services at Federal University of Santa Catarina from 1998 to 2011. Clinical data on these cases were collected from biopsy reports and patient files. Seventy-eight cases of odontogenic tumors were surveyed. Of these diagnoses, 51% were keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs; the remaining cases were mainly ameloblastomas and odontomas. The most frequently observed lesion in this retrospective study was KCOT (more than half of cases. Thus, this study shows that modifying the classification of the OTs altered the frequency of the lesions, possibly making KCOT the most common lesion observed in diagnostic services worldwide.

  7. Diagnostic and treatment features of keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    Guilherme Romano Scartezini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT comprise a unique pathological entity characterized by aggressive/destructive behavior and propensity to recurrence. This study describes the diagnostic and treatment features of a KCOT lesion. A 22-year old man was referred for surgical treatment of pericoronitis on tooth no. 37. Panoramic radiography revealed a unilocular, large radiolucent area extending from tooth no. 36 to the left mandibular ramus. Aspiration and incisional biopsy were performed, and the tissue sample was sent for microscopic evaluation. Microscopically, a cystic lesion was observed, lined by keratinized squamous epithelium and fi lled with keratin lamellae, confi rming the diagnosis of KCOT. Surgery was performed in an outpatient setting and involved osteotomy, detachment of the cystic lesion, and removal of teeth no. 36, 37, and 38. The patient was clinically and radiographically followed for 12 months, and no evidence of recurrence was observed. KCOTs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions affecting the posterior region of the mandible. Accurate clinical, radiographic, and microscopic examinations are essential to establish the defi nitive diagnosis and choose the most effective therapy.

  8. Surgical approach and the use of cryotherapy in a keratocystic odontogenic tumor after 12 months of decompression

    Claudio Maranhão Pereira; Danilo Santos Carneiro; Renan Correia Arcanjo; Mauro Silva Filho; Flávio Augusto Cardoso da Silva; Alberto Ferreira da Silva Júnior

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KOT) is a pathology classified as an odontogenic cyst and began to be considered an odontogenic tumor in 2005, because of the presence of intrinsic characteristics compatible with neoplasm, such as its high rate of recurrence and differentiated mechanism of growth. Although its etiology is still unknown, its origin is believed to be related to the remnants of the dental lamina. Clinically it presents aggressive behavior and high rates of recu...

  9. Conservative Management of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors of Jaws

    Nurhan Güler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate different surgical treatment methods for keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs and the outcome of those treatments over a 9-year period. Patients and Methods. A retrospective review was performed on 43 KCOTs in 39 patients. In radiographic evaluations for diagnosis, follow ups and before and after treatment, panoramic, 3D CT and MR images were used. The three groups of different surgical treatment were (1 enucleation for small unilocular lesions without certainty of histology; (2 enucleation with Carnoy's solution, for small unilocular lesions after previous histological confirmation of KOCT; (3 marsupialization followed by enucleation with Carnoy's solution implemented for large often multilocular KCOTs with intact or destruction of cortical bone without infiltration of neighbouring tissue. Results. 43 KCOT cases were mostly localized in mandible (76.7%, radiologically unilocular (72%, and parakeratocysts (88.4%. Inflammation and satellite cysts (daughter cysts were detected histopathologically in 14 (32.5% and 7 (16.3%, respectively. Among the 43 cysts, 20 (46.5% were associated with the impacted third molar and of 21 (48.8% was in tooth bearing area, and 5 (11, 6% located on edentulous areas. It was located mostly in the anterior region of maxilla (90% and in mandibular molar and ramus (62.8%. The treatments of KCOTs were 18 (41.9% for group 1, and 10 (23.3% group 2, and 15 (34.8% group 3. A statistically significant relationship was found between the radiographic appearance and treatment methods (=0.00. No recurrence was found on 40.54±23.02 months follow up. Conclusion. We concluded that successful treatment methods were enucleation and Carnoy's solution in small lesions and marsupialization in lesions that have reached a very large size, but because KCOT was observed in second decade mostly, long-term follows up are suggested.

  10. Giant Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor of the Mandible – A Case Report

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a relatively rare, benign neoplasm which develops in the maxilla or mandible, arising from the dental lamina or basal cells of the oral epithelium. It is often found incidentally and brings about late symptoms as it does not cause bone distension for a long time. The presented case is of a young woman with a giant keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the mandible. Despite its rare occurrence, it must be taken into consideration in radiological and clinical diagnostics. Due to the frequent recurrence of KCOT, patients are recommended to be kept under long-term and close radiological supervision

  11. A pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with compound odontoma: a case report and review of literature

    Borkosky Silvia S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigmented intraosseous odontogenic lesions are rare with only 47 reported cases in the English literature. Among them, pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, formerly known as calcifying odontogenic cyst, is the most common lesion with 20 reported cases. Methods A case of pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma occurring at the mandibular canine-premolar region of a young Japanese boy is presented with radiographic, and histological findings. Special staining, electron microscopic study and immunohistochemical staining were also done to characterize the pigmentation. Results The pigments in the lesion were confirmed to be melanin by Masson-Fontana staining and by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of dendritic melanocytes within the lesion was also demonstrated by S-100 immunostaining. Conclusion The present case report of pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma features a comprehensive study on melanin and melanocytes, including histochemical, immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopic findings.

  12. Central Granular Cell Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case with CBCT Features.

    Najmeh Anbiaee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central granular cell odontogenic tumor CGCOT of the jaw is an exceedingly rare benign odontogenic neoplasm with 35 reported cases in the literature. Among these, very few studies have focused on the cone-beam CT features of CGCOT. Here, we report a case of an asymptomatic CGCOT in a 16-year-old girl and focus on the cone-beam CT features. Only 36 cases of this lesion, including this one, have been reported so far. The case presented is of special importance due to the young age of the patient, the posterior location of the lesion and the multilocular pattern in the cone beam CT images.

  13. Two unique cases of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in the maxillary posterior region.

    Chindasombatjaroen, Jira; Poomsawat, Sopee; Boonsiriseth, Kiatanant

    2014-10-01

    A calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is an uncommon odontogenic tumor with a predilection for the anterior part of the jaws. We report on 2 cases of CCOT in the posterior maxilla involving the maxillary sinus. In the first case, conventional radiography found a well-defined unilocular lesion. Internal calcification was identified on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Radiographically, the second case showed 2 large locules with a large complex odontoma and an embedded third molar. By revealing the internal calcification of the lesion, CBCT was helpful in the differential diagnosis of the first case. In both cases, CBCT illustrated the tumor extension and the relationship of the tumor to the maxillary sinus. Therefore, CBCT was an important tool for developing effective treatment plans for lesions in the posterior maxillary region. PMID:25201118

  14. Study of immunohistochemical demonstration of Bcl-2 protein in ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    C S Sindura; Chaitanya Babu; Vijaya Mysorekar; Vinod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma) gene product also known as apoptotic inhibitor is expressed in many normal and tumor tissues. This Bcl-2 gene protects the cell by blocking postmitotic differentiation from apoptosis, thus maintaining the stem cell pool. Objective: To study the expression of Bcl-2 protein in ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) to determine their apoptotic behaviors and to analyze biological nature of KCOT, which has higher proliferative potential and...

  15. Squamous Odontogenic Tumor with Unusual Localization and Appearance: A Rare Case Report

    Sucheta Bansal; Sanjeev Kumar Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Squamous odontogenic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and may affect multiple sites in the mouth. SOT was first described by Pullon et al. (1975). Since then, there have been less than 50 reported cases. The tumor is often asymptomatic, although it can present with symptoms of pain and tooth mobility. We report a case of SOT occurring in a 26-year-old female in the anterior mandible with unusual localization and appearance.

  16. Squamous Odontogenic Tumor with Unusual Localization and Appearance: A Rare Case Report

    Sucheta Bansal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous odontogenic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and may affect multiple sites in the mouth. SOT was first described by Pullon et al. (1975. Since then, there have been less than 50 reported cases. The tumor is often asymptomatic, although it can present with symptoms of pain and tooth mobility. We report a case of SOT occurring in a 26-year-old female in the anterior mandible with unusual localization and appearance.

  17. The relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in the Black Sea region of Turkey: an analysis of 86 cases

    ŞENEL, Figen ÇİZMECİ; DAYISOYLU, Ezher Hamza; ERSÖZ, Şafak; ALTINTAŞ, Nuray YILMAZ; TOSUN, Emre; Üngör, Cem; Taşkesen, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relative frequency and distribution of different types of odontogenic tumors in southeastern Europe, focusing on the Black Sea region of Turkey. Materials and methods: In total 1165 oromaxillofacial biopsy records were evaluated for histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors over a 7-year period from patients referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Department of Pathology, Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry and Medicine, Trabzon, T...

  18. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor with impacted maxillary third molar involving the right maxillary antrum:An unusual case report

    Abhishek Gupta; Bhagavandas Rai; Nair, Manju A.; Mitul K Bhut

    2011-01-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), first described by Phillipsen in 1956, has metamorphosized as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) as reported in WHO classification of head and neck tumors in 2005. KCOT is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaw and its occurrence in maxilla is unusual and its appearance in maxillary antrum along with maxillary impacted third molar is very uncommon. This article reports a case of KCOT associated with impacted maxillary third molar in right maxillary an...

  19. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A biopsy service’s experience with 104 solitary, multiple and recurrent lesions

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a clinically significant cystic lesion of odontogenic origin. This study aimed to retrospectively review and describe the clinicopathologic features of KCOT and to objectively compare the clinical and histological features of solitary, multiple and recurrent KCOT in a Saudi Arabian population. Material and Methods Biopsy request forms, pathology records and archival materials (all histological slides) of 104 cases of KCOT from 75 patients were retrieved. Demographic and clinical details as well as histological evaluation were analyzed and compared between the 3 groups using chi-squared or Mann-Whitney tests of association as appropriate. Results Significant differences were noted in the age of presentation, location and association with impaction between multiple and solitary cases. Histologically, there was a difference in the mitotic count, presence of satellite cysts and proliferating odontogenic epithelium between solitary and multiple lesions. There was no difference between the KCOT that later recurred and solitary lesion which did not recur even when matched clinically for age, sex and location. There were differences when solitary KCOT that later recurred or recurrent KCOT were compared with multiple lesions. Multiple lesions still had more significant proliferative activity parameters than solitary recurrence-related KCOT. Conclusions KCOTs in Saudi Arabians are not different from those reported from other parts of the world. Clinical and histological analyses showed multiple KCOT is different from its solitary recurrent or non-recurrent counterparts and has a higher proliferative activity than both. Clinicohistologic features alone cannot wholly explain the behavior of KCOT. Key words:Descriptive study, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontogenic keratocyst, solitary, multiple, recurrent. PMID:27475695

  20. Presentation of a keratocystic odontogenic tumor with agenesis: a case report

    Lacarbonara, Mariano; Marzo, Giuseppe; Lacarbonara, Vitantonio; Monaco, Annalisa; Capogreco, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We analyzed the etiopathogenetic, clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic aspects of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, particularly in association with dental anomalies of number, with the aim of providing useful information for their correct diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis within a multidisciplinary approach. Case presentation A 14-year-old Caucasian girl presented for observation of bilateral agenesis of the upper incisors, which was diagnosed by orthopantomography. Appr...

  1. Transforming growth factor beta 2 in epithelial differentiation of developing teeth and odontogenic tumors.

    Heikinheimo, K; Happonen, R P; Miettinen, P J; Ritvos, O

    1993-01-01

    Dysregulation of TGF beta 2, a modulator of cell growth and differentiation, can result in uncontrolled growth and tumor formation. Our comparative studies on the expression of TGF beta 2 mRNA and protein indicate that TGF beta 2 may primarily be a regulator of epithelial differentiation during tooth development (between 13 and 20 gestational wk) and tumorigenesis of odontogenic neoplasms. A paracrine mode of action for TGF beta 2 in early human tooth germ (cap/early bell stage) is suggested ...

  2. Disruption of Smad4 in Odontoblasts Causes Multiple Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors and Tooth Malformation in Mice▿

    Gao, Yuanrong; Yang, Guan; Weng, Tujun; Du, Juan; Wang, Xuejiu; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Songlin; Yang, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic epithelial neoplasias with a high recurrence rate. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of KCOTs are still largely unknown. Here, we show that specific ablation of Smad4 in odontoblasts unexpectedly resulted in spontaneous KCOTs in mice. The mutant mice exhibited malformed teeth characterized by fractured incisors and truncated molar roots. These abnormalities were mainly caused by disrupted odontoblast ...

  3. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Findings in Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor Associated with Odontome: A Case Report

    Tushar Phulambrikar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT is a rare cystic odontogenic neoplasm frequently found in association with odontome. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with an odontome arising in the anterior maxilla in a 28-year-old man. Conventional radiographs showed internal calcification within the lesion but were unable to visualize its relation with the adjacent structures and its accurate extent. In this case cone beam computed tomography (CBCT could accurately reveal the extent and the internal structure of the lesion which aided the presumptive diagnosis of the lesion as CCOT. This advanced imaging technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment and management of this neoplasm of the maxilla.

  4. Marsupialization and enucleation of keratocystic odontogenic tumor with the use of Carnoy's solution

    Jovanović Goran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT or odontogenic keratocysts are aggressive and expansive odontogenic neoplasms with high recurrence rate (25%- 60%. There are a small number of publications about the combination of marsupialization and enucleation with the use of Carnoy's solution for the treatment of KCOT. Case report. In a female patient, aged 24, marsupialization KCOT was done in the first stage, and enucleation with the use of Carnoy's solution in the second stage, six months later. Lost sensibility of the lower lip was reestablished after three months. A postoperation defect was completely filled in seven months. One year later orthopantomographic x-ray showed the presence of a newly formed bone tissue, whereas in 7 years a completely preserved new mandibular bone and recanalisation of mandibular canal were observed. Conclusion. We consider that our method was successful in the treatment of KCOT, with no occurrence of recidives seven years later. However, it is necessary to follow the patient periodically because of a possible late recidive.

  5. Study of immunohistochemical demonstration of Bcl-2 protein in ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    C S Sindura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma gene product also known as apoptotic inhibitor is expressed in many normal and tumor tissues. This Bcl-2 gene protects the cell by blocking postmitotic differentiation from apoptosis, thus maintaining the stem cell pool. Objective: To study the expression of Bcl-2 protein in ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT to determine their apoptotic behaviors and to analyze biological nature of KCOT, which has higher proliferative potential and aggressive clinical behavior like odontogenic tumors. Materials and Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin sections of ameloblastoma (n = 20 and KCOT (n = 20 are considered for immunohistochemical analysis using monoclonal antibody against antihuman Bcl-2 oncoprotein. Lymphomas (n = 3 were used as controls. Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis was performed using software package of social science version 16.The data were analyzed using Chi-square test and Student′s t test. In all the above tests, P < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Results: The positive ratio of Bcl-2 was 85% (17/20 in ameloblastoma, 85% (17/20 in KCOT and 100% (3/3 in lymphomas. Bcl-2 was expressed in peripheral cells and few scattered cells of stellate reticulum in ameloblastoma. KCOT showed strong positivity for Bcl-2 mainly in the basal layer. Interpretation and Conclusion: The present study demonstrates the aggressive nature of KCOT and intrinsic growth potential of its lining epithelium. This study clearly demonstrates that KCOT like ameloblastoma demonstrates aggressive clinical and noticeable invasive behavior. Therefore, it is now considered as no longer a developmental cyst but as odontogenic tumor.

  6. Adenomatoid tumor of the suprarenal region with high plasma adrenocorticotropinhormone: a case report

    CHANG Qing; ZHU Xiang; ZHONG Yan-feng; McNutt MA

    2009-01-01

    @@A denomatoid tumors (ATs) are benign neoplasms that most commonly occur in the genital tracts of both male and females.~1 Extragenital ATs are rare and have been reported in the pleura, heart, omentum, the mesentery of the small intestine, pancreas, mediastinal lymph nodes and peri-umbilical skin.~(1,2) AT of the adrenal gland is typically an asymptomatic neoplasm with benign behavior, which has been recently recognized as a diagnostic challenge, as it is both rare and can present in such a manner as to suggest a wide range of differential diagnoses.1'3'8 Here we report a very large AT of the left adrenal gland, which at present appears to be the largest tumor of this type that has ever been reported. It may be the first case of AT associated with a high level of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).

  7. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 127 cases Tumores odontogênicos: análise de 127 casos

    Jean Nunes SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty-seven cases of histologically confirmed odontogenic tumors were retrieved from a total of 5,289 oral and maxillary lesions diagnosed at the Division of Oral Pathology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, during a period of 30 years (l970-l999. The most common histological diagnosis was odontoma (50.40%, followed by ameloblastoma (30.70%. The prevalence of odontogenic tumors was greater in females and the peak incidence occurred in the second and third decades of life. The main anatomical location was the mandible, and no malignant tumors were found.De uma série de 5.289 casos de lesões orais e dos maxilares diagnosticadas no Laboratório de Patologia Oral da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte no período de 30 anos (1970-1999, foram analisados 127 casos de tumores odontogênicos confirmados histologicamente. A lesão mais freqüente foi o odontoma (50,40% seguida pelo ameloblastoma (30,70%. A prevalência de tumores odontogênicos foi maior nas mulheres e o pico de incidência ocorreu na segunda e terceira décadas de vida. A localização anatômica mais comum foi a mandíbula e não foram encontrados casos de tumores malignos.

  8. A comparative immunohistochemical analysis of COX-2, p53, and Ki-67 expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    R.A. Mendes; J.F.C. Carvalho; I. van der Waal

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) and more commonly used markers, such as p53 and Ki-67. Study design. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in 20 biopsy specimens o

  9. Odontogenic Tumors: A 13-year Retrospective Study of 395 Cases in a South Indian Teaching Institute of Kerala

    Deepak Pandiar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: T he aim o f the present study was to determine the epidemiology and clinicopathological presentation of odonto­ genic tumors (OTs seen in a Government Teaching Institute from Kozhikode district of Kerala (South India, over a period of 13 years and to compare the data obtained with previous reports published in literature from different world population. Study design: Records of the Oral Pathology and Microbio logy, Government Dental College, Kozhikode (Kerala, South India, were analyzed during a period of 13 years and reclassified accor- ding to World Health Organization (WHO 2005 Classification. Results: A total of 6.08% of odontogenic tumors were reported out of which (96.7% were benign and (3.3% were malignant. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (35.9% was the most frequent type, followed by ameloblastoma (25.9%, calcifying cystic odonto genic tumor (10.6% , and odontoma (8.9%. The mean age was 32.69 ± 17.2 7, and males were more commonly affected. Conclusion: A marked geographic and demographic variation was observed in the relative frequency of various odontogenic tumors in the South Indian population which stresses upon the influence of genetic and/or environmental (epigenetic factors on tumor pathogenesis.

  10. Clinical and Radiographic Study of Benign Odontogenic Tumors in the Jaws

    The author observed and analyzed the age, sex, chief complaint and radiographic finding of sixty-one cases of benign odontogenic tumors seen in Yonsei Medical Center, for the period of Jan. 1979 to Aug. 1989. The results were as follows: 1. Benign odontogenic tumors of 61 cases included 52 cases (85.3%) of ameloblastoma and odontoma, and 9 cases of other lesions. Radiographically, the border of the lesions were well-defined. 2. Ameloblastoma constituting twenty-seven cases (44.3%) occurred the average age of 31.1 years and had a 3:1 male predominance. The most common complaint was swelling (20 cases, 74.0%) and followed by pain (13 cases, 48.2%). Radiographically, the most common site was mandibular body area (74.0%) and the lesions were mainly multiocular radiolucency; in 17 cases (63.0%) and unilocular radiolucent lesion were seen in 10 cases (37.0%). 16 cases (59.3%) showed the resorption of roots of adjacent teeth. 3. Odontoma constituting twenty-five cases (41.0%) discovered at the average age of 16.9 years and had a 3:2 male predominance. The most common complaint was delayed eruption of tooth (8 cases, 31.0%) and 7 cases (27.0%) detected on a routine radiograph of the area. Radiographically, 17 cases (68.0%) were of compound type and 8 were of complex variety and compound odontomas were common in the anterior maxilla, whereas complex odontomas occurred more frequently in the posterior mandible. 19 cases (76.0%) showed the impaction of adjacent teeth.

  11. Clinical and Radiographic Study of Benign Odontogenic Tumors in the Jaws

    Kim, Gyung Yae; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-11-15

    The author observed and analyzed the age, sex, chief complaint and radiographic finding of sixty-one cases of benign odontogenic tumors seen in Yonsei Medical Center, for the period of Jan. 1979 to Aug. 1989. The results were as follows: 1. Benign odontogenic tumors of 61 cases included 52 cases (85.3%) of ameloblastoma and odontoma, and 9 cases of other lesions. Radiographically, the border of the lesions were well-defined. 2. Ameloblastoma constituting twenty-seven cases (44.3%) occurred the average age of 31.1 years and had a 3:1 male predominance. The most common complaint was swelling (20 cases, 74.0%) and followed by pain (13 cases, 48.2%). Radiographically, the most common site was mandibular body area (74.0%) and the lesions were mainly multiocular radiolucency; in 17 cases (63.0%) and unilocular radiolucent lesion were seen in 10 cases (37.0%). 16 cases (59.3%) showed the resorption of roots of adjacent teeth. 3. Odontoma constituting twenty-five cases (41.0%) discovered at the average age of 16.9 years and had a 3:2 male predominance. The most common complaint was delayed eruption of tooth (8 cases, 31.0%) and 7 cases (27.0%) detected on a routine radiograph of the area. Radiographically, 17 cases (68.0%) were of compound type and 8 were of complex variety and compound odontomas were common in the anterior maxilla, whereas complex odontomas occurred more frequently in the posterior mandible. 19 cases (76.0%) showed the impaction of adjacent teeth.

  12. Odontogenic Carcinoma with Dentinoid: A New Odontogenic Carcinoma

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Brad W Neville; Tatemoto, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Ikuko; Takata, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Dentinoid is an integral part of some odontogenic tumors. This article describes the clinico-pathological features of three cases of odontogenic carcinomas with dentinoid (OCD). A comparison of these with previously reported cases of dentinoid-producing epithelial odontogenic tumors allowed us to identify another six cases that may be considered as examples of OCD. Six cases occurred in the mandible and three in the maxilla, all developing behind the canines. There was no sex predilection (fi...

  13. Surgical approach and the use of cryotherapy in a keratocystic odontogenic tumor after 12 months of decompression

    Claudio Maranhão Pereira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KOT is a pathology classified as an odontogenic cyst and began to be considered an odontogenic tumor in 2005, because of the presence of intrinsic characteristics compatible with neoplasm, such as its high rate of recurrence and differentiated mechanism of growth. Although its etiology is still unknown, its origin is believed to be related to the remnants of the dental lamina. Clinically it presents aggressive behavior and high rates of recurrence. Various types of treatment have been related, ranging from more conservative methods to radical surgery. With the goal of diminishing the potential for recurrence of these lesions, some authors have recommended the use of adjunct therapies such as peripheral osteotomy with burs, treatment of the surgical site with Carnoy’s solution, electrocauterization, cryotherapy and resection. Objective: The aim of the present study is to report the case of a patient with a KOT of large proportions in the mandible.Case report: Treatment was taken to perform decompression of the lesion for 12 months, and after this treatment comprised curettage and cryotherapy. Conclusion: This procedure is considered useful and conservative, as it avoids traumatisms to the noble structures close to the lesion.

  14. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor: Possible Role in Locally Aggressive Behavior

    Wen-Qun Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to clarify whether epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is involved in the pathogenesis and development of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT. The expression levels of EMT-related proteins and genes in normal oral mucosa (OM, radicular cyst (RC, and KCOT were determined and compared by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our data showed that the expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin and Pan-cytokeratin was significantly downregulated in KCOT with upregulation of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin compared to OM and RC. Importantly, TGF-β, a potent EMT inducer, and Slug, a master transcription factor, were also found highly expressed in KCOT. In addition, the results from Spearman rank correlation test and clustering analysis revealed the close relationship between Slug and MMP-9, which was further evidenced by double-labeling immunofluorescence that revealed a synchronous distribution for Slug with MMP-9 in KCOT samples. All the data suggested EMT might be involved in the locally aggressive behavior of KCOT.

  15. The relationship between radiological features and clinical manifestation and dental expenses of keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    Min, Jung Hyun; Huh, Kyung Heo; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Bae, Kwang Hak [Dept. of School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to identify correlations between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) data from CT sections, and data on the KCOT clinical manifestation and resulting dental expenses. Following local Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a seven-years of retrospective study was performed regarding patients with KCOTs treated at the Seoul National University Dental Hospital. A total of 180 KCOT were included in this study. The following information was collected: age, gender, location and size of the lesion, radiological features, surgical treatment provided and dental expenses. There was no significant association between the size of the KCOT and age, gender, and presenting preoperative symptoms. In both jaws, it was unusual to find KCOTs under 10 mm. The correlation between the number of teeth removed and the size of the KCOT in the tooth bearing area was statistically significant in the mandible, whereas in the maxilla, no significant relationship was found. Dental expenses compared with the size of the KCOT were found to be significant in both jaws. The size of KCOT was associated with a significant increase in dental expenses for both jaws and the number of teeth removed from the mandible. These findings emphasize the importance of routine examinations and early detection of lesions, which in turn helps preserving anatomical structures and reducing dental expenses.

  16. The relationship between radiological features and clinical manifestation and dental expenses of keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    This study was performed to identify correlations between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) data from CT sections, and data on the KCOT clinical manifestation and resulting dental expenses. Following local Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a seven-years of retrospective study was performed regarding patients with KCOTs treated at the Seoul National University Dental Hospital. A total of 180 KCOT were included in this study. The following information was collected: age, gender, location and size of the lesion, radiological features, surgical treatment provided and dental expenses. There was no significant association between the size of the KCOT and age, gender, and presenting preoperative symptoms. In both jaws, it was unusual to find KCOTs under 10 mm. The correlation between the number of teeth removed and the size of the KCOT in the tooth bearing area was statistically significant in the mandible, whereas in the maxilla, no significant relationship was found. Dental expenses compared with the size of the KCOT were found to be significant in both jaws. The size of KCOT was associated with a significant increase in dental expenses for both jaws and the number of teeth removed from the mandible. These findings emphasize the importance of routine examinations and early detection of lesions, which in turn helps preserving anatomical structures and reducing dental expenses.

  17. Odontogenic myxoma: Report of two cases

    Reddy, Sridhar P.; Naag, Ananth; Kashyap, Bina

    2010-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors represents a broad spectrum of lesions ranging from benign to malignant to dental hamartomas all arising from odontogenic residues, that is, the odontogenic epithelium, ectomesenchyme with variable amounts of dental hard tissues formed in the same sequence as in normal tooth development. We report two cases of myxoma, which were misdiagnosed initially and latter, reported as odontogenic myxoma; and were treated by conservative surgical excision in one case and radical resec...

  18. Odontogenic myxoma: report of 2 cases

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Park, Geum Mee; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The odontogenic myxoma is an infiltrative benign tumor of bone that occurs almost exclusively in the jaw bones and comprises 3% to 6% of odontogenic tumors. This neoplasm is thought to arise from the primitive mesenchymal structures of a developing tooth, including the dental follicle, dental papilla, or periodontal ligament. Radiographically the odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns: unicystic, multilocular, pericoronal, and radiolucent-radiopaque, making the differential diagnosis difficult. In this report, two cases of the odontogenic myxoma in the jaw bones are presented. The first case involved only the mandible, while the second case involved the maxilla. Both cases presented extensive multilocular radiolucencies characteristic of odontogenic myxoma.

  19. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible: A case report with diagnostic considerations

    Angela Santoro

    2016-02-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Benign odontogenic tumors may be distinguished from other odontogenic/non-odontogenic neoplasias and from malignant tumours through a cytologic differential diagnosis as treatment differs accordingly.

  20. Expression and clinical significance of the genes of Hedgehog signaling pathway in sporadic keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the jaw bones

    Kong Li; Yuan Rong-tao; Jia Mu-yun; Wang Ke; Wang Bingchao; Yang Yinhui

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE It was to study the role of genes of Hedgehog signaling pathway in sporadic keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT)of the jaw bones.METHODS Fresh specimens of sporadic KCOT and the same patient 's normal oral mucosa were obtained.Then RNA was extracted.Gene chip was used to detect the genes of Hedgehog signaling pathway.RESULTS Com-pared to normal oral mucosa,there were five genes of Hedgehog signaling pathway in KCOT changed,including PRKX ,WNT5a,PTCH1 up -regulated.CONCLUSION There were abnormal ex-pressions of genes of Hedgehog pathway in sporadicKCOT.Genes of Hedgehog pathway played roles in sporadic KCOT.

  1. Disruption of Smad4 in odontoblasts and dental epithelial cells influences the phenotype of multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Jiang, Weipeng; Yang, Guan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiao; Li, Tiejun

    2015-07-31

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic epithelial neoplasms with a high recurrence rate. The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of KCOTs are still largely unknown. Previous research showed that specific ablation of Smad4 in odontoblasts and dental epithelia resulted in spontaneous KCOTs in mice, and that constitutively activated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling was detected in the cyst epithelia of both Smad4(Co/Co) OC-Cre and Smad4(Co/Co) K5-Cre mice. Here, we ablated Smad4 in mouse odontoblasts and dental epithelia and compared the sizes and numbers of KCOTs. Both the number and size of KCOTs in Smad4(Co/Co) OC-Cre mice were larger than those in Smad4(Co/Co) K5-Cre mice, suggesting that paracrine signals from root odontoblasts play a more important role than those from Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) cells. PMID:26002469

  2. Early reconstruction of bone defect created after initial surgery of a large keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report

    Matijević Stevo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is defined as a benign cystic neoplasm of the jaws of odontogenic origin with a high rate of recurrence. The most lesions occur in the posterior part of the mandible. Treatment of KCOT remains controversial, but the goals of treatment should involve eliminating the potential for recurrence while minimizing surgical morbidity. However, another significant therapeutic problem related to the management of KCOT is an adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect, as well as appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a patient, especially in cases of a very large destruction of the jaws bone. Case report. We presented a 65-year-old female patient with very large KCOT of the mandible. Orthopantomographic radiography showed a very large elliptical multilocular radiolucency, located on the right side of the mandible body and the ascending ramus of the mandible, with radiographic evidence of cortical perforation at the anterior border of the mandibular ramus and the superior border of the alveolar part of the mandible. The surgical treatment included two phases. In the first phase, the tumor was removed by enucleation and additional use of Carnoy solution, performing peripheral ostectomy and excision of the affected overlying mucosa, while in the second phase, restorative surgery of the existing mandibular defect was performed 6 months later. Postoperatively, we did not register any of postoperative complications, nor recurrence within 2 years of the follow-up. Conclusion. Adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect and appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of the patient should be the primary goal in the treatment of KCOT, having in mind the need for a long-term post-surgical follow-up.

  3. Educational effect of a lecture on differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandible presented to dental students

    The objective of this study was to clarify the educational effect of a lecture on differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandibles presented to dental students. Panoramic and CT images of 10 ameloblastomas and 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors were randomly presented 114 dental students. Test scores, correct answer ratios, identification index, and understanding of the imaging features contributing to a correct diagnosis were serially evaluated before and after the lecture on the differential imaging features comparing the two types of tumors. The mean and standard deviation of the scoring ratios of dental students diagnosing these lesions on panoramic and CT images were 48.8±10.8% and 52.5±12.9%, respectively. After the lecture on the differential imaging features comparing the two tumors, the scoring ratios improved significantly. After the lecture, both the numbers of patients whose images were correctly diagnosed and the identification indices increased. The lecture also increased the number of imaging features recognized as contributing to the correct diagnosis. A lecture on the differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandibles contributed to the improvement of imaging diagnosis skills among dental students. (author)

  4. Odontogenic lesions in pediatric patients.

    Fang, Qi-Gen; Shi, Shuang; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-05-01

    The purpose was to evaluate our 20-year experience of pediatric odontogenic lesions. Pediatric patients with a diagnosis of odontogenic lesion were identified. Three hundred ten patients were odontogenic; dentigerous cyst was seen in 62.0% of the cases. Most (70.2%) of them occurred in mixed dentition period, and it had a male preponderance. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor occurred in the permanent dentition period. It had an equal site distribution. Odontoma was seen in 20.0% of the cases. Its site of predilection was the mandible. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor. Most of the cases occurred in the permanent dentition period. It affected the male and female equally. Calcifying epithelioma odontogenic tumor was seen in 11.8% of the cases. All the lesions occurred in the primary dentition period. It had no sex or site preponderance. Myxoma was seen in 3.6% of the cases. It was most common in the permanent dentition period, and it was more frequent in the male. Iliac crest bone graft was successfully performed in 28 patients, postoperative infection occurred in 2 patients, and no donor-site dysfunctions were reported. The observed differences in lesion type and distribution in this study compared with previous researches may be attributable to genetic and geographic variation in the populations studied. Iliac crest bone graft was suggested for pediatric mandible reconstruction. PMID:24785745

  5. Tumores odontogénicos a células fantasmas: Conceptos actuales y aporte de 10 nuevos casos Odontogenic tumours ghost cell tumors: Actual concepts and reports of 10 new cases

    V. Keochgerián Basmayean

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan 10 nuevos casos de neoplasias odontogénicas a células fantasmas del archivo de la Cátedra de Anatomía Patológica de la Facultad de Odontología de la UDELAR de Montevideo, Uruguay. Estos tumores constituyeron el 0,08% del total de biopsias del Servicio y el 2,9% de todas las neoplasias odontogénicas registradas. Nueve fueron tumores odontogénicos quísticos calcificantes y uno fue tumor dentinogénico a células fantasmas. Ocho casos fueron centrales y dos periféricos (uno, quístico y el otro, sólido. Se registraron las características clínicas, radiográficas e histopatológicas y se compararon con otros trabajos de la literatura internacional.This paper reports 10 new cases of ghost cell odontogenic tumors retrieved from the files of the Oral Pathology Service of the Faculty of Dentistry (UDELAR, Montevideo, Uruguay. These tumors accounted for 0.08% of total biopsies and 2.9 % of all registered odontogenic neoplasms. Nine cases were calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOT and one dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT, eight in central and two in peripheral locations (one cystic and one solid variant. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological features are presented and compared with reported cases in literature.

  6. Five years follow-up of a keratocyst odontogenic tumor treated by marsupialization and enucleation: A case report and literature review

    Rafael Scaf de Molon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic cysts are considered as nonneoplasic benign lesions. Among the cysts, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT is an intra-osseous tumor characterized by parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior, and for the possibility to develop carcinomas in the lesion wall. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of KCOT in a young patient and discuss the treatment alternatives to solve this case. A 15-year-old male was referred for treatment of a giant lesion in his left side of the mandible. After the biopsy, a diagnostic of KCOT was made, and the following procedures were planned for KCOT treatment. Marsupialization was performed for lesion decompression and consequent lesion size reduction. Afterward, enucleation for complete KCOT removal was performed followed by third mandibular molar extraction. After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed. The treatment proposed was efficient in removing the KCOT with minimal surgical morbidity and optimal healing process, and the first and second mandibular molars were preserved with pulp vitality. In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function. No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed.

  7. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible: A case report with diagnostic considerations

    Angela Santoro; Giuseppe Pannone; Luca Ramaglia; Pantaleo Bufo; Lorenzo Lo Muzio; Raffaele Saviano

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Odontogenic fibroma (OF), a rare odontogenic tumor of mesodermal origin, has been thought to originate from either dental follicle, periodontal ligament, or dental papilla [1]. Different studies reported high variability in the incidence rate as being between 3 and 23% of all odontogenic tumors [2,3]. OF manifests a dual character at the histopathological examination showing odontogenic epithelial structures mimicking those observed in biopsy of ameloblastoma and, in addition, p...

  8. MR imaging features of peritoneal adenomatoid mesothelioma: a case report

    Adenomatoid mesothelioma of the peritoneum (AMP) is a rare benign tumor originating from mesothelial cells.1 Most frequently, AMP occurs between 26 and 55 years of age, at a mean age of 41 years. In contrast to diffuse malignant mesothelioma, which has been linked to asbestos exposure, the etiology of AMP has not been established. Only a minority of patients have symptoms related to the tumor. AMP may present local recurrence, but it has no potential for malignant transformation. Although there are many case reports of abdominal mesotheliomas, to date, there have been no reports of MR imaging features of AMP. In this article, we present the MR imaging features of a case of AMP with histopathological correlation. (author)

  9. MR imaging features of peritoneal adenomatoid mesothelioma: a case report

    Lins, Cynthia Maria Coelho; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Monteiro, Carlos Ribeiro [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Internal Medicine], e-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br; Cunha, Adilson Ferreira [School of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics; Valeri, Fabio V. [Victorio Valeri Institute of Medical Diagnosis, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Feres, Omar [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Surgery and Anatomy

    2009-07-01

    Adenomatoid mesothelioma of the peritoneum (AMP) is a rare benign tumor originating from mesothelial cells.1 Most frequently, AMP occurs between 26 and 55 years of age, at a mean age of 41 years. In contrast to diffuse malignant mesothelioma, which has been linked to asbestos exposure, the etiology of AMP has not been established. Only a minority of patients have symptoms related to the tumor. AMP may present local recurrence, but it has no potential for malignant transformation. Although there are many case reports of abdominal mesotheliomas, to date, there have been no reports of MR imaging features of AMP. In this article, we present the MR imaging features of a case of AMP with histopathological correlation. (author)

  10. Spontaneous pneumothorax in cystic adenomatoid malformation

    Spontaneous pneumothorax as the initial manifestation of cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung is rare. Only four cases have been reported in the English literature. We add one more case, and review the clinical and roentgenographic findings. All the patients presented later in infancy or childhood and the cyst type appear to belong to Madewell's dominant cyst type. (orig.)

  11. Spontaneous pneumothorax in cystic adenomatoid malformation

    Gaisie, G.; Sang Oh, K.

    1983-07-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax as the initial manifestation of cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung is rare. Only four cases have been reported in the English literature. We add one more case, and review the clinical and roentgenographic findings. All the patients presented later in infancy or childhood and the cyst type appear to belong to Madewell's dominant cyst type.

  12. Kerathocyst odontogenic tumor: Importance of selection the best treatment modality and a periodical follow-up to prevent from recurrence: A case report and literature review

    Nasim Jafaripozve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is a relatively common oral and maxillofacial lesion with specific characteristics such us rapid growth, extension into the surrounding tissues and high rates of recurrence. Various treatment modalities have been reported. Due to the very thin and friable lining characteristic of the tumor, enucleation can be difficult undertaken and for this reason it is associated with the highest recurrence rates. A 22-year-old male referred to our clinic due to a slight expansion in the right mandible from 2 years ago. He has a history of occurrence of KCOT in this region that was treated surgically by enucleation and curettage 5 years ago. Cone beam computed tomography showed a multilocular radiolucent lesion that extended from the angle of the mandible to the symphysis. Incisional biopsy showed a KCOT recurrence that surgically treated with resection of the right mandible by continuity preservation. Selection of the best treatment modality and also a periodical lifelong follow-up is very important to reduce the rate of recurrence and morbidity of the patient.

  13. 138例子宫腺瘤样瘤临床病理及免疫组化特征分析%Analysis of clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of 138 cases with ad-enomatoid tumor of uterus

    周洪园; 邹燕丽; 卓俊菊; 付蓉; 李红

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨子宫腺瘤样瘤的组织发生、临床病理、免疫组化特征及鉴别诊断,提高子宫腺瘤样瘤的诊断水平。方法回顾性分析我科2004年1月~12月138例经病理确诊的子宫腺瘤样瘤的临床、巨检及光镜检查资料及免疫组化特征。结果子宫腺瘤样瘤占同期子宫标本的1.85%(138/7460),其中合并平滑肌瘤和/或腺肌症占69.6%(96/138)。巨检肿瘤多位于肌壁间或浆膜下,平均直径2.4 cm,界限较清,但无包膜,切面呈实性,灰红或灰白色,部分呈灰黄色,部分可见细小裂隙或微囊甚至囊腔形成。光镜下见肿瘤由大小不等、形态不一的裂隙样或脉管样结构组成,腔内可见蓝染的分泌物,内衬有扁平、立方状细胞,胞质红染,核圆形或卵圆形,无明显异型性及病理性核分裂像。免疫组化显示内衬肿瘤细胞呈 pan-CK、Vim-entin、D2-40、Calretinin 阳性,CD34、CEA、CD31、PAX2/8、SMA 阴性,Ki-67增殖指数≤10%。结论免疫组化提示子宫腺瘤样瘤为间皮起源性肿瘤,多数伴有平滑肌瘤和(或)腺肌症,临床病理表现和免疫组化特征有助于该病的诊断和鉴别诊断。%Objective To analyze the histogenesis,clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features and differential diag -nosis of adenomatoid tumors (ATs)of uterus in order to improve the level of diagnosis .Methods Data of clinical information,autopsy and pathological morphology and immunohistochemical features of 138 cases with ATs of uterus diagnosed by pathology from January 2004 to December 2014 in our department were retrospectively analyzed .Results The cases of ATs of uterus were 1.85% of all uterus samples in corresponding time (138 /7460),in which uterine 1eiomyoma or adenomyoma were 69.6%(96 /138).The tumor autopsy showed that the tumors were located in the uterine muscle walls or under serosa with average size about 2.4 cm

  14. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst with Complex Odontoma: Histological and Immunohistochemical Features

    Mohsen Merati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a rare odontogenic cyst. Only 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors are COC. COC associated with odontoma (COCaO reported in 24% of COCs. COCaO presents a greater incidence in female, with a ratio of 2 to 1. The highest incidence of COCaO occurs during the second decade with a mean age of 16 years, most frequently occurring in the maxilla (61.5%. Here, we describe a classic case of COCaO of the maxillary incisor-canine region in 17-year-old girl, and discuss the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical finding of this tumor.

  15. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst with Complex Odontoma: Histological and Immunohistochemical Features

    Nooshin Mohtasham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a rare odontogenic cyst. Only 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors are COC. COC associated with odontoma (COCaO reported in 24% of COCs. COCaO presents a greater incidence in female, with a ratio of 2 to 1. The highest incidence of COCaO occurs during the second decade with a mean age of 16 years, most frequently occurring in the maxilla (61.5%. Here, we describe a classic case of COCaO of the maxillary incisor-canine region in 17-year-old girl, and discuss the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical finding of this tumor.

  16. Immunohistochemical Analysis of P63 Expression in Odontogenic Lesions

    Saede Atarbashi Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available P63 may have a role in tumorigenesis and cytodifferentiation of odontogenic lesions. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of P63 in a total of 30 cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors. The percentage of positive cells was calculated in the lining of odontogenic cysts and islands of ameloblastoma. P63 expression was evident in all types of odontogenic lesions. P63 was expressed throughout the lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst except surface parakeratinized layer. In addition, calcifying odontogenic cyst showed P63 expression in all layers. In almost all radicular and dentigerous cysts, the basal and parabasal layers were immunoreactive. Peripheral cells of ameloblastoma expressed P63; however, stellate reticulum had weaker immunostaining. No significant difference in P63 expression was observed between studied lesions (. Expression of P63 in odontogenic lesions suggests that this protein is important in differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. However, it seems that it could not be a useful marker to differentiate between aggressive and nonaggressive lesions. P63 also represents a progenitor or basal cell marker, and it is not expressed in mature differentiated cells.

  17. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a ...

  18. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A case report

    Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are rare intrabony solitary or multiloculated cysts of odontogenic origin. The importance of GOCs lies in the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence similar to keratocystic odontogenic tumors and that they may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Thus, the oral and maxillofacial radiologists play an important role in definitive diagnosis of GOC based on distinctive cases; though they are rare. In large part, this is due to the GOC's complex and frequently non-specific histopathology. This report describes a case of GOC occurrence in the posterior mandibular ramus region in a 17-year-old female, which is a rare combination of site, age, and gender for occurrence.

  19. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A case report

    Tambawaia, Shahnaz S.; Karjodkar, Freny R.; Yadav, Archana; Sansare, Kaustubh; Sontakke, Subodh [Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai (India)

    2014-03-15

    Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are rare intrabony solitary or multiloculated cysts of odontogenic origin. The importance of GOCs lies in the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence similar to keratocystic odontogenic tumors and that they may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Thus, the oral and maxillofacial radiologists play an important role in definitive diagnosis of GOC based on distinctive cases; though they are rare. In large part, this is due to the GOC's complex and frequently non-specific histopathology. This report describes a case of GOC occurrence in the posterior mandibular ramus region in a 17-year-old female, which is a rare combination of site, age, and gender for occurrence.

  20. An Intricate Clinicopathologic Presentation of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst

    Arup K Ghosh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is considered to be an uncommon benign entity which was first recognized by Gorlin. Calcifying odontogenic cyst accounts for only 2% of all the odon- togenic tumors and is a relatively rare lesion which is charac - terized by histological diversity as its clinical and radiological features are not pathognomonic. Here, we report a case of COC in a 45 years old male patient with a long standing swelling.

  1. Odontogenic Tumors: A 13-year Retrospective Study of 395 Cases in a South Indian Teaching Institute of Kerala

    Deepak Pandiar; PM Shameena; Sudha; Sujatha Varma; P Manjusha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: T he aim o f the present study was to determine the epidemiology and clinicopathological presentation of odonto­ genic tumors (OTs) seen in a Government Teaching Institute from Kozhikode district of Kerala (South India), over a period of 13 years and to compare the data obtained with previous reports published in literature from different world population. Study design: Records of the Oral Pathology and Microbio logy, Government Dental...

  2. Management of antenatally diagnosed pulmonary sequestration associated with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation

    Samuel, M; BURGE, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Sequestration with associated cystic adenomatoid malformation is rare. A study was undertaken to determine whether pulmonary sequestration associated with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation has a more favourable natural history than that of sequestration without associated cystic adenomatoid malformation.
METHODS—An outline of the postnatal work up leading to the management of extralobar or intralobar pulmonary sequestration with congenital cystic ad...

  3. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of maxilla: A diagnostic challenge

    Fouzia Siraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC is a rare odontogenic tumor which occurs mostly in the mandible. It is primarily seen in fifth to seventh decades with a female predilection. We report a case of CCOC in the maxillary arch of a 66-year-old woman. Morphologic examination along with histochemical and immunohistochemical markers led to the establishment of the diagnosis. It is important to diagnose this entity and differentiate it from other clear cell tumors in the head and neck region as it is a locally aggressive tumor with a propensity for regional, nodal, and distant metastasis.

  4. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case

    Garima Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare neoplasm with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a case of a 50-year-old female patient with the malignancy at a less common location. Diagnosis was given based on the histopathologic findings. The demographic data and understanding for this tumor needs to be strengthened by reporting all new cases, which are diagnosed, in literature.

  5. Nasal Cavity Masses Resembling Chondro-osseous Respiratory Epithelial Adenomatoid Hamartomas in 3 Dogs.

    LaDouceur, E E B; Michel, A O; Lindl Bylicki, B J; Cifuentes, F F; Affolter, V K; Murphy, B G

    2016-05-01

    Chondro-osseous respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartomas (COREAHs) are rare tumors in the nasal cavity of people, which have not been described in other species. COREAHs in people are minimally invasive and rarely recur following excision. Histologically, these tumors are composed of disorganized, mature, nasal turbinate tissue that is organized into polypoid growths. These growths are lined by respiratory epithelium, contain glandular elements, and are organized around central cores of chondro-osseous matrix. This report describes 3 cases of dogs with nasal tumors that have histomorphology similar to that of COREAH in people. The tumors were all identified within the nasal cavity and were associated with regional bony lysis of the turbinates and surrounding skull bones, a feature that has not been reported in COREAH in people. There was no evidence of metastasis or extension beyond the nasal cavity in any of the 3 cases. PMID:26253881

  6. Odontogenic Facial Cellulitis

    Yordany Boza Mejias

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: odontogenic facial cellulitis is an acute inflammatory process manifested in very different ways, with a variable scale in clinical presentation ranging from harmless well defined processes, to diffuse and progressive that may develop complications leading the patient to a critical condition, even risking their lives. Objective: To characterize the behavior of odontogenic facial cellulitis. Methods: A descriptive case series study was conducted at the dental clinic of Aguada de Pasajeros, Cienfuegos, from September 2010 to March 2011. It included 56 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Variables analyzed included: sex, age, teeth and regions affected, causes of cellulite and prescribed treatment. Results: no sex predilection was observed, lower molars and submandibular anatomical region were the most affected (50% and 30 4% respectively being tooth decay the main cause for this condition (51, 7%. The opening access was not performed to all the patients in the emergency service. The causal tooth extraction was not commonly done early, according to the prescribed antibiotic group. Thermotherapy with warm fomentation and saline mouthwash was the most prescribed and the most widely used group of antibiotics was the penicillin. Conclusions: dental caries were the major cause of odontogenic cellulite. There are still difficulties with the implementation of opening access.

  7. Odontogenic Myxoma of the Mandible

    Rakesh Kumar Manne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic myxomas are benign but locally aggressive neoplasms found almost exclusively in the jaws and arise only occasionally in other bones. We present a rare case of odontogenic myxoma occurring in the mandible of a 19-year-old male patient with a brief review of clinical and radiological features, and diagnostic and operative dilemmas in managing the same.

  8. ODONTOGENIC NECROTIZING FASCIITIS

    G. Melian; D. Gogalniceanu; Carmen Vicol; Otilia Lupascu; M. Ciofu

    2005-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe group A ß-hemolytic streptococcus infection that leads to necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue, adjacent fascia and blood vessels. It is a rare, rapidly progressing condition, with a poor prognosis and a mortality rate as high as 74%. Over a period of 11 years, 4616 with odontogenic infections were admitted to O.M.F. Surgery Department of Iasi. Out of these 4616 patients, we established the necrotizing fasciitis diagnosis just in 4 cases. Treatment must be imm...

  9. Orthokeratinizing odontogenic cyst of maxilla with complex odontoma

    Meena Kulkarni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC and odontoma are the odontogenic cyst and tumor respectively that are minimally invasive neoplasms of head and neck region. OOC is a rare variant of odontogenic cyst characterized by the presence of excessive orthokeratin covering the cystic lining. Odontoma is a benign neoplasm/hamartoma often discovered accidently on panoramic radiographs. We came across a case of a 26‑year‑old male with swelling on his face along with difficulty in breathing. On the basis of radiographic and histopathological findings the final diagnosis of OOC associated with odontoma was given. However, there is no report in the English literature of the simultaneous occurrence of these two lesions and hence this case is very rare. It is unclear whether the two lesions were just coincidental or were actually related to each other.

  10. Stromal differences in odontogenic cysts of a common histopathogenesis but with different biological behavior: A study with picrosirius red and polarizing microscopy

    P Aggarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was undertaken to detect and compare the pattern of collagen fibers in odontogenic cysts and also to find out if this methodology could be used to predict the aggressive nature of odontogenic cysts by comparing with the odontogenic tumors. Materials and Methods: The collagen in the wall of 11 odontogenic keratocysts, 14 dentigerous cysts and 14 radicular cysts was studied histochemically by staining sections with picrosirius red and examining under polarizing microscope. This was compared to 10 cases of odontogenic tumors using Z test of proportion at 1% and 5%. Results: In dentigerous cysts, odontogenic keratocysts and odontogenic tumors, the predominant color of collagen fibers birefringence was found to be orangish red, whereas in radicular cysts the collagen fiber was of green color. Conclusions: Similar birefringence pattern of collagen fibers between dentigerous cysts, odontogenic keratocysts and odontogenic tumors may indicate that these lesions have a common histogenesis with a broad spectrum of biological behavior and belong to the same group, i.e., are developmental in origin. Different patterns of radicular cysts suggest different biological behavior and a positive role of inflammation on polarization color of collagen fibers.

  11. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation: case presentation in a two months old infant

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare abnormality of lung development; it is increasingly detected by the routine ultrasound scan during pregnancy. The severity of the abnormality is very variable. Herein, we present a case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation that presented in a two months old infant who had normal initial chest X rays. (author)

  12. Odontogenic myxoma: a case report with recent image modalities

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Kwang Won; Lim, Sung Hoon [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    The odontogenic myxoma is an benign, slow growing neoplasm which is of ectomesenchymal origin. This neoplasm occurs almost exclusively in the jaw bones and comprises 0.2% to 17.7% of odontogenic tumors. The odontogenic myxoma may show a wide spectrum of radiographic appearances, unilocular, multilocular radiolucency and a distinct or diffuse border, making the differential diagnosis difficult. We present a case of the odontogenic myxoma in the maxilla with conventional and recent image modalities. Occlusal film revealed a medially extended multilocular lesion with intralesional fine and straight trabeculations from the scalloped margin and buccal expansion and thinning of cortical bone. Computed tomogram revealed lesion showed equivalent density to the muscles in the left maxillary sinus with partial cortical discontinuity of medical wall and the tennis-racket pattern with internal straight trabeculations. MRI revealed intermediate signal intensity on T1 weighted image and high signal intensity on T2 weighted image. In Gd enhanced MR image, the peripheral portions of the lesion were enhanced.

  13. Odontogenic myxoma: a case report with recent image modalities

    The odontogenic myxoma is an benign, slow growing neoplasm which is of ectomesenchymal origin. This neoplasm occurs almost exclusively in the jaw bones and comprises 0.2% to 17.7% of odontogenic tumors. The odontogenic myxoma may show a wide spectrum of radiographic appearances, unilocular, multilocular radiolucency and a distinct or diffuse border, making the differential diagnosis difficult. We present a case of the odontogenic myxoma in the maxilla with conventional and recent image modalities. Occlusal film revealed a medially extended multilocular lesion with intralesional fine and straight trabeculations from the scalloped margin and buccal expansion and thinning of cortical bone. Computed tomogram revealed lesion showed equivalent density to the muscles in the left maxillary sinus with partial cortical discontinuity of medical wall and the tennis-racket pattern with internal straight trabeculations. MRI revealed intermediate signal intensity on T1 weighted image and high signal intensity on T2 weighted image. In Gd enhanced MR image, the peripheral portions of the lesion were enhanced.

  14. Immunohistochemical Assessment of HER3 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been demonstrated that HER3 plays an important role in some human cancers and the HER3 expression is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare HER3 expression in epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study, which assessed all 57 paraffin blocks of RCs, DCs and OKCs (21 RCs, 16 DCs, 20 OKC) from patho...

  15. Antenatal diagnosis of cystic adenomatoid malformation: Effect on patient management

    Claiborne, A.K.; McAlister, W.H.; Martin, C.M.; Gast, M.J.

    1985-07-01

    Congenital adenomatoid malformation (CAM) of the lung was diagnosed at 30 weeks gestation. The mother presented with preterm labor and polyhydramnios. A complex cystic mass was seen in the right lung of the fetus. Additional radiographic and sonographic investigations prior to delivery allowed differentiation of this rare lesion from other cystic thoracic pathology of the fetal period. Careful hospital obstetric management of the mother and fetus for over 3 weeks allowed the delivery of an infant with adequate pulmonary maturity to permit stabilization and surgery on the baby in the first days of life.

  16. Antenatal diagnosis of cystic adenomatoid malformation: Effect on patient management

    Congenital adenomatoid malformation (CAM) of the lung was diagnosed at 30 weeks gestation. The mother presented with preterm labor and polyhydramnios. A complex cystic mass was seen in the right lung of the fetus. Additional radiographic and sonographic investigations prior to delivery allowed differentiation of this rare lesion from other cystic thoracic pathology of the fetal period. Careful hospital obstetric management of the mother and fetus for over 3 weeks allowed the delivery of an infant with adequate pulmonary maturity to permit stabilization and surgery on the baby in the first days of life. (orig.)

  17. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection.

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  18. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection

    Eveline Claudia Martini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved.

  19. Nasoethmoidal meningocele in a child presenting bilateral congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation

    da Rosa, Ernani B; Silveira, Daniélle B; Tsugami, Laís G;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nasoethmoidal meningocele is considered an uncommon type of cephalocele, and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare lung disorder characterized by overgrowth of the terminal bronchioles. CASE: We report the unusual association between a nasoethmoidal meningocele a...

  20. An unusual presentation of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma in mandibular anterior region

    Sindhu M Ganvir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC is a rare, potentially aggressive odontogenic epithelial tumor with tendency for recurrence. It was first described as a clinicopathological entity in 1985 and to date only 73 cases has been reported in English literature. A case of CCOC in 64-year-old male patient in mandibular anterior region is presented which when recurred in soft tissue 5 years after wide surgical resection of mandible, revealed a biphasic pattern as against monophasic pattern of primary neoplasm and was unusually associated with primary squamous cell carcinoma, suggestive of hybrid tumor.

  1. Bilateral Odontogenic Keratocyst of the Mandible

    Ram, Hari; Mohammad, Shadab; Husain, Nuzhat; Gupta, Shalini; Kumar, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a cyst of dental origin with an aggressive clinical behavior, having high recurrence rate. Multiple cysts are associated with bifid-rib basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). We present a case of bilateral odontogenic keratocyst in a cleft lip patient.

  2. Maxillary sinus disease of odontogenic origin.

    Mehra, Pushkar; Murad, Haitham

    2004-04-01

    Odontogenic sinusitis is a well-recognized condition and accounts for approximately 10% to 12% of cases of maxillary sinusitis. An odontogenic source should be considered in patients with symptoms of maxillary sinusitis who give a history positive for odontogenic infection or dentoalveolar surgery or who are resistant to standard sinusitis therapy. Diagnosis usually requires a thorough dental and clinical evaluation with appropriate radiographs. Common causes of odontogenic sinusitis include dental abscesses and periodontal disease perforating the Schneidarian membrane, sinus perforations during tooth extraction, or irritation and secondary infection caused by intra-antral foreign bodies. The typical odontogenic infection is now considered to be a mixed aerobic-anaerobic infection, with the latter outnumbering the aerobic species involved. Most common organisms include anaerobic streptococci, Bacteroides, Proteus, and Coliform bacilli. Typical treatment of atraumatic odontogenic sinusitis is a 3- to 4- week trial of antibiotic therapy with adequate oral and sinus flora coverage. When indicated, surgical removal of the offending odontogenic foreign body (primary or delayed) or treatment of the odontogenic pathologic conditions combined with medical therapy is usually sufficient to cause resolution of symptoms. If an oroantral communication is suspected, prompt surgical management is recommended to reduce the likelihood of causing chronic sinus disease. PMID:15064067

  3. Respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma on the anterior nasal septum

    Tuğba Bostan Bozkurt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma (REAHis a rare benign lesion of the sinonasal cavity. In this report,by physical examination in the anterior part of thenasal cavity, on the septum a mass lesion was detectedand paranasal sinus computed tomography (PSCT performed.On PSCT; bounded, homogenious, solid lesionwas shown and no evidence of invasion of surroundingbone and cartilage structures. Histopathologic diagnosisof the lesion was evaluated as REAH. Though REAH is avery rare benign lesion of sinonasal cavity the treatmentis only simple excision. Therefore keeping it in mind indifferential diagnosis list, aggressive surgical proceduresshould be avoided. The clinical and radiological featuresare discussed in the light of the literature.Key words: Hamartoma, sinonasal cavity, septum

  4. The Calcifying Epithelial Odonogenic Tumor : Report of a Case

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which was first described by Pindborg in 1955 and accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. The tumor occurs primarily in the molar-premolar region of the mandible, and 52% of cases are associated with an unerupted tooth. The clinical feature is most commonly a slow-growing painless swelling. The tumor may show considerable radiographic variation and usually characteristic histopathologic features. In this study, we report a case of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor on the left mandibular body and ramus area in a 28-year-old male with a brief review of the concerned literatures.

  5. Histopathologic Findings of Pneumatocele in a Patient with Hyper-IgE Syndrome, Compatible with Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation

    Soheila Aleyacin

    2008-06-01

    There are few reports of cystic adenomatoid malformation in children. To our best known, this is the first report of cystic adenomatoid malformation in a child with hyper IgE syndrome. Early diagnosis and surgical therapy are helpful in prevention of repeated infections in these patients.

  6. Multiple adenomatoid tumours in the Epididymis and Tunica vaginalis: Case report

    Ahmed Abroaf

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 65 year-old male presenting with a tender right testicular mass, confirmed to be a tumour on ultrasound. The patient underwent a radical inguinal orchidectomy and histology revealed multiple adenomatoid tumours in epididymis and tunica vaginalis. This is an infrequent benign tumour of mesothelial origin that has rarely been reported as multiple lesions in the literature. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that adenomatoid tumour and mesotheliomas share the expression of podoplanin (D2-40 which is helpful to differentiate them from carcinomas. On the other hand adenomatoid tumour is differentiated from mesothelioma on morphological grounds since the former does not exhibit cellular atypia, mitotic activity or bland focal tumour necrosis. Although testis preserving surgery can be an option for benign adenomatoid tumours, most patients (as in our case proceed to orchidectomy as diagnosing them confidently can be difficult.---------------------------Cite this article as: Abroaf A, Veeratterapillay R, Vasdev N, Majo J, Sherif AE, Paez E. Multiple adenomatoid tumours in the Epididymis and Tunica vaginalis : Case Report. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:02021.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0202.1

  7. Ameloglastic fibro-odontoma with a change of calcifying odontogenic cyst

    Thirteen-year-old girl complaining of the swelling and pain on the left midface visited our dental hospital. On the radiographic examination, well-defined radiolucent lesion with hyperostotic border was found in the left maxilla accompanying with the external root resorption of the involved teeth and the displaced second molar. CT showed calcified bodies, thinning of hard palate, inferior orbital wall and lateral wall of nasal fossa, and thinning and perforation of the buccal plate of the maxilla. Enucleation and curettage of the lesion and nasoantrostomy was carried out and histopathologic examination mainly showed a solid tumor tissue composed of odontogenic epithelium and pulp tissues admixed with dentin and enamel formation. And some part of reduced follicular epithelium of tooth germ showed a change mimicking calcifying odontogenic cyst. Taken together, we concluded the lesion is an ameloblastic fibro-odontoma with as change of calcifying odontogenic cyst

  8. Ameloglastic fibro-odontoma with a change of calcifying odontogenic cyst

    Kwon, Hyuk Rok; Han, Jin Woo; Lee, Jin Ho; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, In Woo; Lee, Suk Keun [Kangnung National Univ., Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-15

    Thirteen-year-old girl complaining of the swelling and pain on the left midface visited our dental hospital. On the radiographic examination, well-defined radiolucent lesion with hyperostotic border was found in the left maxilla accompanying with the external root resorption of the involved teeth and the displaced second molar. CT showed calcified bodies, thinning of hard palate, inferior orbital wall and lateral wall of nasal fossa, and thinning and perforation of the buccal plate of the maxilla. Enucleation and curettage of the lesion and nasoantrostomy was carried out and histopathologic examination mainly showed a solid tumor tissue composed of odontogenic epithelium and pulp tissues admixed with dentin and enamel formation. And some part of reduced follicular epithelium of tooth germ showed a change mimicking calcifying odontogenic cyst. Taken together, we concluded the lesion is an ameloblastic fibro-odontoma with as change of calcifying odontogenic cyst.

  9. Cerebral Abscess Potentially of Odontogenic Origin

    Marouene Ben Hadj Hassine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic origins are rarely implicated in the formation of brain abscesses. The relative paucity of this kind of infection and the difficulty in matching the causative microorganisms of a brain abscess to an odontogenic source can explain the late management of patients. We herein describe a case of a 46-year-old man with a cerebellar abscess that was probably due to an odontogenic infection. The diagnosis supported by imaging and microscopic identification, mini craniectomy for abscess drainage followed by eradication of all potential dental infectious foci, and an antibiotic regimen based on cephalosporins, metronidazole, and vancomycine contributed to a successful outcome.

  10. An Immunohistochemical Survey to Evaluate the Expression of CD105 and CD34 in Ameloblastoma and Odontogenic Keratocyst

    Shokoofeh Jamshidi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Ameloblastoma is the most common odontogenic tumor which is slow-growing, locally invasive and exhibit specific biologic be-havior and high recurrence rate. Likewise, odontogenic keratocyst is a develop-mental odontogenic cyst that has a high recurrence rate and aggressive behavior. There are limited studies considering the relationship between the angiogenesis factors and the biologic behavior of these lesions. Purpose: the aim of this study was to evaluate the mean density of vessels in odontogenic keratocysts and ameloblastoma and investigate its possible relationship with biological behavior of these lesions. Materials and Method: In this descriptive-analytic cross-sectional study, 40 cases, comprising 10 odontogenic keratocysts and 30 ameloblastomas (10 plexiform, 10 follicular, and 10 unicystic type were selected and were stained immuno-histochemically with CD34 and CD105. The micro vessel density was assessed and compared in all groups. T- test for the independent samples’ One- way Anova, Wilcoxon test and Tukey tests were adopted for statistical analysis. Results: A statistically significant difference was observed in mean vascular density (MVD between the odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma groups concerning the CD105 and CD34 markers (p= 0.005, p= 0.000, respectively. The MVD was significantly higher in ameloblastomas than odontogenic keratocyst. MVD with CD34 was significantly higher than MVD with CD105 in ameloblastomas (p= 0.00. Conclusion: It can be suggested that angiogenesis might be one of the mecha-nisms that is more possible to contribute the aggressive biological behaviors in ameloblastoma rather than odontogenic keratocyst.

  11. Radiological and histopathological study of benign tumors of the mandible

    Benign tumors of the mandible are uncommon lesions. That were classified into odontogenic tumors and nonodontogenic tumors. Author reviewed the radiological evaluation and pathological microscopic finding from 33 benign tumors of the mandible that were confirmed by the biopsy during last 10 years in Dental Clinics, Ewha Womans University Hospital and Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Following results were obtained; 1. Benign tumors of the mandible were classified into odontogenic (66.7%) and non-odontogenic tumors (33.3%). 2. The range of the age distribution was between 6 years and 67 years old. The commonest age group was the second decade (39.4%). 3. There was no difference to sex distribution. 4. The most frequent location was the body of the mandible (42.4%). 5. Radiographic findings were relatively characteristic in odontogenic tumors rather than non-odontogenic tumors. 1) Radiolucent cystic lesions-ameloblastoma, odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibtoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and neurofibroma. 2) Radiopaque mass lesions-odontoma, cementoma and osteoma. 3) Mixed patterns-ossifying fibroma, cementifying fibroma, calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor and hemangioma. It was concluded that the radiographic examination was of value to diagnose the benign tumors of the mandible in symptomless patients

  12. Radiological and histopathological study of benign tumors of the mandible

    Yoo, Seon Young; Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeung Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-06-15

    Benign tumors of the mandible are uncommon lesions. That were classified into odontogenic tumors and nonodontogenic tumors. Author reviewed the radiological evaluation and pathological microscopic finding from 33 benign tumors of the mandible that were confirmed by the biopsy during last 10 years in Dental Clinics, Ewha Womans University Hospital and Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Following results were obtained; 1. Benign tumors of the mandible were classified into odontogenic (66.7%) and non-odontogenic tumors (33.3%). 2. The range of the age distribution was between 6 years and 67 years old. The commonest age group was the second decade (39.4%). 3. There was no difference to sex distribution. 4. The most frequent location was the body of the mandible (42.4%). 5. Radiographic findings were relatively characteristic in odontogenic tumors rather than non-odontogenic tumors. 1) Radiolucent cystic lesions-ameloblastoma, odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibtoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and neurofibroma. 2) Radiopaque mass lesions-odontoma, cementoma and osteoma. 3) Mixed patterns-ossifying fibroma, cementifying fibroma, calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor and hemangioma. It was concluded that the radiographic examination was of value to diagnose the benign tumors of the mandible in symptomless patients.

  13. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  14. Bilateral orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst: A rare case report and review

    Rahul Devidas Pimpalkar; Barpande, Suresh R; Bhavthankar, Jyoti D; Mandale, Mandakini S

    2014-01-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a developmental cyst of jaw and was initially considered by the World Health Organization (1992) as the uncommon orthokeratinized variant of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). However, studies have shown that OOC has peculiar clinicopathologic aspects when compared with other developmental odontogenic cysts, especially OKC. So orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst now stands out to be a distinct entity. Clinically, it occurs as a single cyst, shows a predilec...

  15. Adenomatoid cystic malformation, report of a case with prenatal diagnostic by ultrasound

    We report a case of a male newborn with a right intrapulmonary cystic lesion, without other congenital malformations or fetal hidrops, visualized prenatally by ultrasound in the second trimester, posterior diagnosed as a cystic adenomatoid malformation. We describe the ultrasound, plain, film, CT; histopathologic and intraoperatory findings

  16. Mixed form of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and extralobar bronchopulmonary sequestration : a case report

    Bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS) and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) are rare, but both should be included in the differential diagnosis of fetal lung mass. We experienced a mixed form of Stocker type-III CCAM and extralobar BPS, and present this case, together with a review of the related literature. (author)

  17. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma.

    Shah, Amisha A; Sangle, Amit; Bussari, Smita; Koshy, Ajit V

    2016-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated. PMID:27134453

  18. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  19. Retrospective study of spontaneous bone regeneration after decompression of large odontogenic cystic lesions in children

    Pejović Marko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Surgical treatment of odontogenic cysts in childhood could be accompanied by injury of important anatomical structures. Even though enucleation is considered to be preferable treatment of odontogenic cysts, the specificities of pediatric age favor more conservative surgical approach. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of decompression as the uttermost treatment of odontogenic cysts in the pediatric age. Methods. This retrospective study included 22 patients, 7−16 years old, with a single jaw cystic lesion. The majority of these lesions were dentigerous cyst (14, and the rest belonged to keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT (8. All lesions were primarily treated with decompression; it was a final treatment (one-stage procedure in 13 dentigerous cysts, and it was followed by enucleation (twostage procedure in one dentigerous cyst and all the KCOT. Results. A total of 13 (59.1% dentigerous cysts were treated successfully only with decompression as one stage procedure, while the other 9 (40.9% cysts required enucleation (1 dentigerous and 8 KCOT, after decompression (p ≤ 0.001. Conclusion. Related to non-aggressive lesions, more conservative treatment approach, such as decompression as one-stage procedure, should be considered. On the other hand, KCOTs in children require a two-stage procedure for a successful treatment outcome. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175021

  20. Primordial Odontogenic Cyst with Induction Phenomenon (Zonal Fibroblastic Hypercellularity) and Dentinoid Material Versus Archegonous Cystic Odontoma: You Choose!

    Argyris, Prokopios P; Wetzel, Stephanie L; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2016-06-01

    The most recent A.F.I.P. fascicle defines primordial odontogenic cyst (POC) as a distinct, nonkeratinized, odontogenic cyst of "undetermined origin" forming in the place of a developing normal or supernumerary tooth. However, the majority of examples reported in the literature under this term represent odontogenic keratocysts (keratocystic odontogenic tumors). In addition, there are rare reported cases of cystic odontomas. An 18-year-old Caucasian male presented with a unilocular mandibular radiolucent lesion in the place of a congenitally missing molar. Histologically, it featured nonkeratinizing, thin stratified squamous epithelial lining with areas of spongiosis and foci of vacuolization of individual basal cells without significant nuclear palisading. Focally, budding of the basal cell layer was identified. A zone of increased cellularity featuring induction-type fibroblasts was present subepithelially as well as dentinoid deposits with odontogenic epithelial nests. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial lining was negative for calretinin and the induction-like zone negative for S100 protein, smooth muscle actin, and CD34. The case was externally reviewed by five oral pathologists who provided various diagnostic interpretations including primordial cyst, odontogenic cyst not otherwise specified (NOS), cyst with ameloblastic changes, and unicystic ameloblastoma. At that time, a final diagnosis of odontogenic cyst NOS was rendered with a comment that it may represent a true example of POC or a cystic odontoma. The lesion has not recurred within a 13 year follow-up period after initial excision. An unusual cystic lesion is presented that may represent a true example of POC with dentinoid formation or an archegonous cystic odontoma. PMID:26156422

  1. Recurrent odontogenic keratocyst within the masticatory space

    Lim, Su Yeon; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Choi, Hyun Bae; Choi, Soon Chul [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst typically occurring in the jaws. Since the first description of OKC was published in 1956, the lesion has been of particular interest because of its specific histopathologic features, high recurrence rate, and aggressive behavior. Recurrences most commonly arise within bone at the site of the original cyst. However, as lining cells may find their way into surrounding tissues either from implantation during surgery or from cortical perforation recurrences may arise at a distance from the original cyst. Here, we report a rare case of recurrent OKC which was first developed in mandible and recurred within the masticatory space.

  2. Clear Cell Carcinoma and Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma: a Comparative Clinicopathologic and Immunohistochemical Study

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth A.; Hoschar, Aaron P.; Barnes, E. Leon; Hunt, Jennifer L.; Seethala, Raja R.

    2011-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma or hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (CCC) and clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) are rare, low-grade and typically indolent malignancies that can be diagnostically challenging. In this study the clinicopathologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical features of 17 CCCs and 12 CCOCs are examined. The differential diagnosis of clear cell malignancies in the head and neck is discussed. The relationship of CCCs and CCOCs to other clear cell tumors on the basis of their i...

  3. Glandular odontogenic cyst associated with ameloblastoma occupying maxillary sinus: A rare case report

    Riaz Abdulla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC is a rare entity with around 111 cases available in the literature. The occurrence of GOC with ameloblastoma as a collision tumor is rarest, and such a case poses problems in the form of diagnostic dilemma and management. The present case report describes and discusses a rare case of GOC with ameloblastomatous component occurring in right maxilla of a 54-year-old male patient with a chief complaint of painful swelling.

  4. Radiographic study of the odontogenic keratocyst

    Chun, Sang Deuk; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Karp Shik [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    To acquire the useful diagnostic information through the analysis of the clinical and radiological characteristics of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst. The researchers compared and analysed the clinical and radiological features of 112 cases of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst confirmed by histopathologic examination. Mandibular odontogenic keratocysts occurred more frequently in males than in females and the incidence is the highest in the 2nd and 3rd decades. These cysts occurred in the mandibular posterior area, angle-ramus area and anterior area 51.8%, 31.2% and 17.0% respectively. These cysts had undulating border (69.6%) rather than smooth border (30.4%). Most of these cysts had well-defined hyperostotic border (94.6%). These cysts caused cortical thinning or expansion (78.6%) rather than no cortical reaction (21.4%). Loss of lamina dura was observed in 72.3%, displacement of tooth appeared in 35.7% and root resorption appeared in 12.5% of cases. In 71% of cases, displacement of mandibular canal was observed. Internal patterns of lesional radiolucency were even (61.6%) or uneven (38.4%). These results would be helpful in diagnosing of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst.

  5. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: hazards of delayed diagnosis.

    Collins, Anne M

    2012-02-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is a rare pulmonary developmental anomaly, which typically manifests in neonates and infants. Presentation in adulthood is uncommon, with <60 cases reported in the literature. The majority of cases involve one lobe only. We report a case of type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in an adult presenting with a respiratory tract infection and haemoptysis. At thoracotomy, complex cystic masses were noted in the right upper and lower lobes. Lung-sparing surgery, in the form of two segmentectomies and a non-anatomical resection, was performed in order to avoid pneumonectomy. Such presentations may be problematic as potentially incomplete resections may increase the risk of complications and malignant transformation. This suggests the importance of appropriate clinical and radiological follow up.

  6. An unusual prenatal manifestation of a huge congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation with favorable perinatal outcome

    Suk, Hye-Jin; Won, Hye-Sung; Lee, Eun Jung; Lee, Mi-Young

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare condition which is easily detectable by prenatal ultrasonography. Fetuses with large CCAMs associating with hydrops are predisposed to perinatal mortality, therefore prenatal intervention is required. While macrocystic CCAM is treated prenatally by thoracentesis or thoraco-amniotic shunt, microcystic or mixed CCAM is difficult to manage in the fetus. In these latter lesions, fetal lobectomy, sclerotherapy, or laser ablation was used ...

  7. Pulmonary congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation involving upper lobe with successful surgical management

    Rajiv Garg

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A four-week-old infant born after a normal vaginal delivery presented with dyspnea of one month duration. His radiologic evaluation showed multiple cystic lesions involving the left upper lobe, although lower lobe is the usual site. It was removed after pnemonectomy and the fi nal pathological diagnosis was congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (type II. The postoperative follow up showed excellent recovery and normal development of the child.

  8. 伴痣样基底细胞癌综合征的牙源性角化囊性瘤中PTCH2基因的突变检测%PTCH2 gene alterations in keratocystic odontogenic tumors associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    徐丽莉; 李铁军

    2008-01-01

    目的:检测伴痣样基底细胞癌综合征(nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome,NBCCS)牙源性角化囊性瘤(keratocystic odontogenic tumor,KCOT)中是否存在PTCH2基因的异常.方法:收集15例NBCCS相关的KCOT患者的新鲜病变组织和外周血标本,提取DNA,采用PCR直接测序法进行PTCH2的突变分析.结果:发现2例尚未报道的错义突变(c.323 T>C,c.1319 C>T),分别引起1个氨基酸的改变,另发现9处PTCH2的多态性位点,其中3处为尚未报道的新位点.结论:虽然在NBCCS患者中PTCH2突变不如PTCH1突变频发,但少数NBCCS相关的KCOT患者可发生PTCH2的胚系突变,其病理学意义有待进一步研究.

  9. The early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions: from Thoma to Gorlin.

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kusama, Kaoru; Saito, Ichiro; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    To reappraise the early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions (OGCL), the extensive world literature published from 1838 to 1962 was reviewed. In light of the long history of OGCL, the term "calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe" first appeared in a 1931 French report, and the term "ghost cells" had its origin in two American seminal articles by Thoma and Goldman in 1946. Although Gorlin et al. coined the term "calcifying odontogenic cyst" (COC) in 1962, this type of cyst was initially reported three decades earlier by Rywkind in Russia, and almost concurrently by Blood good in the United States and Sato in Japan. In 1948, Willis provided the initial histological evidence of a peripheral COC in his British pathology textbook. Credit for the earliest clinical presentation of odontoma associated calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor belongs to the American radiology textbook by Thoma in 1917. A Scandinavian journal report published in 1953 by Husted and Pindborg was the first to address a dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and its peripheral counterpart was originally reported in the Swiss literature 7 years later. The current concept of COC was undoubtedly established by Gorlin et al. but the history of OGCL really started with Thoma's pioneering work about a century ago. PMID:24972654

  10. Ameloblastomatous Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst: A Rare Lesion

    Shojaei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a unique and uncommon odontogenic cyst classified into four groups of cystic, odontoma producing, ameloblastomatous proliferating and neoplastic ones. Case Presentation A 34-year-old Iranian man complaining of a painless facial and palatal swelling of the left side of the maxilla persisted for approximately three years was referred to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery, Hamadan University, Iran. Panoramic film revealed a well-defined multilocular mixed radiolucent and radioopaque lesion of the maxilla at the left side. An incisional biopsy was obtained. Based on the histopathologic findings, ameloblastomatous COC was diagnosed. Discussion We reported a rare case of COC. According to Praetorius et al. classification, this patient comes under the category of type 1C (ameloblastomatous proliferating. Many patients with ameloblastomatous COC should be reported to understand its biological behavior as possible.

  11. Surgical treatment of odontogenic keratocyst by enucleation

    Mamta Singh; Gupta, K C

    2010-01-01

    Although odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are benign, they are often locally destructive and tend to recur after conservative surgical treatment. They must therefore be distinguished from other cysts of the jaw. Keratocysts possess outpouchings and microscopic daughter cysts from which recurrences may arise. Histologic examination is essential for diagnosis since the appearances on roentgenograms and at operation usually do not reveal the true nature of the lesion. Since many non-dental surgeon...

  12. A study on the mixed jaw lesions associated with teeth

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    1. Retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of tentative diagnosis or impression from the clinico-radiographic materials of jaw lesions which showed mixed lesions associated with teeth. 2. To observe the diagnostic importance of the calcified part of the lesions which appear as radiopaque areas. 14 cases of jaw lesions which showed mixed lesions associated with teeth were reviewed. These lesions were mostly diagnosed as adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (6 cases) or calcifying odontogenic cysts with (4 cases) or without odontomas (4 cases). The calcified elements of the lesions which demonstrated various sizes and patterns of radiopaque shadows resembled odontoid tissues in some cases but could not be defined in some other cases radiographically. The final histopathologic diagnosis confirmed adenomatoid odontogenic tumors in 4 of the 6 cases. The remaining 2 cases turned out to be odontoma and ameloblastic fibroodontoma. The 4 cases of calcifying odontogenic cysts with odontomas were correct in 3 cases but remaining 1 case was just odontoma. The 4 cases of calcifying odontogenic cysts were proved to be odontogenic keratocyst, calcified peripheral fibroma, unicystic ameloblastoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The diagnostic accuracy of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumors and calcifying odontogenic cysts were high when the lesions show typical appearance. The calcifications which show radiopaque areas could be odontomas or dystrophic calficifations or remnants of bone fragments from resorption.

  13. A study on the mixed jaw lesions associated with teeth

    1. Retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of tentative diagnosis or impression from the clinico-radiographic materials of jaw lesions which showed mixed lesions associated with teeth. 2. To observe the diagnostic importance of the calcified part of the lesions which appear as radiopaque areas. 14 cases of jaw lesions which showed mixed lesions associated with teeth were reviewed. These lesions were mostly diagnosed as adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (6 cases) or calcifying odontogenic cysts with (4 cases) or without odontomas (4 cases). The calcified elements of the lesions which demonstrated various sizes and patterns of radiopaque shadows resembled odontoid tissues in some cases but could not be defined in some other cases radiographically. The final histopathologic diagnosis confirmed adenomatoid odontogenic tumors in 4 of the 6 cases. The remaining 2 cases turned out to be odontoma and ameloblastic fibroodontoma. The 4 cases of calcifying odontogenic cysts with odontomas were correct in 3 cases but remaining 1 case was just odontoma. The 4 cases of calcifying odontogenic cysts were proved to be odontogenic keratocyst, calcified peripheral fibroma, unicystic ameloblastoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The diagnostic accuracy of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumors and calcifying odontogenic cysts were high when the lesions show typical appearance. The calcifications which show radiopaque areas could be odontomas or dystrophic calficifations or remnants of bone fragments from resorption.

  14. Oral Cavity Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma.

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Villaflor, Victoria; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2016-06-01

    A case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of the oral cavity is described in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article. CT demonstrated a solid and cystic mass arising from the mandible. Histology demonstrated variably-sized nests of clear to pale eosinophilic cells with occasional central necrosis embedded in a hyalinized to fibrocellular stroma. The specimen was also positive for the characteristic rearrangement of the EWSR1 (22q12) locus in 93.5 % of interphase cells. PMID:25994920

  15. Differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma by computed tomography

    The objective of this study is to find the differentiating characteristics of ameloblastomas and odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw by analyzing computed tomography (CT) images of the lesions, clarify radiological characteristics associated with jaw lesions, and to make a diagnosis based on these findings. Test subjects were chosen among the patients who were diagnosed as having an odontogenic keratocyst or ameloblastoma at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital from January 1996 to December 2000 and had CT scans taken preoperatively. The subject pool was comprised of 51 cases of odontogenic keratocyst and 37 cases of ameloblastoma. The following measures were used for image analysis of the lesion : the anatomic location, CT pattern, mesiodistal width, buccolingual width, the ratios between mesiodistal width and buccolingual width, height, CT number, homogeneity of radiodensity, the appearance of a sclerotic rim, continuity of adjacent cortical bone, and displacement and resorption of adjacent teeth. Comparing the CT patten, mesiodistal width, buccolingual width, height, CT number, homogeneity, appearance of sclerotic rim, continuity of adjacent cortical bone, there were statistically significant differences between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst test subjects (p0.05). We compared odontogenic keratocysts and ameloblastomas in CT scans. They occurred most frequently in the posterior to the ramus of the mandible. The findings of patterns of the CT images showed that size and border of lesions were more aggressive in ameloblastomas than in odontogenic keratocysts. The internal contents represented an increased attenuation area (IAA) in odontopenic keratocyst. Odontogenic keratocysts were shown to have higher CT numbers than ameloblastomas.

  16. CT-MPR invaluable in diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis

    In everyday examination, it is usual to encounter odontogenic maxillary sinusitis patients. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis is generally best diagnosed by dental X-ray imaging. Many medical facilities not having a dental X-ray unit use coronal computed tomography (CT) images to diagnose odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Coronal CT imaging causes artifacts, however due to dental prosthesises. Computed tomography-Multiplanar reformation (CT-MPR) imaging has proved useful in evaluating the paranasal sinus because it is not influenced by dental prosthesises. We evaluated the usefulness of CT-MPR for diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis by retrospectively analyzing 16 patients, with the following results. We couldn't diagnose all cases of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in posteroanterior and Waters projection images. Panoramic radiography is needed to diagnose odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Dental X-ray imaging missed some cases, but all cases were diagnosed by CT-MPR imaging, giving a 100% diagnosestic rate. CT-MPR imaging is thus at least as valuable or better than dental X-ray imaging in diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. (author)

  17. The enhancing effect of excess retinol palmitate on induction of odontogenic tumors and inhibitory effect on squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva in hamsters treated with N-methylnitrosourea

    Kohgo, T.; Mezawa, F.; lizuka, T.; Shindoh, M

    1999-01-01

    The influence of excess retinol palmitate on induction of tumors in the oral region was examined histopathologically. Sixty-three weanling Syrian golden hamsters were divided into five groups and received either 0.2% N-methylnitrosourea (MNU) (lmg1100g body weight) or retinol palmitate (RP) (25,000 IU/100g body weight) twice a week for 16 weeks, singly or in combination. Animals received RP intraperitoneally or intragastrically and then, 6 hours later, the anim...

  18. Treatment of Odontogenic Myxoma: A Multidisciplinary Approach—6-Year Follow-Up Case

    João Gustavo Oliveira de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most aggressive diseases that affect the oral environment are considered tumors of the jaw. The surgical treatment is preferably done by surgical resection of the lesion, resulting in a great loss of tissue and esthetics. Multidisciplinary planning is required for the rehabilitation of these cases. Autogenous grafting techniques or vascularized flaps allow ridge reconstruction for implant placement, restoring function, and esthetics. This paper reports a 6-year follow-up case of an odontogenic myxoma treated with wide resection and mandibular bone reconstruction for posterior rehabilitation with dental implants.

  19. Clinicoradiologic Differential Diagnosis of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastoma

    To clarify the clinical and radiologic parameters that can be used to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma. The records of 46 patients of ameloblstoma and 48 patients of odontogenic keratocyst at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital during the period of 1979 to 1995 were retrospectively reviewed. As a possible means for differentiating between the odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, the clinical parameters and the radiologic parameters were evaluated. In the clinical parameters, there was no significant deference in age, sex, and sign and symptoms (p>0.05).In the radiologic parameters, there was significant difference in site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth (p<0.05). The site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth can be the parameters to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, but a definite differentiation of these two lesions needs a more specialized imaging modality.

  20. Glandular odontogenic cyst mimicking central mucoepidermoid carcinoma

    Prabhu Sudeendra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC is a rare developmental cyst of the jaws. The most common site of occurrence is the anterior mandible, and it is most commonly seen in middle-aged people. It is a destructive lesion with a high rate of recurrence. A predilection for men is observed. Clinical and radiographic findings are not specific, and it can mimic as any other destructive lesion of the jaw. The histopathological features of GOC and those of low-grade central mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC are similar. Often, they are misdiagnosed as MEC. We present a case of GOC in the posterior maxilla, which is a rare site. The similarities and differences between GOC and central MEC are also discussed.

  1. Two cases report of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Paeng, Jun Young; Lee, Jun; Choi, Moon Ki [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Wonkwang Dental Research Institute, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Eulji University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) is a rare disorder of the jaws and shows various radiographic features. The purpose of this study is to describe the different radiographic appearances of 2 cases of COC. Case 1 was located in the posterior maxilla extending into maxillary sinus, showing unilocular radiolucency with a well-defined margin. Cortical bone expansion and thinning were prominent. Root resorption of adjacent teeth was apparent. Case 2 showed unilocular radiolucency with a calcified material. Calcification was supposed to be dystrophic dental hard structures, detected at the periphery of the lesion. Ghost cell and proliferation of ameloblastoma-like tissues were common features for these two lesions on histopathological findings. This reports presented common and atypical radiographic features of the COC.

  2. Surgical treatment of odontogenic keratocyst by enucleation

    Mamta Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs are benign, they are often locally destructive and tend to recur after conservative surgical treatment. They must therefore be distinguished from other cysts of the jaw. Keratocysts possess outpouchings and microscopic daughter cysts from which recurrences may arise. Histologic examination is essential for diagnosis since the appearances on roentgenograms and at operation usually do not reveal the true nature of the lesion. Since many non-dental surgeons and pathologists are unaware of OKCs, a case is presented in which surgical treatment was by original conservative method. Decompression causes a reduction in the cyst volume with new bone formation so that the structures impinged upon (e.g., teeth, nerves are completely free.

  3. Two cases report of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) is a rare disorder of the jaws and shows various radiographic features. The purpose of this study is to describe the different radiographic appearances of 2 cases of COC. Case 1 was located in the posterior maxilla extending into maxillary sinus, showing unilocular radiolucency with a well-defined margin. Cortical bone expansion and thinning were prominent. Root resorption of adjacent teeth was apparent. Case 2 showed unilocular radiolucency with a calcified material. Calcification was supposed to be dystrophic dental hard structures, detected at the periphery of the lesion. Ghost cell and proliferation of ameloblastoma-like tissues were common features for these two lesions on histopathological findings. This reports presented common and atypical radiographic features of the COC.

  4. A case of odontogenic brain abscess arising from covert dental sepsis

    Clifton, TC; Kalamchi, S

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can spread to any organ of the body and in some cases cause life threatening infections. We report a case of multiple odontogenic brain abscesses resulting from undetected tooth decay. Whereas most odontogenic brain abscesses occur following dental treatment, this report documents brain abscesses prior to dental treatment, signifying the dangers of covert dental infections. This case report updates the literature on the topic of odontogenic brain abscesses.

  5. Central odontogenic fibroma (simple type) in a four year old boy: Atypical cone-beam computed tomographic appearance with periosteal reaction

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. A case of COF (simple type) of the mandible in a four-year-old boy is described in this report. The patient showed asymptomatic swelling in the right inferior border of the lower jaw for one week. A panoramic radiograph showed a poorly-defined destructive unilocular radiolucent area. Cone-beam computed tomography showed expansion and perforation of the adjacent cortical bone plates. A periosteal reaction with the Codman triangle pattern was clearly visible in the buccal cortex. Since the tumor had destroyed a considerable amount of bone, surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted

  6. Central odontogenic fibroma (simple type) in a four year old boy: Atypical cone-beam computed tomographic appearance with periosteal reaction

    Anbiaee, Najme; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed; Sanaei, Alireza [Dept. of , Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. A case of COF (simple type) of the mandible in a four-year-old boy is described in this report. The patient showed asymptomatic swelling in the right inferior border of the lower jaw for one week. A panoramic radiograph showed a poorly-defined destructive unilocular radiolucent area. Cone-beam computed tomography showed expansion and perforation of the adjacent cortical bone plates. A periosteal reaction with the Codman triangle pattern was clearly visible in the buccal cortex. Since the tumor had destroyed a considerable amount of bone, surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted.

  7. Recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma associated with basal cell budding

    C Sreeja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. It represents the soft tissue counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. The embryonic source of POdF has been suggested by many as arising from the rest of dental lamina that has persisted in the gingiva following its disintegration. It presents clinically as a firm, slow growing and sessile gingival mass, which is difficult to distinguish with more common inflammatory lesions. Very few cases of recurrence have been documented. It has been stated that histological budding of basal cell layer of the surface squamous epithelium is associated with higher recurrence and the presence of calcification in direct apposition to the epithelial rest is associated with lower recurrence. Hereby, we present a case which histologically exhibited budding of the basal cell layer, which could have been the reason for its recurrence.

  8. Glandular odontogenic cyst: Report of an unusual bilateral occurrence

    Vikram S Amberkar; Abhishek Jahagirdar; B R Ahmed Mujib

    2011-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a recently recognized rare developmental odontogenic cyst having an aggressive behavior and accounting for 0.012% to 1.3% of all jaw cysts. GOC usually presents as a painless, slow-growing swelling that tends to affect the anterior part of the jaws. It chiefly occurs in the fourth and fifth decades of life and presents as an expansion of jaws with or without pain or paresthesia. Aggressive nature of the lesion has been reported, as supported by the fact tha...

  9. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    Sandhyarani, B; Noorani, Hina; Shivaprakash, P K; Dayanand, A Huddar

    2016-01-01

    Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise. PMID:27307677

  10. A case report of odontogenic myxoma with characteristic multilocular lesion

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Paeng, Jun Young [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Although odontogenic myxoma (OM) has various radiographic appearances, the characteristic features of OM are the multilocular radiolucent lesion, straight bony septa along the margin forming either square or triangular spaces. We present a case of OM in a 25-year old-male patient. Multilocular radiolucent lesion on the left mandible body showed tennis racket appearance. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) showed straight bony septa along the margin and cortical perforation. This CBCT features would have significantly contributed to allowing a diagnosis of OM. We think that this case shows characteristic radiographic features of odontogenic myxoma.

  11. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    B Sandhyarani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise.

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst

    Yu, Jae Jung; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong Hee [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst is uncommon. The diagnosis of carcinoma arising in a cyst requires that there must be an area of microscopic transition from the benign epithelial cyst lining to the invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We report a histopathologically proven case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in a residual mandibular cyst in a 54-year-old woman.

  13. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis diagnosed using conebeam x-ray CT

    We evaluated the usefulness of conebeam x-ray CT in the diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in 21 patients. Among teeth causing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, 95% had apical lesions after root canal treatment. Most root canals were filled with filling materials incompletely. Apical lesions in inappropriately treated teeth thus caused odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Conebeam CT involves 3-dimensional isotropic voxel image date in up to 512 frames for transaxial, coronal, and sagittal planes, so resolution in imaging on the body axis was especially high. Multiplanar reconstruction and volume rendering images at any optional plane could be obtained without interpolation. The relationship between causative teeth and the maxillary sinus could be observed and measured, and odontogenic maxillary sinusitis accurately diagnosed. In addition to the accurate diagnosis of apical lesions, maxilla, and maxillary sinus, periodontal ligament space, lamina dura, pulp cavity, root canal, canal-treated root, apical periodontitis, alveolar ostitis, marginal periodontitis of causative teeth could be observed. Metal artifacts were minimized, making conebeam CT useful in the diagnosis of periodontal tissue and causative teeth, including root-canal-treated and crown-restored teeth. (author)

  14. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. 18F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that 18F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  15. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    Liu Renshyan [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chu Leeshing [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yen Sanhui [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang Chenpei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chou Kuoliang [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wu Liangchi [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chang Chiwei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lui Muntain [Dept. of Dentistry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen Kuangy [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh Shinhwa [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-10-01

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. {sup 18}F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that {sup 18}F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  16. The imaging manifestation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung in children

    Objective: To describe the imaging manifestation in 8 cases of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung in children (CCAM) in order to improve the recognition. Methods: Seven males and 1 female were reported, and the mean age was 3 years 10 months. The complaints were cough, fever, and chest distress repeated for 4 days to 8 years. Chest films and CT scan were performed in all cases before operation and three of them were examined by high-resolution CT. All cases were confirmed by operation and pathology as CCAM. Results: (1) On chest films, 4 cases showed single or multiple large air cystic lesions (> 3 cm in diameter), one case only showed localized hazy and curl-like markings, and 3 cases showed honeycomb-like small cystic lesions (< 3 cm in diameter). All cases were complicated with emphysema on affected side. 6 cases showed pulmonary hernia of mediastinum. (2) On CT scan, each lung were involved in 4 cases, 2 cases showed large air cyst (almost 9 cm in diameter), 2 cases showed roundness thin-wall air cystic lesions (3.8-5.6 cm in diameter), and 4 cases showed multiple irregular small air cystic lesions (0.2-3.2 cm in diameter) and adenoid change. The cysts were filled with air but with small amount of liquid in only 3 cases. All lesions showed obvious space occupying sign. (3) The pathologic findings, the cyst was paraplasmic glandular or bronchiolar structures, cyst wall was lined with ciliated pseudo-stratified columnar epithelium in 3 cases and lined by cuboids to columnar epithelium in 5 cases. The cyst wall contained smooth muscle and elastic tissue. Cartilage plates were not present in all cases. Conclusion: Imaging examination is a reliable method in diagnosing CCAM. It can provide the diagnosis in location and quality. CT scan can improve the detection rate of CCAM

  17. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations (CCAM) - prenatal MRI diagnosis: a case report

    Full text: Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation/CCAM (recently termed Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformation/CPAM) is a rare lung lesion that is believed to result from a cessation of bronchiolar maturation with overgrowth of mesenchymal elements. The differential diagnosis of a mass in the fetal thorax includes CCAM/CPAM, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and pulmonary sequestration. We present a case of CCAM/CPAM detected on prenatal ultrasound examination with prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlation. A multicystic lesion in the right hemithorax of the fetus was identified on ultrasound at 26th weeks of gestation which was slightly increasing in size on follow-up examinations. MRI was performed for further evaluation and selecting the appropriate management. On MRI the lesion was confined to the right middle lobe, consisting of a single large 3 cm cyst surrounded by multiple smaller cysts and compressed normal parenchyma of the upper and lower lobes of the right lung (type I, Stocker and al. classification). No mediastinal shift or other abnormalities to the contralateral lung were detected. No complications, such as hydrothorax or polyhydramnios were identified. Based on the MR findings postnatal surgical removal of the lung lesion was planned. Continuous weekly ultrasound follow-up examination was recommended. Improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now permit diagnostic images of the fetus to be obtained. Ultrasound (US) remains vital in all aspects of fetal imaging but MR serves as a useful second line imaging test. MR imaging can provide excellent tissue contrast with more accurate analysis of the fetal anatomy and superior differentiation between the abnormalities and adjacent structures, thereby allowing early planning of pre- and postnatal management

  18. A huge glandular odontogenic cyst occurring at posterior mandible

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    The glandular odontogenic cyst is a rare lesion described in 1987. It generally occurs at anterior region of mandible in adults over the age of 40 and has a slight tendency to recur. Histopathologically, a cystic cavity lined by a nonkeratinized, stratified squamous, or cuboidal epithelium varying in thickness is found including a superficial layer with glandular or pseudoglandular structures. A 21-year-old male visited Dankook University Dental Hospital with a chief complaint of swelling of the left posterior mandible. Radiographically, a huge multilocular radiolucent lesion involving impacted 3rd molar at the posterior mandible was observed. Buccolingual cortical expansion with partial perforation of buccal cortical bone was also shown. Histopathologically, this lesion was lined by stratified squamous epithelium with glandular structures in areas of plaque-like thickening. The final diagnosis was made as a glandular odontogenic cyst.

  19. Multiple Calcifying Odontogenic Cysts Involving the Maxillary Sinus

    Zargaran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is an uncommon odontogenic lesion, classified in two variants: the cystic variant and neoplastic (solid variant. Case Presentation This case report presents multiple COC, which involved the maxillary bone and sinus in a 30-year-old man. Several of these lesions were cystic, while the others were neoplastic in type, and the lesions were removed surgically. Discussion Based on a literature review available on this topic in English, our case study was found to be the first one with multiple COC, showing both the cystic and neoplastic histopathological variant. Considering the high rate of recurrence of neoplastic COC, the patients should benefit from a long follow-up after treatment.

  20. A huge glandular odontogenic cyst occurring at posterior mandible

    The glandular odontogenic cyst is a rare lesion described in 1987. It generally occurs at anterior region of mandible in adults over the age of 40 and has a slight tendency to recur. Histopathologically, a cystic cavity lined by a nonkeratinized, stratified squamous, or cuboidal epithelium varying in thickness is found including a superficial layer with glandular or pseudoglandular structures. A 21-year-old male visited Dankook University Dental Hospital with a chief complaint of swelling of the left posterior mandible. Radiographically, a huge multilocular radiolucent lesion involving impacted 3rd molar at the posterior mandible was observed. Buccolingual cortical expansion with partial perforation of buccal cortical bone was also shown. Histopathologically, this lesion was lined by stratified squamous epithelium with glandular structures in areas of plaque-like thickening. The final diagnosis was made as a glandular odontogenic cyst.

  1. Clinical enigma: A rare case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma

    Cheshta Walia; Rudra Prasad Chatterjee; Sanchita Kundu; Sudip Roy

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare, aggressive neoplasm of the jaw with only 74 reported cases. It occurs predominantly in the mandibular anterior region during fifth to seventh decades of life. Clinically it manifests as intra-bony swelling with a variable degree of pain. Microscopically, it reveals nests of cells with clear cytoplasm in connective tissue stroma arranged in different patterns. It is often misdiagnosed due to the rarity of lesion and confusing histopathology. Immunohi...

  2. Odontogenic keratocyst with dystrophic calcifications in the maxilla

    Kim, Tae Young; Huh, Kyung Hoe [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) with secondary inflammation involving the maxillary sinus was presented. Radiological diagnosis of this case was made based on the various findings from the cone-beam computed tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. There were calcified materials and impacted tooth within the lumen of the lesion, which is not uncommon in OKC. Histopathologic findings confirmed this lesion as OKC with secondary inflammation.

  3. A review of 156 odontogenic tumours in Calabar, Nigeria

    Odontogenic tumours occur in our environment and because of late treatment, cause considerable disabilities. The objective of this study is to review a baseline data for the Dental and Maxillofacial Clinic, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Nigeria in order to obtain a baseline data and subsequently compare the results with that obtained elsewhere. Using the hospitals case files and register of patients, a 5-year retrospective study of odontogenic tumours at the teaching hospital was carried out. The data documented include age, gender, duration of lesion, type of tumour, socio-economic class, type of surgery, and complaints during follow-up reviews. The results of the study showed that majority of the patients (n=49, 31.4%) were in the third decade of life. There were 85 (54.5%) males and 71 (45.5%) females, giving male to female ratio of 1.2:1. There was a significant association between the type of odontogenic tumour and the age of occurrence (p=0.000). The longer the duration of symptoms before presentation, the larger the tumours (p=0.000). The longer the duration of symptoms before presentation, the larger the tumours (p=0.000). The benign odontogenic tumours were 151 (96.8%), ameloblastoma (n=74, 47.4%) being the commonest. Jaw resection (54.5%) was the predominant treatment. Majority (58.0%) of the complications following treatment were facial deformity, malocclusion and impaired mastication. Majority of the patients was in the lower socio-economic class, presented late for treatment and a few with aesthetic and functional impairment returned for secondary surgery. The intervention of agencies of government and non-governmental organizations is required to assist these patients if we are to accomplish the core healthcare system values in our environment. (author)

  4. Clinical and radiologic study of odontogenic keratocyst in jaws

    The author has clinically and radiologically investigated 57 cases of odontogenic keratocyst in 47 patients consisted of 26 males and 21 females aged from 2 to 63 years, who were pathologically diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst at infirmaries of dental colleges, Yonsei University and Seoul national university during 1965-1986. The results were as follows: 1. The peak incidence of the disease was on their teenagers (29.8%). The ratio of Male/Female was 1.23 : 1 and incidence rate of males showed higher than their counterpart. 2. The most frequent complains were swelling in (65.9%) followed by pus discharge, unknown mass, pain, residual root. 3. The most common site was mandibular third molar and mandibular ramus region (15.8%) followed by mandibular body and ramus, mandibular third molar, mandibular anterior teeth. Incidence of this disease in mandibule was higher than in maxilla. 4. The lesions not associated with adjacent teeth were (14.0%) and in the lesions associated with adjacent teeth (31.5%) showed root resorption, (50.9%) were without root resorption, (35.1%) showed tooth migration and (50.9%) were without tooth migration. 5. The border types of the lesions were scalloped type in (52.6%), smooth type in (47.4%) and morphological type were unilocular in (50.9%), multilocular in (49.1%). 6. The radiologic cyst type of the lesions were follicular type (42.1%) followed by primordial, unclassified odontogenic, residual, lateral periodontal, median mandibular, globulomaxillary type.

  5. Assessment of CD-105 as an Angiogenic Modulator in Odontogenic Myxomas and Dental Follicles.

    Del Carmen González-Galván, María; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Farfán-Morales, J Eduardo; Gainza-Cirauqui, Maria Luisa; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2016-06-01

    Aim Odontogenic myxoma is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaws, with a locally aggressive behavior and a high recurrence rate. CD-105 is a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein and is a component of the TGF-β1 growth factor receptor complex that modulates angiogenesis by regulating the proliferation, differentiation and cellular migration. The aim of this study is to quantify the microvascular density of the odontogenic myxoma based on the expression of CD-105. Materials and Methods The analysis included 18 odontogenic myxoma and 18 dental follicles as controls. A standard immunohistochemical procedure was performed with the CD-105 antibody. Five representative fields (40×) of the odontogenic myxoma and the dental follicles were selected to determine the microvascular density, which was then followed by a descriptive and comparative statistical analysis. Results Dental follicles presented a significantly higher microvascular density compared with odontogenic myxoma (P = .001). The odontogenic myxoma smaller than 3 cm showed a greater microvascular density than those larger than 3 cm in size (P > .05), and the microvascular density was lower in large odontogenic myxomas as compared with the dental follicles (P = .003). Conclusion A weaker expression of CD-105 in odontogenic myxoma might indicate a lower angiogenic activity, suggesting that vascular proliferation has a limited role in the growth mechanisms and in the aggressive behavior of this neoplasm. PMID:26888956

  6. Giant acanthomatous epithelial tumor of the mandible: A rare entity

    Amit Mittal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a rare benign odontogenic tumor which arises from the odontogenic epithelium. It usually exhibits a range of histopathologic features, such as follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular, basal cell, and desmoplastic variants, which are well recognized. This study reports a case of giant acanthotic ameloblastoma that developed at the anterior mandible in a 70-year-old male. Radiologically, it was diagnosed as ameloblastoma, benign tumor of the jaw which is rare. Biopsy was taken intra-orally, it was confirmed as acanthomatous ameloblastoma. When extensive squamous metaplasia, often associated with keratin formation occurs in central portions of the epithelial islands of follicular ameloblastoma, the term acanthomatous is sometimes applied.

  7. Odontogenic myxoma in a 52-year-old woman

    Ram, Hari; Mehta, Gagan; Kumar, Manoj; Lone, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare benign but locally aggressive tumour of the jaws. It is usually seen in the second to third decade of life. Women are more frequently affected than men and it has more predilections for the mandible rather than the maxilla. OM presents as an asymptomatic swelling in most of the cases. Owing to the non-capsulated and aggressive nature of OM, a high rate of recurrence has been reported. Here we present a case of OM in a 52-year-old woman managed by segmental mandibulectomy. Sign of recurrence was seen after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24859552

  8. Remission for Loss of Odontogenic Potential in a New Micromilieu In Vitro

    Zheng, Yunfei; Cai, Jinglei; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Jia, Lingfei; Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Chen, Shubin; Ge, Lihong; Pei, Duanqing; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic organogenesis, the odontogenic potential resides in dental mesenchyme from the bud stage until birth. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) isolated from the inductive dental mesenchyme of developing molars are frequently used in the context of tooth development and regeneration. We wondered if and how the odontogenic potential could be retained when mDMCs were cultured in vitro. In the present study, we undertook to test the odontogenic potential of cultured mDMCs and attempted to maintain the potential during culturing. We found that cultured mDMCs could retain the odontogenic potential for 24 h with a ratio of 60% for tooth formation, but mDMCs were incapable of supporting tooth formation after more than 24 h in culture. This loss of odontogenic potential was accompanied by widespread transcriptomic alteration and, specifically, the downregulation of some dental mesenchyme-specific genes, such as Pax9, Msx1, and Pdgfrα. To prolong the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in vitro, we then cultured mDMCs in a serum-free medium with Knockout Serum Replacement (KSR) and growth factors (fibroblastic growth factor 2 and epidermal growth factor). In this new micromilieu, mDMCs could maintain the odontogenic potential for 48 h with tooth formation ratio of 50%. Moreover, mDMCs cultured in KSR-supplemented medium gave rise to tooth-like structures when recombined with non-dental second-arch epithelium. Among the supplements, KSR is essential for the survival and adhesion of mDMCs, and both Egf and Fgf2 induced the expression of certain dental mesenchyme-related genes. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the transcriptomic changes responded to the alteration of odontogenic potential in cultured mDMCs and a new micromilieu partly retained this potential in vitro, providing insight into the long-term maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:27050091

  9. The surgical treatment of the subperiosteal abscess of the low orbital wall of the odontogenic origin

    G.M. Khakimova; E. A. Drozdova; L. N. Tarasova; G. V. Kuznetsova; V.Y. Shkarednikh

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose. Optimization of surgical treatment of the odontogenic subperiosteal abscess (SPA) of the inferior orbital wall. Material and methods. Within the period between 2000 and 2011 the odontogenic SPA of the low orbital wall was diagnosed in 12 patients aged from 13 to 64 (mean 35.6±9.8): male 6, female 5, children 1. There were applied in the diagnosis the multi-spiral computer tomography, the magnetic resonance angiography of orbit, paranasal sinuses, brain and w...

  10. Conservative Treatment Protocol for Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: a Follow-up Study of 3 Cases

    Gülsün Yildirim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The keratocystic odontogenic tumour is classified as a developmental cyst derived from the enamel organ or from the dental lamina. The treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumour of the jaw remains controversial. The aim of this study was to report the outcome of our conservative treatment protocol for keratocystic odontogenic tumour.Methods: Three patients with different complaints referred to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Selçuk University. Initial biopsy was carried out in all patients and keratocystic odontogenic tumours was diagnosed subsequent to histopathological examination. The patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumours were treated by enucleation followed by open packing. This conservative treatment protocol was selected because of existing young aged patients. The average follow-up duration of the cases was 2 years.Results: Out of 3 cases, 2 lesions were present in mandible and 1 lesion in maxilla. There was no evidence of recurrence during follow-up. All the cases were monitored continuously with panoramic radiographs, computed tomography and clinical evaluations.Conclusions: This conservative treatment protocol for keratocystic odontogenic tumours, based on enucleation followed by open packing would be a possible choice with a view of offering low recurrence rate and low morbidity rate particularly in young patients.

  11. Odontogenic Keratocyst Looks Can Be Deceptive, Causing Endodontic Misdiagnosis

    K. M. Veena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is the cyst arising from the cell rests of dental lamina. It can occur anywhere in the jaw, but commonly seen in the posterior part of the mandible. Radiographically, most OKCs are unilocular when presented at the periapex and can be mistaken for radicular or lateral periodontal cyst. When the cyst is multilocular and located at the molar ramus area, it may be confused to ameloblastoma. Lots of cases have been reported in the literature where OKC is associated with the nonvital tooth. So trauma could be one of the reasons in inducing this cyst. In our case, it was in the anterior region at the periapex of nonvital tooth having traumatic occlusion. Hence, the diagnosis of radicular cyst was made and endodontic treatment was done.

  12. Monochorionic triamniotic triplet pregnancy with a co-triplet fetus discordant for congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung

    Ceylan Yavuz

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous monochorionic triamniotic pregnancy is rare and is at increased risk for pregnancy complications. The presence of an anomalous fetus further complicates the management. Case presentation We present a case of monochorionic triamniotic triplet pregnancy diagnosed at 15 weeks of gestation with one fetus having developed a multicystic lung lesion, suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM. At 24 weeks, the largest cyst measured 10 mm in diameter. We managed the pregnancy conservatively and delivered three live male fetuses with birth weights 1560 g, 1580 g and 1590 g at 35 weeks of gestation. Two newborns were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit with respiratory distress, the third one died due to sepsis 7 days postpartum. One of the newborns was discharged healthy at 24 days postpartum. The newborn with CCAM developed a pneumothorax on the right side, recovered after treatment, and was discharged after one month. Computerized tomography (CT of the infant at 3 months demonstrated two cystic lesions in the middle lobe of the right lung measuring 25 mm and 15 mm. A repeat CT of the infant at 6 months showed a 30 mm solitary cystic mass. Conclusion Monochorionic triamniotic triplet pregnancy with a co-triplet fetus discordant for CCAM, present rarely and can be managed conservatively. These findings may help in decision making and counselling of parents.

  13. Fetal bronchoscopy as a useful procedure in a case with prenatal diagnosis of congenital microcystic adenomatoid malformation.

    Cruz-Martinez, Rogelio; Méndez, Antonio; Perez-Garcilita, Oscar; Monroy, Araceli; Aguilar-Vidales, Karla; Cruz-Martinez, Miriam Alejandra; Martinez-Morales, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Massive microcystic congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and bronchial atresia are associated with a high perinatal mortality secondary to lung hypoplasia and cardiac dysfunction, and fetal intervention should be considered to improve prognosis. Therapeutic options include open fetal surgery with pulmonary resection, fetal sclerotherapy and fetoscopy. We present a case with a severely enlarged left lung without ultrasound signs of dilated airways compatible with the diagnosis of microcystic CCAM, hydrops and severe contralateral lung hypoplasia that was treated successfully at 30 weeks of gestation by fetal bronchoscopy, through which bronchial atresia was identified at the end of the left mainstem bronchi and permeabilized by laser ablation. After fetal surgery, weekly follow-up showed a progressive decrease in the affected lung size and an increase in the contralateral hypoplastic lung size, demonstrating normal dimensions of both lungs at 34 weeks of gestation, reversal of the mediastinal shift, and complete disappearance of hydrops. A healthy neonate was delivered uneventfully at term with no need for respiratory support, and the boy is now doing well at 15 months of age. This report demonstrates that in cases with prenatal diagnosis of large microcystic CCAM, fetal bronchoscopy can be used to refine the diagnosis of bronchial atresia and as a therapeutic tool with good outcome. PMID:25138479

  14. A three-year-old boy with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and congenital pulmonary adenomatoid malformation: a case report

    Cakan Nedim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy leads to demyelination of the nervous system, adrenal insufficiency, and accumulation of long-chain fatty acids. Most young patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy develop seizures and progressive neurologic deficits, and die within the first two decades of life. Congenital or acquired disorders of the respiratory system have not been previously described in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Case presentation A 3-year-old Arabic boy from Yemen presented with discoloration of the mucous membranes and nail beds, which were considered cyanoses due to methemoglobinemia. He also had shortness of breath, fatigue, emesis and dehydration episodes for which he was admitted to our hospital. Chest radiograph and chest computed tomography scans showed congenital pulmonary adenomatoid malformation. A few weeks before the removal of the malformation, he had a significant episode of hypotension and hypoglycemia. This development required further in-hospital evaluation that led to the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency and the initiation of treatment with corticosteroids. One year later, he developed seizures and loss of consciousness. Magnetic resonance imaging of his head showed diffuse demyelination secondary to X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. He was treated with anti-seizure and anti-oxidants, and was referred for bone marrow transplant evaluation. Conclusion The presence of adrenal insufficiency, neurologic deficits and seizures are common manifestations of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. The association of congenital lung disease with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy or Addison's disease has not been described previously.

  15. Expression of Odontogenic Genes in Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Seyedeh Sara Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth loss is a common problem and since current tooth replacement methods cannot counter balance with biological tooth structures, regenerating natural tooth structures has become an ideal goal. A challenging problem in tooth regeneration is to find a proper clinically feasible cell to seed.This study was designed to investigate the odontogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs for seeding in tooth regeneration.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, three pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD rats were used at the eleventh embryonic day and rat fetuses were removed surgically using semilunar flap under general anesthesia. The primary mandible was cut using a stereomicroscope. The epithelial and mesenchymal components were separated and the dissected oral epithelium was cultured for 3 days. We used flow cytometry analysis to confirm presence of mesenchymal stem cells and not hematopoietic cells and to demonstrate the presence of oral epithelium. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and cultured oral epithelium were then co-cultured for 14 days. BMSCs cultured alone were used as controls. Expression of two odontogenic genes Pax9 and DMP1 was assessed using quantitative reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.Results: Expression of two odontogenic genes, Pax9 and DMP1, were detected in BMSCs co-cultured with oral epithelium but not in the control group.Conclusion: Expression of Pax9 and DMP1 by human BMSCs in the proximity of odontogenic epithelium indicates odontogenic potential of these cells.

  16. Primary Antibiotic Susceptibility against Streptococci in Odontogenic Infections – A Clinical Study

    Rachita Chengappa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics form an intergral part in the management of odontogenic infections. Streptococci group of bacteria have been implicated as one of the important causative agents in dental caries and dental abscess. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and resistance of pathogenic facultative anaerobic streptococci to various routinely used antibiotics in odontogenic infections and also to determine appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy for the orofacial infections of odontogenic origin. Primary culture was performed for duration of 48 hours with the samples obtained from the patient. A lawn culture from the primary culture was made and antibiotic sensitivity testing was done using commercially available antibiotic disks by disk diffusion method. Standard strain of Streptococcus mutans (MTCC 497 was subjected to susceptibility testing by the above mentioned method. Poor susceptibility was seen in amoxicillin (18.4%, amoxicillin clavulanic acid (14.3%, and erythromycin (26.5%. Maximum resistance was noted for metronidazole (89.8%. High susceptibility was observed in tetracycline (67.3%, streptomycin (61.2% and ciprofloxacin (44.9%. Low resistance was also exhibited by gentamycin (22.4% and doxycycline (40.8%. Streptococcus mutans (MTCC 497 too showed similar results as that of the test samples. Due to the evolving resistance to all major antimicrobial agents used for treatment of odontogenic infections, antibiotic susceptibility testing is important to direct therapy. Antimicrobial susceptibility helps in monitoring the changing patterns of resistance and can be useful for empirical treatment of odontogenic infections.

  17. Evaluation of sporadic cases of odontogenic keratocysts in multicentric study.

    Valter, K; Pavelić, B; Katanec, D; Sokler, K; Galić, N; Segović, S; Donath, K; Herman, R

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to report frequency of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts (sOKC) according to the age and gender, as well as location (mandible, maxilla, soft tissues, and maxillary sinus). Four hundred and twenty nine sOKC confirmed pathohistologically in a period from 1965-1998 were included in this study. The average age of patients with sOKC was 43.11 (age range 10-91), in males 42.06 and in females 44.72 years. More frequently sOKC were found in males (60.61%) in comparison to the females (39.39%). Therefore, ratio between males and females was 1.5:1. Diagnosis of sOKC is usually established in patients aged 21-30 (18.88%), in males usually aged between 21-30 (23.46%), and in females aged between 11-20 (18.93%). sOKC are more frequent in males according to the age groups, except between age 61-70 where sOKC were more frequent in females. Most frequently, sOKC occurred in the mandible 70.16%, 12.35% of sOKC were found in the maxilla, 12.82% in soft tissues and 4.66% in the maxillary sinuses. PMID:12674852

  18. Bilateral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour of Mandible: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Khandelwal, Pragun; Aditya, Amita; Mhapuskar, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a relatively rare lesion of oral and maxillofacial region and forms only 2% of all odontogenic tumours. It was previously known as Calcifying odontogenic cyst and only recently has been classified as a tumour by WHO. The controversy regarding its origin can be owed to its diverse clinical and histopathological presentation and variation in reported malignant potential. It was first reported by Gorlin in 1962 and since then conundrum regarding its true nature has persisted. It is seen in association with other lesions like odontoma, ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma. Both intra-osseous and extra-osseous forms of CCOT have been reported. It commnoly occurs in anterior region with equal preponderance in maxilla and mandible. Here we present a rare case of bilateral CCOT in the posterior mandible of a 16-year-old male patient which was discovered incidentally during a radiographic examination. PMID:26673837

  19. Botryoid odontogenic cyst developing from lateral periodontal cyst: A rare case and review on pathogenesis

    Piyush Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Botryoid odontogenic cyst (BOC is considered to be a polycystic variant of the lateral periodontal cyst (LPC as the specimen resembled a cluster of grapes. It is a non-inflammatory odontogenic cyst. The BOCs can be unicystic or multicystic. These cysts have potential to extend in the bone and become multilocular and they have a high recurrence rate. Till now, only 73 cases of BOC have been reported. The pathogenesis of BOC is still debatable. We review different pathogenesis proposed for BOC and discuss a rare case of BOC developing from lining of an abnormally large LPC which showed aggressive behaviour in terms of growth and size.

  20. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    Jaume Miranda Rius; Alfons Nadal; Eduard Lahor; Beatus Mtui; Llus Brunet

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment.

  1. Co-occurrence of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst, Aggressive Central Giant Cell Granuloma and Central Odontogenic Fibroma: Report of a Very Rare Entity and Its Surgical Management

    Touraj Vaezi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC, Central odontogenic fibroma (COF and aggressive central giant cell granuloma (CGCG are rare pathologic diseases affecting the jaws. While the Co-existence of two of them is reported in the literature, existence of all three conditions in one patient is an extremely rare entity. In the present report, initial biopsy revealed fibrosarcoma, therefore mandibular resection was performed for the subject. Sectional Histopathologic evaluation revealed the co-existence of three conditions through histopathologic evaluation. This report emphasizes the importance of precise microscopical evaluation of jaw lesions and thorough sectional examination of the lesions to reach the precise diagnosis. Treatment modalities and follow-up radiographs are also provided to help clinicians manage these entities.

  2. A cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts from major dental institutions of Bangalore city: A study of 252 cases

    Prashanth Ramachandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to perform a cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts obtained from the data of major dental institutions of Bangalore city, as well as to evaluate their distribution during a 5-year period and compare the results with other international studies. Materials and Methods: Data for the study were obtained from the reports of patients diagnosed with odontogenic cysts between 2005 and 2010 from different dental institutions of Bangalore. Case records of patients that fit the histological classification of the World Health Organization (WHO (2005 were included in the study and the following variables were analyzed: age, gender, anatomic location, and histological type. Results: In a total of 252 cyst specimens diagnosed, 79.76% were odontogenic cysts and 20.24% were nonodontogenic cysts. Among the odontogenic cysts most frequent lesions were radicular cysts (50.25%, followed by keratocysts (27.36% and dentigerous cysts (22.39%. Conclusions: Our study provides a cumulative data of odontogenic cysts in the population of Bangalore city. The results of our study showed a similar frequency of odontogenic cysts as compared to other populations of the world, with radicular cyst being identified as the most frequent odontogenic cyst. Keratocyst was the second most common cyst followed by dentigerous cyst.

  3. Accuracy and interobserver-intraobserver agreement in the radiologic diagnosis of ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst

    Six observers with different amount of experience in the field of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology interpreted the radiographs of 13 cases of ameloblastoma and 8 cases of odontogenic keratocyst which were confirmed histopathologically and showed pseudo-multilocular appearanced and scalloped border radiographically. The authors examined the accuracy of radiologic diagnoses, interobserver agreement and intraobserver agreement. The obtained results were as follows : 1. The accuracy of radiologic diagnosis ranged from 0.48 to 0.81. The average value was 0.61 2. The accuracy of radiologic diagnosis for ameloblastoma (0.55) was lower than that for odontogenic keratocyst (0.70) (P <0.05). 3. The overall agreement among the 6 observers was 14.3% at the first interpretation and 19.0% at the second interpretation. 4. The intraobserver agreement of each observer expressed in kappa index ranged from -0.14 to 0.64. The overall intraobserver agreement was 0.29. 5. The intraobserver agreement of each observer for ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst ranged from -0.07 to 0.65 and from -0.25 to 1.00, respectively. The overall intraobserver agreement for ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst were 0.27 and 0.26, respectively. 6. The diagnostic accuracy highly correlated to the intraobserver agreement (r=0.6370).

  4. Mechanical Changes in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells during Early Odontogenic Differentiation

    Jones, Taneka D.; Naimipour, Hamed; Sun, Shan; Cho, Michael; Alapati, Satish B.

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration in bioactive scaffolds require actin cytoskeleton remodeling and focal adhesion formation. Additionally, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) undergo several changes in their mechanical properties during odontogenic differentiation. The effect of factors essential for odontogenesis on the actin stress fiber elasticity and focal adhesion formation is not known.

  5. Tumors and tumor - like lesions of the oro - facial region at Mayo hospital, Lahore - a five year study

    The oro-facial region including the oral cavity, the maxilla and mandible and related tissues can be the site of a multitude of neoplastic conditions. These tumours have a predilection for the entire facial region; however, odontogenic tumours tend to affect the mandible more than the maxilla. We report results from a retrospective study spanning five years on the frequency, clinical presentation, sites and character of orofacial tumors seen in the main referral hospital of Pakistan. Patients and Methods: Records of consecutive patients of all age and sex seen by the author's team at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Mayo Hospital with tumours affecting the oro-facial region from January 2005 to December 2009 were retrieved, coded and entered into a database. The data were then analyzed by age, sex, presenting signs and symptoms, site of lesion, and their histology. Results: A total of 237 patients with oro-facial swellings were retrieved from the registry. The complete data set was obtained for 189 patients, comprising 108 (57.9%) males and 81 (42%) females. The most common clinical presenting features were mandibular facial swelling (63%), intra-oral swelling (55%), and ulceration (29%). The tumors were found in the mandible 67 (35%), buccal mucosa 33 (17%), floor of the mouth 22 (11%) and tongue 29 (15%). The remainder making up almost 20% was found in the palate, submandibular region, pre auricular region and lips. Ninety three (49.2%) of the patients presented with lesions that were classified as malignant of which 64 (69%) were diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). seventy (37.0%) had benign odontogenic tumors and twenty six (13.7%) had non-odontogenic tumor - like lesions. Sixty - four (69%) of malignant tumors were squamous cell carcinoma; sixty four (86.4%) of the benign odontogenic tumors were classified as ameloblastoma. The mean age at presentation of all lesions was 40.4 years with over 50% of benign lesions in patients aged

  6. Cases report of ossifying fibroma showing various radiographic appearances in posterior mandible

    Lee, Byung Do; Oh, Seung Hwan [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Eulji University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Common radiographic appearances of ossifying fibroma (OF) are well demarcated margin, radiolucent or mixed lesion. Lesions for the radiographic differential diagnosis with OF include fibrous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. Other confusing lesions might be the mixed lesions such as calcifying odontogenic cyst, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, and benign cementoblastoma. We reported three cases of OF in posterior mandible. These cases showed a little distinguished radiographic features of OF and diagnosed from a combination of clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic information. We need to further refine radiographic and histopathological features of OF and other confusing lesions with literatures review because some cases of these lesions are not easily differentiated radiographically and histopathologically.

  7. Pathologic changes in the maxillary sinus wall after conservative therapy in odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Examination using bone scintigraphy

    Single photon emission computed tomographic bone scintigraphy (bone SPECT) was performed in 16 patients with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis to compare inflammatory changes in the maxillary sinus wall including the alveolar process (bony lesions) before and after conservative therapy. Morphologic changes in bony lesions as evaluated by bone SPECT images correlated with those of the maxillary sinus mucosa (mucosal lesions) as evaluated by CT images. Morphologic changes in the bony lesions also correlated with changes in inflammatory activity in the maxillary alveolar process as functionally evaluated by bone SPECT before and after conservative therapy. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis is considered a disease in which maxillary alveolitis causes mucosal lesions as well as bony lesions. Changes in alveolitis are associated with morphologic changes in bony lesions after conservative therapy, and these changes affect the pathophysiologic nature of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Bone SPECT is valuable for predicting outcome and treatment planning in patients with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. (author)

  8. Characterization and mRNA expression in an unusual odontogenic lesion in a patient with tricho-dento-osseous syndrome

    Dodds, A.P.; Cox, S A; Suggs, C.A.; Boyd, C.; Hart, T. C.; Wright, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Odontogenic lesions are rare, but can be associated with significant morbidity. While their molecular determinants are unknown, they likely express many genes common to normal odontogenesis. This study evaluated the histology and mRNA expression of an unusual odontogenic lesion in a patient with a confirmed history of tricho-dento-osseous syndrome. Methods: Decalcified, frozen 8 µm sections of the lesion were cut and mounted on glass slides and stained with ...

  9. A cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts from major dental institutions of Bangalore city: A study of 252 cases

    Prashanth Ramachandra; Prathima Maligi; Raghuveer, H P

    2011-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to perform a cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts obtained from the data of major dental institutions of Bangalore city, as well as to evaluate their distribution during a 5-year period and compare the results with other international studies. Materials and Methods: Data for the study were obtained from the reports of patients diagnosed with odontogenic cysts between 2005 and 2010 from different dental institutions of Bangalore. Case records of ...

  10. A case of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst suspected to be a radicular cyst.

    Onuki, Mizuho; Saito, Atsushi; Hosokawa, Sohei; Ohnuki, Tomohiro; Hayakawa, Hiroki; Seta, Shuichi; Muramatsu, Takashi; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a case of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst arising in the mandibular molar region of a 39-year-old man. Under the initial clinical diagnosis of radicular cyst, root canal treatment was performed on the mandibular right second molar. The treatment that continued for six months did not achieve healing. Subsequently surgical intervention was selected since the tooth fracture was found, and the prognosis was judged to be poor. After atraumatic tooth extraction, the apical cystic lesion was enucleated, and the tooth was replanted. A definite diagnosis of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. The radiograph taken seven months after the operation showed an improvement in the radiolucent lesion. No clinical signs of tooth mobility, pain, and swelling were present. The tooth was then successfully retained with the final restoration. Careful follow-up is needed in order to detect any signs of recurrence. PMID:19622877

  11. The surgical treatment of the subperiosteal abscess of the low orbital wall of the odontogenic origin

    G.M. Khakimova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose. Optimization of surgical treatment of the odontogenic subperiosteal abscess (SPA of the inferior orbital wall. Material and methods. Within the period between 2000 and 2011 the odontogenic SPA of the low orbital wall was diagnosed in 12 patients aged from 13 to 64 (mean 35.6±9.8: male 6, female 5, children 1. There were applied in the diagnosis the multi-spiral computer tomography, the magnetic resonance angiography of orbit, paranasal sinuses, brain and were found: an exudative detachment of periosteum, destruction of the low bone wall of orbit, exudate in the paranasal sinuses, thrombophlebitis of orbital veins. Results. The SPA sources were purulent periodontitis, extraction of tooth with a fistula formation into maxillary sinus, sinusitis. Infection of the odontogenic origin penetrated into orbit by contact and hematogenic ways simultaneously with the development of the SPA, thrombophlebitis of orbital veins, pterygopalatine fossa (5, thrombosis of cavernous sinus (4, sepsis (E.coli, St.aureus. Ten (83.3% out of 12 patients with the odontogenic SPA associated with antibiotic therapy underwent a simultaneous subperiosteal and supraperiosteal orbitotomy by transcutaneous approach along ciliary border of inferior eyelid (the patent for invention № 2370247 of 20.10.2009. At the same time maxillaryethmoidotomia, operative exploration of maxilla, drainage of pterygopalatine fossa were performed by a otorhinolaryngologist maxillofacial surgeon. It was made in 2 patients a wrong admission diagnosis — orbital phlegmon, that led to inadequate treatment, reoperations. Conclusion. The innovated operation turned to be highly effective in 90% of patients, allowed to exclude repeated surgical operations, to achieve a clinical recovery within 12-18 days with a good cosmetic effect maintaining visual functions. A lethal outcome was observed in one case in the patient with brain abscess who was hospitalized too late

  12. Gene polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase -1 in chronic periapical lesions and acute odontogenic infection

    Evrosimovska, Biljana; Dimova, Cena

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation involved various genes. Gene polymorphisms are contributing factors in the pathogenesis of inflammation. The promontory region of some matrix metalloproteinase’s (MMP) detected polymorphisms of the DNA (those promontory regions controlled transcription of the gene). Identification of genetic factors which are of enormous meaning for establishing of different profile of patients who will develop chronic periapical lesion or acute odontogenic infection, as well as, calculation o...

  13. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a Turkish Population

    Açikgöz, Aydan; Uzun-Bulut, Emel; ÖZDEN, Bora; Gündüz, Kaan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative frequency and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a large Turkish population. Study Design A retrospective survey of jaw cysts was undertaken at the Oral Diagnosis and Radiology and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Ondokuz Mayıs University Dental School, Samsun, Turkey. Data were retrieved from clinical files, imaging, and histopathology reports from 2000 to 2008; a total of 12,350 patients were included. In each case, we anal...

  14. Odontogenic Inflammatory Processes of Head and Neck in Computed Tomography Examinations

    Infections of odontogenic origin are the most common cause of inflammatory disease of head and neck region. Computed tomography allows for defining localization and extent of inflammatory lesions, visualizes soft tissue involvement, presence of an abscess or an osteolytic lesion around causative tooth. The aim of this study was to assess pathways, by which odontogenic infections spread into respective deep head and neck structures in computed tomography examination, taking into account the following criteria: frequency of involvement of respective deep cervical spaces, possibility to determine a probable causative tooth and concordance with the results of clinical examination. Thirty-eight patients cervicofacial inflammatory disease had undergone CT examination of head and neck region with a 64-slice CT scanner after intravenous contrast administration. Abscess was reported in 30 (79%) cases, while inflammatory infiltration was diagnosed in remaining 8 (21%) patients. There was full concordance between radiological report and intraoperative report In 33 cases (87%). The most commonly involved cervical space was masticator space – 31 patients (82%), followed by submandibular space – 27 patients (71%). Dental examination was impossible in 29 patient because of trismus. During analysis of CT studies we evaluated maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes for presence of osteolytic bone lesions around causative teeth roots and we found them in 30 cases (79%). In 32 cases (84%) cervicofacial infection were of mandibular odontogenic origin. In most cases CT study in patients suspected of odontogenic craniofacial infection revealed presence of an abscess, needing urgent surgery. Inflammatory infiltration of dental origin most frequently involves masticator space, followed by submandibular space. In most cases CT scanning allows for identification of causative teeth, especially when trismus makes detailed clinical examination impossible

  15. Antimicrobial therapies for odontogenic infections in children and adolescents. Literature review and clinical recomendations.

    Inés Caviglia; Adriana Techera; Graciela García

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral infections are caused by an imbalance in the patient’s indigenous flora which changes from commensal to opportunistic. Odontogenic infections are the most common reason for consultation in children and adolescents. Rational use of antibiotics is the best strategy to avoid microbial resistance. Dental infections should first receive proper local treatment, which can also be complemented with a systemic method. Appropriate drug selection and dosing should be made. Amoxicilin is t...

  16. Periodontal Plastic Surgical Repair Following Removal of a Recurrent Peripheral Odontogenic Fibroma

    Soileau, Kristi M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to present a case of a recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma, which required periodontal plastic surgery, due to resultant esthetic complications. This report describes a case of removal and biopsy of a large gingival lesion over the left maxillary central incisor, which recurred, thus requiring more aggressive treatment, followed by esthetic periodontal plastic surgery. After fourteen months, there was uneventful healing of the gingival and alveolar tis...

  17. Cutaneous sinus tracts (or emerging sinus tracts) of odontogenic origin: a report of 3 cases

    Brown, Ronald S; Robert Jones; Tawana Feimster; et al

    2010-01-01

    Ronald S Brown1, Robert Jones2, Tawana Feimster3, Frances E Sam21Department of Oral Diagnostic Services, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Endodontics, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Three cases are presented in which patients presented with either cutaneous swelling or cutaneous sinus tracts of odontogenic ...

  18. Diagnostic ability of differential diagnosis in ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst by imaging modalities and observers

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability in differentiating between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst according to the imaging modalities and observes. We evaluated thirty-six cases of ameloblastomas and forty-seven cases of odontogenic keratocysts all histologically confirmed. Six oral and maxillofacial radiologists diagnosed the lesions by 3 methods: using panoramic radiograph, using computed tomograph (CT), and using panoramic radiograph and CT. The observers were classified by 3 groups: group 1 had experienced over 10 years in oral and mazilofacial radiologic field, group 2 had experienced for 3-4 years, and group 3 was in the process of residentship. After over 2 weeks, the observers diagnosed them by the same methods. The ROC curve areas except for group 3 were the highest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph and CT, followed by interpretation using CT only, and the lowest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph only. The overall difference was not found in diagnostic ability among groups in using panoramic radiograph only, but there was difference in diagnostic ability of group 1 and 2 vs 3 in using CT only, and combination panoramic radiograph and CT. To differentiate between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst more accurately, the experienced oral and maxillofacial radiologist should diagnose with combination of panoramic radiograph and CT

  19. Comparison of odontogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells and human dental papilla cells.

    Lijuan Guo

    Full Text Available Classical tooth development theory suggests that dental papilla cells (DPCs are the precursor cells of odontoblasts, which are responsible for dentin development. However, our previous studies have indicated that dental follicle cells (DFCs can differentiate into odontoblasts. To further our understanding of tooth development, and the differences in dentinogenesis between DFCs and DPCs, the odontogenic differentiation of DFCs and DPCs was characterized in vitro and in vivo. DFCs and DPCs were individually combined with treated dentin matrix (TDM before they were subcutaneously implanted into the dorsum of mice for 8 weeks. Results showed that 12 proteins were significantly differential, and phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1, Isoform 2 of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1A and Isoform 1 of annexin A2 (ANXA2, were the most significantly differential proteins. These proteins are related to regulation of bone balance, angiogenesis and cell survival in an anoxic environment. Both DFCs and DPCs express odontogenic, neurogenic and peridontogenic markers. Histological examination of the harvested grafts showed that both DFCs and DPCs form pulp-dentin/cementum-periodentium-like tissues in vivo. Hence, DFCs and DPCs have similar odontogenic differentiation potential in the presence of TDM. However, differences in glucose and amino acid metabolism signal transduction and protein synthesis were observed for the two cell types. This study expands our understanding on tooth development, and provides direct evidence for the use of alternative cell sources in tooth regeneration.

  20. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x2-test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  1. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    2011-01-01

    A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures. PMID:22070833

  2. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    Stoetzer Marcus

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures.

  3. Pituitary Tumors

    ... Tumors Oligoastrocytoma Oligodendroglioma Pineal Tumor Pituitary Tumor PNET Schwannoma Risk Factors Brain Tumor Facts Brain Tumor Dictionary ... Tumors Oligoastrocytoma Oligodendroglioma Pineal Tumor Pituitary Tumor PNET Schwannoma Risk Factors Brain Tumor Facts Brain Tumor Dictionary ...

  4. The histone acetyltransferase p300 regulates the expression of pluripotency factors and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    Tong Wang

    Full Text Available p300 is a well-known histone acetyltransferase (HAT and coactivator that plays vital roles in many physiological processes. Despite extensive research on the involvement of p300 in the regulation of transcription in numerous cell lines, the roles of this protein in regulating pluripotency genes and odontogenic differentiation in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs are poorly understood. To address this issue, we investigated the expression of OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 and the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation capacity of HDPCs following p300 overexpression. We found that p300 overexpression did not overtly affect the ability of HDPCs to proliferate. The overexpression of p300 upregulated the promoter activity and the mRNA and protein expression of NANOG and SOX2. The HAT activity of p300 appeared to partially mediate the regulation of these factors; indeed, when a mutant form of p300 lacking the HAT domain was overexpressed, the promoter activity and expression of NANOG and SOX2 decreased relative to p300 overexpression but was greater than in the control. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA levels of the odontogenic marker genes dentine matrix protein-1 (DMP-1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP, dentin sialoprotein (DSP, osteopontin (OPN and osteocalcin (OCN were significantly decreased in HDPCs overexpressing p300 cultured under normal culture conditions and increased in HDPCs inducted to undergo odontogenic differentiation. This finding was further confirmed by measuring levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and assessing the formation of mineralized nodules. The HAT activity of p300 had no significant effect on odontogenic differentiation. p300 was recruited to the promoter regions of OCN and DSPP and might be acting as a coactivator to increase the acetylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 of OCN and DSPP. Collectively, our results show that p300 plays an important role in regulating the expression of key pluripotency genes in

  5. Decompression of Odontogenic Cystic Lesions: Past, Present, and Future.

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Tumors and cystic lesions of the jawbones have been described since the late 1600s and it took another 200 years for classification systems to appear in the medical, surgical, and dental literatures. In the late 1800s, Carl Partsch introduced cystostomy, a method by which the cyst is converted into a pouch by suturing its lining to the mucosa of the oral cavity. The purpose of this article is to analyze the history, present, and future of cystic conditions of the jaws and decompression, a modality of treatment that during the past few years has regained the attention of oral and maxillofacial surgeons and pathologists owing to its relative simplicity and effectiveness compared with other conservative options. PMID:26428611

  6. Fibroma periférico odontogénico: A propósito de un caso Peripheral odontogenic fibroma: A case report

    M. Rebolledo Cobos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available El fibroma periférico odontogénico es una lesión tumoral de la submucosa oral o del ligamento periodontal causado por irritación crónica como traumatismos locales, cuerpos extraños y cálculo o ciertos factores que transforman el tejido conectivo de las mucosas en tejido fibroso. Es de crecimiento lento, asintomático y en ocasiones involuciona cuando se eliminan los factores causales. El tratamiento consta de escisión quirúrgica y curetaje de la base de la lesión para evitar recurrencias. Se presenta un caso clínico en el servicio de Estomatología y cirugía oral de una Universidad en Cartagena Colombia, de un paciente de 36 años de edad, masculino y sistémicamente sano con impresión clínica de fibroma periférico odontogénico ubicado en el tercio anterior derecho de paladar duro, ulcerado y asintomático de un año de evolución. Se ejecutan diversos estudios paraclínicos como radiografías panorámicas, periapicales y oclusales para descartar afección a estructuras óseas. Previo a la firma de un consentimiento informado se realizó procedimiento quirúrgico que constó de la escisión quirúrgica de la lesión para posterior análisis histopatológico que confirmó el diagnostico.The peripheral odontogenic fibroma is a tumor of the oral submucosa, or periodontal ligament caused by chronic irritation, local trauma, dental calculus foreign agents or certain agents that may transform the connective tissue of the mucous membranes in fibrous tissue. It is like slow growing, asymptomatic and sometimes regress when the etiologic factors are eliminated. Treatment consists of surgical excision and curettage of the base of the lesion to prevent recurrence. In this paper is presented a clinical case in the service of oral surgery and stomatology of a University in Cartagena Colombia, in a 36 years old patient, male and systemically healthy with clinical impression of peripheral odontogenic fibroma located in the anterior third of

  7. Cutaneous sinus tracts (or emerging sinus tracts of odontogenic origin: a report of 3 cases

    Ronald S Brown

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ronald S Brown1, Robert Jones2, Tawana Feimster3, Frances E Sam21Department of Oral Diagnostic Services, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Endodontics, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Three cases are presented in which patients presented with either cutaneous swelling or cutaneous sinus tracts of odontogenic origin. A cutaneous sinus tract of odontogenic origin is a pathway through the alveolar bone that typically begins at the apex of an infected tooth or of an infected portion of the dental alveolus and empties infected material (pus through the skin. Where as the more common finding of an oral fistula is a pathway from the apical periodontal area of a tooth to the surface of the oral mucous membrane, permitting the discharge of suppurative material. Diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed with reference to patient history, clinical examinations, imaging, and treatment perspectives.Keywords: dental abscess, fistula, cutaneous sinus tract, odotogenic infection

  8. Expression of bcl-2 in the Epithelial Lining of Odontogenic Keratocysts

    Gh. Jahanshahi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The aggressive nature and high recurrence rate of Odontogenic Keratocysts (OKCs may be due to unknown factors inherent in the epithelium or because of enzymatic activity in the fibrous wall. Bcl-2 protein is characterized by its ability to inhibit apoptosis.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of bcl-2 protein in OKCs and to compare it with the more common radicular and dentigerous cysts. The possible relationship between inflammation and bcl-2 expression was also investigated.Materials and Methods: Formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 20 OKCs, 20 radicular and 20 dentigerous cysts were immunohistochemically analyzed for immunoreactivity of the bcl-2 protein.Results: Bcl-2 expression was observed in 19 OKCs (95%, one radicular cyst (5%and one dentigerous cyst (5%. There was no statistically significant relationship between inflammation and the number of bcl-2 positive cells. Immunoreactivity was mainly noted in the basal or basal/supra basal layers.Conclusion: Considering the fact that bcl-2 over expression may lead to increased survival of epithelial cells, present study may demonstrate a possible relationship between the aggressive nature of OKC and the intrinsic growth potential of its lining epithelium. Furthermore a basal/supra basal distribution of bcl-2 positive cells was seen in some odontogenic keratocysts which may have a significant impact on the behavior of this cyst.

  9. Odontogenic keratocysts: a clinical and histological study with special reference to enzyme histochemistry.

    Magnusson, B C

    1978-02-01

    Of a total of 1,420 odontogenic cysts, 52 (3.3%) were diagnosed as odontogenic keratocysts. Clinical and histological findings in these 52 cysts are reported. Frozen sections of 26 of the keratocysts were incubated to show the following enzyme activities: NADH2- and NADPH2-diaphorase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase and ATPase. Furthermore, keratinization was studied with the rhodamine B method and lipids with the oil red O, the OTAN and the acid hematein methods. Sections from epidermis, oral mucosa, radicular cysts, residual cysts and follicular cysts served as reference material. The oxidative enzymes showed strong activity in the keratocyst epithelium which contrasted with weak activity in the reference cysts. Acid phosphatase activity was weak in all epithelia except that in keratocysts, which displayed a marked activity. In the fibrous capsule of the keratocyst a high activity of leucine aminopeptidase was recorded. This high activity contrasted with a weak activity in the reference material. The significance of the histochemical results in relation to the aggressive behavior of the keratocyst is discussed. PMID:148497

  10. Oral streptococcal strains isolated from odontogenic infections and their susceptibility to antibiotics.

    Bancescu, Gabriela; Dumitriu, Silvia; Bancescu, Adrian; Pana, Marina; Andrei, Manuela

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify at species level and to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility of oral streptococcal strains isolated from 100 pus samples collected from Romanian patients with different odontogenic infections. The isolates were identified at species level using the Rapid ID 32 STREP system and their susceptibility was testing by the Etest, against: penicillin G, ampicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. For the investigation of erythromycin resistance phenotype the disk diffusion test was used. The isolates belonged to several species, with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus oralis predominating. Reduced susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics was found only among the isolates belonging to S. mitis and S. sanguinis groups. Resistance to erythromycin was detected among all species, except for: S. constellatus, S. intermedius and S. gordonii, and the M phenotype was established, while resistance to tetracycline was detected within all species but S. gordonii. In contrast, clindamycin was fully active. As most odontogenic infections are mixed infections, often involving strictly anaerobic bacteria, which are frequently beta-lactamase producers, the association of a penicillin and a beta-lactamase inhibitor, like Amoxiclav, is recommended when the antimicrobial treatment is necessary. PMID:17438917

  11. Diagnosis and Treatment of Odontogenic Cutaneous Sinus Tracts in an 11-Year-Old Boy

    Chen, Ke; Liang, Yun; Xiong, Huacui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts (OCSTs) are generally primarily misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated by virtue of their rarity and the absence of dental symptoms. Accurate diagnosis and treatment and the elimination of the source of infection can reduce the incidence of complications and relieve the pain of the patient. In this case report, we present the case of an 11-year-old patient with an apparent abscess but an unobvious draining sinus tract in his left cheek. Intraorally, a glass-ionomer-cement filling on the occlusal surface of the left mandibular first molar (tooth 36) was noted. Radiographic examination revealed a radiopaque mass inside the crown and pulp chamber and an irregular, radiolucent periapical lesion surrounding the distal root apex. He was diagnosed with an OCTS secondary to a periapical abscess of tooth 36. Precise root canal therapy (RCT) and chronic granuloma debridement was performed; 6 months later, the abscess and sinus had healed completely, and the periapical lesion had resolved. Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts are uncommon in the clinic. This case report reminds us of the significance of OCSTs and provides some implications for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27196471

  12. Prevalence of Odontogenic Deep Head and Neck Spaces Infection and its Correlation with Length of Hospital Stay

    Zamiri B.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available tement of Problem: As the duration of hospital stay could be an indicator of the severity of infection (Including odontogenic sources; defining related variables could be very helpful in the treatment process. All clinical and paraclinical variables related to sever head and neck infections of odontogenic origin have not been fully evaluated.Purpose: This study was designed to identify the potential risk factors associated with increasing hospital stay in patients with deep head and neck spaces infections of odontogenic origin. Materials and Method: A total of 297 patients admitted to Shiraz Khalili hospital (1996-2006 with head and neck spaces infection were retrospectively identified by a medical chart view. Data concerning patient demographics, source and location of infection, culture results, and treatment modalities were evaluated. Linear regression techniques were used to explain the relationship between patient admission characteristics and duration of hospitalization.Results: A total of 34.3 % (n=102 of the patients had head and neck spaces infections of odontogenic origin. The most common location of infection was submandibular space (32%, followed by masseter space (22% and Ludwig’s angina (20%. Culture results showed non-hemolytic streptococcus as the most common microorganism with the prevalence of 61.6%.The most frequent signs and symptoms were swelling and pain. The results showed a higher percentage of hospital admissions for the middle socioeconomic status (58.8%. Variables such as high weight, blood sodium level less than 135, preexisting disease and increasing in blood mean cell volume (MCV were associated with longer hospital stay. Only 1 (0.9% death was reported as the result of these infections. Conclusion: Odontogenic infections were a common source of deep head and neck spaces infection resulted in longer hospital stay. Paying particular attention to the variables that lead to longer hospital stay could be very

  13. Multiple bilateral supernumerary mandibular premolars in a non-syndromic patient with associated orthokeratised odontogenic cyst- A case report and review of literature

    Vikrant O Kasat; Harish Saluja; Jitendra V Kalburge; Yogesh Kini; Atul Nikam; Ruchi Laddha

    2012-01-01

    Multiple supernumerary teeth are very rare, accounting for less than 1% of cases. They are commonly associated with syndromes like Gardner′s syndrome and cleidocranial dysostosis and cleft lip and palate. Non-syndromic multiple supernumerary teeth have a predilection to occur in the mandibular premolar region. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a relatively uncommon developmental cyst comprising about 10% of the cases that had been previously implied as odontogenic keratocysts. More t...

  14. A quantitative and qualitative comparative analysis of collagen fibers to determine the role of connective tissue stroma on biological behavior of odontogenic cysts: A histochemical study

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Shetty, Devi Charan; Wadhwan, Vijay; Aggarwal, Palak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Intricate relationship between epithelium and connective tissue is believed to play a significant role in pathogenesis of odontogenic lesions. Role of epithelium in its pathogenesis is well established and at the same time role of mesenchyme cannot be underestimated. Aim: To investigate, compare and correlate different types and pattern of collagen fibers in odontogenic cysts using picrosiriusred stain under polarizing microscopy in order to delineate its exact role in biological ...

  15. Radiographic differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst: with emphasis on CT

    To evaluate clinical and radiographic differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) using clinical data, plain radiographs, and CT. 25 cases of ameloblastoma and 44 cases of OKC diagnosed in biopsy, were selected from the files stored in Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Seoul National University Dental Hospital from 1999 to 2001, and evaluated using following criteria: sex and age, location, shape, border to normal bone tissue, effect to adjacent tissues, homogeneity in the lumen of the lesion, response of the cortical bone, long-to-short length (L/S) ratio of the lesion, and expansion angle of the cortex. Ameloblastoma and OKC were seen most frequently in third decades and no statistical significance was noted between both sexes. Ameloblastoma occurred most frequently in mandibular angle and ramus area (68%) and OKC at the maxillary molar (34.1%), and mandibular angle and ramus area (43.2%). The root resorption of the adjacent teeth, mandibular canal displacement, and the impaction of teeth were seen more frequently in ameloblastoma than in OKC. The L/S ratio measured in CT was largest in maxillary OKC cases, followed by mandibular ameloblastoma, and mandibular OKC (1.2, 1.8 and 2.4 respectively). The expansion angle of the cortex shows a statistically significant difference between ameloblastoma (48.8 .deg. C) and OKC (31.5 .deg. C). The numeric morphology (L/S ratio) and expansion angle of the cortical bone of the lesion measured in computed tomography can be used to differentiate the ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst.

  16. Odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) inhibits growth and migration of human melanoma cells and elicits PTEN elevation and inactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling

    The Odontogenic Ameloblast-associated Protein (ODAM) is expressed in a wide range of normal epithelial, and neoplastic tissues, and we have posited that ODAM serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for breast cancer and melanoma. Transfection of ODAM into breast cancer cells yields suppression of cellular growth, motility, and in vivo tumorigenicity. Herein we have extended these studies to the effects of ODAM on cultured melanoma cell lines. The A375 and C8161 melanoma cell lines were stably transfected with ODAM and assayed for properties associated with tumorigenicity including cell growth, motility, and extracellular matrix adhesion. In addition, ODAM–transfected cells were assayed for signal transduction via AKT which promotes cell proliferation and survival in many neoplasms. ODAM expression in A375 and C8161 cells strongly inhibited cell growth and motility in vitro, increased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix, and yielded significant cytoskeletal/morphologic rearrangement. Furthermore, AKT activity was downregulated by ODAM expression while an increase was noted in expression of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) tumor suppressor gene, an antagonist of AKT activation. Increased PTEN in ODAM-expressing cells was associated with increases in PTEN mRNA levels and de novo protein synthesis. Silencing of PTEN expression yielded recovery of AKT activity in ODAM-expressing melanoma cells. Similar PTEN elevation and inhibition of AKT by ODAM was observed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells while ODAM expression had no effect in PTEN-deficient BT-549 breast cancer cells. The apparent anti-neoplastic effects of ODAM in cultured melanoma and breast cancer cells are associated with increased PTEN expression, and suppression of AKT activity. This association should serve to clarify the clinical import of ODAM expression and any role it may serve as an indicator of tumor behavior

  17. Vegetable Granuloma in Pindborg’s Tumor: A Rare Encounter

    Sowmya, S V; Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S

    2014-01-01

    Vegetable granuloma (VG) or pulse granuloma is an enigmatic lesion in terms of its designated nomenclature and etiopathogenesis. It is less often reported in the walls of inflammatory and developmental odontogenic cysts. It can present different histological characteristics, possibly related to the length of time in the tissue and its location. Due to its deceptive appearance, it can often mislead the pathologists. Here, we report an unusual encounter of VG in a Pindborg’s tumor, which is the first of its kind in the literature. PMID:25214745

  18. Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid for the Treatment of Odontogenic Infections: A Randomised Study Comparing Efficacy and Tolerability versus Clindamycin

    Archiel Launch Tancawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Treatment of odontogenic infections includes surgical drainage and adjunctive antibiotics. This study was designed to generate efficacy and safety data to support twice daily dosing of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid compared to clindamycin in odontogenic infections. Methods. This was a phase IV, randomised, observer blind study; 472 subjects were randomised to receive amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (875 mg/125 mg BID, n=235 or clindamycin (150 mg QID, n=237 for 5 or 7 days based on clinical response. The primary endpoint was percentage of subjects achieving clinical success (composite measure of pain, swelling, fever, and additional antimicrobial therapy required at the end of treatment. Results. The upper limit of two-sided 95% confidence interval for the treatment difference between the study arms (7.7% was within protocol specified noninferiority margin of 10%, thus demonstrating noninferiority of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid to clindamycin. Secondary efficacy results showed a higher clinical success rate at Day 5 in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid arm. Most adverse events (raised liver enzymes, diarrhoea, and headache were similar across both arms and were of mild to moderate intensity. Conclusion. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was comparable to clindamycin in achieving clinical success (88.2% versus 89.7% in acute odontogenic infections and the safety profile was consistent with the known side effects of both drugs. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02141217.

  19. Imaging analyses of odontogenic infection involving the maxillofacial fascial spaces, with special emphasis on the parapharyngeal space

    Ariji, Yoshiko; Gotoh, Masakazu; Izumi, Masahiro; Naitoh, Munetaka; Kurita, Kenichi; Natsume, Nagato; Ariji, Eiichiro [Aichi-Gakuin Univ., Nisshin (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate odontogenic infection pathways into the maxillofacial fascial spaces, especially into the parapharyngeal space, in relation to causal tooth and clinical symptoms. CT and MR images were retrospectively investigated in 47 patients with spread of odontogenic infection into the maxillofacial spaces. The involvement of spaces was evaluated based on lateral asymmetry of their shapes and density on CT images or intensity on MR images. Involvement on images was observed in 70%, 49%, and 30% of the submandibular, the masticator, and the parapharyngeal spaces, respectively. Patients with submandibular space involvement often had spontaneous pain. Of 14 patients with parapharyngeal space involvement, 8 patients showed dysphagia and/or fever, and 13 patients showed involvement of the mandibular molar as a cause of infection. All of these 14 patients also had submandibular space involvement, while only 7 patients (50%) showed changes in the medial pterygoid muscle. The fat layer between the medial pterygoid muscle and parapharyngeal space was maintained in 11 of 14 (79%) patients with parapharyngeal involvement. CT and MR images clearly demonstrated the spread of odontogenic infection into the maxillofacial spaces. Involvement of the parapharyngeal space was mostly caused by infection originating in the mandibular molar, and was considered to be secondary spread from the submandibular space and/or medial pterygoid muscle. (author)

  20. Use of FDG-PET to detect a chronic odontogenic infection as a possible source of the brain abscess.

    Sato, Jun; Kuroshima, Takeshi; Wada, Mayumi; Satoh, Akira; Watanabe, Shiro; Okamoto, Shozo; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the use of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) to detect a chronic odontogenic infection as the possible origin of a brain abscess (BA). A 74-year-old man with esophageal carcinoma was referred to our department to determine the origin of a BA in his oral cavity. He had no acute odontogenic infections. The BA was drained, and bacteria of the Staphylococcus milleri group were detected. Whole body FDG-PET revealed that the only sites of definite uptake of FDG were the esophageal carcinoma and the left upper maxillary region (SUVmax: 4.5). These findings suggested that the BA may have originated from a chronic periodontal infection. Six teeth with progressive chronic periodontal disease were extracted to remove the possible source of BA. These findings excluded the possibility of direct spread of bacteria from the odontogenic infectious lesion to the intracranial cavity. After extraction, there was no relapse of BA. PMID:26497357

  1. Osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected human stem cells from apical papilla.

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaolei; Ling, Junqi; Wei, Xi; Jian, Yutao

    2016-05-01

    Stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) possess clear osteo‑/odontogenic differentiation capabilities, and are regarded as the major cellular source for root dentin development. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serve pivotal roles in the modulation of tooth development and dentin formation. However, the synergistic effects of BMP2 and VEGF on osteo‑/odontogenic differentiation of SCAP remain unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the proliferative and osteo‑/odontogenic differentiating capabilities of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2-VEGF) in vitro. The basic characteristics of the isolated SCAP were identified by the induction of multipotent differentiation and by flow cytometry. Lentiviral vector‑mediated gene transfection was conducted with SCAP in order to construct blank vector‑transfected SCAP (SCAP-green fluorescent protein), BMP2 gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2), VEGF gene‑transfected SCAP (SCAP‑VEGF) and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF. The Cell Counting Kit 8 assay was used to analyze the proliferative capacities of the four groups of cells. The expression of osteo-/odontogenic genes and proteins in the cells were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The mineralized nodules formed by the four group cells were visualized by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. Among the four groups of cells, SCAP‑VEGF was demonstrated to exhibit increased proliferation, and SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF exhibited reduced proliferation during eight days observation. SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF exhibited significantly increased expression levels of ALP, osteocalcin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene 1 and dentin sialoprotein than the other three groups at the majority of the time points. Furthermore, the SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF group exhibited a significantly greater number of ALP‑positive mineralized nodules than the other

  2. FDG-PET/CT in staging of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma.

    Krishnamoorthy, R; Ravi Kumar, A S; Batstone, M

    2014-11-01

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) is a rare neoplasm; only 75 cases have been reported in the English language literature. They have a tendency for recurrence and a capacity to metastasize. There is very little known regarding the metabolic features of this tumour or the utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scans in the staging and follow-up of these tumours. We present two cases of CCOC with their relevant FDG-PET/CT scan findings. The first patient had primary CCOC of the mandible that was FDG-avid, and the other had recurrence of CCOC of the anterior mandible and superomedial orbit that was not FDG-avid. FDG uptake in CCOC appears to be variable. Although FDG-PET/CT is useful in other head and neck cancers and has benefits compared to other imaging modalities, further studies are needed to investigate the sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT in CCOC. PMID:25015905

  3. The clinical and radiological consideration of calcifying odontogenic cyst of the jaw

    Yoon, Hae Rym; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-15

    Nine cases presented with a calcifying odontogenic cyst to the Dental Hospital of the College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, from January 1987 to September June, 1996, Clinical or histopathological findings were observed according to each radiologic criteria. The results obtained are as follows:1. The male to female ratio was 2 : 1 with a mean age of 25 years. 2. The radiographic appearances of nine caes were well-defined radiolucent lesions in which eight cases were shown until ocular lesions and only one lesion was seen multilocular lesion. 3. Radiologically, three of nine cases were pure radiolucent lesion and others, six cases were radiolucent contained a variable amount of radiopaque material. 4. Histologically, two cases were classified simple cyst, five were cyst associated odontoma, two were neoplastic type. 5. Histological findings according to the radiological classification, two of three radiolucent lesions were simple cys ts; another was a cyst associated with odontoma. While, four of six radiologic mixed lesions turned out to be a cyst associated with odontoma, two was the neoplastic type.

  4. The clinical and radiological consideration of calcifying odontogenic cyst of the jaw

    Nine cases presented with a calcifying odontogenic cyst to the Dental Hospital of the College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, from January 1987 to September June, 1996, Clinical or histopathological findings were observed according to each radiologic criteria. The results obtained are as follows:1. The male to female ratio was 2 : 1 with a mean age of 25 years. 2. The radiographic appearances of nine caes were well-defined radiolucent lesions in which eight cases were shown until ocular lesions and only one lesion was seen multilocular lesion. 3. Radiologically, three of nine cases were pure radiolucent lesion and others, six cases were radiolucent contained a variable amount of radiopaque material. 4. Histologically, two cases were classified simple cyst, five were cyst associated odontoma, two were neoplastic type. 5. Histological findings according to the radiological classification, two of three radiolucent lesions were simple cys ts; another was a cyst associated with odontoma. While, four of six radiologic mixed lesions turned out to be a cyst associated with odontoma, two was the neoplastic type.

  5. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation.

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-07-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation. PMID:26062551

  6. Glandular odontogenic cyst mimicking ameloblastoma in a 78 year old female: A case report

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Kwon, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Moon Ki; Choi, Eun Joo [College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dentistry, Daejeon Dental Hospital, Wonkwang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare, potentially aggressive jaw lesion. The common radiographic features include a well-defined radiolucency with distinct borders, presenting a uni- or multilocular appearance. A cystic lesion in the posterior mandible of a 78-year-old female was incidentally found. Radiographs showed a unilocular lesion with a scalloped margin, external root resorption of the adjacent tooth, and cortical perforation. This lesion had changed from a small ovoid shape to a more expanded lesion in a period of four years. The small lesion showed unilocularity with a smooth margin and a well-defined border, but the expanded lesion produced cortical perforation and a lobulated margin. The provisional diagnosis was an ameloblastoma, whereas the histopathological examination revealed a GOC. This was a quite rare case, given that this radiographic change was observed in the posterior mandible of an elderly female. This case showed that a GOC can grow even in people in their seventies, changing from the unilocular form to an expanded, lobulated lesion. Here, we report a case of GOC with characteristic radiographic features.

  7. Nanofibrous spongy microspheres enhance odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    Kuang, Rong; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-16

    Dentin regeneration is challenging due to its complicated anatomical structure and the shortage of odontoblasts. In this study, a novel injectable cell carrier, nanofibrous spongy microspheres (NF-SMS), is developed for dentin regeneration. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(l-lactic acid)-block-poly(l-lysine) are synthesized and fabricated into NF-SMS using self-assembly and thermally induced phase separation techniques. It is hypothesized that NF-SMS with interconnected pores and nanofibers can enhance the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), compared to nanofibrous microspheres (NF-MS) without pore structure and conventional solid microspheres (S-MS) with neither nanofibers nor pore structure. During the first 9 d in culture, hDPSCs proliferate significantly faster on NF-SMS than on NF-MS or S-MS (p SMS group than in the control groups. Furthermore, 6 weeks after subcutaneous injection of hDPSCs and microspheres into nude mice, histological analysis shows that NF-SMS support superior dentin-like tissue formation compared to NF-MS or S-MS. Taken together, NF-SMS have great potential as an injectable cell carrier for dentin regeneration. PMID:26138254

  8. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I.

    Francesco Paduano

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I, one of the main components of dental pulp ECM.DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP, dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1 and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining.When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions.These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  9. Assessment of the relationship between odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and findings in the ostiomeatal unit on coronal CT images

    The ostiomeatal unit (OMU) incorporates the maxillary sinus ostium, infundibulum, uncinate process, hiatus semilunaris ethmoid bulla, middle turbinate and middle meatus. The maxillary ostium is located in the superior portion of the medial maxillary wall and drains into the posterior aspect of the ethmoid infundibulum. The detailed anatomy of the OMU as displayed by CT provides a road map for surgeons prior to endoscopic sinus surgery. However, little attention has been paid to the relationship between the OMU and odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. This study examined the relationship between the osteomeatal unit and odontogenic maxillary sinusitis using coronal CT images. Materials consisted of 100 abnormal maxillary sinuses in 100 odontgenic maxillary sinusitis patients. Using coronal images, mucosal abnormalities were examined by grading expansion of the low density area, which represents the mucous membranes in the maxillary sinuses. Findings were classified into 3 types and the correlation between obstruction of the maxillary ostium and thickening of other sinonasal sinuses was examined. Results of the grading were as follows: 25 maxillary sinuses were graded as type 1, 22 maxillary sinuses as type 2, and 53 maxillary sinuses as type 3. On pattern analysis using coronal CT images, there were significant differences in obstruction of the maxillary ostium based on thickening of the mucous membranes of the odontgenic maxillary sinusitis (p<0.01); also there was a correlation between thickening of the mucous membranes of the ethmoid sinuses and thickening of the mucous membranes of the odontgenic maxillary sinusitis (p<0.01). Thickening of the mucous membranes of both the ethmoid sinuses and frontal sinuses was well correlated with obstruction of the maxillary ostium on coronal CT images (p<0.05). However, there was no correlation between obstruction of the maxillary ostium and sphenoid sinuses. Our study indicates that the severity of odontogenic maxillary

  10. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    Liu, Chao-Hsin [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP.

  11. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP

  12. DIFFUSE SUPPURATION OF THE FLOOR OF MOUTH WITH ODONTOGENIC ORIGIN COMPLICATED WITH MEDIASTINAL AND HEPATIC PATHOLOGY

    F. Onişor-Gligor

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The complications of diffuse suppurations of the head and neck represent a major risk factor for the patient´s life. The emergency surgical intervention, associated with the antimicrobial drugs represents the elective treatment of these affections. In this paper we present the case of a patient who presented a diffuse suppuration of the floor of mouth, with odontogenic origin, complicated with mediastinal, pericardial and hepatic pathology. As a result of the surgical intervention, both at the level of the cephalic extremity, and at the thoracic level, the postoperative evolution was favorable and lead to the patient’s recovery. The large drainage of the mouth floor and the deep neck spaces, associated with the thoracic drainage were the most important elements for the patient’s total recovery. Simultaneously, the patient was administered antimicrobial drugs, according to the antibiogram, that limited the extent of the suppuration through the hematogenic way and the installation of multiorgan failure. After the amelioration of the inflammatory phenomena the reconstructive plastic surgery of the postoperative scars was done. In the Romanian and in the international literature many cases of diffuse suppurations of the head and neck, complicated with septic determinations at a distance, were presented. These were successfully cured due to a sustained surgical treatment. Most of the authors endorse the opinion that the antimicrobial drugs are of major importance in the case of the diffuse suppurations. They have the role of limiting the extent of the suppuration, but the most important remains the surgical treatment. However, the diffuse suppurations represent a category of affections that may lead to an unfortunate ending.

  13. Antimicrobial therapies for odontogenic infections in children and adolescents. Literature review and clinical recomendations.

    Inés Caviglia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Oral infections are caused by an imbalance in the patient’s indigenous flora which changes from commensal to opportunistic. Odontogenic infections are the most common reason for consultation in children and adolescents. Rational use of antibiotics is the best strategy to avoid microbial resistance. Dental infections should first receive proper local treatment, which can also be complemented with a systemic method. Appropriate drug selection and dosing should be made. Amoxicilin is the first choice for antimicrobial agents in pediatric dentistry. Clindamycin and clarithromycin are the best alternative for patients with penicillin hypersensibility. In this literature review, the authors intended to establish clear clinical management guidelines for emergency treatment and subsequent final resolution. RESUMEN Las infecciones bucales son producidas por un desequilibrio de la flora indígena del paciente que pasa de comensal a oportunista. Las consultas más frecuentes en niños y adolescentes son las infecciones odontogénicas. El uso racional de antibióticos, es la estrategia más importante para evitar la resistencia microbiana. Las infecciones dentarias deben recibir en primera instancia el tratamiento local correspondiente y a veces complementarse con tratamiento sistémico seleccionando y dosificando adecuadamente el fármaco. El antimicrobiano de primera elección en odontopediatría es la amoxicilina y para pacientes con hipersensibilidad a las penicilinas, se indican claritromicina o clindamicina. Esta revisión de la literatura busca establecer pautas de manejo clínico claras para el tratamiento de urgencia y su posterior resolución definitiva.

  14. Bone tumor

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  15. Ameloblasts serum-free conditioned medium: bone morphogenic protein 4-induced odontogenic differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Liu, Li; Liu, Ying-Feng; Zhang, Jing; Duan, Yin-Zhong; Jin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells possess the ability of self-renewal and can differentiate into cells of the three germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Here we report a new method to efficiently induce differentiation of mouse iPS cells into the odontogenic lineage. Using ameloblasts serum-free conditioned medium (ASF-CM), we successfully generated ameloblast-like cells from mouse iPS cells. Importantly, culturing mouse iPS cells in ASF-CM supplemented with BMP4 (ASF-BMP4) promoted odontogenic differentiation, which was evident by the upregulation of ameloblast-specific as well as odontoblast-specific genes. On the other hand, culturing mouse iPS cells in ASF-CM supplemented with noggin (ASF-noggin), an inhibitor of BMP4, abrogated this effect. These results suggest that mouse iPS cells can be induced by ASF-BMP4 to differentiate into ameloblast-like and odontoblast-like cells. The results of our study raise the possibility of using patient-specific iPS cells for tooth regeneration in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23606575

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Odontogenic Cutaneous Sinus Tracts in an 11-Year-Old Boy: A Case Report.

    Chen, Ke; Liang, Yun; Xiong, Huacui

    2016-05-01

    Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts (OCSTs) are generally primarily misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated by virtue of their rarity and the absence of dental symptoms. Accurate diagnosis and treatment and the elimination of the source of infection can reduce the incidence of complications and relieve the pain of the patient.In this case report, we present the case of an 11-year-old patient with an apparent abscess but an unobvious draining sinus tract in his left cheek. Intraorally, a glass-ionomer-cement filling on the occlusal surface of the left mandibular first molar (tooth 36) was noted. Radiographic examination revealed a radiopaque mass inside the crown and pulp chamber and an irregular, radiolucent periapical lesion surrounding the distal root apex. He was diagnosed with an OCTS secondary to a periapical abscess of tooth 36. Precise root canal therapy (RCT) and chronic granuloma debridement was performed; 6 months later, the abscess and sinus had healed completely, and the periapical lesion had resolved.Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts are uncommon in the clinic. This case report reminds us of the significance of OCSTs and provides some implications for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27196471

  17. Detection of arenavirus in a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) with inclusion body disease.

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Saey, Veronique; Martel, An

    2015-03-01

    A captive bred red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) was presented with a large intraoral mass originating from the buccal gingiva, attached to the right dentary teeth row. Based on the clinical features and histological examination, the diagnosis of a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma was made. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, indistinguishable from those observed in inclusion body disease-affected snakes. Inclusion bodies were not observed in cells comprising the neoplastic mass. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), arenavirus was detected in the neoplastic tissue. Two years after surgical removal of the mass, recurrence of the neoplastic lesion was observed. Numerous large inclusion body disease inclusions were abundantly present in the neoplastic cells of the recurrent fibromyxoma. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few intracytoplasmic inclusions. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of arenavirus in blood, a liver biopsy, and neoplastic tissue. The present case describes the co-occurrence of an arenavirus infection and an odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa. PMID:25776548

  18. CT findings of the infraorbital space. Special reference to odontogenic infection caused by periapical lesions of the maxillary canine

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical significance of the infraorbital space demonstrated on CT for the diagnosis of odontogenic infection caused by periapical lesions of the maxillary canine tooth. We evaluated the radiological appearance of the labial cortical bone and the surrounding soft tissue adjacent to the root apex of the maxillary canine in 12 patients with infraorbital space infection demonstrated on CT. The patients consisted of 6 males and 6 females, and age ranged from 33 to 84 years with a mean age of 58.7 years. On CT, disruption of the labial cortical bone around the root apex of the maxillary canine accompanied with pathological soft tissue density adjacent to the disrupted cortical bone was observed in all of the cases. Swelling of the facial muscles (levator labii superioris muscle, levator anguli oris muscle) was shown in 6 (50%) of 12 cases. Deviation of the levator labii superioris muscle was demonstrated in 9 cases (75%), whereas that of the levator anguli oris muscle was observed only in 2 cases (17%). The anatomical appearance of the infraorbital space which is clearly demonstrated on CT might be useful in diagnosing the spread of odontogenic infection caused by periapical lesions of the maxillary canine. (author)

  19. Insight from Frogs: Sonic Hedgehog Gene Expression and a Re-evaluation of the Vertebrate Odontogenic Band.

    Grieco, Theresa M; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2016-08-01

    While the identification of conserved processes across multiple taxa leads to an understanding of fundamental developmental mechanisms, the ways in which different animals fail to conform to common developmental processes can elucidate how evolution modifies development to result in the vast array of morphologies seen today-the developmental mechanisms that lead to anatomical variation. Odontogenesis-how teeth are initiated and formed-is well suited to the examination of both developmental conservation and phenotypic diversity. We suggest here that the study of early tooth development, the period of odontogenic band development, reveals departures from conserved mechanisms that question the role of players in the developmental process. In the earliest stages of odontogenesis, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene expression is interpreted as critical evidence of tooth initiation prior to any histological indication. However, a detailed examination of studies of tooth development across a wide range of taxa reveals that several vertebrate species fail to conform to the expectations of the Shh Consensus Model, calling for a reconsideration of the assumed causality of epithelial Shh in tooth initiation. We present new Shh gene expression data for an amphibian, the frog Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. In these animals, craniofacial and odontogenic developmental processes are more disjunct, and thereby provide a natural test of the hypothesis that Shh is immediately required for subsequent tooth development. Our results suggest that Shh expression may actually be related to the formation of the mouth rather than a required precursor to subsequent tooth formation. Anat Rec, 299:1099-1109, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27262165

  20. Diagnosis of fetal congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung by MRI%胎儿先天性肺囊腺瘤样畸形的MRI诊断与鉴别诊断

    董素贞; 朱铭; 钟玉敏; 张弘; 潘慧红

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨MRI在胎儿先天性肺囊腺瘤样畸形(CCAM)诊断与鉴别诊断中的应用价值.方法:36例孕妇,年龄21~38岁,平均29岁;孕龄20~31周,平均24周.产前常规行超声(US)检查后24~48h内行MR检查,采用二维快速平衡稳态采集 (2D-FIESTA) 序列、单次激发快速自旋回波(SSFSE)序列,行胎儿颅脑胸腹部常规及胸部重点冠状面、矢状面及横轴面扫描,将产前MRI、US表现与出生后增强CT或手术(33例胎儿)、引产后尸体解剖结果(3例胎儿)对照.结果:病变位于左侧15例,右侧21例.单个肺叶31例,单侧全肺5例.大囊型18例、微囊型18例.随访结果证实MRI误诊2例;产前US误诊6例、漏诊2例,不完全诊断1例.结论:MRI在胎儿CCAM诊断与鉴别诊断方面具有较高的应用价值,可诊断病变具体所在肺叶、病变类型、心脏移位及对侧肺受压程度预测胎儿预后.%Objective : To explore the diagnostic value of MRI in fetal lung congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM). Methods:Thirty-six pregnant women,aged from 21 to 38 years (average 29 years) and with gestation from 20 to 31 weeks (average 24 weeks) were examined with a 1.5T MR unit within 24 to 48 hours after ultrasound studies. The imaging protocol included fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition ( FIESTA) , single-shot fast spin echo ( SSFSE) sequences in the axial, frontal, and sagittal planes relative to the fetal brain, thorax, abdomen, especially thorax. Prenatal US and MR imaging findings were compared with postnatal diagnoses (33 fetuses) or autopsy (3 fetuses). Postnatal evaluation included computed tomography and surgery. Results : The lesions were in the left side in 15 cases and in the right in 21 cases. There were lesions in a single lobe in 31 cases,and in unilateral whole lung in 5 cases. There were large cystic lesions in 18 cases,and microcystic in other 18 cases. Follow-up examinations confirmed 2 cases of misdiagnosis by prenatal MRI, 6

  1. Multiple bilateral supernumerary mandibular premolars in a non-syndromic patient with associated orthokeratised odontogenic cyst- A case report and review of literature

    Vikrant O Kasat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple supernumerary teeth are very rare, accounting for less than 1% of cases. They are commonly associated with syndromes like Gardner′s syndrome and cleidocranial dysostosis and cleft lip and palate. Non-syndromic multiple supernumerary teeth have a predilection to occur in the mandibular premolar region. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC is a relatively uncommon developmental cyst comprising about 10% of the cases that had been previously implied as odontogenic keratocysts. More than half of the cases of OOC are associated with impacted tooth; but not a single case of OOC associated with supernumerary teeth is reported. Hence, the purpose of this article is to report the first case of multiple supernumerary mandibular premolars associated with OOC in a 35-year-old male and to review the literature associated with multiple bilateral supernumerary mandibular premolars.

  2. Proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of stem cells from apical papilla regulated by Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2: An in vitro study.

    Wan, Fang; Gao, Lifen; Lu, Yating; Ma, Hongxin; Wang, Hongxing; Liang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yan; Ma, Chunhong

    2016-01-15

    In the process of tooth root development, stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) can differentiate into odontoblasts and form root dentin, however, molecules regulating SCAPs differentiation have not been elucidated. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. It is reported to modulate the development of nerve cells, liver cells, B cells, red blood cells, and so on. However, the role of ZHX2 in tooth root development remains unclear. In this study, we explored the potential role of ZHX2 in the process of SCAPs differentiation. The results showed that overexpression of ZHX2 upregulated the expression of osteo/odontogenic related genes and ALP activity, inhibited the proliferation of SCAPs. Consistently, ZHX2 knockdown reduced SCAPs mineralization and promoted SCAPs proliferation. These results indicated that ZHX2 plays a critical role in the proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs. PMID:26679602

  3. Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Moxifloxacin and Clindamycin in the Treatment of Odontogenic Abscesses and Inflammatory Infiltrates: a Phase II, Double-Blind, Randomized Trial▿

    Cachovan, Georg; Böger, Rainer H.; Giersdorf, Ina; Hallier, Olaf; Streichert, Thomas; Haddad, Munif; Platzer, Ursula; Schön, Gerhard; Wegscheider, Karl; Sobottka, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    Moxifloxacin penetrates well into oromaxillary tissue and covers the causative pathogens that show an increasing resistance to standard antibiotics. Clinical reports suggest that moxifloxacin may be effective for the treatment of odontogenic infections that can lead to serious complications. The objective of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study was to compare the efficacies and safeties of moxifloxacin and clindamycin for the medical treatment of patients with gingiva...

  4. Induction of dental epithelial cell differentiation marker gene expression in non-odontogenic human keratinocytes by transfection with thymosin beta 4

    Tamotsu Kiyoshima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the recombination of cells liberated from developing tooth germs develop into teeth. However, it is difficult to use human developing tooth germ as a source of cells because of ethical issues. Previous studies have reported that thymosin beta 4 (Tmsb4x is closely related to the initiation and development of the tooth germ. We herein attempted to establish odontogenic epithelial cells from non-odontogenic HaCaT cells by transfection with TMSB4X. TMSB4X-transfected cells formed nodules that were positive for Alizarin-red S (ALZ and von Kossa staining (calcium phosphate deposits when cultured in calcification-inducing medium. Three selected clones showing larger amounts of calcium deposits than the other clones, expressed PITX2, Cytokeratin 14, and Sonic Hedgehog. The upregulation of odontogenesis-related genes, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2, Amelogenin (AMELX, Ameloblastin (AMBN and Enamelin (ENAM was also detected. These proteins were immunohistochemically observed in nodules positive for the ALZ and von Kossa staining. RUNX2-positive selected TMSB4X-transfected cells implanted into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of nude mice formed matrix deposits. Immunohistochemically, AMELX, AMBN and ENAM were observed in the matrix deposits. This study demonstrated the possibility of induction of dental epithelial cell differentiation marker gene expression in non-odontogenic HaCaT cells by TMSB4X.

  5. INFLUENCE OF LOCAL RONKOLEIKIN TREATMENT UPON CLINICAL COURSE OF PURULENT WOUNDS AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF WOUND PHAGOCYTES IN PATIENTS WITH ODONTOGENIC PHLEGMONAE

    I. I. Dolgushin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the work was to evaluate clinical features of purulent wounds trend and functional activity of local wound phagocytes in the patients with odontogenic phlegmones in the course of local treatment with Ronkoleukin. A randomized clinical study was performed which included sixty-five patients with odontogenic phlegmones. Their age ranged from 18 to 74 years old. The group was divided in two parts, i.e., patients of a comparison group (n = 33 receiving a conventional combined drug therapy, and the persons from study group (n = 32 who were subject to local immunotherapy with Ronkoleukin, applied along with conventional therapy. It was established that the local therapy with Ronkoleikin exerts distinct positive effects, i.e., increase in wound-located lymphocytes and macrophages, acceleration of phasic dynamics of inflammatory events, augmentation of an lysosomal luminescence index (2.3-fold, enhancement of phagocytosis intensity in wound neutrophiles and macrophages (1.9-2-fold, strengthening the reserve abilities of wound neutrophils (1.3-fold. These effects create favorable conditions for elimination of pathogen and optimal healing of purulent wounds in the patients with odontogenic phlegmones.

  6. Tumor vaccines

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  7. Mammary tumors

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported

  8. Brain Tumors

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are metastatic, ...

  9. Brain Tumors

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  10. Tumor Markers

    ... guidelines on a variety of topics, including tumor markers for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and others. The ... of recurrence 70-Gene signature (Mammaprint®) Cancer type: Breast ... Can tumor markers be used in cancer screening? Because tumor markers ...

  11. Urogenital tumors

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Wilms Tumor

    ... Kids Up for Sports Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Wilms Tumor KidsHealth > For Parents > Wilms Tumor Print A A A Text Size What's in this article? Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caring for Your Child en español Tumor ...

  13. Ameloblastic fibrodentinoma

    Deepak Bhargava; Aparna Dave; Bhudev Sharma; KDS Nanda

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors comprise a complex group of lesions of diverse histopathological types and clinical behavior. The group of mixed odontogenic tumors, which are also rare, is composed of proliferating odontogenic epithelium in a cellular ectomesenchyme resembling dental papilla. Ameloblastic fibrodentinoma is a rare benign odontogenic tumor. The present case report discusses this tumor composed of odontogenic epithelium and odontogenic mesenchyme with dentin or dentin like tissue. The presen...

  14. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    2016-08-24

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Anal Canal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Anal Canal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Appendix Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cholangiocarcinoma; Chordoma; Colorectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fibromyxoid Tumor; Gastric Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Giant Cell Carcinoma; Intestinal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Sarcomatoid Carcinoma; Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Malignant Odontogenic Neoplasm; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Malignant Skin Neoplasm; Malignant Testicular Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm of Unknown Primary Origin; Mixed Mesodermal (Mullerian) Tumor; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Adenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Oral Cavity Carcinoma; Oropharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Paraganglioma; Paranasal Sinus Adenocarcinoma; Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma; Parathyroid Gland Carcinoma; Pituitary Gland Carcinoma; Placental Choriocarcinoma; Placental-Site Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Scrotal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Seminal Vesicle Adenocarcinoma; Seminoma; Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Squamous

  15. Surgical resection of peripheral odontogenic fibromas in African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris): a case study

    Wozniak-Biel, Anna; Janeczek, Maciej; Janus, Izabela; Nowak, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Background Neoplastic lesions of the mammary gland, lymph nodes, or oral cavity in African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) are common in captive animals. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols have not yet been established for the African pygmy hedgehog. Thus, surgical resection is the current treatment of choice in this species. Case presentation A 5-year-old male African pygmy hedgehog showed multiple erythematous, round small tumors located in the oral cavity, on both sides of maxi...

  16. X-ray manifestations of tumors of gnathic bones in adults

    Roentgenologic manifestations of the neoplasms of qnathic bones in adults are considered in details. Odontogenous tumors and neodontogeneous tumors are among the cases under analysis. It is shown that the roentgenologic features of manifestation of every neoplasm are determined by the character of variations in the form of bone affection section and in the architectonics of it's pattern, by the outlines sharphness, by the total delimitation from unaffected bone sections, by the presence of internal inclusions or calcifications, by the cartical plates safety by the presence and character of pathologic osteogenesis and ossification periostitis. Necessity of the histological studies of punctates or bioptates in certain cases is outlined because of the nonabsolutely reliability of radiological data

  17. Enhanced Expression of Contractile-Associated Proteins and Ion Channels in Preterm Delivery Model Mice With Chronic Odontogenic Porphyromonas Gingivalis Infection.

    Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Konishi, Haruhisa; Teraoka, Yuko; Urabe, Satoshi; Furusho, Hisako; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Takata, Takashi; Kudo, Yoshiki

    2016-07-01

    Inflammation and infection have been reported to induce preterm delivery. We have studied the relationship between inflammation and various ion channels, including the L-type Ca(2+) channel and P2X7 receptor, during acute inflammation of the pregnant rat uterus induced by lipopolysaccharides. Recently, we found that mice with odontogenic Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g, an important odontogenic pathogen) infection delivered at day 18.3 of gestation (vs. day 20.5 in normal mice). The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of myometrial contractile-associated proteins inducing contractions and confirm that these mice are useful as a model for preterm delivery induced by chronic inflammation. We examined the expression of the oxytocin receptor, connexin 43, prostaglandin F receptors, L-type Ca(2+) channel, and P2X7 receptor in the myometrium at day 18 of gestation by real-time PCR and western blot analyses. We also measured TNF-α and IL-1β levels in the blood serum, placenta, fetal membrane and myometrium on the same day. mRNA expression of the oxytocin receptor, connexin 43, prostaglandin F receptors, L-type Ca(2+) channel, and P2X7 receptor was elevated by 5.4, 3.2, 2.4, 2.5, and 1.7 fold, respectively, in the P.g-infected mice. Protein levels of the oxytocin receptor and connexin 43 also increased. Serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were elevated, showing that systemic inflammation continued during pregnancy. IL-1β levels in the placenta and fetal membrane also increased, suggesting inflammatory reactions were induced. Thus, mice with odontogenic infection may be useful as a model of chronic inflammation-induced preterm delivery. PMID:26692542

  18. Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Epithelial Linings of Odontogenic Keratocyst, Dentigerous Cyst and Radicular Cyst: A Pathological Insight

    P Swetha; Ramesh, KSV; Madhavan, N; Veeravarmal, V; Sameera, ASS

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study is aimed at analyzing the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) in order to understand the possible role of iNOS with special reference to its neoplastic nature and local aggressive of cysts. Aim: The primary aim of the following study is to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of iNOS and secondary aim is to compare the iNOS expression, patte...

  19. Tumor de Krukenberg Krunkenberg's tumor

    Daisy Hernández Durán

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El tumor de Krukenberg supone el 30-40 % de los cánceres metastásicos al ovario y el 1-2 % de todos los tumores malignos de ovario. En la actualidad, y pese a que el concepto de tumor de Krukenberg ha sido usado para referirse a todos los tumores metastásicos del ovario, se consideran como tal a los que tienen un origen digestivo. Su pronóstico es malo con raras supervivencias más allá del año. Se presenta un caso de una paciente femenina de 38 años de edad, que ingresa por ascitis moderada, anorexia y pérdida de peso, a la cual se le realizó una laparotomía con el posible diagnóstico de un proceso oncoproliferativo del ovario y el diagnóstico histopatológico arrojó un tumor de Krukenberg.Krukenberg's tumor accounts for 30-40 % of ovarian metastatic cancer and for the 1-2 % of all ovarian malignant tumors. Nowadays and in spite of the fact that the concept of Krukenberg' tumor has been used to refer to all ovarian metastatic tumors those with a digestive origin, its prognosis if bad with only a few survivals beyond one year. This is the case of a female patient aged 38 admitted due to a moderate ascites, anorexia and lose weight undergoes laparotomy with the possible diagnosis of a oncoproliferous ovarian process and the histopathological diagnosis showed a Krukenberg's tumor.

  20. Brain tumor

    BNCT in the past was not widely accepted because of poor usability of a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. Recently, technical advancements in the accelerator field have made accelerator-based BNCT feasible. Consequently, clinical trials of intractable brain tumors have started using it since 2012. In this review, our clinical results obtained from conventional reactor-based BNCT for treatment of brain tumors are introduced. It is strong hope that accelerator-based BNCT becomes a standard therapy for current intractable brain tumors. (author)

  1. Clinical analysis of 35 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) of the lung in fetal%胎儿先天性肺囊性腺瘤样畸形35例临床分析

    张莺; 康媛; 李笑天

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical feature and prognosis of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation ( CCAM) of the lung in fetal. Methods From February 2004 to July 2009,35 fetuses diagnosed with CCAM by prenatal-ly ultrasonic examinations in Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University were analyzed retrospectively. Ultrasound monitored the changes of the lesion size and the complications. Results The ultrasonic examination indicated that IS of 35 cases were classified as type I , 11 as type Ⅱ ,8 as type Ⅲ and 1 was type I combined with type Ⅲ. 14 cases were accompanied with mediastinal or heart shifting, 3 cases with polyhydramnios, 3 cases with the thickening of nuchal translucency, 1 case with hydrocephalus,2 cases with fetal growth retardation, 1 case with fetal hydrops and ascites, 1 case with polyhydramnios and digestive systerm malformation. 7 of 35 cases underwent amniocentesis and all of the chromosomal karyotype were normal. 8 cases could not be continued to follow up after the first ultrasonic examination. In the follow-up group, one fetus with hydrops and ascites died intrauterine at 29 weeks, 11 women terminated their pregnancies, 15 cases delievered. Of 15 infants, lesions of 6 cases disappeared at pregnancy, 4 cases disappeared postnatal-ly, lesions of 2 cases still existed, 3 cases were not followed up. 15 infants were healthy. Conclusion Fetal hydrops and ascites are the unfavourable factors for the CCAM prognosis. If fetuses are not complicated with hydrops, ascites and other malformations, the prognosis of CCAM is good, these women should be advised to continue their pregnancies.%目的 探讨胎儿先天性肺囊性腺瘤样畸形( CCAM)的临床特点和预后.方法 回顾性分析2004年2月至2009年7月在复旦大学附属妇产科医院经产前超声诊断为CCAM的35例胎儿的临床资料.超声监测CCAM病灶大小及并发症的变化.结果 超声检查提示:Ⅰ型15例,Ⅱ型11例,Ⅲ型8

  2. Bone Tumor

    ... the knee in either the femur (thigh) or tibia (shinbone). Other common locations include the hip and ... bone that is weakened by a tumor to fracture, or break. This may be severely painful. Occasionally, ...

  3. Oral tumors in dogs: clinical aspects, exfoliative cytology and histopathology Neoplasias orais em cães: avaliação dos aspectos clínicos, histopatologia e citologia esfoliativa

    Cláudia Ronca Felizzola

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish the diagnosis and prognosis of tumors of the oral cavity, a comparative study was carried out in 130 dogs considering age, sex, breed, clinical aspects, exfoliative cytology as well as histopathology. Exfoliative cytology revealed: 100% negative for benign non-odontogenic tumors, 97.91% negative benign odontogenic tumors and 77.92% positive for malignant tumors. Histopathology showed: 59.23% malignant tumors (33.08% malignant melanoma, 9.23% squamous cell carcinoma, 5.38% osteosarcoma, 2.31% fibrosarcoma, 2.31% angiosarcoma, 1.54% malignant mesenchymal tumors, 1.54% malignant fibrohistiocytoma, 1.54% lymphoma, 0.77% leyomyosarcoma, 0.77%% epithelioid sarcoma and 0.77% angiofibrosarcoma; 36.92% benign odontogenic tumors (25.38% peripheral odontogenic fibroma, 10.0% ossifyng fibroma and 1.54% odontoma in addition to 3.85% benign non-odontogenic tumors (1.54% fibroma, 0.77% plasmocytoma, 0.77% pilomatrixoma and 0.77% giant tumor cells. These results permit us to conclude that exfoliative cytology was an efficient, safe, quick and noninvasive method and could be used for early evaluation of oral cancer.Objetivou-se o estudo comparativo em tumores de cavidade bucal de animais de espécie canina de acordo com sexo, faixa etária, raça, aspectos clínicos, citologia esfoliativa e histopatologia, para estabelecer diagnóstico dessas neoplasias, tendo sido utilizados 130 cães, encaminhados ao Hospital Veterinário (HOVET da Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia da Universidade de São Paulo. Os resultados obtidos na citologia esfoliativa foram: 100% de negativos para neoplasias benignas não odontogênicas; 97,91% de negativos para neoplasias benignas odontôgenicas e 77,92% de positivos para neoplasias malignas. Obtiveram-se os seguintes resultados no exame histopatológico: neoplasias malignas - 59,23% (melanoma 33,08%, carcinoma epidermóide 9,23%, osteossarcoma 5,38%, fibrossarcoma 2,31%, angiossarcoma 2

  4. Imaging of brain tumors

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  5. Lung tumors

    This volume 17 in the series of clinicoradiological seminars deals with malignant lung tumors. Twenty-four authors contributed to this comprehensive survey of current knowledge and methods, with about half of the contributions in the monography being concerned with aetiology and epidemiology of the lung, anatomy of the lung and anatomy of lung tumors, as well as with the current diagnostic methods. The latter are discussed in great detail and include CT, differential diagnosis of pulmonary nodules, angiography for lung tumor diagnostics, and nuclear medical diagnostics. The main issue of the other contributions is a new approach in oncology that works towards interdisciplinary exchange of information among experts in search for improved therapies. (orig./MG) With 44 tabs., 111 figs

  6. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung

    Sixteen cases of CCAM are presented, one with bilateral disease, diagnosed at different times, and one with an associated prune belly syndrome, to be added to the 405 already reported in the literature, and their clinical, radiological and pathological features are described. (orig./MG)

  7. Brain tumors

    Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) is the method of choice for the diagnostics of cerebral gliomas, but the differentiation of tumour tissue from unspecific tissue changes is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET) and Single-Photon-Emission-Computed Tomography (SPECT) may offer relevant additional information which allows for a more accurate diagnostics in unclear situations. Especially, radiolabeled amino acids offer a better delineation of cerebral gliomas which allows an improved guidance of biopsy, planning of surgery and radiation therapy. Furthermore, amino acid imaging appears to be useful to differentiate tumor recurrence from unspecific posttherapeutic tissue, to predict the prognosis especially in low grade gliomas and to monitor the metabolic response during tumor therapy. (orig.)

  8. The aggressive nature of the odontogenic keratocyst: is it a benign cystic neoplasm? Part 3. Immunocytochemistry of cytokeratin and other epithelial cell markers.

    Shear, Mervyn

    2002-07-01

    Numerous studies of keratin expression by the more common odontogenic cysts were done to determine whether patterns of cytokeratin staining could provide accurate diagnostic markers for the different varieties; to see whether comparative studies with oral mucosa and developing odontogenic epithelium could explain the pathogenesis of the cysts; and whether cytokeratin patterns could provide clues in elucidating the aggressive nature of the OKC. This review was a complex task with a range of at least 19 different cytokeratins being studied and also a broad range of antibodies in use for the same cytokeratin or group of cytokeratins. Moreover, there was not always standardisation of laboratory techniques in the selection and preparation of material. These difficulties were, in general, recognised by the different workers in the field, particularly when there was disagreement on results and caution was expressed about drawing conclusions from some positive findings. It would be fair to conclude that cytokeratin immunocytochemistry has not advanced to any meaningful extent, its use as a diagnostic marker for the OKC nor in eludidating its pathogenesis. With regard to OKC behaviour, it has been pointed out that there was strong reaction of OKC lining for keratin 16, a cytokeratin that has been associated with high proliferative activity. Yet other studies have also shown keratin 16 expression in dentigerous and radicular cysts. Differences in cytokeratin, EMA and CEA immunocytochemical reactivity between the parakeratinised and orthokeratinised varieties of cyst were demonstrated and the suggestion made that the orthokeratinised type has a considerably less aggressive behaviour, is a different entity and should bear a different name. Furthermore, Ki67 positive cells in the parakeratinised OKC linings were considerably more frequent than in the orthokeratinised linings.OKC, dentigerous and radicular cyst epithelium reacted positively for epithelial growth factor receptor

  9. Ameloblastic fibrodentinoma

    Deepak Bhargava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors comprise a complex group of lesions of diverse histopathological types and clinical behavior. The group of mixed odontogenic tumors, which are also rare, is composed of proliferating odontogenic epithelium in a cellular ectomesenchyme resembling dental papilla. Ameloblastic fibrodentinoma is a rare benign odontogenic tumor. The present case report discusses this tumor composed of odontogenic epithelium and odontogenic mesenchyme with dentin or dentin like tissue. The present paper also throws light on various histological similarities and complexities which make the interpretation of these set of odontogenic tumors a diagnostic dilemma.

  10. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents

  11. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells and impairs mineralization in tooth models of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    Benjamin Salmon

    Full Text Available Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH, a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptide - a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization - derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential

  12. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob [Oral Biology Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Hong Sung [Department of Biomedical Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joo-Cheol [Department of Oral Histology-Developmental Biology, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, BK 21, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Kyung, E-mail: kdk@chosun.ac.kr [Oral Biology Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  13. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  14. Brain tumor - children

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  15. Brain tumor (image)

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  16. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    ... Tumors Tumor Grading and Staging Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain ...

  17. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  18. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist.This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain.Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways.Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders.It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal p...

  19. Pediatric brain tumors

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  20. Pediatric brain tumors

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  1. American Brain Tumor Association

    ... For Health Care Professionals About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Tumor Grade Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor ...

  2. Brain Tumor Surgery

    ... Pediatric Caregiver Resource Center About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Tumor Grade Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor ...

  3. Teratoid Wilms′ tumor - A rare renal tumor

    Biswanath Mukhopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teratoid Wilms′ tumor is an extremely rare renal tumor. We report a case of unilateral teratoid Wilms′ tumor in a 4-year-old girl. The patient was admitted with a right-sided abdominal mass. The mass was arising from the right kidney. Radical nephrectomy was done and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Histopathology report showed teratoid Wilms′ tumor.

  4. Tumor thrombus

    Ravina, Mudalsha; Hess, Søren; Chauhan, Mahesh Singh; Jacob, Mattakorottu Joseph; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Thrombosis in cancer may manifest itself as venous thromboembolic disease or tumor thrombosis (TT). We present our experience with incidentally detected TT on FDG PET/CT in 21 oncologic patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all FDG PET/CT examinations during a 5-year......-one patients were included; the most common malignancies were renal cell carcinoma (n=6), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=3), and lung cancer (n=3). Indication for the scan was initial staging (n=15) and suspected recurrence (n=6). Several vessels were affected, the most common was the inferior vena cava (n=14...

  5. Adolescent and Pediatric Brain Tumors

    ... abta.org Donate Now Menu Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ... or Complete our contact form Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ...

  6. Childhood Brain Tumors

    ... They are among the most common types of childhood cancers. Some are benign tumors, which aren't ... can still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches ...

  7. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  8. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... wireless devices Head injuries Smoking Hormone therapy SPECIFIC TUMOR TYPES Brain tumors are classified depending on: Location of the ...

  9. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  10. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor - Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor - Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on how many people survive this type of ...

  11. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  12. Orbital Tumors and Pseudotumors

    Talan-Hranilović, Jasna; Tomas, Davor

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-four orbital tumors and 4 pseudotumors diagnosed in biopsy material among 596 ophthalmic tumors examined during the 1998-2003 period are presented according to patient age and sex, tumor histology and immunohistochemistry. The most common orbital tumors were lipomas, meningiomas and lymphomas, with a peak incidence in the seventh decade of life. Most orbital tumors of childhood are distinguished from those occurring in adults. Most pediatric orbital tumors are benign (developmental cys...

  13. The value of early intervention and a multidisciplinary approach in the management of necrotizing fasciitis of the neck and anterior mediastinum of odontogenic origin.

    Muhammad, Joseph Kamal; Almadani, Hana; Al Hashemi, Bader A; Liaqat, Muneezeh

    2015-05-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a serious clinical condition, which, if diagnosed late, invariably leads to a fatal outcome. A high index of suspicion of the presenting clinical signs and symptoms, supported by knowledge of the clinicopathologic processes that underlie its aggressive nature, should prompt early surgical intervention. Ultimately, the success of treatment requires a robust clinical pathway in which all members of the health care team are aligned by their skill sets and competencies to manage NF. This report describes the management of a case of a young man with aggressive NF of odontogenic origin affecting the neck and anterior mediastinum. A multidisciplinary approach brought about early recognition of the disease and surgical intervention, the use of frozen section biopsies to determine the extent of fascial spread, and aggressive debridement of the affected tissue. Teamwork, critical thinking, and situational awareness ensured that the patient received optimum care in a timely manner. The psychological, clinical, radiologic, pathologic, and microbiological aspects of the patient's care are presented with a literature review. PMID:25795188

  14. Relation of the radiologic findings and labeling index of Ki-67, PCNA and cytokeratin in unicystic ameloblastoma, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst

    To compare the proliferation potential of the epithelial cells between unicystic ameloblastoma (UA), dentigerous cyst (DC), and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and to correlate this proliferation potential with the radiographic features of these three pathoses. Immunohistochemical expression of PCNA, Ki-67, and cytokeratin as a proliferation maker were assessed for 15 cases of UA, 15 cases of DC, and 15 cases of OKC. The degree of immunochemical expression of three proliferation markers were correlated with the radiographic features, especially cortical expansion (negative and positive) and shape of border (scalloped and round). Using PCNA and Ki-67, OKC showed the highest proliferation potential and UA the lowest. Statistically significant differences were found between the OKC and the UA (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was present according to the radiographic features in all pathoses. Using cytokeratin, there was no significant differences of proliferation potential among three pathoses. OKC epithelium has the most intense proliferation potential, followed by the dentigeous cyst and then unicystic ameloblastoma. There is no significant relation between the radiographic features and the proliferation potential of epithelium of these three pathoses.

  15. Radiological diagnostics of skeletal tumors

    The book contains contributions concerning the following topics: 1. introduction and fundamentals: WHO classification of bone tumors, imaging diagnostics and their function; localization, typical clinical and radiological criteria, TNM classification and status classification, invasive tumor diagnostics; 2. specific tumor diagnostics: chondrogenic bone tumors, osseous tumors, connective tissue bony tumors, osteoclastoma, osteomyelogenic bone tumors, vascular bone tumors, neurogenic bone tumors, chordoma; adamantinoma of the long tubular bone; tumor-like lesions, bony metastases, bone granulomas, differential diagnostics: tumor-like lesions

  16. Tumor heterogeneity, tumor size, and radioresistance

    Mutant clonogenic cells, resistant to individual chemotherapeutic agents, are known to play a central role in clinical chemotherapy failure. The possibility that mutant cells, resistant to conventionally fractionated megavoltage photon radiotherapy, exist in human tumors is considered. Applying the mutation theory of Luria and Delbruck to describe the appearance of resistant cells, several conclusions follow: (a) the mean number of resistant cells in a tumor will be determined by the tumor size and the mutation rate; (b) a wide variation in radiosensitivity in tumors of the same histology is expected, because of a large variation in the number of resistant cells that they contain; (c) the presence of a resistant clone will not reduce the tumor-control probability until the tumor becomes sufficiently large; (d) initial response will not be a reliable predictor of long-term control; (e) clonogenic assays may not accurately predict treatment outcomes; (f) the mutation rate may be the most accurate predictor of tumor aggressiveness and resistance to various treatment modalities; (g) tumors with a low mutation rate, which may include seminoma, Hodgkin's disease and many pediatric tumors would be curable by either chemotherapy or radiation; (h) pleomorphic tumors with a high mutation rate, which may include glioblastoma multiforme, would be difficult to cure by any means. Clinical and experimental evidence is reviewed for the existence of radioresistant cell lines in human and animal tumors, and further experiments are proposed to test this hypothesis. Treatment strategies for targeting radioresistant clones are discussed

  17. Updates in Orbital Tumors

    Nila; F.Moeloek

    1993-01-01

    Orbital anatomy, the clinical features of orbital tumors, the recent development of the diagnosis and management of orbital tumors were described. The incidence of orbital tumors in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in the past years were introduced. The principle of management of orbital tumors and their prognosis were discussed.

  18. Supratentorial tumors; Supratentorielle Tumoren

    Grunwald, I.; Dillmann, K.; Roth, C.; Backens, M.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Saarland, Homburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a routine diagnostic measure for a suspected intracerebral mass. Computed tomography is usually also indicated. Further diagnostic procedures as well as the interpretation of the findings vary depending on the tumor location. This contribution discusses the symptoms and diagnostics for supratentorial tumors separated in relation to their intra- or extracranial location. Supratentorial tumors include astrocytoma, differentiated by their circumscribed and diffuse growth, ganglioglioma, ependyoma, neurocytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), oligodendroglioma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNET), meningoangiomatosis, pineal tumors, hamartoma, lymphoma, craniopharyngeoma and metastases. The supratentorial extracranial tumors include the choroid plexus, colloid cysts, meningeoma, infantile myofibromatosis and lipoma. The most common subforms, especially of astrocytoma, will also be presented. (orig.)

  19. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs. PMID:26902424

  20. Endocrine tumors other than thyroid tumors

    This paper discusses the tendency for the occurrence of tumors in the endocrine glands, other than the thyroid gland, in A-bomb survivors using both autopsy and clinical data. ABCC-RERF sample data using 4136 autopsy cases (1961-1977) revealed parathyroid tumors in 13 A-bomb survivors, including 3 with the associated hyperparathyroidism, with the suggestion of dose-dependent increase in the occurrence of tumors. Based on clinical data from Hiroshima University, 7 (46.7%) of 15 parathyroid tumors cases were A-bomb survivors. Data (1974-1987) from the Tumor Registry Committee (TRC) in Hiroshima Prefecture revealed that a relative risk of parathyroid tumors was 5.6 times higher in the entire group of A-bomb survivors and 16.2 times higher in the group of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, suggesting the dose-dependent increase in their occurrence. Adrenal tumors were detected in 47 of 123 cases from the TRC data, and 15 (31.5%) of these 47 were A-bomb survivors. Particularly, 11 cases of adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome included 6 A-bomb survivors (54.5%). The incidence of multiple endocrine gonadial tumors (MEGT) tended to be higher with increasing exposure doses; and the 1-9 rad group, the 10-99 rad group, and the 100 or more rad group had a risk of developing MEGT of 4.1, 5.7, and 7.1, respectively, relative to both the not-in the city group and the 0 rad group. These findings suggested that there is a correlation between A-bomb radiation and the occurrence of parathyroid tumors (including hyperparathyroidism), adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome and MEGT (especially, the combined thyroid and ovarian tumors and the combined thyroid and parathyroid tumors). (N.K.)

  1. Imaging the Tumor Microenvironment

    LeBleu, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex, heterogeneous, and dominant component of solid tumors. Cancer imaging strategies of a subset of characteristics of the tumor microenvironment are under active development and currently used modalities and novel approaches are summarized here. Understanding the dynamic and evolving functions of the tumor microenvironment is critical to accurately inform imaging and clinical care of cancer. Novel insights into distinct roles of the tumor microenvironment...

  2. Documento de consenso sobre el tratamiento antimicrobiano de las infecciones bacterianas odontogénicas Consensus statement on antimicrobial treatment of odontogenic bacterial infections

    A Bascones Martínez

    2005-12-01

    cavity is a common public health problem and constant cause for antibiotic prescription, with 10% of antibiotics used to treat this problem. However, few studies have so far aimed to determine its incidence. Added to this, its relationship with certain sytemic diseases (cardiac, endocrine, etc… confers this pathology vital importance. In spite of the frequency and importance of odontogenic infection, the current dispersion in criteria regarding key aspects in classification, terminology and therapeutic recommendations is noticeable. The main objective of this document, compiled as a consensus statement by specialists in microbiology and odontology, is to establish useful recommendations for all of those involved in the clinical management of this pathology. Special attention has been placed on the rise in bacterial resistance observed over the last years, specifically the proliferation of betalactamase producing strains. Another important factor causing the resistance to appear is lack of therapeutic compliance, specially what regards dosage and treatment duration. Therefore, this pathology constitutes a complex problem which requires the instauration of broad spectrum antimicrobials, well tolerated and a convenient posology so that patients receive the adequate dose over the necessary period. High doses of amoxicillin/ clavulanate (2000 mg / 125 mg have showed good results and power to overcome resistance. Other agents such as metronidazole and clindamycin, followed by de claritromycin and azithromycin have also proved to be active against most of microorganisms responsible for odontogenic infection.

  3. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  4. Testicular germinal tumors

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of testicular germinal tumors. The presumed diagnosis is based in the anamnesis, clinical examination, testicular ultrasound and tumor markers. The definitive diagnosis is obtained through the inguinal radical orchidectomy

  5. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Michigan event celebrates 25 years Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  6. Benign Liver Tumors

    ... Handouts Education Resources Support Services Helpful Links For Liver Health Information Call 1-800-GO-LIVER (1- ... Liver > Liver Disease Information > Benign Liver Tumors Benign Liver Tumors Explore this section to learn more about ...

  7. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author)

  8. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed.

  9. Nonislet Cell Tumor Hypoglycemia

    Johnson Thomas; Salini C. Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) is a rare cause of hypoglycemia. It is characterized by increased glucose utilization by tissues mediated by a tumor resulting in hypoglycemia. NICTH is usually seen in large mesenchymal tumors including tumors involving the GI tract. Here we will discuss a case, its pathophysiology, and recent advances in the management of NICTH. Our patient was diagnosed with poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus. He continued to be hypoglycemic ...

  10. Soft tissue mixed tumor

    Eiichi Hiraishi; Hiroshi Sakihara; Michiro Susa; Takayuki Honma; Hiroshi Shimosawa

    2009-01-01

    Mixed tumors are relatively common in the skin and salivary glands, but extremely rare in soft tissues, often resulting in diagnostic problems. The occurrence of these tumors in the hand is especially limited. In this article we report the clinical, radiological, and histological features of a mixed tumor of the hypothenar region of the right hand.

  11. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    ... experience symptoms associated with their tumor(s) and/or treatment(s). People with brain tumors often suffer from: Headaches Seizures Sensory (touch) and motor (movement control) loss Deep venous thrombosis (DVT, or blood clot) Hearing loss Vision loss ...

  12. Malignant tumors of childhood

    This book contains 34 papers about malignant tumors. some of the titles are: Invasive Cogenital Mesoblastic Nephroma, Leukemia Update, Unusual Perinatal Neoplasms, Lymphoma Update, Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors in Children, Nutritional Status and Cancer of Childhood, and Chemotherapy of Brain tumors in Children

  13. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  14. Tumor penetrating peptides

    ErkkiRuoslahti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  15. Tumors in invertebrates

    F Tascedda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are ectopic masses of tissue formed by due to an abnormal cell proliferation. In this review tumors of several invertebrate species are examined. The description of tumors in invertebrates may be a difficult task, because the pathologists are usually inexperienced with invertebrate tissues, and the experts in invertebrate biology are not familiar with the description of tumors. As a consequence, the terminology used in defining the tumor type is related to that used in mammalian pathology, which can create misunderstandings in some occasions.

  16. Epilepsy and Brain Tumors

    Zhi-yi Sha

    2009-01-01

    @@ Epidemiology It is estimated 61,414 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed in 2009 in the U.S. The incidence statistic of 61,414 persons diagnosed per year includes both malignant (22,738) and non-malignant (38,677) brain tumors. (Data from American Brain Tumor Association). During the years 2004-2005, approximately 359,000 people in the United States were living with the diagnosis of a primary brain or central nervous system tumor. Specifically, more than 81,000 persons were living with a malignant tumor, more than 267,000 persons with a benign tumor. For every 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 131 are living following the diagnosis of a brain tumor. This represents a prevalence rate of 130.8 per 100,000 person years[1].

  17. Bone tumors: Nursing care

    Bone tumors represent approximately 5% of childhood malignancies. osteosarcoma is the primary malignant bone tumor, accounting for 60% of cancer with peak incidence in the 2nd decade of life. Ewing's sarcoma is the second most common bone cancer with peak at a slightly younger age. This presentation discusses similarities and differences in the diagnosis and treatment of these two malignancies. Diagnostic procedures include plain radiographs, CT and MRI of the primary site, plain x-ray and CT of the chest, bone scan, and biopsy of the primary tumor. For patients diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma, a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy will also be required. Our current approach to the treatment of bone tumors includes preoperative combination chemotherapy and en bloc surgical removal of the tumor followed by postoperative chemotherapy. In the case of Ewing's sarcoma, radiation therapy may be employed in addition to surgery, if margins are questionable of instead of surgery, if the tumor is not resectable

  18. Pulmonary neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors

    Caplin, M E; Baudin, E; Ferolla, P;

    2015-01-01

    relevant literature was carried out, followed by expert review. RESULTS: PCs are well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors and include low- and intermediate-grade malignant tumors, i.e. typical (TC) and atypical carcinoid (AC), respectively. Contrast CT scan is the diagnostic gold standard for PCs, but...... used, however, temozolomide has shown most clinical benefit. CONCLUSIONS: PCs are complex tumors which require a multidisciplinary approach and long-term follow-up....

  19. Percutaneous Bone Tumor Management

    Gangi, Afshin; Buy, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Interventional radiology plays a major role in the management of bone tumors. Many different percutaneous techniques are available. Some aim to treat pain and consolidate a pathological bone (cementoplasty); others aim to ablate tumor or reduce its volume (sclerotherapy, thermal ablation). In this article, image-guided techniques of primary and secondary bone tumors with vertebroplasty, ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation, laser photocoagulation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ioniza...

  20. Olfactory ensheathing cell tumor

    Ippili Kaushal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs are found in the olfactory bulb and olfactory nasal mucosa. They resemble Schwann cells on light and electron microscopy, however, immunohistochemical staining can distinguish between the two. There are less than 30 cases of olfactory groove schwannomas reported in the literature while there is only one reported case of OEC tumor. We report an OEC tumor in a 42-year-old male and discuss the pathology and origin of this rare tumor.

  1. Brain tumor - children

    Glioblastoma multiforme - children; Ependymoma - children; Glioma - children; Astrocytoma - children; Medulloblastoma - children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children)

  2. Pituitary gland tumors

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.)

  3. Skull Base Tumors

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  4. What Is Wilms Tumor?

    ... back wall of the abdomen (see picture). Each kidney is about the size of a fist. One kidney is just to ... functions. Many people in the United States live normal, healthy lives with just one kidney. Wilms tumors Wilms tumors are the most common ...

  5. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    Vimal, M. V.; Budyal, Sweta; Kasliwal, Rajeev; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Lila, Anurag R.; Bandgar, Tushar; Menon, Padmavathy; Shah, Nalini S.

    2012-01-01

    A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented. PMID:23226664

  6. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    Vimal, M. V.; Sweta Budyal; Rajeev Kasliwal; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Lila, Anurag R.; Tushar Bandgar; Padmavathy Menon; Nalini S. Shah

    2012-01-01

    A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented.

  7. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    M V Vimal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented.

  8. Parallel evolution of tumor subclones mimics diversity between tumors

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco;

    2013-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumor adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicines approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumor (intratumor heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumors (intertumor heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, ...

  9. Tumor interstitial fluid

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.;

    2013-01-01

    secretion, non-classical secretion, secretion via exosomes and membrane protein shedding. Consequently, the interstitial aqueous phase of solid tumors is a highly promising resource for the discovery of molecules associated with pathological changes in tissues. Firstly, it allows one to delve deeper into...... the regulatory mechanisms and functions of secretion-related processes in tumor development. Secondly, the anomalous secretion of molecules that is innate to tumors and the tumor microenvironment, being associated with cancer progression, offers a valuable source for biomarker discovery and possible...... targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we provide an overview of the features of tumor-associated interstitial fluids, based on recent and updated information obtained mainly from our studies of breast cancer. Data from the study of interstitial fluids recovered from several other types of cancer are...

  10. Iatrogenic Tumor Implantation

    Ying Ma; Ping Bai

    2008-01-01

    Iatrogenic tumor implantation is a condition that results from various medical procedures used during diagnosis or treatment of a malignancy. It involves desquamation and dissemination of tumor cells that develop into a local recurrence or distant metastasis from the tumor under treatment. The main clinical feature of the condition is nodules at the operation's porous channel or incision, which is easily diagnosed in accordance with the case history. Final diagnosis can be made based on pathological examination. Tumor implantation may occur in various puncturing porous channels, including a laparoscopic port, abdominal wall incision, and perineal incision, etc. Besides a malignant tumor,implantation potential exists with diseases, such as a borderline tumor and endometriosis etc. Once a tumor implantation is diagnosed, or suspected, surgical resection is usually conducted.During the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, avoiding and reducing iatrogenic implantation and dissemination has been regarded as an important principle for surgical treatment of tumors. In a clinical practice setting, if possible, excisional biopsy should be employed, if a biopsy is needed. Repeated puncturing should be avoided during a paracentesis. In a laparoscopic procedure, the tissue is first put into a sample bag and then is taken out from the point of incision. After a laparoscopic procedure, the peritoneum, abdominal muscular fasciae, and skin should be carefully closed, and/or the punctured porous channel be excised. In addition, the sample/tissue should be rinsed with distilled water before surgical closure of the abdominal cavity,allowing the exfoliated tumor cells to swell and rupture in the hypo-osmolar solution. Then surgical closure can be conducted following a change of gloves and equipment. The extent of hysteromyomectomy should as far as possible be away from the uterine cavity. The purpose of this study is to make clinicians aware of the possibility of tumor implantation

  11. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. PMID:26216635

  12. The management of parotid tumors

    Guang Yan Yu

    2008-01-01

    @@ The majority of salivary gland tumors are of epithelial origin. Parotid gland is the most common location of the tumors. Surgery is the main modality for the management of parotid tumors. Radiotherapy, chemotherapy etc are the auxiliary modalities.

  13. CT of parapharyngeal space tumors

    Five patients with parapharyngeal space tumors were examined with computed tomography (CT). They consisted of two parotid pleomorphic adenomas, and one neurilemmoma, neuroblastoma and Glomus vagale tumor respectively. The parapharyngeal space is divided into pre- or poststyloid compartments by the styloid process. Physical examinations and conventional radiographic examinations often fail to localize tumors in either compartment. However CT can divide the parapharyngeal space into two compartments by means of the styloid process. It is important to determine whether tumors are located in pre- or poststyloid compartments, because almost all prestyloid tumors are parotid gland tumors while poststyloid tumors include neurogenic tumors, lymphangioma, leiomyoma, lipoma, teratoma etc. In poststyloid tumors, contrast-enhanced CT may allow paragangliomas to be distinguished from other neurogenic tumors and other poststyloid tumors, e.g., lymphangioma and teratoma, because paragangioma shows marked enhancement whereas the other neurogenic tumors reveal moderate enhancement. (author)

  14. Scintiscans and carcinoid tumors

    The presence of somatostatin receptors on carcinoid tumors mediate imaging of tumor extent and inhibition of tumor's marker secretion and growth. This prospective study aimed to evaluate radiolabelled somatostatin analogues scans in the therapeutical work-up of carcinoids. Twenty-one patients with carcinoids underwent 26 scans with iodine octreotide or indium pentetreotide. The results for tumor and metastase imaging were analysed and compared to those of a short inhibition test of marker secretion and to those of MIBG scan. The sensitivity for imaging the overall 43 tumor sites was 72%. We had no false positive. Unknown tumors were discovered in three patients. The results were slightly better with indium pentetreotide and in metastase imaging. A positive scan did not always preclude responsiveness to the functional effect of octreotide. Results of somatostatin analogue scans were better than those with MBG. The two techniques showed complementary in one patient. Treatment decision making in patients with carcinoid tumors should benefit from functional inhibition test by octreotide as well as from indium pentreotide and MIBG scans. (authors). 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Intraaxial brain tumors

    The incidence of primary intracranial tumors in the United States is approximately 15,0000 new cases per year. It has been estimated that 80--85% of all intracranial tumors occur in adults; the majority are situated in the supratentorial compartment. In the pediatric population, intracranial tumors are extraordinarily common---the CNS is the second most common site of pediatric neoplasia. Excluding the first year of life and adolescence, the location of intracranial tumors in the pediatric age group is infratentorial in 60--70% of cases, of which 75% involve the cerebellum and 25% reside in the brainstem. The limitations of neuroimaging are often revealed by understanding the microscopic pathology of these lesions, just as the neuropathologist would find if he or she relied solely on gross pathology. The general correlation between pathology and imaging will be stressed in this paper. Innumerable schemes for tumor classification have been devised; unfortunately, no classification is perfect. For the purposes of this discussion, the author has modified the proposed classifications of tumors in an attempt to combine typical neuroanatomic sites with the complex divisions traditionally formed on the basis of histopathology, since it is well recognized that the clinical behavior of brain tumors can depend largely on their sites of origin

  16. Adult brain tumors

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of adults with brain tumors. This refresher course will focus on a wide variety of benign and malignant brain neoplasms and how contemporary radiotherapy affects survival. In each case the intent of radiation therapy is to destroy the neoplasm without affecting normal tissues. However, for many neoplasms serial post-treatment scans may show little change, and success is often measured more by absence of tumor progression than by scan normalization. Successful outcome after radiation therapy of brain tumors usually requires that (1) there is no tumor extension beyond the target volume, (2) adequate dose is delivered to the target volume, and (3) normal tissue tolerance doses are not exceeded. For some tumors it may be impossible to satisfy all three criteria. Three-dimensional treatment planning based on MRI or CT makes it possible to guarantee delivery of the full dose of radiation to gross tumor while minimizing the volume of normal tissue receiving high dose. Acceptable dose conformity can often be achieved with 2-4 static beams or arcs and are usually preferable to opposed lateral fields. Examples of planning solutions for a variety of tumor types, sizes, and anatomic location will be given. For some tumors, protocols involving substantial dose escalation require a large number of non-coplanar x-ray beams or particle therapy. Several concepts and techniques which relate to the treatment of brain tumors will be discussed, including conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, altered fractionation, inverse treatment planning, re-irradiation and biologically effective dose (BED)

  17. Central nervous system tumors

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are relatively common in veterinary medicine, with most diagnoses occurring in the canine and feline species. Numerous tumor types from various cells or origins have been identified with the most common tumors being meningiomas and glial cell tumors. Radiation therapy is often used as an aid to control the clinical signs associated with these neoplasms. In general, these tumors have a very low metastatic potential, such that local control offers substantial benefit. Experience in veterinary radiation oncology would indicate that many patients benefit from radiation treatment. Current practice indicates the need for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies. These highly beneficial studies are used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and to monitor treatment response. Improvements in treatment planning and radiation delivered to the tumor, while sparing the normal tissues, should improve local control and decrease potential radiation related problems to the CNS. When possible, multiple fractions of 3 Gy or less should be used. The tolerance dose to the normal tissue with this fractionation schedule is 50 to 55 Gy. The most common and serious complications of radiation for CNS tumors is delayed radiation myelopathy and necrosis. Medical management of the patient during radiation therapy requires careful attention to anesthetic protocols, and medications to reduce intracranial pressure that is often elevated in these patients. Canine brain tumors have served as an experimental model to test numerous new treatments. Increased availability of advanced imaging modalities has spawned increased detection of these neoplasms. Early detection of these tumors with appropriate aggressive therapy should prove beneficial to many patients

  18. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  19. SURVIVIN AND TUMOR

    宋文哲; 宋燕; 叶剑桥; 邱东涛

    2003-01-01

    As a new member of IAP (inhibitors of apoptosis protein) family, survivin has potent anti-apoptotic activities, and involves in the mitosis and angiogenesis. Researches have demonstrated that surviving is a tumor-specific anti-apoptotic factor, expressed in fetal tissues, and common human cancers, while not in normal, terminally differentiated adult tissues. The overexpression of survivin in tumor tissues is correlated with poor prognosis of the patients. Survivin can be used as a prognostic factor and a new target in tumor targeting therapy.

  20. Canine mast cell tumors.

    Macy, D W

    1985-07-01

    Despite the fact that the mast cell tumor is a common neoplasm of the dog, we still have only a meager understanding of its etiology and biologic behavior. Many of the published recommendations for treatment are based on opinion rather than facts derived from careful studies and should be viewed with some skepticism. Because of the infrequent occurrence of this tumor in man, only a limited amount of help can be expected from human oncologists; therefore, burden of responsibility for progress in predicting behavior and developing treatment effective for canine mast cell tumors must fall on the shoulders of the veterinary profession. PMID:3929444

  1. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N;

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained...

  2. Renal tumors in infancy

    The classification of childhood renal masses in updated, including the clinical signs and imaging techniques currently employed to confirm their presence and type them. Several bening and malignant childhood tumors are described in substantial detail. (Author) 24 refs

  3. Stages of Wilms Tumor

    ... of Childhood Treatment for more information. Primary Renal Synovial Sarcoma Primary renal synovial sarcoma is a rare tumor ... multilocular cystic nephroma usually includes: Surgery . Primary Renal Synovial Sarcoma Treatment of primary renal synovial sarcoma usually includes: ...

  4. Modulation of tumor oxygenation

    There is a large body of evidence suggesting that deficiencies in the O2 supply of tumors exist due to restrictions (i) in the O2 delivery by perfusion and/or diffusion, and (ii) in the O2 transport capacity. Whereas the former are mostly based on inadequate and heterogeneous microcirculatory functions, the latter are predominantly due to tumor-associated anemia. Possible uses and limitations of measures are discussed which can increase the microvascular O2 content and thus may preferentially serve to enhance diffusion-limited O2 availability. In addition, means are described for improving and increasing the uniformity of microcirculation thus possibly enhancing perfusion-limited O2 delivery. Reducing cellular respiration rate should be of benefit in both pathophysiological conditions. Because both types of O2 limitation coexist in solid tumors, appropriate combinations should be aimed at eradicating tumor hypoxia which is present in at least one third of cancers in the clinical setting

  5. Children's Tumor Foundation

    ... Registry Learn About NF Facts & Statistics NF1 NF2 Schwannomatosis About Us Foundation News & Events Employment Opportunities About ... Children's Tumor Foundation Home - Neurofibromatosis, NF, NF1, NF2, Schwannomatosis What Is NF? Facts & Statistics Schwannomatosis Diagnosis of ...

  6. What Are Pituitary Tumors?

    ... too little makes you sluggish. If a pituitary tumor makes too much TSH, it can cause hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, also known as corticotropin ) causes ...

  7. Understanding Brain Tumors

    ... Our Mission Advance Research Clinical Trial Endpoints Defeat GBM Oligo Research Fund Pediatric Initiatives Funded Research & Accomplishments ... no symptoms when their brain tumor is discovered Recurrent headaches Issues with vision Seizures Changes in personality ...

  8. Brain Tumor Risk Factors

    ... for example), unusual symptoms such as headaches or short-term memory loss can be investigated with your family history in mind. Click here to view our webinars on Causes and Risk Factors of Brain Tumors. Additional information ...

  9. Overview of Heart Tumors

    ... flow, and has grown into the surrounding tissue, heart transplantation may be required. Transplantation is very rarely done ... and only noncancerous tumors are typically considered for heart transplantation. Mechanical cardiac support might be considered until doctors ...

  10. Brain Tumor Statistics

    ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Press Releases Headlines Newsletter ABTA ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain ...

  11. Ovarian tumors secreting insulin.

    Battocchio, Marialberta; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Chiarelli, Silvia; Trento, Mariangela; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Pasquali, Claudio; De Carlo, Eugenio; Dassie, Francesca; Mioni, Roberto; Rebellato, Andrea; Fallo, Francesco; Degli Uberti, Ettore; Martini, Chiara; Vettor, Roberto; Maffei, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    Combined ovarian germ cell and neuroendocrine tumors are rare. Only few cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion have been hypothesized in the literature. An ovarian tumor was diagnosed in a 76-year-old woman, referred to our department for recurrent hypoglycemia with hyperinsulinism. In vivo tests, in particular fasting test, rapid calcium infusion test, and Octreotide test were performed. Ectopic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia was demonstrated in vivo and hypoglycemia disappeared after hysteroadnexectomy. Histological exam revealed an ovarian germ cell tumor with neuroendocrine and Yolk sac differentiation, while immunostaining showed insulin positivity in neuroendocrine cells. A cell culture was obtained by tumoral cells, testing Everolimus, and Pasireotide. Insulin was detected in cell culture medium and Everolimus and Pasireotide demonstrated their potentiality in reducing insulin secretion, more than controlling cell viability. Nine cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion reported in literature have been reviewed. These data confirm the ovarian tissue potentiality to induce hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic syndrome after neoplastic transformation. PMID:25896552

  12. Adrenocortical tumors in children

    R.C. Ribeiro

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adrenocortical tumors (ACT are rare. In the USA, only about 25 new cases occur each year. In Southern Brazil, however, approximately 10 times that many cases are diagnosed each year. Most cases occur in the contiguous states of São Paulo and Paraná. The cause of this higher rate has not been identified. Familial genetic predisposition to cancer (p53 mutations and selected genetic syndromes (Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome have been associated with childhood ACT in general but not with the Brazilian counterpart. Most of the affected children are young girls with classic endocrine syndromes (virilizing and/or Cushing. Levels of urinary 17-ketosteroids and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, which are abnormal in approximately 90% of the cases, provide the pivotal clue to a diagnosis of ACT. Typical imaging findings of pediatric ACT consist of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor containing calcifications with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage. The pathologic classification of pediatric ACT is troublesome. Even an experienced pathologist can find it difficult to differentiate carcinoma from adenoma. Surgery is the single most important procedure in the successful treatment of ACT. The role of chemotherapy in the management of childhood ACT has not been established although occasional tumors are responsive to mitotane or cisplatin-containing regimens. Because of the heterogeneity and rarity of the disease, prognostic factors have been difficult to establish in pediatric ACT. Patients with incomplete tumor resection or with metastatic disease at diagnosis have a dismal prognosis. In patients with localized and completely resected tumors, the size of the tumor has predictive value. Patients with large tumors have a much higher relapse rate than those with small tumors.

  13. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N;

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained......'s disease and 7 acromegaly with adenomas containing ACTH. The cholecystokinin peptides from the tumors were smaller and less sulfated than cholecystokinin from normal pituitary glands. We conclude that ACTH-producing pituitary cells may also produce an altered form of cholecystokinin....

  14. Radioembolization of hepatic tumors

    Kennedy, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors are a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity. This remains a challenging and key task for every oncologist despite significant advances that have been made with selective targeted systemic agents and in technology advances with radiotherapy delivery. Radioembolization (RE) is a technique of permanently implanting microspheres containing Yttrium-90 (90Y), a beta-emitting isotope with a treatment range of 2 mm, into hepatic tumors. This ...

  15. Adult brain tumors

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of adults with brain tumors. This refresher course will focus on a variety of benign and malignant brain neoplasms and how contemporary radiotherapy affects outcome. Successful outcome after radiotherapy requires that (1) there is no tumor extension beyond the selected target volume, (2) adequate dose is delivered to the target volume, and (3) normal tissue tolerance dose is not exceeded. For many neoplasms serial post-treatment scans may show little change, and success is often measured more by absence of tumor progression than by scan normalization. Three-dimensional treatment planning based on MRI or CT makes it possible to guarantee delivery of the full prescription dose to gross tumor while minimizing the volume of normal tissue receiving high dose. Acceptable dose conformity can often be achieved with 2-4 static beams or arcs, which is usually preferable to opposed lateral fields. Protocols involving substantial dose escalation require a large number of non-coplanar x-ray beams or particle therapy. This course will cover important concepts and techniques which relate to the treatment of brain tumors, including conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, altered fractionation, inverse treatment planning, re-irradiation, and biologically effective dose (BED). Examples of planning solutions for a variety of tumor types, size and anatomical locations will be given

  16. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  17. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics

    Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  18. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics.

    Kourea, Helen; Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-07-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  19. A Rare Cutaneous Adnexal Tumor: Malignant Proliferating Trichilemmal Tumor

    Omer Alici; Musa Kemal Keles; Alper Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating trichilemmal tumors (PTTs) are neoplasms derived from the outer root sheath of the hair follicle. These tumors, which commonly affect the scalp of elderly women, rarely demonstrate malignant transformation. Although invasion of the tumors into neighboring tissues and being accompanied with anaplasia and necrosis are accepted as findings of malignancy, histological features may not always be sufficient to identify these tumors. The clinical behavior of the tumor may be incompatib...

  20. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  1. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    Fuchigami, Takao [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kibe, Toshiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Nishizawa, Yoshiaki [Kagoshima University Faculty of Medicine, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ueda, Masahiro [Natural Science Centre for Research and Education, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Koorimoto, Kagoshima 890-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Norifumi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kiyono, Tohru [Department of Virology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuouku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kishida, Michiko, E-mail: kmichiko@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  2. Tumor diagnosis, grading, and staging

    Optimal use of radiation therapy for the treatment of animal tumors necessitates accurate clinical evaluation, diagnostic imaging, and pathology. This requires a coordinated effort between the clinical and radiation oncologist, radiologist, and pathologist. The histological appearance of the tumor, tumor grade, and tumor stage are important diagnostic criteria that need to be established. Diagnostic imaging, including radiographic, computerized tomographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound studies are helpful in establishing an accurate tumor location and diagnosis. Biopsy and histological examination of tumor tissue are necessary for final diagnosis of tumor type. Determination of tumor type is critical because different tumor types vary in regard to radiosensitivity, local behavior, and propensity for regional and systemic metastasis. The histological grade of many tumors is an important indicator of the potential for local invasion or systemic metastases, and may influence treatment response. Tumor staging as determined by clinical evaluation, imaging studies, and histological evaluation is necessary to establish the extent of the tumor, both locally, regionally, and systemically. The clinical oncologist should have an understanding of the procedures involved in tumor diagnosis, tumor grading, and tumor staging. This provides a better understanding of the neoplastic condition and recognition of the limitations of diagnostic procedures. Tumor type, grade, and stage all impact radiation treatment planning and the need for adjuvant regional or systemic therapy

  3. Clear-cell Odontogenic Tumor(Immunohistochemical and Electron Microscope Study)%牙源性透明细胞瘤--免疫组化及电镜研究

    Thomas Albert; Wei-Xiong Ye; Monica B Zieper; Charles K Meshul

    2004-01-01

    牙源性透明细胞瘤通常称牙源性透明细胞癌,是一种极少见的肿瘤.组织学上,肿瘤细胞排列成片状或巢状,细胞呈椭圆形或多边形,有丰富透明或淡伊红细胞浆和一小的偏中心,深染的核.偶尔肿瘤巢的周边细胞呈栅栏状排列和一反极向的核相似造釉细胞.大多数文献报道牙源性透明细胞瘤是一浸润性肿瘤.手术后,有复发倾向;常有区域及远处转移.因此,多数作者称此肿瘤为牙源性透明细胞癌.但是也有很多病例经长期随访,术后无复发,有随访长达5a,甚至用保守治疗(挖除肿瘤)的病例,手术前已存13a,手术时仅见局部膨胀和局部舌侧皮质骨板穿孔.术前及术后没有区域和远处转移.手术后已随访5a.这些结果似指示这病例应属于良性肿瘤范畴.这种肿瘤是否有从良性到恶性的转变过程值得探讨.其显微镜所见,免疫组化及电子显微镜检查结果,不能与那些有恶性行为的肿瘤区别.因此,这些不能用作预测肿瘤的行为.作者主张整块肿瘤切除,术中做冰冻切片检查标本,以期获得无肿瘤残留的证据.

  4. Epigenetic changes in tumor microenvironment

    P Dey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The drama of cancer is not the solo performance of the malignant cells. Microenvironment of the tumor has significant contribution in carcinogenesis. Recent evidences show distinct gene promoter methylation in stromal cells of various malignant and pre-malignant tumors. These changes probably create unique tumor microenvironment, which is responsible for initiation, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. In this mini review the role of epigenetic changes of tumor microenvironment in carcinogenesis has been discussed.

  5. Pituitary gland tumors; Hypophysentumoren

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit ist eine Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten Hypophysentumoren und deren Differenzialdiagnosen mit Augenmerk auf die

  6. Parotid hybrid tumor

    Tumors of the salivary glands represent 33%-10% of head and neck neoplasms. The most common location is the parotid gland, accounting for 50%-85% of the cases, with 20%-30% of them being malignant. The following are known to be indicative of a malignant tumor: fast growing, painless mass, associated facial paralysis and lymphadenopathy. Most parotid neoplasm derive from a single histological type but eventually the development of more than one type on the same gland can occur. This paper presents a case of a parotid neoplasm with two different histological tumors, with uncharacteristic clinical presentation. The patient presented initially with ear pain and otorrhoea, in the clinical examination highlighted an external auditory canal tumor. The complementary study revealed a parotid neoplasm and a total resection of the gland was performed. The biopsy revealed an adenoid-cystic carcinoma with differentiated basaloid areas. Adjuvant radio-chemotherapy was administered, and the imaging control with PET-CT showed no evidence of recurrence or dissemination of the tumor

  7. Extradural tumors; Extradurale Tumoren

    Reith, W.; Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Approximately 50-60% of spinal tumors are extradural and depending on the origin and location are classified into tumors of the vertebrae, tumors of the epidural space and primarily extraspinal tumors growing into the spine. Presenting complaints include back pain and weakness as well as myelopathy and radiculopathy due to compression of the spinal cord or the nerve roots, respectively. Imaging of extradural tumors mostly requires both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Extradural masses and infiltration of the cord can be depicted by MRI and CT depicts osteolytic and osteosclerotic lesions and the extent of osseous involvement. Bone scintigraphy is often helpful in detecting metastases and characterizing osteoid osteomas. (orig.) [German] Fuenfzig bis 60% aller spinalen Tumoren sind extradural gelegen. Sie koennen in Knochentumoren (benigne, intermediaere und maligne) und Tumoren des Epiduralraums, und extraspinale Tumoren, die in den Spinalraum vorwachsen, unterteilt werden. Die fuehrenden klinischen Symptome sind Rueckenschmerzen, Schwaeche sowie Myelo- und Radikulopathien, verursacht durch Kompression des Rueckenmarks bzw. der Nervenwurzeln. Die Bildgebung der extraduralen Tumoren erfordert meist sowohl ein MRT als auch eine CT. Das MRT kann die extraduralen Weichteilanteile und Infiltration des Knochenmarks gut darstellen. Veraenderungen im Myelon, z. B. verursacht durch eine Kompression im Sinne einer Myelopathie mit zentromedullaerer Signalanhebung, stellen sich vor allem in den T2-Sequenzen gut dar. Die CT kann osteolytische oder osteosklerotische Laesionen darstellen und das Ausmass der knoechernen Beteiligung aufzeigen. Eine Szintigraphie ist oft hilfreich, um Metastasen nachzuweisen und Osteoidosteome zu charakterisieren. (orig.)

  8. Cryoablation for pulmonary tumor

    We have experienced more than 200 sessions for mainly metastatic lung tumor and small number of primary lung cancer since 2002. Cryo-probe is inserted percutaneously with local anesthesia under CT scan guide. Co-axial technique is adopted to prevent from hemorrhage and massive air leakage. The average of hospital stay after treatment is 2.6 days. Although pneumothorax was associated with more than half patients, 5% of them experienced chest tube insertion. Local recurrence 1 year after treatment was found 10% of tumors of 10 mm or less diameter, 30% of 11-20 mm diameter, and 40% of 20-30 mm diameter and 100% of 31 mm or more diameter. In case of large vessels (3 mm or more diameter) running within 4 mm from tumor, recurrence rate was higher compared with the same sized tumors without large vessels running nearby. We are eager for the development of 3D-simulation system considering the distribution of caloric value is strongly requested to improve the local control power of cryoablation for lung tumor. (author)

  9. Tumor-associated macrophages: effectors of angiogenesis and tumor progression.

    Coffelt, Seth B; Hughes, Russell; Lewis, Claire E

    2009-08-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a prominent inflammatory cell population in many tumor types residing in both perivascular and avascular, hypoxic regions of these tissues. Analysis of TAMs in human tumor biopsies has shown that they express a variety of tumor-promoting factors and evidence from transgenic murine tumor models has provided unequivocal evidence for the importance of these cells in driving angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, immunosuppression, and metastasis. This review will summarize the mechanisms by which monocytes are recruited into tumors, their myriad, tumor-promoting functions within tumors, and the influence of the tumor microenvironment in driving these activities. We also discuss recent attempts to both target/destroy TAMs and exploit them as delivery vehicles for anti-cancer gene therapy. PMID:19269310

  10. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  11. Mediastinal tumors. Update 1995

    This volume represents the premier work devoted solely to the complex myriad of mediastinal tumors. The contributors to the state-of-the-art text are clinical investigators of international renown. The diagnosis, natural history, and therapeutic strategies in respect of all mediastinal tumors are thoroughly addressed in a concise and logical manner. An emphasis on the multidisciplinary nature of mediastinal tumors is thematic throughout the text. Moreover, the combined-modality treatment schemes that have been increasingly developed worldwide are analyzed. This textbook will prove of value to all general surgeons, thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pulmonologists, and endocrinologists, as well as to nursing and medical students, residents and fellows-in training. (orig.). 55 figs., 21 tabs

  12. Renal Tumor Biopsy Technique

    Lei Zhang; Xue-Song Li; Li-Qun Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To review hot issues and future direction of renal tumor biopsy (RTB) technique.Data Sources:The literature concerning or including RTB technique in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015.Study Selection:We included all the relevant articles on RTB technique in English,with no limitation of study design.Results:Computed tomography and ultrasound were usually used for guiding RTB with respective advantages.Core biopsy is more preferred over fine needle aspiration because of superior accuracy.A minimum of two good-quality cores for a single renal tumor is generally accepted.The use of coaxial guide is recommended.For biopsy location,sampling different regions including central and peripheral biopsies are recommended.Conclusion:In spite of some limitations,RTB technique is relatively mature to help optimize the treatment of renal tumors.

  13. Adult brain tumors

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of adults with brain tumors. This refresher course will focus on a variety of benign and malignant brain neoplasms and how contemporary radiotherapy affects outcome. Successful outcome after radiotherapy requires that (1) there is no tumor extension beyond the selected target volume, (2) adequate dose is delivered to the target volume, and (3) normal tissue tolerance dose is not exceeded. For many neoplasms serial post-treatment scans may show little change, and success is often measured more by absence of tumor progression than by scan normalization. Three-dimensional treatment planning based on MRI or CT makes it possible to guarantee delivery of the full prescription dose to gross tumor while minimizing the volume of normal tissue receiving high dose. Acceptable dose conformity can often be achieved with 2-4 static beams or arcs, which is usually preferable to opposed lateral fields. Protocols involving substantial dose escalation require a large number of non-coplanar x-ray beams or particle therapy. This course will cover important concepts and techniques which relate to the treatment of brain tumors, including conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, altered fractionation, inverse treatment planning, re-irradiation, and biologically effective dose (BED). Examples of planning solutions for a variety of tumor types, size and anatomical locations will be given. Note: I will incorporate examples of interesting, difficult and unusual cases from other practices as time permits, provided slides and descriptive materials are sent to me in advance of the course

  14. Brain tumors; Hirntumoren

    Langen, K.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Biophysik; Stoffels, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). C. und O. Vogt Inst. fuer Hirnforschung

    2007-09-15

    Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) is the method of choice for the diagnostics of cerebral gliomas, but the differentiation of tumour tissue from unspecific tissue changes is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET) and Single-Photon-Emission-Computed Tomography (SPECT) may offer relevant additional information which allows for a more accurate diagnostics in unclear situations. Especially, radiolabeled amino acids offer a better delineation of cerebral gliomas which allows an improved guidance of biopsy, planning of surgery and radiation therapy. Furthermore, amino acid imaging appears to be useful to differentiate tumor recurrence from unspecific posttherapeutic tissue, to predict the prognosis especially in low grade gliomas and to monitor the metabolic response during tumor therapy. (orig.)

  15. Radioembolization of hepatic tumors.

    Kennedy, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors are a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity. This remains a challenging and key task for every oncologist despite significant advances that have been made with selective targeted systemic agents and in technology advances with radiotherapy delivery. Radioembolization (RE) is a technique of permanently implanting microspheres containing Yttrium-90 ((90)Y), a beta-emitting isotope with a treatment range of 2 mm, into hepatic tumors. This form of brachytherapy utilizes the unique dual vascular anatomy of the liver to preferentially deliver radioactive particles via the hepatic artery to tumor, sparing normal liver parenchyma. The main treatment inclusion criteria are patients with solid tumors, compensated liver functions, life expectancy of at least three months, and ECOG performance status 0-2. Benefit of RE has been proven in patients that have low-to-moderate extrahepatic disease burden, prior liver radiotherapy, heavy prior chemotherapy and biologic agent exposure, and history of hepatic surgery or ablation. Most of the clinical evidence is reported in metastatic colorectal, and neuroendocrine tumors (NET), and primary hepatocellular cancer. A growing body of data supports the use of RE in hepatic metastatic breast cancer, intrahepatic cholangiocarinoma, and many other metastatic tumor types. Side effects are typically mild constitutional and GI issues limited to the first 7-14 days post treatment, with only 6% grade 3 toxicity reported in large series. Potentially serious or fatal radiation induced liver disease is extremely rare, reported in only 1% or fewer in major series of both metastatic and primary tumors treated with RE. Currently, high priority prospective clinical trials are testing RE combined with chemotherapy in first line therapy for colorectal hepatic metastases, and combined with sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Fortunately, this beneficial and now widely available therapy

  16. Pediatric sinonasal tumors

    This paper demonstrates the pathology and imaging characteristics of pediatric sinonasal tumors, which are distinctly different from those found in adults. The medical records, radiologic studies, and pathologic findings in 51 patients, aged 18 years or younger, with sinonasal tumors were retrospectively reviewed. CT images and histopathologic correlation were available in all 51 cases, angiography in 17, and MR in 3. The majority of lesions were benign (33/51), with juvenile angiofibroma being the most common (10/33), followed by fibro-osseous lesions (9/33)

  17. NON EPITHELIAL TUMORS OF OVARY

    Rajani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non epithelial tumors of ovary are uncommon tumors and may generate difficulty in establishing a diagnosis. Small cell carcinoma (SCC of the female genital tract and primary lymphoma of ovary is even rarer, constituting less than 1% of all gynecologic malignancies. These tumors have poor prognosis. In the present study an effort was made to review these tumors in our Institute. AIMS: To know the prevalence, age distribution, clinical presentation and morphological appearance of these tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Analyzed 34 cases of non - epithelial tumors of ovary received in the department of pathology during a period of three years. Specimens were grossed, routinely processed under standardized conditions for paraffin embedding and stained with hematoxylin and eosin using standard procedures. Special stains and Immunohistochemistry was done where ever necessary. RESULTS: A total of ovarian tumors received during this period were 136. Non epithelial tumors of ovary constituted 34/136 (25%, of the ovarian neoplasms. Germ cell tumors constituted 23/34(67.64% followed by sexcord stromal tumors 7/34 (20.58%. Among the rare tumors we encountered a case of small cell carcinoma, primary lymphoma of ovary and 2 cases of Krukenberg tumors of ovary 2/34 (5.88%. CONCLUSION: Small cell carcinoma and primary lymphoma are morphologically similar to sex cord stromal tumors and germ cell tumors, may pose significant problems in establishing the correct diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry is a must to diagnose these lesions as they have grave prognosis.

  18. Extradigital Glomus Tumor of Thigh

    Kemal Beksaç

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomus tumors are benign neoplasms that arise from neuromyoarterial glomus bodies. They represent around 1–5% of all soft-tissue tumors. High temperature, sensitivity, and pain and localized tenderness are the classical triad of symptoms. Most glomus tumors represent in the subungual area of digits. Extradigital glomus tumors are a very rare entity. There are rare cases of these tumors reported to be in shoulder, elbow, knee, wrist, even stomach, colon, and larynx. We are reporting a case of a glomus tumor on thigh and discuss the histological and immunohistochemical features.

  19. Hyaluronan Promotes Tumor Lymphangiogenesis and Intralymphantic Tumor Growth in Xenografts

    Li-Xia GUO; Ke ZOU; Ji-Hang JU; Hong XIE

    2005-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix, has been implicated in the promotion of malignant phenotypes, including tumor angiogenesis. However, little is known about the effect of HA on tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis. In this study, mouse hepatocellular carcinoma Hca-F cells combined with or without HA were injected subcutaneously into C3H/Hej mice, then angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis of implanted tumors were examined by immunostaining for plateletendothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and lymphatic vascular endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 respectively.Interestingly, we found HA promotes tumor lymphangiogenesis and the occurrence of intratumoral lymphatic vessels, but has little effect on tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, HA also promotes intralymphatic tumor growth, although it is not sufficient to potentiate lymphatic metastasis. These results suggest that HA,which is elevated in most malignant tumor stroma, may also play a role in tumor progression by promoting lymphangiogenesis.

  20. Intracardiac tumor causing

    Christopher P. Jordan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The following report describes the case of newborn girl with an asymptomatic systolic murmur, which on imaging revealed a nearly obstructive mass in the left-ventricular outflow tract. The mass was resected and found to be consistent with a rhabdomyoma. Here, we describe the pathologic and clinical characteristics of this tumor.

  1. Pituitary: Secretory Tumors

    ... is caused by the excess secretion of growth hormone (GH). It can cause noticeable changes in your appearance, ... medication approved for acromegaly. Instead of suppressing excess GH production by the pituitary tumor, it works to stop the hormone from acting on the body, but does not ...

  2. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    ... 3 families will mourn the loss of their child to a brain or spinal cord tumor. Friends, family and community will try to make sense of an untimely death and the unfulfilled promise of a life. 6 families will transition to survivorship. A mother may be too exhausted from providing constant care ...

  3. [Mediastinal tumors: introduction].

    Trousse, D; Avaro, J-P

    2010-02-01

    Mediastinal tumors are relatively uncommon, usually incidentally discovered on a chest X-ray in asymptomatic patients. Young adults are particularly concerned. Mediastinal masses represent a group of heterogeneous histological type cell. A definite diagnosis is essential leading to an adequate prompt therapeutic strategy when either benign disease or aggressive malignant tumor is conceivable. Indeed the therapeutic management of such tumors could be strictly medical, requiring exclusive surgical approach or includes a multimodal treatment. Clinical examination and imaging are important tools in the diagnostic approach. However the specific diagnosis could be complex and requires histological confirmation by an experienced pathologist after examination of large biopsies of the tumor. Several investigations, including surgical invasive exploration, should be quickly requested in order to achieve a final diagnosis and refer patients in an adequate therapeutic scheme without delay. The aim of this article is to point out the available diagnostic tools in mediastinal masses, including surgical approach, and to identify the role of surgical resection in specific subtypes. PMID:20207291

  4. Tumor ablations in IMRI

    Roberto Blanco Sequeiros

    2002-01-01

    @@ IntroductionMagnetic resonance imaging based guidance control and monitoring of minimally invasive intervention has developed from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. Magnetic-resonance-guided interstitial therapy in principle is defined as a treatment technique for ablating deepseated tumors in the human body.

  5. Upper urinary tract tumors

    Gandrup, Karen L; Nordling, Jørgen; Balslev, Ingegerd; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2014-01-01

    who underwent nephroureterectomy between 2006 and 2011 and who had split-bolus CTU prior to surgery were included. The images were available electronically. The attenuation values before and after administration of iodine-based contrast media were measured. The radiology, patient, and pathology...... examination is useful to diagnose a tumor in the renal pelvis and the ureter....

  6. Brain tumor stem cells.

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  7. Parallel evolution of tumor subclones mimics diversity between tumors

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca; Rowan, Andrew; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Swanton, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumor adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicines approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumor (intratumor heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumors (intertumor heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumor with 440 singletumor biopsies fro...

  8. Retroperitoneal calcifying fibrous tumor mimicking an adrenal tumor

    Prochaska, Erica C.; Sciallis, Andrew P.; Miller, Barbra S.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the etiology of a retroperitoneal tumor may be difficult due to close proximity of multiple organs. Evaluation of retroperitoneal tumors often leads to surgery, many times to obtain a definitive diagnosis and rule out malignancy. Calcifying fibrous tumors (CFT) are very rare soft tissue tumors occurring most often in young patients. They are most often found arising in the thoracic cavity, mediastinum, abdominal cavity and extremities and usually have a benign clinical course. Ma...

  9. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  10. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  11. What Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What are lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  12. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) Becenum ( ...

  13. How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed?

    ... at under a microscope. The cells in Wilms tumors have a distinct appearance when looked at this way. Doctors also look at the sample to determine the histology of the Wilms tumor (favorable or unfavorable), as was described in the ...

  14. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    Davies, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  15. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    Davies, Karen

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  16. Neurogenic tumors of the stomach

    The general and radiologic features of neurogenic tumors of the stomach are reviewed in connection with 18 cases (16 benign and 2 maglignant tumors). Such neurogenic tumors are rare in the stomach, representing less than 0.5% of all tumors. Solitary neurogenic tumors must be differentiated from those encountered during von Recklinghausen's disease. Radiological or endoscopic examination can generally determine the benign or malignant nature of solitary neurogenic tumors, which are essentially represented by schwannomas. Since these tumors are submucosal, a deep biopsy is imperative; furthermore, since such tumors are subject to hemorrhage, prior investigation by CT appears advisable to detect possible hypervascularization after injection of contrast material. For patients with von Recklinghausen's disease, a neurofibroma is usually diagnosed when faced with a digestive hemorrhage. Radiological exploration of the entire digestive tract appears essential to confirm the solitary nature of the gastric lesion and to be sure it is responsible for the clinical symptoms. (orig.)

  17. Biopsy in Musculoskeletal Tumors

    Mohammad Gharehdaghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of bone tumors is based on careful evaluation of clinical, imaging and a pathologic findings. So the biopsy of bone and soft tissue sarcomas is the final step in evaluation and a fundamental step in the diagnosis of the lesion. It should not be performed as a shortcut to diagnosis (1. The biopsy should be performed in order to confirm the diagnosis and differentiate among few diagnoses after careful staged studies. Real and artificial changes in imaging studies will be superimposed after performing biopsy, which may alter the interpretation if done after biopsy is taken (1. The correct management of a sarcoma depends on the accurate diagnosis. Inadequate, inapprppriate, or inaccurate non-representative biopsy leads to poorer outcome in terms of survivorship and limb salvage. An incorrect, unplanned incision and biopsy may unnecessarily contaminate uninvolved compartments which may convert a salvageable limb to amputation. Anatomic approach along with the proper biopsy techniques may lead to success or catastrophe. It is clear that in patients with inappropriate biopsy, the chance of the need to change the treatment to more radical than would originally be expected is significantly higher. Also it is more probable to need to  convert curative to palliative treatment and to require adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with inappropriate biopsies. Patients with sarcoma are best served by early referral to a specialized center where staged investigations and biopsy can be performed with minimal morbidity (3. Open biopsy is still considered the gold standard; however, recent studies suggest comparable results with percutaneous core needle biopsy. Our study on 103 consecutive CNB and open biopsy showed comparable results as well. Surgeons need to answer to two questions prior to performing a biopsy: 1-          Where is the best part of the lesion to be biopsied? 2-          What is the safest route without contaminating

  18. Growth factors in tumor microenvironment

    Zhang, Xuejing; Nie, Daotai; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation and progression. Components in the microenvironment can modulate the growth of tumor cells, their ability to progress and metastasize. A major venue of communication between tumor cells and their microenvironment is through polypeptide growth factors and receptors for these growth factors. This article discusses three major classes of growth-stimulatory polypeptide growth factors and receptors for these growth factors. It also d...

  19. Tumor suppressor and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Juliette Martin; Jean-Frangois Dufour

    2008-01-01

    A few signaling pathways are driving the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma. Each of these pathways possesses negative regulators. These enzymes, which normally suppress unchecked cell proliferation, are circumvented in the oncogenic process, either the over-activity of oncogenes is sufficient to annihilate the activity of tumor suppressors or tumor suppressors have been rendered ineffective. The loss of several key tumor suppressors has been described in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we systematically review the evidence implicating tumor suppressors in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs−/−) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  1. Tumor Budding in Colorectal Carcinomas

    Sevda SERT BEKTAŞ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In colorectal carcinomas, tumor budding has been defined as the presence of isolated single tumor cells or small cell clusters in the stroma at the invasive tumor margin. In this study, the relationship between tumor budding density at the invasive tumor margin and pathological parameters is investigated.Material and Method: Haematoxylin and eosin stained slides of 73 cases with colorectal carcinoma were retrospectively evaluated for the presence and intensity of tumor budding by 2 observers. After the specimens were assessed, the highest density of tumor budding area was counted in a microscopic field of x200. Cases were separated into 2 groups according to tumor budding density as low grade (<10 and high grade (≥10. The relationship of these groups with depth of tumor invasion, histological grade, vascular invasion and lymph node involvement was investigated.Results: Of the 73 colorectal carcinoma cases, 33 (45.2% had low and 40 (54.8% had high grade tumor budding density, respectively. There was a statistically significant relationship between high grade tumor budding density and histological grade (p=0.042, lymph node involvement (p=0.0001 and vascular invasion (p=0.0034.Conclusion: High grade tumor budding density is associated with aggressive phenotypical features in colorectal carcinoma.

  2. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  3. Tumor Microenvironment in the Brain

    In addition to malignant cancer cells, tumors contain a variety of different stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types provide crucial support for tumor growth, while others have been suggested to actually inhibit tumor progression. The composition of tumor microenvironment varies depending on the tumor site. The brain in particular consists of numerous specialized cell types such as microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. In addition to these brain-resident cells, primary and metastatic brain tumors have also been shown to be infiltrated by different populations of bone marrow-derived cells. The role of different cell types that constitute tumor microenvironment in the progression of brain malignancies is only poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in extracranial malignancies. A better understanding of tumor microenvironment in the brain would therefore be expected to contribute to the development of improved therapies for brain tumors that are urgently required due to a poor availability of treatments for these malignancies. This review summarizes some of the known interactions between brain tumors and different stromal cells, and also discusses potential therapeutic approaches within this context

  4. Tumor Microenvironment in the Brain

    Lorger, Mihaela [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, St. James’s University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-22

    In addition to malignant cancer cells, tumors contain a variety of different stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types provide crucial support for tumor growth, while others have been suggested to actually inhibit tumor progression. The composition of tumor microenvironment varies depending on the tumor site. The brain in particular consists of numerous specialized cell types such as microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. In addition to these brain-resident cells, primary and metastatic brain tumors have also been shown to be infiltrated by different populations of bone marrow-derived cells. The role of different cell types that constitute tumor microenvironment in the progression of brain malignancies is only poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in extracranial malignancies. A better understanding of tumor microenvironment in the brain would therefore be expected to contribute to the development of improved therapies for brain tumors that are urgently required due to a poor availability of treatments for these malignancies. This review summarizes some of the known interactions between brain tumors and different stromal cells, and also discusses potential therapeutic approaches within this context.

  5. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...

  6. CT findings of parotid gland tumors: benign versus malignant tumors

    Lee, Moon Ok; Han, Chun Hwan; Kim, Mie Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Kyung Joo; Lee, Joo Hyuk [Kang Nam General Hospital, Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeung Sook [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of parotid gland tumors to help in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. The CT findings of 22 patients with surgically proven parotid gland tumors were reviewed. Analysis was focused on the density and margin characteristics of the tumors, and the relationship between the tumor and surrounding structures. Those tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (n = 8), Warthin's tumor (n = 5), basal cell adenoma (n = 1), lipoma (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 2), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n 1), epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), and carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (n 1). Most of benign and malignant tumors were heterogeneous in density on contrast enhanced CT scans. In 5 of 6 malignant cases, the tumors had irregular or ill-defined margin and a tendancy to involve or cross the superficial layer of deep cervical fascia with obliteration of subcutaneous fat. Two malignant tumors invaded surrounding structures. Although the heterogeneous density of tumor is not a specific finding for malignancy at CT, following findings, such as, irregular or blurred margin of the lesion, the involvement of fascial plane, and the infiltration of surrounding structures may suggest the possibility of malignant parotid tumor.

  7. CT findings of parotid gland tumors: benign versus malignant tumors

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of parotid gland tumors to help in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. The CT findings of 22 patients with surgically proven parotid gland tumors were reviewed. Analysis was focused on the density and margin characteristics of the tumors, and the relationship between the tumor and surrounding structures. Those tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (n = 8), Warthin's tumor (n = 5), basal cell adenoma (n = 1), lipoma (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 2), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n 1), epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), and carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (n 1). Most of benign and malignant tumors were heterogeneous in density on contrast enhanced CT scans. In 5 of 6 malignant cases, the tumors had irregular or ill-defined margin and a tendancy to involve or cross the superficial layer of deep cervical fascia with obliteration of subcutaneous fat. Two malignant tumors invaded surrounding structures. Although the heterogeneous density of tumor is not a specific finding for malignancy at CT, following findings, such as, irregular or blurred margin of the lesion, the involvement of fascial plane, and the infiltration of surrounding structures may suggest the possibility of malignant parotid tumor

  8. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth

    Jianfeng Huang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh−/− tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh−/− mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh−/− mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth.

  9. MR findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity, with emphasis on tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors

    Sex cord-stromal tumors including granulosa cell tumor, thecoma, Sertoli stromal cell tumor and steroid cell tumor are noted for their hormonal activity. However, there are many kinds of ovarian tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors and tumor-like conditions with endocrine manifestations. Cross-sectional imaging, especially MR, can provide precise features of ovarian tumors and uterine morphological change even in a clinically latent excess of estrogen. In this article, we demonstrate typical imaging findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity. We also shortly explain the mechanism of the virilization and hyperestrogenism caused by ovarian tumors and tumor-like conditions

  10. Large-sized kidney tumor mimicking an extraorgan retroperitoneal tumor

    I. A. Reva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The retroperitoneal space may be a site for a broad spectrum of both rare benign and malignant tumors that are in turn a focus of primary or metastatic involvement. Sarcomas, lymphomas, and different epithelial tumors (of the kidney, adrenal, and pancreas constitute the bulk of retroperitoneal tumors. Detection of a large-sized tumor located at one of the renal poles may raise the question of whether this mass is a kidney tumor or an extraorgan retroperitoneal tumor adjacent to or growing into the kidney. In view of significant differences in treatment procedures for various retroperitoneal tumors, when the origin of the mass is unknown, there is a need for an individual approach to defining the optimal therapeutic and diagnostic tactics, by attracting specialists in allied fields. 

  11. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Sangeeta Palaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an uncommon lesion of unknown cause. It encompasses a spectrum of myofibroblastic proliferation along with varying amount of inflammatory infiltrate. A number of terms have been applied to the lesion, namely, inflammatory pseudotumor, fibrous xanthoma, plasma cell granuloma, pseudosarcoma, lymphoid hamartoma, myxoid hamartoma, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, benign myofibroblatoma, and most recently, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The diverse nomenclature is mostly descriptive and reflects the uncertainty regarding true biologic nature of these lesions. Recently, the concept of this lesion being reactive has been challenged based on the clinical demonstration of recurrences and metastasis and cytogenetic evidence of acquired clonal chromosomal abnormalities. We hereby report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor and review its inflammatory versus neoplastic behavior.

  12. ADENOMATOIDNI TUMOR JAJOVODA

    Labinac-Peteh, Loredana; Matković-Bilin, Marija; Pirkić, Ahmed; Končar, Milan; Kučinar, Ilija

    2006-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman, nulipara, was admitted to the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital “Sestre Milosrdnice“, Zagreb, Croatia, because of a single cyst on the left ovary. Hysterectomy with bilateral salpingoophorectomy was performed. The left tube contained a well circumscribed, round, yellowish nodule of middle firm consistency, which was situated both under the serosa and in the muscular layer. The tubal lumen was strongly displaced by the tumor. Histologically, the ...

  13. Respiratory tract tumor

    2008-01-01

    2008053 Expression of PTEN gene in non-small cell lung cancer. HONG Zheng(洪征),et al. Dept Thoracic Surg, Thoracic Tumor & Tuberc Res Instit , Beijing 101149. Chin J Clin Oncol Rehabil 2007;14(6):487-490. Objective To investigate the expression of PTEN gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and analyze the role of PTEN gene in lung tumorigenesis. Methods Immunohistochemical stain was used to determine the expression of PTEN in

  14. Combined tumor therapy

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs

  15. Intracranial germ cell tumor

    Kreutz, J; Rausin, L.; Weerts, E; Tebache, M; Born, J; Hoyoux, C

    2010-01-01

    Germ cell tumours represent about 3 to 8% of pediatric brain tumours. Occurrence of diabetes insipidus is common in the case of suprasellar germ cell tumors. The diagnosis may be advanced by MRI owing to the location and relatively univocal characteristics of the lesion signal. The existence of a bifocal mass developed in both suprasellar region and pineal zone is highly suggestive of a germinoma. The most important notion is to recognize that at the time of diabetes insipidus diagnosis in a ...

  16. Familial germ cell tumor

    Sanju Cyriac; Rejeev Rajendranath; A. Robert Louis; Sagar, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    Familial testicular germ cell tumors are well known in literature. Only few cases are reported where both brother and sister of the same family suffered from germ cell malignancies. We present a family where the proband is a survivor of ovarian dysgerminoma stage IA. Her elder male sibling became acutely ill and was detected to have disseminated testicular malignancy with grossly elevated markers and vegetations in the mitral valve leaflets. Despite all measures he could not be saved. Presenc...

  17. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    Levidou Georgia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GISTs are a subset of mesenchymal tumors and represent the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of GI tract. However, GIST is a recently recognized tumor entity and the literature on these stromal tumors has rapidly expanded. Methods An extensive review of the literature was carried out in both online medical journals and through Athens University Medical library. An extensive literature search for papers published up to 2009 was performed, using as key words, GIST, Cajal's cells, treatment, Imatinib, KIT, review of each study were conducted, and data were abstracted. Results GIST has recently been suggested that is originated from the multipotential mesenchymal stem cells. It is estimated that the incidence of GIST is approximately 10-20 per million people, per year. Conclusion The clinical presentation of GIST is variable but the most usual symptoms include the presence of a mass or bleeding. Surgical resection of the local disease is the mainstay therapy. However, therapeutic agents, such as Imatinib have now been approved for the treatment of advanced GISTs and others, such as everolimus, rapamycin, heat shock protein 90 and IGF are in trial stage demonstrate promising results for the management of GISTs.

  18. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  19. Primary cardiac tumors

    Cardiac tumors happen to be among the less known pathologies without clear treatment standards. Even one decade ago most of the cardiac tumor diagnosis were made post mortem, and only reports of isolated cases could be found in the literature, showing the lack of interest in the investigation of these pathologies by cardiology and cardiovascular surgery specialists. With the development of echocardiography and of cardiovascular surgery, more cases of primary and metastatic cardiac tumors have been diagnosed. Many cases have been treated by palliative or curative surgical interventions, thus increasing the reports in the world literature and the experience in this field, and pointing out the real incidence of these pathologies, not being as bizarre as it had been considered. a revision of the literature will be made, in which the frequency and the suggested interventions will be reported, as well as the cases of cardiac pathology in two cardiovascular centers of the country known by the author. The echocardiographic, pathologic and histological characteristics of the representative cases will be presented, without a greater evidence level, due to the problem's incidence and the few cases reported by these centers

  20. Modeling tumor evolutionary dynamics

    Beatriz eStransky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis can be seen as an evolutionary process, in which the transformation of a normal cell into a tumor cell involves a number of limiting genetic and epigenetic events, occurring in a series of discrete stages. However, not all mutations in a cell are directly involved in cancer development and it is likely that most of them (passenger mutations do not contribute in any way to tumorigenesis. Moreover, the process of tumor evolution is punctuated by selection of advantageous (driver mutations and clonal expansions. Regarding these driver mutations, it is uncertain how many limiting events are required and / or sufficient to promote a tumorigenic process or what are the values associated with the adaptive advantage of different driver mutations. In spite of the availability of high-quality cancer data, several assumptions about the mechanistic process of cancer initiation and development remain largely untested, both mathematically and statistically. Here we review the development of mathematical/computational models where some assumptions were tested and discuss the impact of these models to the field of tumor biology.

  1. Malignant intraocular tumors

    The role of the radiation therapist in the management of malignant intraocular tumors is changing. With more active identification of malignant intraocular tumors, and a better recognization of the manner in which one can deal with problems of radiation sensitivity, radiation techniques of all sorts will be more actively employed in the treatment of these tumors. Special techniques must be selected for appropriate circumstances of management in order to diminish to an absolute minimum the impact upon the lens, the impact upon visual acuity and the impact upon the cornea. Cobalt-60 plaques are being used more commonly in the treatment of melanomas of the choroid, and the role for radiation therapy in the management of retinoblastoma is changing markably to where it may be used as the primary treatment program rather than enucleation. In metastatic disease involving the uveal tract, radiation therapy has assumed the most important role for management. Chemotherapy should be considered as an active adjuvant in the management of not only those individuals with retinoblastoma but also in those identified circumstances where metastases to the uveal tract are being treated. The role for chemotherapy or immunotherapy in malignant melanoma is unclear

  2. Respiratory-driven lung tumor motion is independent of tumor size, tumor location, and pulmonary function

    Purpose: To determine whether superior-inferior lung tumor motion is predictable by tumor size or location, or pulmonary function test results. Methods and Materials: Superior-inferior tumor motion was measured on orthogonal radiographs taken during simulation of 22 patients with inoperable lung cancer diagnosed by orthogonal radiographs. Results: The tumor size averaged 5.5±3.1 cm (range 1.5-12 cm). Seven of 11 central tumors demonstrated some motion compared with 5 of 11 peripheral tumors. Four of 5 upper lobe tumors moved compared with 8 of 17 tumors that were either middle or lower lobe lesions. The mean fourth rib motion was 7.3±3.2 mm (range 2-15). The mean FeV1 was 1.8±1.2 (range 0.55-5.33. The mean diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was 14.0±6.5 (range 7.8-21.9). The mean total lung capacity was 6.5±1.2 (range 3.3-8.4). None of these parameters correlated with tumor motion. Although lateral tumor motion could not be consistently determined, 1 tumor moved 10 mm anterior-posteriorly. Conclusions: Lung tumors often move significantly during respiration. Tumor motion is not predictable by tumor size or location, or pulmonary function test results. Therefore, tumor motion must be measured in all patients. Measurement in three dimensions will likely be necessary to maximize the irradiated lung volumes or choose beam arrangements parallel to the major axis of motion

  3. Study of Kidney Tumors in Younger Patients

    2016-05-17

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Congenital Mesoblastic Nephroma; Diffuse Hyperplastic Perilobar Nephroblastomatosis; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Wilms Tumor; Stage V Wilms Tumor

  4. Expressão imuno-histoquímica de proteínas da matriz extracelular em cistos odontogênicos calcificantes Immunohistochemical expression of extracellular matrix proteins in calcifying odontogenic cyst

    Rosilene Calazans Soares

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O cisto odontogênico calcificante (COC é uma lesão odontogênica de natureza benigna considerada por alguns autores como uma lesão exclusivamente cística, enquanto outros admitem uma contraparte neoplásica benigna. Vários estudos têm pesquisado a natureza das células fantasmas características do COC, porém permanece obscuro o conhecimento sobre a expressão dos constituintes da matriz extracelular (MEC nessa lesão. OBJETIVO: Realizar uma avaliação imuno-histoquímica da expressão de proteínas constituintes da MEC (fibronectina, tenascina e colágeno I em espécimes de COCs, a fim de verificar se há diferenças significativas em tal expressão ou se esses padrões representam um espectro da mesma entidade. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados dez casos de COCs, representados por cinco do tipo unicístico simples, três do tipo produtor de odontoma e dois com proliferação ameloblastomatosa, que foram submetidos à técnica imuno-histoquímica da estreptoavidina-biotina com anticorpos monoclonais anti-fibronectina, anti-tenascina e anti-colágeno I. RESULTADOS: Verificou-se que houve uma expressão variável das proteínas pesquisadas, tanto entre as lesões do mesmo grupo, como entre os três grupos estudados, sendo notável a reatividade para os três anticorpos apresentada pelas células fantasmas. CONCLUSÃO: Não foi possível observar um padrão de marcação que denotasse diferenças entre o tipo unicístico simples, o produtor de odontoma e o com proliferação ameloblastomatosa. Esse achado reforça a visão de que os vários tipos histológicos do COC podem, simplesmente, representar espectros histológicos diferentes de uma só entidade com comportamento biológico semelhante.BACKGROUND: The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is an odontogenic lesion of benign nature considered by some authors as an exclusively cystic lesion, while others admit a benign neoplastic counterpart. Some studies have studied the

  5. Imaging in Pediatric Infratentorial Tumors

    S. Hajiahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors are the second cause of malignancies in childhood following leukemia. The overall incidence varies between 1:20000 and 1:100000 in different series. They are the most common solid tumors that occur in childhood .The most important diagnostic feature of an intracranial mass is its location. They can be supratentorial or infratentorial. With the exception of the first year of life, infratentorial brain tumors are more frequent than supratentorial tumors in the first decade of life. In particular, these are cerebellar low-grade astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, brain stem gliomas and ependymomas of the fourth ventricle. .Posterior fossa tumors also are readily identified with both CT and MRI. Spectroscopy in the analysis of brain tumors has recently come on the scene but may be of limited practical value when it comes to differentiating tumors. However, CT and especially MRI are the primary imaging modalities for the investigation of brain tumors. Sonography can be used in the neonates. With modern imaging, it is relatively easy to detect the presence of a tumor in most patients. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the imaging features of various infratentorial brain tumors to make a clue for differentiation them by these features.

  6. Mechanisms of Metastatic Tumor Dormancy

    Mary Osisami

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor metastasis can occur years after an apparent cure due to a phenomenon known as metastatic tumor dormancy; in which tumor masses or individual tumor cells are growth restricted for extended periods of time. This period of dormancy is induced and maintained by several mechanisms, including: (1 Tumor microenvironment factors such as cytokine expression, immunosurveillance and angiogenesis; (2 Metastasis suppressor gene activity; and (3 Cancer therapeutics. Disseminated tumor cells (DTC are the key cells that result in dormant tumors. However, many challenges exist towards isolating DTCs for mechanistic studies. The main DTC that may represent the dormant cell is the cancer stem cells (CSC as they have a slow proliferation rate. In addition to limited knowledge regarding induction of tumor dormancy, there are large gaps in knowledge regarding how tumors escape from dormancy. Emerging research into cancer stem cells, immunotherapy, and metastasis suppressor genes, may lead to new approaches for targeted anti-metastatic therapy to prevent dormancy escape. Overall, an enhanced understanding of tumor dormancy is critical for better targeting and treatment of patients to prevent cancer recurrence.

  7. Imaging tumors of the patella

    Background: Patellar tumors are rare; only a few series have been described in the literature and radiographic diagnosis can be challenging. We reviewed all patellar tumors at one institution and reviewed the literature. Materials and methods: In an evaluation of the database at one institution from 1916 to 2009, 23,000 bone tumors were found. Of these, 41 involved the patella. All had imaging studies and microscopic diagnostic confirmation. All medical records, imaging studies, and pathology were reviewed. Results: There were 15 females and 26 males, ranging from 8 to 68 years old (average 30). There were 30 benign tumors; eight giant cell tumors, eight chondroblastomas, seven osteoid osteomas, two aneurysmal bone cysts, two ganglions, one each of chondroma, exostosis, and hemangioma. There were 11 malignant tumors: five hemangioendotheliomas, three metastases, one lymphoma, one plasmacytoma, and one angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Patellar tumors are rare and usually benign. As the patella is an apophysis, the most frequent lesions are giant cell tumor in the adult and chondroblastoma in children. Osteoid osteomas were frequent in our series and easily diagnosed. Metastases are the most frequent malignant diagnoses in the literature; in our series malignant vascular tumors were more common. These lesions are often easily analyzed on radiographs. CT and MR define better the cortex, soft tissue extension, and fluid levels. This study presents the imaging patterns of the more common patellar tumors in order to help the radiologist when confronted with a lesion in this location

  8. What is a pediatric tumor?

    Mora J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jaume Mora1,21Department of Oncology, 2Developmental Tumor Biology Laboratory, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Fundacio Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Working together with medical oncologists, the question of whether a Ewing sarcoma in a 25-year-old is a pediatric tumor comes up repeatedly. Like Ewing's, some tumors present characteristically at ages that cross over what has been set as the definition of pediatrics (15 years, 18 years, or 21 years?. Pediatric oncology textbooks, surprisingly, do not address the subject of defining a pediatric tumor. They all begin with an epidemiology chapter defining the types of tumors appearing at distinct stages of childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Describing the epidemiology of tumors in relation to age, it becomes clear that the disease is related to the phenomenon of aging. The question, however, remains: is there a biological definition of what pediatric age is? And if so, will tumors occurring during this period of life have anything to do with such biological definition? With the aim of finding an objective definition, the fundamental concepts of what defines "pediatrics" was reviewed and then the major features of tumors arising during development were analyzed. The tumors were explored from the perspective of a host immersed in the normal process of growth and development. This physiological process, from pluripotential and undifferentiated cells, makes possible the differentiation, maturation, organization, and function of tissues, organs, and apparatus. A biological definition of pediatric tumors and the infancy–childhood–puberty classification of developmental tumors according to the infancy–childhood–puberty model of normal human development are proposed.Keywords: growth and development, pediatric tumor, infant, childhood and adolescence, pubertal tumors

  9. Angiogenesis and tumor

    Kamran Mansouri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation from existing ones, plays an important role in the physiologic circumstances such as embryonic development, placenta formation, and wound healing. It is also crucial to progress of pathogenic processes of a variety of disorders, including tumor growth and metastasis. In general, angiogenesis process is a multi-factorial and highly structured sequence of cellular events comprising migration, proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and finally vascular formation, maturation and remodeling.Thereby, angiogenesis inhibition as a helping agent to conventional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiation has attracted the scientists’ attentions studying in this field.

  10. Liver tumor ablation

    Minimal-invasive techniques for ablation of primary and secondary hepatic tumors gain increasingly clinical importance. This is especially true since surgical resection and classic chemotherapy is successful only in a limited number of patients. Local ablative methods incorporate chemo- (percutaneous alcohol instillation, transarterial chemoembolization), thermo- (radiofrequency-, laser-, microwave-, cryoablation, high intensive focused ultrasound) and radio-ablative techniques (interstitial brachytherapy, selective internal radiotherapy). Regarding their implementation and specific effects these methods are varying widely, nevertheless all of them have a high therapeutical efficacy together with a low complication rate in common - correct application presumed. The knowledge on specific indications and contraindications is crucial to implement these methods into multimodality therapy concepts. (orig.)

  11. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  12. Advances of Tumor Hyperthermia and Tumor Immunology in Translational Medicine

    Hooshang Lahooti

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is another important method in the treatment of tumors, secondary to surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and biotherapy. It has been demonstrated the efifcacy and versatility of hyperthermia in a lot of randomized trials across various primary cancers. Both heat shock proteins (HSPs) and dendritic cells (DCs) are greatly affected by hyperthermia and closely related to the tumor immunology. Nowadays, tumor hyperthermia and tumor immunology have been attached much attention in the field of translational medicine. In this article, the action mechanism and immunological effects of hyperthermia, activation of HSPs and DCs as well as HSP- and DC-based cancer vaccine were reviewed from the perspective of translational medicine.

  13. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol.

    Maryam Aghighi

    Full Text Available Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment.Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a proof of concept for clinical translation of our observations.4T1 tumors showed central areas of high signal on T1 and low signal on T2 weighted MR images, which corresponded to extracellular nanoparticles in a necrotic core on histopathology. MMTV-PyMT tumors showed little change on T1 but decreased signal on T2 weighted images, which correlated to compartmentalized nanoparticles in tumor associated macrophages. Only 4T1 tumors demonstrated significantly increased R1 relaxation rates of the tumor core compared to the tumor periphery (p<0.001. Transendothelial USPIO leakage was significantly higher for 4T1 tumors (3.4±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100cm3 compared to MMTV-PyMT tumors (1.0±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100 cm3. Likewise, ferumoxytol imaging in patients showed similar findings with

  14. Tumor triquilemal proliferante

    Fulin Yu-Tseng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available El tumor triquilemal proliferante es una dermatosis tumoral poco frecuente y derivada de la capa externa de la raíz del folículo piloso. Generalmente, es de características benignas, tiende a ser recidivante y se han reportado casos de transformaciones malignas en la bibliografía mundial. El caso trata de una paciente femenina de 59 años, con una neoformación exofítica nodular lobulada de crecimiento lento en piel cabelluda, de 5 años de evolución, con recidivas después de 3 cirugías. No se documentó compromiso óseo ni cerebral en los estudios de gabinete. La biopsia mostró proliferación de nidos de células escamosas en dermis, separados por bandas de tejido fibroso de la epidermis. El abordaje quirúrgico es el tratamiento de elección de esta patología.

  15. NANOROBOTS IN BRAIN TUMOR

    Sayyed Tarannum, Garje Dattatray H

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicine is the process of diagnosing, treating, and preventing disease and traumatic injury, of relieving pain, and of preserving and improving human health, using molecular tools and molecular knowledge of the human body. In the relatively near term, nanomedicine can address many important medical problems by using nanoscale-structured materials and simple nanodevices that can be manufactured today, including the interaction of nanostructured materials with biological systems. The authors predict that technology-assisted medicine and robotics in particular, will have a significant impact over the next few decades. Robots will augment the surgeon’s motor performance, diagnosis capability, and senses with haptics (feel, augmented reality (sight, and ultrasound (sound. Robotic devices have been used in cardiac surgery, urology, fetal surgery, pediatrics, neurosurgery, orthopedics, and many other medical disciplines. In this article, we present the Nanorobot drug delivery to brain tumor, paying special attention to the transformation trends of organizations, and the integration of robots in brain tumor and underscoring potential repercussions which may deserve more attention and further research.

  16. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders;

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by...... stabilizing the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes...

  17. Dynamic CT of pancreatic tumors

    Hosoki, T.

    1983-05-01

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 19 patients with clinically diagnosed pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. There were 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, three with inflammatory pancreatic masses, two with cystadenoma, one with insuloma, and three with peripancreatic tumors. Computed tomography was performed with a Varian-V-360-3 scanner; scanning was for 30 consecutive sec at 3 sec intervals after the bolus injection of 50 ml of contrast medium into the antecubital vein. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) may be more useful than conventional contrast CT because it facilitates: (1) correct evaluation of tumor vascularity allowing a differential diagnosis; (2) location of the boundary between tumor and a nontumor tissue; (3) detection of small tumors; and (4) visualization of pancreatic invasion by peripancreatic tumors. In addition, contrast enhancement and the degree of vascular proliferation can be quantitatively assessed by analyzing time-density curves.

  18. Dynamic CT of pancreatic tumors

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 19 patients with clinically diagnosed pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. There were 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, three with inflammatory pancreatic masses, two with cystadenoma, one with insuloma, and three with peripancreatic tumors. Computed tomography was performed with a Varian-V-360-3 scanner; scanning was for 30 consecutive sec at 3 sec intervals after the bolus injection of 50 ml of contrast medium into the antecubital vein. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) may be more useful than conventional contrast CT because it facilitates: (1) correct evaluation of tumor vascularity allowing a differential diagnosis; (2) location of the boundary between tumor and a nontumor tissue; (3) detection of small tumors; and (4) visualization of pancreatic invasion by peripancreatic tumors. In addition, contrast enhancement and the degree of vascular proliferation can be quantitatively assessed by analyzing time-density curves

  19. Primary omental yolk sac tumor.

    Lim, Seon Hwa; Kim, Yon Hee; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sunghoon

    2013-11-01

    Extra-ovarian yolk sac tumor arising in the omentum is extremely rare. As yolk sac tumor originated from the omentum has been rarely reported, its clinical information is very limited. The authors encountered a case of yolk sac tumor originated from the omentum, and reported the case herein. A 32-year-old woman was presented with developed low abdominal distension for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were suggestive of ovarian malignancy with ascites and peritoneal seeding nodules. Explorative laparotomy was performed and then the findings from frozen biopsy of omentum were suggestive of poorly differentiated tumor though whether it was primary or metastatic was uncertain. Thus, staging laparotomy were performed. Histopathology confirmed that the tumor was a yolk sac tumor of omentum origin. Then, 6 cycles of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy at intervals of 3 weeks were performed using bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin regimen. Four-year outpatient follow-up thereafter showed no relapse. PMID:24396822

  20. Proton Therapy for Thoracoabdominal Tumors

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tokuuye, Koichi

    In advanced-stage disease of certain thoracoabdominal tumors, proton therapy (PT) with concurrent chemotherapy may be an option to reduce side effects. Several technological developments, including a respiratory gating system and implantation of fiducial markers for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), are necessary for the treatment in thoracoabdominal tumors. In this chapter, the role of PT for tumors of the lung, the esophagus, and liver are discussed.

  1. Treatment of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Karajannis, Matthias; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Newcomb, Elizabeth W.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decades considerable advances have been made in neurosurgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy resulting in improved survival and cure rates for children with brain tumors. Here we review four of the most common subtypes of pediatric brain tumors, low-grade and high-grade astrocytomas, medulloblastomas and ependymomas, highlighting their molecular features regarding their tumor biology and promising potential therapeutic targets that may hold promise for finding new “molecularly ta...

  2. Modeling Tumor Microenvironments In Vitro

    Wu, Mingming; Melody A Swartz

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression depends critically upon the interactions between the tumor cells and their microenvironment. The tumor microenvironment is heterogeneous and dynamic; it consists of extracellular matrix, stromal cells, immune cells, progenitor cells, and blood and lymphatic vessels. The emerging fields of tissue engineering and microtechnologies have opened up new possibilities for engineering physiologically relevant and spatially well-defined microenvironments. These in vitro models allow ...

  3. Sclerosing Stromal Tumor of Ovary

    Hsiu-Huei Peng; Ting-Chang Chang; Swei Hsueh

    2003-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary is a rare ovarian disease with prevalence of 1.5%to 6% of ovarian stromal tumors. We present a 24-year-old woman with irregular menstruationfor 6 months and a self-palpable lower abdominal mass. Enucleation of the left ovariantumor was undertaken. Gross examination showed a soft elastic tumor with a smooth outersurface and diffusely white edematous stroma with scattered yellowish nodular areas on thecut surface. Histologic study showed that the cellular n...

  4. Primary omental yolk sac tumor

    Lim, Seon Hwa; Kim, Yon Hee; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Tae; KIM, SUNGHOON

    2013-01-01

    Extra-ovarian yolk sac tumor arising in the omentum is extremely rare. As yolk sac tumor originated from the omentum has been rarely reported, its clinical information is very limited. The authors encountered a case of yolk sac tumor originated from the omentum, and reported the case herein. A 32-year-old woman was presented with developed low abdominal distension for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were suggestive of ovarian malignancy with ascites and peritoneal seeding nodules...

  5. Monitoring Radiographic Brain Tumor Progression

    John H. Sampson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining radiographic progression in primary malignant brain tumors has posed a significant challenge to the neuroncology community. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO Grade IV through its inherent heterogeneous enhancement, growth patterns, and irregular nature has been difficult to assess for progression. Our ability to detect tumor progression radiographically remains inadequate. Despite the advanced imaging techniques, detecting tumor progression continues to be a clinical challenge. Here we review the different criteria used to detect tumor progression, and highlight the inherent challenges with detection of progression.

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in pituitary tumor

    Ashis Patnaik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is the bleeding into the subarachnoid space containing cerebrospinal fluid. The most common cause of SAH is trauma. Rupture of aneurysms, vascular anomalies, tumor bleeds and hypertension are other important etiologies. SAH in the setting of pituitary tumor can result from various causes. It can be due to intrinsic tumor related pathology, injury to surrounding the vessel during the operative procedure or due to an associated aneurysm. We discuss the pathological mechanisms and review relevant literature related to this interesting phenomenon. Early and accurate diagnosis of the cause of the SAH in pituitary tumors is important, as this influences the management.

  7. Mast cell tumors: clinical management

    Mast cell tumors are commonly diagnosed in small animal practice; however, appropriate treatment and prognosis remain controversial. These tumors are considered malignant in dogs but generally are benign in cats. Mast cell tumors are associated with various clinical signs that are related to the release of biologic mediators from the granules of the neoplastic cells, and these signs may be the primary presenting complaint. Clinical staging as well as histopathologic grading are important in determining the treatment of choice and prognosis. Treatment consists of several options, including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. This article summarizes the available information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of mast cell tumors and makes recommendations for therapy

  8. [Tumor of the Parotid Gland].

    Pötzl, Teresa; Iselin, Sabine; Husner, Alexander

    2016-05-11

    Salivary gland tumors are a rare, histologically heterogeneous group of tumors which constitute approximately 4–6 % of all head and neck neoplasms. In 2/3 of cases they are benign, especially in the parotid gland. We report about a rare tumor of the parotid gland presenting as an extraskeletal chondroma. Histologically there were multiple S 100 protein-positive nests of chondrocytes. The externally completed cytology suspected a pleomorphic adenoma, nevertheless, the final histopathological findings showed another tumor entity. PMID:27167480

  9. Surgical Treatment in Uveal Tumors

    Kaan Gündüz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment in uveal tumors can be done via iridectomy, partial lamellar sclerouvectomy (PLSU and endoresection. Iridectomy is done in iris tumors without angle and ciliary body involvement. PLSU is performed in tumors with ciliary body and choroidal involvement. For this operation, a partial thickness scleral flap is dissected, the intraocular tumor is excised, and the flap is sutured back in position. PLSU surgery is done in iridociliary and ciliary body tumors with less than 3 clock hours of iris and ciliary body involvement and in choroidal tumors with a base diameter less than 15 mm. However, it can be employed in any size tumor for biopsy purposes. Potential complications of PLSU surgery include vitreous hemorrhage, cataract, retinal detachment, and endophthalmitis. Endoresection is a technique whereby the intraocular tumor is excised using vitrectomy techniques. The rationale for performing endoresection is based on the fact that irradiated uveal melanomas may be associated with exudation and neovascular glaucoma and removing the dead tumor tissue may contribute to better visual outcome. There are some centers where endoresection is done without prior radiotherapy. Allegedly, avoidance of radiation retinopathy and papillopathy are the main advantages of using endoresection without prior radiotherapy. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: Supplement 29-34

  10. Polarography of Walker tumor submitted to radiotherapy

    A polarographic study of oxigen was done in 57 rats inoculated with walker 256 tumor and Platinum electrode implanted in muscle and in tumor. The goal of the research was the study of oxygen in tumor before and after irradiation. Tumor growth caused a decrease in tumoral oxygen. Oxigen was always lower in the tumor than in the muscle. Radiotherapy with 2000 rad (but not with 1000 rad) increased oxygen in the tumor

  11. [Ovarian germ cell tumors in girls].

    Nechushkina, I V; Karseladze, A I

    2015-01-01

    Morphological structure of tumor influences on the clinical course of the disease in children with germ cell tumors. Patients with ovarian dysgerminoma at the time of diagnosis are significantly older than patients with immature teratoma and yolk sac tumor. Immature teratoma and mixed germ cell tumors are significantly larger compared to other germ cell tumors. Yolk sac tumor and embryonal carcinoma are the most common cause of emergency surgical interventions and are accompanied by rupture of tumor capsule. PMID:26087605

  12. Hepatic tumor volumetry

    Accurate CT quantification of hepatic tumor volume in sequential CT studies of oncology patients could provide a reliable morphologic marker of disease response to chemotherapy. At present, estimates of morphologic response are based on number and size of individual lesions. In this paper three-dimensional (3D) technique is presented. A filtering program is applied to all two-dimensional (2D) sections to increase signal-to-noise ratio while maintaining boundary delineation. A CT number histogram of normal and abnormal intrahepatic tissue derived from a representative 2D section is applied in sequence to contiguous 2D sections in 3D space. A user graphics tool is available to correct for false delineation

  13. Pediatric Intracerebral Tumors

    Ersin Haciyakupoglu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Histopathology, appearance, biological behaviour, cytogenesis, molecular biology, physiology and effects on the brain development of the pediatric intracerebral tumors are completely different from the tumours in adults. In adults, glioblastoma multiforme and meningiomas are seen mostly, but in children pilocytic astrocytoma, medulloblastoma and germ cell tumours are more common. When pediatric intracerebral tumours are detected, families should be supported and the physcosocial trauma affecting the family should be reduced. As pediatric intracranial tumours are located mostly in the midline, neurological symptoms of them are quite faint. As cerebrospinal fluid paths are obstructed, increased intracranial pressure symptoms appear. Special anesthetic and surgical techniques should be performed for children. Stereotactic surgery, neuroendoscopy, functional and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and neuromonitoring could be used. Radiotherapy (in patients aged 3 and more years old, stereotactic radiosurgery, chemotherapy and gene therapies could be performed as the other treatment modalities. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 367-386

  14. Gynecological tumors; Gynaekologische Tumoren

    Zimny, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Nitzsche, E.U. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearmedizin

    2000-09-01

    Early diagnosis and accurate staging of gynecological tumors based on noninvasive imaging remains a challenge. US, CT and MRI lack sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis and staging of primary disease, residual mass and recurrent disease. FDG-PET may add some important diagnostic information, but currently available results from initial studies indicate that it will not replace other staging tools for specific questions to be answered during work-up. (orig.) [German] Fruehdiagnose und korrekte nichtinvasive bildgebende Ausbreitungsdiagnostik von gynaekologischen Tumorerkrankungen sind vorerst weiterhin eine Illusion. US, CT und MRI erreichen bisher keine akzeptable Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet in der Primaertumordiagnostik, Tumorresiduendiagnostik und Tumorrezidivdiagnostik. Die FDG-PET wird moeglicherweise wichtige Informationen bezueglich Lymphknotenbefall und Fernmetastasierung sowie Rezidivdetektion beitragen koennen, initiale Studienergebnisse zeigen jedoch, dass sie etablierte Staginguntersuchungen gegenwaertig nicht ersetzen kann. (orig.)

  15. Cystic tumors of Pancreas

    Case material consists of five patients, four of them corresponding to cystic tumors of pancreas and one to a pseudocyst which, as literature tells us, is often difficult to differentiate from the former.There is a description of main clinical and image aspects and the conduct applied there to. This subject is in full process of development and new pathology grading is applied although the last word has yet to be said. It is very difficult to reach exact diagnosis in the pre and in the intra operative stage. As they tend to be malignant, surgical resection is advised, however without discarding enucleation.Whenever they are malignant prognosis in general is better than in the case of solid pancreatic cancer

  16. Cystic tumors of Pancreas

    Case material consist of five patients, four of them corresponding to cystic tumors of Pancreas and one to pseudocyst which, as literature tells us, is often difficult to differentiate from the former.There is a description of main clinical and image aspects and the conduct applied thereto. This subject is in full process of development and a new pathology grading is applied although the last word has yet to be said. It is very difficult to reach exact diagnosis in the pre-and in the intra-operative stage.As they tend to be malignant, surgical resection is advised, however without discarding enucleation.Whenever they are malignant prognosis in general is better than in the case of solid pancreatic cancers

  17. Cathepsins mediate tumor metastasis

    Gong-Jun; Tan; Zheng-Ke; Peng; Jin-Ping; Lu; Fa-Qing; Tang

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsins are highly expressed in various human cancers, associated with tumor metastasis. It is superfamily, concluding A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, L, K, O, S, V, and W family members. As a group of lysosomal proteinases or endopeptidases, each member has a different function, playing different roles in distinct tumorigenic processes such as proliferation, angiogenesis, metastasis, and invasion. Cathepsins belong to a diverse number of enzyme subtypes, including cysteine proteases, serine proteases and aspartic proteases. The contribution of cathepsins to invasion in human cancers is well documented, although the precise mechanisms by which cathepsins exert their effects are still not clear. In the present review, the role of cathepsin family members in cancer is discussed.

  18. Familial germ cell tumor

    Sanju Cyriac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial testicular germ cell tumors are well known in literature. Only few cases are reported where both brother and sister of the same family suffered from germ cell malignancies. We present a family where the proband is a survivor of ovarian dysgerminoma stage IA. Her elder male sibling became acutely ill and was detected to have disseminated testicular malignancy with grossly elevated markers and vegetations in the mitral valve leaflets. Despite all measures he could not be saved. Presence of germ cell malignancies in the siblings of different sex in the same family points toward a genetic susceptibility. Literature review revealed only six similar cases. A discussion regarding the rare occurrence of familial germ cell malignancies with the affected family members may be worthwhile.

  19. From oncogenes to tumor antigens

    This book presents 26 manuscripts which comprise comprehensive reviews and recent experimental data from four main areas of cancer research: oncogenes, transforming proteins and growth factors; immunodeficiencies and tumors; new markers for tumor immunodiagnosis; and prospects of immunological cancer treatment. (Auth.)

  20. [Recent advances in transmissible tumors].

    Tingting, Yin; Lu, Wang; Guodong, Wang

    2015-11-01

    Transmissible tumors are a class of tumor that can be transmitted between individuals through living cells. So far, four types of transmissible tumors including canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT),Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), soft-shell clams leukemia (SSCL), and hamsters reticulum cell sarcoma (HRCS)have been discovered and identified. In the last decades, these transmissible tumors have been proved to be transmitted through living cells by cytological, histological and genetic studies. CTVT, the oldest mammalian somatic cell line, and DFTD originated from Schwann cell have been reported to avoid immunological recognition by down-regulating MHC expression, while a high copy number of Steamer retrotransposon is commonly exist in SSCL. In recent years, the whole-genome sequencing of CTVT and DFTD have been completed which facilitates studies on the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, transmission and evolution of transmissible tumors at the whole-genome level. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in transmissible tumors and discuss the research focus in next decade. PMID:26582522