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Sample records for adaptive response induced

  1. Radiation-induced preventive bystander response and adaptive response

    Radiation-induced bystander response (BR) is a phenomenon not observed in cells irradiated directly but in cells nearby. Recently, the relationship between BR and adaptive response (AR) has been studied and BR is suggested to be one of important mechanisms involved in AR induction through key molecules like reactive oxygen (RO) and nitrogen species. In this paper, the possible contribution of BR to AR is discussed on recent findings including author's ones. Many biological responses in bystander cells, cultured tissues and mice by cell-cell communication molecules such as cytokines and nitrogen oxide (NO) have been elucidated for BR to involve the cell death, sister chromatid exchange, chromosome instability, mutation, increased/ decreased p53 level, etc. However, BR has been recently found to contain biologically favorable events like the increase of radio-resistance and of cellular take rate and decrease of micronucleus formation through NO by X-ray and HIMAC C-ion. AR is observed in irradiated cell population with previous exposure to low dose and involves the above mentioned biologically favorable responses, which having lead to the possible interrelationship between BR and AR. Together with findings obtained hitherto, hypothesized is that AR is induced in bystander cells through a sequence of signals of evoked radicals like RO/ NO by pre-irradiation, and of consequent intermediating molecules like transforming growth factor (TGF)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1 and estrogen to activate NF-KB for inducing COX-2 and NO synthase, which resulting in stimulation of damaged DNA repairing mechanism and of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade that constructs the signaling between plasma membrane and nucleus. (K.T.)

  2. Adaptive response induced by occupational exposures to ionizing radiation

    We have found a significant decreased sensitivity to the cytogenetic effects of ionizing radiation (IR) and bleomycin (BLM) in lymphocytes from individuals occupationally exposed to IR when compared with a control population. These results suggest that occupational exposures to IR can induce adaptive response that can be detected by a subsequent treatment by IR or by BLM. However, no correlation between the results obtained with both treatments was observed. A great heterogeneity in the frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by BLM was observed. The study of the influence of different harvesting times showed that there was no correlation with the frequencies of chromatid breaks. Our results indicate that the use of BLM to detect adaptive response has several difficulties at the individual level. (author)

  3. Adaptive response induced by occupational exposures to ionizing radiation

    We have found a significant decreased sensitivity to the cytogenetic effects of both ionizing radiation (IR) (2 Gy of γ rays) and bleomycin (BLM, 0,03 U/ml), in lymphocytes from individuals occupationally exposed to IR when compared with controls. These results suggest that occupational exposures to IR can induce adaptive response that can be detected by a subsequent treatment either by IR or by BLM. When a comparison is made between the cytogenetic effects of both treatments, no correlation was observed at the individual level. On the other hand, the individual frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by a challenge dose of IR were negatively correlated with the occupationally received doses during the last three years. This correlation was not observed after the challenge treatment of BLM. Moreover, the individual frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by IR treatment were homogeneous. This is not the case of the individual frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by BLM, where a great heterogeneity was observed. (authors)

  4. Adaptive responses induced in vivo by low level tritium contamination

    Single cells or whole organisms can often improve their ability to respond to a challenging irradiation after being previously exposed to a lower 'adaptive' amount of a similar stress. A consistent collection of experimental data exists proving that low doses of irradiation trigger adaptive responses in mammalian cells in vitro with respect to cell survival and mutation, induction of chromosome aberrations or micronuclei, DNA strand-breaks or synthesis of new proteins. Adaptive responses have been reported to occur also in vivo in bone marrow, blood cells and germ cells following low dose irradiation of animals. The investigated end-points have been the animal survival or cytogenetic effects. Doses used for the initiation of adaptive responses in vivo are within the range of 1-50 cGy with challenging doses between 0.75-6 Gy. Concerning the molecular mechanisms it is generally postulated that radioadaptation could result from activation of damage repair. Another hypothesis points to a mechanism related to the ability of cells to eliminate the toxic radicals generated through oxidative stress by the activation of antioxidant defense systems. It is however accepted that the upregulation of antioxidant defense is only partly responsible for the whole protection mechanism that governs the adaptive response. The alterations after in vivo irradiation appear to be dependent on the post-irradiation interval time and on the dose level. Very few information is available concerning the correlation between the radiosensitivity of cells or tissues and the capability to develop an adaptive reaction. Some new data were provided by our research group by examining whether adaptive response could be elicited in vivo by 7 or 35 cGy irradiation (low LET) delivered in a chronically regime (internal contamination of rats with tritiated water) and observed after subsequent 1 Gy high LET challenging irradiation (with fast neutrons). The end-points addressed to the evaluation of the

  5. Understanding the role of p53 in adaptive response to radiation-induced germline mutations

    Full text: Radiation-induced adaptive response is now a widely studied area of radiation biology. Studies have demonstrated reduced levels of radiation-induced biological damage when an 'adaptive dose' is given before a higher 'challenge dose' compared to when the challenge dose is given alone. It has been shown in some systems to be a result of inducible cellular repair systems. The adaptive response has been clearly demonstrated in many model systems, however its impact on heritable effects in the mammalian germline has never been studied. Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) loci have been used as markers demonstrating that induced heritable mutations in mice follow a dose-response relationship. Recent data in our laboratory show preliminary evidence of radiation-induced adaptive response suppressing germline mutations at ESTR loci in wild type mice. The frequency of heritable mutations was significantly reduced when a priming dose of 0.1 Gy was given 24 hours prior to a 1 Gy acute challenging dose. We are now conducting a follow-up study to attempt to understand the mechanism of this adaptive response. P53 is known to play a significant role in governing apoptosis, DNA repair and cancer induction. In order to determine what function p53 has in the adaptive response for heritable mutations, we have mated radiation treated Trp53+/- male mice (C57Bl) to untreated, normal females (C57Bl). Using DNA fingerprinting, we are investigating the rate of inherited radiation-induced mutations on pre- and post-meiotic radiation-treated gametocytes by examining mutation frequencies in offspring DNA. If p53 is integral in the mechanism of adaptive response, we should not see an adaptive response in radiation-induced heritable mutations in these mice. This research is significant in that it will provide insight to understanding the mechanism behind radiation-induced adaptive response in the mammalian germline

  6. Human population structure and the adaptive response to pathogen-induced selection pressures

    Novembre, John; Han, Eunjung

    2012-01-01

    The past few years of research in human evolutionary genetics have provided novel insights and questions regarding how human adaptations to recent selective pressures have taken place. Here, we review the advances most relevant to understanding human evolution in response to pathogen-induced selective pressures. Key insights come from theoretical models of adaptive evolution, particularly those that consider spatially structured populations, and from empirical population genomic studies of ad...

  7. Study on cellular survival adaptive response induced by low dose irradiation of 153Sm

    The present study engages in determining whether low dose irradiation of 153Sm could cut down the responsiveness of cellular survival to subsequent high dose exposure of 153Sm so as to make an inquiry into approach the protective action of adaptive response by second irradiation of 153Sm. Experimental results indicate that for inductive low dose of radionuclide 153Sm 3.7 kBq/ml irradiated beforehand to cells has obvious resistant effect in succession after high dose irradiation of 153Sm 3.7 x 102 kBq/ml was observed. Cells exposed to low dose irradiation of 153Sm become adapted and therefore the subsequent cellular survival rate induced by high dose of 153Sm is sufficiently higher than high dose of 153Sm merely. It is evident that cellular survival adaptive response could be induced by pure low dose irradiation of 153Sm only

  8. Effect and adaptive response of lymphocytes DNA induced by low dose irradiation

    Fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) was conducted and was proved to be an optimal method for studying DNA strand breaks induced by low dose irradiation. The linear dose response curve was obtained. The minimum detected dose was 0.3 Gy. There was no effect of low dose γ-rays (0.5∼8.0 cGy) on DNA strand breaks of quiescent and mitogen-induced lymphocytes. The 0.5∼4.0 cGy γ-rats could induce adaptive response of lymphocytes' DNA strand breaks, especially, at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 cGy. The challenge doses of 5∼20 Gy could make the adaptive response appearance, and the 15 Gy was the best one. The 3-AB could powerfully inhibit the adaptive response. The repair of DNA strand breaks (37 degree C, 15∼60 min) caused by 15 Gy γ-rays could be promoted by the low dose γ-ray irradiation (2.0 cGy), but no difference was found at 37 degree C, 120 min

  9. Adaptive response to ionising radiation induced by cadmium in zebrafish embryos

    An adaptive response is a biological response where the exposure of cells or animals to a low priming exposure induces mechanisms that protect the cells or animals against the detrimental effects of a subsequent larger challenging exposure. In realistic environmental situations, living organisms can be exposed to a mixture of stressors, and the resultant effects due to such exposures are referred to as multiple stressor effects. In the present work we demonstrated, via quantification of apoptosis in the embryos, that embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) subjected to a priming exposure provided by one environmental stressor (cadmium in micromolar concentrations) could undergo an adaptive response against a subsequent challenging exposure provided by another environmental stressor (alpha particles). We concluded that zebrafish embryos treated with 1 to 10 μM Cd at 5 h postfertilisation (hpf) for both 1 and 5 h could undergo an adaptive response against subsequent ∼4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation at 10 hpf, which could be interpreted as an antagonistic multiple stressor effect between Cd and ionising radiation. The zebrafish has become a popular vertebrate model for studying the in vivo response to ionising radiation. As such, our results suggested that multiple stressor effects should be carefully considered for human radiation risk assessment since the risk may be perturbed by another environmental stressor such as a heavy metal. (paper)

  10. Study on the adaptive response of mammalian cells induced by low dose radiation of carbon ions

    The effect of high LET carbon ions irradiation with low dose on V79 Chinese hamster cells and B16 melanoma cells were investigated. The cells were treated with inducing doses of 0.02 Gy and 0.05 Gy first, and then with challenge dose of 1 Gy after-additional culture of 4h. The adaptive responses including survival fraction and micronucleus frequency were studied. Authors' results showed that when the inducing dose was chosen as 0.02 Gy, there were marked increase of surviving fraction and decrease of micronucleus frequency in both cell lines. On the contrary, when the inducing dose was chosen as 0.05 Gy, there was no statistical change of surviving fraction, furthermore, the micronucleus frequency increased a little. This meant that high LET radiation of 0.02 Gy could induce the adaptive response of cultured cells while 0.05 Gy can not. Meanwhile, there was a good linear relationship between micronucleus frequency and surviving fraction, cells pre-exposed to low dose such as 0.02 Gy had low micronucleus frequency and high surviving fraction

  11. Influence of adaptative response to low dose radiation on radiation-induced thymic lymphoma in mice

    Objective: To search for influence of low dose radiation (LDR) on thymic lymphoma (TL) induced by carcinogenic dose radiation in C57BL /6J mice and its immunologic mechanism. Methods: The model was adopted that C57BL/6J mice were subjected to whole body irradiation with 1.75 Gy X-ray once every week for 4 weeks to induce TL. The incidence of TL was observed by microscopy 6 months after irradiation. The following indexes were examined:splenic NK cytotoxic activity, IL-2 and γ- IFN secretion activity, peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis and its TNFα secretion activity, the changes of thymocyte differentiation in mice irradiated with different dose 1 month after irradiation. Results: The incidences of Tl in mice irradiated with 25mGy or 75m Gy 6h or 12h before 1.75Gy irradiation were all lower than that in mice irradiated with 1.75Gy only, and it is more obvious in mice irradiated with 75mGy prior to carcinogenic dose radiation. Immune parameters mentioned above in mice irradiated with 75mGy 12h before 1.75Gy were higher than those in mice irradiated with 1.75 only and the majority approached to those of the sham-irradiated mice. The number of thymic CD4-CD8 cells or CD4-CD8- cells was lower and CD4+CD 8+ cells was higher in mice irradiated with 75mGy 12h before 1.75Gy than that in mice irradiated with 1.75Gy only. Conclusion: LDR can induce the adaptative response of radiation-induced TL, and prevent or reduce the onset of radiation-induced TL. The suppression mechanism may be related to the immuno-enhancement effect and the adaptive response induced by LDR, decreasing immune function damage caused by carcinogenic dose radiation, eliminating thymic pre-lymphoma cells before they from solid tumor

  12. Adaptive Response Against Spontaneous Neoplastic Transformation In Vitro Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    The goal of this project was to establish a dose response curve for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells in vitro under experimental conditions were an adaptive response, if it were induced, would have an opportunity to be expressed. During the first two years of the grant an exhaustive series of experiments were performed and the resulting data were reported at the 2000 Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society and then Subsequently published. The data showed that an adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation was seen up to doses of 10cGy of Cs-137 gamma rays. At dose of 30, 50 and 100 cGy the transformation frequencies were above background. This indicated that for this system, under the specific experimental conditions used, there was a threshold of somewhere between 10 and 30 cGy. The results also indicated some unexpected, though very interesting, correlations with relative risk estimates made from human epidemiologic studies

  13. Plant natriuretic peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-26

    In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs). PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologs are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0) cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM) concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO) terms “oxidation-reduction process,” “translation” and “response to salt stress” and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions.

  14. Plant Natriuretic Peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    Ilona eTurek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs. PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologues are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0 cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO terms oxidation-reduction process, translation and response to salt stress and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions.

  15. Inducible protective processes in animal systems XIV: Cytogenetic adaptive response induced by EMS or MMS in bone marrow cells of diabetic mouse

    B.B. Dada Khalandar

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: (1 Methylating agents are a more effective inducer of adaptive response than ethylating agents in diabetic mouse. (2 Further, it is interesting to note that the percentage reduction of chromosomal breaks in diabetics is comparatively much less than in non diabetic mouse, inferring that there is variation in adaptive response between diseased and non diseased condition.

  16. In vivo study of the adaptive response induced by radiation of different types

    Low doses of X- and gamma-rays are known to induce the adaptive response (AR), i.e. a reduction in the damage caused by subsequent high doses. Using micronucleus test, we investigated the in vivo induction of AR in mouse bone marrow cells by low doses of radiation of different types. In our experiments we used low-LET gamma-radiation, high-LET secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons and secondary biogenic radiation. The latter is a novel type of radiation discovered only recently. Secondary biogenic radiation is known to be induced in biological objects after exposure to radiation and thought to be responsible for stimulating and protecting effects in cells in response to external irradiation. To expose mice to the secondary biogenic radiation, animals were housed in plastic cages containing gamma-irradiated oat seeds as bedding and food for 2 weeks before challenging with a high dose (1.5 Gy at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min) of 60Co gamma-radiation. It was found that the yield of cytogenetic damage in mice exposed to both secondary biogenic and gamma-radiation was significantly reduced as compared to that in animals exposed to the challenge dose alone, i.e. the AR was induced. Pretreatment of animals with a low dose of gamma-radiation (0.1 Gy at a dose rate of 0.125 Gy/min) also induced the AR. In contrast, preliminary exposure of mice to a low dose (0.09 Gy at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min) of secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons induced no AR, suggesting that triggering the cascade of events leading to the AR induction depends on the DNA single-strand to double- strand breaks ratio. The precise mechanisms underlying the AR are of great importance since the phenomenon of AR can be used for medical benefits and in assessment of risks for carcinogens. But they have not been elucidated well at present. Taken together, our results suggest the crucial role of particular types of initial DNA lesions and the secondary biogenic radiation induced in cells in response to external

  17. Adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes

    The term adaptive response (AR) applies to the phenomenon of protection or enhanced repair induced by a small dose of a mutagenic agent. In order to determine the existence of AR in human lymphocytes for two different irradiation schemes, microcultures of blood from 4 donors were irradiated. Samples were exposed 24 hours (hr) after phytohemagglutinin stimulation to an adapting dose of 0,01 Gy and to a challenging dose of 1,5 Gy either 6 or 24 hr later (irradiation scheme 24+30 or 24+48, respectively). Gamma radiation from a 2,5 MeV Linac was used in all experiments. A cytogenetic analysis of unstable chromosome aberrations was applied as the endpoint. High inter-individual variability was found for the first irradiation scheme: one expressed AR, two did not and the last showed an apparent synergistic response. For the second irradiation scheme, low mitotic indices (MI) were found, suggesting a G2 arrest. When a series of harvesting times were applied for the last donor, normal MI were obtained only harvesting after 58 hr. An AR was found when harvesting at 72 hr but not at 58 hr. (author)

  18. Radio-adaptive response

    An adaptive response to radiation stress was found as a suppressed induction of chromosomal damage including micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells pre-exposed to very low doses of ionizing radiations. The mechanism underlying this novel chromosomal response, called 'radio-adaptive response (RAR)' has been studied progressively. The following results were obtained in recent experiments. 1. Low doses of β-rays from tritiated water (HTO) as well as tritium-thymidine can cause RAR. 2. Thermal neutrons, a high LET radiation, can not act as tritium β-rays or γ-rays. 3. The RAR expression is suppressed not only by the treatment with an inhibitor of protein synthesis but also by RNA synthesis inhibition. 4. Several proteins are newly synthesized concurrently with the RAR expression after the adapting doses, viewed by two-dimensional electrophoresis of cellular proteins. These results suggests that the RAR might be a cellular stress response to a signal produced preferentially by very low doses of low LET radiation under restricted conditions, accompany the inducible specific gene expression. (author)

  19. Interval for the expression of the adaptive response induced by gamma radiation in leucocytes of mouse In vivo

    The interval between the adaptive gamma radiation dose (0.01 Gy) and challenge (1.0 Gy) capable to induce the maximum expression of the adaptive response in lymphocytes of mouse In vivo. The animals were exposed to the mentioned doses with different intervals among both (1, 1.5, 5 or 18 hr). By means of the unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique, four damage parameters were analysed. The results showed that from the 1 hr interval an adaptive response was produced since in the pretreated organisms with 0.01 Gy the cells present lesser damage than in those not adapted. The maximum response was induced with the intervals between 2.5 and 5 hr and even though it persisted until 18 hr, the effect was reducing. (Author)

  20. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van, E-mail: Stephan.vanEeden@hli.ubc.ca

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  1. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 μm or less, PM10) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 μm or less, PM2.5) and ultrafine particles (0.1 μm or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-κB and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-κB pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  2. Adaptive Response to ionizing Radiation Induced by Low Doses of Gamma Rays in Human Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    When cells are exposed to low doses of a mutagenic or clastogenic agents, they often become less sensitive to the effects of a higher does administered subsequently. Such adaptive responses were first described in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells to low doses of an alkylating agent. Since most of the studies have been carried out with human lymphocytes, it is urgently necessary to study this effect in different cellular systems. Its relation with inherent cellular radiosensitivity and underlying mechanism also remain to be answered. In this study, adaptive response by 1 cGy of gamma rays was investigated in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines which were derived from ataxia telangiectasia homozygote, ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote, and normal individual. Experiments were carried out by delivering 1 cGy followed by 50 cGy of gamma radiation and chromatid breaks were scored as an endpoint. The results indicate that prior exposure to 1 cGy of gamma rays reduces the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher does (50 cGy). The expression of this adaptive response was similar among three cell lines despite of their different radiosensitivity. When 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added after 50 cGy, adaptive responses were abolished in all the tested cell lines. Therefore it is suggested that the adaptive response can be observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Which was first documented through this study. The expression of adaptive response was similar among the cell lines regardless of their radiosensitivity. The elimination of the adaptive response by 3-aminobenzamide is consistent with the proposal that this adaptive response is the result of the induction of a certain chromosomal repair mechanism

  3. Relationship between radiation induced adaptive response in human fibroblasts and changes in chromatin conformation

    Ya. Belyaev, Igor [Department of Radiation Physics, Biophysics and Ecology, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russia); Spivak, Irina M.; Kolman, Ada; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Department of Radiobiology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-11-04

    Chromatin conformation changes in the normal human fibroblasts VH-10 were studied by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD). Gamma-irradiation of cells in a dose range of 0.1-3 Gy caused an increase in maximal viscosity of cell lysates. Conversely, irradiation of cells with low doses of 0.5 or 2 cGy resulted in a decrease in the AVTD peaks with a maximum effect approximately 40 min after irradiation. The same exposure conditions were used to study a possible adaptive effect of low doses, measured by changes in cell survival. A primary dose of 2 cGy caused significant modification of cell response to a challenge dose. Approximately 20% protection to challenge doses of 0.5 Gy (p<0.003), 2 Gy (p<0.02) and 2.5 Gy (p<0.002) was observed. However, the direction of this effect (adaptation or synergism) was found to be dependent on a challenge dose. The combined effect of 2 cGy and 1 Gy was significantly synergistic, while no modification was observed for 1.5 Gy and 3 Gy. A partial correlation was found between the AVTD changes and cell survival when the combined effect of a primary dose of 2 cGy and challenge dose was examined. The dose of 2 cGy alone increased survival by 16% (p<0.0003). These results suggest that the low-dose induced effects on survival may be related to chromatin reorganization.

  4. Hippocampal adaptive response following extensive neuronal loss in an inducible transgenic mouse model.

    Kristoffer Myczek

    Full Text Available Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for the formation and retrieval of memories. Long-lasting and sometimes unrecoverable deficits caused by neuronal loss present a unique challenge for clinicians and for researchers who attempt to model these traumas in animals. Can these deficits be recovered, and if so, is the brain capable of regeneration following neuronal loss? To address this significant question, we utilized the innovative CaM/Tet-DT(A mouse model that selectively induces neuronal ablation. We found that we are able to inflict a consistent and significant lesion to the hippocampus, resulting in hippocampally-dependent behavioral deficits and a long-lasting upregulation in neurogenesis, suggesting that this process might be a critical part of hippocampal recovery. In addition, we provide novel evidence of angiogenic and vasculature changes following hippocampal neuronal loss in CaM/Tet-DTA mice. We posit that angiogenesis may be an important factor that promotes neurogenic upregulation following hippocampal neuronal loss, and both factors, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, can contribute to the adaptive response of the brain for behavioral recovery.

  5. Can previous thyroid scan induce cytogenetic radio adaptive response in patients treated by radioiodine for hyperthyroidism?

    Background: Induction of radio adaptive responses in cells pretreated with a low dose radiation before exposure to a high dose is well documented by many in investigators. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of chromosomal aberration in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated by radioiodine (131 I) for hyperthyroidism, with or without previous thyroid scan with 99m Tc. Materials and methods: venous blood samples were obtained from 35 patients one month after radioiodine therapy and cytogenetic ally evaluated using analysis of metaphase in two groups. The first group (n=15, 13 females and 2 males, mean age=44.7±11.5 years and mean weight 74.4±7.9 Kg) received 5 mCi 99m Tc for thyroid scanning 38.6±19.9 days before radioiodine therapy with 10.4±3.4 mCi 131I. The second group (n=20, 14 females and 6 males, mean age=41.0±10.8 years and mean weight=68.1±9.2 Kg) didn't have history of thyroid scanning. We also studied a control group (n=29, 11 females and 8 males age=33.7±7.4 and mean weight=70.0±8.8 Kg) who didn't have any history of diagnostic or therapeutic and also occupational exposure. Results: The mean frequency of total chromosomal aberrations in the first and second groups and controls were 1.46±1.55, 1.65±1.62 and 0.93±0.92 respectively. Results also showed that the mean frequency of total chromosome aberration in two groups were higher than controls and significantly higher in patients who had not received 99m Tc compared those who had undertaken thyroid scan before radioiodine therapy (p=0.03). Conclusion: These findings may indicate the fact that the radiation dose received from 99m Tc could induce resistance to subsequent higher radiation dose of 131 I in peripheral blood lymphocytes and it might be due to cytogenetic radio adaptive response

  6. Survival adaptive response in rats induced by some common radiographic procedures

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Low dose irradiation suppresses the molecular responses against a subsequent high dose irradiation. Survival adaptive response can be defined as increased survival of laboratory animals pre-exposed to a conditioning (adapting) dose after irradiation with a high (challenge) dose. In this study, the induction of survival adaptive response is investigated in rats exposed to x-rays generated by a common radiographic machine followed by a challenge irradiation. Methods: Twenty rats (average weight of 200g) were divided randomly into four groups each consisting of 5 animals. The 1st-3rd groups were pre-exposed to 3 different common diagnostic levels of x-rays; low (0.22±0.03 mGy; mean±SD), intermediate (0.43±0.05 mGy) and high (0.93±0.10 mGy). These entrance surface doses were similar to doses received in common radiographic procedures. The 4th group was only sham exposed to x-rays. Twenty four hours after conditioning dose, a Cs-137 source was used for irradiating all animals with a sublethal challenge dose of 7 Gy. Results: Two weeks after the irradiation with challenge dose, 2, 3, 5 and 2 animals survived in 1st to 4th groups respectively. Thirty days after irradiation with challenge dose, 2, 1, 4 and 2 animals survived in 1st to 4th group respectively. The observed differences in survival rates in either 1st or 2nd group with the 4th group were not statistically significant. Although the animals in the 3rd group (high adapting dose) had a higher survival rate compared to either 1st and 2nd groups or the 4th group, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: These findings may confirm the previous reports that indicated the existence of a narrow window of adapting doses for induction of adaptive response.

  7. Persistence and prevention of aluminium- and paraquat-induced adaptive response to methyl mercuric chloride in plant cells in vivo.

    Patra, Jita; Sahoo, Malaya K; Panda, Brahma B

    2003-07-01

    Induction and persistence of adaptive response by aluminium (Al), 1 or 10 microM, and paraquat (PQ), 5 or 10 microM, against genotoxicity of methyl mercuric chloride (MMCl), 1.26 microM, a standard environmental genotoxin, was investigated in root meristem cells of Allium cepa. Subsequently, three metabolic inhibitors, namely, 3-aminobezamide (3-AB, 10 or 100 microM), an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) implicated in DNA repair and/or apoptosis, cycloheximide (CH, 0.1 or 1 microM), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, 100 microM or 1mM), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis were tested for their ability to prevent the adaptive response induced by conditioning doses of Al, 10 or 100 microM; and PQ, 5 or 100 microM, against MMCl-challenge, 1.26 or 100 microM, in root meristems of A. cepa or embryonic shoots of Hordeum vulgare, respectively. The findings demonstrated that once triggered, the Al- or PQ-adaptive response to MMCl could persist for at least 48h in root meristems of A. cepa. Furthermore, the adaptive response could effectively be prevented by 3-AB, to a lesser degree by CH, and the least by BSO, suggesting primarily the involvement of PARP and implicating DNA repair in the underlying mechanisms of adaptive response in plant cells in vivo. PMID:12834754

  8. Low dose radiation induced adaptive response upon salt stress and vacuum stress: a possible mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose response curve

    To explore mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose-response curve, the relationship of irradiation-vacuum stress, and irradiation-salt stress, was investigated with rice seeds irradiated to 60-560 Gy by 60Co γ-rays. The dose-response curve was simulated based on seedling height data, which showed obedient to linear-quadratic model. During germination,the irradiated rice seeds were stressed by 10-3 Pa vacuum, or by NaCl in different concentrations. After that, the dose-response curve manifested a saddle-like shape. The results indicate that while low dose irradiation could retard seedling growth synergistically with vacuum stress and salt stress, it could also induce adaptive response upon vacuum stress and salt stress. Low dose irradiation induced adaptive response upon environmental adverse factors could contribute to the mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose-response curve. (authors)

  9. The absence of radiation-induced adaptive response in lymphocytes of patients with Down's syndrome

    The adaptive syndrome and response (AR) in lymphocytes from 6 patients with Down syndrome (DS) were investigated. No AR was found to occur in all cases in DS cells pre-exposed to 3 rad of X-rays in S phase of cell cycle and then irradiated with 150 rad of gamma rays in G2 whereas the chromosome aberrations yield in cells from control donors was decreased twice under such conditions of the experiment

  10. Inbreeding and adaptive plasticity: an experimental analysis on predator-induced responses in the water flea Daphnia.

    Swillen, Ine; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have emphasized that inbreeding depression (ID) is enhanced under stressful conditions. Additionally, one might imagine a loss of adaptively plastic responses which may further contribute to a reduction in fitness under environmental stress. Here, we quantified ID in inbred families of the cyclical parthenogen Daphnia magna in the absence and presence of fish predation risk. We test whether predator stress affects the degree of ID and if inbred families have a reduced capacity to respond to predator stress by adaptive phenotypic plasticity. We obtained two inbred families through clonal selfing within clones isolated from a fish pond. After mild purging under standardized conditions, we compared life history traits and adaptive plasticity between inbred and outbred lineages (directly hatched from the natural dormant egg bank of the same pond). Initial purging of lineages under standardized conditions differed among inbred families and exceeded that in outbreds. The least purged inbred family exhibited strong ID for most life history traits. Predator-induced stress hardly affected the severity of ID, but the degree to which the capacity for adaptive phenotypic plasticity was retained varied strongly among the inbred families. The least purged family overall lacked the capacity for adaptive phenotypic plasticity, whereas the family that suffered only mild purging exhibited a potential for adaptive plasticity that was comparable to the outbred population. We thus found that inbred offspring may retain the capacity to respond to the presence of fish by adaptive phenotypic plasticity, but this strongly depends on the parental clone engaging in selfing. PMID:26257883

  11. Neutron-induced adaptive response studied in go human lymphocytes using the comet assay.

    Gajendiran, N; Tanaka, K; Kumaravel, T S; Kamada, N

    2001-03-01

    This study demonstrates that cells adapted to ionizing radiation developed reduced initial DNA damage when compared to non-adapted cells. The results were obtained by subjecting in vitro irradiated whole blood from 10 healthy volunteers (including 2 A-bomb survivors carrying 1.5-2 Gy in vivo exposure) in an unstimulated condition (G0) using the comet assay. The intensity of DNA damage was assessed by computing the 'tail moment'. Adaptive response (AR) was noticed in only donor 3, as indicated by reduced tail moment when the blood samples received priming + challenging doses over a 4 h interval. The priming dose was either 0.01 Gy 137Cs gamma-rays or 0.0025 Gy 252Cf neutrons. The delivered challenging dose was either 1 Gy 60Co g-rays or 0.25 Gy 252Cf neutrons. The irradiation was conducted using the HIRRAC facility. A prior exposure to 0.0025 Gy 252Cf neutrons nullified the excess tail moment caused by 0.25 Gy neutrons given during a 4 h gap. In a similar way, 0.01 Gy 137Cs gamma-rays offered a cross-adaptive response to the neutron challenging dose. The tail moment of A-bomb survivors after in vitro irradiation was less than that of the age-matched control and, at the same time, was not influenced by the priming dose. An altered subset and the immunological status of blood after A-bomb exposure were cited as possible factors. Because AR can affect the outcome of RBE, its individual variability only emphasizes the need to have individual biodosimetry for better risk assessment, especially in planning for a long space voyage. PMID:11393893

  12. Effects of inhibitors of protein kinase C and NO-synthase on the radiation-induced cytogenetic adaptive response in Chinese hamster cells in culture

    The effect of the serine-threonin kinase inhibitor - staurosporine and inhibitor of NO-synthase - L-NAME on the radiation-induced adaptive response were studied in fibroblasts of Chinese hamster in culture. It is shown that staurosporine and L-NAME inhibit cytogenetic adaptive response induced by β-particles in low doses. Inhibition is not connected with radiosensitizing effect of these agents. L-NAME decreases significantly the γ-rays-induced chromosome aberration yield also. Study confirms the role of protein kinase C in induction of the adaptive response and participation of NO-synthase in this process is noticed for the first time

  13. Characterization of the adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of X-rays to Vibrio cholerae cells

    Pretreatment with sublethal doses of X-rays induced an adaptive response in Vibrio cholerae cells as indicated by their greater resistance to the subsequent challenging doses of X-irradiation. The adaptive response was maximum following a pre-exposure dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays and an optimum incubation period of 40 min at 37C. Pre-exposure to a sublethal dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays made the Vibrio cholerae cells 3.38-fold more resistant to the subsequent challenge by X-rays. Pretreatment with a sublethal dose of hydrogen peroxide offered a similar degree of protection to the bacterial cells against subsequent treatment with challenging doses of X-ray radiation. However, exposure of Vibrio cholerae cells to mild heat (42C for 10 min) before X-ray irradiation decreased their survival following X-irradiation

  14. Low dose effects. Adaptive response

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate if there are disturbancies in adaptive response when lymphocytes of people living on the polluted with radionuclides area after Chernobyl disaster and liquidators suffered from accident have been investigated. The level of lymphocytes with micronuclei have been scored in Moscow donors and people living in Bryansk region with the degree of contamination 15 - 40 Ci/km. The doses that liquidators have been obtained were not higher then 25 cGy. The mean spontaneous level of MN in control people and people from Chernobyl zones does't differ significantly but the individual variability in the mean value between two populations does not differ significantly too. And in this case it seems that persons of exposed areas. Then another important fact in lymphocytes of people living on polluted areas the chronic low dose irradiation does not induce the adaptive response. In Moscow people in most cases (≅ 59 %) the adaptive response is observed and in some cases the demonstration of adaptive response is not significant (≅1%). In Chernobyl population exposed to chronic low level, low dose rate irradiation there are fewer people here with distinct adaptive response (≅38%). And there appear beings with increased radiosensitivity after conditioned dose. Such population with enhanced radiosensitivity have not observed in Moscow. In liquidators the same types of effects have been registered. These results have been obtained on adults. Adaptive response in children 8 - 14 old population living in Moscow and in Chernobyl zone have been investigated too. In this case the spontaneous level of MN is higher in children living in polluted areas, after the 1.0 Gy irradiation the individual variability is very large. Only 5 % of children have distinct is very large. Only 5 % of children have distinct adaptive response, the enhancement of radiosensitivity after conditioned dose is observed. (authors)

  15. Vanguards of paradigm shift in radiation biology. Radiation-induced adaptive and bystander responses

    The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv) are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation, using a linear no-threshold model (LNT model). However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose/low dose-rate radiation than they do to high dose/high dose-rate radiation. In other words, there are accumulated findings which cannot be explained by the classical ''target theory'' of radiation biology. The radioadaptive response, radiation-induced bystander effects, low-dose radio-hypersensitivity, and genomic instability are specifically observed in response to low dose/low dose-rate radiation, and the mechanisms underlying these responses often involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. Recently, correlations between the radioadaptive and bystander responses have been increasingly reported. The present review focuses on the latter two phenomena by summarizing observations supporting their existence, and discussing the linkage between them from the aspect of production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. (author)

  16. The adaptive response of human lymphocytes to very low doses of ionizing radiation: a case of induced chromosomal repair with the induction of specific proteins

    It appears that the adaptive response of human lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays can be mimicked by exposure to low levels of a truly radiomimetic compound, bleomycin, that induces double-strand breaks in DNA. Similarly, the adaptive response can be induced by exposure to low levels of H2O2, which produces reactive species similar to those induced by ionizing radiation. This adaptive response, which is attributed to the induction of a repair mechanism, i.e. repair enzymes, can be prevented if protein synthesis, and thus enzyme synthesis, is inhibited by cycloheximide at the crucial time (4-6 h) after exposure to the adaptive dose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has shown that 1 cGy of X-rays can reproducibly induce several proteins not found in unirradiated lymphocytes. These proteins are considered to be excellent candidates for the actual repair enzyme(s). (author)

  17. The threshold number of protons to induce an adaptive response in zebrafish embryos

    In this study, microbeam protons were used to provide the priming dose to induce an in vivo radioadaptive response (RAR) in the embryos of zebrafish, Danio rerio, against subsequent challenging doses provided by x-ray photons. The microbeam irradiation system (Single-Particle Irradiation System to Cell, acronym SPICE) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan, was employed. The embryos were dechorionated at 4 h post fertilisation (hpf) and irradiated at 5 hpf by microbeam protons. For each embryo, one irradiation point was chosen, to which 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 100, 200, 300 and 500 protons each with an energy of 3.4 MeV were delivered. The embryos were returned to the incubator until 10 hpf to further receive the challenging exposure, which was achieved using 2 Gy of x-ray irradiation, and then again returned to the incubator until 24 hpf for analyses. The levels of apoptosis in zebrafish embryos at 25 hpf were quantified through terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay. The results revealed that at least 200 protons (with average radiation doses of about 300 and 650 mGy absorbed by an irradiated epithelial and deep cell, respectively) would be required to induce RAR in the zebrafish embryos in vivo. Our previous investigation showed that 5 protons delivered at 10 points on an embryo would already be sufficient to induce RAR in the zebrafish embryos. The difference was explained in terms of the radiation-induced bystander effect as well as the rescue effect. (paper)

  18. Hormesis and adaptive response of survival in Hela cells induced by low dose X-ray irradiation

    The survival fraction in HeLa cells irradiated by low dose X-rays was observed using clone method. The results showed that the survival fraction in the cells irradiated by less than 0.5 Gy X-rays was higher than control, 'hormesis' of HeLa cell survival was obtained and was significant at doses near 0.25 Gy; also, the damage degree of cells induced by the following irradiation was reduced because of pre-treating the cells with low dose D1 of 0.05, 0.75 Gy; it was found from above that 'adaptive response' of cell survival was induced by the low dose irradiation

  19. Acute adaptive immune response correlates with late radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    The lung response to radiation exposure can involve an immediate or early reaction to the radiation challenge, including cell death and an initial immune reaction, and can be followed by a tissue injury response, of pneumonitis or fibrosis, to this acute reaction. Herein, we aimed to determine whether markers of the initial immune response, measured within days of radiation exposure, are correlated with the lung tissue injury responses occurring weeks later. Inbred strains of mice known to be susceptible (KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ) or resistant (C3H/HeJ, A/J, AKR/J) to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and to vary in time to onset of respiratory distress post thoracic irradiation (from 10–23 weeks) were studied. Mice were untreated (controls) or received 18 Gy whole thorax irradiation and were euthanized at 6 h, 1d or 7 d after radiation treatment. Pulmonary CD4+ lymphocytes, bronchoalveolar cell profile & cytokine level, and serum cytokine levels were assayed. Thoracic irradiation and inbred strain background significantly affected the numbers of CD4+ cells in the lungs and the bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential of exposed mice. At the 7 day timepoint greater numbers of pulmonary Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes and reduced lavage interleukin17 and interferonγ levels were significant predictors of late stage fibrosis. Lavage levels of interleukin-10, measured at the 7 day timepoint, were inversely correlated with fibrosis score (R = −0.80, p = 0.05), while serum levels of interleukin-17 in control mice significantly correlated with post irradiation survival time (R = 0.81, p = 0.04). Lavage macrophage, lymphocyte or neutrophil counts were not significantly correlated with either of fibrosis score or time to respiratory distress in the six mouse strains. Specific cytokine and lymphocyte levels, but not strain dependent lavage cell profiles, were predictive of later radiation-induced lung injury in this panel of inbred strains. The online version of this

  20. Contribution of nitric oxide radicals in bystander and adaptive responses induced by heavy ion-beams

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether radioadaptive responses were induced after irradiation with accelerated ion beams through nitric oxide-mediated bystander response in cultured cells in vitro and in some organs of mice in vivo. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells transfected with wild-type p53 (H1299/wtp53 cells) were used. The cells were irradiated with accelerated neon (400 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm) or iron (500 MeV/u, 200 keV/μm) ion beams. Then, the cells were allowed forming colonies, were cultured for 48 h to obtained samples for Western blot analysis, or were cultured for several weeks to fix mutations in the locus of hprt gene. ICR male mice (Jcl:ICR) were used. The mice were irradiated on 2 days with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 13 keV/μm) or argon ion beams (500 MeV/u, 90 keV/μm). The intestine and testis were excised 2 days after the last irradiation. These excised tissues were fixed, embedded in paraffin and made of thin-sections on slide glasses. Then the TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL)- and activated caspase-3-positive cells in the thin-sections of tissues were detected by the immunohistochemical method. A significant reduction of mutation rate of the hprt gene was observed when the cells were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate neon or iron ion beams. This reduction was partially suppressed by NO radical scavenger, carboxy-PTIO. The bystander-induced apoptotic and activated caspase-3-positive cells were obviously observed in unirradiated intestine and testis when mice were irradiated with carbon or argon ion beams across the upper body. These observations were partially suppressed by carboxy-PTIO into the peritoneal cavity. (author)

  1. Contribution of nitric oxide radicals in bystander and adaptive responses induced by heavy ion-beams

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether radioadaptive responses were induced after irradiation with accelerated ion beams through nitric oxide-mediated bystander response in cultured cells in vitro and in some organs of mice in vivo. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells transfected with wild-type p53 (H1299/wtp53 cells) were used. The cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm or 135 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm). Then, the cells were allowed forming colonies. ICR male mice (Jcl: ICR) were used. The mice were irradiated on 2 days with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 13 keV/μm or 135 MeV/u, 25 keV/μm) or argon ion beams (500 MeV/u, 90 keV/μm). The small intestine and testis were excised 2 days after the last irradiation. These excised tissues were fixed, embedded in paraffin and made of thin-sections on slide glasses. Then the TUNEL- and activated caspase-3-positive cells in the thin-sections of tissues were detected by the immunohistochemical method. A significant elevated surviving fractions of cells was observed when the cells were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate carbon ion beams. This enhancement was partially suppressed by Nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (c-PTIO). The bystander-induced apoptotic and activated caspase-3-positive cells were obviously observed in the unirradiated small intestine and testis when mice were irradiated with carbon or argon ion beams across the upper body. In addition, a significant reduction of apoptotic cells in the intestine and testis, when mice were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate carbon or argon ion beams. These observations were partially suppressed by c-PTIO into the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, it is suggested that the apoptosis may be induced in the tissue stem cells of small intestine and testis. (author)

  2. Low-dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Polychromatic Mice Erythrocyte as Measures by Acridine Orange Stained Micronucleus Assay

    The effect of conditioning pretreatment with 0.01Gy of gamma rays on micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction by 2Gy of g-rays was determined in peripheral blood of C3H/He mice. The timing of their administration of challenge doses was 6 hr. The response was determined by scoring of Acridine orange due stained MN-PCEs. The results indicate that low dose gamma ray pretreatment does protect against MN-PCE induction by the challenge g-ray dose. Introduction: an adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in vivo reported. Some research team reports that a reduction on MN-PCE of mice caused by the pretreatment was observed (1-4). However, there was variability in the amount of the response depending on the time and adaptive dose (3). This is important because the variation of MN-PCE frequency with time could lead to differences in the interpretation. In this study, differences in the biological effects within the priming dose ranges are discussed. (Author)

  3. Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Polychromatic Mice Erythrocyte as Measured by Acridine Orange Stained Micronuleus Assay

    The effect of conditioning pretreatment with 0.01Gy of gamma rays on micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction by 2Gy of g-rays was determined in peripheral blood of C3H/He mice. The timing of their administration of challenge doses was 6hr. The response was determined by scoring of Acridine orange dye stained MN-PCEs. The results indicate that low dose gamma ray pretreatment does protect against MN-PCE induction by the challenge g-ray dose. Introduction: An adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in vivo reported. Some research team reports that a reduction on MN-PCE of mice caused by the pretreatment was observed [1- 4]. However, there was variability in the amount of the response depending on the time and adaptive dose [3]. This is important because the variation of MN-PCE frequency with time could lead to differences in the interpretation. In this study, differences in the biological effects within the priming dose ranges are discussed. Materials and Methods: Specific pathogen free 5-week-old C3H/He mice, purchased from Shizuoka Laboratory Center (Japan), were kept in clean and conventional environment. When 6 weeks old, the animal were whole body irradiated using irradiator of IBL-437 (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min). After various time intervals, the two groups were administrated to adaptation dose and challenge dose of 0.01Gy and 2Gy, respectively. For experiments, sham-irradiated, only adaptive and challenge dose irradiated groups were run concurrently. Smears were stained and scored using Acridine orange dye method [2]. Statistically significant differences in MN-PCE frequency were determined by comparing tie individual values at each group with the respective control values (challenge dose irradiated group) by using the paired ttest. Results and Discussions: Induced MN by the challenge dose (2Gy) after the pretreatment with 0.01Gy is low to the one induced by the challenge dose alone. In the present study, this estimation for the

  4. Involvement of p27CIP/KIP in HSP25 or inducible HSP70 mediated adaptive response by low dose radiation

    ThermoResistant (TR) clones of Radiation-Induced Fibrosarcoma (RIF) cells have been reported to show an adaptive response to 1cGy of low dose radiation, and HSP25 and inducible HSP70 are involved in this process. In this study, to further elucidate the mechanism by which HSP25 and inducible HSP70 regulate the adaptive response, HSP25 or inducible HSP70 overexpressed RIF cells were irradiated with 1cGy and the cell cycle was analyzed. HSP25 or inducible HSP70 overexpressed cells together with TR cells showed increased G1 phase after 1cGy irradiation, while RIF cells did not. [3H]-Thymidine and BrdU incorporation also indicated that both HSP25 and inducible HSP70 are involved in G1 arrest after 1cGy irradiation. Molecular analysis revealed upregulation of p27Cip/Kip protein in HSP25 and inducible HSP70 overexpressed cells, and cotransfection of p27Cip/Kip antisense abolished the induction of the adaptive response and 1cGy-mediated G1 arrest. The above results indicate that induction of an adaptive response by HSP25 and inducible HSP70 is mediated by upregulation of p27Cip/Kip protein, resulting in low dose radiation-induced G1 arrest

  5. p27Cip/Kip is involved in hsp25 or inducible hsp70 mediated adaptive response by low dose radiation

    Thermoresistant (TR) clone of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) cells have been reported to show adaptive response to 1cGy of low dose radiation, and hsp25 and inducible hsp70 are involved in this process. In the present study, to further elucidate the mechanism of how hsp25 and inducible hsp70 regulate the adaptive response, hsp25 or inducible hsp70 overexpressed RIF cells were irradiated with 1cGy and cell cycle was analyzed. Hsp25 or inducible hsp70 overexpressed cells as well as TR cells showed increase of G1 phase population after γ-irradiation at 1cGy, while the parent RIF cells did not. [3H]-Thymidine and BrdU incorporation also indicated that both hsp25 and inducible hsp70 were involved in G1 arrest after 1cGy irradiation. Molecular analysis revealed upregulation of p27Cip/Kip protein in hsp25 and inducible hsp70 overexpressed cells, and cotransfection of p27Cip/Kip antisense abolished the induction of adaptive response and 1cGy-mediated G1 arrest. The above results indicate that induction of adaptive response by hsp25 and inducible hsp70 is mediated by upregulation of p27Cip/Kip protein, resulting in low dose radiation-induced G1 arrest. (author)

  6. The roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose-starvation induced adaptive response in the zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    Zhang, Tengfei; Zhu, Jiawen; Wei, Shun; Luo, Qingping; Li, Lu; Li, Shengqing; Tucker, Alexander; Shao, Huabin; Zhou, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The (p)ppGpp signal molecules play a central role in the stringent response (SR) to adapt to nutrient starvation in bacteria, yet the carbohydrate starvation induced adaptive response and the roles of SR in this response is not well characterized, especially in Gram-positives. Here, two (p)ppGpp synthetases RelA and RelQ are identified in Streptococcus suis, an important emerging zoonotic Gram-positive bacterium, while only RelA is functional under glucose starvation. To characterize the roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose starvation response in S. suis, the growth curves and transcriptional profiles were compared between the mutant strain ΔrelA [a (p)ppGpp(0) strain under glucose starvation] and its parental strain SC-19 [(p)ppGpp(+)]. The results showed great difference between SC-19 and ΔrelA on adaptive responses when suffering glucose starvation, and demonstrated that RelA/(p)ppGpp plays important roles in adaptation to glucose starvation. Besides the classic SR including inhibition of growth and related macromolecular synthesis, the extended adaptive response also includes inhibited glycolysis, and carbon catabolite repression (CCR)-mediated carbohydrate-dependent metabolic switches. Collectively, the pheno- and genotypic characterization of the glucose starvation induced adaptive response in S. suis makes a great contribution to understanding better the mechanism of SR. PMID:27255540

  7. Adaptive response in zebrafish embryos induced using microbeam protons as priming dose and X-ray photons as challenging dose

    In the studies reported here, a high-linear-energy-transfer (high-LET)-radiation dose was used to induce adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Microbeam protons were used to provide the priming dose and X-ray photons were employed to provide the challenging dose. The microbeam irradiation system (Single-Particle Irradiation System to Cell, acronym as SPICE) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan, was employed to control and accurately quantify the number of protons at very low doses, viz., about 100 μGy. The embryos were dechorionated at 4 h post fertilization (hpf) and irradiated at 5 hpf by microbeam protons. For each embryo, ten irradiation points were arbitrarily chosen without overlapping with one another. To each irradiation point, 5, 10 or 20 protons each with an energy of 3.4 MeV were delivered. The embryos were returned back to the incubator until 10 hpf to further receive the challenging exposure, which was achieved using 2 Gy of X-ray irradiation, and then again returned to the incubator until 24 hpf for analyses. The levels of apoptosis in zebrafish embryos at 25 hpf were quantified through terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay, with the apoptotic signals captured by a confocal microscope. The results revealed that 5 to 20 protons delivered at 10 points each on the embryos, or equivalently 110 to 430 μGy, could induce radioadaptive response in the zebrafish embryos in vivo. (author)

  8. Accumulation of small heat shock proteins, including mitochondrial HSP22, induced by oxidative stress and adaptive response in tomato cells

    Changes in gene expression, by application of H2O2, O2.- generating agents (methyl viologen, digitonin) and gamma irradiation to tomato suspension cultures, were investigated and compared to the well-described heat shock response. Two-dimensional gel protein mapping analyses gave the first indication that at least small heat shock proteins (smHSP) accumulated in response to application of H2O2 and gamma irradiation, but not to O2.- generating agents. While some proteins seemed to be induced specifically by each treatment, only part of the heat shock response was observed. On the basis of Northern hybridization experiments performed with four heterologous cDNA, corresponding to classes I-IV of pea smHSP, it could be concluded that significant amounts of class I and II smHSP mRNA are induced by H2O2 and by irradiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in plants some HSP genes are inducible by oxidative stresses, as in micro-organisms and other eukaryotic cells. HSP22, the main stress protein that accumulates following H2O2 action or gamma irradiation, was also purified. Sequence homology of amino terminal and internal sequences, and immunoreactivity with Chenopodium rubrum mitochondrial smHSP antibody, indicated that the protein belongs to the recently discovered class of plant mitochondrial smHSP. Heat shock or a mild H2O2 pretreatment was also shown to lead to plant cell protection against oxidative injury. Therefore, the synthesis of these stress proteins can be considered as an adaptive mechanism in which mitochondrial protection could be essential

  9. Adaptive response to and its time effect on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in mouse embryonic cells pre-exposed to cadmium chloride

    Objective: To observe if cadmium chloride could induce cross adaptive response to and its time effect on cytogenetic damage of mouse embryonic cells caused by ionizing radiation. Methods: The mice were pre-treated with iv injection of cadmium chloride solution on gestation d 9, then they were exposed to 1.5 cGy 60Co γ-rays at different time intervals. Chromosome preparation was made on gestation d 10. Results: 0.25-2 mg Cd/kg body weight could induce resistance to cytogenetic damage of embryonic cells of mice caused by ionizing radiation and the adaptive response appeared 4 h after pre-exposure, at 8h reached the peak, but 12 to 24 h later synergism appeared. Conclusion: Cadmium chloride could induce cross adaptive response to 60Co γ-rays which had relations with time interval of ionizing radiation

  10. Pica as an adaptive response: Kaolin consumption helps rats recover from chemotherapy-induced illness

    De Jonghe, Bart C.; Lawler, Maureen P.; Horn, Charles C.; Tordoff, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Clay consumption can occur during illness but there has been little work to understand why. To investigate whether consuming clay confers an advantage to the sick animal, we compared the recovery from illness of adult male rats with or without access to kaolin. Illness was induced by injection of 6 mg/kg, ip, cisplatin, a toxic chemotherapy agent, and recovery was assessed by changes in daily food intake, water intake, and body weight. Relative to saline-injected controls, cisplatin-injected ...

  11. Endogenous nitric oxide mediates He-Ne laser-induced adaptive responses in salt stressed-tall fescue leaves.

    Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Limei; Han, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of endogenous nitric oxide in protective effects of He-Ne laser on salt stressed-tall fescue leaves. Salt stress resulted in significant increases of membrane injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, polyamine accumulation, and activities of SOD, POD, and APX, while pronounced decreases of antioxidant contents, CAT activity and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in seedlings leaves. He-Ne laser illumination caused a distinct alleviation of cellular injury that was reflected by the lower MDA amounts, polyamine accumulation and ROS levels at the stress period. In contrast, the laser treatment displayed a higher Ca(2+) concentration, antioxidant amounts, NO release, antioxidant enzyme, and NOS activities. These responses could be blocked due to the inhibition of NO biosynthesis by PTIO (NO scavenger) or LNNA (NOS inhibitor). The presented results demonstrated that endogenous NO might be involved in the progress of He-Ne laser-induced plant antioxidant system activation and ROS degradation in order to enhance adaptive responses of tall fescue to prolonged saline conditions. PMID:27309569

  12. Fatp1 deficiency affects retinal light response and dark adaptation, and induces age-related alterations.

    Karim Chekroud

    Full Text Available FATP1 is involved in lipid transport into cells and in intracellular lipid metabolism. We showed previously that this protein interacts with and inhibits the limiting-step isomerase of the visual cycle RPE65. Here, we aimed to analyze the effect of Fatp1-deficiency in vivo on the visual cycle, structure and function, and on retinal aging. Among the Fatp family members, we observed that only Fatp1 and 4 are expressed in the control retina, in both the neuroretina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In the neuroretina, Fatp1 is mostly expressed in photoreceptors. In young adult Fatp1(-/- mice, Fatp4 expression was unchanged in retinal pigment epithelium and reduced two-fold in the neuroretina as compared to Fatp1(+/+ mice. The Fatp1(-/- mice had a preserved retinal structure but a decreased electroretinogram response to light. These mice also displayed a delayed recovery of the b-wave amplitude after bleaching, however, visual cycle speed was unchanged, and both retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors presented the same fatty acid pattern compared to controls. In 2 year-old Fatp1(-/- mice, transmission electron microscopy studies showed specific abnormalities in the retinas comprising choroid vascularization anomalies and thickening of the Bruch membrane with material deposits, and sometimes local disorganization of the photoreceptor outer segments. These anomalies lead us to speculate that the absence of FATP1 accelerates the aging process.

  13. Participation of intracellular signal transduction in the radio-adaptive response induced by low-dose X-irradiation in human embryonic cells

    To elucidate the induction mechanism of radio-adaptive response in normal cells, we searched the literatures of the intracellular signal transduction. Furthermore, we examined the induction of radio-adaptive response with or without inhibitors of several kinds of protein kinase. The major results obtained were as follows; (1) According to the literature survey it is revealed that there are 4 intracellular signal transduction pathways which are possibly involved in the induction of radio-adaptive response: pathways depending on cAMP, calcium, cGMP, or protein-tyrosine kinase. (2) Addition of either inhibitor of protein-tyrosine kinase or protein kinase C to the cell culture medium during the low-dose X-irradiation inhibited the induction of radio-adaptive response. However, the addition of inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cGMP-dependent protein kinase, or Ca2+-calmodulin kinase II failed to inhibit the induction of radio-adaptive response. (3) These results suggest that the signal induced in cells by low-dose X-irradiation was transduced from protein-tyrosine kinase to protein kinase C via either pathway of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or splitting of profilin binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. (author)

  14. Time-effect of adaptive response of mouse thymocyte apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low dose radiation

    2001-01-01

    目的:观察低剂量辐射(LDR)诱导胸腺细胞凋亡及细胞周期进程适应性反应的基本规律。方法:用X射线照射昆明系雄性小鼠,其诱导剂量(D1)及其后攻击剂量(D2)分别是75 mGy 和1.5 Gy。D1和D2间隔时间分别是3、6、12、24和60 h。D2照射后18 h胸腺细胞培养4、20 和44 h用流式细胞仪检测胸腺细胞凋亡小体(TAB)和细胞周期进程的变化。结果:当D1和D2间隔3、6和12 h,在D2照射后胸腺细胞培养4和20 h,D1 + D2组 TAB 百分数明显低于D2组(P<0.05),G0/G1和G2+M期细胞百分数也不同程度地低于D2组, 而S期细胞百分数却明显高于D2组(P<0.05或P<0.01)。结论:D1和D2分别是75 mGy(剂量率,12.5 mGy/min)和1.5 Gy(剂量率,0.287 Gy/min),D1和D2间隔3~12 h, 在小鼠全身照射后其胸腺细胞培养4和20 h可诱导细胞凋亡和细胞周期进程的适应性反应。%Objective: In the present study we observed the general pattern of the adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low dose radiation (LDR). Methods: Kunming male mice were irradiated with the inductive dose (D1, 75 mGy) and the challenging dose (D2, 1.5 Gy). The intervals between D1 and D2 were 3, 6, 12, 24 and 60 hours. The changes of thymocyte apoptotic bodies (TAB) and cell cycle progression were measured with flow cytometry with the thymocytes cultured for 4, 20 and 44 hours, respectively, 18 hours after irradiation with D2. Results: When the intervals between D1 and D2 were 3, 6 and 12 hours, the percentages of TAB in the D1 + D2 groups in the thymocytes cultured for 4 and 20 hours were significantly lower than those in the D2 groups (P<0.05) and the percentages of G0/G1 and G2 + M phase cells decreased in varying degrees, while the percentages of S phase cells increased significantly (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion: The results mentioned above indicate that when the mice were irradiated with 75 m

  15. Glucose starvation induces mutation and lineage-dependent adaptive responses in a large collection of cancer cell lines

    He, Ningning; Kim, Nayoung; JEONG, EUNA; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance of glucose deprivation is an important factor for cancer proliferation, survival, migration and progression. To systematically understand adaptive responses under glucose starvation in cancers, we analyzed reverse phase protein array (RPPA) data of 115 protein antibodies across a panel of approximately 170 heterogeneous cancer cell lines, cultured under normal and low glucose conditions. In general, glucose starvation broadly altered levels of many of the proteins and phosphoprotein...

  16. Kinetics of the early adaptive response and adaptation threshold dose

    The expression kinetics of the adaptive response (RA) in mouse leukocytes in vivo and the minimum dose of gamma radiation that induces it was determined. The mice were exposed 0.005 or 0.02 Gy of 137 Cs like adaptation and 1h later to the challenge dose (1.0 Gy), another group was only exposed at 1.0 Gy and the damage is evaluated in the DNA with the rehearsal it makes. The treatment with 0. 005 Gy didn't induce RA and 0. 02 Gy causes a similar effect to the one obtained with 0.01 Gy. The RA was show from an interval of 0.5 h being obtained the maximum expression with 5.0 h. The threshold dose to induce the RA is 0.01 Gy and in 5.0 h the biggest quantity in molecules is presented presumably that are related with the protection of the DNA. (Author)

  17. Adaptive response of spermatogenic cell apoptosis and p53 gene expression selectively induced by irradiation with low dose X-ray in mice

    Objective: The adaptive response of spermatogenic cell apoptosis and p53 gene expression induced by whole-body low dose radiation (LDR) with X-rays was studied in male Kunming mice. Methods: Different kinds of spermatogenic cells were separated using density gradient centrifugation and their apoptotic percentagcs were analysed using flow cytometry (FCM) stained with propodium iodide. At meantime, p53 protein was measured with immunohistochemical SABC. Results: When inductive dose (D1) was 75 mGy 6 h before irradiation with the challenging doses (D2) of 1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 Gy, the apoptotic percentages of the spermatogonia and spermatocytes in the D1 + D2 groups were declined rapidly as compared with those in the D2 groups , and the apoptotic percentages of spermatids and spermatozoa showed no significant changes. When inductive dose (D1) was 75 mGy 6 h before irradiation with the challenging doses (D2) of 1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 Gy, the percentages of p53 protein positive of spermatogonia and spermatocytes in the D1 + D2 groups were declined rapidly as compared with those in the D2 groups, and the positive percentages of spermatids and spermatozoa showed no significant changes. Conclusion: The adaptive response of apoptosis and p53 protein expression in spermatogonia and spermatocytes could be selectively induced by irradiation with low dose X-ray. The apoptotic adaptive response induced by LDR could closely relate to the D2 doses and interval time between D1 and D2, so we speculated that p53 gene plays a great role in molecular mechanisms of adaptive response on spermatogenic cell apoptosis induced by LDR. (authors)

  18. Glucose starvation induces mutation and lineage-dependent adaptive responses in a large collection of cancer cell lines.

    He, Ningning; Kim, Nayoung; Jeong, Euna; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2016-01-01

    Tolerance of glucose deprivation is an important factor for cancer proliferation, survival, migration and progression. To systematically understand adaptive responses under glucose starvation in cancers, we analyzed reverse phase protein array (RPPA) data of 115 protein antibodies across a panel of approximately 170 heterogeneous cancer cell lines, cultured under normal and low glucose conditions. In general, glucose starvation broadly altered levels of many of the proteins and phosphoproteins assessed across the cell lines. Many mTOR pathway components were selectively sensitive to glucose stress, although the change in their levels still varied greatly across the cell line set. Furthermore, lineage- and genotype-based classification of cancer cell lines revealed mutation-specific variation of protein expression and phosphorylation in response to glucose starvation. Decreased AKT phosphorylation (S473) was significantly associated with PTEN mutation under glucose starvation conditions in lung cancer cell lines. The present study (see TCPAportal.org for data resource) provides insight into adaptive responses to glucose deprivation under diverse cellular contexts. PMID:26573869

  19. Relieved residual damage in the hematopoietic system of mice rescued by radiation-induced adaptive response (Yonezawa Effect)

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; VarèS, Guillaume; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    Existence of adaptive response (AR) was previously demonstrated in C57BL/6J mice. Irradiations were performed by delivering a priming low dose of X-rays (0.50 Gy) in combination with a challenge high dose of accelerated carbon or neon ion particles. AR was characterized by significantly decreased mortality in the 30-day survival test. This mouse AR model (‘Yonezawa Effect’) was originally established by using X-rays as both the priming and challenge irradiations. The underlying mechanism was ...

  20. Inducible competitors and adaptive diversification

    Beren W. ROBINSON, David W. PFENNIG

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the causes of diversification is central to evolutionary biology. The ecological theory of adaptive diversification holds that the evolution of phenotypic differences between populations and species––and the formation of new species––stems from divergent natural selection, often arising from competitive interactions. Although increasing evidence suggests that phenotypic plasticity can facilitate this process, it is not generally appreciated that competitively mediated selection often also provides ideal conditions for phenotypic plasticity to evolve in the first place. Here, we discuss how competition plays at least two key roles in adaptive diversification depending on its pattern. First, heterogenous competition initially generates heterogeneity in resource use that favors adaptive plasticity in the form of “inducible competitors”. Second, once such competitively induced plasticity evolves, its capacity to rapidly generate phenotypic variation and expose phenotypes to alternate selective regimes allows populations to respond readily to selection favoring diversification, as may occur when competition generates steady diversifying selection that permanently drives the evolutionary divergence of populations that use different resources. Thus, competition plays two important roles in adaptive diversification––one well-known and the other only now emerging––mediated through its effect on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity [Current Zoology 59 (4: 537–552, 2013].

  1. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation induced by low doses of low LET radiation, Final Technical Report

    J. Leslie Redpath, Ph.D.

    2006-01-23

    The goal of this project was to investigate mechanisms underlying the adaptive response seen following exposure of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells to low doses of low LET radiation. It was proposed to investigate the contributions of three possible mechanisms. These were: 1. Upregulation of cellular antioxidant status. 2. Upregulation of DNA repair. 3. Upregulation of gap junction intracellular communication. We have completed the study of the role of upregulation of reduced glutathione (GSH) as a possible mechanism underlying our observed suppression of transformation frequency at low radiation doses. We have also completed our study of the possible role of upregulation of DNA repair in the observed adaptive response against neoplastic transformation. We concluded that upregulation of DNA repair may be more important in modulating transformation at the higher dose. A manuscript describing the above studies has been submitted published in Carcinogenesis 24:1961-1965, 2003. Finally, we have completed two studies of the possible role of upregulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in modulating transformation frequency at low doses of low LET radiation. This research was published in Radiation Research 162:646-654, 2004. In order to optimize the opportunity for GJIC, we then carried out a study where confluent cultures were irradiated. The results indicated, that while the degree of low dose suppression was somewhat reduced compared to that seen for subconfluent cultures, it was not completely absent. This research has been submitted for publication. Our research program was of sufficient interest to generate two invited reviews, and five invited presentations.

  2. Low dose, radiation-induced adaptive response against cancer in high-dose-exposed, cancer-prone, Trp53 heterozygous mice

    Full text: Mice that are heterozygous for Trp53 are both cancer-prone and sensitive to high radiation doses. Groups of 7-8-week-old female Trp53 heterozygous mice were exposed to 4 Gy of 60Co-gamma radiation at either high (0.5 Gy/min) or low (0.5 mGy/min) dose rate. Other groups received a 10-mGy or 100-mGy dose, given at low dose rate (0.5 mGy/min) 24 h prior to the 4 Gy dose. Tumor frequency and latency were measured over the lifespan of the animals. Compared to animals receiving only 4 Gy at high dose rate, mice receiving a prior 10-mGy adapting exposure had significantly extended lifespan and increased latency for all malignant tumors taken together. However, the latency responses were tumor type specific. The prior 10-mGy exposure increased latency for lymphomas and hemangiosarcomas, but decreased latency for spinal osteosarcomas. Increasing the adapting dose to 100 mGy eliminated the tumor latency increase and significantly reduced lifespan. A 10-mGy adapting dose given prior to a 4 Gy exposure at low dose rate generally showed either a reduced effect or no effect. Adapting exposures had no significant effect on tumor frequency. We conclude that adaptive responses are induced by low doses of radiation in radiation sensitive, cancer prone Trp53 +/ - mice, and that these responses are expressed as an increase in tumor latency that reduces the carcinogenic effects of a subsequent large exposure. The dose at which protective effects give way to detrimental effects is tumor type specific

  3. Inducible Protective Processes in Animal Systems XIII: Comparative Analysis of Induction of Adaptive Response by EMS and MMS in Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma Cells

    Periyapatna Vishwaprakash Mahadimane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the presence of adaptive response in cancerous cells, two monofunctional alkylating agents, namely, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, were employed to treat Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC cells in vivo. Conditioning dose of 80 mg/kg body weight of EMS or 50 mg/kg body weight of MMS and challenging dose of 240 mg/kg body weight of EMS or 150 mg/kg body weight of MMS were selected by pilot toxicity studies. Conditioned EAC cells when challenged after 8 h time lag resulted in significant reduction in chromosomal aberrations compared to challenging dose of respective agents. As has been proved in earlier studies with normal organisms, even in cancerous cells (EAC, there is presence of adaptive response to methylating and ethylating agents. Furthermore, it is also interesting to note in the present studies that the methylating agent, MMS, is a stronger inducer of the adaptive response than the ethylating agent, EMS.

  4. Adaptive response of the mutagenicity of the somatic andgerm cells in mice induced by in vivo 147Pm radiation

    1999-01-01

    Effects of pretreatment of mousewith low doses of internally deposited 147Pm on the mutagenicity ofboththe bone marrow lymphocytes and the spermatoblasts induced by subsequenthigh dose of internally deposited 147Pm were studied. Kunming male mice were injected from the tail vein with low doses of 147Pm(NO3)3 of 0.37, 3.7 and 37 Bq/gbody weight. Three days later the mice were injected with a high dose of147Pm(NO3)3 of 18.5 kBq/g body weight. The animals were sacrificedat 24 hafter the high dose injection. The results show that the bone marrow lymphocytesand the spermatoblasts pre-exposed in vivo to low doses of 147Pmcan produce anadaptive response. The radioadapted cells had a resistance to themutagenicity induced by the subsequent high dose of 147Pm, that is, theproportion of both the bone marrow lymphocytes containing micronuclei andthe sperm shape abnormalities was significantly lower than those forthe pure high dose group (P<0.01). In addition, the induction of theadaptive response of the cells possesses the different dose ranges forthe different biological parameters. The 147Pm dose ranges of the adaptiveresponse are 0.37~3.7 and 0.37~37 Bq/g body weight for thefrequency of micronucleated bone marrow lymphocytes and abnormalsperms, respectively.

  5. Adaptive response and genetic instability induced by a low-dose rate radiation simulating the high-altitude flight conditions on mice in vivo

    Complete text of publication follows. In the present work, we investigated the effect of a low-dose rate of high-LET radiation that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response, and genetic instability in generation F1 born from males irradiated under these conditions were examined in polychromatic erythrocytes of bone marrow using the micronucleus test. Two-month-old males of SHK white mongrel mice were used. Irradiation was performed for 24 h a day in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the U-70 accelerator of 70 GeV protons (Serpukhov), which adequately simulates radiation field formed in the atmosphere at a height of about 10 km, to accumulate doses of 11.5, 21.5 and 31.5 cGy (1 cGy/day). The experiments demonstrated that: 1) irradiation of mice in vivo with these doses of low dose rate high-LET radiation leads to an increase in cytogenetic damage in polychromatic erythrocytes; 2) irradiation of mice with these doses induces no adaptive response in polychromatic erythrocytes as opposite to γ-radiation; and 3) in mice of the F1 generation born from males irradiated with doses of 11.5, 21.5 and 31.5 cGy, an increase in sensitivity to additional irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy of γ-radiation and the absence of adaptive response compared with the descendants of unirradiated males occur. These data indicate a genetic instability in generation F1 born from irradiated males.

  6. Studies on adaptive responses in Chinese hamster cells

    For many years the possibility has been considered of low doses of radiation inducing adaptive responses in cells and organisms against the mutagenic effects of radiation. Currently, a number of experimental data appraise the existence of an adaptive response that is characterized by a decrease of radiation induced genetic damages. The understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in this phenomenon permits to estimate the effects and risks of low dose exposure. In this work, preliminary results of studies on the induction of adaptive response in cells subjected to different doses of ionizing radiation are presented

  7. AMPKα is essential for acute exercise-induced gene responses but not for exercise training-induced adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle

    Fentz, Joachim; Kjøbsted, Rasmus; Maag Kristensen, Caroline; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Gudiksen, Anders; Foretz, Marc; Schjerling, Peter; Viollet, Benoit; Pilegaard, Henriette; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    . Maximal running speed was lower in AMPKα mdKO than WT mice, but increased similarly in both genotypes with exercise training. Exercise training increased quadriceps protein content of ubiquinol-cytochrome-C reductase core protein 1 (UQCRC1), cytochrome C, hexokinase II, plasma membrane fatty acid binding......Exercise training increases skeletal muscle expression of metabolic proteins improving the oxidative capacity. Adaptations in skeletal muscle by pharmacologically induced activation of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are dependent on the AMPKα2 subunit. We hypothesized that exercise training......, glucose transporter 4 and VEGF in an AMPK-dependent manner, while cluster of differentiation 36 and fatty acid transport protein 1 mRNA content increased similarly in AMPKα wild type (WT) and mdKO mice. During four weeks of voluntary running wheel exercise training, the AMPKα mdKO mice ran less than WT...

  8. Interval for the expression of the adaptive response induced by gamma radiation in leucocytes of mouse In vivo; Intervalo para la expresion de la respuesta adaptativa inducida por radiacion gamma en leucocitos de raton In vivo

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The interval between the adaptive gamma radiation dose (0.01 Gy) and challenge (1.0 Gy) capable to induce the maximum expression of the adaptive response in lymphocytes of mouse In vivo. The animals were exposed to the mentioned doses with different intervals among both (1, 1.5, 5 or 18 hr). By means of the unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique, four damage parameters were analysed. The results showed that from the 1 hr interval an adaptive response was produced since in the pretreated organisms with 0.01 Gy the cells present lesser damage than in those not adapted. The maximum response was induced with the intervals between 2.5 and 5 hr and even though it persisted until 18 hr, the effect was reducing. (Author)

  9. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays. Progress report, Year 2

    1993-09-01

    I will describe our recent data in which we have extracted and purified a sufficient amount of RNA from primed and unprimed U1-Mel cells to begin the search for new genes which are modulated by priming or high dose irradiation during the establishment and/or challenge of adapted cells, respectively. Gene transcripts which are altered during ASRs now include alterations in xip5 (a gene with homology to human growth hormone), xipl2 (a gene with homology to human angiogenesis factor and a gene which may be involved in apoptosis due to its possible RNase activity), cyclin A (which is altered in primed cells only after a high dose of ionizing radiation), cyclin B (which is also altered in a similar manner as cyclin A), p53 (a tumor suppressor gene involved in cell division control in G{sub 1} following ionizing radiation), and glutathionine S transferase-pi (a gene product which has been demonstrated to be involved in DNA repair and redox cycling). In contrast, the remaining xip CDNA clones [i.e., xip1-4,6-11, which were isolated following high dose ionizing radiation exposure to human U1-Mel cells], Prad-1 (a gene involved in cell cycle controlling events at the G{sub 1} portion of the cell cycle), 36B4 (a gene involved in homeostasis), and cdc2 (a gene involved in the regulation of the S-phase portion of the cell cycle), were not altered following ionizing radiation, either during the establishment or challenge of adapted human cells.

  10. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce an adaptive inflammatory response and invasion and proliferation of lung epithelial cells in chorioallantoic membrane

    Medina-Reyes, Estefany I.; Déciga-Alcaraz, Alejandro [Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 54059 Estado de México (Mexico); Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica [Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 54059 Estado de México (Mexico); Doctorado en Ciencias en Alimentos, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CP 11340 México, DF (Mexico); Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L. [Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 54059 Estado de México (Mexico); Flores-Flores, José O. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria AP 70-186, CP 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Gutiérrez-López, Gustavo F. [Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CP 11340 México, DF (Mexico); Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; García-Cuéllar, Claudia M. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Subdirección de Investigación Básica, San Fernando 22, Tlalpan, CP 14080 México, DF (Mexico); and others

    2015-01-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2} NPs) studies have been performed using relatively high NPs concentration under acute exposure and limited studies have compared shape effects. We hypothesized that midterm exposure to low TiO{sub 2} NPs concentration in lung epithelial cells induces carcinogenic characteristics modulated partially by NPs shape. To test our hypothesis we synthesized NPs shaped as belts (TiO{sub 2}-B) using TiO{sub 2} spheres (TiO{sub 2}-SP) purchased from Sigma Aldrich Co. Then, lung epithelial A549 cells were low-exposed (10 µg/cm{sup 2}) to both shapes during 7 days and internalization, cytokine release and invasive potential were determined. Results showed greater TiO{sub 2}-B effect on agglomerates size, cell size and granularity than TiO{sub 2}-SP. Agglomerates size in cell culture medium was 310 nm and 454 nm for TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B, respectively; TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B induced 23% and 70% cell size decrease, respectively, whilst TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B induced 7 and 14-fold of granularity increase. NO{sub x} production was down-regulated (31%) by TiO{sub 2}-SP and up-regulated (70%) by TiO{sub 2}-B. Both NPs induced a transient cytokine release (IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) after 4 days, but cytokines returned to basal levels in TiO{sub 2}-SP exposed cells while TiO{sub 2}-B induced a down-regulation after 7 days. Midterm exposure to both shapes of NPs induced capability to degrade cellular extracellular matrix components from chorioallantoic membrane and Ki-67 marker showed that TiO{sub 2}-B had higher proliferative potential than TiO{sub 2}-SP. We conclude that midterm exposure to low NPs concentration of NPs has an impact in the acquisition of new characteristics of exposed cells and NPs shape influences cellular outcome. - Graphical abstract: (A) Lung epithelial cells were low exposed (below 10 µg/cm{sup 2}) to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2}-NPs) shaped as spheres (TiO{sub 2

  11. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce an adaptive inflammatory response and invasion and proliferation of lung epithelial cells in chorioallantoic membrane

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) studies have been performed using relatively high NPs concentration under acute exposure and limited studies have compared shape effects. We hypothesized that midterm exposure to low TiO2 NPs concentration in lung epithelial cells induces carcinogenic characteristics modulated partially by NPs shape. To test our hypothesis we synthesized NPs shaped as belts (TiO2-B) using TiO2 spheres (TiO2-SP) purchased from Sigma Aldrich Co. Then, lung epithelial A549 cells were low-exposed (10 µg/cm2) to both shapes during 7 days and internalization, cytokine release and invasive potential were determined. Results showed greater TiO2-B effect on agglomerates size, cell size and granularity than TiO2-SP. Agglomerates size in cell culture medium was 310 nm and 454 nm for TiO2-SP and TiO2-B, respectively; TiO2-SP and TiO2-B induced 23% and 70% cell size decrease, respectively, whilst TiO2-SP and TiO2-B induced 7 and 14-fold of granularity increase. NOx production was down-regulated (31%) by TiO2-SP and up-regulated (70%) by TiO2-B. Both NPs induced a transient cytokine release (IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) after 4 days, but cytokines returned to basal levels in TiO2-SP exposed cells while TiO2-B induced a down-regulation after 7 days. Midterm exposure to both shapes of NPs induced capability to degrade cellular extracellular matrix components from chorioallantoic membrane and Ki-67 marker showed that TiO2-B had higher proliferative potential than TiO2-SP. We conclude that midterm exposure to low NPs concentration of NPs has an impact in the acquisition of new characteristics of exposed cells and NPs shape influences cellular outcome. - Graphical abstract: (A) Lung epithelial cells were low exposed (below 10 µg/cm2) to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) shaped as spheres (TiO2-SP) and belts (TiO2-B) for midterm (7 continuous days) separately. (B) Then, cells from each cell culture were harvested and seeded on the top

  12. Adaptive immune responses of legumin nanoparticles.

    Mirshahi, T; Irache, J M; Nicolas, C; Mirshahi, M; Faure, J P; Gueguen, J; Hecquet, C; Orecchioni, A M

    2002-12-01

    Legumin is one of the main storage proteins in the pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) and the molecules of this protein have the capacity of binding together to form nanoparticles after aggregation and chemical cross-linkage with glutaraldehyde. The aim of this work was to study the adaptive immune response of legumin nanoparticles in rats. Following intradermal immunisation with the native protein legumin and legumin nanoparticles of about 250 nm, the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were analysed in rats. The humoral responses against legumin and legumin nanoparticles were examined by western blot and ELISA analysis. Both techniques clearly showed that sera from rats immunised with legumin strongly expressed antibodies against this protein. On the contrary, serum samples from rats inoculated with legumin nanoparticles did not contain detectable amounts of antibodies. These results may be explained by a reduction on the antigenic epitopes of the protein induced by the glutaraldehyde used during the cross-linking step. Concerning the cell-mediated response, neither legumin nor legumin nanoparticles stimulated an immunogenic response. This absence of response of spleen lymphocytes for legumin and legumin nanoparticles may be explained by a cytostatic effect of legumin which was corroborated by the evaluation of the middle phase of cell apoptose. In fact, both legumin and legumin nanoparticles are potent inductors of a cytostatic phenomenon and showed a significant increase of the chromatin condensation (p < 0.05) as compared with control. PMID:12683667

  13. "Adaptive response" - some underlying mechanisms and open questions

    Evgeniya G. Dimova; Bryant, Peter E.; Chankova, Stephka G

    2008-01-01

    Organisms are affected by different DNA damaging agents naturally present in the environment or released as a result of human activity. Many defense mechanisms have evolved in organisms to minimize genotoxic damage. One of them is induced radioresistance or adaptive response. The adaptive response could be considered as a nonspecific phenomenon in which exposure to minimal stress could result in increased resistance to higher levels of the same or to other types of stress some hours later. A ...

  14. Genes associated with radiation adaptive response induced by low level radiation from {sup 99m}Tc in human cell line

    Kwon, An Sung; Bom, Hee Seung; Choi, Chan; Kim, Ji Yeul; Lim, Wook Bin [Chonam National Univ., Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to search activated genes that could be related to radiation adaptive response (RAR) induced by low-level radiation from {sup 99m}Tc in human cell lines. We used gene discovery array (GDA) and representational difference analysis (RDA) methods. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate was added to 2 X 106/mL NC-37 cells (human lymphoblastic cells) to make concentrations ranging from 148 MBq/mL to 148Bq/mL by serial 10 fold dilutions. After 44 hours. 2 Gy gamma irradiation was given to them using a Cs-137 cell irradiator. As compared to the control (Con) group to which no {sup 99m}Tc was added, those cells to which 148 and 14.8 KBq of {sup 99m}Tc were added showed significantly lower damage to chromosomes, which was evaluated by metaphase analysis. Cells with 148 KBq {sup 99m}Tc (T148 group) showed most significant protection. Activated genes in the T148 group as compared to Con group were evaluated by GDA and RDA methods. GDA revealed genes of casein kinase 2 (CK2) beta chain, immunoglobulins (lg), human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B, and two novel genes. Twenty RAR related clones were selected by RDA method. The size of those genes was from 234 to 603 base pairs. RAR was induced by low dose irradiation from {sup 99m}Tc in NC-37 cell lines. Genes related to the response included CK2, lg, HLA-B in human lymphoblastic cell lines.

  15. Suppression Measured from Chinchilla Auditory-Nerve-Fiber Responses Following Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: Adaptive-Tracking and Systems-Identification Approaches.

    Sayles, Mark; Walls, Michael K; Heinz, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    The compressive nonlinearity of cochlear signal transduction, reflecting outer-hair-cell function, manifests as suppressive spectral interactions; e.g., two-tone suppression. Moreover, for broadband sounds, there are multiple interactions between frequency components. These frequency-dependent nonlinearities are important for neural coding of complex sounds, such as speech. Acoustic-trauma-induced outer-hair-cell damage is associated with loss of nonlinearity, which auditory prostheses attempt to restore with, e.g., "multi-channel dynamic compression" algorithms.Neurophysiological data on suppression in hearing-impaired (HI) mammals are limited. We present data on firing-rate suppression measured in auditory-nerve-fiber responses in a chinchilla model of noise-induced hearing loss, and in normal-hearing (NH) controls at equal sensation level. Hearing-impaired (HI) animals had elevated single-fiber excitatory thresholds (by ~ 20-40 dB), broadened frequency tuning, and reduced-magnitude distortion-product otoacoustic emissions; consistent with mixed inner- and outer-hair-cell pathology. We characterized suppression using two approaches: adaptive tracking of two-tone-suppression threshold (62 NH, and 35 HI fibers), and Wiener-kernel analyses of responses to broadband noise (91 NH, and 148 HI fibers). Suppression-threshold tuning curves showed sensitive low-side suppression for NH and HI animals. High-side suppression thresholds were elevated in HI animals, to the same extent as excitatory thresholds. We factored second-order Wiener-kernels into excitatory and suppressive sub-kernels to quantify the relative strength of suppression. We found a small decrease in suppression in HI fibers, which correlated with broadened tuning. These data will help guide novel amplification strategies, particularly for complex listening situations (e.g., speech in noise), in which current hearing aids struggle to restore intelligibility. PMID:27080669

  16. Radio-Adaptive Responses of Mouse Myocardiocytes

    Seawright, John W.; Westby, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) Cs-137 gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Pro-apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value . 0.003) 4hr after H, but not after 4hr LH when compared to control. Other p53-mediated apoptosis genes Casp3, Casp9, Trp53, and Myc exhibited down-regulation but did not achieve a notable level of significance 4hr after H. 24hr after H, genetic down-regulation was no longer present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio-adaptive

  17. FDG-PET response-adapted therapy

    Hutchings, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate tool for staging, treatment monitoring, and response evaluation in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Early determination of treatment sensitivity by FDG-PET is the best tool to guide individualized......, response-adapted treatment. Several ongoing or recently completed trials have investigated the use of FDG-PET/CT for early response-adapted HL therapy. The results are encouraging, but the data are immature, and PET response-adapted HL therapy is discouraged outside the setting of clinical trials. PET...

  18. Self-adjuvanted mRNA vaccines induce local innate immune responses that lead to a potent and boostable adaptive immunity.

    Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Doener, Fatma; Zanzinger, Kai; Noth, Janine; Baumhof, Patrick; Fotin-Mleczek, Mariola; Heidenreich, Regina

    2016-07-19

    mRNA represents a new platform for the development of therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines with high flexibility with respect to production and application. We have previously shown that our two component self-adjuvanted mRNA-based vaccines (termed RNActive® vaccines) induce balanced immune responses comprising both humoral and cellular effector as well as memory responses. Here, we evaluated the early events upon intradermal application to gain more detailed insights into the underlying mode of action of our mRNA-based vaccine. We showed that the vaccine is taken up in the skin by both non-leukocytic and leukocytic cells, the latter being mostly represented by antigen presenting cells (APCs). mRNA was then transported to the draining lymph nodes (dLNs) by migratory dendritic cells. Moreover, the encoded protein was expressed and efficiently presented by APCs within the dLNs as shown by T cell proliferation and immune cell activation, followed by the induction of the adaptive immunity. Importantly, the immunostimulation was limited to the injection site and lymphoid organs as no proinflammatory cytokines were detected in the sera of the immunized mice indicating a favorable safety profile of the mRNA-based vaccines. Notably, a substantial boostability of the immune responses was observed, indicating that mRNA can be used effectively in repetitive immunization schedules. The evaluation of the immunostimulation following prime and boost vaccination revealed no signs of exhaustion as demonstrated by comparable levels of cytokine production at the injection site and immune cell activation within dLNs. In summary, our data provide mechanistic insight into the mode of action and a rational for the use of mRNA-based vaccines as a promising immunization platform. PMID:27269061

  19. Sterile inflammation induced by Carbopol elicits robust adaptive immune responses in the absence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns

    Gartlan, Kate H.; Krashias, George; Wegmann, Frank; Hillson, William R.; Scherer, Erin M.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.; Moghaddam, Amin E.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbopol is a polyanionic carbomer used in man for topical application and drug delivery purposes. However parenteral administration of Carbopol in animal models results in systemic adjuvant activity including strong pro-inflammatory type-1 T-cell (Th1) polarization. Here we investigated potential pathways of immune activation by Carbopol by comparison with other well-characterized adjuvants. Carbopol administration triggered rapid and robust leukocyte recruitment, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and antigen capture largely by inflammatory monocytes. The induction of antigen specific Th1 cells by Carbopol was found to occur via a non-canonical pathway, independent of MyD88/TRIF signaling and in the absence of pattern-recognition-receptor (PRR) activation typically associated with Th1/Ig2a induction. Using multispectral fluorescence imaging (Imagestream) and electron microscopy we demonstrated that phagocytic uptake of Carbopol particles followed by entry into the phagosomal/lysosomal pathway elicited conformational changes to the polymer and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We therefore conclude that Carbopol may mediate its adjuvant activity via novel mechanisms of antigen presenting cell activation and Th1 induction, leading to enhanced IgG2a responses independent of microbial pattern recognition. PMID:27005810

  20. Adaptive response of Peruvian Hake to overfishing

    Mendo, C.W.; Carrasco, R.G.

    2000-01-01

    Compensatory mechanisms of the Peruvian hake population (Merluccius gayi peruanus) in response to heavy exploitation and changes in species interaction are discussed. Changes in the rate of cannibalism, diet composition, maximization of fecundity and behavioral adaptation are noted.

  1. Adaptive Modeling for Security Infrastructure Fault Response

    CUI Zhong-jie; YAO Shu-ping; HU Chang-zhen

    2008-01-01

    Based on the analysis of inherent limitations in existing security response decision-making systems, a dynamic adaptive model of fault response is presented. Several security fault levels were founded, which comprise the basic level, equipment level and mechanism level. Fault damage cost is calculated using the analytic hierarchy process. Meanwhile, the model evaluates the impact of different responses upon fault repair and normal operation. Response operation cost and response negative cost are introduced through quantitative calculation. This model adopts a comprehensive response decision of security fault in three principles-the maximum and minimum principle, timeliness principle, acquiescence principle, which assure optimal response countermeasure is selected for different situations. Experimental results show that the proposed model has good self-adaptation ability, timeliness and cost-sensitiveness.

  2. Vibrational response of adaptive composites

    Parlinska, M.; Michaud, V.; Gotthardt, R. [EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Genie Atomique; Balta, J.A.; Maanson, J.A. [EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Genie Atomique; EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland). Lab. de Technologie des Composites et Polymeres, Dept. des Materiaux; Bidaux, J.E. [EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Genie Atomique; Ecole d' Ingenieurs du Valais, Sion (Switzerland). Groupe Materiaux et Conception

    2001-11-01

    Composite laminates containing pre-deformed NiTiCu wires embedded in an epoxy matrix reinforced with Kevlar fibres were manufactured and tested. These materials change their properties, for example vibration resonance frequency or modulus in response to a temperature variation. When heated by direct electrical current above the transformation temperature, the pre-deformed shape memory alloy (SMA) wires try to recover their shape and since they are restrained by a stiff matrix and clamping, a stress is created. As a result, a change in the resonance frequency of the composite occurs. The magnitude of the recovery stress and corresponding resonance frequency shift was found to increase with the SMA wire volume fraction and to decrease with the thickness of the host composite layers between the wires and the constraining grips. (orig.)

  3. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change

    Hansen, M.M.; Olivieri, I.; Waller, D.M.;

    2012-01-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how...... for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We...... further review a broader set of 44 studies to assess how well they meet the proposed criteria, and conclude that only 23% fulfill all criteria. Approximately half (43%) of these studies failed to rule out the alternative hypothesis of replacement by a different, better-adapted population. Likewise, 34...

  4. Adaptive Filters for Muscle Response Suppression

    Sennels, Søren; Biering-Soerensen, Fin; Hansen, Steffen Duus;

    1996-01-01

    are proposed, based on the observation that the shape of the muscle responses only exhibits moderate changes during a time window of up to 300 ms. The filters are derived and compared with a conventional fixed comb filter on both simulated and real data. For variations in amplitude of the muscle responses......To be able to use the voluntary EMG-signal from an electrically stimulated muscle as control signal for FES-applications, it is necessary to eliminate the muscle response evoked by the stimulation. The muscle response is a non-stationary signal, therefore a set of linear adaptive prediction filters...

  5. Adaptive Acid Tolerance Response of Streptococcus sobrinus

    Nascimento, Marcelle M.; Lemos, José A. C.; Abranches, Jacqueline; Gonçalves, Reginaldo B.; Burne, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus are the bacteria most commonly associated with human dental caries. A major virulence attribute of these and other cariogenic bacteria is acid tolerance. The acid tolerance mechanisms of S. mutans have begun to be investigated in detail, including the adaptive acid tolerance response (ATR), but this is not the case for S. sobrinus. An analysis of the ATR of two S. sobrinus strains was conducted with cells grown to steady state in continuous chem...

  6. Epigenetics and the Adaptive Immune Response

    Kondilis-Mangum, Hrisavgi D.; Wade, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Cells of the adaptive immune response undergo dynamic epigenetic changes as they develop and respond to immune challenge. Plasticity is a necessary prerequisite for the chromosomal dynamics of lineage specification, development, and the immune effector function of the mature cell types. The alterations in DNA methylation and histone modification that characterize activation may be integral to the generation of immunologic memory, thereby providing an advantage on secondary exposure to pathoge...

  7. Adaptive response: some underlying mechanisms and open questions

    Evgeniya G. Dimova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are affected by different DNA damaging agents naturally present in the environment or released as a result of human activity. Many defense mechanisms have evolved in organisms to minimize genotoxic damage. One of them is induced radioresistance or adaptive response. The adaptive response could be considered as a nonspecific phenomenon in which exposure to minimal stress could result in increased resistance to higher levels of the same or to other types of stress some hours later. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the adaptive response may lead to an improvement of cancer treatment, risk assessment and risk management strategies, radiation protection, e.g. of astronauts during long-term space flights. In this mini-review we discuss some open questions and the probable underlying mechanisms involved in adaptive response: the transcription of many genes and the activation of numerous signaling pathways that trigger cell defenses - DNA repair systems, induction of proteins synthesis, enhanced detoxification of free radicals and antioxidant production.

  8. Adaptive behavior of neighboring neurons during adaptation-induced plasticity of orientation tuning in V1

    Shumikhina Svetlana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory neurons display transient changes of their response properties following prolonged exposure to an appropriate stimulus (adaptation. In adult cat primary visual cortex, orientation-selective neurons shift their preferred orientation after being adapted to a non-preferred orientation. The direction of those shifts, towards (attractive or away (repulsive from the adapter depends mostly on adaptation duration. How the adaptive behavior of a neuron is related to that of its neighbors remains unclear. Results Here we show that in most cases (75%, cells shift their preferred orientation in the same direction as their neighbors. We also found that cells shifting preferred orientation differently from their neighbors (25% display three interesting properties: (i larger variance of absolute shift amplitude, (ii wider tuning bandwidth and (iii larger range of preferred orientations among the cluster of cells. Several response properties of V1 neurons depend on their location within the cortical orientation map. Our results suggest that recording sites with both attractive and repulsive shifts following adaptation may be located in close proximity to iso-orientation domain boundaries or pinwheel centers. Indeed, those regions have a more diverse orientation distribution of local inputs that could account for the three properties above. On the other hand, sites with all cells shifting their preferred orientation in the same direction could be located within iso-orientation domains. Conclusions Our results suggest that the direction and amplitude of orientation preference shifts in V1 depend on location within the orientation map. This anisotropy of adaptation-induced plasticity, comparable to that of the visual cortex itself, could have important implications for our understanding of visual adaptation at the psychophysical level.

  9. Regulated cell death and adaptive stress responses.

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells react to potentially dangerous perturbations of the intracellular or extracellular microenvironment by activating rapid (transcription-independent) mechanisms that attempt to restore homeostasis. If such perturbations persist, cells may still try to cope with stress by activating delayed and robust (transcription-dependent) adaptive systems, or they may actively engage in cellular suicide. This regulated form of cell death can manifest with various morphological, biochemical and immunological correlates, and constitutes an ultimate attempt of stressed cells to maintain organismal homeostasis. Here, we dissect the general organization of adaptive cellular responses to stress, their intimate connection with regulated cell death, and how the latter operates for the preservation of organismal homeostasis. PMID:27048813

  10. Resistance Training: Physiological Responses and Adaptations (Part 3 of 4).

    Fleck, Steven J.; Kraemer, William J.

    1988-01-01

    The physiological responses and adaptations which occur as a result of resistance training, such as cardiovascular responses, serum lipid count, body composition, and neural adaptations are discussed. Changes in the endocrine system are also described. (JL)

  11. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Fibre Adaptation

    Arabadzhiev T. I.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hard-strength training induces strength increasing and muscle damage, especially after eccentric contractions. Eccentric contractions also lead to muscle adaptation. Symptoms of damage after repeated bout of the same or similar eccentrically biased exercises are markedly reduced. The mechanism of this repeated bout effect is unknown. Since electromyographic (EMG power spectra scale to lower frequencies, the adaptation is related to neural adaptation of the central nervous system (CNS presuming activation of slow-non-fatigable motor units or synchronization of motor unit firing. However, the repeated bout effect is also observed under repeated stimulation, i.e. without participation of the CNS. The aim of this study was to compare the possible effects of changes in intracellular action potential shape and in synchronization of motor units firing on EMG power spectra. To estimate possible degree of the effects of central and peripheral changes, interferent EMG was simulated under different intracellular action potential shapes and different degrees of synchronization of motor unit firing. It was shown that the effect of changes in intracellular action potential shape and muscle fibre propagation velocity (i.e. peripheral factors on spectral characteristics of EMG signals could be stronger than the effect of synchronization of firing of different motor units (i.e. central factors.

  12. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  13. Adaptive Response Surface Techniques in Reliability Estimation

    Enevoldsen, I.; Faber, M. H.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1993-01-01

    Problems in connection with estimation of the reliability of a component modelled by a limit state function including noise or first order discontinuitics are considered. A gradient free adaptive response surface algorithm is developed. The algorithm applies second order polynomial surfaces...... determined from central composite designs. In a two phase algorithm the second order surface is adjusted to the domain of the most likely failure point and both FORM and SORM estimates are obtained. The algorithm is implemented as a safeguard algorithm so non-converged solutions are avoided. Furthermore, a...

  14. Adaptive response to pneumonectomy in puppies.

    Thurlbeck, W. M.; Galaugher, W; Mathers, J.

    1981-01-01

    When left pneumonectomy was performed on 9-week-old puppies, the right lung increased in weight, volume, surface area, and number of alveoli so that at age 20 weeks these variables were the same as those of both lungs of control animals and significantly larger than those of the right lung of control animals. The adaptive response of the right lung after pneumonectomy was greater in the lower lobe than in the middle or cardiac lobes. The number of alveoli per ml and the average interalveolar ...

  15. Individual differences in response conflict adaptations

    DorisKeye

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Conflict-monitoring theory argues for a general cognitive mechanism that monitors for con-flicts in information-processing. If that mechanism detects conflict, it engages cognitive con-trol to resolve it. A slow-down in response to incongruent trials (conflict effect, and a modu-lation of the conflict effect by the congruence of the preceding trial (Gratton or context effect have been taken as indicators of such a monitoring system. The present study (N = 157 investigated individual differences in the conflict and the context effect in a horizontal and a vertical Simon task, and their correlation with working memory capacity. Strength of conflict was varied by proportion of congruent trials. Coherent factors could be formed representing individual differences in speeded performance, conflict adaptation, and context adaptation. Conflict and context factors were not associated with each other. Contrary to theories assuming a close relation between working memory and cognitive control, working memory capacity showed no relation with any factors representing adaptation to conflict.

  16. The possible role of chromatin conformation changes in adaptive responses to ionizing radiation

    Organisms are affected by different DNA damaging agents naturally present in the environment or released as a result of human activity. Many defense mechanisms have evolved in organisms to minimize genotoxic damage. One of them is induced radioresistance or adaptive response. The adaptive response could be considered as a nonspecific phenomenon in which exposure to minimal stress could result in increased resistance to higher levels of the same or to other types of stress some hours later. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the adaptive response may lead to an improvement of cancer treatment, risk assessment and risk management strategies, radiation protection. The aim of current study was to study the possible role of chromatin conformation changes induced by ionizing radiation on the adaptive responses in human lymphocyte. For this aim the chromatin conformation have been studied in human lymphocytes from three non-smoking and three smoking healthy volunteers prior, and after espouser to gamma radiation (adaptive dose 0.1 Gy, challenge dose 1.5 Gy and adaptive + dose challenge). Chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus have been used as end point to study radio cytotoxicity and adaptive response. Our results indicated individual differences in radio adaptive response and the level of this response was dependent of chromatin de condensation induced by a adaptive small dose.The results showed that different dose of gamma rays induce a chromatin de condensation in human lymphocyte. The maximum chromatin relaxation were record when lymphocyte exposed to adaptive dose (0.1 Gy.). Results also showed that Adaptive dose have affected on the induction of challenge dose (1.5 Gy) of chromosome aberration and micronucleus . The comparison of results of chromatin de condensation induction as measured by flow cytometry and cytogenetic damages measured by chromosomal aberrations or micronucleus, was showed a proportionality of adaptive response with

  17. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies.

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  18. Cross adaptive response of human blood lymphocytes in vitro, bone marrow cells and germ cells in mice in vivo induced by low doses of X-rays and low concentrations of MMC, H2O2 and CP

    Interaction of low doses of X-rays (two doses of 10 mGy and 50 mGy, a dose rate of 50 mGy/min) and low concentrations of MMC, H2O2 and CP on chromosome aberrations of human blood lymphocytes in vitro, bone marrow cells and germ cells in mice in vivo was studied in order to elucidate cross adaptive response between radiation and chemical agents. Results showed that cross adaptive response could be induced of (1) chromosome aberrations of bone marrow cells when MMC with different concentrations (0.5, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) were i.p. injected into mice 3 h after irradiation to 10 mGy X-rays. (2) chromosome aberrations of germ cells in mice by radiation and MMC, H2O2 when different concentrations of MMC, H2O2 and CP were i.p. injected into mice 3 h after irradiation to 50 mGy X-rays. However, it is not the case when CP applied, there is the synergetic effect between radiation and CP. (3) chromosome aberrations of human blood lymphocytes by 1.5 Gy X-irradiation 6 h after MMC (final concentration is 35 ng/mL) applied. (4) Anti-X rays damage by 1.5 Gy X-irradiation 24 h after low concentrations of MMC and H2O2, while not by CP. It provided the same conclusion as (2). The results suggested that the cross adaptive response of X-rays and MMC was induced not only in bone marrow cells in mice, but also in human blood lymphocytes in vitro. Besides, the response of interaction could be induced in germ cells in mice in vivo between low doses of X-rays and low concentrations of MMC and H2O2. But it is not the case for low concentrations of CP, the synergetic effect was produced between low concentration of CP and low dose of X-rays

  19. Stochastic switching induced adaptation in a starved Escherichia coli population.

    Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Tsuru, Saburo; Ito, Yoichiro; Ying, Bei-Wen; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Population adaptation can be determined by stochastic switching in living cells. To examine how stochastic switching contributes to the fate decision for a population under severe stress, we constructed an Escherichia coli strain crucially dependent on the expression of a rewired gene. The gene essential for tryptophan biosynthesis, trpC, was removed from the native regulatory unit, the Trp operon, and placed under the extraneous control of the lactose utilisation network. Bistability of the network provided the cells two discrete phenotypes: the induced and suppressed level of trpC. The two phenotypes permitted the cells to grow or not, respectively, under conditions of tryptophan depletion. We found that stochastic switching between the two states allowed the initially suppressed cells to form a new population with induced trpC in response to tryptophan starvation. However, the frequency of the transition from suppressed to induced state dropped off dramatically in the starved population, in comparison to that in the nourished population. This reduced switching rate was compensated by increasing the initial population size, which probably provided the cell population more chances to wait for the rarely appearing fit cells from the unfit cells. Taken together, adaptation of a starved bacterial population because of stochasticity in the gene rewired from the ancient regulon was experimentally confirmed, and the nutritional status and the population size played a great role in stochastic adaptation. PMID:21931628

  20. Stochastic switching induced adaptation in a starved Escherichia coli population.

    Yoshihiro Shimizu

    Full Text Available Population adaptation can be determined by stochastic switching in living cells. To examine how stochastic switching contributes to the fate decision for a population under severe stress, we constructed an Escherichia coli strain crucially dependent on the expression of a rewired gene. The gene essential for tryptophan biosynthesis, trpC, was removed from the native regulatory unit, the Trp operon, and placed under the extraneous control of the lactose utilisation network. Bistability of the network provided the cells two discrete phenotypes: the induced and suppressed level of trpC. The two phenotypes permitted the cells to grow or not, respectively, under conditions of tryptophan depletion. We found that stochastic switching between the two states allowed the initially suppressed cells to form a new population with induced trpC in response to tryptophan starvation. However, the frequency of the transition from suppressed to induced state dropped off dramatically in the starved population, in comparison to that in the nourished population. This reduced switching rate was compensated by increasing the initial population size, which probably provided the cell population more chances to wait for the rarely appearing fit cells from the unfit cells. Taken together, adaptation of a starved bacterial population because of stochasticity in the gene rewired from the ancient regulon was experimentally confirmed, and the nutritional status and the population size played a great role in stochastic adaptation.

  1. Formation and Regulation of Adaptive Response in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Y.-L. Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All organisms respond to environmental stresses (e.g., heavy metal, heat, UV irradiation, hyperoxia, food limitation, etc. with coordinated adjustments in order to deal with the consequences and/or injuries caused by the severe stress. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans often exerts adaptive responses if preconditioned with low concentrations of agents or stressor. In C. elegans, three types of adaptive responses can be formed: hormesis, cross-adaptation, and dietary restriction. Several factors influence the formation of adaptive responses in nematodes, and some mechanisms can explain their response formation. In particular, antioxidation system, heat-shock proteins, metallothioneins, glutathione, signaling transduction, and metabolic signals may play important roles in regulating the formation of adaptive responses. In this paper, we summarize the published evidence demonstrating that several types of adaptive responses have converged in C. elegans and discussed some possible alternative theories explaining the adaptive response control.

  2. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    simulated microgravity and temperature elevation have different effects on the small HSP genes belonging to subfamilies with different subcellular localization: cytosol/nucleus - PsHSP17.1-СІІ and PsHSP18.1-СІ, cloroplasts - PsHSP26.2-Cl, endoplasmatic reticulum - PsHSP22.7-ER and mitochondria - PsHSP22.9-M: unlike high temperature, clinorotation does not cause denaturation of cell proteins, that confirms the sHSP chaperone function. Dynamics of investigated gene expression in pea seedlings growing 5 days after seed germination under clinorotation was similar to that in the stationary control. Similar patterns in dynamics of sHSP gene expression in the stationary control and under clinorotation may be one of mechanisms providing plant adaptation to simulated microgravity. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in cell organelle functional load. Thus, next certain changes in the structure and function of plant cells may be considered as adaptive: 1) an increase in the unsaturated fatty acid content in the plasmalemma, 2) rearrangements of organelle ultrastructure and an increase in their functional load, 3) an increase in cortical F-actin under destabilization of tubulin microtubules, 4) the level of gene expression and synthesis of heat shock proteins, 5) alterations of the enzyme and antioxidant system activity. The dynamics of these patterns demonstrated that the adaptation occurs on the principle of self-regulating systems in the limits of physiological norm reaction. The very importance of changed expression of genes involved in different cellular processes, especially HSP genes, in cell adaptation to altered gravity is discussed.

  3. Molecular mechanism of radioadaptive response: A cross-adaptive response for enhanced repair of DNA damage in adapted cells

    The radioadaptive response (RAR) has been attributed to the induction of a repair mechanism by low doses of ionizing radiation, but the molecular nature of the mechanism is not yet elucidated. We have characterized RAR in a series of experiments in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells. A 4-h interval is required for the full expression of RAR, which decays with the progression of cell proliferation. Treatments with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, protein- or RNA synthesis, and protein kinase C suppress the RAR expression. The RAR cross-reacts on clastogenic lesions induced by other physical and chemical DNA-damaging agents. The presence of newly synthesised proteins has been detected during the expression period. Experiments performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis provided more direct evidence for a faster and enhaced DNA repair rate in adapted cells. Here, using single-cell gel electrophoresis, a cross-adaptive response has been demonstrated for enhanced repair of DNA damage induced by neocarzinostatin in radio-adapted cells. (author)

  4. Plant adaptation to dynamically changing environment: the shade avoidance response.

    Ruberti, I; Sessa, G; Ciolfi, A; Possenti, M; Carabelli, M; Morelli, G

    2012-01-01

    The success of competitive interactions between plants determines the chance of survival of individuals and eventually of whole plant species. Shade-tolerant plants have adapted their photosynthesis to function optimally under low-light conditions. These plants are therefore capable of long-term survival under a canopy shade. In contrast, shade-avoiding plants adapt their growth to perceive maximum sunlight and therefore rapidly dominate gaps in a canopy. Daylight contains roughly equal proportions of red and far-red light, but within vegetation that ratio is lowered as a result of red absorption by photosynthetic pigments. This light quality change is perceived through the phytochrome system as an unambiguous signal of the proximity of neighbors resulting in a suite of developmental responses (termed the shade avoidance response) that, when successful, result in the overgrowth of those neighbors. Shoot elongation induced by low red/far-red light may confer high relative fitness in natural dense communities. However, since elongation is often achieved at the expense of leaf and root growth, shade avoidance may lead to reduction in crop plant productivity. Over the past decade, major progresses have been achieved in the understanding of the molecular basis of shade avoidance. However, uncovering the mechanisms underpinning plant response and adaptation to changes in the ratio of red to far-red light is key to design new strategies to precise modulate shade avoidance in time and space without impairing the overall crop ability to compete for light. PMID:21888962

  5. A Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (SOD2)-Mediated Adaptive Response

    David J Grdina; Murley, Jeffrey S.; Miller, Richard C.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Sutton, Harold G.; Thirman, Michael J.; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    Very low doses of ionizing radiation, 5 to 100 mGy, can induce adaptive responses characterized by elevation in cell survival and reduction in micronuclei formation. Utilizing these end points, RKO human colon carcinoma and transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), wild-type or knockout cells missing TNF receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1−R2−), and C57BL/6 and TNFR1−R2− knockout mice, we demonstrate that intact TNF signaling is required for induction of elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) ...

  6. The surgically induced stress response.

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A; Herndon, David N

    2013-09-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes that induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Burn injuries provide an extreme model of trauma induced stress responses that can be used to study the long-term effects of a prolonged stress response. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to confer improved chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  7. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress respo...

  8. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  9. Expression of protein encoded by apoptosis-associated gene p53, bcl-2, and bax in adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by low dose radiation with X-rays

    Objective: To explore the regulative mechanism of apoptosis-associated gene proteins on the adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by low dose radiation with X-rays. Methods: Kunming male mice were irradiated with the inductive doses (D1: 25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 mGy; dose rate: 12.5 mGy ·min-1) and the challenging dose (D2: 1.5 Gy; dose rate: 287 mGy·min-1). The time interval between D1 and D2 was 6 h. The expressive levels of thymocyte apoptosis-associated gene proteins were measured with flow cytometry. Results: As compared with the sham-irradiation, the positive percentage of thymocyte Bcl-2 protein expression decreased significantly in D2 group (P<0.05), Bax increased significantly (P<0.05), and Bcl-2/Bax decreased significantly (P<0.001); p 53 increased significantly (P<0.001). As compared with D2 group, the positive percentage of thymocyte Bcl-2 protein expression increased in varying degree in D1+ D2 group of 25-75 mGy D1, Bax decreased in varying degree, and Bcl-2/Bax increased significantly (P<0.01); p53 decreased significantly (P<0.001 or P<0.05). Conclusion: The apoptotic thymocytes in the adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by irradiation with 25-75 mGy decrease significantly due to the increase of apoptosis-associated gene Bcl-2 protein expression and Bcl-2/Bax, the decrease of Bax and p53 protein expressions. (authors)

  10. How relevant to radiation protection is the adaptive response mechanism?

    There is evidence that the phenomenon of adaptive response (AR) which results from a low dose exposure could modify the risk of a subsequent radiation exposure, and conceivably could even provide a net benefit rather than the putative radiation detriment at low doses. The AR has been widely observed in human and other mammalian cells exposed to low doses and low-dose rates. The phenomenon has been demonstrated at the level of one track per cell, the lowest insult a cell can receive. The AR to radiation has been shown to: (i) protect against the DNA damaging effects of radiation and many chemical carcinogens; (ii) increase the probability that improperly repaired cells will die by apoptosis, thereby reducing risk to the whole organism; (iii) suppress both spontaneous- and radiation-induced neoplastic transformation in vitro; and (iv) reduce life-shortening in mice that develop myeloid leukemia as a result of a radiation exposure. It remains unclear, however, if the AR will be relevant to either risk assessment or radiation protection. There is currently no evidence of AR's influence on the incidence of radiogenic cancer in vivo although recent data indicate that adapting doses could lead to reduced risk in animal or human populations. Currently the existing dose control and dose management programs attempt to limit or eliminate even very low exposures, without evidence that such an approach has economic and societal benefits. Indeed, if adaptation from exposure to low doses provides the same responses in vivo as have been shown in vitro, then the current approach to protection against low doses may be counterproductive However, the demonstrated principles of the adaptive response to radiation in vitro will not likely influence the long held current formulation of radiation protection practices until the biological action of accumulated low doses of radiation in vivo and its impact on the modulation of radiation carcinogenesis are better understood. (author)

  11. Determination of the adaptive response induced In vivo by gamma radiation and its relation with the sensibility to the damage induction in the DNA and with the repairing capacity

    The kinetics of damage induction and repair at different doses as well as the adaptive response induced by gamma ray exposure were determined in murine leukocytes in vivo. The damage-repair kinetics were established after the exposure to 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 Gy in a 137Cs source. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from the tails of mice, the percentage of damaged cells and the DNA migration in each one were analyzed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) technique or comet assay. Results indicated that there was an induction of approximately 75% comets with the doses of 1.0 and 2.0 Gy, which was considerably reduced to 22% and 42% respectively during the first 15 minutes. This evidences the presence of a rapid repair process and suggests that leucocytes are genetically well prepared to repair this kind of damage. After 15 minutes, a second increase in the percentage of damaged cells that was proportional to dose occurred, which seems to represent the breaks produced during the repair of other kind of lesions. After that a second reduction was observed, reaching values near to the basal ones, except with the dose of 2.0 Gy. The kinetics obtained with the dose of 0.5 Gy was similar to that established with 1.0 Gy, but in this case the initial damage was 50 % lower. Besides, the adaptive response was observed after the exposure of the mice to an adaptive dose of 0.01 Gy and to a challenge dose of 1.0 Gy 60 minutes later. The pretreatment reduced the percentage of damaged cells caused by the challenge dose to one third approximately, and also diminished this parameter produced during the late repair process. This indicates that the early adaptive response is caused, instead of by an increment in repair, by the induction of a process that protects DNA from damage induction by radiation, i.e synthesis of substances that increase the scavenging of free radicals. (Author)

  12. Akt and MAPK signaling mediate pregnancy-induced cardiac adaptation.

    Chung, Eunhee; Yeung, Fan; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-05-01

    Although the signaling pathways underlying exercise-induced cardiac adaptation have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that result in the response of the heart to pregnancy. The objective of this study was to define the morphological, functional, and gene expression patterns that define the hearts of pregnant mice, and to identify the signaling pathways that mediate this response. Mice were divided into three groups: nonpregnant diestrus control, midpregnancy, and late pregnancy. Both time points of pregnancy were associated with significant cardiac hypertrophy. The prosurvival signaling cascades of Akt and ERK1/2 were activated in the hearts of pregnant mice, while the stress kinase, p38, was decreased. Given the activation of Akt in pregnancy and its known role in cardiac hypertrophy, the hypertrophic response to pregnancy was tested in mice expressing a cardiac-specific activated (myristoylated) form of Akt (myrAkt) or a cardiac-specific constitutively active (antipathologic hypertrophic) form of its downstream target, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (caGSK3β). The pregnancy-induced hypertrophic responses of hearts from these mice were significantly attenuated. Finally, we tested whether pregnancy-associated sex hormones could induce hypertrophy and alter signaling pathways in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). In fact, progesterone, but not estradiol treatment increased NRVM cell size via phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Inhibition of MEK1 effectively blocked progesterone-induced cellular hypertrophy. Taken together, our study demonstrates that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy is mediated by activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. PMID:22345431

  13. "I know, therefore I adapt?" Complexities of individual adaptation to climate-induced forest dieback in Alaska

    Lauren E. Oakes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Individual actions to avoid, benefit from, or cope with climate change impacts partly shape adaptation; much research on adaptation has focused at the systems level, overlooking drivers of individual responses. Theoretical frameworks and empirical studies of environmental behavior identify a complex web of cognitive, affective, and evaluative factors that motivate stewardship. We explore the relationship between knowledge of, and adaptation to, widespread, climate-induced tree mortality to understand the cognitive (i.e., knowledge and learning, affective (i.e., attitudes and place attachment, and evaluative (i.e., use values factors that influence how individuals respond to climate-change impacts. From 43 semistructured interviews with forest managers and users in a temperate forest, we identified distinct responses to local, climate-induced environmental changes that we then categorized as either behavioral or psychological adaptations. Interviewees developed a depth of knowledge about the dieback through a combination of direct, place-based experiences and indirect, mediated learning through social interactions. Knowing that the dieback was associated with climate change led to different adaptive responses among the interviewees, although knowledge alone did not explain this variation. Forest users reported psychological adaptations to process negative attitudes; these adaptations were spurred by knowledge of the causes, losses of intangible values, and impacts to a species to which they held attachment. Behavioral adaptations exclusive to a high level of knowledge included actions such as using the forests to educate others or changing transportation behaviors to reduce personal energy consumption. Managers integrated awareness of the dieback and its dynamics across spatial scales into current management objectives. Our findings suggest that adaptive management may occur from the bottom up, as individual managers implement new practices in

  14. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation in normal and aneuploid human lymphocytes

    The ability to induce an adaptive response with low doses of gamma rays was studied in normal and trisomic lymphocytes (47, XX or XY, +21). The results indicate the presence of an adaptive response in lymphocytes of 3 normal donors, but in lymphocytes of 5 donors with trisomy 21 no significant adaptive response was found after irradiation with a low dose of gamma rays. In normal and trisomic lymphocytes (47, XX or XY, +21) irradiated with 1.50 Gy, a similar chromosomal radiosensitivity was observed at the 48th hour after stimulation. (author) 2 tabs., 15 ref

  15. Characterization of recombinant B. abortus strain RB51SOD towards understanding the uncorrelated innate and adaptive immune responses induced by RB51SOD compared to its parent vaccine strain RB51

    Jianguo eZhu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen for several mammals, including humans. Live attenuated B. abortus strain RB51 is currently the official vaccine used against bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. Overexpression of protective B. abortus antigen Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD in a recombinant strain of RB51 (strain RB51SOD significantly increases its vaccine efficacy against virulent B. abortus challenge in a mouse model. An attempt has been made to better understand the mechanism of the enhanced protective immunity of RB51SOD compared to its parent strain RB51. We previously reported that RB51SOD stimulated enhanced Th1 immune response. In this study, we further found that T effector cells derived from RB51SOD-immunized mice exhibited significantly higher cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity than T effector cells derived from RB51-immunized mice against virulent B. abortus-infected target cells. Meanwhile, the macrophage responses to these two strains were also studied. Compared to RB51, RB51SOD cells had a lower survival rate in macrophages and induced lower levels of macrophage apoptosis and necrosis. The decreased survival of RB51SOD cells correlates with the higher sensitivity of RB51SOD, compared to RB51, to the bactericidal action of either Polymyxin B or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. Furthermore, a physical damage to the outer membrane of RB51SOD was observed by electron microscopy. Possibly due to the physical damage, overexpressed Cu/Zn SOD in RB51SOD was found to be released into the bacterial cell culture medium. Therefore, the stronger adaptive immunity induced by RB51SOD did not correlate with the low level of innate immunity induced by RB51SOD compared to RB51. This unique and apparently contradictory profile is likely associated with the differences in outer membrane integrity and Cu/Zn SOD release.

  16. Training induced adaptation in horse skeletal muscle

    van Dam, K.G.

    2006-01-01

    It appears that the physiological and biochemical adaptation of skeletal muscle to training in equine species shows a lot of similarities with human and rodent physiological adaptation. On the other hand it is becoming increasingly clear that intra-cellular mechanisms of adaptation (substrate transport, enzyme activity, etc) differ considerably between species. The major drawbacks in equine training physiological research are the lack of an appropriate training model and the lack of control o...

  17. Innate and adaptive immune responses to in utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Infection of pregnant cows with noncytopathic (ncp) BVDV induces rapid innate and adaptive immune responses resulting in clearance of the virus in less than 3 weeks. Seven to 14 days after inoculation of the cow, ncpBVDV crosses the placenta and induces a fetal viremia. Establishment of persistent ...

  18. Gene 33/Mig-6, a transcriptionally inducible adapter protein that binds GTP-Cdc42 and activates SAPK/JNK. A potential marker transcript for chronic pathologic conditions, such as diabetic nephropathy. Possible role in the response to persistent stress.

    Makkinje, A; Quinn, D A; Chen, A; Cadilla, C L; Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Kyriakis, J M

    2000-06-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extracellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  19. A Dynamic Analysis of the Shade-induced Plasticity in Arabidopsis thaliana Rosette Leaf Development Reveals New Components of the Shade-adaptative Response

    Cookson, Sarah Jane; Granier, Christine

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims It is well known that plant aerial development is affected by light intensity in terms of the date of flowering, the length of stems and petioles, and the final individual leaf area. The aim of the work presented here was to analyse how shade-induced changes in leaf development occur on a dynamic basis from the whole rosette level to that of the cells.

  20. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to improve chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  1. Molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low dose radiation

    Adaptive response is a term used to describe the ability of a low, priming dose of ionizing radiation to modify the effects of a subsequent higher, challenge dose. Molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low dose radiation is involved in signal transduction pathway, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage repair

  2. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  3. Pancreatic adaptive responses in alcohol abuse: Role of the unfolded protein response.

    Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T; Pandol, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The majority of those who drink excessive amounts of alcohol do not develop pancreatic disease. One overarching hypothesis is that alcohol abuse requires additional risk factors, either environmental or genetic, for disease to occur. However, another reason be a result of alcohol-induced activation of adaptive systems that protect the pancreas from the toxic effects of alcohol. We show that mechanisms within the unfolded protein response (UPR) of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can lead to protection of the pancreas from pancreatic diseases with alcohol abuse. The remarkable ability of the pancreas to adapt its machinery to alcohol abuse using UPR systems and continue functioning is the likely reason that pancreatitis from alcohol abuse does not occur in the majority of heavy drinkers. These findings indicate that methods to enhance the protective responses of the UPR can provide opportunities for prevention and treatment of pancreatic diseases. PMID:25736240

  4. Adaptive Queue Management with Restraint on Non-Responsive Flows

    Lan Li

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an adaptive queue management scheme (adaptive RED to improve Random Early Detection (RED on restraining non-responsive flows. Due to a lack of flow control mechanism, non-responsive flows can starve responsive flows for buffer and bandwidth at the gateway. In order to solve the disproportionate resource problem, RED framework is modified in this way: on detecting when the non-responsive flows starve the queue, packet-drop intensity (Max_p in RED can be adaptively adjusted to curb non-responsive flows for resource fair-sharing, such as buffer and bandwidth fair-sharing. Based on detection of traffic behaviors, intentionally restraining nonresponsive flows is to increase the throughput and decrease the drop rate of responsive flows. Our experimental results based on adaptive RED shows that the enhancement of responsive traffic and the better sharing of buffer and bandwidth can be achieved under a variety of traffic scenarios.

  5. Adaptive Filtering for Aeroservoelastic Response Suppression Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CSA Engineering proposes the design of an adaptive aeroelastic mode suppression for advanced fly-by-wire aircraft, which will partition the modal suppression...

  6. Vascular adaptive responses to physical exercise and to stress are affected differently by nandrolone administration

    T. Bruder-Nascimento

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Androgenic anabolic steroid, physical exercise and stress induce cardiovascular adaptations including increased endothelial function. The present study investigated the effects of these conditions alone and in combination on the vascular responses of male Wistar rats. Exercise was started at 8 weeks of life (60-min swimming sessions 5 days per week for 8 weeks, while carrying a 5% body-weight load. One group received nandrolone (5 mg/kg, twice per week for 8 weeks, im. Acute immobilization stress (2 h was induced immediately before the experimental protocol. Curves for noradrenaline were obtained for thoracic aorta, with and without endothelium from sedentary and trained rats, submitted or not to stress, treated or not with nandrolone. None of the procedures altered the vascular reactivity to noradrenaline in denuded aorta. In intact aorta, stress and exercise produced vascular adaptive responses characterized by endothelium-dependent hyporeactivity to noradrenaline. These conditions in combination did not potentiate the vascular adaptive response. Exercise-induced vascular adaptive response was abolished by nandrolone. In contrast, the aortal reactivity to noradrenaline of sedentary rats and the vascular adaptive response to stress of sedentary and trained rats were not affected by nandrolone. Maximum response for 7-10 rats/group (g: sedentary 3.8 ± 0.2 vs trained 3.0 ± 0.2*; sedentary/stress 2.7 ± 0.2 vs trained/stress 3.1 ± 0.1*; sedentary/nandrolone 3.6 ± 0.1 vs trained/nandrolone 3.8 ± 0.1; sedentary/stress/nandrolone 3.2 ± 0.1 vs trained/stress/nandrolone 2.5 ± 0.1*; *P < 0.05 compared to its respective control. Stress and physical exercise determine similar vascular adaptive response involving distinct mechanisms as indicated by the observation that only the physical exercise-induced adaptive response was abolished by nandrolone.

  7. Heat shock response and mammal adaptation to high elevation (hypoxia)

    WANG Xiaolin; XU Cunshuan; WANG Xiujie; WANG Dongjie; WANG Qingshang; ZHANG Baochen

    2006-01-01

    The mammal's high elevation (hypoxia) adaptation was studied by using the immunological and the molecular biological methods to understand the significance of Hsp (hypoxia) adaptation in the organic high elevation, through the mammal heat shock response. (1) From high elevation to low elevation (natural hypoxia): Western blot and conventional RT-PCR and real-time fluorescence quota PCR were adopted. Expression difference of heat shock protein of 70 (Hsp70) and natural expression of brain tissue of Hsp70 gene was determined in the cardiac muscle tissue among the different elevation mammals (yak). (2)From low elevation to high elevation (hypoxia induction):The mammals (domestic rabbits) from the low elevation were sent directly to the areas with different high elevations like 2300, 3300 and 5000 m above sea level to be raised for a period of 3 weeks before being slaughtered and the genetic inductive expression of the brain tissue of Hsp70 was determined with RT-PCR. The result indicated that all of the mammals at different elevations possessed their heat shock response gene. Hsp70 of the high elevation mammal rose abruptly under stress and might be induced to come into being by high elevation (hypoxia). The speedy synthesis of Hsp70 in the process of heat shock response is suitable to maintain the cells' normal physiological functions under stress. The Hsp70 has its threshold value. The altitude of 5000 m above sea level is the best condition for the heat shock response, and it starts to reduce when the altitude is over 6000 m above sea level. The Hsp70 production quantity and the cell hypoxia bearing capacity have their direct ratio.

  8. Chemotactic response and adaptation dynamics in Escherichia coli.

    Diana Clausznitzer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of the chemotaxis sensory pathway of the bacterium Escherichia coli is integral for detecting chemicals over a wide range of background concentrations, ultimately allowing cells to swim towards sources of attractant and away from repellents. Its biochemical mechanism based on methylation and demethylation of chemoreceptors has long been known. Despite the importance of adaptation for cell memory and behavior, the dynamics of adaptation are difficult to reconcile with current models of precise adaptation. Here, we follow time courses of signaling in response to concentration step changes of attractant using in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements. Specifically, we use a condensed representation of adaptation time courses for efficient evaluation of different adaptation models. To quantitatively explain the data, we finally develop a dynamic model for signaling and adaptation based on the attractant flow in the experiment, signaling by cooperative receptor complexes, and multiple layers of feedback regulation for adaptation. We experimentally confirm the predicted effects of changing the enzyme-expression level and bypassing the negative feedback for demethylation. Our data analysis suggests significant imprecision in adaptation for large additions. Furthermore, our model predicts highly regulated, ultrafast adaptation in response to removal of attractant, which may be useful for fast reorientation of the cell and noise reduction in adaptation.

  9. Antibody Response to Serpin B13 Induces Adaptive Changes in Mouse Pancreatic Islets and Slows Down the Decline in the Residual Beta Cell Function in Children with Recent Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Kryvalap, Yury; Lo, Chi-Wen; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Baldzizhar, Raman; Jospe, Nicholas; Czyzyk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is characterized by a heightened antibody (Ab) response to pancreatic islet self-antigens, which is a biomarker of progressive islet pathology. We recently identified a novel antibody to clade B serpin that reduces islet-associated T cell accumulation and is linked to the delayed onset of T1D. As natural immunity to clade B arises early in life, we hypothesized that it may influence islet development during that time. To test this possibility healthy young Balb/c male mice were injected with serpin B13 mAb or IgG control and examined for the number and cellularity of pancreatic islets by immunofluorescence and FACS. Beta cell proliferation was assessed by measuring nucleotide analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-EdU) incorporation into the DNA and islet Reg gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Human studies involved measuring anti-serpin B13 autoantibodies by Luminex. We found that injecting anti-serpin B13 monoclonal Ab enhanced beta cell proliferation and Reg gene expression, induced the generation of ∼80 pancreatic islets per animal, and ultimately led to increase in the beta cell mass. These findings are relevant to human T1D because our analysis of subjects just diagnosed with T1D revealed an association between baseline anti-serpin activity and slower residual beta cell function decline in the first year after the onset of diabetes. Our findings reveal a new role for the anti-serpin immunological response in promoting adaptive changes in the endocrine pancreas and suggests that enhancement of this response could potentially help impede the progression of T1D in humans. PMID:26578518

  10. Perceptual task induces saccadic adaptation by target selection

    Alexander Christian Schütz

    2015-10-01

    We replicated our finding that a perceptual task can drive adaptation of saccades. Adaptation showed no effect of feedback reliability, nor an effect of the perceptual task beyond target selection. Adaptation was induced by a top-down signal since it was absent when there was no target selection instruction and no perceptual task. The immediate error correction was larger for the difficult than for the easy condition, suggesting that task difficulty affects mainly voluntary saccade targeting. In addition, the repetition of experiments one week later increased the magnitude of the gradual error correction. The results dissociate two distinct components of adaptation: an immediate and a gradual error correction. We conclude that perceptual-task induced adaptation is most likely due to top-down target selection within a larger object.

  11. Stimuli for municipal responses to climate adaptation: insights from Philadelphia – an early adapter

    Uittenbroek, C.J.; Janssen-Jansen, Leonie; Runhaar, H.A.C.

    2016-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of these stimuli is currently lacking in literature as most research has focussed on overcoming barriers to climate adaptation. The aim of this paper is to identify stimuli for municipal responses to climate adaptation and examine how they influence the governance approach

  12. Responsiveness-to-Intervention: A "Systems" Approach to Instructional Adaptation

    Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom research on adaptive teaching indicates few teachers modify instruction for at-risk students in a manner that benefits them. Responsiveness-To-Intervention, with its tiers of increasingly intensive instruction, represents an alternative approach to adaptive instruction that may prove more workable in today's schools.

  13. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  14. Responsibility for private sector adaptation to climate change

    Tina Schneider

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007 indicates that vulnerable industries should adapt to the increasing likelihood of extreme weather events along with slowly shifting mean annual temperatures and precipitation patterns, to prevent major damages or periods of inoperability in the future. Most articles in the literature on business management frame organizational adaptation to climate change as a private action. This makes adaptation the sole responsibility of a company, for its sole benefit, and overlooks the fact that some companies provide critical goods and services such a food, water, electricity, and medical care, that are so vital to society that even a short-term setback in operations could put public security at risk. This raises the following questions: (1 Who is responsible for climate change adaptation by private-sector suppliers of critical infrastructure? (2 How can those who are identified to be responsible, actually be held to assume their responsibility for adapting to climate change? These questions will be addressed through a comprehensive review of the literature on business management, complemented by a review of specialized literature on public management. This review leads to several conclusions. Even though tasks that formerly belonged to the state have been taken over by private companies, the state still holds ultimate responsibility in the event of failure of private-sector owned utilities, insofar as they are “critical infrastructure.” Therefore, it remains the state’s responsibility to foster adaptation to climate change with appropriate action. In theory, effective ways of assuming this responsibility, while enabling critical infrastructure providers the flexibility adapt to climate change, would be to delegate adaptation to an agency, or to conduct negotiations with stakeholders. In view of this theory, Germany will be used as a case study to demonstrate how private-sector critical

  15. Using response times for item selection in adaptive testing

    Linden, van der Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a s

  16. Exposure to stressful environments - Strategy of adaptive responses

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Stresses such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure can produce strains in more than a single organ system, in turn stimulating the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups: (1) conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, (2) stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products such as CO2 and heat, and (3) environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of microenvironment, is often favored by the animal.

  17. Adaptive workflow simulation of emergency response

    Bruinsma, Guido Wybe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Recent incidents and major training exercises in and outside the Netherlands have persistently shown that not having or not sharing information during emergency response are major sources of emergency response inefficiency and error, and affect incident mitigation outcomes through workflow planning

  18. Responsible Climate Change Adaptation : Exploring, analysing and evaluating public and private responsibilities for urban adaptation to climate change

    Mees, Heleen

    2014-01-01

    Cities are vulnerable to climate change. To deal with climate change, city governments and private actors such as businesses and citizens need to adapt to its effects, such as sea level rise, storm surges, intense rainfall and heatwaves. However, adaptation planning and action is often hampered when the relevant public and private actors have only vague and ambiguous responsibilities. Some exploration on the issue of public and private responsibilities has been undertaken in the literature, b...

  19. Relation between radio-adaptive response and cell to cell communication

    Ionizing radiation has been considered to cause severe damages to DNA and do harm to cells in proportion to the dose, however low it might be. In 1984, Wolff et al. showed that human peripheral lymphocytes adapted to the low-dose radiation from 3H-TdR added in culture medium and became resistant to the subsequent irradiation with high-doses of X-rays. This response, which is called radio-adaptive response, is also induced by X-rays and gamma-rays in human lymphocytes and Chinese hamster V79 cells. However, the mechanisms of and conditions for adaptive responses to radiation have not been clarified. With an objective of clarifying the conditions for adaptive responses of cells to radiation, we examined how the cell to cell communication is involved in the adaptive responses. We irradiated normal human embryo-derived (HE) cells and cancer cells (HeLa) in culture at high density with low-dose X-ray and examined their radio-adaptive responses by measuring the changes in sensitivity to subsequent high-dose X-ray irradiation using the Trypan Blue dye-exclusion test method. We also conducted experiments to examine the effects of Ca2+ ions and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate (TPA) which are supposed to be involved in cell to cell communication. (author)

  20. The adaptive response of E. coli to low levels of alkylating agent

    In an attempt to characterise which gene products may be involved in the repair system induced in E. coli by growth on low levels of alkylating agent (the adaptive response) we have analysed mutants deficient in other known pathways of DNA repair for the ability to adapt to MNNG. Adaptive resistance to the killing effects of MNNG seems to require a functional DNA polymerase I whereas resistance to the mutagenic effects can occur in polymerase I deficient strains; similarly killing adaptation could not be observed in a dam3 mutant, which was nonetheless able to show mutational adaptation. These results suggest that these two parts of the adaptive response must, at least to some extent, be separable. Both adaptive responses can be seen in the absence of uvrD+ uvrE+-dependent mismatch repair, DNA polymerase II activity, or recF-mediated recombination and they are not affected by decreased levels of adenyl cyclase. The data presented support our earlier conclusion that adaptive resistance to the killing and mutagenic effect of MNNG is the result of previously uncharacterised repair pathways. (orig.)

  1. Adaptation or Manipulation? Unpacking Climate Change Response Strategies

    Timothy F. Smith

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation is a key feature of sustainable social–ecological systems. As societies traverse various temporal and spatial scales, they are exposed to differing contexts and precursors for adaptation. A cursory view of the response to these differing contexts and precursors suggests the particular ability of persistent societies to adapt to changing circumstances. Yet a closer examination into the meaning of adaptation and its relationship to concepts of resilience, vulnerability, and sustainability illustrates that, in many cases, societies actually manipulate their social–ecological contexts rather than adapt to them. It could be argued that manipulative behaviors are a subset of a broader suite of adaptive behaviors; however, this paper suggests that manipulative behaviors have fundamentally different intentions and outcomes. Specifically, adaptive behaviors are respectful of the intrinsic integrity of social–ecological systems and change is directed toward internal or self-regulating modification. By way of contrast, manipulative behaviors tend to disregard the integrity of social–ecological systems and focus on external change or manipulating the broader system with the aim of making self-regulation unnecessary. It is argued that adaptive behaviors represent long-term strategies for building resilience, whereas manipulative behaviors represent short-term strategies with uncertain consequences for resilience, vulnerability, and the sustainability of social–ecological systems. Of greatest significance; however, is that manipulative strategies have the potential to avoid authentic experiences of system dynamics, obscure valuable learning opportunities, create adverse path dependencies, and lessen the likelihood of effective adaptation in future contexts.

  2. The Nominal Response Model in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    De Ayala, R. J.

    One important and promising application of item response theory (IRT) is computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The implementation of a nominal response model-based CAT (NRCAT) was studied. Item pool characteristics for the NRCAT as well as the comparative performance of the NRCAT and a CAT based on the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model were…

  3. Bacterial genomic adaptation and response to metals

    The beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 (formerly Ralstonia metallidurans) has been intensively studied since 1976 in SCK-CEN and VITO, for its adaptation capacity to survive in harsh (mostly industrial) environments, to overcome acute environmental stresses, for its resistance to a variety of heavy metals and for applications in environmental biotechnology. Recently, CH34 has become a model bacterium to study the effect of spaceflight conditions in several space flight experiments conducted by SCK-CEN (e.g. MESSAGE, BASE). Furthermore, Cupriavidus and Ralstonia species are isolated from the floor, air and surfaces of spacecraft assembly rooms; were found prior-to-flight on surfaces of space robots such as the Mars Odyssey Orbiter and even in-flight in ISS cooling water and Shuttle drinking water, vindicating its role as model bacterium in space research. In addition, Ralstonia species are also the causative agent of nosocomial infections and are among the unusual species recovered from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The genomic organization of Cuprivavidus metallidurans CH34 was studied in-depth to identify the genetic and regulatory structures involved in the resistance to heavy metals

  4. Exposure to Stressful Environments: Strategy of Adaptive Responses

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Any new natural environment may generate a number of stresses (such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure), each of which can produce strains in more than a single organ system. Every strain may in turn stimulate the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups. The first category includes conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, while the second is made up by those stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products, such as CO2 and heat. In both classes, there is a small number of responses, similar in principle, regardless of the specific situation. The third unit is created by environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of micro-environment, is often favored by the animal.

  5. Oxazolone-induced contact hypersensitivity reduces lymphatic drainage but enhances the induction of adaptive immunity.

    David Aebischer

    Full Text Available Contact hypersensitivity (CHS induced by topical application of haptens is a commonly used model to study dermal inflammatory responses in mice. Several recent studies have indicated that CHS-induced skin inflammation triggers lymphangiogenesis but may negatively impact the immune-function of lymphatic vessels, namely fluid drainage and dendritic cell (DC migration to draining lymph nodes (dLNs. On the other hand, haptens have been shown to exert immune-stimulatory activity by inducing DC maturation. In this study we investigated how the presence of pre-established CHS-induced skin inflammation affects the induction of adaptive immunity in dLNs. Using a mouse model of oxazolone-induced skin inflammation we observed that lymphatic drainage was reduced and DC migration from skin to dLNs was partially compromised. At the same time, a significantly stronger adaptive immune response towards ovalbumin (OVA was induced when immunization had occurred in CHS-inflamed skin as compared to uninflamed control skin. In fact, immunization with sterile OVA in CHS-inflamed skin evoked a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH response comparable to the one induced by conventional immunization with OVA and adjuvant in uninflamed skin. Striking phenotypic and functional differences were observed when comparing DCs from LNs draining uninflamed or CHS-inflamed skin. DCs from LNs draining CHS-inflamed skin expressed higher levels of co-stimulatory molecules and MHC molecules, produced higher levels of the interleukin-12/23 p40 subunit (IL-12/23-p40 and more potently induced T cell activation in vitro. Immunization experiments revealed that blockade of IL-12/23-p40 during the priming phase partially reverted the CHS-induced enhancement of the adaptive immune response. Collectively, our findings indicate that CHS-induced skin inflammation generates an overall immune-stimulatory milieu, which outweighs the potentially suppressive effect of reduced lymphatic vessel function.

  6. Space Mapping With Adaptive Response Correction for Microwave Design Optimization

    Koziel, S.; Bandler, J.W.; Madsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    microwave area where the typical model response (e.g., vertical bar S-21 vertical bar) is a highly nonlinear function of the free parameter (e.g., frequency), the output space-mapping correction term may actually increase the mismatch between the surrogate and fine models for points other than the one at...... mapping by adaptive adjustment of the response correction term according to the changes of the space-mapped coarse model response. Examples indicate the robustness of our approach....

  7. Load Cell Response Correction Using Analog Adaptive Techniques

    Jafaripanah, Mehdi; Al-Hashimi, Bashir; White, Neil M.

    2003-01-01

    Load cell response correction can be used to speed up the process of measurement. This paper investigates the application of analog adaptive techniques in load cell response correction. The load cell is a sensor with an oscillatory output in which the measurand contributes to response parameters. Thus, a compensation filter needs to track variation in measurand whereas a simple, fixed filter is only valid at one load value. To facilitate this investigation, computer models for the load cell a...

  8. Adaptive plasticity and epigenetic variation in response to warming in an Alpine plant

    Adrienne B. Nicotra; Segal, Deborah L.; Hoyle, Gemma L; Schrey, Aaron W.; Verhoeven, Koen J. F.; Richards, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    Environmentally induced phenotypic plasticity may be a critical component of response to changing environments. We examined local differentiation and adaptive phenotypic plasticity in response to elevated temperature in half-sib lines collected across an elevation gradient for the alpine herb, Wahlenbergia ceracea. Using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP), we found low but significant genetic differentiation between low- and high-elevation seedlings, and seedlings originating from ...

  9. p53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations

    Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

  10. Bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive response, and cancer risk assessment for radiation and chemical exposures

    There is an increased interest in utilizing mechanistic data in support of the cancer risk assessment process for ionizing radiation and environmental chemical exposures. In this regard, the use of biologically based dose-response models is particularly advocated. The aim is to provide an enhanced basis for describing the nature of the dose-response curve for induced tumors at low levels of exposure. Cellular responses that might influence the nature of the dose-response curve at low exposures are understandably receiving attention. These responses (bystander effects, genomic instability, and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. The former two could result in an enhancement of the tumor response at low doses and the latter could lead to a reduced response compared to that predicted by a linear extrapolation from high dose responses. Bystander responses, whereby cells other than those directly traversed by radiation tracks are damaged, can alter the concept of target cell population per unit dose. Similarly, induced genomic instability can alter the concept of total response to an exposure. There appears to be a role for oxidative damage and cellular signaling in the etiology of these cellular responses. The adaptive response appears to be inducible at very low doses of radiation or of some chemicals and reduces the cellular response to a larger challenge dose. It is currently unclear how these cellular toxic responses might be involved in tumor formation, if indeed they are. In addition, it is not known how widespread they are as regards inducing agents. Thus, their impact on low dose cancer risk remains to be established

  11. REM SLEEP REBOUND AS AN ADAPTIVE RESPONSE TO STRESSFUL SITUATIONS

    Deborah eSuchecki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress and sleep are related to each other in a bidirectional way. If on one hand poor or inadequate sleep exacerbates emotional, behavioral and stress-related responses, on the other hand acute stress induces sleep rebound, most likely as a form to cope with the adverse stimuli. Chronic stress, conversely, has been claimed to be one of the triggering factors of emotional-related sleep disorders, such as insomnia, depressive- and anxiety-disorders. These outcomes are dependent on individual psychobiological characteristics, which confer more complexity to the stress-sleep relationship. Its neurobiology has only recently begun to be explored, through animal models, which are also valuable for the development of potential therapeutic agents and preventive actions. This review seeks to present data on the effects of stress on sleep and the different approaches used to study this relationship as well as possible neurobiological underpinnings and mechanisms involved. The results of numerous studies in humans and animals indicate that increased sleep, especially the REM phase, following a stressful situation is an important adaptive behavior for recovery. However, this endogenous advantage appears to be impaired in human beings and rodent strains that exhibit high levels of anxiety and anxiety-like behavior.

  12. Adaptation responses of crops to climate change

    Seino, Hiroshi [National Inst. of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    Appreciable global climatic responses to increasing levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and other trace gases are expected to take place over the next 50 to 80 years. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are producing or will produce changes in the climate of the Earth. In particular, numerous efforts of climate modeling project very substantial increase of surface air temperature. In addition to a general warming of the atmosphere, the possibility of increased summer dryness in the continental mid-latitudes has been suggested on the basis of both historical analogues and some General Circulation Model (GCM) studies. There are three types of effect of climatic change on agriculture: (1) the physiological (direct) effect of elevated levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} on crop plants and weeds, (2) the effect of changes in parameters of climate (e.g., temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation) on plants and animals, and (3) the effects of climate-related rises in sea-level on land use. The direct effects of elevated CO{sub 2} are on photosynthesis and respiration and thereby on growth, and there are additional effects of increased CO{sub 2} on development, yield quality and stomatal aperture and water use. A doubling of CO{sub 2} increases the instantaneous photosynthetic rate by 30% to 100%, depending on the other environmental conditions, and reduce water requirements of plants by reducing transpiration (per unit leaf area) through reductions in stomatal aperture. A doubling of CO{sub 2} causes partial stomatal closure on both C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} plants (approximately a 40% decrease in aperture). In many experiments this results in reductions of transpiration of about 23% to 46%. However. there is considerable uncertainty over the magnitude of this in natural conditions.

  13. Adaptive response and split-dose effect of radiation on the survival of mice

    Ashu Bhan Tiku; R K Kale

    2004-03-01

    Although the importance of radiation-induced adaptive response has been recognized in human health, risk assessment and clinical application, the phenomenon has not been understood well in terms of survival of animals. To examine this aspect Swiss albino mice were irradiated with different doses (2–10 Gy) at 0.015 Gy/s dose rate and observed on a regular basis for 30 days. Since almost 50% lethality was seen with 8 Gy, it was selected as the challenging dose for further studies. Irradiation of mice with conditioning doses (0.25 or 0.5 Gy) and subsequent exposure to 8 Gy caused significant increase in the survival of mice compared to irradiated control. The splitting of challenging dose did not influence the efficiency of conditioning doses (0.25 Gy and 0.5 Gy) to induce an adaptive response. However conditioning doses given in fractions (0.25 Gy + 0.25 Gy) or (0.5 Gy + 0.5 Gy) were able to modulate the response of challenging dose of 8 Gy. These results clearly showed the occurrence of adaptive response in terms of survival of animals. The conditioning dose given in small fractions seemed to be more effective. The findings have been discussed from a mechanistic point of view. The possible biological implications, potential medical benefits, uncertainties and controversies related to adaptive response have also been addressed.

  14. Adaptation responses to climate change differ between global megacities

    Georgeson, Lucien; Maslin, Mark; Poessinouw, Martyn; Howard, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Urban areas are increasingly at risk from climate change, with negative impacts predicted for human health, the economy and ecosystems. These risks require responses from cities to improve their resilience. Policymakers need to understand current adaptation spend to plan comprehensively and effectively. Through the measurement of spend in the newly defined `adaptation economy', we analyse current climate change adaptation efforts in ten megacities. In all cases, the adaptation economy remains a small part of the overall economy, representing a maximum of 0.33% of a city's gross domestic product (here referred to as GDPc). Differences in total spend are significant between cities in developed, emerging and developing countries, ranging from #15 million to #1,600 million. Comparing key subsectors, we demonstrate the differences in adaptation profiles. Developing cities have higher proportional spend on health and agriculture, whereas developed cities have higher spend on energy and water. Spend per capita and percentage of GDPc comparisons more clearly show disparities between cities. Developing country cities spend half the proportion of GDPc and significantly less per capita, suggesting that adaptation spend is driven by wealth rather than the number of vulnerable people. This indicates that current adaptation activities are insufficient in major population centres in developing and emerging economies.

  15. The Pupillary Orienting Response Predicts Adaptive Behavioral Adjustment after Errors.

    Peter R Murphy

    Full Text Available Reaction time (RT is commonly observed to slow down after an error. This post-error slowing (PES has been thought to arise from the strategic adoption of a more cautious response mode following deployment of cognitive control. Recently, an alternative account has suggested that PES results from interference due to an error-evoked orienting response. We investigated whether error-related orienting may in fact be a pre-cursor to adaptive post-error behavioral adjustment when the orienting response resolves before subsequent trial onset. We measured pupil dilation, a prototypical measure of autonomic orienting, during performance of a choice RT task with long inter-stimulus intervals, and found that the trial-by-trial magnitude of the error-evoked pupil response positively predicted both PES magnitude and the likelihood that the following response would be correct. These combined findings suggest that the magnitude of the error-related orienting response predicts an adaptive change of response strategy following errors, and thereby promote a reconciliation of the orienting and adaptive control accounts of PES.

  16. Impact of Global Changes on Mountains: Responses and Adaptation

    Stephan Harrison

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Impact of Global Changes on Mountains: Responses and Adaptation. Edited by Velma I. Grover, Axel Borsdorf, Jürgen Breuste, Prakash Chandra Tiwari, Flavia Witkowski Frangetto, . Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2015. ix + 517 pp. £ 103.00. Also available as an e-book. ISBN 978-1-4822-0890-0.

  17. Adaptive Patterns of Stress Responsivity: A Preliminary Investigation

    Del Giudice, Marco; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Ellis, Bruce J.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in stress responsivity. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a middle childhood sample (N = 256). Measures of autonomic nervous system activity across the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches validated the 4-pattern…

  18. Zinc-Induced Transposition of Insertion Sequence Elements Contributes to Increased Adaptability of Cupriavidus metallidurans

    Vandecraen, Joachim; Monsieurs, Pieter; Mergeay, Max; Leys, Natalie; Aertsen, Abram; Van Houdt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can respond to adverse environments by increasing their genomic variability and subsequently facilitating adaptive evolution. To demonstrate this, the contribution of Insertion Sequence (IS) elements to the genetic adaptation of Cupriavidus metallidurans AE126 to toxic zinc concentrations was determined. This derivative of type strain CH34, devoid of its main zinc resistance determinant, is still able to increase its zinc resistance level. Specifically, upon plating on medium supplemented with a toxic zinc concentration, resistant variants arose in which a compromised cnrYX regulatory locus caused derepression of CnrH sigma factor activity and concomitant induction of the corresponding RND-driven cnrCBA efflux system. Late-occurring zinc resistant variants likely arose in response to the selective conditions, as they were enriched in cnrYX disruptions caused by specific IS elements whose transposase expression was found to be zinc-responsive. Interestingly, deletion of cnrH, and consequently the CnrH-dependent adaptation potential, still enabled adaptation by transposition of IS elements (ISRme5 and IS1086) that provided outward-directed promoters driving cnrCBAT transcription. Finally, adaptation to zinc by IS reshuffling can also enhance the adaptation to subsequent environmental challenges. Thus, transposition of IS elements can be induced by stress conditions and play a multifaceted, pivotal role in the adaptation to these and subsequent stress conditions. PMID:27047473

  19. Nanoparticles for nasal delivery of vaccines : monitoring adaptive immune responses

    Keijzer, C.

    2013-01-01

    The continuous emergence of new pathogens and growing drug resistance of microorganisms asks for innovative vaccination strategies. An alternative to conventional multiple injection vaccines is the nasal route of vaccine delivery. The immune response induced following nasal antigen delivery depends

  20. Global transcriptional, physiological and metabolite analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough responses to salt adaptation

    He, Z.; Zhou, A.; Baidoo, E.; He, Q.; Joachimiak, M. P.; Benke, P.; Phan, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wall, J.; Stahl, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Zhou, J.

    2009-12-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. The growth of D. vulgaris was inhibited by high levels of NaCl, and the growth inhibition could be relieved by the addition of exogenous amino acids (e.g., glutamate, alanine, tryptophan) or yeast extract. Salt adaptation induced the expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). Genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell motility, and phage structures were repressed. Comparison of transcriptomic profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation with those of salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure) showed some similarity as well as a significant difference. Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine were accumulated under salt adaptation, suggesting that they may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. A conceptual model is proposed to link the observed results to currently available knowledge for further understanding the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl.

  1. Infinite impulse response modal filtering in visible adaptive optics

    Agapito, G; Quirós-Pacheco, F; Puglisi, A; Esposito, S

    2012-01-01

    Diffraction limited resolution adaptive optics (AO) correction in visible wavelengths requires a high performance control. In this paper we investigate infinite impulse response filters that optimize the wavefront correction: we tested these algorithms through full numerical simulations of a single-conjugate AO system comprising an adaptive secondary mirror with 1127 actuators and a pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS). The actual practicability of the algorithms depends on both robustness and knowledge of the real system: errors in the system model may even worsen the performance. In particular we checked the robustness of the algorithms in different conditions, proving that the proposed method can reject both disturbance and calibration errors.

  2. Infinite impulse response modal filtering in visible adaptive optics

    Agapito, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.

    2012-07-01

    Diffraction limited resolution adaptive optics (AO) correction in visible wavelengths requires a high performance control. In this paper we investigate infinite impulse response filters that optimize the wavefront correction: we tested these algorithms through full numerical simulations of a single-conjugate AO system comprising an adaptive secondary mirror with 1127 actuators and a pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS). The actual practicability of the algorithms depends on both robustness and knowledge of the real system: errors in the system model may even worsen the performance. In particular we checked the robustness of the algorithms in different conditions, proving that the proposed method can reject both disturbance and calibration errors.

  3. Frequency Response Adaptive Control of a Refrigeration Cycle

    Jens G. Balchen

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the adaptation of controller parameters in a single control loop based upon the estimation of frequency response parameters has been presented in an earlier paper. This paper contains an extension and a generalization of the first method and results in a more versatile solution which is applicable to a wider range of process characteristics. The application of this adaptive control technique is illustrated by a laboratory refrigeration cycle in which the evaporator pressure controls the speed of the compressor.

  4. Aspects of the adaptive response to very low doses of radiation and other agents

    When human lymphocytes and other cells are pre-exposed to very low doses of ionizing radiation and subsequently exposed to a high dose, less genetic damage, i.e., fewer chromosome aberrations, is found than is observed in cells that had not been pre-exposed. This has been termed the adaptive response and has been attributed to the induction of a repair mechanism by the low dose exposure. Several experiments have now been carried out on this adaptive response to better characterize the phenomenon. (A) Experiments with differential display of mRNAs indicate that human lymphocytes exposed to 2 cGy of X-rays have somewhat different mRNAs expressed than do unexposed cells. This is providing access to DNA that might be involved in adaptation. (B) Other experiments with embryonic cells from transgenic mice that are deficient in superoxide dismutase (SOD) have shown that the adaptive response is unrelated to the amount of SOD in the cells, and thus is independent of superoxide radicals. (C) Experiments in which very low doses of various restriction enzymes were electroporated into human lymphocytes have shown that low levels of double-strand DNA breaks alone are able to induce the adaptive response. (D) Experiments in which human male lymphocytes (XY chromosome constitution) and human female lymphocytes (XX chromosome constitution) were cocultivated have shown that adaptation is not caused by a change in the rate of cell progression to mitosis after a challenge dose, and is a further indication that cell stage sensitivity is not a factor in the adaptive response

  5. Multigenerational epigenetic adaptation of the hepatic wound-healing response.

    Zeybel, Müjdat; Hardy, Timothy; Wong, Yi K; Mathers, John C; Fox, Christopher R; Gackowska, Agata; Oakley, Fiona; Burt, Alastair D; Wilson, Caroline L; Anstee, Quentin M; Barter, Matt J; Masson, Steven; Elsharkawy, Ahmed M; Mann, Derek A; Mann, Jelena

    2012-09-01

    We investigated whether ancestral liver damage leads to heritable reprogramming of hepatic wound healing in male rats. We found that a history of liver damage corresponds with transmission of an epigenetic suppressive adaptation of the fibrogenic component of wound healing to the male F1 and F2 generations. Underlying this adaptation was less generation of liver myofibroblasts, higher hepatic expression of the antifibrogenic factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and lower expression of the profibrogenic factor transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) compared to rats without this adaptation. Remodeling of DNA methylation and histone acetylation underpinned these alterations in gene expression. Sperm from rats with liver fibrosis were enriched for the histone variant H2A.Z and trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys27 (H3K27me3) at PPAR-γ chromatin. These modifications to the sperm chromatin were transmittable by adaptive serum transfer from fibrotic rats to naive rats and similar modifications were induced in mesenchymal stem cells exposed to conditioned media from cultured rat or human myofibroblasts. Thus, it is probable that a myofibroblast-secreted soluble factor stimulates heritable epigenetic signatures in sperm so that the resulting offspring better adapt to future fibrogenic hepatic insults. Adding possible relevance to humans, we found that people with mild liver fibrosis have hypomethylation of the PPARG promoter compared to others with severe fibrosis. PMID:22941276

  6. Filoviruses and the balance of innate, adaptive, and inflammatory responses.

    Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Chen, Lieping; Olinger, Gene G; Pratt, William D; Schmaljohn, Alan L

    2006-01-01

    The Filoviruses Marburg virus and Ebola virus are among the deadliest of human pathogens, causing fulminant hemorrhagic fevers typified by overmatched specific immune responses and profuse inflammatory responses. Keys to both vaccination and treatment may reside, first, in the understanding of immune dysfunctions that parallel Filoviral disease and, second, in devising ways to redirect and restore normal immune function as well as to mitigate inflammation. Here, we describe how Filoviral infections may subvert innate immune responses through perturbances of dendritic cells and neutrophils, with particular emphasis on the downstream effects on adaptive immunity and inflammation. We suggest that pivotal events may be subject to therapeutic intervention as Filoviruses encounter immune processes. PMID:17201655

  7. Adaptive radiation-induced epigenetic alterations mitigated by antioxidants

    Bernal, Autumn J.; Dolinoy, Dana C; Huang, Dale; Skaar, David A.; Weinhouse, Caren; Jirtle, Randy L

    2013-01-01

    Humans are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) from a number of environmental and medical sources. In addition to inducing genetic mutations, there is concern that LDIR may also alter the epigenome. Such heritable effects early in life can either be positively adaptive or result in the enhanced formation of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Herein, we show that LDIR significantly increased DNA methylation at the viable yellow agouti (Avy) locus in a sex-specific man...

  8. Landowner response to wildfire risk: Adaptation, mitigation or doing nothing.

    Gan, Jianbang; Jarrett, Adam; Johnson Gaither, Cassandra

    2015-08-15

    Wildfire has brought about ecological, economic, and social consequences that engender human responses in many parts of the world. How to respond to wildfire risk is a common challenge across the globe particularly in areas where lands are controlled by many small private owners because effective wildfire prevention and protection require coordinated efforts of neighboring stakeholders. We explore (i) wildfire response strategies adopted by family forestland owners in the southern United States, one of the most important and productive forest regions in the world, through a landowner survey; and (ii) linkages between the responses of these landowners and their characteristics via multinomial logistic regression. We find that landowners used diverse strategies to respond to wildfire risk, with the most popular responses being "doing nothing" and combined adaptation and mitigation, followed by adaptation or mitigation alone. Landowners who had lost properties to wildfire, lived on their forestlands, had a forest management plan, and were better educated were more likely to proactively respond to wildfire risk. Our results indicate the possibility to enhance the effectiveness of collective action of wildfire risk response by private forestland owners and to coordinate wildfire response with forest conservation and certification efforts. These findings shed new light on engaging private landowners in wildfire management in the study region and beyond. PMID:26074470

  9. Sequential monitoring of response-adaptive randomized clinical trials

    Zhu, Hongjian; 10.1214/10-AOS796

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials are complex and usually involve multiple objectives such as controlling type I error rate, increasing power to detect treatment difference, assigning more patients to better treatment, and more. In literature, both response-adaptive randomization (RAR) procedures (by changing randomization procedure sequentially) and sequential monitoring (by changing analysis procedure sequentially) have been proposed to achieve these objectives to some degree. In this paper, we propose to sequentially monitor response-adaptive randomized clinical trial and study it's properties. We prove that the sequential test statistics of the new procedure converge to a Brownian motion in distribution. Further, we show that the sequential test statistics asymptotically satisfy the canonical joint distribution defined in Jennison and Turnbull (\\citeyearJT00). Therefore, type I error and other objectives can be achieved theoretically by selecting appropriate boundaries. These results open a door to sequentially monitor res...

  10. The adaptive value of parental responsiveness to nestling begging

    Grodzinski, Uri; Lotem, Arnon

    2007-01-01

    Despite extensive theoretical and empirical research into offspring food solicitation behaviour as a model for parent–offspring conflict and communication, the adaptive value of parental responsiveness to begging has never been tested experimentally. Game theory models, as well as empirical studies, suggest that begging conveys information on offspring state, which implies that parental investment can be better translated to fitness by responding to begging when allocating resources rather th...

  11. Comparison of adaptive response to γ-radiation and nickel sulfate treatment in human cells

    The comparison of the adaptive response to the impact of the γ-irradiation and nickel sulfate treatment in human cells, as the adaptive factors relative to these mutagens in the challenging doses by the cells survival criterium, is carried out. The pretreatment of human fibroblasts (the rhabdomyosarcoma line) with the low dose γ-radiation (10-14 cGy) formed increased viability of human cells to the nickel sulfate high concentrations (10-5-10-3 M). The adaptive response observed was similar to the radioadaptive response in human fibroblasts pretreated with low doses of γ-radiation with subsequent impact of high dose radiation. The pretreatment of human cells with the nickel sulfate low concentrations induced the DNA increased stability by impact of challenging doses of the γ-radiation and stimulated the DNA reparative synthesis by impact of both NiSO4 and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide. These data confirm the existence of the cross-sectional adaptive response in the experiments with the nickel sulfate

  12. Temporal recalibration in vocalization induced by adaptation of delayed auditory feedback.

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants produced a single voice sound repeatedly with specific delay times of DAF (0, 66, 133 ms during three minutes to induce 'Lag Adaptation'. They then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback. We found that lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. Furthermore, we found that the temporal recalibration in vocalization can be affected by averaging delay times in the adaptation phase. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  13. Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis

    Since disease processes are largely expressions of how living organisms react and respond to perturbations in the external and internal environments, adaptive or protective responses and their modulations and mechanisms are of the greatest concern in fundamental studies of disease pathogenesis. Such considerations are also of the greatest relevance in toxicology, including how living organisms respond to low levels of single and multiple xenobiotics and radiations. As the steps and mechanisms during cancer development are studied in greater depth, phenomena become apparent that suggest that adaptive reactions and responses may play important or even critical roles in the process of carcinogenesis. The question becomes whether the process of carcinogenesis is fundamentally an adversarial one (i.e., an abnormal cell in a vulnerable host), or is it more in the nature of a physiological selection or differentiation, which has survival value for the host as an adaptive phenomena? The very early initial interactions of mutagenic chemical carcinogens, radiations and viruses with DNA prejudice most to consider the adversarial 'abnormal' view as the appropriate one. Yet, the unusually common nature of the earliest altered rare cells that appear during carcinogenesis, their unusually bland nature, and their spontaneous differentiation to normal-appearing adult liver should be carefully considered

  14. Prolonged stress induces adaptation of drosophila population to ionizing radiation

    We studied natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster from radio-contaminated area (Vetka district of Gomel region with 24 Ci/km2 of 137Cs and 0.5 Cu/km2 of 90Sr) and from Berezynski Natural Reserve as a control area (region of Chernobyl catastrophe). Population samples were caught in 2000-2001 years. Natural insect populations from radio-contaminated areas are more resistant to additional irradiation than control populations. Keeping of natural populations under laboratory or vivarium conditions is a strong stress (limited space, overpopulation, other than in nature temperature and light conditions), which increases mutation process and induces unspecific adaptation. (authors)

  15. Central adaptation of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Sundstrup, Emil;

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of long-standing musculoskeletal pain and adaptations in response to physical rehabilitation is important for developing optimal treatment strategies. The influence of central adaptations of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain remains...

  16. Receptor-Induced Dilatation in the Systemic and Intrarenal Adaptation to Pregnancy in Rats

    Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Gomes, Thiago S.; Reis, Luciana A.; Ferreira, Alice T.; Razvickas, Clara V.; Schor, Nestor; Boim, Mirian A.

    2009-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with systemic and intrarenal vasodilatation resulting in an increased glomerular filtration rate. This adaptive response occurs in spite of elevated circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang II). In the present study, we evaluated the potential mechanisms responsible for this adaptation. The reactivity of the mesangial cells (MCs) cultured from 14-day-pregnant rats to Ang II was measured through changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Cai]). The expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the Ang II-induced vasodilatation receptor AT2, and the relaxin (LGR7) receptor were evaluated in cultured MCs and in the aorta, renal artery and kidney cortex by real time-PCR. The intrarenal distribution of LGR7 was further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The MCs displayed a relative insensitivity to Ang II, which was paralleled by an impressive increase in the expression level of iNOS, AT2 and LGR7. These results suggest that the MCs also adapt to the pregnancy, thereby contributing to the maintenance of the glomerular surface area even in the presence of high levels of Ang II. The mRNA expression levels of AT2 and LGR7 also increased in the aorta, renal artery and kidney of the pregnant animals, whereas the expression of the AT1 did not significantly change. This further suggests a role of these vasodilatation-induced receptors in the systemic and intrarenal adaptation during pregnancy. LGR7 was localized in the glomeruli and on the apical membrane of the tubular cells, with stronger labeling in the kidneys of pregnant rats. These results suggest a role of iNOS, AT2, and LGR7 in the systemic vasodilatation and intrarenal adaptation to pregnancy and also suggest a pivotal role for relaxin in the tubular function during gestation. PMID:19287481

  17. Evidence of cross-stressor - induced adaptive gastric cytoprotection

    Glavin, G.B.; Lockhart, L.K.; Rockman, G.E.; Hall, A.M.; Kiernan, K.M.

    1987-11-09

    Rats were given 7 days pre-treatment with either water (p.o.), 1 h immobilization or 20% ethanol (p.o.) with or without concomitant indomethacin injection. Following the pre-treatment phase, rats from each pre-treatment group were exposed to either 3 h cold-restraint stress or to 100% ethanol p.o. Results indicated that immobilization and 20% ethanol pre-treatment significantly reduce both cold-restraint stress ulcer formation and 100% ethanol-induced ulcers. Indomethacin co-treatment attenuated the reduction of ulcer formation of both pretreatments. These results suggest that cross-stressor adaptive cytoprotection occurs. Indomethacin abolished these effects, implicating the involvement of endogenous prostaglandins in the mediation of cross-stressor - induced gastric cytoprotection. 12 references, 2 figures.

  18. Inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) Involves in radioadaptive response

    Radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) cells did not show the adaptive response, i.e. a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose (4 Gy) of a radiation when a priming dose (1 cGy) had been applied 4 or 7 hrs earlier, but its thermoresistant clone (TR) did. Since inducible HSP70 expression was different between two cell lines, the role of inducible HSP70 in adaptive response was examined. When inducible hsp70 was transfected to RIF cells, the adaptive response was acquired. Inducible hsp70 transfected NIH3T3 mouse embryo cells also conferred radioresistance when detected by clonogenic survival, [3H]-thymidine incoporation, and ELISA cell death detection kit, as well as increased tendency of induction adaptive response. Interestingly, basal levels of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent PKC activities were increased by inducible HSP70, when compared to those of control vector cells. Irradiation of g-ray induced PKC activation within minutes in control vector cells, while it did not by inducible HSP70. Cellular redistribution to particulate fraction of PKCa, d and z by g-rays was not detected either. Furthermore, radioresistance by inducible HSP70 was disappeared by pre-treatment of PKC inhibitors, 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfomyI)-2-methylpepirazine (H7), prolonged treatment of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and GF109203X in clonogenic survival assay. Taken together, these data suggest that inducible HSP70-induced radioresistance is associated with its elevated level of PKC activity

  19. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: → Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. → The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. → No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. → Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  20. Roles of chemical signals in regulation of the adaptive responses to iron deficiency.

    Liu, Xing Xing; He, Xiao Lin; Jin, Chong Wei

    2016-05-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for plants but is not readily accessible in most calcareous soils. Although the adaptive responses of plants to iron deficiency have been well documented, the signals involved in the regulatory cascade leading to their activation are not well understood to date. Recent studies revealed that chemical compounds, including sucrose, auxin, ethylene and nitric oxide, positively regulated the Fe-deficiency-induced Fe uptake processes in a cooperative manner. Nevertheless, cytokinins, jasmonate and abscisic acid were shown to act as negative signals in transmitting the iron deficiency information. The present mini review is to briefly address the roles of chemical signals in regulation of the adaptive responses to iron deficiency based on the literatures published in recent years. PMID:27110729

  1. Distributed Demand Response and User Adaptation in Smart Grids

    Fan, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed framework for demand response and user adaptation in smart grid networks. In particular, we borrow the concept of congestion pricing in Internet traffic control and show that pricing information is very useful to regulate user demand and hence balance network load. User preference is modeled as a willingness to pay parameter which can be seen as an indicator of differential quality of service. Both analysis and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the dynamics and convergence behavior of the algorithm.

  2. Adaptive governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations in Alaska.

    Bronen, Robin; Chapin, F Stuart

    2013-06-01

    This article presents governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations. In Alaska, repeated extreme weather events coupled with climate change-induced coastal erosion impact the habitability of entire communities. Community residents and government agencies concur that relocation is the only adaptation strategy that can protect lives and infrastructure. Community relocation stretches the financial and institutional capacity of existing governance institutions. Based on a comparative analysis of three Alaskan communities, Kivalina, Newtok, and Shishmaref, which have chosen to relocate, we examine the institutional constraints to relocation in the United States. We identify policy changes and components of a toolkit that can facilitate community-based adaptation when environmental events threaten people's lives and protection in place is not possible. Policy changes include amendment of the Stafford Act to include gradual geophysical processes, such as erosion, in the statutory definition of disaster and the creation of an adaptive governance framework to allow communities a continuum of responses from protection in place to community relocation. Key components of the toolkit are local leadership and integration of social and ecological well-being into adaptation planning. PMID:23690592

  3. Role of SHIP-1 in the adaptive immune responses to aeroallergen in the airway.

    Sukit Roongapinun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Th2-dominated inflammatory response in the airway is an integral component in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway is involved in the process. We previously reported that SHIP-1, a negative regulator of the PI3K pathway, is essential in maintaining lung immunohomeostasis, potentially through regulation of innate immune cells. However, the function of SHIP-1 in adaptive immune response in the lung has not been defined. We sought to determine the role of SHIP-1 in adaptive immunity in response to aeroallergen stimulation in the airway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SHIP-1 knockout (SHIP-1-/- mice on BALB/c background were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus aluminum hydroxide, a strong Th2-inducing immunization, and challenged with OVA. Airway and lung inflammation, immunoglobulin response, Th2 cytokine production and lymphocyte response were analyzed and compared with wild type mice. Even though there was mild spontaneous inflammation in the lung at baseline, SHIP-1-/- mice showed altered responses, including less cell infiltration around the airways but more in the parenchyma, less mucus production, decreased Th2 cytokine production, and diminished serum OVA-specific IgE, IgG1, but not IgG2a. Naïve and OVA sensitized SHIP-1-/- T cells produced a lower amount of IL-4. In vitro differentiated SHIP-1-/- Th2 cells produced less IL-4 compared to wild type Th2 cells upon T cell receptor stimulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that, in contrast to its role as a negative regulator in the innate immune cells, SHIP-1 acts as a positive regulator in Th2 cells in the adaptive immune response to aeroallergen. Thus any potential manipulation of SHIP-1 activity should be adjusted according to the specific immune response.

  4. 2.5D induced polarization forward modeling using the adaptive finite-element method

    Ye Yi-Xin; Li Yu-Guo; Deng Ju-Zhi; Li Ze-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The conventional finite-element (FE) method often uses a structured mesh, which is designed according to the user’s experience, and it is not sufficiently accurate and flexible to accommodate complex structures such as dipping interfaces and rough topography. We present an adaptive FE method for 2.5D forward modeling of induced polarization (IP). In the presented method, an unstructured triangulation mesh that allows for local mesh refinement and flexible description of arbitrary model geometries is used. Furthermore, the mesh refinement process is guided by dual error estimate weighting to bias the refinement towards elements that affect the solution at the receiver locations. After the final mesh is generated, the Jacobian matrix is used to obtain the IP response on 2D structure models. We validate the adaptive FE algorithm using a vertical contact model. The validation shows that the elements near the receivers are highly refined and the average relative error of the potentials converges to 0.4%and 1.2%for the IP response. This suggests that the numerical solution of the adaptive FE algorithm converges to an accurate solution with the refined mesh. Finally, the accuracy and flexibility of the adaptive FE procedure are also validated using more complex models.

  5. Complement activation pathways: a bridge between innate and adaptive immune responses in asthma.

    Wills-Karp, Marsha

    2007-07-01

    Although it is widely accepted that allergic asthma is driven by T helper type 2 (Th2)-polarized immune responses to innocuous environmental allergens, the mechanisms driving these aberrant immune responses remain elusive. Recent recognition of the importance of innate immune pathways in regulating adaptive immune responses have fueled investigation into the role of innate immune pathways in the pathogenesis of asthma. The phylogenetically ancient innate immune system, the complement system, is no exception. The emerging paradigm is that C3a production at the airway surface serves as a common pathway for the induction of Th2-mediated inflammatory responses to a variety of environmental triggers of asthma (i.e., allergens, pollutants, viral infections, cigarette smoke). In contrast, C5a plays a dual immunoregulatory role by protecting against the initial development of a Th2-polarized adaptive immune response via its ability to induce tolerogenic dendritic cell subsets. On the other hand, C5a drives type 2-mediated inflammatory responses once inflammation ensues. Thus, alterations in the balance of generation of the various components of the complement pathway either due to environmental exposure changes or genetic alterations in genes of the complement cascade may underlie the recent rise in asthma prevalence in westernized countries. PMID:17607007

  6. Biological Stress Response Terminology: Integrating the Concepts of Adaptive Response and Preconditioning Stress Within a Hormetic Dose-Response Framework

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stres...

  7. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion

    Michele Fornaciai; Roberto Arrighi; Burr, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. Th...

  8. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior

    Tassé, Marc J.; Schalock, Robert L.; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry, Jr.; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A.; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F.; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT…

  9. Detection of plant adaptation responses to saline environment in rhizosphere using microwave sensing

    The physiological adaptation responses in plants to environmental stress, such as water stress and salt stress induce changes in physicochemical conditions of the plant, since formation of osmotic-regulatory substances can be formed during the environmental adaptation responses. Strong electrolytes, amino acids, proteins and saccharides are well-known as osmoregulatory substances. Since these substances are ionic conductors and their molecules are electrically dipolar, it can be considered that these substances cause changes in the dielectric properties of the plant, which can be detected by microwave sensing. The dielectric properties (0.3 to 3GHz), water content and water potential of plant leaves which reflect the physiological condition of the plant under salt stress were measured and analyzed. Experimental results showed the potential of the microwave sensing as a method for monitoring adaptation responses in plants under saline environment and that suggested the saline environment in rhizosphere can be detected noninvasively and quantitatively by the microwave sensing which detects the changes in complex dielectric properties of the plant

  10. Cytogenetic monitoring, radiosensitivity study and adaptive response of workers exposed to low level ionizing radiation

    The objectives of the present study were: To determine the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from individuals belonging to professionally exposed groups, under normal conditions; to determine the possible differences in radiosensitivity between the lymphocytes of technicians and controls after in vitro irradiation with gamma rays during the G1 phase of the cell cycle (radiosensitivity study), and to examine the influence of in vivo and in vitro pre-exposure to low doses of radiation on the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by high doses (study of the adaptive response) in a group of technicians (T) compared to controls (C). (author)

  11. Comparative characteristics of electroretinograms induced by light and x-ray stimulation under different adaptation conditions

    It has been demonstrated previously that the administration of certain chemicals reveals in the X-ray-induced electroretinogram (X-ERG) two electrical processes that are not found in photoinduced electroretinograms. A question arises whether the revealed first and second X-ray reactions are natural and physiological, or whether they are the response to the chemical effect upon the retina or the entire organism of the test animal. The present study investigates changes in electroretinograms induced by X-rays and by red and blue light in the process of the natural dark adaptation of the animals eyes from standard illumination. The results show that the two-component character of X-ERG may be the result not only of the introduction of some specific chemicals, e.g., of sodium axide, monoiodoacetate, or some other specific retinal poisons, but also the result of the natural adaptation of the retina to darkness. They also provide evidence in favor of the earlier hypothesis that postulates that the summary ERG, induced by short X-ray exposure, also includes responses specific for ionizing stimuli

  12. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines

  13. Offspring's hydromineral adaptive responses to maternal undernutrition during lactation.

    Nuñez, P; Arguelles, J; Perillan, C

    2015-12-01

    Early development, throughout gestation and lactation, represents a period of extreme vulnerability during which susceptibility to later metabolic and cardiovascular injuries increases. Maternal diet is a major determinant of the foetal and newborn developmental environment; maternal undernutrition may result in adaptive responses leading to structural and molecular alterations in various organs and tissues, such as the brain and kidney. New nephron anlages appear in the renal cortex up to postnatal day 4 and the last anlages to be formed develop into functional nephrons by postnatal day 10 in rodents. We used a model of undernutrition in rat dams that were food-restricted during the first half of the lactation period in order to study the long-term effects of maternal diet on renal development, behaviour and neural hydromineral control mechanisms. The study showed that after 40% food restriction in maternal dietary intake, the dipsogenic responses for both water and salt intake were not altered; Fos expression in brain areas investigated involved in hydromineral homeostasis control was always higher in the offspring in response to isoproterenol. This was accompanied by normal plasma osmolality changes and typical renal histology. These results suggest that the mechanisms for the control of hydromineral balance were unaffected in the offspring of these 40% food-restricted mothers. Undernutrition of the pups may not be as drastic as suggested by dams' restriction. PMID:26234469

  14. The dependence of the magnitude of induced adaptive responseon on the dose of pre-irradiation of cultured human lymphocytes under the optimum irradiation time scheme

    Human lymphocytes exposed to low doses of X-rays, become less susceptible to the induction of chromosome aberrations by subsequent exposure to high doses of X-rays. This has been termed the radioadaptive response. One of the most important questions in the adaptive response studies was that of the possible existence of an optimum adapting dose. Early experiments indicated that this response could be induced by low doses of X-rays from 1 cGy to 20 cGy. Recently, it has been interestingly shown that the time scheme of exposure to adapting and challenge doses plays an important role in determination of the magnitude of the induced adaptive response. In this study, using the optimum irradiation time scheme (24-48), we have monitored the cytogenetic endpoint of chromosome aberrations to assess the magnitude of adaptation to ionizing radiation in the cultured human lymphocytes. Lymphocytes were pre-exposed to an adapting dose of 1-20 cGy at 24 hours, before an acute challenge dose of 1 or 2 Gy at 48 hours. Cells were fixed at 54 hours. Lymphocytes, which were pretreated with 5 as well as 10 cGy adapting doses, had significantly fewer chromosome aberrations. In spite of the fact that lymphocytes of some of our blood donors which were pre-treated with 1 or 20 cGy adapting doses, showed an adaptive response, the pooled data (all donors) indicated that such an induction of adaptive response can not be observed in these lymphocytes. The overall pattern of the induced adaptive response, indicated that in human lymphocyte (at least under the above mentioned irradiation scheme), 5 cGy and 10 cGy adapting doses are the optimum doses. (author)

  15. Radiation-induced gene responses

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5' region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression

  16. Phenotypic plasticity as an adaptive response to predictable and unpredictable environmental changes

    Manenti, Tommaso

    such as anti-predator behaviours or the activation of mechanisms to prevent thermal stress injuries suggest that plasticity is an adaptive response, favoured by natural selection. At the same time, organisms do show limited plastic responses, indicating that this ability is not for free. Costs and...... benefits of a plastic response are expected to depend on the environmental conditions experienced by organisms. Thus, in populations exposed to a non-changing environment, the plastic machinery might be a waste of resources. Contrary, in populations experiencing varying environmental conditions, plasticity...... selected Drosophila simulans for many generations in three thermal regimes, specifically designed to affect the levels of plasticity. The three environments were found to induce high levels of plasticity and to affect stress resistance and life history traits differently. However, flies selected in...

  17. Adaptive response of Chironomus riparius populations exposed to uranium contaminated sediments during consecutive generations

    The intensity of selection on populations caused by polluted environment often exceeds which is caused by an unpolluted environment. Therefore, micro evolution can occur in response to this anthropic-directional force over a short period. In this context, this thesis focused on studying phenotypic changes in Chironomus riparius populations exposed during several consecutive generations to uranium-contaminated sediments. In laboratory-controlled conditions experiments were conducted with same origin populations exposed to a range of uranium concentration inducing toxic effects. Over eight-generations of exposure, life-history traits measures revealed micro evolution in exposed populations, including increase of adult reproductive success. Other experiments (acute toxicity test, common garden experiment) performed in parallel enabled to link these micro evolution with a tolerance induction, as a consequence of genetic adaptation. Nonetheless this adaptation also induced cost in terms of fitness and genetic diversity for pre-exposed populations. These results lead to the hypothesis of a selection by uranium that acted sequentially on populations. They also underline the need to better-understand the adaptive mechanisms to better assess the ecological consequences of chronic exposure of populations to a pollutant. (author)

  18. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing.

  19. EXERCISE-INDUCED ARTERIAL ADAPTATIONS IN ELITE JUDO ATHLETES

    Panagiotis Karagounis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine exercise-induced arterial adaptations in elite Judo male and female athletes. 27 male Judo athletes (age 24.06 ± 2 years, 11 female Judoka (age 24.27 ± 1 years, 27 sedentary healthy men (age 24.01 ± 2 years and 11 women (age 24.21 ± 1 years participated in the current study. The examined vessels included brachial, radial, ulnar, popliteal, anterior and posterior tibial arteries. The experimental parameters were recorded with the use of Duplex ultrasound at rest. Diastolic diameter and blood mean flow velocity of the examined arteries in Judo athletes were found to be both significantly increased (p < 0.05 compared to the findings of the control groups. In male Judo athletes the brachial (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and anterior tibial artery (p < 0.001 presented the highest difference on the diastolic diameter, compared with the control male group. In female Judo athletes, ulnar (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and brachial (p < 0.001 arteries illustrated the highest diastolic diameter. The highest blood mean flow velocity was recorded in ulnar (p < 0.001 and popliteal arteries (p < 0.001 of the Judo athletes groups. Recording differences between the two genders, male participants presented larger arteries than females. Conclusively, Judo has been found to be a highly demanding physical sport, involving upper and lower limbs leading to significant arterial adaptations. Obtaining vascular parameters provide a useful tool to the medical team, not only in the direction of enhancement of the efficacy of physical training, but in unknown so far parameters that may influence athletic performance of both male and female elite Judokas

  20. Control of the adaptive immune response by tumor vasculature

    Laetitia eMauge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium is nowadays described as an entire organ that regulates various processes: vascular tone, coagulation, inflammation, and immune cell trafficking, depending on the vascular site and its specific microenvironment as well as on endothelial cell-intrinsic mechanisms like epigenetic changes. In this review, we will focus on the control of the adaptive immune response by the tumor vasculature. In physiological conditions, the endothelium acts as a barrier regulating cell trafficking by specific expression of adhesion molecules enabling adhesion of immune cells on the vessel, and subsequent extravasation. This process is also dependent on chemokine and integrin expression, and on the type of junctions defining the permeability of the endothelium. Endothelial cells can also regulate immune cell activation. In fact, the endothelial layer can constitute immunological synapses due to its close interactions with immune cells, and the delivery of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory signals. In tumor conditions, the vasculature is characterized by abnormal vessel structure and permeability, and by specific phenotype of endothelial cells. All these abnormalities lead to a modulation of intratumoral immune responses and contribute to the development of intratumoral immunosuppression, which is a major mechanism for promoting the development, progression and treatment resistance of tumors. The in-depth analysis of these various abnormalities will help defining novel targets for the development of antitumoral treatments. Furthermore, eventual changes of the endothelial cell phenotype identified by plasma biomarkers could secondarily be selected to monitor treatment efficacy.

  1. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  2. Extratropical Transitions in Atlantic Canada: Impacts and Adaptive Responses

    Masson, Athena; Catto, Norm

    2013-04-01

    . Storm surge damage occurred along the north shore of the Bonavista Peninsula. Similar effects, differing only in the size of the affected areas, have resulted from several extratropical transitions which have impacted Atlantic Canada since July 1989. Extratropical transition "Leslie" impacted Newfoundland on 10-11 September 2012. Although the area affected was comparable to "Igor", wind velocities and rainfall totals were less, fortunately limiting damage. Preparation, advance warning to the population, proaction, and response efforts all showed significant improvement, however, indicating that the experience gained from coping with "Igor" had been successfully applied in adaptation to "Leslie". Extratropical transitions pose a significantly different set of challenges for adaptation in comparison to purely tropical hurricanes, and responses and adaptation strategies should be tailored to address these specific events. Calculating the frequency, magnitude and intensity of potential shifts is important for accurate forecasting and public awareness, safety management, preparedness, and adaptation. Available data indicate an increase in extratropical frequency and severity in Atlantic Canada since 1991, but there are difficulties in establishing the extent and nature of transition for previous storm events. A cautionary policy would assume no significant changes in extratropical transition frequency for Atlantic Canada, but would also acknowledge that large events remain probable.

  3. Synchrony between orientation-selective neurons is modulated during adaptation-induced plasticity in cat visual cortex

    Shumikhina Svetlana

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual neurons respond essentially to luminance variations occurring within their receptive fields. In primary visual cortex, each neuron is a filter for stimulus features such as orientation, motion direction and velocity, with the appropriate combination of features eliciting maximal firing rate. Temporal correlation of spike trains was proposed as a potential code for linking the neuronal responses evoked by various features of a same object. In the present study, synchrony strength was measured between cells following an adaptation protocol (prolonged exposure to a non-preferred stimulus which induce plasticity of neurons' orientation preference. Results Multi-unit activity from area 17 of anesthetized adult cats was recorded. Single cells were sorted out and (1 orientation tuning curves were measured before and following 12 min adaptation and 60 min after adaptation (2 pairwise synchrony was measured by an index that was normalized in relation to the cells' firing rate. We first observed that the prolonged presentation of a non-preferred stimulus produces attractive (58% and repulsive (42% shifts of cell's tuning curves. It follows that the adaptation-induced plasticity leads to changes in preferred orientation difference, i.e. increase or decrease in tuning properties between neurons. We report here that, after adaptation, the neuron pairs that shared closer tuning properties display a significant increase of synchronization. Recovery from adaptation was accompanied by a return to the initial synchrony level. Conclusion We conclude that synchrony reflects the similarity in neurons' response properties, and varies accordingly when these properties change.

  4. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Adaptive Responses of an Enterobacteriaceae Strain LSJC7 to Arsenic Exposure

    Zhang, Yingjiao; Chen, Songcan; Hao, Xiuli; Su, Jian-Qiang; Xue, Ximei; Yan, Yu; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) resistance determinant ars operon is present in many bacteria and has been demonstrated to enhance As(V) resistance of bacteria. However, whole molecular mechanism adaptations of bacteria in response to As(V) stress remain largely unknown. In this study, transcriptional profiles of Enterobacteriaceae strain LSJC7 responding to As(V) stress were analyzed using RNA-seq and qRT-PCR. As expected, genes involved in As(V) uptake were down-regulated, those involved in As(V) reduction and As(III) efflux were up-regulated, which avoided cellular As accumulation. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO) were induced, which caused cellular damages including DNA, protein, and Fe–S cluster damage in LSJC7. The expression of specific genes encoding transcriptional regulators, such as nsrR and soxRS were also induced. NsrR and SoxRS modulated many critical metabolic activities in As(V) stressed LSJC7 cells, including reactive species scavenging and repairing damaged DNA, proteins, and Fe–S clusters. Therefore, besides As uptake, reduction, and efflux; oxidative stress defense and damage repair were the main cellular adaptive responses of LSJC7 to As(V) stress. PMID:27199962

  5. Ultramarathon is an outstanding model for the study of adaptive responses to extreme load and stress.

    Millet, Grégoire P; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2012-01-01

    Ultramarathons comprise any sporting event involving running longer than the traditional marathon length of 42.195 km (26.2 miles). Studies on ultramarathon participants can investigate the acute consequences of ultra-endurance exercise on inflammation and cardiovascular or renal consequences, as well as endocrine/energetic aspects, and examine the tissue recovery process over several days of extreme physical load. In a study published in BMC Medicine, Schütz et al. followed 44 ultramarathon runners over 4,487 km from South Italy to North Cape, Norway (the Trans Europe Foot Race 2009) and recorded daily sets of data from magnetic resonance imaging, psychometric, body composition and biological measurements. The findings will allow us to better understand the timecourse of degeneration/regeneration of some lower leg tissues such as knee joint cartilage, to differentiate running-induced from age-induced pathologies (for example, retropatelar arthritis) and finally to assess the interindividual susceptibility to injuries. Moreover, it will also provide new information about the complex interplay between cerebral adaptations/alterations and hormonal influences resulting from endurance exercise and provide data on the dose-response relationship between exercise and brain structure/function. Overall, this study represents a unique attempt to investigate the limits of the adaptive response of human bodies.Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/78. PMID:22812424

  6. Ultramarathon is an outstanding model for the study of adaptive responses to extreme load and stress

    Millet Grégoire P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultramarathons comprise any sporting event involving running longer than the traditional marathon length of 42.195 km (26.2 miles. Studies on ultramarathon participants can investigate the acute consequences of ultra-endurance exercise on inflammation and cardiovascular or renal consequences, as well as endocrine/energetic aspects, and examine the tissue recovery process over several days of extreme physical load. In a study published in BMC Medicine, Schütz et al. followed 44 ultramarathon runners over 4,487 km from South Italy to North Cape, Norway (the Trans Europe Foot Race 2009 and recorded daily sets of data from magnetic resonance imaging, psychometric, body composition and biological measurements. The findings will allow us to better understand the timecourse of degeneration/regeneration of some lower leg tissues such as knee joint cartilage, to differentiate running-induced from age-induced pathologies (for example, retropatelar arthritis and finally to assess the interindividual susceptibility to injuries. Moreover, it will also provide new information about the complex interplay between cerebral adaptations/alterations and hormonal influences resulting from endurance exercise and provide data on the dose-response relationship between exercise and brain structure/function. Overall, this study represents a unique attempt to investigate the limits of the adaptive response of human bodies. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/78

  7. Crosstalk between innate and adaptive immune responses to infectious bronchitis virus after vaccination and challenge of chickens varying in serum mannose-binding lectin concentrations

    Juul-Madsen, Helle R.; Norup, Liselotte R.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    . Serum MBL levels also influenced IBV vaccine-induced changes in circulating T-cell populations. Moreover, addition of mannose to an IBV vaccine altered both vaccine-induced changes in circulating T-cell populations and IBV specific vaccine and infection-induced antibody responses in chickens with high...... serum MBL levels. These data demonstrate that MBL is involved in the regulation of the adaptive immune response to IBV....

  8. Fisheries-induced neutral and adaptive evolution in exploited fish populations and consequences for their adaptive potential

    Marty, Lise; Dieckmann, Ulf; Ernande, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Fishing may induce neutral and adaptive evolution affecting life-history traits, and molecular evidence has shown that neutral genetic diversity has declined in some exploited populations. Here, we theoretically study the interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution caused by fishing. An...... individual-based eco-genetic model is devised that includes neutral and functional loci in a realistic ecological setting. In line with theoretical expectations, we find that fishing induces evolution towards slow growth, early maturation at small size and higher reproductive investment. We show, first, that...

  9. Risk factors that may modify the innate and adaptive immune responses in periodontal diseases.

    Knight, Ellie T; Liu, Jenny; Seymour, Gregory J; Faggion, Clovis M; Cullinan, Mary P

    2016-06-01

    Plaque-induced periodontal diseases occur in response to the accumulation of dental plaque. Disease manifestation and progression is determined by the nature of the immune response to the bacterial complexes in plaque. In general, predisposing factors for these periodontal diseases can be defined as those factors which retain or hinder the removal of plaque and, depending upon the nature of the immune response to this plaque, the disease will either remain stable and not progress or it may progress and result in chronic periodontitis. In contrast, modifying factors can be defined as those factors that alter the nature or course of the inflammatory lesion. These factors do not cause the disease but rather modify the chronic inflammatory response, which, in turn, is determined by the nature of the innate and adaptive immune responses and the local cytokine and inflammatory mediator networks. Chronic inflammation is characterized by vascular, cellular and repair responses within the tissues. This paper will focus on how common modifying factors, such as smoking, stress, hormonal changes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and HIV/AIDS, influence each of these responses, together with treatment implications. As treatment planning in periodontics requires an understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease, it is important for all modifying factors to be taken into account. For some of these, such as smoking, stress and diabetic control, supportive health behavior advice within the dental setting should be an integral component for overall patient management. PMID:27045429

  10. Adaptive magnetorheological shock isolation mounts for drop-induced impacts

    Non-dimensional analysis and optimal control design of adaptive magnetorheological shock isolation (MRSI) mounts are addressed for drop-induced impacts. The governing equation of motion of a single degree-of-freedom under impact was derived, where a magnetorheological energy absorber (MREA), which has controllable stroking load and a passive linear spring, isolate the payload mass from the base that impacts the ground. During the impact event, the payload experiences both a compression and a rebound stroke. During the compression stroke, the payload descends as the MREA dissipates and the spring stores, the energy of impact. During the rebound stroke, the spring releases its stored energy under the control of the MREA. The Bingham number, defined as the ratio of the MREA yield force to its viscous force, is utilized as the control variable. A non-dimensional analysis was conducted using key parameters such as available MREA stroke and Bingham number. The first control objective was to ensure that the payload achieved a soft landing (i.e., comes to rest) at the end of the compression stroke by fully utilizing the available stroke of the MREA. The second control objective was to completely recover the available MREA stroke during rebound, with no overshoot of the equilibrium point, i.e. dead-beat control. It is shown that the optimal MRSI control strategy implies the selection of two distinct Bingham numbers, one for the compression stroke and one for the rebound stroke, which achieve the control objectives. (fast track communication)

  11. Adaptation or malignant transformation: the two faces of epigenetically mediated response to stress.

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation--the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments. PMID:24187667

  12. Determination of the adaptive response induced In vivo by gamma radiation and its relation with the sensibility to the damage induction in the DNA and with the repairing capacity; Determinacion de la respuesta adaptativa inducida In vivo por radiacion gamma y su relacion con la sensibilidad a la induccion de dano en el ADN y con la capacidad de reparacion

    Mendiola C, M.T

    2002-07-01

    The kinetics of damage induction and repair at different doses as well as the adaptive response induced by gamma ray exposure were determined in murine leukocytes in vivo. The damage-repair kinetics were established after the exposure to 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 Gy in a {sup 137}Cs source. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from the tails of mice, the percentage of damaged cells and the DNA migration in each one were analyzed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) technique or comet assay. Results indicated that there was an induction of approximately 75% comets with the doses of 1.0 and 2.0 Gy, which was considerably reduced to 22% and 42% respectively during the first 15 minutes. This evidences the presence of a rapid repair process and suggests that leucocytes are genetically well prepared to repair this kind of damage. After 15 minutes, a second increase in the percentage of damaged cells that was proportional to dose occurred, which seems to represent the breaks produced during the repair of other kind of lesions. After that a second reduction was observed, reaching values near to the basal ones, except with the dose of 2.0 Gy. The kinetics obtained with the dose of 0.5 Gy was similar to that established with 1.0 Gy, but in this case the initial damage was 50 % lower. Besides, the adaptive response was observed after the exposure of the mice to an adaptive dose of 0.01 Gy and to a challenge dose of 1.0 Gy 60 minutes later. The pretreatment reduced the percentage of damaged cells caused by the challenge dose to one third approximately, and also diminished this parameter produced during the late repair process. This indicates that the early adaptive response is caused, instead of by an increment in repair, by the induction of a process that protects DNA from damage induction by radiation, i.e synthesis of substances that increase the scavenging of free radicals. (Author)

  13. Mouse retinal adaptive response to proton irradiation: Correlation with DNA repair and photoreceptor cell death

    Tronov, V. A.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Poplinskaya, V. A.; Nekrasova, E. I.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging body of data indicate protecting effect of low level of stress (preconditioning) on retina. Our previous study revealed non-linear dose-response relationship for cytotoxicity of both ionizing radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on mouse retina. Moreover, non cytotoxic dose of MNU increased tolerance of retina to following challenge dose of MNU. This result displays protection of retina through mechanism of recovery. In present study we used the mouse model for MNU-induced retinal degeneration to evaluate adaptive response of retina to proton irradiation and implication in it of glial Muller cells. The data showed that the recovery of retina after genotoxic agents has been associated with increased efficacy of DNA damage repair and lowered death of retinal photoreceptor cells.

  14. Distributed reinforcement learning for adaptive and robust network intrusion response

    Malialis, Kleanthis; Devlin, Sam; Kudenko, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks constitute a rapidly evolving threat in the current Internet. Multiagent Router Throttling is a novel approach to defend against DDoS attacks where multiple reinforcement learning agents are installed on a set of routers and learn to rate-limit or throttle traffic towards a victim server. The focus of this paper is on online learning and scalability. We propose an approach that incorporates task decomposition, team rewards and a form of reward shaping called difference rewards. One of the novel characteristics of the proposed system is that it provides a decentralised coordinated response to the DDoS problem, thus being resilient to DDoS attacks themselves. The proposed system learns remarkably fast, thus being suitable for online learning. Furthermore, its scalability is successfully demonstrated in experiments involving 1000 learning agents. We compare our approach against a baseline and a popular state-of-the-art throttling technique from the network security literature and show that the proposed approach is more effective, adaptive to sophisticated attack rate dynamics and robust to agent failures.

  15. Adaptive Response of T and B Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is initiated by the retention and accumulation of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins, particularly low-density lipoprotein, in the artery wall. In the arterial intima, lipoprotein components that are generated through oxidative, lipolytic, and proteolytic activities lead to the formation of several danger-associated molecular patterns, which can activate innate immune cells as well as vascular cells. Moreover, self- and non-self-antigens, such as apolipoprotein B-100 and heat shock proteins, can contribute to vascular inflammation by triggering the response of T and B cells locally. This process can influence the initiation, progression, and stability of plaques. Substantial clinical and experimental data support that the modulation of adaptive immune system may be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. This may lead to the development of more selective and less harmful interventions, while keeping host defense mechanisms against infections and tumors intact. Approaches such as vaccination might become a realistic option for cardiovascular disease, especially if they can elicit regulatory T and B cells and the secretion of atheroprotective antibodies. Nevertheless, difficulties in translating certain experimental data into new clinical therapies remain a challenge. In this review, we discuss important studies on the function of T- and B-cell immunity in atherosclerosis and their manipulation to develop novel therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular disease. PMID:26892965

  16. Cardiac adaptations of bullfrog tadpoles in response to chytrid infection.

    Salla, Raquel Fernanda; Gamero, Fernando Urban; Ribeiro, Larissa Rodrigues; Rizzi, Gisele Miglioranza; Medico, Samuel Espinosa Dal; Rissoli, Rafael Zanelli; Vieira, Conrado Augusto; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine Cristina Mathias; Leite, Domingos Silva; Abdalla, Fábio Camargo; Toledo, Luis Felipe; Costa, Monica Jones

    2015-08-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can result in heart failure in Bd-susceptible species. Since Bd infection generally does not cause mortality in North American bullfrogs, the aim of this work was to verify whether this species presents any cardiac adaptation that could improve the tolerance to the fungus. Thus, we analyzed tadpoles' activity level, relative ventricular mass, ventricle morphology, in loco heart frequency, and in vitro cardiac function. The results indicate that infected animals present an increase in both ventricular relative mass and in myofibrils' incidence, which accompanied the increase in myocytes' diameter. Such morphological alterations enabled an increase in the in vitro twitch force that, in vivo, would result in elevation of the cardiac stroke volume. This response requires much less energy expenditure than an elevation in heart frequency, but still enables the heart to pump a higher volume of blood per minute (i.e., an increase in cardiac output). As a consequence, the energy saved in the regulation of the cardiac function of Bd-infected tadpoles can be employed in other homeostatic adjustments to avoid the lethal effect of the fungus. Whether other species present this ability, and to what extent, remains uncertain, but such possible interspecific variability might explain different mortality rates among different species of Bd-infected amphibians. PMID:26055358

  17. The "adaptive responses" of low concentrations of HBCD in L02 cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms.

    An, Jing; Guo, Panpan; Shang, Yu; Zhong, Yufang; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Yingxin; Yu, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the "adaptive responses" of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCD) at environmentally relevant concentrations in human hepatocytes L02. L02 cells were pre-treated with low concentrations of HBCD (10(-13)-10(-11) M), followed by treatment with high concentrations of HBCD, α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), or polybrominated diphenyl ether-47 (BDE47). The results showed that the pre-treatment with low concentrations of HBCD induced "adaptive responses" to high concentrations of HBCD/α-HCH exposure (but not to PCBs and BDE47), as evidenced by attenuation of survival inhibition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-production, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage induction. The "adaptive responses" induced by low concentrations of HBCD, which depended on the activation of the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) pathway, reduced the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK) and enhanced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK). The observations were further confirmed by the experiments with inhibitors. Moreover, the evaluation on the changes of metabolic enzymes revealed that HBCD and α-HCH shared a similar pattern of cytochrome P450 induction (CYP2B6), which was different from those of PCBs and BDE47 (CYP1A1 and CYP2B6). These results indicated that low concentrations of HBCD could induce "adaptive responses" to the subsequent treatment with high concentrations of HBCD/α-HCH in L02 cells, which was associated with the PI3K/Akt pathway, and AMPK and p38 MAPK signaling. The "adaptive responses" seemed to be dependent on the types of chemicals in terms of the metabolic patterns and chemical structures. PMID:26688241

  18. Evolutionary Influences of Plastic Behavioral Responses Upon Environmental Challenges in an Adaptive Radiation.

    Foster, Susan A; Wund, Matthew A; Baker, John A

    2015-09-01

    At the end of the 19th century, the suggestion was made by several scientists, including J. M. Baldwin, that behavioral responses to environmental change could both rescue populations from extinction (Baldwin Effect) and influence the course of subsequent evolution. Here we provide the historical and theoretical background for this argument and offer evidence of the importance of these ideas for understanding how animals (and other organisms that exhibit behavior) will respond to the rapid environmental changes caused by human activity. We offer examples from long-term research on the evolution of behavioral and other phenotypes in the adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a radiation in which it is possible to infer ancestral patterns of behavioral plasticity relative to the post-glacial freshwater radiation in northwestern North America, and to use patterns of parallelism and contemporary evolution to understand adaptive causes of responses to environmental modification. Our work offers insights into the complexity of cognitive responses to environmental change, and into the importance of examining multiple aspects of the phenotype simultaneously, if we are to understand how behavioral shifts contribute to the persistence of populations and to subsequent evolution. We conclude by discussing the origins of apparent novelties induced by environmental shifts, and the importance of accounting for geographic variation within species if we are to accurately anticipate the effects of anthropogenic environmental modification on the persistence and evolution of animals. PMID:26163679

  19. Design of artificial genetic regulatory networks with multiple delayed adaptive responses

    Kaluza, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Genetic regulatory networks with adaptive responses are widely studied in biology. Usually, models consisting only of a few nodes have been considered. They present one input receptor for activation and one output node where the adaptive response is computed. In this work, we design genetic regulatory networks with many receptors and many output nodes able to produce delayed adaptive responses. This design is performed by using an evolutionary algorithm of mutations and selections that minimizes an error function defined by the adaptive response in signal shapes. We present several examples of network constructions with a predefined required set of adaptive delayed responses. We show that an output node can have different kinds of responses as a function of the activated receptor. Additionally, complex network structures are presented since processing nodes can be involved in several input-output pathways.

  20. Adaptive responses of mitochondria to mild copper deprivation involve changes in morphology, OXPHOS remodeling and bioenergetics.

    Ruiz, Lina María; Jensen, Erik L; Bustos, Rodrigo I; Argüelloa, Graciela; Gutierrez-Garcia, Ricardo; González, Mauricio; Hernández, Claudia; Paredes, Rodolfo; Simon, Felipe; Riedel, Claudia; Ferrick, David; Elorza, Alvaro A

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an essential cofactor of complex IV of the electron transfer chain, and it is directly involved in the generation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Its deficiency induces the formation of ROS, large mitochondria and anemia. Thus, there is a connection between copper metabolism and bioenergetics, mitochondrial dynamics and erythropoiesis. Copper depletion might end in cellular apoptosis or necrosis. However, before entering into those irreversible processes, mitochondria may execute a series of adaptive responses. Mitochondrial adaptive responses (MAR) may involve multiple and diverse mechanisms for preserving cell life, such as mitochondrial dynamics, OXPHOS remodeling and bioenergetics output. In this study, a mild copper deficiency was produced in an animal model through intraperitoneal injections of bathocuproine disulfonate in order to study the MAR. Under these conditions, a new type of mitochondrial morphology was discovered in the liver. Termed the "butternut squash" mitochondria, it coexisted with normal and swollen mitochondria. Western blot analyses of mitochondrial dynamics proteins showed an up-regulation of MFN-2 and OPA1 fusion proteins. Furthermore, isolated liver mitochondria displayed OXPHOS remodeling through a decrease in supercomplex activity with a concomitant increase at an individual level of complexes I and IV, higher respiratory rates at complex I and II levels, higher oligomycin-insensitive respiration, and lower respiratory control ratio values when compared to the control group. As expected, total ATP and ATP/ADP values were not significantly different, since animal's health was not compromised. As a whole, these results describe a compensatory and adaptive response of metabolism and bioenergetics under copper deprivation. PMID:24446197

  1. PACAP is essential for the adaptive thermogenic response of brown adipose tissue to cold exposure.

    Diané, Abdoulaye; Nikolic, Nikolina; Rudecki, Alexander P; King, Shannon M; Bowie, Drew J; Gray, Sarah L

    2014-09-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a widely distributed neuropeptide that acts as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, neurotropic factor, neuroprotectant, secretagogue, and neurohormone. Owing to its pleiotropic biological actions, knockout of Pacap (Adcyap1) has been shown to induce several abnormalities in mice such as impaired thermoregulation. However, the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. A previous report has shown that cold-exposed Pacap null mice cannot supply appropriate levels of norepinephrine (NE) to brown adipocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that exogenous NE would rescue the impaired thermogenic response of Pacap null mice during cold exposure. We compared the adaptive thermogenic capacity of Pacap(-/-) to Pacap(+/+) mice in response to NE when housed at room temperature (24 °C) and after a 3.5-week cold exposure (4 °C). Biochemical parameters, expression of thermogenic genes, and morphological properties of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) were also characterized. Results showed that there was a significant effect of temperature, but no effect of genotype, on the resting metabolic rate in conscious, unrestrained mice. However, the normal cold-induced increase in the basal metabolic rate and NE-induced increase in thermogenesis were severely blunted in cold-exposed Pacap(-/-) mice. These changes were associated with altered substrate utilization, reduced β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-Ar (Adrb3)) and hormone-sensitive lipase (Hsl (Lipe)) gene expression, and increased fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2) gene expression in BAT. Interestingly, Pacap(-/-) mice had depleted WAT depots, associated with upregulated uncoupling protein 1 expression in inguinal WATs. These results suggest that the impairment of adaptive thermogenesis in Pacap null mice cannot be rescued by exogenous NE perhaps in part due to decreased β3-Ar-mediated BAT activation. PMID:25056115

  2. Neural correlates of adaptive social responses to real-life frustrating situations: a functional MRI study

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Satoru; Sassa, Yuko; HORIE, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-01-01

    Background Frustrating situations are encountered daily, and it is necessary to respond in an adaptive fashion. A psychological definition states that adaptive social behaviors are “self-performing” and “contain a solution.” The present study investigated the neural correlates of adaptive social responses to frustrating situations by assessing the dimension of causal attribution. Based on attribution theory, internal causality refers to one’s aptitudes that cause natural responses in real-lif...

  3. Adaptations in muscle activity to induced, short-term hindlimb lameness in trotting dogs.

    Fischer, Stefanie; Nolte, Ingo; Schilling, Nadja

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissue has a great intrinsic adaptability to changing functional demands. Triggering more gradual responses such as tissue growth, the immediate responses to altered loading conditions involve changes in the activity. Because the reduction in a limb's function is associated with marked deviations in the gait pattern, understanding the muscular responses in laming animals will provide further insight into their compensatory mechanisms as well as help to improve treatment options to prevent musculoskeletal sequelae in chronic patients. Therefore, this study evaluated the changes in muscle activity in adaptation to a moderate, short-term, weight-bearing hindlimb lameness in two leg and one back muscle using surface electromyography (SEMG). In eight sound adult dogs that trotted on an instrumented treadmill, bilateral, bipolar recordings of the m. triceps brachii, the m. vastus lateralis and the m. longissimus dorsi were obtained before and after lameness was induced. Consistent with the unchanged vertical forces as well as temporal parameters, neither the timing nor the level of activity changed significantly in the m. triceps brachii. In the ipsilateral m. vastus lateralis, peak activity and integrated SEMG area were decreased, while they were significantly increased in the contralateral hindlimb. In both sides, the duration of the muscle activity was significantly longer due to a delayed offset. These observations are in accordance with previously described kinetic and kinematic changes as well as changes in muscle mass. Adaptations in the activity of the m. longissimus dorsi concerned primarily the unilateral activity and are discussed regarding known alterations in trunk and limb motions. PMID:24236207

  4. Participation of intercellular communication and intracellular signal transduction in the radio-adaptive response of human fibroblastic cells

    To investigate the radio-adaptive response of normal cells to low-dose radiation, we irradiated human embryonic cells with low-dose X-rays and examined the changes in sensitivity to subsequent high-dose X-irradiation. When the cells were irradiated by 200 cGy, the growth ratio of the viable cells five days after the irradiation decreased to 37% of that of the cells which received no X-irradiation. When the cells received a conditioning irradiation of 10 to 20 cGy four hours before the irradiation of 200 cGy, the growth ratio increased significantly to 45-53%, and a peak was reached at a conditioning dose of 13 cGy. Cells blocked off intercellular communication either in Ca2+ ion-free medium or in TPA added medium during the conditioning irradiation of 13 cGy did not show the improvement of growth ratio. Addition of H-7, as an inhibitor of PKC, to the medium during the conditioning irradiation inhibited the induction of the radio-adaptive response. However, addition of either inhibitor of A kinase, H-89, or inhibitor of G kinase, H-8, failed to inhibit the induction of the radio-adaptive response. These results suggest that: (1) normal cells show an adaptive response to low-dose radiation, (2) intercellular communication may play a role in radio-adaptive responses, (3) the transduction of the signal induced in cells by low-dose X-irradiation via protein kinase C was involved in radio-adaptive responses, not via A kinase nor G kinase. (author)

  5. Induction of a Radio-Adaptive Response by Low-dose Gamma Irradiation in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    Westby, Christian M.; Seawright, John W.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) 137Cs gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value < or = 0.003) 4hr after H, but not after 4hr LH compared to control. Other p53-mediated apoptosis genes Casp3, Casp9, Trp53, and Myc exhibited down-regulation but did not achieve a notable level of significance 4hr after H. 24hr after H, genetic down-regulation was no longer present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio-adaptive

  6. Dependence of the adaptive response value in rat bone marrow cells on chronic γ-radiation dose in vivo

    Dependence of cytogenetic adaptive response (AR) induction in rat bone marrow cells on chronic γ-radiation dose (3, 9, 21 and 40 cGy, 0.13 cGy/h dose rate) with subsequent acute γ-irradiation in vivo conditions was studied. It was shown that preliminary chronic irradiation might induce essential AR within the dose examined range. 40 cGy dose was the most efficient for AR induction

  7. Responsible Climate Change Adaptation : Exploring, analysing and evaluating public and private responsibilities for urban adaptation to climate change

    Mees, Heleen

    2014-01-01

    Cities are vulnerable to climate change. To deal with climate change, city governments and private actors such as businesses and citizens need to adapt to its effects, such as sea level rise, storm surges, intense rainfall and heatwaves. However, adaptation planning and action is often hampered when

  8. Effect of low-dose X-ray radiation on adaptive response in gastric cancer cell

    Shukai Wang; Gang Jiang; Hongsheng Yu; Xiangping Liu; Chang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to study the effect and mechanism of low-dose radiation (LDR) on adaptive response of gastric cancer cell. Methods: SGC7901 cells were cultured in vitro, and divided into 4 groups: control group (D0 group), low-dose radiation group (D1 group, 75 mGy), high-dose radiation group (D2 group, 2 Gy), low-dose plus high-dose radiation group (D1 + D2 group, 75 mGy + 2 Gy, the interval of low and high-dose radiation being 8 h). Cell inhibition rate was detected by cytometry and CCK8 method; the proportion of cell cycle at different times after irradiation was determined by using a flow cytometry. The ATM mRNA levels were detected by using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: There was no significant different between groups D0 and D1, groups D2 and D1 + D2 cell inhibition rate (P > 0.05). There was a significant increase G2/M arrest in groups D2 and D1 + D2 than groups D0 and D1 after 6 h of radiation and did not recover at 48 h (P 0.05). Conclusion: LDR cannot induce adaptive response in SGC7901 cells in vitro, which may be associated the regulation of cell cycle, and its ATM mRNA expression cannot be affected by 75 mGy X-ray radiation.

  9. Multigenerational Epigenetic Adaptation of the Hepatic Wound-Healing Response

    Zeybel, Müjdat; Hardy, Timothy; Wong, Yi K.; Mathers, John C; Fox, Christopher R.; Gackowska, Agata; Oakley, Fiona; Burt, Alastair D; Wilson, Caroline L.; Anstee, Quentin M.; Barter, Matt J; Masson, Steven; Elsharkawy, Ahmed M.; Mann, Derek A.; Mann, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    We asked if ancestral liver damage leads to heritable reprogramming of hepatic wound-healing. We discovered that male rats with a history of liver damage transmit epigenetic suppressive adaptation of the fibrogenic component of wound-healing through male F1 and F2 generations. Underlying this adaptation was reduced generation of liver myofibroblasts, increased hepatic expression of antifibrogenic PPAR-γ and decreased expression of profibrogenic TGF-β1. Remodelling of DNA methylation and histo...

  10. New concepts in immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoeae: innate responses and suppression of adaptive immunity favor the pathogen, not the host

    Yingru eLiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that gonorrhea can be acquired repeatedly with no apparent development of protective immunity arising from previous episodes of infection. Symptomatic infection is characterized by a purulent exudate, but the host response mechanisms are poorly understood. While the remarkable antigenic variability displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its capacity to inhibit complement activation allow it to evade destruction by the host’s immune defenses, we propose that it also has the capacity to avoid inducing specific immune responses. In a mouse model of vaginal gonococcal infection, N. gonorrhoeae elicits Th17-driven inflammatory- immune responses, which recruit innate defense mechanisms including an influx of neutrophils. Concomitantly, N. gonorrhoeae suppresses Th1- and Th2-dependent adaptive immunity, including specific antibody responses, through a mechanism involving TGF-β and regulatory T cells. Blockade of TGF-β alleviates the suppression of specific anti-gonococcal responses and allows Th1 and Th2 responses to emerge with the generation of immune memory and protective immunity. Genital tract tissues are naturally rich in TGF-β, which fosters an immunosuppressive environment that is important in reproduction. In exploiting this niche, N. gonorrhoeae exemplifies a well-adapted pathogen that proactively elicits from its host innate responses that it can survive and concomitantly suppresses adaptive immunity. Comprehension of these mechanisms of gonococcal pathogenesis should allow the development of novel approaches to therapy and facilitate the development of an effective vaccine.

  11. New concepts in immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoeae: innate responses and suppression of adaptive immunity favor the pathogen, not the host.

    Liu, Yingru; Feinen, Brandon; Russell, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    It is well-known that gonorrhea can be acquired repeatedly with no apparent development of protective immunity arising from previous episodes of infection. Symptomatic infection is characterized by a purulent exudate, but the host response mechanisms are poorly understood. While the remarkable antigenic variability displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its capacity to inhibit complement activation allow it to evade destruction by the host's immune defenses, we propose that it also has the capacity to avoid inducing specific immune responses. In a mouse model of vaginal gonococcal infection, N. gonorrhoeae elicits Th17-driven inflammatory-immune responses, which recruit innate defense mechanisms including an influx of neutrophils. Concomitantly, N. gonorrhoeae suppresses Th1- and Th2-dependent adaptive immunity, including specific antibody responses, through a mechanism involving TGF-β and regulatory T cells. Blockade of TGF-β alleviates the suppression of specific anti-gonococcal responses and allows Th1 and Th2 responses to emerge with the generation of immune memory and protective immunity. Genital tract tissues are naturally rich in TGF-β, which fosters an immunosuppressive environment that is important in reproduction. In exploiting this niche, N. gonorrhoeae exemplifies a well-adapted pathogen that proactively elicits from its host innate responses that it can survive and concomitantly suppresses adaptive immunity. Comprehension of these mechanisms of gonococcal pathogenesis should allow the development of novel approaches to therapy and facilitate the development of an effective vaccine. PMID:21833308

  12. The study on adaptive response at various spermatogenesis stages in Drosophila melanogaster

    Applying the test of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations we studied radioadaptive response (at various spermatogenesis stages) in Drosophila melanogaster represented by the Canton-S stock, as well as by w stock and w; Canton stock marked with the white gene. The adaptive response was revealed in the s stock marked with the white gene but was not detected in the Canton-S stock. The obtained results confirmed the existence of the relation between the Drosophila melanogaster adaptive response and X chromosome carrying the mutant white gene; they also witness to the probability of the absence of the relation between this adaptive response and autosomes. (authors)

  13. Hypercapnia Suppresses the HIF-dependent Adaptive Response to Hypoxia.

    Selfridge, Andrew C; Cavadas, Miguel A S; Scholz, Carsten C; Campbell, Eric L; Welch, Lynn C; Lecuona, Emilia; Colgan, Sean P; Barrett, Kim E; Sporn, Peter H S; Sznajder, Jacob I; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T

    2016-05-27

    Molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide are the primary gaseous substrate and product of oxidative metabolism, respectively. Hypoxia (low oxygen) and hypercapnia (high carbon dioxide) are co-incidental features of the tissue microenvironment in a range of pathophysiologic states, including acute and chronic respiratory diseases. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is the master regulator of the transcriptional response to hypoxia; however, little is known about the impact of hypercapnia on gene transcription. Because of the relationship between hypoxia and hypercapnia, we investigated the effect of hypercapnia on the HIF pathway. Hypercapnia suppressed HIF-α protein stability and HIF target gene expression both in mice and cultured cells in a manner that was at least in part independent of the canonical O2-dependent HIF degradation pathway. The suppressive effects of hypercapnia on HIF-α protein stability could be mimicked by reducing intracellular pH at a constant level of partial pressure of CO2 Bafilomycin A1, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase that blocks lysosomal degradation, prevented the hypercapnic suppression of HIF-α protein. Based on these results, we hypothesize that hypercapnia counter-regulates activation of the HIF pathway by reducing intracellular pH and promoting lysosomal degradation of HIF-α subunits. Therefore, hypercapnia may play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases where HIF is implicated. PMID:27044749

  14. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children.

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-04-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3-5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination. PMID:27195118

  15. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. PMID:25086685

  16. Innate and adaptive immune responses in migrating spring-run adult chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    Dolan, Brian P.; Fisher, Kathleen M.; Colvin, Michael E.; Benda, Susan E.; Peterson, James T.; Kent, Michael L.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    Adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from salt water to freshwater streams to spawn. Immune responses in migrating adult salmon are thought to diminish in the run up to spawning, though the exact mechanisms for diminished immune responses remain unknown. Here we examine both adaptive and innate immune responses as well as pathogen burdens in migrating adult Chinook salmon in the Upper Willamette River basin. Messenger RNA transcripts encoding antibody heavy chain molecules slightly diminish as a function of time, but are still present even after fish have successfully spawned. In contrast, the innate anti-bacterial effector proteins present in fish plasma rapidly decrease as spawning approaches. Fish also were examined for the presence and severity of eight different pathogens in different organs. While pathogen burden tended to increase during the migration, no specific pathogen signature was associated with diminished immune responses. Transcript levels of the immunosuppressive cytokines IL-10 and TGF beta were measured and did not change during the migration. These results suggest that loss of immune functions in adult migrating salmon are not due to pathogen infection or cytokine-mediated immune suppression, but is rather part of the life history of Chinook salmon likely induced by diminished energy reserves or hormonal changes which accompany spawning.

  17. The study on relation between adaptive response and genotype of drosophila melanogaster

    The paper deals with the study on radioadaptive response in Drosophila melanogaster of the different stocks at various spermiogenesis stages by the test of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations. The adaptive response was revealed in the stocks marked with gene white but was not detected in the stock Can-ton-S. The results obtained can point to the relation between the adaptive response in Drosophila melanogaster and X chromosome carrying a gene white but not autosoms. (Authors)

  18. Photosynthetic responses mediate the adaptation of two Lotus japonicus ecotypes to low temperature.

    Calzadilla, Pablo Ignacio; Signorelli, Santiago; Escaray, Francisco Jose; Menéndez, Ana Bernardina; Monza, Jorge; Ruiz, Oscar Adolfo; Maiale, Santiago Javier

    2016-09-01

    Lotus species are important forage legumes due to their high nutritional value and adaptability to marginal conditions. However, the dry matter production and regrowth rate of cultivable Lotus spp. is drastically reduced during colder seasons. In this work, we evaluated the chilling response of Lotus japonicus ecotypes MG-1 and MG-20. No significant increases were observed in reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production or in lipid peroxidation, although a chilling-induced redox imbalance was suggested through NADPH/NADP(+) ratio alterations. Antioxidant enzyme catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities were also measured. Superoxide dismutase, in particular the chloroplastic isoform, showed different activity for different ecotypes and treatments. Stress-induced photoinhibition also differentially influenced both ecotypes, with MG-1 more affected than MG-20. Data showed that the D2 PSII subunit was more affected than D1 after 1 d of low temperature exposure, although its protein levels recovered over the course of the experiment. Interestingly, D2 recovery was accompanied by improvements in photosynthetic parameters (Asat and Fv/Fm) and the NADPH/NADP(+) ratio. Our results suggest that the D2 protein is involved in the acclimation response of L. japonicus to low temperature. This may provide a deeper insight into the chilling tolerance mechanisms of the Lotus genus. PMID:27457984

  19. A Comparison of the Adaptive Immune Response between Recovered Anthrax Patients and Individuals Receiving Three Different Anthrax Vaccines

    Laws, Thomas R.; Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Chitadze, Nazibriola; Little, Stephen F.; Webster, Wendy M.; Debes, Amanda K.; Saginadze, Salome; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Chubinidze, Mariam; Rivard, Robert G.; Tsanava, Shota; Dyson, Edward H.; Simpson, Andrew J. H.; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Trapaidze, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Several different human vaccines are available to protect against anthrax. We compared the human adaptive immune responses generated by three different anthrax vaccines or by previous exposure to cutaneous anthrax. Adaptive immunity was measured by ELISPOT to count cells that produce interferon (IFN)-γ in response to restimulation ex vivo with the anthrax toxin components PA, LF and EF and by measuring circulating IgG specific to these antigens. Neutralising activity of antisera against anthrax toxin was also assayed. We found that the different exposures to anthrax antigens promoted varying immune responses. Cutaneous anthrax promoted strong IFN-γ responses to all three antigens and antibody responses to PA and LF. The American AVA and Russian LAAV vaccines induced antibody responses to PA only. The British AVP vaccine produced IFN-γ responses to EF and antibody responses to all three antigens. Anti-PA (in AVA and LAAV vaccinees) or anti-LF (in AVP vaccinees) antibody titres correlated with toxin neutralisation activities. Our study is the first to compare all three vaccines in humans and show the diversity of responses against anthrax antigens. PMID:27007118

  20. A Comparison of the Adaptive Immune Response between Recovered Anthrax Patients and Individuals Receiving Three Different Anthrax Vaccines.

    Laws, Thomas R; Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Chitadze, Nazibriola; Little, Stephen F; Webster, Wendy M; Debes, Amanda K; Saginadze, Salome; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Chubinidze, Mariam; Rivard, Robert G; Tsanava, Shota; Dyson, Edward H; Simpson, Andrew J H; Hepburn, Matthew J; Trapaidze, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Several different human vaccines are available to protect against anthrax. We compared the human adaptive immune responses generated by three different anthrax vaccines or by previous exposure to cutaneous anthrax. Adaptive immunity was measured by ELISPOT to count cells that produce interferon (IFN)-γ in response to restimulation ex vivo with the anthrax toxin components PA, LF and EF and by measuring circulating IgG specific to these antigens. Neutralising activity of antisera against anthrax toxin was also assayed. We found that the different exposures to anthrax antigens promoted varying immune responses. Cutaneous anthrax promoted strong IFN-γ responses to all three antigens and antibody responses to PA and LF. The American AVA and Russian LAAV vaccines induced antibody responses to PA only. The British AVP vaccine produced IFN-γ responses to EF and antibody responses to all three antigens. Anti-PA (in AVA and LAAV vaccinees) or anti-LF (in AVP vaccinees) antibody titres correlated with toxin neutralisation activities. Our study is the first to compare all three vaccines in humans and show the diversity of responses against anthrax antigens. PMID:27007118

  1. A Comparison of the Adaptive Immune Response between Recovered Anthrax Patients and Individuals Receiving Three Different Anthrax Vaccines.

    Thomas R Laws

    Full Text Available Several different human vaccines are available to protect against anthrax. We compared the human adaptive immune responses generated by three different anthrax vaccines or by previous exposure to cutaneous anthrax. Adaptive immunity was measured by ELISPOT to count cells that produce interferon (IFN-γ in response to restimulation ex vivo with the anthrax toxin components PA, LF and EF and by measuring circulating IgG specific to these antigens. Neutralising activity of antisera against anthrax toxin was also assayed. We found that the different exposures to anthrax antigens promoted varying immune responses. Cutaneous anthrax promoted strong IFN-γ responses to all three antigens and antibody responses to PA and LF. The American AVA and Russian LAAV vaccines induced antibody responses to PA only. The British AVP vaccine produced IFN-γ responses to EF and antibody responses to all three antigens. Anti-PA (in AVA and LAAV vaccinees or anti-LF (in AVP vaccinees antibody titres correlated with toxin neutralisation activities. Our study is the first to compare all three vaccines in humans and show the diversity of responses against anthrax antigens.

  2. Molecular mechanisms involved in adaptive responses to radiation, UV light, and heat

    Viable organisms recognize and respond to environmental changes or stresses. When these environmental changes and their responses by organisms are extreme, they can limit viability. However, organisms can adapt to these different stresses by utilizing different possible responses via signal transduction pathways when the stress is not lethal. In particular, prior mild stresses can provide some aid to prepare organisms for subsequent more severe stresses. These adjustments or adaptations for future stresses have been called adaptive responses. These responses are present in bacteria, plants and animals. The following review covers recent research which can help describe or postulate possible mechanisms which may be active in producing adaptive responses to radiation, ultraviolet light, and heat. (author)

  3. Adapting responsibilities: an ethical analysis of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    Harry, Rebecca Jane

    2010-01-01

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the seminal international agreement that provides a commitment and a corresponding responsibility framework to assist the least developed countries (LDCs) adapt to the adverse effects of climate change. To operationalize these commitments the National Adaptation Programmes of Action was created to assist LDCs implement adaptation projects. This programme has been severely hampered by the limited resources provided by Parties to the ...

  4. Adaptation-induced Tourism for Consumers of Literature on Screen: the Experience of Jane Austen Fans

    Maddalena Pennacchia

    2015-01-01

    My aim in this article is that of starting to relate the expanding research field of adaptation studies to the subject area of film-induced tourism. Adaptations are a specific typology of films: that is, films whose story was not originally intended for the screen but, more often than not, for the written page, and has, therefore, been ‘translated’ into a new medium. The phenomenon of adaptation has been at the center of a heated debate for a few years now, but the specific link between adapt...

  5. Brevity of haptic force perturbations induces heightened adaptive sensitivity

    Wanda, Paul A.; Fine, Michael S.; Weeks, Heidi M.; Gross, Andrew M.; Macy, Jenny L.; Thoroughman, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    We have exposed human participants to both full-movement and pulsatile viscous force perturbations to study the effect of force duration on the incremental transformation of sensation into adaptation. Traditional views of movement biomechanics could suggest that pulsatile forces would largely be attenuated as stiffness and viscosity act as a natural low-pass filter. Sensory transduction, however, tends to react to changes in stimuli and therefore could underlie heightened sensitivity to briefer, pulsatile forces. Here, participants adapted within perturbation duration conditions in a manner proportionate to sensed force and positional errors. Across perturbation conditions, we found participants had greater adaptive sensitivity when experiencing pulsatile forces rather than full-movement forces. In a follow-up experiment, we employed error-clamped, force channel trials to determine changes in predictive force generation. We found that while participants learned to closely compensate for the amplitude and breadth of full-movement forces, they exhibited a persistent mismatch in amplitude and breadth between adapted motor output and experienced pulsatile forces. This mismatch could generate higher salience of error signals that contribute to heightened sensitivity to pulsatile forces. PMID:23468159

  6. Kinetics of the early adaptive response and adaptation threshold dose; Cinetica de la respuesta adaptativa temprana y dosis umbral de adaptacion

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The expression kinetics of the adaptive response (RA) in mouse leukocytes in vivo and the minimum dose of gamma radiation that induces it was determined. The mice were exposed 0.005 or 0.02 Gy of {sup 137} Cs like adaptation and 1h later to the challenge dose (1.0 Gy), another group was only exposed at 1.0 Gy and the damage is evaluated in the DNA with the rehearsal it makes. The treatment with 0. 005 Gy didn't induce RA and 0. 02 Gy causes a similar effect to the one obtained with 0.01 Gy. The RA was show from an interval of 0.5 h being obtained the maximum expression with 5.0 h. The threshold dose to induce the RA is 0.01 Gy and in 5.0 h the biggest quantity in molecules is presented presumably that are related with the protection of the DNA. (Author) =.

  7. Fire-Induced Response in Foam Encapsulants

    Borek, T.T.; Chu, T.Y.; Erickson, K.L.; Gill, W.; Hobbs, M.L.; Humphries, L.L.; Renlund, A.M.; Ulibarri, T.A.

    1999-04-02

    The paper provides a concise overview of a coordinated experimental/theoretical/numerical program at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an experimentally validated model of fire-induced response of foam-filled engineered systems for nuclear and transportation safety applications. Integral experiments are performed to investigate the thermal response of polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. A suite of laboratory experiments is performed to characterize the decomposition chemistry of polyurethane. Mass loss and energy associated with foam decomposition and chemical structures of the virgin and decomposed foam are determined. Decomposition chemistry is modeled as the degradation of macromolecular structures by bond breaking followed by vaporization of small fragments of the macromolecule with high vapor pressures. The chemical decomposition model is validated against the laboratory data. Data from integral experiments is used to assess and validate a FEM foam thermal response model with the chemistry model developed from the decomposition experiments. Good agreement was achieved both in the progression of the decomposition front and the in-depth thermal response.

  8. Detection of the radioadaptive response in mouse bone marrow in remote terms after adaptation

    Duration of the adaptive response (AR) reservation in various times after exposure to adaptive dose (including delayed times) in the system in vivo is studied. Mice-males were used for experiments. 60Co source was used for irradiation. It is shown that the AR remains for a long time after single acute low dose gamma-irradiation

  9. Adaptability: Conceptual and Empirical Perspectives on Responses to Change, Novelty and Uncertainty

    Martin, Andrew J.; Nejad, Harry; Colmar, Susan; Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptability is proposed as individuals' capacity to constructively regulate psycho-behavioral functions in response to new, changing, and/or uncertain circumstances, conditions and situations. The present investigation explored the internal and external validity of an hypothesised adaptability scale. The sample comprised 2,731 high school…

  10. Control of Dichotomic Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses by Artery Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Atherosclerosis

    Falk eWeih

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs emerge in tissues in response to nonresolving inflammation such as chronic infection, graft rejection, and autoimmune disease. We identified artery TLOs (ATLOs in the adventitia adjacent to atherosclerotic plaques of aged hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice. ATLOs are structured into T cell areas harboring conventional dendritic cells (cDCs and monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs; B cell follicles containing follicular dendritic cells (FDCs within activated germinal centers; and peripheral niches of plasma cells. ATLOs also show extensive neoangiogenesis, aberrant lymphangiogenesis, and high endothelial venule (HEV neogenesis. Newly formed conduit networks connect the external lamina of the artery with HEVs in T cell areas. ATLOs recruit and generate lymphocyte subsets with opposing activities including activated CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cells, natural and induced CD4+ T regulatory cells (nTregs; iTregs as well as B-1 and B-2 cells at different stages of differentiation. These data indicate that ATLOs organize dichotomic innate and adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis. In this review we discuss the novel concept that dichotomic immune responses towards atherosclerosis-specific antigens are carried out by ATLOs in the adventitia of the arterial wall and that malfunction of the tolerogenic arm of ATLO immunity triggers transition from silent autoimmune reactivity to clinically overt disease.