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Sample records for adaptive genetic divergence

  1. Genetic divergence and biology of adaptation inCicer arietinum L.

    Dani, R G; Murty, B R

    1985-07-01

    The role of 19 structural, developmental and biochemical traits in relation to specific adaptation was analysed in a set of 17 diverse lines with quantified adaptation, representing contemporary cultivars and land races of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), using multivariate analysis. Significant varietal variation was observed for most characters, particularly for the activity of the enzyme nitrate reductase (NR) and protein content in the plant. The distance analysis (D(2)-statistic) revealed that seed size and pod number and their associated attributes were important forces of divergence. The additional forces of divergence were NR activity at the flower initiation stage, yield components such as number of primary and secondary branches, and other features such as plant habit and duration of flowering. The principal component analysis revealed some similarities and also differences from the distance analysis. Leaf size, days to flower initiation, seed size and, to some extent, NR activity at flower initiation stage, were important in the first vector. Developmental traits such as chlorophyll depth, NR activity at the pod initiation and grain filling stages, and the percent protein content in the plant at flower initiation were important in the second vector. In general, the clustering pattern was not related to the geographical origin, seed colour, size of regression coefficient for yield, or deviation from linearity. The importance of the developmental and biochemical attributes in the divergence of cultivated chickpea, such as days to flower initiation, duration of flowering, NR activity and the rates of protein accumulation in developing seeds, and in adaptation, suggests the critical role of these attributes. NR activity at the flower initiation stage would appear to have a major role in the domestication of this crop and its intra-specific differentiation, as an increased seed size could not have been possible without better nutrient uptake and utilization

  2. Fine-grained adaptive divergence in an amphibian: genetic basis of phenotypic divergence and the role of nonrandom gene flow in restricting effective migration among wetlands.

    Richter-Boix, Alex; Quintela, María; Kierczak, Marcin; Franch, Marc; Laurila, Anssi

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive ecological differentiation among sympatric populations is promoted by environmental heterogeneity, strong local selection and restricted gene flow. High gene flow, on the other hand, is expected to homogenize genetic variation among populations and therefore prevent local adaptation. Understanding how local adaptation can persist at the spatial scale at which gene flow occurs has remained an elusive goal, especially for wild vertebrate populations. Here, we explore the roles of natural selection and nonrandom gene flow (isolation by breeding time and habitat choice) in restricting effective migration among local populations and promoting generalized genetic barriers to neutral gene flow. We examined these processes in a network of 17 breeding ponds of the moor frog Rana arvalis, by combining environmental field data, a common garden experiment and data on variation in neutral microsatellite loci and in a thyroid hormone receptor (TRβ) gene putatively under selection. We illustrate the connection between genotype, phenotype and habitat variation and demonstrate that the strong differences in larval life history traits observed in the common garden experiment can result from adaptation to local pond characteristics. Remarkably, we found that haplotype variation in the TRβ gene contributes to variation in larval development time and growth rate, indicating that polymorphism in the TRβ gene is linked with the phenotypic variation among the environments. Genetic distance in neutral markers was correlated with differences in breeding time and environmental differences among the ponds, but not with geographical distance. These results demonstrate that while our study area did not exceed the scale of gene flow, ecological barriers constrained gene flow among contrasting habitats. Our results highlight the roles of strong selection and nonrandom gene flow created by phenological variation and, possibly, habitat preferences, which together maintain genetic and

  3. Adaptive filters: stable but divergent

    Rupp, Markus

    2015-12-01

    The pros and cons of a quadratic error measure in the context of various applications have often been discussed. In this tutorial, we argue that it is not only a suboptimal but definitely the wrong choice when describing the stability behavior of adaptive filters. We take a walk through the past and recent history of adaptive filters and present 14 canonical forms of adaptive algorithms and even more variants thereof contrasting their mean-square with their l 2-stability conditions. In particular, in safety critical applications, the convergence in the mean-square sense turns out to provide wrong results, often not leading to stability at all. Only the robustness concept with its l 2-stability conditions ensures the absence of divergence.

  4. Genetic divergence of tomato subsamples

    André Pugnal Mattedi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic variability of a species is crucial for the progress of a genetic breeding program and requires characterization and evaluation of germplasm. This study aimed to characterize and evaluate 101 tomato subsamples of the Salad group (fresh market and two commercial controls, one of the Salad group (cv. Fanny and another of the Santa Cruz group (cv. Santa Clara. Four experiments were conducted in a randomized block design with three replications and five plants per plot. The joint analysis of variance was performed and characteristics with significant complex interaction between control and experiment were excluded. Subsequently, the multicollinearity diagnostic test was carried out and characteristics that contributed to severe multicollinearity were excluded. The relative importance of each characteristics for genetic divergence was calculated by the Singh's method (Singh, 1981, and the less important ones were excluded according to Garcia (1998. Results showed large genetic divergence among the subsamples for morphological, agronomic and organoleptic characteristics, indicating potential for genetic improvement. The characteristics total soluble solids, mean number of good fruits per plant, endocarp thickness, mean mass of marketable fruit per plant, total acidity, mean number of unmarketable fruit per plant, internode diameter, internode length, main stem thickness and leaf width contributed little to the genetic divergence between the subsamples and may be excluded in future studies.

  5. Parallel divergent adaptation along replicated altitudinal gradients in Alpine trout

    Keller Irene

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The European trout (Salmo trutta species complex occurs across a very wide altitudinal range from lowland rivers to alpine streams. Historically, the major European river systems contained different, evolutionarily distinct trout lineages, and some of this genetic diversity has persisted in spite of extensive human-mediated translocations. We used AFLP-based genome scans to investigate the extent of potentially adaptive divergence among major drainages and along altitudinal gradients replicated in several rivers. Results The proportion of loci showing evidence of divergent selection was larger between drainages than along altitudinal transects within drainages. This suggests divergent selection is stronger between drainages, or adaptive divergence is constrained by gene flow among populations within drainages, although the latter could not be confirmed at a more local scale. Still, altitudinal divergence occurred and, at approximately 2% of the markers, parallel changes of the AFLP band frequencies with altitude were observed suggesting that altitude may well be an important source of divergent selection within rivers. Conclusions Our results indicate that adaptive genetic divergence is common both between major European river systems and along altitudinal gradients within drainages. Alpine trout appear to be a promising model system to investigate the relative roles of divergent selection and gene flow in promoting or preventing adaptation to climate gradients.

  6. Genetic divergence of common bean cultivars.

    Veloso, J S; Silva, W; Pinheiro, L R; Dos Santos, J B; Fonseca, N S; Euzebio, M P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic divergence in the 'Carioca' (beige with brown stripes) common bean cultivar used by different institutions and in 16 other common bean cultivars used in the Rede Cooperativa de Pesquisa de Feijão (Cooperative Network of Common Bean Research), by using simple sequence repeats associated with agronomic traits that are highly distributed in the common bean genome. We evaluated 22 polymorphic loci using bulks containing DNA from 30 plants. There was genetic divergence among the Carioca cultivar provided by the institutions. Nevertheless, there was lower divergence among them than among the other cultivars. The cultivar used by Instituto Agronômico do Paraná was the most divergent in relation to the Carioca samples. The least divergence was observed among the samples used by Universidade Federal de Lavras and by Embrapa Arroz e Feijão. Of all the cultivars, 'CNFP 10104' and 'BRSMG Realce' showed the greatest dissimilarity. The cultivars were separated in two groups of greatest similarity using the Structure software. Genetic variation among cultivars was greater than the variation within or between the groups formed. This fact, together with the high estimate of heterozygosity observed and the genetic divergence of the samples of the Carioca cultivar in relation to the original provided by Instituto Agronômico de Campinas, indicates a mixture of cultivars. The high divergence among cultivars provides potential for the utilization of this genetic variability in plant breeding. PMID:26400359

  7. Genetic divergence in chilli accessions

    B.M. Dushyantha Kumar, Anand kantti and H. Mallikarjunaiah

    2010-01-01

    A study of genetic diversity in 25 chilli genotypes for various characters revealed substantial differences for all the traits.Based on D2 values, the genotypes were clustered into eight constellations. Cluster I contained nine genotypes fallowed bycluster-II (four) cluster IV and V (two each). The maximum inter cluster distance (D=12.75) was observed between cluster VIand cluster VIII. The cluster IV recorded maximum intracluster distance (D=5.91).Intercrossing among the genotypesbelonging t...

  8. Genetic divergence among pumpkin landraces

    Rebeca Lourenço de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the genetic variability in germplasm collections is important not only for conserving genetic resources, but also for plant breeding purposes. However, generating a large number of different categories data (qualitative and quantitative often complicate the analysis and results interpretation, resulting in an incomplete distinction of accessions. This study reports the characterization and evaluation of 14 pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata accessions collected from farms in the northern region of Rio de Janeiro state. Genetic diversity among accessions was also estimated using qualitative and quantitative variables considering joint analysis. The plants were grown under field conditions in a randomized block design with three replications and six plants per plot. Eight qualitative traits (leaf size; seed shape; seed color; color of the fruit pulp; hollow; fruit shape; skin color, and fruit skin texture and eight quantitative traits (fruit weight; fruit length; fruit diameter; soluble solids, 100 seed weight, and wall thickness measured in the middle and in the lower stem were evaluated. The data were analyzed considering the Gower distance, and cluster analysis was performed using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA. Variability among accessions was observed considering morphoagronomic data. The Gower distance together with UPGMA cluster allowed for good discrimination between accessions in the groups, demonstrating that the simultaneous analysis of qualitative and quantitative data is feasible and may increase the understanding of the variation among accessions.

  9. Genetic divergence in chilli accessions

    B.M. Dushyantha Kumar, Anand kantti and H. Mallikarjunaiah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of genetic diversity in 25 chilli genotypes for various characters revealed substantial differences for all the traits.Based on D2 values, the genotypes were clustered into eight constellations. Cluster I contained nine genotypes fallowed bycluster-II (four cluster IV and V (two each. The maximum inter cluster distance (D=12.75 was observed between cluster VIand cluster VIII. The cluster IV recorded maximum intracluster distance (D=5.91.Intercrossing among the genotypesbelonging to cluster III, IV and I was suggested to develop high yielding varieties with other desirable characters or may beused as potential donors for future hybridization programme to develop better chilli variety with good fruit yield

  10. Adaptive divergence in embryonic thermal plasticity among Atlantic salmon populations.

    Côte, J; Roussel, J-M; Le Cam, S; Guillaume, F; Evanno, G

    2016-08-01

    In the context of global changes, the long-term viability of populations of endangered ectotherms may depend on their adaptive potential and ability to cope with temperature variations. We measured responses of Atlantic salmon embryos from four populations to temperature variations and used a QST -FST approach to study the adaptive divergence among these populations. Embryos were reared under two experimental conditions: a low temperature regime at 4 °C until eyed-stage and 10 °C until the end of embryonic development and a high temperature regime with a constant temperature of 10 °C throughout embryonic development. Significant variations among populations and population × temperature interactions were observed for embryo survival, incubation time and length. QST was higher than FST in all but one comparison suggesting an important effect of divergent selection. QST was also higher under the high-temperature treatment than at low temperature for length and survival due to a higher variance among populations under the stressful warmer treatment. Interestingly, heritability was lower for survival under high temperature in relation to a lower additive genetic variance under that treatment. Overall, these results reveal an adaptive divergence in thermal plasticity in embryonic life stages of Atlantic salmon suggesting that salmon populations may differentially respond to temperature variations induced by climate change. These results also suggest that changes in temperature may alter not only the adaptive potential of natural populations but also the selection regimes among them. PMID:27177256

  11. Genetic divergence in land races of rice

    T.Rajesh, K.Paramasivam and S.Thirumeni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity was assessed in 29 land races of rice using Mahalanobis’s D2 statistics. Eight quantitativecharacters including grain yield were considered for the study. Based on genetic distances, the 29 genotypeswere grouped into five clusters. The mode of distribution of genotypes from different geographic regions intovarious clusters was at random indicating that geographical diversity and genetic diversity were not related .Thecharacters days to first flowering and single plant yield contributed maximum towards genetic divergence. Themaximum inter cluster distance was recorded between cluster IV and cluster V. The genotypes in these clustersVattan and Vellai Chitraikar (cluster IV and Thulasi Manjari (cluster V may serve as potential donors forfuture hybridization programmes.

  12. Predictors for reproductive isolation in a ring species complex following genetic and ecological divergence

    Pereira Ricardo J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproductive isolation (RI is widely accepted as an important "check point" in the diversification process, since it defines irreversible evolutionary trajectories. Much less consensus exists about the processes that might drive RI. Here, we employ a formal quantitative analysis of genetic interactions at several stages of divergence within the ring species complex Ensatina eschscholtzii in order to assess the relative contribution of genetic and ecological divergence for the development of RI. Results By augmenting previous genetic datasets and adding new ecological data, we quantify levels of genetic and ecological divergence between populations and test how they correlate with a restriction of genetic admixture upon secondary contact. Our results indicate that the isolated effect of ecological divergence between parental populations does not result in reproductively isolated taxa, even when genetic transitions between parental taxa are narrow. Instead, processes associated with overall genetic divergence are the best predictors of reproductive isolation, and when parental taxa diverge in nuclear markers we observe a complete cessation of hybridization, even to sympatric occurrence of distinct evolutionary lineages. Although every parental population has diverged in mitochondrial DNA, its degree of divergence does not predict the extent of RI. Conclusions These results show that in Ensatina, the evolutionary outcomes of ecological divergence differ from those of genetic divergence. While evident properties of taxa may emerge via ecological divergence, such as adaptation to local environment, RI is likely to be a byproduct of processes that contribute to overall genetic divergence, such as time in geographic isolation, rather than being a direct outcome of local adaptation.

  13. Repeated adaptive divergence of microhabitat specialization in avian feather lice

    Johnson Kevin P; Shreve Scott M; Smith Vincent S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Repeated adaptive radiations are evident when phenotypic divergence occurs within lineages, but this divergence into different forms is convergent when compared across lineages. Classic examples of such repeated adaptive divergence occur in island (for example, Caribbean Anolis lizards) and lake systems (for example, African cichlids). Host-parasite systems in many respects are analogous to island systems, where host species represent isolated islands for parasites whose l...

  14. Genomic architecture of adaptive color pattern divergence and convergence in Heliconius butterflies

    Supple, Megan A; Hines, Heather M.; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon Kumar; Lewis, James J.; Nielsen, Dahlia; Lavoie, Christine; Ray, David A.; Salazar, Camilo; McMillan, W. Owen; Counterman, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the genetic changes driving adaptive variation in natural populations is key to understanding the origins of biodiversity. The mosaic of mimetic wing patterns in Heliconius butterflies makes an excellent system for exploring adaptive variation using next-generation sequencing. In this study, we use a combination of techniques to annotate the genomic interval modulating red color pattern variation, identify a narrow region responsible for adaptive divergence and convergence in Heli...

  15. Phenotypic and genetic divergence within a single whitefish form - detecting the potential for future divergence.

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Eckmann, Reiner; Oppelt, Claus; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2013-12-01

    Human-induced nutrient input can change the selection regime and lead to the loss of biodiversity. For example, eutrophication caused speciation reversal in polymorphic whitefish populations through a flattening of littoral-pelagic selection gradients. We investigated the current state of phenotypic and genetic diversity in whitefish (Coregonus macrophthalmus) in a newly restored lake whose nutrient load has returned to pre-eutrophication levels and found that whitefish spawning at different depths varied phenotypically and genetically: individuals spawning at shallower depth had fewer gill rakers, faster growth, and a morphology adapted to benthic feeding, and they showed higher degrees of diet specialization than deeper spawning individuals. Microsatellite analyses complemented the phenotype analyses by demonstrating reproductive isolation along different spawning depths. Our results indicate that whitefish still retain or currently regain phenotypic and genetic diversity, which was lost during eutrophication. Hence, the population documented here has a potential for future divergence because natural selection can target phenotypes specialized along re-established littoral-pelagic selection gradients. The biodiversity, however, will have better chances to return if managers acknowledge the evolutionary potential within the local whitefish and adapt fishing and stocking measures. PMID:24478795

  16. Interspecific genetic divergence in grey mullets from the Goa region

    Menezes, M.R.; Martins, M.; Naik, S.

    Genetic divergence and phylogenetic relationships among Mugil cephalus, Liza subviridis and Valamugil cunnesius were investigated by examining the electrophoretic patterns of ten enzymes and sarcoplasmic proteins. Among the 19 loci detected, eight...

  17. Genetic divergence for quantitative traits in rice germplasm

    P. K. Bhati, S. K. Singh, S. Y. Dhurai and Amita Sharma

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out with 52 genotypes of rice to study the nature and magnitude of genetic divergence using D2 statistics. Fifty two genotypes were grouped into 8 clusters based on Euclidean cluster analysis with cluster-IV containing maximum of 14 genotypes. Maximum intra-cluster distance was observed in cluster- IV (187.87) indicating greater genetic divergence among genotypes belonging to this cluster. Number of spikelets panicle-1, plant height, grain panicle-1 and grain yiel...

  18. Repeated adaptive divergence of microhabitat specialization in avian feather lice

    Johnson Kevin P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeated adaptive radiations are evident when phenotypic divergence occurs within lineages, but this divergence into different forms is convergent when compared across lineages. Classic examples of such repeated adaptive divergence occur in island (for example, Caribbean Anolis lizards and lake systems (for example, African cichlids. Host-parasite systems in many respects are analogous to island systems, where host species represent isolated islands for parasites whose life cycle is highly tied to that of their hosts. Thus, host-parasite systems might exhibit interesting cases of repeated adaptive divergence as seen in island and lake systems. The feather lice of birds spend their entire life cycle on the body of the host and occupy distinct microhabitats on the host: head, wing, body and generalist. These microhabitat specialists show pronounced morphological differences corresponding to how they escape from host preening. We tested whether these different microhabitat specialists were a case of repeated adaptive divergence by constructing both morphological and molecular phylogenies for a diversity of avian feather lice, including many examples of head, wing, body and generalist forms. Results Morphological and molecular based phylogenies were highly incongruent, which could be explained by rampant convergence in morphology related to microhabitat specialization on the host. In many cases lice from different microhabitat specializations, but from the same group of birds, were sister taxa. Conclusions This pattern indicates a process of repeated adaptive divergence of these parasites within host group, but convergence when comparing parasites across host groups. These results suggest that host-parasite systems might be another case in which repeated adaptive radiations could be relatively common, but potentially overlooked, because morphological convergence can obscure evolutionary relationships.

  19. Genetic Divergence Analysis In Indigenous Maize Germplasms (Zea Mays L.

    K.N. Ganesan, G. Nallathambi, Thura Safawo, N. Senthil and P. M. Tamilarasi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the genetic diversity is a pre-requisite for any breeding programme to select appropriate parents forhybridization. A total of 105 adapted maize germplasms lines were subjected to Mahalanobis D2analysis based on fourcharacteristics viz., plant height, cob height, cob length and number of kernel rows per cob in order to assess the genetic divergenceamong them. The analysis grouped the genotypes into four clusters. Among them, cluster IV was the largest with 53 genotypesfollowed by cluster II with 32 genotypes. The percent contribution of each traits for total divergence revealed the highestcontribution from Plant height followed by ear length, number of kernel rows per cob and ear height. The maximum intra-clusterdistance was observed in cluster II followed by cluster I and IV. The highest inter cluster distance was observed between cluster IIIand cluster IV followed by cluster I and III indicating greater variability in genetic make up of the genotypes included in theseclusters. Based on inter cluster distances, genotypes present in the clusters viz., I, III and IV are advisable to used as parents forhybridization programme to develop heterotic hybrids in maize.

  20. Fungal evolutionary genomics provides insight into the mechanisms of adaptive divergence in eukaryotes.

    Gladieux, Pierre; Ropars, Jeanne; Badouin, Hélène; Branca, Antoine; Aguileta, Gabriela; de Vienne, Damien M; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Branco, Sara; Giraud, Tatiana

    2014-02-01

    Fungi are ideal model organisms for dissecting the genomic bases of adaptive divergence in eukaryotes. They have simple morphologies and small genomes, occupy contrasting, well-identified ecological niches and tend to have short generation times, and many are amenable to experimental approaches. Fungi also display diverse lifestyles, from saprotrophs to pathogens or mutualists, and they play extremely important roles in both ecosystems and human activities, as wood decayers, mycorrhizal fungi, lichens, endophytes, plant and animal pathogens, and in fermentation or drug production. We review here recent insights into the patterns and mechanisms of adaptive divergence in fungi, including sources of divergence, genomic variation and, ultimately, speciation. We outline the various ecological sources of divergent selection and genomic changes, showing that gene loss and changes in gene expression and in genomic architecture are important adaptation processes, in addition to the more widely recognized processes of amino acid substitution and gene duplication. We also review recent findings regarding the interspecific acquisition of genomic variation and suggesting an important role for introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfers (HGTs). We show that transposable elements can mediate several of these genomic changes, thus constituting important factors for adaptation. Finally, we review the consequences of divergent selection in terms of speciation, arguing that genetic incompatibilities may not be as widespread as generally thought and that pleiotropy between adaptation and reproductive isolation is an important route of speciation in fungal pathogens. PMID:24341913

  1. Ecological, morphological and genetic divergence of sympatric North Atlantic killer whale populations

    Foote, Andrew D; Newton, Jason; Piertney, Stuart B;

    2009-01-01

    Ecological divergence has a central role in speciation and is therefore an important source of biodiversity. Studying the micro-evolutionary processes of ecological diversification at its early stages provides an opportunity for investigating the causative mechanisms and ecological conditions...... a single fixed genetic difference in the mtDNA control region between these types, indicating integrity of groupings and a shallow divergence. Phylogenetic analysis indicates this divergence is independent of similar ecological divergences in the Pacific and Antarctic. Niche-width in the generalist...... type is more strongly influenced by between-individual variation rather than within-individual variation in the composition of the diet. This first step to divergent specialization on different ecological resources provides a rare example of the ecological conditions at the early stages of adaptive...

  2. Convergent and Divergent Adaptations of Subterranean Rodents

    Fang, Xiaodong

    Subterranean rodents comprise approximately 250 species that spend their entire lives in underground, unventilated tunnels, distributed along all continents except Australia and Antarctica. Subterranean rodents escape from predators and extreme climatic fluctuations in their underground habitats...... systems in the dark; they display remarkable tolerance to a living environment with an excess of carbon dioxide and ammonia, but lack of oxygen; they exhibit extraordinarily long lives, and keep a fantastic resistance to cancer and other aging-associated diseases. In this study, we reported the genomic...... and transcriptomic information of DMR and BMR. By comparing the genomes and transcriptomes of subterranean rodents with that of their aboveground counterparts, we uncovered candidate molecular mechanisms of mammalian adaptation to subterranean environment. The extreme biological features of the NMR...

  3. Genetic divergence of inbred lines in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Gopal Dan, N. Manivannan and P. Vindhiyavarman

    2012-01-01

    Genetic divergence of 79 inbred lines of sunflower using eight agronomic characters was studied. Analysis of variance revealedthe existence of divergence among the inbred lines. Mahalanobis D2 statistics indicated the presence of substantial geneticdiversity. Based on intercluster D2 value and cluster mean for various characters, potential inbred lines were identified.Intercrossing of these inbreds will exhibit more variability for yield and yield component traits. The character oil yield was...

  4. Long-Term Experimental Evolution in Escherichia Coli. VI. Environmental Constraints on Adaptation and Divergence

    Travisano, M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of environment on adaptation and divergence was examined in two sets of populations of Escherichia coli selected for 1000 generations in either maltose- or glucose-limited media. Twelve replicate populations selected in maltose-limited medium improved in fitness in the selected environment, by an average of 22.5%. Statistically significant among-population genetic variation for fitness was observed during the course of the propagation, but this variation was small relative to the f...

  5. Genetic divergence between genotypes for male and female broilers

    Rogério de Carvalho Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to verify the genetic divergence amongst three broiler genotype, from both sexes, by means of a multivariate performance analysis and carcass traits. Nine hundred and ninety sexed, one-day chicks were utilized; belonged to the following genetic groups: Cobb 500, Hubbard Flex, and Ross 308. The study evaluated the daily average weight gain, the daily average ration consumption, feed conversion, body weight, weight and performance for breast, and carcass over the period from 1 to 35, and from 1 to 42 days of age. Performance of the genetic groups was evaluated by means of multivariate analysis of variance and by Fisher's linear discriminant function, using Roy's largest eigenvalue and Roy's union-intersection test for multiple comparisons. The genetic divergence study was carried out through the analysis of canonical variables and through Tocher method. Female animals from Cobb 500, Hubbard Flex, and Ross 308 genetic groups presented different canonical averages from males of the same groups. First two canonical variables explained 88.10% of variation between genetic groups. Genetic divergence between the evaluated groups allowed formation of two clusters with the following genotypes: Cluster 1 - Cobb 500, Hubbard Flex and Ross 308 females; Cluster 2 - Cobb 500, Hubbard Flex and Ross 308 males.

  6. STUDIES ON GENETIC DIVERGENCE IN GOSSYPIUM ARBOREUM L.

    Rumesh Ranjan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of D2 values, sixty genotypes were grouped into eight clusters containing one to fourteen genotypes. These clusters consisted of genotypes with different geographical origins and indicated no correlation between genetic divergence and geographical divergence. The genotypes of Cluster VIII showed maximum genetic divergence with Cluster I and cluster V. The genotypes belonging to cluster VIII and cluster I may be selected for hybridization for generating genetic variability. Cluster VI having six genotypes was found to be best performing for agronomic characters followed by cluster VIII with one genotype and cluster V with eight genotypes. Thus to generate desirable genetic variability the crossing between cluster VI, VIII and V genotypes would be useful. It is suggested that hybridization among the genotypes of above said clusters would produce segregants for more than one economic character which can serve as parents of hybrids. Days to first flower followed by seed cotton yield per plant, number of monopods and plant height contribute maximum toward divergence.

  7. Environmental versus anthropogenic effects on population adaptive divergence in the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Anthony Bouétard

    Full Text Available Repeated pesticide contaminations of lentic freshwater systems located within agricultural landscapes may affect population evolution in non-target organisms, especially in species with a fully aquatic life cycle and low dispersal ability. The issue of evolutionary impact of pollutants is therefore conceptually important for ecotoxicologists. The impact of historical exposure to pesticides on genetic divergence was investigated in the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis, using a set of 14 populations from contrasted environments in terms of pesticide and other anthropogenic pressures. The hypothesis of population adaptive divergence was tested on 11 life-history traits, using Q(ST-F(ST comparisons. Despite strong neutral differentiation (mean F(ST = 0.291, five adult traits or parameters were found to be under divergent selection. Conversely, two early expressed traits showed a pattern consistent with uniform selection or trait canalization, and four adult traits appeared to evolve neutrally. Divergent selection patterns were mostly consistent with a habitat effect, opposing pond to ditch and channel populations. Comparatively, pesticide and other human pressures had little correspondence with evolutionary patterns, despite hatching rate impairment associated with global anthropogenic pressure. Globally, analyses revealed high genetic variation both at neutral markers and fitness-related traits in a species used as model in ecotoxicology, providing empirical support for the need to account for genetic and evolutionary components of population response in ecological risk assessment.

  8. Toxic hydrogen sulfide and dark caves: phenotypic and genetic divergence across two abiotic environmental gradients in Poecilia mexicana.

    Tobler, Michael; Dewitt, Thomas J; Schlupp, Ingo; García de León, Francisco J; Herrmann, Roger; Feulner, Philine G D; Tiedemann, Ralph; Plath, Martin

    2008-10-01

    Divergent natural selection drives evolutionary diversification. It creates phenotypic diversity by favoring developmental plasticity within populations or genetic differentiation and local adaptation among populations. We investigated phenotypic and genetic divergence in the livebearing fish Poecilia mexicana along two abiotic environmental gradients. These fish typically inhabit nonsulfidic surface rivers, but also colonized sulfidic and cave habitats. We assessed phenotypic variation among a factorial combination of habitat types using geometric and traditional morphometrics, and genetic divergence using quantitative and molecular genetic analyses. Fish in caves (sulfidic or not) exhibited reduced eyes and slender bodies. Fish from sulfidic habitats (surface or cave) exhibited larger heads and longer gill filaments. Common-garden rearing suggested that these morphological differences are partly heritable. Population genetic analyses using microsatellites as well as cytochrome b gene sequences indicate high population differentiation over small spatial scale and very low rates of gene flow, especially among different habitat types. This suggests that divergent environmental conditions constitute barriers to gene flow. Strong molecular divergence over short distances as well as phenotypic and quantitative genetic divergence across habitats in directions classic to fish ecomorphology suggest that divergent selection is structuring phenotypic variation in this system. PMID:18637957

  9. Peaches tree genetic divergence for brown rot reaction

    Américo Wagner Júnior; Keli Cristina Fabiane; Jéssica Scarlet Marth Alves de Oliveira; Juliano Zanela; Idemir Citadin

    2011-01-01

    It was evaluated the genetic divergence in peach genotypes for brown rot reaction. It was evaluated 26 and 29 peach genotypes in the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 production cycle, respectively. The experiment was carried out at the Laboratório de Fitossanidade, da UTFPR - Campus Dois Vizinhos. The experimental design was entirely randomized, considering each peach genotype a treatment, and it was use three replication of nine fruits. The treatment control use three replication of three peach. The ...

  10. EVALUATION OF GENETIC DIVERGENCE IN BERSEEM (TRIFOLIUM ALEXANDRINUM L.) GERMPLASMS

    D. M. LANGADE; C. N. RAM; D. N. VISHWAKARMA; AMITA SHARMA

    2013-01-01

    Forty germplasms of berseem were assessed for the nature and magnitude of genetic divergence based on tendifferent traits of economic importance including green forage yield per plant following Mahalanobis’s D2statistics. The germplasms were grouped into seven clusters. The grouping showed one mono-genotypic cluster(Cluster II), while others comprised of two (Cluster IV), three (Cluster III), four (Cluster V), five (Cluster VII), nine(Cluster I) and sixteen germplasms (Cluster VI). The maximu...

  11. Peaches tree genetic divergence for brown rot reaction

    Américo Wagner Júnior

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It was evaluated the genetic divergence in peach genotypes for brown rot reaction. It was evaluated 26 and 29 peach genotypes in the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 production cycle, respectively. The experiment was carried out at the Laboratório de Fitossanidade, da UTFPR - Campus Dois Vizinhos. The experimental design was entirely randomized, considering each peach genotype a treatment, and it was use three replication of nine fruits. The treatment control use three replication of three peach. The fruit epidermis were inoculated individually with 0.15 mL of M. fructicola conidial suspension (1.0 x 10(5 spores mL-1. In the control treatment was sprayed with 0.15 mL of distilled water. The fruits were examined 72 and 120 hours after inoculation, and the incidence and severity disease were evaluated. These results allowed realized study for genetic divergence, used as dissimilarity measure the Generalized Mahalanobis distance. Cluster analysis using Tocher´s optimization method and distances in the plan were applied. There was smallest genetic divergence among peach trees evaluated for brown rot, what can difficult to obtain resistance in the genotypes.

  12. Genetic divergence in popcorn lines detected by microsatellite

    Thatiana Silva Dandolini; Carlos Alberto Scapim; Antônio Teixeira do Amaral Júnior; Claudete Aparecida Mangolin; Maria de Fátima Pires da Silva Machado; Andressa de Souza Mott; Ana Daniela Lopes

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use microsatellite markers to evaluate the genetic divergence in 10 popcornlines. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 5. The proportion of polymorphic loci was highest (50%) in lineCuragua, while Zélia II was the most monomorphic (100%). The arithmetic complement of similarity of Roger and Tanimotofor the 10 lines indicated lower genetic similarity between the lines Zélia II and Avati Pichinga I and higher similarity betweenZélia I and Zélia II. T...

  13. Genetic Algorithms for Case Adaptation

    Case based reasoning (CBR) paradigm has been widely used to provide computer support for recalling and adapting known cases to novel situations. Case adaptation algorithms generally rely on knowledge based and heuristics in order to change the past solutions to solve new problems. However, case adaptation has always been a difficult process to engineers within (CBR) cycle. Its difficulties can be referred to its domain dependency; and computational cost. In an effort to solve this problem, this research explores a general-purpose method that applying a genetic algorithm (GA) to CBR adaptation. Therefore, it can decrease the computational complexity of the search space in the problems having a great dependency on their domain knowledge. The proposed model can be used to perform a variety of design tasks on a broad set of application domains. However, it has been implemented for the tablet formulation as a domain of application. The proposed system has improved the performance of the CBR design systems

  14. Experimental Evidence of an Eco-evolutionary Feedback during Adaptive Divergence.

    Matthews, Blake; Aebischer, Thierry; Sullam, Karen E; Lundsgaard-Hansen, Bänz; Seehausen, Ole

    2016-02-22

    Differences in how organisms modify their environment can evolve rapidly and might influence adaptive population divergence. In a common garden experiment in aquatic mesocosms, we found that adult stickleback from a recently diverged pair of lake and stream populations had contrasting effects on ecosystem metrics. These modifications were caused by both genetic and plastic differences between populations and were sometimes comparable in magnitude to those caused by the presence/absence of stickleback. Lake and stream fish differentially affected the biomass of zooplankton and phytoplankton, the concentration of phosphorus, and the abundance of several prey (e.g., copepods) and non-prey (e.g., cyanobacteria) species. The adult-mediated effects on mesocosm ecosystems influenced the survival and growth of a subsequent generation of juvenile stickleback reared in the same mesocosms. The prior presence of adults decreased the overall growth rate of juveniles, and the prior presence of stream adults lowered overall juvenile survival. Among the survivors, lake juveniles grew faster than co-occurring stream juveniles, except in mesocosm ecosystems previously modified by adult lake fish that were reared on plankton. Overall, our results provide evidence for reciprocal interactions between ecosystem dynamics and evolutionary change (i.e., eco-evolutionary feedbacks) in the early stages of adaptive population divergence. PMID:26804555

  15. Genetic Divergence Studies in Guava ( Psidium guajava L.)

    B.R.Jana, P.S.Munsi, D.C.Manna, H.Sarkar and Bikash Das

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-two guava cultivars were studied for genetic divergence (Ward’s minimum variance method) on the basis of growth and yield. Thirty two germplasm were distributed into six clusters. Cluster II was largest having eleven genotypes and was nearest to cluster III (28.200) and farthest to cluster VI (82.786). The maximum inter cluster distance was between cluster IV and cluster VI (222.411). Cluster VI had high mean cluster value for fruit set per cent in rainy and winter seasons and chloroph...

  16. Extensive genetic divergence among Diptychus maculatus populations in northwest China

    Meng, Wei; Yang, Tianyan; Hai, Sa; Ma, Yanwu; Cai, Lingang; Ma, Xufa; Gao, Tianxiang; Guo, Yan

    2015-05-01

    D. maculates is a kind of specialized Schizothoracinae fish has been locally listed as a protected animal in Xinjiang Province, China. Ili River located in north of Tianshan Mountain and Tarim River located in north of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau were two main distribution areas of this fish. To investigate the genetic diversity and genetic structure of D. maculates, four populations from Tarim River system and two populations from Ili River system were collected in this study. A 570-bp sequence of the control region was obtained for 105 specimens. Twenty-four haplotypes were detected from six populations, only Kunes River population and Kashi River population shared haplotypes with each other. For all the populations examined, the haplotype diversity ( h) was 0.904 8±0.012 6, nucleotide diversity (π) was 0.027 9±0.013 9, and the average number of pairwise nucleotide differences ( k) was 15.878 3±7.139 1. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 86.31% of the total genetic variation was apportioned among populations, and the variation within sampled populations was 13.69%. Genetic differences among sampled populations were highly significant. F st statistical test indicated that all populations were significantly divergent from each other ( P<0.01). The largest F st value was between Yurungkash River population and Muzat River population, while the smallest F st value was between Kunes River population and Kashi River population. NJ phylogenetic tree of D-loop haplotypes revealed two main clades. The neutrality test and mismatch distribution analysis suggested that the fish had went through a recent population expansion. The uplift of Tianshan Mountain and movement of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau might contribute to the wide genetic divergence of D. maculates in northwest China.

  17. Adaptive divergence in a scleractinian coral: physiological adaptation of Seriatopora hystrix to shallow and deep reef habitats

    van Oppen Madeleine JH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Divergent natural selection across environmental gradients has been acknowledged as a major driver of population and species divergence, however its role in the diversification of scleractinian corals remains poorly understood. Recently, it was demonstrated that the brooding coral Seriatopora hystrix and its algal endosymbionts (Symbiodinium are genetically partitioned across reef environments (0-30 m on the far northern Great Barrier Reef. Here, we explore the potential mechanisms underlying this differentiation and assess the stability of host-symbiont associations through a reciprocal transplantation experiment across habitats ('Back Reef', 'Upper Slope' and 'Deep Slope', in combination with molecular (mtDNA and ITS2-DGGE and photo-physiological analyses (respirometry and HPLC. Results The highest survival rates were observed for native transplants (measured 14 months after transplantation, indicating differential selective pressures between habitats. Host-symbiont assemblages remained stable during the experimental duration, demonstrating that the ability to "shuffle" or "switch" symbionts is restricted in S. hystrix. Photo-physiological differences were observed between transplants originating from the shallow and deep habitats, with indirect evidence of an increased heterotrophic capacity in native deep-water transplants (from the 'Deep Slope' habitat. Similar photo-acclimatisation potential was observed between transplants originating from the two shallow habitats ('Back Reef' and 'Upper Slope', highlighting that their genetic segregation over depth may be due to other, non-photo-physiological traits under selection. Conclusions This study confirms that the observed habitat partitioning of S. hystrix (and associated Symbiodinium is reflective of adaptive divergence along a depth gradient. Gene flow appears to be reduced due to divergent selection, highlighting the potential role of ecological mechanisms, in addition to

  18. Genetic divergence and stability analysis in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.

    Ch.Sreelakshmi, D.Shivani and C.V.Sameer Kumar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Thirty Pigeonpea genotypes studied for genetic divergence using Mahalanobis D2 statistic indicated wider genetic diversity.Considerable variability was observed for days to 50% flowering, days to maturity, plant height, number of pods per plantand seed yield due to non-linear pooled deviation. The variability was low for number of primary branches per plant and testweight. Among the 7 characters studied, seed yield contributed the most (89.49% towards the divergence of genotypesfollowed by number of pods per plant, days to 50% flowering and plant height. The genotypes were grouped into 8 clusters,maximum inter cluster distance being observed between the clusters III and VII (725.69. Hence, crossing of parents fromthese clusters would be desirable for combining earliness, short plant height, more primary branches per plant with more podnumber coupled with high seed yield. The genotypes ICPL 98008, ICPHAL 4979-2 and ICP 77303 were identified asdesirable and stable for days to maturity. Stability parameters along with per se performance across three kharif seasonsrevealed that ICPL 20036 and ICPL 20058 were stable genotypes for seed yield and were found to be suitable for low inputcultivation while, ICPL 13198 was found suitable for input rich cultivation.

  19. Extensive genetic divergence among Diptychus maculatus populations in northwest China

    Meng, Wei; Yang, Tianyan; Hai, Sa; Ma, Yanwu; Cai, Lingang; Ma, Xufa; Gao, Tianxiang; Guo, Yan

    2015-05-01

    D. maculates is a kind of specialized Schizothoracinae fish has been locally listed as a protected animal in Xinjiang Province, China. Ili River located in north of Tianshan Mountain and Tarim River located in north of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau were two main distribution areas of this fish. To investigate the genetic diversity and genetic structure of D. maculates, four populations from Tarim River system and two populations from Ili River system were collected in this study. A 570-bp sequence of the control region was obtained for 105 specimens. Twenty-four haplotypes were detected from six populations, only Kunes River population and Kashi River population shared haplotypes with each other. For all the populations examined, the haplotype diversity ( h) was 0.904 8±0.012 6, nucleotide diversity (π) was 0.027 9±0.013 9, and the average number of pairwise nucleotide differences ( k) was 15.878 3±7.139 1. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 86.31% of the total genetic variation was apportioned among populations, and the variation within sampled populations was 13.69%. Genetic differences among sampled populations were highly significant. F st statistical test indicated that all populations were significantly divergent from each other ( PChina.

  20. Genetic and phenotypic divergence between low- and high-altitude populations of two recently diverged cinnamon teal subspecies.

    Wilson, Robert E; Peters, Jeffrey L; McCracken, Kevin G

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in the environment can lead to divergent selection between populations occupying different parts of a species' range, and ultimately lead to population divergence. The colonization of new areas can thus facilitate divergence in beneficial traits, yet with little differentiation at neutral genetic markers. We investigated genetic and phenotypic patterns of divergence between low- and high-altitude populations of cinnamon teal inhabiting normoxic and hypoxic regions in the Andes and adjacent lowlands of South America. Cinnamon teal showed strong divergence in body size (PC1; P(ST) = 0.56) and exhibited significant frequency differences in a single nonsynonymous α-hemoglobin amino acid polymorphism (Asn/Ser-α9; F(ST) = 0.60) between environmental extremes, despite considerable admixture of mtDNA and intron loci (F(ST) = 0.004-0.168). Inferences of strong population segregation were further supported by the observation of few mismatched individuals in either environmental extreme. Coalescent analyses indicated that the highlands were most likely colonized from lowland regions but following divergence, gene flow has been asymmetric from the highlands into the lowlands. Multiple selection pressures associated with high-altitude habitats, including cold and hypoxia, have likely shaped morphological and genetic divergence within South American cinnamon teal populations. PMID:23289570

  1. Genetic divergence and the genetic architecture of complex traits in chromosome substitution strains of mice

    Spiezio Sabrina H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic architecture of complex traits strongly influences the consequences of inherited mutations, genetic engineering, environmental and genetic perturbations, and natural and artificial selection. But because most studies are under-powered, the picture of complex traits is often incomplete. Chromosome substitution strains (CSSs are a unique paradigm for these genome surveys because they enable statistically independent, powerful tests for the phenotypic effects of each chromosome on a uniform inbred genetic background. A previous CSS survey in mice and rats revealed many complex trait genes (QTLs, large phenotypic effects, extensive epistasis, as well as systems properties such as strongly directional phenotypic changes and genetically-determined limits on the range of phenotypic variation. However, the unusually close genetic relation between the CSS progenitor strains in that study raised questions about the impact of genetic divergence: would greater divergence between progenitor strains, with the corresponding changes in gene regulation and protein function, lead to significantly more distinctive phenotypic features, or alternatively would epistasis and systems constraints, which are pervasive in CSSs, limit the range of phenotypic variation regardless of the extent of DNA sequence variation? Results We analyzed results for an extensive survey of traits in two new panels of CSSs where the donor strains were derived from inbred strains with more distant origins and discovered a strong similarity in genetic and systems properties among the three CSS panels, regardless of divergence time. Conclusion Our results argue that DNA sequence differences between host and donor strains did not substantially affect the architecture of complex traits, and suggest instead that strong epistasis buffered the phenotypic effects of genetic divergence, thereby constraining the range of phenotypic variation.

  2. User Profile Creation Using Genetic Algorithm with Kullback Leibler Divergence

    Hidekazu, Yanagimoto; Sigeru, Omatu

    In this paper we propose a user profile creation method using the Kullback Leibler divergence. To cope with information flood, many information filtering systems have been developed up to now. In the information filtering systems it is important to create a user profile which represents user's interests correctly. Since almost all information filtering systems are developed with techniques of information retrieval, machine learning, and pattern recognition, they often use a linear function as a discriminant function. To classify information in the field of document classification more precisely, the systems have been reported which use a non-linear function as a discriminant function. The proposed method is to use the Kullback Leibler divergence as a discriminant function which denotes to user's interest in the information filtering system. To identify an optimal discriminat function with documents which a user evaluates, we use the real-coded genetic algorithm. We compare the present method with the other one using a linear discriminant function and confirm the effectiveness of the proposing method.

  3. Marker-aided genetic divergence analysis in Brassica

    V. Arunachalam; Shefali Verma; V. Sujata; K. V. Prabhu

    2005-08-01

    Genetic divergence was evaluated in 31 breeding lines from four Brassica species using Mahalanobis’ $D^{2}$. A new method of grouping using $D^{2}$ values was used to group the 31 lines, based on diagnostic morphological traits (called morphoqts). Isozyme variation of the individual enzymes esterase and glutamate oxaloacetate was quantified by five parameters (called isoqts) developed earlier. Grouping by the same method was also done based on the isoqts, and the grouping by isozymes was compared with that by morphoqts. Overall, there was an agreement of 73% suggesting that isoqts can be used in the choice of parents and also first stage selection of segregants in the laboratory. It was suggested that such an exercise would help to take care of season-bound and field-related problems of breeding. The new isozyme QTs, within lane variance of relative mobility and relative absorption, accounted for about 50% of the total divergence. The utility of the new method and isoqts in cost-effective breeding were highlighted.

  4. Population structure, genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in perennial ryegrass populations divergently selected for freezing tolerance

    Mallikarjuna Rao eKovi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature is one of the abiotic stresses seriously affecting the growth of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. Understanding the genetic control of freezing tolerance would aid in the development of cultivars of perennial ryegrass with improved adaptation to frost. A total number of 80 individuals (24 of High frost [HF]; 29 of Low frost [LF] and 27 of Unselected [US] from the second generation of the two divergently selected populations and an unselected control population were genotyped using 278 genome-wide SNPs derived from Lolium perenne L. transcriptome sequence. Our studies showed that the HF and LF populations are very divergent after selection for freezing tolerance, whereas the HF and US populations are more similar. Linkage disequilibrium (LD decay varied across the seven chromosomes and the conspicuous pattern of LD between the HF and LF population confirmed their divergence in freezing tolerance. Furthermore, two Fst outlier methods; finite island model (fdist by LOSITAN and hierarchical structure model using ARLEQUIN detected six loci under directional selection. These outlier loci are most probably linked to genes involved in freezing tolerance, cold adaptation and abiotic stress and might be the potential marker resources for breeding perennial ryegrass cultivars with improved freezing tolerance.

  5. The Kalash genetic isolate: ancient divergence, drift, and selection.

    Ayub, Qasim; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Pagani, Luca; Haber, Marc; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Khaliq, Shagufta; Mehdi, Syed Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The Kalash represent an enigmatic isolated population of Indo-European speakers who have been living for centuries in the Hindu Kush mountain ranges of present-day Pakistan. Previous Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA markers provided no support for their claimed Greek descent following Alexander III of Macedon's invasion of this region, and analysis of autosomal loci provided evidence of a strong genetic bottleneck. To understand their origins and demography further, we genotyped 23 unrelated Kalash samples on the Illumina HumanOmni2.5M-8 BeadChip and sequenced one male individual at high coverage on an Illumina HiSeq 2000. Comparison with published data from ancient hunter-gatherers and European farmers showed that the Kalash share genetic drift with the Paleolithic Siberian hunter-gatherers and might represent an extremely drifted ancient northern Eurasian population that also contributed to European and Near Eastern ancestry. Since the split from other South Asian populations, the Kalash have maintained a low long-term effective population size (2,319-2,603) and experienced no detectable gene flow from their geographic neighbors in Pakistan or from other extant Eurasian populations. The mean time of divergence between the Kalash and other populations currently residing in this region was estimated to be 11,800 (95% confidence interval = 10,600-12,600) years ago, and thus they represent present-day descendants of some of the earliest migrants into the Indian sub-continent from West Asia. PMID:25937445

  6. Genetic hitchhiking associated with life history divergence and colonization of North America in the European corn borer moth.

    Dopman, Erik B

    2011-05-01

    A primary goal for evolutionary biology is to reveal the genetic basis for adaptive evolution and reproductive isolation. Using Z and E pheromone strains the European corn borer (ECB) moth, I address this problem through multilocus analyses of DNA polymorphism. I find that the locus Triose phosphate isomerase (Tpi) is a statistically significant outlier in coalescent simulations of demographic histories of population divergence, including strict allopatric isolation, restricted migration, secondary contact, and population growth or decline. This result corroborates a previous QTL study that identified the Tpi chromosomal region as a repository for gene(s) contributing to divergence in life history. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphism at Tpi suggest a recent selective sweep and genetic hitchhiking associated with colonization of North America from Europe ~200 generations ago. These results indicate that gene genealogies initially diverge during speciation because of selective sweeps, but differential introgression may play a role in the maintenance of differentiation for sympatric populations. PMID:21104111

  7. Genetic divergence across habitats in the widespread coral Seriatopora hystrix and its associated Symbiodinium.

    Pim Bongaerts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral reefs are hotspots of biodiversity, yet processes of diversification in these ecosystems are poorly understood. The environmental heterogeneity of coral reef environments could be an important contributor to diversification, however, evidence supporting ecological speciation in corals is sparse. Here, we present data from a widespread coral species that reveals a strong association of host and symbiont lineages with specific habitats, consistent with distinct, sympatric gene pools that are maintained through ecologically-based selection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Populations of a common brooding coral, Seriatopora hystrix, were sampled from three adjacent reef habitats (spanning a approximately 30 m depth range at three locations on the Great Barrier Reef (n = 336. The populations were assessed for genetic structure using a combination of mitochondrial (putative control region and nuclear (three microsatellites markers for the coral host, and the ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA for the algal symbionts (Symbiodinium. Our results show concordant genetic partitioning of both the coral host and its symbionts across the different habitats, independent of sampling location. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that coral populations and their associated symbionts can be highly structured across habitats on a single reef. Coral populations from adjacent habitats were found to be genetically isolated from each other, whereas genetic similarity was maintained across similar habitat types at different locations. The most parsimonious explanation for the observed genetic partitioning across habitats is that adaptation to the local environment has caused ecological divergence of distinct genetic groups within S. hystrix.

  8. Influence of divergent and convergent thinking on visuomotor adaptation in young and older adults.

    Simon, Anja; Bock, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Visuomotor adaptation declines in older age. This has been attributed to cognitive impairments. One relevant cognitive function could be creativity, since creativity is implicated as mediator of early learning. The present study therefore evaluates whether two aspects of creativity, divergent and convergent thinking, are differentially involved in the age-dependent decline of visuomotor adaptation. In 25 young and 24 older volunteers, divergent thinking was assessed by the alternative-uses-task (AUT), convergent thinking by the Intelligenz-Struktur-Test-2000 (IST), and sensorimotor-adaptation by a pointing task with 60° rotated visual feedback. Young participants outperformed older participants in all three tasks. AUT scores were positively associated with young but not older participants' adaptive performance, whereas IST scores were negatively associated with older but not young participants' adaptive performance. This pattern of findings could be attributed to a consistent relationship between AUT, IST and adaptation; taking this into account, adaptation deficits of older participants were no longer significant. We conclude that divergent thinking supports workaround-strategies during adaptation, but doesn't influence visuomotor recalibration. Furthermore, the decay of divergent thinking in older adults may explain most of age-related decline of adaptive strategies. When the age-related decay of divergent thinking coincides with well-preserved convergent thinking, adaptation suffers most. PMID:26707677

  9. Divergência genética em café conilon Genetic divergence in conilon coffee

    Aymbiré Francisco Almeida da Fonseca

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a divergência genética entre 32 clones de café conilon (Coffea canephora Pierre ex Frohener componentes de três variedades clonais melhoradas, com vistas à identificação dos mais dissimilares, para o estabelecimento de programas de cruzamentos dirigidos. A divergência genética foi avaliada por procedimentos multivariados: distância generalizada de Mahalanobis, método de agrupamento de otimização de Tocher e técnica de variáveis canônicas. Sete caracteres foram avaliados em experimento conduzido em Marilândia, ES. Os genótipos ES 92, ES 25 e ES 22 são os mais divergentes, sendo os dois últimos os mais indicados para cruzamento com os demais, tendo em vista aliarem divergência genética a um bom desempenho produtivo.The objective of this work was to evaluate the genetic divergence between 32 clones of three clonal varieties of conilon coffee, to identify the most dissimilar for the establishment of programs of directed crosses. Genetic divergence was evaluated by multivariate procedures: generalized Mahalanobis distance, the grouping optimization method of Tocher and the technique of canonical variables. Seven characteristics were evaluated in one trial conducted in Marilândia, ES, Brazil. Genotypes ES 92, ES 25 and ES 22 are the most divergent; the last two are the most appropriate for crossing and to obtain hybrids of improved performance by using genetic divergence for good productive performance.

  10. Clonal selection drives genetic divergence of metastatic medulloblastoma.

    Wu, Xiaochong; Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian; Dupuy, Adam J; Shih, David J H; Witt, Hendrik; Croul, Sidney; Bouffet, Eric; Fults, Daniel W; Eberhart, Charles G; Garzia, Livia; Van Meter, Timothy; Zagzag, David; Jabado, Nada; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Scheetz, Todd E; Pfister, Stefan M; Korshunov, Andrey; Li, Xiao-Nan; Scherer, Stephen W; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Akagi, Keiko; MacDonald, Tobey J; Koster, Jan; McCabe, Martin G; Sarver, Aaron L; Collins, V Peter; Weiss, William A; Largaespada, David A; Collier, Lara S; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-02-23

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour, arises in the cerebellum and disseminates through the cerebrospinal fluid in the leptomeningeal space to coat the brain and spinal cord. Dissemination, a marker of poor prognosis, is found in up to 40% of children at diagnosis and in most children at the time of recurrence. Affected children therefore are treated with radiation to the entire developing brain and spinal cord, followed by high-dose chemotherapy, with the ensuing deleterious effects on the developing nervous system. The mechanisms of dissemination through the cerebrospinal fluid are poorly studied, and medulloblastoma metastases have been assumed to be biologically similar to the primary tumour. Here we show that in both mouse and human medulloblastoma, the metastases from an individual are extremely similar to each other but are divergent from the matched primary tumour. Clonal genetic events in the metastases can be demonstrated in a restricted subclone of the primary tumour, suggesting that only rare cells within the primary tumour have the ability to metastasize. Failure to account for the bicompartmental nature of metastatic medulloblastoma could be a major barrier to the development of effective targeted therapies. PMID:22343890

  11. Genetic divergence analysis in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.

    Jadhav, R. S. and Mohrir, M. N.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one germplasm lines of sesame collected from AICRP on Sesame & Niger, Jabalpur and NBPGR Regional Station,Akola were evaluated for genetic divergence using Mahalanobis D2 analysis. Analysis of variances for dispersion indicatessignificant differences among the genotypes. Thirty one genotypes were grouped into seven clusters and cluster I (10 waslargest, followed by cluster II (8, cluster III (7 and cluster V (3, while clusters IV, VI and VII were solitary. Inter clusterdistance ranged from 51.96 (between clusters V and VII to 423.26 (between clusters II and VII, while maximum intracluster distance observed within cluster V (48.03. Character oil content contributed maximum (91.83% towards geneticdivergence. On the basis of the inter cluster distance, cluster I, II, III and VII were identified as distant clusters andgenotypes viz., S-0434, IC-413209, GRT-8637, NIC-16328, TKG-22, IC-413204, IC-413231, Lalguda local, KMR-116, SI-331517, IC-413208, KMS-5-343, ES-111-284, KMS-5-873, SI-3218 and SI-2973 from these clusters could be used forintercrossing to obtain heterosis and also wider variability.

  12. Genomic and functional approaches to genetic adaptation

    Carnero-Montoro, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of phenotypes that have contributed to the adaptation of species and organisms to new environments is a central question in evolutionary genetics. The recent accumulation of genetic variability data has allowed a genome-wide search for different signatures of positive selection which has led to the discovery of hundreds of putative candidate genes that may have played a role in adaptation. However, such hypothesis-free approaches do not reveal either causal va...

  13. Effective Population Size Is Positively Correlated with Levels of Adaptive Divergence among Annual Sunflowers

    Strasburg, Jared L.; Kane, Nolan C.; Raduski, Andrew R.; Bonin, Aurélie; Michelmore, Richard; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2010-01-01

    The role of adaptation in the divergence of lineages has long been a central question in evolutionary biology, and as multilocus sequence data sets have become available for a wide range of taxa, empirical estimates of levels of adaptive molecular evolution are increasingly common. Estimates vary widely among taxa, with high levels of adaptive evolution in Drosophila, bacteria, and viruses but very little evidence of widespread adaptive evolution in hominids. Although estimates in plants are ...

  14. Elevational speciation in action? Restricted gene flow associated with adaptive divergence across an altitudinal gradient.

    Funk, W C; Murphy, M A; Hoke, K L; Muths, E; Amburgey, S M; Lemmon, E M; Lemmon, A R

    2016-02-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that divergent selection pressures across elevational gradients could cause adaptive divergence and reproductive isolation in the process of ecological speciation. Although there is substantial evidence for adaptive divergence across elevation, there is less evidence that this restricts gene flow. Previous work in the boreal chorus frog (Pseudacris maculata) has demonstrated adaptive divergence in morphological, life history and physiological traits across an elevational gradient from approximately 1500-3000 m in the Colorado Front Range, USA. We tested whether this adaptive divergence is associated with restricted gene flow across elevation - as would be expected if incipient speciation were occurring - and, if so, whether behavioural isolation contributes to reproductive isolation. Our analysis of 12 microsatellite loci in 797 frogs from 53 populations revealed restricted gene flow across elevation, even after controlling for geographic distance and topography. Calls also varied significantly across elevation in dominant frequency, pulse number and pulse duration, which was partly, but not entirely, due to variation in body size and temperature across elevation. However, call variation did not result in strong behavioural isolation: in phonotaxis experiments, low-elevation females tended to prefer an average low-elevation call over a high-elevation call, and vice versa for high-elevation females, but this trend was not statistically significant. In summary, our results show that adaptive divergence across elevation restricts gene flow in P. maculata, but the mechanisms for this potential incipient speciation remain open. PMID:26363130

  15. Elevational speciation in action? Restricted gene flow associated with adaptive divergence across an altitudinal gradient

    Funk, W. C.; Murphy, M.A.; Hoke, K. L.; Muths, Erin L.; Amburgey, Staci M.; Lemmon, Emily M.; Lemmon, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that divergent selection pressures across elevational gradients could cause adaptive divergence and reproductive isolation in the process of ecological speciation. Although there is substantial evidence for adaptive divergence across elevation, there is less evidence that this restricts gene flow. Previous work in the boreal chorus frog (Pseudacris maculata) has demonstrated adaptive divergence in morphological, life history and physiological traits across an elevational gradient from approximately 1500–3000 m in the Colorado Front Range, USA. We tested whether this adaptive divergence is associated with restricted gene flow across elevation – as would be expected if incipient speciation were occurring – and, if so, whether behavioural isolation contributes to reproductive isolation. Our analysis of 12 microsatellite loci in 797 frogs from 53 populations revealed restricted gene flow across elevation, even after controlling for geographic distance and topography. Calls also varied significantly across elevation in dominant frequency, pulse number and pulse duration, which was partly, but not entirely, due to variation in body size and temperature across elevation. However, call variation did not result in strong behavioural isolation: in phonotaxis experiments, low-elevation females tended to prefer an average low-elevation call over a high-elevation call, and vice versa for high-elevation females, but this trend was not statistically significant. In summary, our results show that adaptive divergence across elevation restricts gene flow in P. maculata, but the mechanisms for this potential incipient speciation remain open.

  16. Divergência genética em linhagens de melancia Genetic divergence in watermelon lines

    Flávio de França Souza

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A divergência genética entre 31 genótipos de melancia foi avaliada por meio da análise de variáveis canônicas e de técnicas de agrupamento (Tocher e método hierárquico de Ward baseadas na distância generalizada de Mahalanobis (D²ii'. Trinta linhagens, obtidas a partir de acessos coletados no Nordeste brasileiro e a cultivar 'Crimson Sweet' foram avaliadas quanto ao número de dias para o aparecimento da primeira flor masculina e da primeira flor feminina (NDM e NDF; número do nó da primeira flor masculina e da primeira flor feminina (NGM e NGF; número de frutos por planta (NFP; comprimento de rama principal (CRP; peso médio de fruto (PMF; teor de sólidos solúveis (TSS; diâmetro transversal e longitudinal do fruto (DTF e DLF e espessura média de casca (EMC. O experimento foi realizado em delineamento de blocos ao acaso com três repetições, compostas por parcelas de sete plantas. As características que mais contribuíram para a divergência entre as linhagens foram número de frutos por planta, diâmetro longitudinal, teor de sólidos solúveis e peso médio de fruto. Foram formados três grupos por meio do método de otimização de Tocher, três por meio do método hierárquico de Ward e quatro grupos pela dispersão gráfica baseada nas duas primeiras variáveis canônicas. Neste caso, o grupo I compôs-se de sete linhagens de Pernambuco e uma da Bahia; o grupo II reuniu todas as 21 linhagens do Maranhão; os grupos III e IV foram compostos pela linhagem 97-0247.008 (Pernambuco e pela cultivar Crimson Sweet, respectivamente. As linhagens 87-019.021 e 87-019.022 foram as mais semelhantes, enquanto a linhagem 87-019.023 e 'Crimson Sweet' apresentaram maior dissimilaridade pela distância generalizada Mahalanobis (D²ii'. Os cruzamentos mais promissores serão aqueles realizados entre Crimson Sweet e as linhagens do grupo II. Cruzamentos entre Crimson Sweet e as linhagens do grupo I serão interessantes para a obtenção de

  17. Predictors for reproductive isolation in a ring species complex following genetic and ecological divergence

    Pereira Ricardo J; Monahan William B; Wake David B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Reproductive isolation (RI) is widely accepted as an important "check point" in the diversification process, since it defines irreversible evolutionary trajectories. Much less consensus exists about the processes that might drive RI. Here, we employ a formal quantitative analysis of genetic interactions at several stages of divergence within the ring species complex Ensatina eschscholtzii in order to assess the relative contribution of genetic and ecological divergence for...

  18. On the origin of Lake Malawi cichlid species: A population genetic analysis of divergence

    Won, Yong-jin; Sivasundar, Arjun; Wang, Yong; Hey, Jody

    2005-01-01

    The cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi are famously diverse. However, phylogenetic and population genetic studies of their history have been difficult because of the great amount of genetic variation that is shared between species. We apply a recently developed method for fitting the “isolation with migration” divergence model to a data set of specially designed compound loci to develop portraits of cichlid species divergence. Outgroup sequences from a cichlid from Lake Tanganyika permit model par...

  19. Adaptive sensor fusion using genetic algorithms

    Past attempts at sensor fusion have used some form of Boolean logic to combine the sensor information. As an alteniative, an adaptive ''fuzzy'' sensor fusion technique is described in this paper. This technique exploits the robust capabilities of fuzzy logic in the decision process as well as the optimization features of the genetic algorithm. This paper presents a brief background on fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms and how they are used in an online implementation of adaptive sensor fusion

  20. Adaptive sensor fusion using genetic algorithms

    Fitzgerald, D.S.; Adams, D.G.

    1994-08-01

    Past attempts at sensor fusion have used some form of Boolean logic to combine the sensor information. As an alteniative, an adaptive ``fuzzy`` sensor fusion technique is described in this paper. This technique exploits the robust capabilities of fuzzy logic in the decision process as well as the optimization features of the genetic algorithm. This paper presents a brief background on fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms and how they are used in an online implementation of adaptive sensor fusion.

  1. Divergência genética em genótipos de girassol Genetic divergence in sunflower genotypes

    Edson Perito Amorim

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Uma investigação sobre a diversidade genética entre 15 genótipos de girassol, por meio de 12 características agronômicas, foi implementada no Instituto Agronômico, Campinas, Brasil. Análises de variância univariada e multivariada revelaram diferenças entre os genótipos. A distância generalizada de Mahalanobis indicou um alto grau de divergência genética. Os genótipos foram agrupados em três grupos. As características início do florescimento, 50% do florescimento, número de folhas e altura da inserção do capítulo contribuíram com grande parte da divergência genética observada. Por meio desses resultados, é possível identificar materiais divergentes e com características agronômicas complementares para o desenvolvimento de novos cultivares superiores.An investigation about the genetical diversity among fifteen sunflower genotypes using twelve agronomical characteristics was implanted at the Agronomic Institute, Campinas Brazil. Univariate and multivariate analyses of variance revealed the presence of differences among the genotypes. The generalized distance of Mahalanobis indicated the presence of genetic diversity. The genotypes were grouped into tree clusters. Among the investigated characteristics, the beginning of flowering, 50% flowering, leaf number and head height of chapter insertion exhibited high contribution towards genetic divergence. Through these studies it is possible to identify divergent material with further agronomical features for the development of new superior sunflower cultivars.

  2. Genetic divergence in Virginia groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.

    R. P. Gupta, J. H. Vachhani, V. H. Kachhadia, M. A. Vaddoria and V. J. Bhatiya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Divergence analysis among sixty groundnut genotypes was carried out using Mahalanobis’s D2-statistic. The genotypes were grouped into thirteen clusters. The maximum inter-cluster distance (D=36.51 was found between clusters III and V followed by clusters IV and V (D=32.67 and II and IV (D=24.21 indicated that these groups of genotypes were highly divergent from each other. The genotypes in above clusters revealed substantial difference in the means for important yield contributing characters suggesting that the genotypes belonging to these clusters from ideal parents for yield improvement in groundnut.

  3. Parallel genetic divergence among coastal-marine ecotype pairs of European anchovy explained by differential introgression after secondary contact.

    Le Moan, A; Gagnaire, P-A; Bonhomme, F

    2016-07-01

    Ecophenotypic differentiation among replicate ecotype pairs within a species complex is often attributed to independent outcomes of parallel divergence driven by adaptation to similar environmental contrasts. However, the extent to which parallel phenotypic and genetic divergence patterns have emerged independently is increasingly questioned by population genomic studies. Here, we document the extent of genetic differentiation within and among two geographic replicates of the coastal and marine ecotypes of the European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) gathered from Atlantic and Mediterranean locations. Using a genome-wide data set of RAD-derived SNPs, we show that habitat type (marine vs. coastal) is the most important component of genetic differentiation among populations of anchovy. By analysing the joint allele frequency spectrum of each coastal-marine ecotype pair, we show that genomic divergence patterns between ecotypes can be explained by a postglacial secondary contact following a long period of allopatric isolation (c. 300 kyrs). We found strong support for a model including heterogeneous migration among loci, suggesting that secondary gene flow has eroded past differentiation at different rates across the genome. Markers experiencing reduced introgression exhibited strongly correlated differentiation levels among Atlantic and Mediterranean regions. These results support that partial reproductive isolation and parallel genetic differentiation among replicate pairs of anchovy ecotypes are largely due to a common divergence history prior to secondary contact. They moreover provide comprehensive insights into the origin of a surprisingly strong fine-scale genetic structuring in a high gene flow marine fish, which should improve stock management and conservation actions. PMID:27027737

  4. Population extinction and the genetics of adaptation.

    Orr, H Allen; Unckless, Robert L

    2008-08-01

    Theories of adaptation typically ignore the effect of environmental change on population size. But some environmental challenges--challenges to which populations must adapt--may depress absolute fitness below 1, causing populations to decline. Under this scenario, adaptation is a race; beneficial alleles that adapt a population to the new environment must sweep to high frequency before the population becomes extinct. We derive simple, though approximate, solutions to the probability of successful adaptation (population survival) when adaptation involves new mutations, the standing genetic variation, or a mixture of the two. Our results show that adaptation to such environmental challenges can be difficult when relying on new mutations at one or a few loci, and populations will often decline to extinction. PMID:18662122

  5. Genetic, ecological and morphological divergence between populations of the endangered Mexican Sheartail hummingbird (Doricha eliza.

    Yuyini Licona-Vera

    Full Text Available The Mexican Sheartail (Doricha eliza, an endangered hummingbird, is endemic to Mexico where two populations have a disjunct distribution. One population is distributed along the northern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula whereas the other is mostly restricted to central Veracruz. Despite their disjunct distribution, previous work has failed to detect morphological or behavioral differences between these populations. Here we use variation in morphology, mtDNA and nuDNA sequences to determine the degree of morphological and molecular divergence between populations, their divergence time, and historical demography. We use species distribution modeling and niche divergence tests to infer the relative roles of vicariance and dispersal in driving divergence in the genus. Our Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses revealed that Doricha eliza populations form a monophyletic clade and support their sister relationship with D. enicura. We found marked genetic differentiation, with reciprocal monophyly of haplotypes and highly restricted gene flow, supporting a history of isolation over the last 120,000 years. Genetic divergence between populations is consistent with the lack of overlap in environmental space and slight morphological differences between males. Our findings indicate that the divergence of the Veracruz and Yucatan populations is best explained by a combination of a short period of isolation exacerbated by subsequent divergence in climate conditions, and that rather than vicariance, the two isolated ranges of D. eliza are the product of recent colonization and divergence in isolation.

  6. Divergência genética em feijão-caupi Genetic divergence among cowpea

    Adriana Rodrigues Passos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou avaliar a divergência genética entre genótipos de feijão-caupi, visando à seleção dos mais divergentes e de maior potencial produtivo para indicar como genitores em cruzamentos genéticos para futura recomendação de cultivares aos agricultores do Recôncavo Baiano. Os experimentos foram desenvolvidos na Escola de Agronomia da Universidade Federal da Bahia, Cruz das Almas (BA, utilizando-se 22 genótipos do tipo prostrado e 20 do tipo semi-ereto, dispostos em delineamento de blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. Foram analisados os caracteres altura da planta, comprimento de vagem, massa de vagens, massa de grãos por vagem, número de grãos por vagem, massa de cem grãos, índice de grãos, produtividade de vagem e de grãos. A divergência genética foi obtida através da distância generalizada de Mahalanobis. Novas combinações gênicas promissoras podem surgir nos cruzamentos entre os genótipos TE97-309G-1, TE97-367G-3, TE97-367G-11 e TE97-430G-12 do tipo prostrado e TE97-321G-4 e TE97-404-1E-1 do tipo semi-ereto. A seleção dos genótipos TE93-244-23F-1, TE97-299G-10 e BR 17-Gurguéia tipo prostrado e os genótipos TE97-321G-4, TE97-406-2E, TE96-282-22G e EV x 91-2E-1 tipo semi-ereto demonstram superioridade para a produtividade de grãos. Os caracteres comprimento de vagem, massa de grãos por vagem e produtividade de vagens são os que mais contribuem para a divergência genética.This work aimed to evaluate the genetic divergence among cowpea genotypes, for selection of most divergent genotypes and of highest yield potential as parents in crossings as well as for future recommendation of cultivars in the reconcave region in Bahia, Brazil. The experiment was carried out Agronomy School of Universidade Federal da Bahia, Cruz das Almas, State of Bahia, using twenty two erect cowpea and twenty semi-erect cowpea genotypes, in a randomized design, with four replications. The following characters

  7. Molecular genetic and quantitative trait divergence associated with recent homoploid hybrid speciation: a study of Senecio squalidus (Asteraceae).

    Brennan, A C; Barker, D; Hiscock, S J; Abbott, R J

    2012-02-01

    Hybridization is increasingly seen as a trigger for rapid evolution and speciation. To quantify and qualify divergence associated with recent homoploid hybrid speciation, we compared quantitative trait (QT) and molecular genetic variation between the homoploid hybrid species Senecio squalidus and its parental species, S. aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius, and also their naturally occurring Sicilian hybrids. S. squalidus originated and became invasive in the United Kingdom following the introduction of hybrid plants from Mount Etna, Sicily, about 300 years ago. We recorded considerable molecular genetic differentiation between S. squalidus and its parents and their Sicilian hybrids in terms of both reduced genetic diversity and altered allele frequencies, potentially due to the genetic bottleneck associated with introduction to the United Kingdom. S. squalidus is also distinct from its parents and Sicilian hybrids for QTs, but less so than for molecular genetic markers. We suggest that this is due to resilience of polygenic QTs to changes in allele frequency or lack of selection for hybrid niche divergence in geographic isolation. While S. squalidus is intermediate or parental-like for most QTs, some trangressively distinct traits were observed, which might indicate emerging local adaptation in its invasive range. This study emphasizes the important contribution of founder events and geographic isolation to successful homoploid hybrid speciation. PMID:21829224

  8. Adaptation by Plasticity of Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Brenner, Naama

    2007-03-01

    Genetic regulatory networks have an essential role in adaptation and evolution of cell populations. This role is strongly related to their dynamic properties over intermediate-to-long time scales. We have used the budding yeast as a model Eukaryote to study the long-term dynamics of the genetic regulatory system and its significance in evolution. A continuous cell growth technique (chemostat) allows us to monitor these systems over long times under controlled condition, enabling a quantitative characterization of dynamics: steady states and their stability, transients and relaxation. First, we have demonstrated adaptive dynamics in the GAL system, a classic model for a Eukaryotic genetic switch, induced and repressed by different carbon sources in the environment. We found that both induction and repression are only transient responses; over several generations, the system converges to a single robust steady state, independent of external conditions. Second, we explored the functional significance of such plasticity of the genetic regulatory network in evolution. We used genetic engineering to mimic the natural process of gene recruitment, placing the gene HIS3 under the regulation of the GAL system. Such genetic rewiring events are important in the evolution of gene regulation, but little is known about the physiological processes supporting them and the dynamics of their assimilation in a cell population. We have shown that cells carrying the rewired genome adapted to a demanding change of environment and stabilized a population, maintaining the adaptive state for hundreds of generations. Using genome-wide expression arrays we showed that underlying the observed adaptation is a global transcriptional programming that allowed tuning expression of the recruited gene to demands. Our results suggest that non-specific properties reflecting the natural plasticity of the regulatory network support adaptation of cells to novel challenges and enhance their evolvability.

  9. Genetic Divergence, Implication of Diversity, and Conservation of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Bindroo, Bharat Bhusan; Manthira Moorthy, Shunmugam

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity is critical to success in any crop breeding and it provides information about the quantum of genetic divergence and serves a platform for specific breeding objectives. It is one of the three forms of biodiversity recognized by the World Conservation Union (IUCN) as deserving conservation. Silkworm Bombyx mori, an economically important insect, reported to be domesticated over 5000 years ago by human to meet his requirements. Genetic diversity is a particular concern because ...

  10. A candidate multimodal functional genetic network for thermal adaptation

    Katharina C. Wollenberg Valero

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate ectotherms such as reptiles provide ideal organisms for the study of adaptation to environmental thermal change. Comparative genomic and exomic studies can recover markers that diverge between warm and cold adapted lineages, but the genes that are functionally related to thermal adaptation may be difficult to identify. We here used a bioinformatics genome-mining approach to predict and identify functions for suitable candidate markers for thermal adaptation in the chicken. We first established a framework of candidate functions for such markers, and then compiled the literature on genes known to adapt to the thermal environment in different lineages of vertebrates. We then identified them in the genomes of human, chicken, and the lizard Anolis carolinensis, and established a functional genetic interaction network in the chicken. Surprisingly, markers initially identified from diverse lineages of vertebrates such as human and fish were all in close functional relationship with each other and more associated than expected by chance. This indicates that the general genetic functional network for thermoregulation and/or thermal adaptation to the environment might be regulated via similar evolutionarily conserved pathways in different vertebrate lineages. We were able to identify seven functions that were statistically overrepresented in this network, corresponding to four of our originally predicted functions plus three unpredicted functions. We describe this network as multimodal: central regulator genes with the function of relaying thermal signal (1, affect genes with different cellular functions, namely (2 lipoprotein metabolism, (3 membrane channels, (4 stress response, (5 response to oxidative stress, (6 muscle contraction and relaxation, and (7 vasodilation, vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. This network constitutes a novel resource for the study of thermal adaptation in the closely related nonavian reptiles and

  11. Phenotypic and genetic divergence within single whitefish form – detecting the potential for future divergence

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Eckmann, Reiner; Oppelt, Claus; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2013-01-01

    Human-induced nutrient input can change the selection regime and lead to the loss of biodiversity. For example, eutrophication caused speciation reversal in polymorphic whitefish populations through a flattening of littoral–pelagic selection gradients. We investigated the current state of phenotypic and genetic diversity in whitefish (Coregonus macrophthalmus) in a newly restored lake whose nutrient load has returned to pre-eutrophication levels and found that whitefish spawning at different ...

  12. Constrained body shape among highly genetically divergent allopatric lineages of the supralittoral isopod Ligia occidentalis (Oniscidea).

    Santamaria, Carlos A; Mateos, Mariana; DeWitt, Thomas J; Hurtado, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    Multiple highly divergent lineages have been identified within Ligia occidentalis sensu lato, a rocky supralittoral isopod distributed along a ~3000 km latitudinal gradient that encompasses several proposed marine biogeographic provinces and ecoregions in the eastern Pacific. Highly divergent lineages have nonoverlapping geographic distributions, with distributional limits that generally correspond with sharp environmental changes. Crossbreeding experiments suggest postmating reproductive barriers exist among some of them, and surveys of mitochondrial and nuclear gene markers do not show evidence of hybridization. Populations are highly isolated, some of which appear to be very small; thus, the effects of drift are expected to reduce the efficiency of selection. Large genetic divergences among lineages, marked environmental differences in their ranges, reproductive isolation, and/or high isolation of populations may have resulted in morphological differences in L. occidentalis, not detected yet by traditional taxonomy. We used landmark-based geometric morphometric analyses to test for differences in body shape among highly divergent lineages of L. occidentalis, and among populations within these lineages. We analyzed a total of 492 individuals from 53 coastal localities from the southern California Bight to Central Mexico, including the Gulf of California. We conducted discriminant function analyses (DFAs) on body shape morphometrics to assess morphological variation among genetically differentiated lineages and their populations. We also tested for associations between phylogeny and morphological variation, and whether genetic divergence is correlated to multivariate morphological divergence. We detected significant differences in body shape among highly divergent lineages, and among populations within these lineages. Nonetheless, neither lineages nor populations can be discriminated on the basis of body shape, because correct classification rates of cross

  13. Genetic algorithms in adaptive fuzzy control

    Karr, C. Lucas; Harper, Tony R.

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, an analysis element to recognize changes in the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust fuzzy membership functions in response to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific computer-simulated chemical system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  14. Self-adaptive parameters in genetic algorithms

    Pellerin, Eric; Pigeon, Luc; Delisle, Sylvain

    2004-04-01

    Genetic algorithms are powerful search algorithms that can be applied to a wide range of problems. Generally, parameter setting is accomplished prior to running a Genetic Algorithm (GA) and this setting remains unchanged during execution. The problem of interest to us here is the self-adaptive parameters adjustment of a GA. In this research, we propose an approach in which the control of a genetic algorithm"s parameters can be encoded within the chromosome of each individual. The parameters" values are entirely dependent on the evolution mechanism and on the problem context. Our preliminary results show that a GA is able to learn and evaluate the quality of self-set parameters according to their degree of contribution to the resolution of the problem. These results are indicative of a promising approach to the development of GAs with self-adaptive parameter settings that do not require the user to pre-adjust parameters at the outset.

  15. Genetic evidence for a recent divergence and subsequent gene flow between Spanish and Eastern imperial eagles

    Martínez-Cruz Begoña

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dating of population divergence is critical in understanding speciation and in evaluating the evolutionary significance of genetic lineages, upon which identification of conservation and management units should be based. In this study we used a multilocus approach and the Isolation-Migration model based on coalescence theory to estimate the time of divergence of the Spanish and Eastern imperial eagle sister species. This model enables estimation of population sizes at split, and inference of gene flow after divergence. Results Our results indicate that divergence may have occurred during the Holocene or the late Pleistocene, much more recently than previously suspected. They also suggest a large population reduction at split, with an estimated effective population size several times smaller for the western population than for the eastern population. Asymmetrical gene flow after divergence, from the Eastern imperial eagle to the Spanish imperial eagle, was detected for the nuclear genome but not the mitochondrial genome. Male-mediated gene flow after divergence may explain this result, and the previously reported lower mitochondrial diversity but similar nuclear diversity in Spanish imperial eagles compared to the Eastern species. Conclusion Spanish and Eastern imperial eagles split from a common ancestor much more recently than previously thought, and asymmetrical gene flow occurred after divergence. Revision of the phylogenetic proximity of both species is warranted, with implications for conservation.

  16. Genetic divergence among sweet corn lines estimated by microsatellite markers.

    Lopes, A D; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of 15 sugary-1 sweet corn lines by microsatellite markers. One hundred pairs of simple sequence repeat primers that were mapped for field corn were tested. Of these primers, 15% were polymorphic, and all were selected for the evaluation. These primers identified a total of 39 alleles among the 15 loci that were evaluated. The number of alleles per locus in the genotypes ranged from 2 to 4, with an average of 2.60 alleles per locus; the highest number of alleles was observed at the loci Bnlg1083, Umc1241, and Umc1590. The occurrence of null alleles at locus Umc1363 was evident only in line DN44. The proportion of polymorphic loci was the highest in lines DN17.1 and DN6 (73.33%), whereas lines DN47, DN23, and DN28 were more monomorphic than other lines. The loci Bnlg1083 and Umc1506 were polymorphic in 8 and 7 lines, respectively, indicating that these loci might be effective and promising for the identification of polymorphism in other sweet corn lines. The genetic diversity calculated by Rogers' genetic distances indicated the lowest genetic similarity between lines DN9 and DN28 (0.7603) and the highest similarity between lines DN19 and DN6 (0.3724). The dendrogram obtained by the unweighted pair-group method based on arithmetic averages indicated the formation of 4 major groups, showing the crossing of the genotypes DN19 and DN6 with DN8 as a possible alternative for the expression of heterozygosis. PMID:25511025

  17. Genetic Divergence Analysis in Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Yaikhom Vivekananda, Pramesh Khoyumthem and N. Brajendra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity among 31 genotypes of groundnut were estimated using Mahalanobis D2 statistic for five agro-morphological characters. The analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the genotypes for all characters. Based on Tocher's method, 31 genotypes were grouped into seven clusters, where cluster I was the largest containing 11 genotypes followed by cluster II and III with 7 genotypes each. The inter-cluster distance was maximum between cluster I and cluster VI followed...

  18. Adaptive divergence with gene flow in incipient speciation of Miscanthus floridulus / sinensis complex (Poaceae)

    Huang, Chao-Li

    2014-11-11

    Young incipient species provide ideal materials for untangling the process of ecological speciation in the presence of gene flow. The Miscanthus floridulus/sinensis complex exhibits diverse phenotypic and ecological differences despite recent divergence (approximately 1.59million years ago). To elucidate the process of genetic differentiation during early stages of ecological speciation, we analyzed genomic divergence in the Miscanthus complex using 72 randomly selected genes from a newly assembled transcriptome. In this study, rampant gene flow was detected between species, estimated as M=3.36x10(-9) to 1.20x10(-6), resulting in contradicting phylogenies across loci. Nevertheless, beast analyses revealed the species identity and the effects of extrinsic cohesive forces that counteracted the non-stop introgression. As expected, early in speciation with gene flow, only 3-13 loci were highly diverged; two to five outliers (approximately 2.78-6.94% of the genome) were characterized by strong linkage disequilibrium, and asymmetrically distributed among ecotypes, indicating footprints of diversifying selection. In conclusion, ecological speciation of incipient species of Miscanthus probably followed the parapatric model, whereas allopatric speciation cannot be completely ruled out, especially between the geographically isolated northern and southern M.sinensis, for which no significant gene flow across oceanic barriers was detected. Divergence between local ecotypes in early-stage speciation began at a few genomic regions under the influence of natural selection and divergence hitchhiking that overcame gene flow.

  19. Comparative landscape genetics and the adaptive radiation of Darwin's finches: the role of peripheral isolation.

    Petren, K; Grant, P R; Grant, B R; Keller, L F

    2005-09-01

    We use genetic divergence at 16 microsatellite loci to investigate how geographical features of the Galápagos landscape structure island populations of Darwin's finches. We compare the three most genetically divergent groups of Darwin's finches comprising morphologically and ecologically similar allopatric populations: the cactus finches (Geospiza scandens and Geospiza conirostris), the sharp-beaked ground finches (Geospiza difficilis) and the warbler finches (Certhidea olivacea and Certhidea fusca). Evidence of reduced genetic diversity due to drift was limited to warbler finches on small, peripheral islands. Evidence of low levels of recent interisland migration was widespread throughout all three groups. The hypothesis of distance-limited dispersal received the strongest support in cactus and sharp-beaked ground finches as evidenced by patterns of isolation by distance, while warbler finches showed a weaker relationship. Support for the hypothesis that gene flow constrains morphological divergence was only found in one of eight comparisons within these groups. Among warbler finches, genetic divergence was relatively high while phenotypic divergence was low, implicating stabilizing selection rather than constraint due to gene flow. We conclude that the adaptive radiation of Darwin's finches has occurred in the presence of ongoing but low levels of gene flow caused by distance-dependent interisland dispersal. Gene flow does not constrain phenotypic divergence, but may augment genetic variation and facilitate evolution due to natural selection. Both microsatellites and mtDNA agree in that subsets of peripheral populations of two older groups are genetically more similar to other species that underwent dramatic morphological change. The apparent decoupling of morphological and molecular evolution may be accounted for by a modification of Lack's two-stage model of speciation: relative ecological stasis in allopatry followed by secondary contact, ecological

  20. Genetic divergence, speciation and morphological stasis in a lineage of African cichlid fishes

    Sturmbauer, Christian; Meyer, Axel

    1992-01-01

    Since their discovery at the turn of the century, the species assemblages of cichlid fishes in the East African Lakes Victoria, Malawi and Tanganyika have fascinated evolutionary biologists. Many models have attempted to account for the 'explosive' evolution of several hundred species within these lakes. Here we report a case of surprisingly large genetic divergence among populations of the endemic Tropheus lineage of Lake Tanganyika. This lineage of six species contains twice as much genetic...

  1. Geographical genetic diversity and divergence of common wild rice (O. rufipogon Griff.) in China

    WANG MeiXing; LIChen; LI ZiChao; ZHANG HongLiang; ZHANG DongLing; PAN DaJian; LI DaoYuan; FAN ZhiLan; QI YongWen; SUN JunLi; YANG QingWen

    2008-01-01

    Using 36 SSR markers and 889 accessions of common wild rice in China, the genetic diversity and the divergence among different geographical populations are investigated. Guangdong Province has the largest number of alleles, which account for 84% of the total alleles detected in the study, followed by Guangxi Province. The Nei's gone diversity indices, from high to low, are in the sequence of Hainan, Guangdong, Guangxi, Fujian, Hunan, Jiangxi, and Yunnan provinces. Two genetic diversity centers of Chinese common wild rice are detected on the basis of geographic analysis, i.e., the region covering Boluo, Zijin, Lufeng, Haifeng, Huidong and Huiyang counties of Guangdong Province and the region covering Yongning, Longan, Laibin and Guigang counties of Guangxi Province. The common wild rice in Yunnan, Hunan, Jiangxi, and Fujian provinces are diverged into respectively independent popula-tions with relatively large genetic distances, whereas, those in Hainan, Guangdong and Guangxi prov-inces have relatively low genetic divergence. Under the condition of geographic separation, natural selection is considered as one of the primary forces contributing to the divergence of common wild rice in China.

  2. Ecological opportunities and specializations shaped genetic divergence in a highly mobile marine top predator.

    Louis, Marie; Fontaine, Michael C; Spitz, Jérôme; Schlund, Erika; Dabin, Willy; Deaville, Rob; Caurant, Florence; Cherel, Yves; Guinet, Christophe; Simon-Bouhet, Benoit

    2014-11-22

    Environmental conditions can shape genetic and morphological divergence. Release of new habitats during historical environmental changes was a major driver of evolutionary diversification. Here, forces shaping population structure and ecotype differentiation ('pelagic' and 'coastal') of bottlenose dolphins in the North-east Atlantic were investigated using complementary evolutionary and ecological approaches. Inference of population demographic history using approximate Bayesian computation indicated that coastal populations were likely founded by the Atlantic pelagic population after the Last Glacial Maxima probably as a result of newly available coastal ecological niches. Pelagic dolphins from the Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea likely diverged during a period of high productivity in the Mediterranean Sea. Genetic differentiation between coastal and pelagic ecotypes may be maintained by niche specializations, as indicated by stable isotope and stomach content analyses, and social behaviour. The two ecotypes were only weakly morphologically segregated in contrast to other parts of the World Ocean. This may be linked to weak contrasts between coastal and pelagic habitats and/or a relatively recent divergence. We suggest that ecological opportunity to specialize is a major driver of genetic and morphological divergence. Combining genetic, ecological and morphological approaches is essential to understanding the population structure of mobile and cryptic species. PMID:25297864

  3. Divergent Adaptive Strategies by Two Co-occurring Epiphytic Orchids to Water Stress: Escape or Avoidance?

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Due to the fluctuating water availability in the arboreal habitat, epiphytic plants are considered vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic disturbances. Although co-occurring taxa have been observed divergent adaptive performances in response to drought, the underlying physiological and morphological mechanisms by which epiphyte species cope with water stress remain poorly understood. In the present study, two co-occurring epiphytic orchids with different phenologies were selected to i...

  4. Environmental versus Anthropogenic Effects on Population Adaptive Divergence in the Freshwater Snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Bouetard, Anthony; Côte, Jessica; Besnard, Anne-Laure; Collinet, Marc; Coutellec, Marie-Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Repeated pesticide contaminations of lentic freshwater systems located within agricultural landscapes may affect population evolution in non-target organisms, especially in species with a fully aquatic life cycle and low dispersal ability. The issue of evolutionary impact of pollutants is therefore conceptually important for ecotoxicologists. The impact of historical exposure to pesticides on genetic divergence was investigated in the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis, using a set of 14 ...

  5. Proteome-Wide Analysis of Functional Divergence in Bacteria: Exploring a Host of Ecological Adaptations

    Caffrey, Brian E.; Williams, Tom A.; Jiang, Xiaowei; Toft, Christina; Hokamp, Karsten; Fares, Mario A

    2012-01-01

    Functional divergence is the process by which new genes and functions originate through the modification of existing ones. Both genetic and environmental factors influence the evolution of new functions, including gene duplication or changes in the ecological requirements of an organism. Novel functions emerge at the expense of ancestral ones and are generally accompanied by changes in the selective forces at constrained protein regions. We present software capable of analyzing whole proteome...

  6. Adaptive Genetic Algorithm Model for Intrusion Detection

    K. S. Anil Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrusion detection systems are intelligent systems designed to identify and prevent the misuse of computer networks and systems. Various approaches to Intrusion Detection are currently being used, but they are relatively ineffective. Thus the emerging network security systems need be part of the life system and this ispossible only by embedding knowledge into the network. The Adaptive Genetic Algorithm Model - IDS comprising of K-Means clustering Algorithm, Genetic Algorithm and Neural Network techniques. Thetechnique is tested using multitude of background knowledge sets in DARPA network traffic datasets.

  7. Divergência genética entre cultivares de caupi Genetic divergence among cultivars of cowpea

    Francisco José de Oliveira

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi quantificar a divergência genética de cultivares de caupi, agrupadas por análise multivariada visando à seleção de parentais superiores. Foram utilizadas 16 cultivares de caupi [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] do banco de germoplasma do Centro de Ciências Agrárias da Universidade Federal do Ceará. As observações fenotípicas foram realizadas num ensaio com delineamento experimental em blocos completos casualizados, com seis blocos e 16 tratamentos, incluindo três testemunhas, com parcela experimental de 24 m² e área útil de 16 m², sendo quatro fileiras de plantas, com espaços de 1,0 x 0,5 m, contendo duas plantas por cova. Para mensurar os caracteres fenotípicos, cinco plantas competitivas, localizadas nas duas fileiras centrais da parcela, foram tomadas ao acaso. Os cruzamentos entre os grupos I [TVx-337-3F e Vita-4 (TVu 1977-OD] e II (Bengala e V-4 Alagoas podem resultar em produção de novas combinações gênicas, por serem divergentes e reunirem maior número de caracteres agronomicamente desejáveis. Os caracteres que mais contribuem para divergência genética são o comprimento da vagem (36,80% e o peso de 100 sementes (19,21%.This work aimed to determine the genetic divergence among cowpea cultivars [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] when grouped in a multivariate analysis concerning to select superior parents. So 16 cowpea cultivars were used from the germplasm bank of the Centro de Ciências Agrárias of the Universidade Federal do Ceará, in Brazil. The data were accomplished in complete randomized blocks, with six blocks, 16 treatments and three cultivar checks. The total area of experimental plots was 24 m² and the net area was 16 m², displayed in four rows, plants were spaced about 1.0 x 0.5 m with two plants in each plot. The phenotypic data were estimated from five competitive plants as casual samples on two central rows of each replicate. Breeding among the groups I [TVx-337-3F and

  8. Genetic divergence between Melipona quadrifasciata Lepeletier (Hymenoptera, Apidae populations

    Mara Garcia Tavares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melipona quadrifasciata is a stingless bee widely found throughout the Brazilian territory, with two recognized subspecies, M. quadrifasciata anthidioides, that exhibits interrupted metasomal stripes, and M. quadrifasciata quadrifasciata, with continuous metasomal stripes. This study aimed to estimate the genetic variability of these subspecies. For this purpose, 127 colonies from 15 Brazilian localities were analyzed, using nine species-specific microsatellite primers. At these loci, the number of alleles ranged from three to 15 (mean: 7.2, and the observed heterozygosity (Ho ranged from 0.03-0.21, while the expected heterozygosity (He ranged from 0.23-0.47. The genetic distances among populations ranged from 0.03-0.45. The F ST multilocus value (0.23 indicated that the populations sampled were structured, and the clustering analysis showed the formation of two subgroups and two more distant populations. The first group contained the subspecies M. quadrifasciata quadrifasciata, and the other, the subspecies M. quadrifasciata anthidioides and the two M. quadrifasciata populations with continuous metasomal stripes from northern Minas Gerais. These results confirmed that the yellow metasomal stripes alone are not a good means for correctly identifying the different subspecies of M. quadrifasciata.

  9. Niche evolution and adaptive radiation: Testing the order of trait divergence

    Ackerly, D.D.; Schwilk, D.W.; Webb, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of an adaptive radiation, the evolution of niche parameters is of particular interest for understanding modes of speciation and the consequences for coexistence of related species within communities. We pose a general question: In the course of an evolutionary radiation, do traits related to within-community niche differences (?? niche) evolve before or after differentiation of macrohabitat affinity or climatic tolerances (?? niche)? Here we introduce a new test to address this question, based on a modification of the method of independent contrasts. The divergence order test (DOT) is based on the average age of the nodes on a tree, weighted by the absolute magnitude of the contrast at each node for a particular trait. The comparison of these weighted averages reveals whether large divergences for one trait have occurred earlier or later in the course of diversification, relative to a second trait; significance is determined by bootstrapping from maximum-likelihood ancestral state reconstructions. The method is applied to the evolution of Ceanothus, a woody plant group in California, in which co-occurring species exhibit significant differences in a key leaf trait (specific leaf area) associated with contrasting physiological and life history strategies. Co-occurring species differ more for this trait than expected under a null model of community assembly. This ?? niche difference evolved early in the divergence of two major subclades within Ceanothus, whereas climatic distributions (?? niche traits) diversified later within each of the subclades. However, rapid evolution of climate parameters makes inferences of early divergence events highly uncertain, and differentiation of the ?? niche might have taken place throughout the evolution of the group, without leaving a clear phylogenetic signal. Similar patterns observed in several plant and animal groups suggest that early divergence of ?? niche traits might be a common feature of niche evolution in

  10. Red and white Chinook salmon: genetic divergence and mate choice.

    Lehnert, Sarah J; Pitcher, Trevor E; Devlin, Robert H; Heath, Daniel D

    2016-03-01

    Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exhibit extreme differences in coloration of skin, eggs and flesh due to genetic polymorphisms affecting carotenoid deposition, where colour can range from white to bright red. A sympatric population of red and white Chinook salmon occurs in the Quesnel River, British Columbia, where frequencies of each phenotype are relatively equal. In our study, we examined evolutionary mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of the morphs, where we first tested whether morphs were reproductively isolated using microsatellite genotyping, and second, using breeding trials in seminatural spawning channels, we tested whether colour assortative mate choice could be operating to maintain the polymorphism in nature. Next, given extreme difference in carotenoid assimilation and the importance of carotenoids to immune function, we examined mate choice and selection between colour morphs at immune genes (major histocompatibility complex genes: MHC I-A1 and MHC II-B1). In our study, red and white individuals were found to interbreed, and under seminatural conditions, some degree of colour assortative mate choice (71% of matings) was observed. We found significant genetic differences at both MHC genes between morphs, but no evidence of MHC II-B1-based mate choice. White individuals were more heterozygous at MHC II-B1 compared with red individuals, and morphs showed significant allele frequency differences at MHC I-A1. Although colour assortative mate choice is likely not a primary mechanism maintaining the polymorphisms in the population, our results suggest that selection is operating differentially at immune genes in red and white Chinook salmon, possibly due to differences in carotenoid utilization. PMID:26836978

  11. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change

    Hansen, M.M.; Olivieri, I.; Waller, D.M.;

    2012-01-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how...... for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We...... further review a broader set of 44 studies to assess how well they meet the proposed criteria, and conclude that only 23% fulfill all criteria. Approximately half (43%) of these studies failed to rule out the alternative hypothesis of replacement by a different, better-adapted population. Likewise, 34...

  12. Contrasting patterns of genetic divergence in two sympatric pseudo-metallophytes: Rumex acetosa L. and Commelina communis L.

    Ye M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patterns of genetic divergence between populations of facultative metallophytes have been investigated extensively. However, most previous investigations have focused on a single plant species making it unclear if genetic divergence shows common patterns or, conversely, is species-specific. The herbs Rumex acetosa L. and Commelina communis L. are two pseudo-metallophytes thriving in both normal and cupriferous soils along the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River in China. Their non-metallicolous and metallicolous populations are often sympatric thus providing an ideal opportunity for comparative estimation of genetic structures and divergence under the selective pressure derived from copper toxicity. Results In the present study, patterns of genetic divergence of R. acetosa and C. communis , including metal tolerance, genetic structure and genetic relationships between populations, were investigated and compared using hydroponic experiments, AFLP, ISSR and chloroplast genetic markers. Our results show a significant reduction in genetic diversity in metallicolous populations of C. communis but not in R. acetosa . Moreover, genetic differentiation is less in R. acetosa than in C. communis , the latter species also shows a clustering of its metallicolous populations. Conclusions We propose that the genetic divergences apparent in R. acetosa and C. communis , and the contrasting responses of the two species to copper contamination, might be attributed to the differences in their intrinsic physiological and ecological properties. No simple and generalised conclusions on genetic divergence in pseudo-metallophytes can thus be drawn.

  13. Coupling genetic and ecological-niche models to examine how past population distributions contribute to divergence.

    Knowles, L Lacey; Carstens, Bryan C; Keat, Marcia L

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the impact of climate-induced distributional shifts on species divergence, like those accompanying the Pleistocene glacial cycles [1, 2], requires tools that explicitly incorporate the geographic configuration of past distributions into analyses of genetic differentiation. Depending on the historical distribution of species, genetic differences may accumulate among ancestral source populations, but there is long-standing debate whether displacements into glacial refugia promoted divergence. Here we integrate coalescent-based genetic models [3, 4] with ecological-niche modeling [5, 6] to generate expectations for patterns of genetic variation based on an inferred past distribution of a species. Reconstruction of the distribution of a montane grasshopper species during the last glacial maximum suggests that Melanoplus marshalli populations from the sky islands of Colorado and Utah were likely colonized from multiple ancestral source populations. The genetic analyses provide compelling evidence that the historical distribution of M. marshalli-namely, spatial separation of multiple refugia-was conducive to genetic differentiation. The coupling of genetic and ecological-niche modeling provides a new and flexible tool for integrating paleoenvironmental details into species-specific predictions of population structure that can increase our understanding of why the glacial cycles promoted speciation in some taxa and yet inhibited diversification in others [7, 8]. PMID:17475496

  14. Genetic divergence is more tightly related to call variation than landscape features in the Amazonian frogs Physalaemus petersi and P. freibergi.

    Funk, W C; Cannatella, D C; Ryan, M J

    2009-09-01

    Behavioural isolation from divergence in male advertisement calls and female preferences is hypothesized to cause genetic divergence and speciation in the Amazonian frogs Physalaemus petersi and P. freibergi, yet the importance of call variation and landscape features in genetic divergence is unresolved. We tested for correlations between genetic divergence at microsatellite loci and (1) call variables; and (2) landscape variables among 10 populations of these frogs. Genetic divergence was not correlated with geographical distance, rivers or elevation. There was a strong positive relationship, however, between genetic divergence and inter-population differences in one call variable, whine dominant frequency. Effective population sizes varied among sites (range = 15-846) and were often small, suggesting that genetic drift could influence call evolution. Evidence for fine-scale genetic structure within sites was also found. Our results support the hypothesis that behavioural isolation from divergence in male calls and female preferences causes genetic divergence and speciation. PMID:19583696

  15. Lack of genetic differentiation between monarch butterflies with divergent migration destinations.

    Lyons, Justine I; Pierce, Amanda A; Barribeau, Seth M; Sternberg, Eleanore D; Mongue, Andrew J; De Roode, Jacobus C

    2012-07-01

    Monarch butterflies are best known for their spectacular annual migration from eastern North America to Mexico. Monarchs also occur in the North American states west of the Rocky Mountains, from where they fly shorter distances to the California Coast. Whether eastern and western North American monarchs form one genetic population or are genetically differentiated remains hotly debated, and resolution of this debate is essential to understand monarch migration patterns and to protect this iconic insect species. We studied the genetic structure of North American migratory monarch populations, as well as nonmigratory populations in Hawaii and New Zealand. Our results show that eastern and western migratory monarchs form one admixed population and that monarchs from Hawaii and New Zealand have genetically diverged from North American butterflies. These findings suggest that eastern and western monarch butterflies maintain their divergent migrations despite genetic mixing. The finding that eastern and western monarchs form one genetic population also suggests that the conservation of overwintering sites in Mexico is crucial for the protection of monarchs in both eastern and western North America. PMID:22574833

  16. Ecological genomics in Xanthomonas: the nature of genetic adaptation with homologous recombination and host shifts

    Huang, Chao-Li

    2015-03-15

    Background: Comparative genomics provides insights into the diversification of bacterial species. Bacterial speciation usually takes place with lasting homologous recombination, which not only acts as a cohering force between diverging lineages but brings advantageous alleles favored by natural selection, and results in ecologically distinct species, e.g., frequent host shift in Xanthomonas pathogenic to various plants. Results: Using whole-genome sequences, we examined the genetic divergence in Xanthomonas campestris that infected Brassicaceae, and X. citri, pathogenic to a wider host range. Genetic differentiation between two incipient races of X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae was attributable to a DNA fragment introduced by phages. In contrast to most portions of the genome that had nearly equivalent levels of genetic divergence between subspecies as a result of the accumulation of point mutations, 10% of the core genome involving with homologous recombination contributed to the diversification in Xanthomonas, as revealed by the correlation between homologous recombination and genomic divergence. Interestingly, 179 genes were under positive selection; 98 (54.7%) of these genes were involved in homologous recombination, indicating that foreign genetic fragments may have caused the adaptive diversification, especially in lineages with nutritional transitions. Homologous recombination may have provided genetic materials for the natural selection, and host shifts likely triggered ecological adaptation in Xanthomonas. To a certain extent, we observed positive selection nevertheless contributed to ecological divergence beyond host shifting. Conclusion: Altogether, mediated with lasting gene flow, species formation in Xanthomonas was likely governed by natural selection that played a key role in helping the deviating populations to explore novel niches (hosts) or respond to environmental cues, subsequently triggering species diversification. © Huang et al.

  17. Chemical Variation in a Dominant Tree Species: Population Divergence, Selection and Genetic Stability across Environments

    Julianne M O'Reilly-Wapstra; Miller, Alison M.; Hamilton, Matthew G.; Dean Williams; Naomi Glancy-Dean; Potts, Brad M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding among and within population genetic variation of ecologically important plant traits provides insight into the potential evolutionary processes affecting those traits. The strength and consistency of selection driving variability in traits would be affected by plasticity in differences among genotypes across environments (G×E). We investigated population divergence, selection and environmental plasticity of foliar plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) in a dominant tree species, Eu...

  18. Genetic divergence, range expansion and possible homoploid hybrid speciation among pine species in Northeast China

    Ren, G-P; Abbott, R J; Zhou, Y-F; Zhang, L-R; Peng, Y-L; Liu, J-Q

    2011-01-01

    Although homoploid hybrid speciation in plants is probably more common than previously realized, there are few well-documented cases of homoploid hybrid origin in conifers. We examined genetic divergence between two currently widespread pines in Northeast China, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica and Pinus densiflora, and also whether two narrowly distributed pines in the same region, Pinus funebris and Pinus takahasii, might have originated from the two widespread species by homoploid hybrid sp...

  19. Multivariate genetic divergence and hybrid performance of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.

    Dias Luiz Antônio dos Santos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic distances among cacao cultivars were calculated through multivariate analysis, using the D2 statistic, to examine racial group classification and to assess heterotic hybrids. A 5 x 5 complete diallel was evaluated. Over a five-year period (1986-1990, five cultivars of the S1 generation, pertaining to the Lower Amazon Forastero and Trinitario racial groups and 20 crosses between the corresponding S0 parents were analyzed, based upon five yield components - number of healthy and collected fruits per plant (NHFP and NCFP, wet seed weight per plant and per fruit (WSWP and WSWF, and percentage of diseased fruits per plant (PDFP. The diversity analysis suggested a close relationship between the Trinitario and Lower Amazon Forastero groups. A correlation coefficient (r was calculated to determine the association between genetic diversity and heterosis. Genetic distance of parents by D2 was found to be linearly related to average performance of hybrids for WSWP and WSWF (r = 0.68, P < 0.05 and r = 0.76, P < 0.05, respectively. The heterotic performance for the same components was also correlated with D2, both with r = 0.66 (P < 0.05. A relationship between genetic divergence and combining ability effects was suggested because the most divergent cultivar exhibited a high general combining ability, generating the best performing hybrids. Results indicated that genetic diversity estimates can be useful in selecting parents for crosses and in assessing relationships among cacao racial groups.

  20. Genetic divergence among Brachiara humidicola (Rendle Schweick hybrids evaluated in the Western Brazilian Amazon

    Giselle Mariano Lessa de Assis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to detect genetic variability among genotypes of Brachiara humidicola, study the genetic diversity and identify redundant variables in the discrimination of hybrids. Fifteen genotypes were evaluated for morphological, agronomic and nutritive characteristics in a randomized block design with six replications, in Rio Branco, Acre. Analysis of variance was performed, followed by the Scott-Knott test. Different techniques of multivariate analysis were used to study genetic diversity. Significant differences in plant performance were observed for agronomic and morphological characteristics, but not for nutritive value. There was consistency between the different clustering techniques. Four redundant characteristics were identified that can be discarded. The existence of divergent and superior hybrids that can be used in recurrent selection (sexual programs or can be released as new (apomictic cultivars after testing for animal response was confirmed. The lack of genetic variability in bromatological traits indicates the need for differentiated selection strategies.

  1. Divergence-based characterization of fundamental limitations of adaptive dynamical systems

    Raginsky, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive dynamical systems arise in a multitude of contexts, e.g., optimization, control, communications, signal processing, and machine learning. A precise characterization of their fundamental limitations is therefore of paramount importance. In this paper, we consider the general problem of adaptively controlling and/or identifying a stochastic dynamical system, where our {\\em a priori} knowledge allows us to place the system in a subset of a metric space (the uncertainty set). We present an information-theoretic meta-theorem that captures the trade-off between the metric complexity (or richness) of the uncertainty set, the amount of information acquired online in the process of controlling and observing the system, and the residual uncertainty remaining after the observations have been collected. Following the approach of Zames, we quantify {\\em a priori} information by the Kolmogorov (metric) entropy of the uncertainty set, while the information acquired online is expressed as a sum of information diverg...

  2. Local adaptation to altitude underlies divergent thermal physiology in tropical killifishes of the genus Aphyosemion.

    David J McKenzie

    Full Text Available In watersheds of equatorial West Africa, monophyletic groups of killifish species (genus Aphyosemion occur in discrete altitudinal ranges, low altitude species (LA, sea level to ∼350 m or high altitude species (HA, 350 to 900 m. We investigated the hypothesis that local adaptation to altitude by the LA and HA species would be revealed as divergent effects of temperature on their physiological energetics. Two species from each group (mass ∼350 mg were acclimated to 19, 25 and 28°C, with 19 and 28°C estimated to be outside the thermal envelope for LA or HA, respectively, in the wild. Wild-caught animals (F0 generation were compared with animals raised in captivity at 25°C (F1 generation to investigate the contribution of adaptation versus plasticity. Temperature significantly increased routine metabolic rate in all groups and generations. However, LA and HA species differed in the effects of temperature on their ability to process a meal. At 25°C, the specific dynamic action (SDA response was completed within 8 h in all groups, but acclimation to temperatures beyond the thermal envelope caused profound declines in SDA performance. At 19°C, the LA required ∼14 h to complete the SDA, whereas the HA required only ∼7 h. The opposite effect was observed at 28°C. This effect was evident in both F0 and F1. Reaction norms for effects of temperature on SDA therefore revealed a trade-off, with superior performance at warmer temperatures by LA being associated with inferior performance at cooler temperatures, and vice-versa in HA. The data indicate that divergent physiological responses to temperature in the LA and HA species reflect local adaptation to the thermal regime in their habitat, and that local adaptation to one thermal environment trades off against performance in another.

  3. Genetic and morphological divergence in three strains of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis commonly stocked in Lake Superior.

    Garrett J McKinney

    Full Text Available Fitness related traits often show spatial variation across populations of widely distributed species. Comparisons of genetic variation among populations in putatively neutral DNA markers and in phenotypic traits susceptible to selection (QST FST analysis can be used to determine to what degree differentiation among populations can be attributed to selection or genetic drift. Traditionally, QST FST analyses require a large number of populations to achieve sufficient statistical power; however, new methods have been developed that allow QST FST comparisons to be conducted on as few as two populations if their pedigrees are informative. This study compared genetic and morphological divergence in three strains of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis that were historically or currently used for stocking in the Lake Superior Basin. Herein we examined if morphological divergence among populations showed temporal variation, and if divergence could be attributed to selection or was indistinguishable from genetic drift. Multivariate QST FST analysis showed evidence for divergent selection between populations. Univariate analyses suggests that the pattern observed in the multivariate analyses was largely driven by divergent selection for length and weight, and moreover by divergence between the Assinica strain and each of the Iron River and Siskiwit strains rather than divergent selection between each population pair. While it could not be determined if divergence was due to natural selection or inadvertent artificial selection in hatcheries, selected differences were consistent with patterns of domestication commonly found in salmonids.

  4. What drivers phenotypic divergence in Leymus chinensis (Poaceae) on large-scale gradient, climate or genetic differentiation?

    Yuan, Shan; Ma, Linna; Guo, Chengyuan; Wang, Renzhong

    2016-05-01

    Elucidating the driving factors among-population divergence is an important task in evolutionary biology, however the relative contribution from natural selection and neutral genetic differentiation has been less debated. A manipulation experiment was conducted to examine whether the phenotypic divergence of Leymus chinensis depended on climate variations or genetic differentiations at 18 wild sites along a longitudinal gradient from 114 to 124°E in northeast China and at common garden condition of transplantation. Demographical, morphological and physiological phenotypes of 18 L. chinensis populations exhibited significant divergence along the gradient, but these divergent variations narrowed significantly at the transplantation. Moreover, most of the phenotypes were significantly correlated with mean annual precipitation and temperature in wild sites, suggesting that climatic variables played vital roles in phenotypic divergence of the species. Relative greater heterozygosity (HE), genotype evenness (E) and Shannon-Wiener diversity (I) in western group of populations suggested that genetic differentiation also drove phenotypic divergence of the species. However, neutral genetic differentiation (FST = 0.041) was greatly lower than quantitative differentiation (QST = 0.199), indicating that divergent selection/climate variable was the main factor in determining the phenotypic divergence of the species along the large-scale gradient.

  5. Biotic interactions govern genetic adaptation to toxicants

    Becker, Jeremias Martin; Liess, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The genetic recovery of resistant populations released from pesticide exposure is accelerated by the presence of environmental stressors. By contrast, the relevance of environmental stressors for the spread of resistance during pesticide exposure has not been studied. Moreover, the consequences of interactions between different stressors have not been considered. Here we show that stress through intraspecific competition accelerates microevolution, because it enhances fitness differences between adapted and non-adapted individuals. By contrast, stress through interspecific competition or predation reduces intraspecific competition and thereby delays microevolution. This was demonstrated in mosquito populations (Culex quinquefasciatus) that were exposed to the pesticide chlorpyrifos. Non-selective predation through harvesting and interspecific competition with Daphnia magna delayed the selection for individuals carrying the ace-1R resistance allele. Under non-toxic conditions, susceptible individuals without ace-1R prevailed. Likewise, predation delayed the reverse adaptation of the populations to a non-toxic environment, while the effect of interspecific competition was not significant. Applying a simulation model, we further identified how microevolution is generally determined by the type and degree of competition and predation. We infer that interactions with other species—especially strong in ecosystems with high biodiversity—can delay the development of pesticide resistance. PMID:25833856

  6. Biotic interactions govern genetic adaptation to toxicants.

    Becker, Jeremias Martin; Liess, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    The genetic recovery of resistant populations released from pesticide exposure is accelerated by the presence of environmental stressors. By contrast, the relevance of environmental stressors for the spread of resistance during pesticide exposure has not been studied. Moreover, the consequences of interactions between different stressors have not been considered. Here we show that stress through intraspecific competition accelerates microevolution, because it enhances fitness differences between adapted and non-adapted individuals. By contrast, stress through interspecific competition or predation reduces intraspecific competition and thereby delays microevolution. This was demonstrated in mosquito populations (Culex quinquefasciatus) that were exposed to the pesticide chlorpyrifos. Non-selective predation through harvesting and interspecific competition with Daphnia magna delayed the selection for individuals carrying the ace-1(R) resistance allele. Under non-toxic conditions, susceptible individuals without ace-1(R) prevailed. Likewise, predation delayed the reverse adaptation of the populations to a non-toxic environment, while the effect of interspecific competition was not significant. Applying a simulation model, we further identified how microevolution is generally determined by the type and degree of competition and predation. We infer that interactions with other species-especially strong in ecosystems with high biodiversity-can delay the development of pesticide resistance. PMID:25833856

  7. Genetic divergence in the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuv) from the coastal waters of Peninsular India and the Andaman Sea

    Menezes, M.R.; Naik, S.; Martins, M.

    Genetic divergence in the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuv) from the west coast (Goa), east coast (Madras) and the Andaman Sea was estimated, using allozyme markers. Skeletal muscle and eye proteins were electrophoretically analysed for 5...

  8. Candidate adaptive genes associated with lineage divergence: identifying SNPs via next-generation targeted resequencing in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    Powell, John H; Amish, Stephen J; Haynes, Gwilym D; Luikart, Gordon; Latch, Emily K

    2016-09-01

    Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are an excellent nonmodel species for empirically testing hypotheses in landscape and population genomics due to their large population sizes (low genetic drift), relatively continuous distribution, diversity of occupied habitats and phenotypic variation. Because few genomic resources are currently available for this species, we used exon data from a cattle (Bos taurus) reference genome to direct targeted resequencing of 5935 genes in mule deer. We sequenced approximately 3.75 Mbp at minimum 20X coverage in each of the seven mule deer, identifying 23 204 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within, or adjacent to, 6886 exons in 3559 genes. We found 91 SNP loci (from 69 genes) with putatively fixed allele frequency differences between the two major lineages of mule deer (mule deer and black-tailed deer), and our estimate of mean genetic divergence (genome-wide FST  = 0.123) between these lineages was consistent with previous findings using microsatellite loci. We detected an over-representation of gamete generation and amino acid transport genes among the genes with SNPs exhibiting potentially fixed allele frequency differences between lineages. This targeted resequencing approach using exon capture techniques has identified a suite of loci that can be used in future research to investigate the genomic basis of adaptation and differentiation between black-tailed deer and mule deer. This study also highlights techniques (and an exon capture array) that will facilitate population genomic research in other cervids and nonmodel organisms. PMID:27438092

  9. Potencial de melhoramento e divergência genética de cultivares de milho-pipoca Potential to breeding and genetic divergence in popcorn cultivars

    Glauco Vieira Miranda

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial de melhoramento e a divergência genética de nove cultivares tropicais de milho-pipoca. A divergência genética foi estimada por meio da técnica de análise multivariada e as cultivares foram agrupadas com base na distância generalizada de Mahalanobis (DGM, utilizando o método de otimização de Tocher e a dispersão gráfica. Com produtividade de grãos acima de 3 t/ha, destacaram-se as cultivares CMS 43, IAC 112, Viçosa, CMS 42 e Branco, e com índices de capacidade de expansão acima de 24 (v/v, as cultivares IAC 112, RS 20 e Zélia. As estimativas da DGM indicaram (RS 20 e Beija-flor e (Rosa-claro e RS 20 os pares de cultivares mais distantes geneticamente, e (IAC 112 e Viçosa e (Branco e CMS 42, os pares mais similares. Foram identificados três ou quatro grupos divergentes dependendo do método de agrupamento. Para o melhoramento de milho-pipoca, as cultivares com maiores potenciais são RS 20, Zélia, IAC 112 e Beija-flor. As cultivares apresentam divergência genética.The objective of this paper was to evaluate the potential of breeding and genetic divergence in nine tropical popcorn cultivars. The genetic divergence was estimated using multivariate analysis techniques and the cultivars were grouped based in Mahalanobis' generalized distance (MGD, using Tocher's optimization and graphic dispersion. The best cultivars concerning the yield grain above 3 ton/ha were CMS 43, IAC 112, Viçosa, CMS 42 and Branco, and to popping expansion above 24 (v/v were IAC 112, RS 20 and Zélia. The estimates of MGD indicated the pairs genetically more distant (RS 20, Beija-flor and (Rosa-claro, RS 20 as well as pairs genetically more similar (IAC 112, Viçosa and (Branco, CMS 42. Tree or four genetic divergences groups were formed depending on the method. To popcorn breeding, cultivars with best potential are RS 20, Zélia, IAC 112, and Beija-flor. The cultivars show genetic divergence.

  10. Genetic divergence and molecular phylogenetics of Puntius spp. based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    Pallavi; Goswami, M; Nautiyal, P; Malakar, A K; Nagpure, N S

    2012-12-01

    Puntius is an important genus of freshwater food and ornamental fish belonging to the family Cyprinidae. A total of 60 samples from twelve species of the genus Puntius were collected from eight sampling sites of eight Indian Rivers. Twelve species of Puntius (P. chola, P. sophore, P. filamentosus, P. fasciatus, P. vittatus, P. chelynoides, P. gonionotus, P. denisonii, P. ticto, P. gelius, P. conchonius and P. sarana) were investigated using 60 partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cyt b, 1096 bp) gene to estimate genetic divergence and to establish the phylogenetic relationship. The average intraspecies diversity was estimated as 0.002, whereas the average interspecies diversity was estimated as 0.177. The sequence analysis of the Cyt b gene revealed four distinct groups, which are genetically distinct species and exhibited identical phylogenetic relationship. The present study validated the utility of the Cyt b gene in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies. PMID:22943631

  11. Deep genetic divergence in giant red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827) across a wide distributional range

    Fernández, M. V.; Heras, S.; Maltagliati, F.; Roldán, M. I.

    2013-02-01

    The giant red shrimp, Aristaeomorpha foliacea, is a commercially important species in the Mediterranean Sea (MED), Mozambique Channel (MOZ), and north western Australia (AUS). 685 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene was sequenced in 317 individuals from six Mediterranean and two Indian Ocean localities. Genetic diversity estimates of Indian Ocean samples were higher than those of MED counterparts. AMOVA, phylogenetic tree, haplotype network and Bayesian assignment analyses detected three haplogroups, corresponding to MED, MOZ and AUS, separated by three and 38 mutational steps, respectively. Within MED shallow genetic divergence between populations was dependent on local oceanographical characteristics. Mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests provided a consistent indication of past population expansion in each region considered. Our results provide the first evidence of genetic structure in A. foliacea and suggest a scenario of allopatric speciation within the Indian Ocean that, however needs deeper examination.

  12. Geographical and Genetic Divergence Among Papaya ringspot virus Populations Within Hainan Province, China.

    Zhao, Hui; Jia, Rui Zong; Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Yun Judy; Zeng, Hui-Cai; Kong, Hua; McCafferty, Heather; Guo, An-Ping; Peng, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) severely affects the global papaya industry. Transgenic papaya has been proven to have effective resistance to PRSV isolates from Hawaii, Thailand, Taiwan, and other countries. However, those transgenic cultivars failed to show resistance to Hainan Island isolates. Some 76 PRSV samples, representative of all traditional papaya planting areas across five cities (Wen Chang, n = 13; Cheng Mai, n = 14; Chang Jiang, n = 11; Le Dong, n = 25; and San Ya, n = 13) within Hainan Province, were investigated. Results revealed three genetic diversity groups (Hainan I, II, and III) that correlated with geographical distribution. Frequent mutations among PRSV isolates from Hainan were also observed. The high genetic divergence in PRSV isolates from Hainan is likely to be the cause of the failure of genetically modified papaya that targets sequence-specific virus. PMID:27070425

  13. Nonmetric Skull Divergence in the Otter - Assessing Genetic Insulation of Populations

    M. Stubbe

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The craniometric variation and non-metric skull divergence between populations of the otter Lutra lutra (Linné, 1758 were studied using more than 430 skulls from different regions of Eastern Germany. No direct regional differences in skull measurements could be established for this area. The comparison of the morphological variation by non-metric skull characters adduces not or unimportant differentiations for most regions. Otter populations with greater geographic distances have partly higher measures of divergence. But only the population from the Baltic coast stand out against each other with a relative important epigenetic distance. Until now there does not exist a general reproductive and genetic insulation between the otter populations of Eastern Germany.

  14. Foraging segregation and genetic divergence between geographically proximate colonies of a highly mobile seabird

    Wiley, Anne E.; Welch, Andreanna J.; Ostrom, P.H.; James, Helen F.; Stricker, C.A.; Fleischer, R.C.; Gandhi, H.; Adams, J.; Ainley, D.G.; Duvall, F.; Holmes, N.; Hu, D.; Judge, S.; Penniman, J.; Swindle, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Foraging segregation may play an important role in the maintenance of animal diversity, and is a proposed mechanism for promoting genetic divergence within seabird species. However, little information exists regarding its presence among seabird populations. We investigated genetic and foraging divergence between two colonies of endangered Hawaiian petrels (Pterodroma sandwichensis) nesting on the islands of Hawaii and Kauai using the mitochondrial Cytochrome b gene and carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen isotope values (?? 13C, ?? 15N and ??D, respectively) of feathers. Genetic analyses revealed strong differentiation between colonies on Hawaii and Kauai, with ?? ST = 0. 50 (p segregation during molt. Feather ??D varied from -69 to 53???. This variation cannot be related solely to an isotopically homogeneous ocean water source or evaporative water loss. Instead, we propose the involvement of salt gland excretion. Our data demonstrate the presence of foraging segregation between proximately nesting seabird populations, despite high species mobility. This ecological diversity may facilitate population coexistence, and its preservation should be a focus of conservation strategies. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag (outside the USA).

  15. Genetic divergence in domesticated and non-domesticated gene regions of barley chromosomes.

    Songxian Yan

    Full Text Available Little is known about the genetic divergence in the chromosomal regions with domesticated and non-domesticated genes. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of natural selection on shaping genetic diversity of chromosome region with domesticated and non-domesticated genes in barley using 110 SSR markers. Comparison of the genetic diversity loss between wild and cultivated barley for each chromosome showed that chromosome 5H had the highest divergence of 35.29%, followed by 3H, 7H, 4H, 2H, 6H. Diversity ratio was calculated as (diversity of wild type - diversity of cultivated type/diversity of wild type×100%. It was found that diversity ratios of the domesticated regions on 5H, 1H and 7H were higher than those of non-domesticated regions. Diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 2H and 4H is similar to that of non-domesticated region. However, diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 3H is lower than that of non-domesticated region. Averaged diversity among six chromosomes in domesticated region was 33.73% difference between wild and cultivated barley, and was 27.56% difference in the non-domesticated region. The outcome of this study advances our understanding of the evolution of crop chromosomes.

  16. Microsatellite markers reveal genetic divergence among wild and cultured populations of Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus.

    Cheng, W W; Wang, D Q; Wang, C Y; Du, H; Wei, Q W

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetic diversity and genetic population structure are critical for the conservation and management of endangered species. The Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus is a vulnerable monotypic species in China, which is at a risk of decline owing to fluctuations in effective population size and other demographic and environmental factors. We screened 11 microsatellite loci in 214 individuals to assess genetic differentiation in both wild and cultured populations. The single extant wild population had a higher number of alleles (13) than the cultured populations (average 7.3). High levels of genetic diversity, expressed as observed and expected heterozygosity (HO = 0.771, HE = 0.748, respectively), were found in both wild and cultured populations. We also report significant differentiation among wild and cultured populations (global FST = 0.023, P < 0.001). Both STRUCTURE analysis and neighbor-joining tree revealed three moderately divergent primary genetic clusters: the wild Yangtze population and the Sichuan population were each identified as an individual cluster, with the remaining populations clustered together. Twenty-two samples collected from the Yangtze River were assigned to the cultured population, demonstrating the efficacy of artificial propagation to avoid drastic reduction in the population size of M. asiaticus. These genetic data support the endangered status of the M. asiaticus and have implications for conservation management planning. PMID:27173283

  17. Degree of intraspecific genetic divergence and variability in three Sciaenid species

    Menezes, M.R.; Taniguchi, N.; Seki, S.

    (1988) Pacific cod II 0.025 22.0 Grant et al. (1987) (North America vs. Asia) II 18.9 (North America) 9 0.0007 ±0.0006 0.2-1.7 (Asia) 2 0.0041 ±0.OO26 African hake Grant et al. (1988) (Genus Merluccius) M. capensis 13 0.0007 I.7 M. paradoxus 10 0.0006 1.... Leslie. 1988. Evolu tionary divergence between sympatric species ofsouthern African hake, Mer/uccius capensis and M. paradoY>us. I. Electrophoretic analysis of proteins. Heredity, 61: 13 20. Menezes, M. R. and N. Taniguchi, 1988. Interspecific genetic...

  18. Morphological divergence in a continental adaptive radiation: South American ovenbirds of the genus Cinclodes

    Rader, Jonathan A.; Dillon, Michael E.; Chesser, Terry; Sabat, Pablo; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Cinclodes is an ecologically diverse genus of South American passerine birds and represents a case of continental adaptive radiation along multiple axes. We investigated morphological diversification in Cinclodes using a comprehensive set of morphometric measurements of study skins. Principal component analysis identified 2 primary axes of morphological variation: one describing body size and a second capturing differences in wing-tip shape and toe length. Phylogenetic analyses of the first principal component suggest an early divergence ofCinclodes into 2 main clades characterized by large and small body sizes. We suggest that 2 morphological outliers within these main clades (C. antarcticus and C. palliatus) may be cases of island gigantism and that a third (C. patagonicus) may reflect ecological character displacement. Despite its ecological and physiological diversity, the genus Cinclodes does not appear to show morphological diversity beyond what is typical of other avian genera.

  19. Does gene flow constrain adaptive divergence or vice versa? A test using ecomorphology and sexual isolation in Timema cristinae walking-sticks.

    Nosil, P; Crespi, B J

    2004-01-01

    Population differentiation often reflects a balance between divergent natural selection and the opportunity for homogenizing gene flow to erode the effects of selection. However, during ecological speciation, trait divergence results in reproductive isolation and becomes a cause, rather than a consequence, of reductions in gene flow. To assess both the causes and the reproductive consequences of morphological differentiation, we examined morphological divergence and sexual isolation among 17 populations of Timema cristinae walking-sticks. Individuals from populations adapted to using Adenostoma as a host plant tended to exhibit smaller overall body size, wide heads, and short legs relative to individuals using Ceonothus as a host. However, there was also significant variation in morphology among populations within host-plant species. Mean trait values for each single population could be reliably predicted based upon host-plant used and the potential for homogenizing gene flow, inferred from the size of the neighboring population using the alternate host and mitochondrial DNA estimates of gene flow. Morphology did not influence the probability of copulation in between-population mating trials. Thus, morphological divergence is facilitated by reductions in gene flow, but does not cause reductions in gene flow via the evolution of sexual isolation. Combined with rearing data indicating that size and shape have a partial genetic basis, evidence for parallel origins of the host-associated forms, and inferences from functional morphology, these results indicate that morphological divergence in T. cristinae reflects a balance between the effects of host-specific natural selection and gene flow. Our findings illustrate how data on mating preferences can help determine the causal associations between trait divergence and levels of gene flow. PMID:15058723

  20. Comparison of morphological and genetic analyses reveals cryptic divergence and morphological plasticity in Stylophora (Cnidaria, Scleractinia)

    Stefani, Fabrizio; Benzoni, F.; Yang, S.-Y.; Pichon, M.; Galli, P.; Chen, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    A combined morphological and genetic study of the coral genus Stylophora investigated species boundaries in the Gulf of Aden, Yemen. Two mitochondrial regions, including the hypervariable IGS9 spacer and the control region, and a fragment of rDNA were used for phylogenetic analysis. Results were compared by multivariate analysis on the basis of branch morphology and corallite morphometry. Two species were clearly discriminated by both approaches. The first species was characterised by small corallites and a low morphological variability and was ascribed to a new geographical record of Stylophora madagascarensis on the basis of its phylogenetic distinction and its morphological similarity to the type material. The second species was characterised by larger corallite size and greater morphological variability and was ascribed to Stylophora pistillata. The analysis was extended to the intrageneric level for other S. pistillata populations from the Red Sea and the Pacific Ocean. Strong internal divergence was evident in the genus Sty lophora. S. pistillata populations were split into two highly divergent Red Sea/Gulf of Aden and western Pacific lineages with significant morphological overlap, which suggests they represent two distinct cryptic species. The combined use of morphological and molecular approaches, so far proved to be a powerful tool for the re-delineation of species boundaries in corals, provided novel evidence of cryptic divergence in this group of marine metazoans.

  1. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae cultivars

    Arwa eShahin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data, RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts. Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium.

  2. Genetic divergence, range expansion and possible homoploid hybrid speciation among pine species in Northeast China.

    Ren, G-P; Abbott, R J; Zhou, Y-F; Zhang, L-R; Peng, Y-L; Liu, J-Q

    2012-05-01

    Although homoploid hybrid speciation in plants is probably more common than previously realized, there are few well-documented cases of homoploid hybrid origin in conifers. We examined genetic divergence between two currently widespread pines in Northeast China, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica and Pinus densiflora, and also whether two narrowly distributed pines in the same region, Pinus funebris and Pinus takahasii, might have originated from the two widespread species by homoploid hybrid speciation. Our results, based on population genetic analysis of chloroplast (cp), mitochondrial (mt) DNA, and nuclear gene sequence variation, showed that the two widespread species were divergent for both cp- and mtDNA variation, and also for haplotype variation at two of eight nuclear gene loci surveyed. Our analysis further indicated that P. sylvestris var. mongolica and P. densiflora remained allopatric during the most severe Quaternary glacial period that occurred in Northeast China, but subsequently exhibited rapid range expansions. P. funebris and P. takahasii, were found to contain a mixture of chlorotypes and nuclear haplotypes that distinguish P. sylvestris var. mongolica and P. densiflora, in support of the hypothesis that they possibly originated via homoploid hybrid speciation following secondary contact and hybridization between P. sylvestris var. mongolica and P. densiflora. PMID:22187083

  3. Genetic divergence and its implication in breeding of desired plant type in coriander -Coriandrum sativum L.-

    Singh S.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy germplasm lines of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. of diverse eco-geographical origin were undertaken in present investigation to determine the genetic divergence following multivariate and canonical analysis for seed yield and its 9 component traits. The 70 genotypes were grouped into 9 clusters depending upon the genetic architecture of genotypes and characters uniformity and confirmed by canonical analysis. Seventy percent of total genotypes (49/70 were grouped in 4 clusters (V, VI, VIII and IX, while apparent diversity was noticed for 30 percent genotypes (21/70 that diverged into 5 clusters (I, II, III, FV, and VII. The maximum inter cluster distance was between I and IV (96.20 followed by III and IV (91.13 and I and VII (87.15. The cluster VI was very unique having genotypes of high mean values for most of the component traits. The cluster VII had highest seeds/umbel (35.3 ± 2.24, and leaves/plant (12.93 ± 0.55, earliest flowering (65.05 ± 1.30 and moderately high mean values for other characters. Considering high mean and inter cluster distance breeding plan has been discussed to select desirable plant types.

  4. Genetic divergence in lowland rice of north eastern region of India

    Pankaj K. Singh

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic divergence of 52 traditional lowland rice (Oryza sativa L. genotypes from five states of North Eastern Region of India was investigated using Mahalanobis D2 statistic. Based on 15 agro-morphological characters, these genotypes were grouped into six clusters. Out of 52 genotypes, 26 genotypes were grouped in cluster I; cluster VI comprised only one genotype. Genotypes from more than one state were grouped in one cluster, and genotypes from one state were grouped in more than one cluster. Geographical origin was not found to be a good parameter of genetic divergence. Clusters II, III, and IV exhibited high values for most of the characters. Plant height, followed by leaf angle and leaf area, highly contributed (32.43% to the formation of clusters. Clusters II, IV, and V, which had maximum inter-cluster distances and high values of plant height, days to 50% flowering, panicle length, grain yield/plant, and milling percent, may be used for initiating a hybridization programme.

  5. On the origin of Lake Malawi cichlid species: a population genetic analysis of divergence.

    Won, Yong-Jin; Sivasundar, Arjun; Wang, Yong; Hey, Jody

    2005-05-01

    The cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi are famously diverse. However, phylogenetic and population genetic studies of their history have been difficult because of the great amount of genetic variation that is shared between species. We apply a recently developed method for fitting the "isolation with migration" divergence model to a data set of specially designed compound loci to develop portraits of cichlid species divergence. Outgroup sequences from a cichlid from Lake Tanganyika permit model parameter estimates in units of years and effective population sizes. Estimated speciation times range from 1,000 to 17,000 years for species in the genus Tropheops. These exceptionally recent dates suggest that Malawi cichlids as a group experience a very active and dynamic diversification process. Current effective population size estimates range form 2,000 to near 40,000, and to >120,000 for estimates of ancestral population sizes. It appears that very recent speciation and gene flow are among the reasons why it has been difficult to discern the phylogenetic history of Malawi cichlids. PMID:15851665

  6. Evaluation of genetic divergence among clones of conilon coffee after scheduled cycle pruning.

    Dalcomo, J M; Vieira, H D; Ferreira, A; Lima, W L; Ferrão, R G; Fonseca, A F A; Ferrão, M A G; Partelli, F L

    2015-01-01

    Coffea canephora genotypes from the breeding program of Instituto Capixaba de Pesquisa e Extensão Rural were evaluated, and genetic diversity was estimated with the aim of future improvement strategies. From an initial group of 55 genotypes, 18 from the region of Castelo, ES, were selected, and three clones of the cultivars "Vitória" and "robusta tropical." Upon completion of the scheduled cycle pruning, 17 morphoagronomic traits were measured in the 22 genotypes selected. The principal components method was used to evaluate the contributions relative to the traits. The genetic dissimilarity matrix was obtained through Mahalanobis generalized distance, and genotypes were grouped using the hierarchical method based on the mean of the distances. The most promising clones of Avaliação Castelo were AC02, AC03, AC12, AC13, AC22, AC24, AC26, AC27, AC28, AC29, AC30, AC35, AC36, AC37, AC39, AC40, AC43, and AC46. These methods detected high genetic variability, grouping, by similarity, the genotypes in five groups. The trait that contributed the least to genetic divergence was the number of leaves in plagiotropic branches; however, this was not eliminated, because discarding it altered the groups. There are superior genotypes with potential for use in the next stages of the breeding program, aimed at both the composition of clonal variety and hybridizations. PMID:26634507

  7. Genetic structure and subspecies divergence of wild boars Sus scrofa in mainland China based on the microsatellite variation analysis

    ZHANG Bao-Wei; ZHANG Chen-Ling; CHEN Jian-Qin; Ding, Dong; LI Chong-Qi; Zhou, Kai-Ya; Chang, Qing

    2008-01-01

    In order to discuss the subspecies classification of wild boar Sus scrofa in China, We studied their genetic structure using 11 microsatellites, with emphasis on South China. High levels of genetic variationwere detected in South China (SC), North China (NC) and Northeast China (NE) wild boar populations. This was consistent with the huge population size of the wild boar and its status as a widely-distributed species. Weak genetic divergence was observed in all subspecies involved in this s...

  8. Divergence and genetic variability among superior rubber tree genotypes Divergência e variabilidade genética de genótipos superiores de seringueira

    Lígia Regina Lima Gouvêa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the genetic variability and divergence among 22 superior rubber tree (Hevea sp. genotypes of the IAC 400 series. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using eight quantitative traits (descriptors, including yield. In the univariate analyses, the estimated parameters were: genetic and environmental variances; genetic and environmental coefficients of variation; and the variation index. The Mahalanobis generalized distance, the Tocher agglomerative method and canonical variables were used for the multivariate analyses. In the univariate analyses, variability was verified among the genotypes for all the variables evaluated. The Tocher method grouped the genotypes into 11 clusters of dissimilarity. The first four canonical variables explained 87.93% of the cumulative variation. The highest genetic variability was found in rubber yield-related traits, which contributed the most to the genetic divergence. The most divergent pairs of genotypes are suggested for crossbreeding. The genotypes evaluated are suitable for breeding and may be used to continue the IAC rubber tree breeding program.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar a divergência e a variabilidade genética entre 22 genótipos superiores de seringueira (Hevea sp. da série IAC 400. Análises univariadas e multivariadas foram realizadas com oito caracteres quantitativos (descritores, incluindo produtividade. Na análise univariada, os parâmetros estimados foram: variâncias genética e ambiental, coeficientes de variação genética e ambiental, e índice de variação. A distância generalizada de Mahalanobis, o método aglomerativo de Tocher e variáveis canônicas foram utilizados nas análises multivariadas. Nas análises univariadas, verificou-se variabilidade entre os genótipos para todas as variáveis avaliadas. O método de Tocher agrupou os genótipos em 11 grupos de dissimilaridade. As quatro primeiras variáveis can

  9. Genetic divergence among extant and extirpated colonies of an endangered pelagic seabird, the Hawaiian petrel

    Welch, A. J.; Fleischer, R. C.; James, H. F.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to consider both the temporal and spatial dimensions of variability in ecology and evolution. Given the potentially great dispersal capabilities and long generation times of pelagic seabirds, genetic diversity in these species seems likely to be homogeneously distributed and relatively static over time. Investigating temporal and spatial processes involved in the ecology and evolution of seabird populations is important to island ecosystem sustainability, as they play a significant role in transferring marine derived nutrients to terrestrial oceanic ecosystems. Additionally, many seabird species are threatened by extinction due to increasing mortality both at land and at sea. Here we investigate population divergence of the endemic and endangered Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis). We examined four extant colonies on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Lanai and Kauai, and employed ancient DNA techniques to study a prehistorically extirpated colony on Oahu, and a historically large, but likely extirpated, colony on the island of Molokai. Analyses of sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene as well as nuclear microsatellite markers indicate substantial differentiation (global Φst of 0.38, p < 0.0001). Significant divergence was found among each pair of the six islands except between Oahu and Molokai (Φst = 0.10, p = 0.07). However, this could result from low power due to the limited availability of amplifiable samples, especially for the hot, low elevation colony formerly present on Oahu. The largest differentiation occurred between the islands of Lanai and Kauai (Φst = 0.58, p < 0.0001). These results suggest that despite their great dispersal capabilities, spatially proximate colonies of the Hawaiian petrel are not genetically homogenous. Additionally, the extirpation of large colonies, such as those on Oahu and Molokai, could result in loss of a substantial amount of genetic diversity. Future work should further investigate temporal

  10. Divergência genética entre cinco genótipos de melão rendilhado Genetic divergence among five muskmelon cultivars

    Adriana Antonieta do Nascimento Rizzo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimou-se a divergência genética entre cinco genótipos de melão rendilhado (Cucumis melo var. reticulatus Naud. (JAB-20, JAB-21, JAB-22, JAB-23 e 'Bônus nº 2' e determinou-se qual a contribuição relativa das 16 características avaliadas [nº médio de flores masculinas, hermafroditas/planta; produção total de frutos/m², peso médio dos frutos comerciáveis; diâmetro médio transversal e longitudinal do fruto (DMTF e DMLF; diâmetro médio transversal da inserção do pedúculo (DMTP; espessura média do mesocarpo e epicarpo (EMM e EME; diâmetro médio longitudinal e transversal do lóculo (DMTL e DMLL; proporção da cavidade (PC; desprendimento de sementes (DS; teor de sólidos solúveis totais (SST, pH e acidez titulável (AT] na divergência gen��tica. Obtiveram-se dois grupos de similaridade: I- JAB-20, JAB-21 e 'Bônus nº2' e II- JAB-22 e JAB-23. As características DMLF, DMTP, DMLL, DS e SST foram as que mais contribuíram para a divergência genética entre os genótipos.The genetic divergence of five cultivars of muskmelon was estimated (Cucumis melo var. reticulatus Naud (JAB-20, JAB-21, JAB-22, JAB-23 and 'Bônus nº2' and the relative contribution of each 16 characteristics were determined (number of male flowers per plant; total production of fruit, weight of fruits; longitudinal and transversal diameters of fruits; thickness and color of flesh and skin; longitudinal and transversal loculos diameter of fruits; seed loosing; netting thickness; and % total solvers solids, pH and total acidity in genetic divergence. Two groups of similarity were formed between the genitors by the values of D², one of then was constituted of the JAB-20 and JAB-21 and 'Bônus nº 2' genotypes, and another of the JAB-22 and JAB-23. The characteristics of longitudinal loculos diameters, longitudinal diameter of fruits, transversal diameter of peduncle insertion, % total solvers solids and seed loosing contributed to for genetic

  11. Divergent adaptive strategies by two co-occurring epiphytic orchids to water stress: escape or avoidance?

    Wei eZhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fluctuating water availability in the arboreal habitat, epiphytic plants are considered vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic disturbances. Although co-occurring taxa have been observed divergent adaptive performances in response to drought, the underlying physiological and morphological mechanisms by which epiphyte species cope with water stress remain poorly understood. In the present study, two co-occurring epiphytic orchids with different phenologies were selected to investigate their drought-resistance performances. We compared their functional traits, and monitored their physiological performances in a 25-d of drought treatment. In contrast to the deciduous species Pleione albiflora, the evergreen species Coelogyne corymbosa had different root anatomical structures and higher values for saturated water content of pseudobulbs. Moreover, plants of C. corymbosa had thicker leaves and epidermis, denser veins and stomata, and higher values for leaf mass per unit area and the time required to dry saturated leaves to 70% relative water content. However, samples from that species had lower values for net photosynthetic rate (An, stomatal length and chlorophyll content per unit dry mass. Nevertheless, due to greater capacity for water storage and conservation, C. corymbosa maintained higher An, stomatal conductance (gs, and instantaneous water-use efficiency during severe drought period, and their values for leaf water potential were higher after the water stress treatment. By Day 10 after irrigation was restarted, only C. corymbosa plants recovered their values for An and gs to levels close to those calculated prior to the imposition of water stress. Our results suggest that the different performance responding to drought and re-watering in two co-occurring epiphytic orchids is related to water-related traits and these two species have divergent adaptive mechanisms. Overall, C. corymbosa demonstrates drought avoidance by

  12. Divergent Adaptive Strategies by Two Co-occurring Epiphytic Orchids to Water Stress: Escape or Avoidance?

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Due to the fluctuating water availability in the arboreal habitat, epiphytic plants are considered vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic disturbances. Although co-occurring taxa have been observed divergent adaptive performances in response to drought, the underlying physiological and morphological mechanisms by which epiphyte species cope with water stress remain poorly understood. In the present study, two co-occurring epiphytic orchids with different phenologies were selected to investigate their drought-resistance performances. We compared their functional traits, and monitored their physiological performances in a 25-days of drought treatment. In contrast to the deciduous species Pleione albiflora, the evergreen species Coelogyne corymbosa had different root anatomical structures and higher values for saturated water content of pseudobulbs. Moreover, plants of C. corymbosa had thicker leaves and epidermis, denser veins and stomata, and higher values for leaf mass per unit area and the time required to dry saturated leaves to 70% relative water content. However, samples from that species had lower values for net photosynthetic rate (A n), stomatal length and chlorophyll content per unit dry mass. Nevertheless, due to greater capacity for water storage and conservation, C. corymbosa maintained higher A n, stomatal conductance (g s), and instantaneous water-use efficiency during severe drought period, and their values for leaf water potential were higher after the water stress treatment. By Day 10 after irrigation was restarted, only C. corymbosa plants recovered their values for A n and g s to levels close to those calculated prior to the imposition of water stress. Our results suggest that the different performance responding to drought and re-watering in two co-occurring epiphytic orchids is related to water-related traits and these two species have divergent adaptive mechanisms. Overall, C. corymbosa demonstrates drought avoidance by enhancing water

  13. Deep genetic structure and ecological divergence in a widespread human commensal toad.

    Wogan, Guinevere O U; Stuart, Bryan L; Iskandar, Djoko T; McGuire, Jimmy A

    2016-01-01

    The Asian common toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus) is a human commensal species that occupies a wide variety of habitats across tropical Southeast Asia. We test the hypothesis that genetic variation in D. melanostictus is weakly associated with geography owing to natural and human-mediated dispersal facilitated by its commensal nature. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence variation, and predictive species distribution modelling, unexpectedly recovered three distinct evolutionary lineages that differ genetically and ecologically, corresponding to the Asian mainland, coastal Myanmar and the Sundaic islands. The persistence of these three divergent lineages, despite ample opportunities for recent human-mediated and geological dispersal, suggests that D. melanostictus actually consists of multiple species, each having narrower geographical ranges and ecological niches, and higher conservation value, than is currently recognized. These findings also have implications for the invasion potential of this human commensal elsewhere, such as in its recently introduced ranges on the islands of Borneo, Sulawesi, Seram and Madagascar. PMID:26763213

  14. Marked genetic divergence among sky island populations of Sedum lanceolatum (Crassulaceae) in the Rocky Mountains.

    Dechaine, Eric G; Martin, Andrew P

    2005-03-01

    Climate change during the Quaternary played an important role in the differentiation and evolution of plants. A prevailing hypothesis is that alpine and arctic species survived glacial periods in refugia at the periphery of glaciers. Though the Rocky Mountains, south of the southernmost extent of continental ice, served as an important glacial refuge, little is known about how climate cycles influenced populations within this region. We inferred the phylogeography of Sedum lanceolatum (Crassulaceae) within the Rocky Mountain refugium to assess how this high-elevation plant responded to glacial cycles. We sequenced 884 base pairs (bp) of cpDNA intergenic spacers (tRNA-L to tRNA-F and tRNA-S to tRNA-G) for 333 individuals from 18 alpine populations. Our highly variable markers allowed us to infer that populations persisted across the latitudinal range throughout the climate cycles, exhibited significant genetic structure, and experienced cycles of range expansion and fragmentation. Genetic differentiation in S. lanceolatum was most likely a product of short-distance elevational migration in response to climate change, low seed dispersal, and vegetative reproduction. To the extent that Sedum is a good model system, paleoclimatic cycles were probably a major factor preserving genetic variation and promoting divergence in high-elevation flora of the Rocky Mountains. PMID:21652425

  15. Differences in foraging ecology align with genetically divergent ecotypes of a highly mobile marine top predator.

    Jeglinski, Jana W E; Wolf, Jochen B W; Werner, Christiane; Costa, Daniel P; Trillmich, Fritz

    2015-12-01

    Foraging differentiation within a species can contribute to restricted gene flow between ecologically different groups, promoting ecological speciation. Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) show genetic and morphological divergence between the western and central archipelago, possibly as a result of an ecologically mediated contrast in the marine habitat. We use global positioning system (GPS) data, time-depth recordings (TDR), stable isotope and scat data to compare foraging habitat characteristics, diving behaviour and diet composition of Galapagos sea lions from a western and a central colony. We consider both juvenile and adult life stages to assess the potential role of ontogenetic shifts that can be crucial in shaping foraging behaviour and habitat choice for life. We found differences in foraging habitat use, foraging style and diet composition that aligned with genetic differentiation. These differences were consistent between juvenile and adult sea lions from the same colony, overriding age-specific behavioural differences. Our study contributes to an understanding of the complex interaction of ecological condition, plastic behavioural response and genetic make-up of interconnected populations. PMID:26307593

  16. Divergência genética entre progênies de café robusta Genetic divergence among robusta coffe progenies

    Milana Gonçalves Ivoglo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a divergência genética de 21 progênies de meios-irmãos - 19 do grupo Congolês e duas do grupo Guineano - de introduções do germoplasma de café robusta (Coffea canephora do IAC. O estudo baseou-se em análises multivariadas de 14 características morfo-agronômicas, com o propósito de selecionar as progênies mais divergentes, visando à definição de população-base para posterior seleção e produção de híbridos. Avaliou-se também a importância das características discriminantes para análises de divergência, visando ao descarte das variáveis, segundo suas contribuições relativas. O experimento foi plantado e desenvolvido em campo experimental localizado no Pólo Regional do Nordeste Paulista, Mococa (SP, em blocos casualizados, com 21 tratamentos e 24 repetições. O agrupamento dos genótipos foi realizado com base nos métodos de Tocher e UPGMA. A matriz de dissimilaridade genética foi obtida por meio da distância generalizada de Mahalanobis, que serviu de base para a formação dos grupos. Os métodos empregados foram eficientes em detectar ampla variabilidade genética entre as progênies avaliadas. Vários grupos dissimilares foram identificados. As progênies IAC 2262, IAC 2290, IAC 2286, IAC 2292 e IAC 2291 são indicadas para compor programas de intercruzamentos, por terem sido consideradas as mais promissoras na obtenção de populações segregantes ou híbridos heteróticos. As características que menos contribuíram para a divergência genética foram, hierarquicamente: diâmetro da copa antes da poda, altura da planta antes da poda e área foliar.It was studied genetic divergence of 21 half-sib progenies, being 19 of the Congolês group and two of the Guineano group, introductions of germoplasma robust (Coffea canephora, based in 14 morpho-agronomic traits and multivariate procedures. It's aims to select the lineages most divergent for definition of population-base for posterior reciprocal

  17. Divergent adaptive and innate immunological responses are observed in humans following blunt trauma

    Lentsch Alex B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune response to trauma has traditionally been modeled to consist of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS followed by the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS. We investigated these responses in a homogenous cohort of male, severe blunt trauma patients admitted to a University Hospital surgical intensive care unit (SICU. After obtaining consent, peripheral blood was drawn up to 96 hours following injury. The enumeration and functionality of both myeloid and lymphocyte cell populations were determined. Results Neutrophil numbers were observed to be elevated in trauma patients as compared to healthy controls. Further, neutrophils isolated from trauma patients had increased raft formation and phospho-Akt. Consistent with this, the neutrophils had increased oxidative burst compared to healthy controls. In direct contrast, blood from trauma patients contained decreased naïve T cell numbers. Upon activation with a T cell specific mitogen, trauma patient T cells produced less IFN-gamma as compared to those from healthy controls. Consistent with these results, upon activation, trauma patient T cells were observed to have decreased T cell receptor mediated signaling. Conclusions These results suggest that following trauma, there are concurrent and divergent immunological responses. These consist of a hyper-inflammatory response by the innate arm of the immune system concurrent with a hypo-inflammatory response by the adaptive arm.

  18. Tracing early stages of species differentiation: Ecological, morphological and genetic divergence of Galápagos sea lion populations

    Brunner Sylvia

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oceans are high gene flow environments that are traditionally believed to hamper the build-up of genetic divergence. Despite this, divergence appears to occur occasionally at surprisingly small scales. The Galápagos archipelago provides an ideal opportunity to examine the evolutionary processes of local divergence in an isolated marine environment. Galápagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki are top predators in this unique setting and have an essentially unlimited dispersal capacity across the entire species range. In theory, this should oppose any genetic differentiation. Results We find significant ecological, morphological and genetic divergence between the western colonies and colonies from the central region of the archipelago that are exposed to different ecological conditions. Stable isotope analyses indicate that western animals use different food sources than those from the central area. This is likely due to niche partitioning with the second Galápagos eared seal species, the Galápagos fur seal (Arctocephalus galapagoensis that exclusively dwells in the west. Stable isotope patterns correlate with significant differences in foraging-related skull morphology. Analyses of mitochondrial sequences as well as microsatellites reveal signs of initial genetic differentiation. Conclusion Our results suggest a key role of intra- as well as inter-specific niche segregation in the evolution of genetic structure among populations of a highly mobile species under conditions of free movement. Given the monophyletic arrival of the sea lions on the archipelago, our study challenges the view that geographical barriers are strictly needed for the build-up of genetic divergence. The study further raises the interesting prospect that in social, colonially breeding mammals additional forces, such as social structure or feeding traditions, might bear on the genetic partitioning of populations.

  19. Morphological and genetic divergence in Swedish postglacial stickleback (Pungitius pungitius populations

    Englund Göran

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important objective of evolutionary biology is to understand the processes that govern phenotypic variation in natural populations. We assessed patterns of morphological and genetic divergence among coastal and inland lake populations of nine-spined stickleback in northern Sweden. Coastal populations are either from the Baltic coast (n = 5 or from nearby coastal lakes (n = 3 that became isolated from the Baltic Sea ( Results Coastal populations showed little variation in 11 morphological traits and had longer spines per unit of body length than inland populations. Inland populations were larger, on average, and showed greater morphological variation than coastal populations. A principal component analysis (PCA across all populations revealed two major morphological axes related to spine length (PC1, 47.7% variation and body size (PC2, 32.9% variation. Analysis of PCA scores showed marked similarity in coastal (Baltic coast and coastal lake populations. PCA scores indicate that inland populations with predators have higher within-group variance in spine length and lower within-group variance in body size than inland populations without predators. Estimates of within-group PST (a proxy for QST from PCA scores are similar to estimates of FST for coastal lake populations but PST >FST for Baltic coast populations. PST >FST for PC1 and PC2 for inland predator and inland no predator populations, with the exception that PST FST for body size in inland populations lacking predators. Conclusions Baltic coast and coastal lake populations show little morphological and genetic variation within and between groups suggesting that these populations experience similar ecological conditions and that time since isolation of coastal lakes has been insufficient to demonstrate divergent morphology in coastal lake populations. Inland populations, on the other hand, showed much greater morphological and genetic variation characteristic of long

  20. Contemporary habitat discontinuity and historic glacial ice drive genetic divergence in Chilean kelp

    Spencer Hamish G

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South America's western coastline, extending in a near-straight line across some 35 latitudinal degrees, presents an elegant setting for assessing both contemporary and historic influences on cladogenesis in the marine environment. Southern bull-kelp (Durvillaea antarctica has a broad distribution along much of the Chilean coast. This species represents an ideal model taxon for studies of coastal marine connectivity and of palaeoclimatic effects, as it grows only on exposed rocky coasts and is absent from beaches and ice-affected shores. We expected that, along the central Chilean coast, D. antarctica would show considerable phylogeographic structure as a consequence of the isolating effects of distance and habitat discontinuities. In contrast, we hypothesised that further south - throughout the region affected by the Patagonian Ice Sheet at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM - D. antarctica would show relatively little genetic structure, reflecting postglacial recolonisation. Results Mitochondrial (COI and chloroplast (rbcL DNA analyses of D. antarctica from 24 Chilean localities (164 individuals revealed two deeply divergent (4.5 - 6.1% for COI, 1.4% for rbcL clades from the centre and south of the country, with contrasting levels and patterns of genetic structure. Among populations from central Chile (32° - 44°S, substantial phylogeographic structure was evident across small spatial scales, and a significant isolation-by-distance effect was observed. Genetic disjunctions in this region appear to correspond to the presence of long beaches. In contrast to the genetic structure found among central Chilean populations, samples from the southern Chilean Patagonian region (49° - 56°S were genetically homogeneous and identical to a haplotype recently found throughout the subantarctic region. Conclusions Southern (Patagonian Chile has been recolonised by D. antarctica relatively recently, probably since the LGM. The inferred trans

  1. Locally adapted fish populations maintain small-scale genetic differentiation despite perturbation by a catastrophic flood event

    Plath Martin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local adaptation to divergent environmental conditions can promote population genetic differentiation even in the absence of geographic barriers and hence, lead to speciation. Perturbations by catastrophic events, however, can distort such parapatric ecological speciation processes. Here, we asked whether an exceptionally strong flood led to homogenization of gene pools among locally adapted populations of the Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae in the Cueva del Azufre system in southern Mexico, where two strong environmental selection factors (darkness within caves and/or presence of toxic H2S in sulfidic springs drive the diversification of P. mexicana. Nine nuclear microsatellites as well as heritable female life history traits (both as a proxy for quantitative genetics and for trait divergence were used as markers to compare genetic differentiation, genetic diversity, and especially population mixing (immigration and emigration before and after the flood. Results Habitat type (i.e., non-sulfidic surface, sulfidic surface, or sulfidic cave, but not geographic distance was the major predictor of genetic differentiation. Before and after the flood, each habitat type harbored a genetically distinct population. Only a weak signal of individual dislocation among ecologically divergent habitat types was uncovered (with the exception of slightly increased dislocation from the Cueva del Azufre into the sulfidic creek, El Azufre. By contrast, several lines of evidence are indicative of increased flood-induced dislocation within the same habitat type, e.g., between different cave chambers of the Cueva del Azufre. Conclusions The virtual absence of individual dislocation among ecologically different habitat types indicates strong natural selection against migrants. Thus, our current study exemplifies that ecological speciation in this and other systems, in which extreme environmental factors drive speciation, may be little

  2. Variability in seed traits and genetic divergence in a clonal seed orchard of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.

    Ombir singh; Altaf Hussain Soft

    2012-01-01

    The variations in seed and pod traits,genetic superiority and genetic divergence were evaluated for a Clonal Seed Orchard (CSO) of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.at Bithmera,India consisting of 20 clones from different agro-climatic conditions of four northern states (Uttar Pradesh,Uttarakhand,Haryana and Rajasthan).The seeds and pods of various clones in the orchard exhibited significant variability in size,weight and other characters.Significant positive correlations were observed between seed length and seed width (p<0.05),seed length and seed thickness (p<0.01),seed length and seed weight (p<0.0l),seed thickness and seed weight (p<0.01),seed length and germination value (p<0.05).The genetic parameters for seed and pod traits also showed a wide range of variations in the orchard.Heritability values were found to be over 50 vpereent for most of the seed and pod traits.Seed weight,seed length and seed thickness showed high heritability values coupled with maximum genetic gain for these characters.Ward's minimum variance dendrogram of clones of D.sissoo showed three distinct clusters; cluster 1 was the largest with 12 better clones whereas cluster 2 and 3 consisting of seven moderate clones and one poor clone,respectively.Mean cluster values showed sufficient variation among the clusters for seed weight,germination value and seed length.The possible hybridization between best clones of cluster 1 to the disease resistant clone of cluster 2 (resistant against deadly Gandoderma lucidum root rot disease of D.sissoo) is also suggested for further breeding programmes of the species.The deployment of clone 194 (better performed and disease resistant) is also recommended in future plantation programmes of D.sissoo in northern India.

  3. Genetic and non-genetic factors affecting rabbit doe sexual receptivity as estimated from one generation of divergent selection

    M. Theau.Clément

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual receptivity of rabbit does at insemination greatly influences fertility and is generally induced by hormones or techniques known as “biostimulation”. Searching for more sustainable farming systems, an original alternative would be to utilise the genetic pathway to increase the does’receptivity. The purpose of the present study was to identify genetic and non-genetic factors that influence rabbit doe sexual receptivity, in the context of a divergent selection experiment over 1 generation. The experiment spanned 2 generations: the founder generation (G0 consisting of 140 rabbit does, and the G1 generation comprising 2 divergently selected lines (L and H lines with 70 does each and 2 successive batches from each generation. The selection rate of the G0 females to form the G1 lines was 24/140. The selection tests consisted of 16 to 18 successive receptivity tests at the rate of 3 tests per week. On the basis of 4716 tests from 275 females, the average receptivity was 56.6±48.2%. A batch effect and a test operator effect were revealed. The contribution of females to the total variance was 20.0%, whereas that of bucks was only 1.1%. Throughout the experiment, 18.2% of does expressed a low receptivity (< 34%, 50.7% a medium one and 33.1% a high one (>66%. Some does were frequently receptive, whereas others were rarely receptive. The repeatability of sexual receptivity was approximately 20%. The results confirmed the high variability of sexual receptivity of non-lactating rabbit does maintained without any biostimulation or hormonal treatment. A lack of selection response on receptivity was observed. Accordingly, the heritability of receptivity was estimated at 0.01±0.02 from an animal model and at 0.02±0.03 from a  sire and dam model. The heritability of the average receptivity of a doe was calculated as 0.04. In agreement with the low estimated heritability, the heritability determined was no different from zero

  4. Mechanisms of species divergence through visual adaptation and sexual selection:Perspectives from a cichlid model system

    Martine E. MAAN, Ole SEEHAUSEN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The theory of ecological speciation suggests that assortative mating evolves most easily when mating preferences are directly linked to ecological traits that are subject to divergent selection. Sensory adaptation can play a major role in this process, because selective mating is often mediated by sexual signals: bright colours, complex song, pheromone blends and so on. When divergent sensory adaptation affects the perception of such signals, mating patterns may change as an immediate consequence. Alternatively, mating preferences can diverge as a result of indirect effects: assortative mating may be promoted by selection against intermediate phenotypes that are maladapted to their (sensory environment. For Lake Victoria cichlids, the visual environment constitutes an important selective force that is heterogeneous across geographical and water depth gradients. We investigate the direct and indirect effects of this heterogeneity on the evolution of female preferences for alternative male nuptial colours (red and blue in the genus Pundamilia. Here, we review the current evidence for divergent sensory drive in this system, extract general principles, and discuss future perspectives [Current Zoology 56 (3: 285–299, 2010].

  5. Population genetic divergence and migration pattern of the Saunders's gull Larus saundersi

    JIANG Hong-Xing

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A molecular method was used to reveal population genetic structure and differentiation of Saunders’s Gull Larus saundersi. The mitochondrial control region (CR sequence variation was assayed from 50 samples, that were collected from 3 current breeding sites in China: Yancheng of Jiangsu, Yellow River Delta of Shandong and Shuangtaihekou of Liaoning. . With the addition of sequences of 2 South Korean samples obtained from the published literature, a total of 49 variable sites were detected and 37 haplotypes were defined from the aligned 550 bp of the 5′ CR. Only 1 haplotype was shared by all 3 sub-populations in China and most of the haplotypes were unique to a sub-population. There were very high diversities in hyplotypes and nucleotides within each population. Over all diversities for all four sub-populations were still quite high ( h = 0.974% ± 0.012%, π= 0.510% ± 0.042%. The range of the nucleotide divergence, the pairwise FST, and the gene flow (Nm between the 4 populations was between 0.457%–0.585%, -0.03176–0.48063, and 1.03–33.79 respectively. The mean genetic distance among the 4 populations was 0.0051±0.0011. UPGMA tree and statistical parsimony cladogram showed a very shallow phylogenetic tree and a star-like haplotype network, which indicated that no distinctive geographic phylogeography has occurred among the 4 sub-populations. At the same time, the color flagging technique was used to reveal the migration patterns of the 4 breeding sub-populations. The results of the migration and genetic studies are very similar. High genetic diversities in the four sub-populations might result from gene exchange when the gulls return from their wintering areas. Finally, considering the migratory behavior and low genetic differences between sub-populations, we suggest taking different management measures for species and genetic conservation of Saunders’s Gull [Acta Zoologica Sinica 54(5: 767–776, 2008].

  6. The Impact of Random and Lineal Fission on the Genetic Divergence of Small Human Groups: A Case Study among the Yanomama

    Smouse, Peter E.; Vitzthum, Virginia J.; Neel, James V.

    1981-01-01

    Most of the genetic divergence that currently separates populations of Homo sapiens must have arisen during that long period when the local village (or band) was the basic unit of biological evolution. Studies of tribally intact Amerindian groups exhibiting such small-group organization have demonstrated marked genetic divergence between nearby villages. Some of this genetic radiation can be attributed to the effects of random genetic drift over time within these small demes. Some of it, howe...

  7. Genetic divergence among geographical populations of the migratory locust in China

    ZHANG Minzhao; KANG Le

    2005-01-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to examine genetic divergence and interrelations of 11 geographical populations of the migratory locust in China, and the role of spatial separation in the population differentiations. AMOVA analysis of genetic variations in all the populations indicated greater within- (79.55%) than among-population variability (20.45%), and that there were significant differentiations among the populations; 11 populations were divided into four regional groups, with significantly greater variability within (82.99%) than among the groups (17.01%), and there existed apparent regional differentiations. Paired comparisons showed significantly greater variability within- than between-groups, indicating significant differentiations between populations of different regional groups. Of all the pairwise comparisons, Hainan and Tibetan groups displayed the greatest differentiation, with the difference between the two groups being seven folds of that between populations within the groups; the least differentiations were exhibited between the groups of Hainan, Xinjiang, and Inner Mongolia, with the differences between groups being only half of the differences between populations within the groups. Mantel tests of the genetic and spatial distances showed that the two matrices were significantly correlated (p<0.01), indicating that the geographical isolation played an important role in the differentiations of the geographical populations of the migratory locusts. Cluster analysis divided all populations into four major groups: Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia group, the Great Plains of North China (the Yellow River and Huai River Plains) group, Hainan group, and Tibet group. Principal component analysis (PCA) supported the division of populations based on the cluster analysis. However, analysis of individuals clustered the locusts into five populations: Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia, Hami in Xinjiang, the Great Plains of North China

  8. Genetic divergence of physiological-quality traits of seeds in a population of peppers.

    Pessoa, A M S; Barroso, P A; do Rêgo, E R; Medeiros, G D A; Bruno, R L A; do Rêgo, M M

    2015-01-01

    Brazil has a great diversity of Capsicum peppers that can be used in breeding programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate genetic variation in traits related to the physiological quality of seeds of Capsicum annuum L. in a segregating F2 population and its parents. A total of 250 seeds produced by selfing in the F1 generation resulting from crosses between UFPB 77.3 and UFPB 76 were used, with 100 seeds of both parents used as additional controls, totaling 252 genotypes. The seeds were germinated in gerboxes containing substrate blotting paper moistened with distilled water. Germination and the following vigor tests were evaluated: first count, germination velocity index, and root and shoot lengths. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, and means were compared by Scott and Knott's method at 1% probability. Tocher's clustering based on Mahalanobis distance and canonical variable analysis with graphic dispersion of genotypes were performed, and genetic parameters were estimated. All variables were found to be significant by the F test (P ≤ 0.01) and showed high heritability and a CVg/CVe ratio higher than 1.0, indicating genetic differences among genotypes. Parents (genotypes 1 and 2) formed distinct groups in all clustering methods. Genotypes 3, 104, 153, and 232 were found to be the most divergent according to Tocher's clustering method, and this was mainly due to early germination, which was observed on day 14, and would therefore be selected. Understanding the phenotypic variability among these 252 genotypes will serve as a basis for continuing the breeding program within this family. PMID:26505398

  9. Divergência genética entre progênies de pessegueiro em Zaragoza, Espanha Genetic divergence among peach tree progenies from Zaragoza, Spain

    Américo Wagner Júnior

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a diversidade genética entre 17 populações de pessegueiro, discriminando os caracteres mais importantes na avaliação da divergência genética de características de qualidade do fruto com base em procedimentos multivariados. Os trabalhos foram desenvolvidos na Estação Experimental de Aula Dei do Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (EEAD-CSIC, Zaragoza - Espanha. Foram analisados 687 indivíduos, pertencentes a 17 populações de pessegueiro. Foram avaliadas as seguintes características: produção; número de frutos por planta; peso por fruto; coloração da epiderme; firmeza de polpa; diâmetros sutural, equatorial e polar; relação diâmetro polar/diâmetro sutural; teor de sólidos solúveis totais dos frutos; pH; acidez total titulável; relação entre teor de sólidos solúveis totais da polpa e acidez total titulável. Das características avaliadas, as que mais contribuíram para a divergência genética foram produção, número de frutos por planta e peso por fruto. Recomendou-se a realização de cruzamentos entre os genótipos superiores da população VADAC 0055 com os das populações VADAC 0027, VADAC 0036, VADAC 0063 e VADAC 0065.This work aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity among seventeen peach progenies and 687 seedlings. The most important characteristics in the genetic divergence evaluation of fruit quality traits were calculated by using a multivariate analysis. Trials were carried out at the Experimental Station of Aula Dei (CSIC, Zaragoza - Spain. Traits such as yield, fruit number per tree, fruit weight, epidermis coloration, firmness, fruit height, suture diameter (SD, cheek diameter (CD, CD/SD ratio, soluble solids content (SSC, ºBrix, pH, titratable acidity (TA and SSC/TA index, were evaluated. Yield, fruit number per tree and fruit weight were the characteristics that contributed the most for genetic divergence. Based on this evaluation, hybridizations

  10. Self-adaptive genetic algorithms with simulated binary crossover.

    Deb, K; Beyer, H G

    2001-01-01

    Self-adaptation is an essential feature of natural evolution. However, in the context of function optimization, self-adaptation features of evolutionary search algorithms have been explored mainly with evolution strategy (ES) and evolutionary programming (EP). In this paper, we demonstrate the self-adaptive feature of real-parameter genetic algorithms (GAs) using a simulated binary crossover (SBX) operator and without any mutation operator. The connection between the working of self-adaptive ESs and real-parameter GAs with the SBX operator is also discussed. Thereafter, the self-adaptive behavior of real-parameter GAs is demonstrated on a number of test problems commonly used in the ES literature. The remarkable similarity in the working principle of real-parameter GAs and self-adaptive ESs shown in this study suggests the need for emphasizing further studies on self-adaptive GAs. PMID:11382356

  11. The puzzle of Italian rice origin and evolution: determining genetic divergence and affinity of rice germplasm from Italy and Asia.

    Xingxing Cai

    Full Text Available The characterization of genetic divergence and relationships of a set of germplasm is essential for its efficient applications in crop breeding and understanding of the origin/evolution of crop varieties from a given geographical region. As the largest rice producing country in Europe, Italy holds rice germplasm with abundant genetic diversity. Although Italian rice varieties and the traditional ones in particular have played important roles in rice production and breeding, knowledge concerning the origin and evolution of Italian traditional varieties is still limited. To solve the puzzle of Italian rice origin, we characterized genetic divergence and relationships of 348 rice varieties from Italy and Asia based on the polymorphisms of microsatellite fingerprints. We also included common wild rice O. rufipogon as a reference in the characterization. Results indicated relatively rich genetic diversity (H(e = 0.63-0.65 in Italian rice varieties. Further analyses revealed a close genetic relationship of the Italian traditional varieties with those from northern China, which provides strong genetic evidence for tracing the possible origin of early established rice varieties in Italy. These findings have significant implications for the rice breeding programs, in which appropriate germplasm can be selected from a given region and utilized for transferring unique genetic traits based on its genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships.

  12. Genetic isolation and morphological divergence mediated by high-energy rapids in two cichlid genera from the lower Congo rapids

    Stiassny Melanie LJ

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that one of the mechanisms promoting diversification in cichlid fishes in the African Great Lakes has been the well-documented pattern of philopatry along shoreline habitats leading to high levels of genetic isolation among populations. However lake habitats are not the only centers of cichlid biodiversity - certain African rivers also contain large numbers of narrowly endemic species. Patterns of isolation and divergence in these systems have tended to be overlooked and are not well understood. Results We examined genetic and morphological divergence among populations of two narrowly endemic cichlid species, Teleogramma depressum and Lamprologus tigripictilis, from a 100 km stretch of the lower Congo River using both nDNA microsatellites and mtDNA markers along with coordinate-based morphological techniques. In L. tigripictilis, the strongest genetic break was concordant with measurable phenotypic divergence but no morphological disjunction was detected for T. depressum despite significant differentiation at mtDNA and nDNA microsatellite markers. Conclusions The genetic markers revealed patterns of philopatry and estimates of genetic isolation that are among the highest reported for any African cichlid species over a comparable geographic scale. We hypothesize that the high levels of philopatry observed are generated and maintained by the extreme hydrology of the lower Congo River.

  13. Partially repeatable genetic basis of benthic adaptation in threespine sticklebacks.

    Erickson, Priscilla A; Glazer, Andrew M; Killingbeck, Emily E; Agoglia, Rachel M; Baek, Jiyeon; Carsanaro, Sara M; Lee, Anthony M; Cleves, Phillip A; Schluter, Dolph; Miller, Craig T

    2016-04-01

    The extent to which convergent adaptation to similar ecological niches occurs by a predictable genetic basis remains a fundamental question in biology. Threespine stickleback fish have undergone an adaptive radiation in which ancestral oceanic populations repeatedly colonized and adapted to freshwater habitats. In multiple lakes in British Columbia, two different freshwater ecotypes have evolved: a deep-bodied benthic form adapted to forage near the lake substrate, and a narrow-bodied limnetic form adapted to forage in open water. Here, we use genome-wide linkage mapping in marine × benthic F2 genetic crosses to test the extent of shared genomic regions underlying benthic adaptation in three benthic populations. We identify at least 100 Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) harboring genes influencing skeletal morphology. The majority of QTL (57%) are unique to one cross. However, four genomic regions affecting eight craniofacial and armor phenotypes are found in all three benthic populations. We find that QTL are clustered in the genome and overlapping QTL regions are enriched for genomic signatures of natural selection. These findings suggest that benthic adaptation has occurred via both parallel and nonparallel genetic changes. PMID:26947264

  14. The genetic architecture of climatic adaptation of tropical cattle.

    Laercio R Porto-Neto

    Full Text Available Adaptation of global food systems to climate change is essential to feed the world. Tropical cattle production, a mainstay of profitability for farmers in the developing world, is dominated by heat, lack of water, poor quality feedstuffs, parasites, and tropical diseases. In these systems European cattle suffer significant stock loss, and the cross breeding of taurine x indicine cattle is unpredictable due to the dilution of adaptation to heat and tropical diseases. We explored the genetic architecture of ten traits of tropical cattle production using genome wide association studies of 4,662 animals varying from 0% to 100% indicine. We show that nine of the ten have genetic architectures that include genes of major effect, and in one case, a single location that accounted for more than 71% of the genetic variation. One genetic region in particular had effects on parasite resistance, yearling weight, body condition score, coat colour and penile sheath score. This region, extending 20 Mb on BTA5, appeared to be under genetic selection possibly through maintenance of haplotypes by breeders. We found that the amount of genetic variation and the genetic correlations between traits did not depend upon the degree of indicine content in the animals. Climate change is expected to expand some conditions of the tropics to more temperate environments, which may impact negatively on global livestock health and production. Our results point to several important genes that have large effects on adaptation that could be introduced into more temperate cattle without detrimental effects on productivity.

  15. The genetic architecture of climatic adaptation of tropical cattle.

    Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Reverter, Antonio; Prayaga, Kishore C; Chan, Eva K F; Johnston, David J; Hawken, Rachel J; Fordyce, Geoffry; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Sonstegard, Tad S; Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Goddard, Michael E; Burrow, Heather M; Henshall, John M; Lehnert, Sigrid A; Barendse, William

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of global food systems to climate change is essential to feed the world. Tropical cattle production, a mainstay of profitability for farmers in the developing world, is dominated by heat, lack of water, poor quality feedstuffs, parasites, and tropical diseases. In these systems European cattle suffer significant stock loss, and the cross breeding of taurine x indicine cattle is unpredictable due to the dilution of adaptation to heat and tropical diseases. We explored the genetic architecture of ten traits of tropical cattle production using genome wide association studies of 4,662 animals varying from 0% to 100% indicine. We show that nine of the ten have genetic architectures that include genes of major effect, and in one case, a single location that accounted for more than 71% of the genetic variation. One genetic region in particular had effects on parasite resistance, yearling weight, body condition score, coat colour and penile sheath score. This region, extending 20 Mb on BTA5, appeared to be under genetic selection possibly through maintenance of haplotypes by breeders. We found that the amount of genetic variation and the genetic correlations between traits did not depend upon the degree of indicine content in the animals. Climate change is expected to expand some conditions of the tropics to more temperate environments, which may impact negatively on global livestock health and production. Our results point to several important genes that have large effects on adaptation that could be introduced into more temperate cattle without detrimental effects on productivity. PMID:25419663

  16. Epidemiology, genetic divergence and acaricides of Otodectes cynotis in cats and dogs

    Fayez Awadalla Salib and Taher Ahamed Baraka

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Otodectes cynotis mite is a common parasite of cats and dogs, survives in the ear canal and causes otitis externa, itching and severe complications. The microscopic examination of ear swabs, skin scraps and faecal samples of 289 cats and 223 dogs revealed that mono-specific and mixed infestations of Otodectes cynotis in cats were (24.56% and(6.57% while in dogs were (7.17% and (4.48% respectively. The highest rate of infestation was in young cats and the lowest was in elder dogs. The mixed infestations were found in combination with Sarcoptes, Demodex, Dermatophytes, Ticks, Fleas, Ascarids, Dipylidium and Isospora. The RAPD-PCR proved the genetic divergence between cat and dog isolates whereas they are morphologically similar. Selamectin-pour on, Doramectin-subcutaneous injection and Ivermectin-Ear drops were evaluated two weeks post treatment. The rate of success in cats were (96.66% ,(90.00% and (83.33% and in dogs were (77.77%, (75.00% and (66.66% respectively. It is concluded that Selamectin pour on is the best acaricide against Otodectes cynotis in both cats and dogs. It is also needed to prepare a vaccine in the future to prevent the infestation with Otodectes cynotis and its complications. [Vet. World 2011; 4(3.000: 109-112

  17. Sds-page based genetic divergence in safflower (carthamus tinctorius l.)

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) germplasm, comprising of 116 accessions was characterized using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of seed storage proteins. The germplasm was acquired from different countries of the world. Total seed proteins were separated through electrophoresis polyacrylamide gels using standard protocols. Eighteen (60%) of the protein bands detected were polymorphic, the rest being monomorphic. Eight bands (14, 17, 18, 19, 20, 23, 24 and 25) were more than 80% common in all accessions. Similarity coefficients among the accessions ranged from 0.00 to 1.00. Accessions 16327 and 26752 were the most divergent genotypes having maximum dissimilarity with all the other accessions used. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic averages (UPGMA) was used which is based on dissimilarity matrix. The dendrogram obtained separated all accessions into four main clusters (I, II, III and IV) and two independent individual genotypes. Four major clusters comprised of 23, 75, 8 and 8 accessions, respectively. This technique did not reveal genetic variability of significant value in safflower genotypes, hence advanced molecular and biochemical markers are recommended for further studies. This study will be helpful for the future breeding program of safflower accessions. (author)

  18. Genetic diversity and divergence among freshwater mussel (Anodonta) populations in the Bonneville Basin of Utah.

    Mock, K E; Brim-Box, J C; Miller, M P; Downing, M E; Hoeh, W R

    2004-05-01

    Populations of the freshwater mussel genus Anodonta appear to be in a state of rapid decline in western North America, following a trend that unfortunately seems to be prevalent among these animals (Mollusca: Unionoida). Here we describe the patterns of molecular divergence and diversity among Anodonta populations in the Bonneville Basin, a large sub-basin of the Great Basin in western North America. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, we found a striking lack of nuclear diversity within some of these populations, along with a high degree of structuring among populations (FST = 0.61), suggesting post-Pleistocene isolation, due either to a long-term loss of hydrologic connectivity among populations or to more recent fish introductions. We also found evidence of recent hybridization in one of these populations, possibly mediated by fish-stocking practices. Using mitochondrial sequence data, we compared the Bonneville Basin populations to Anodonta in several other drainages in western North America. We found a general lack of resolution in these phylogenetic reconstructions, although there was a tendency for the Bonneville Basin Anodonta (tentatively A. californiensis) to cluster with A. oregonensis from the adjacent Lahontan Basin in Nevada. We recommend further investigation of anthropogenic factors that may be contributing to the decline of western Anodonta and a broad-scale analysis and synthesis of genetic and morphological variation among Anodonta in western North America. PMID:15078447

  19. Biotic interactions govern genetic adaptation to toxicants

    Becker, Jeremias Martin; Liess, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The genetic recovery of resistant populations released from pesticide exposure is accelerated by the presence of environmental stressors. By contrast, the relevance of environmental stressors for the spread of resistance during pesticide exposure has not been studied. Moreover, the consequences of interactions between different stressors have not been considered. Here we show that stress through intraspecific competition accelerates microevolution, because it enhances fitness differences betw...

  20. Segmenting the human genome based on states of neutral genetic divergence.

    Kuruppumullage Don, Prabhani; Ananda, Guruprasad; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D

    2013-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that divergence levels generated by different mutation types vary and covary across the human genome. To improve our still-incomplete understanding of the mechanistic basis of this phenomenon, we analyze several mutation types simultaneously, anchoring their variation to specific regions of the genome. Using hidden Markov models on insertion, deletion, nucleotide substitution, and microsatellite divergence estimates inferred from human-orangutan alignments of neutrally evolving genomic sequences, we segment the human genome into regions corresponding to different divergence states--each uniquely characterized by specific combinations of divergence levels. We then parsed the mutagenic contributions of various biochemical processes associating divergence states with a broad range of genomic landscape features. We find that high divergence states inhabit guanine- and cytosine (GC)-rich, highly recombining subtelomeric regions; low divergence states cover inner parts of autosomes; chromosome X forms its own state with lowest divergence; and a state of elevated microsatellite mutability is interspersed across the genome. These general trends are mirrored in human diversity data from the 1000 Genomes Project, and departures from them highlight the evolutionary history of primate chromosomes. We also find that genes and noncoding functional marks [annotations from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)] are concentrated in high divergence states. Our results provide a powerful tool for biomedical data analysis: segmentations can be used to screen personal genome variants--including those associated with cancer and other diseases--and to improve computational predictions of noncoding functional elements. PMID:23959903

  1. Neuro-Genetic Adaptive Optimal Controller for DC Motor

    Mahmoud Mohamed Elkholy; Mohammed Abd Elhameed Abd Elnaiem

    2014-01-01

    Conventional speed controllers of DC motors suffer from being not adaptive, this is because of the nonlinearity in the motor model due to saturation. Structure of DC motor speed controller should vary according to its operating conditions, so that the transient performance is acceptable. In this paper an adaptive and optimal Neuro-Genetic controller is used to control a DC motor speed. GA will be used first to obtain the optimal controller parameter for each load torque and motor refer...

  2. Genomics and Genetics in the Biology of Adaptation to Exercise

    Bouchard, Claude; Rankinen, Tuomo; Timmons, James A.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to the role of genetic variation and gene-exercise interactions in the biology of adaptation to exercise. There is evidence from genetic epidemiology research that DNA sequence differences contribute to human variation in physical activity level, cardiorespiratory fitness in the untrained state, cardiovascular and metabolic response to acute exercise, and responsiveness to regular exercise. Methodological and technological advances have made it possible to undertake th...

  3. Patterns of genetic diversity and candidate genes for ecological divergence in a homoploid hybrid sunflower, Helianthus anomalus

    Sapir,Yuval; MOODY, MICHAEL L.; Brouillette, Larry C.; Donovan, Lisa A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2007-01-01

    Natural hybridization accompanied by a shift in niche preference by hybrid genotypes can lead to hybrid speciation. Natural selection may cause the fixation of advantageous alleles in the ecologically diverged hybrids, and the loci experiencing selection should exhibit a reduction in allelic diversity relative to neutral loci. Here, we analyzed patterns of genetic diversity at 59 microsatellite loci associated with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in a homoploid hybrid sunflower species, Helian...

  4. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier

  5. Genetic divergence of bean genotypes to infestation of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Bohemann (Coleoptera: Bruchidae

    Eduardo Neves Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the genetics divergence of bean genotypes in relation to the oviposition, feeding and development of Zabrotes subfasciatus, determining the degrees of resistance to the weevil. The genotypes used were: IAC Carioca-Tybatã, IAC Fortaleza, IAPAR 81, IAC Carioca-Eté, IAC Galante, IAC Harmonia, IAC Una, IAC Diplomata, BRS Supremo and RAZ 49. Tests were performed in laboratory under controlled humidity, temperature and photophase conditions. In free choice test, 10 g of bean genotypes seeds were distributed in circular openings placed equidistant from each other in aluminum trays, where 70 couples were released. The attractiveness was evaluated 24 hours and seven days after the experiment started, and then the number of eggs was evaluated. In non choice test, 10 g of seeds were used where seven couples of Z. subfasciatus, 24 hours-old, were released, remaining seven days, and after the adults retreat, the total number eggs, viable and unviable eggs, the number and percentage of emerged adults, weight, longevity and period from egg to adult of males and females, sex ratio, dry mass and dry mass consumed by insect were evaluated. In the genotype IAC Harmonia was observed the lower oviposition; RAZ 49 was the most non preference-type resistant for feeding and/or antibiosis-type resistant; BRS Supremo, IAC Carioca-Eté and IAPAR 81 are no preference for feeding and/or antibiosis-type moderate resistant; IAC Galante is susceptible and the other genotypes are highly susceptible to Z. subfasciatus

  6. Genetic divergence and evolutionary times: calibrating a protein clock for South-European Stenasellus species (Crustacea, Isopoda

    Valerio Ketmaier

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied genetic divergence in a group of exclusively stygobiont isopods of the family Stenasellidae. In particular, we assessed evolutionary relationships among several populations of Stenasellus racovitzai and Stenasellus virei. To place this study in a phylogenetic context. we used another species of Stenasellus, S. assorgiai, as an outgroup. S. racovitzai occurs in Corsica, Sardinia and in the fossil islands of the Tuscan Archipelago, while S. virei is a polytypic species widely distributed in the central France and Pyrenean area. This vicariant distribution is believed to be the result of the disjunction of the Sardinia-Corsica microplate from the Pyrenean region and its subsequent rotation. Since geological data provide time estimates for these events, we can use the genetic distance data to calibrate a molecular clock for this group of stygobiont isopods. The calibration of the molecular clock reveals a roughly linear relationship (r = 0.753 between the genetic distances and absolute divergence times, with a mean divergence rate (19.269 Myr/DNei, different from those previously reported in the literature and provides an opportunity to shed some light on the evolutionary scenarios of other Stenasellus species.

  7. Genetic Divergence in Advanced Lines of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus ssp oleifera L.

    Khandker Shazia Afrin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} A field experiment was conducted with 22 Brassica napus L. advanced lines at the experimental farm of Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka from November 2008 to March 2009 to asses genetic diversity among advanced lines of Brassica napus L. Different multivariate analysis techniques were used to classify 22 Brassica napus genotypes. The genotypes were grouped into four clusters. The highest inter-cluster distance was observed between clusters II and IV whereas the maximum intra-cluster distance was found in cluster II. Therefore, the genotypes belonging to cluster I and cluster II, cluster II and cluster III and cluster III and cluster IV have been selected for future hybridization program. The role of number of secondary branches per plant and number of siliqua per plant in both vectors were important components for genetic divergence in these materials. Considering group distance and other agronomic performance the inter-genotypic crosses between G1 and G2, G2 and G6; G6 and G7; G6 and G8 and G7 and G8 might be suggested for future hybridization program.

  8. Adaptive radiation along a thermal gradient: preliminary results of habitat use and respiration rate divergence among whitefish morphs.

    Kimmo Kalevi Kahilainen

    Full Text Available Adaptive radiation is considered an important mechanism for the development of new species, but very little is known about the role of thermal adaptation during this process. Such adaptation should be especially important in poikilothermic animals that are often subjected to pronounced seasonal temperature variation that directly affects metabolic function. We conducted a preliminary study of individual lifetime thermal habitat use and respiration rates of four whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus (L. morphs (two pelagic, one littoral and one profundal using stable carbon and oxygen isotope values of otolith carbonate. These morphs, two of which utilized pelagic habitats, one littoral and one profundal recently diverged via adaptive radiation to exploit different major niches in a deep and thermally stratified subarctic lake. We found evidence that the morphs used different thermal niches. The profundal morph had the most distinct thermal niche and consistently occupied the coldest thermal habitat of the lake, whereas differences were less pronounced among the shallow water pelagic and littoral morphs. Our results indicated ontogenetic shifts in thermal niches: juveniles of all whitefish morphs inhabited warmer ambient temperatures than adults. According to sampling of the otolith nucleus, hatching temperatures were higher for benthic compared to pelagic morphs. Estimated respiration rate was the lowest for benthivorous profundal morph, contrasting with the higher values estimated for the other morphs that inhabited shallower and warmer water. These preliminary results suggest that physiological adaptation to different thermal habitats shown by the sympatric morphs may play a significant role in maintaining or strengthening niche segregation and divergence in life-history traits, potentially contributing to reproductive isolation and incipient speciation.

  9. Adaptive radiation along a thermal gradient: preliminary results of habitat use and respiration rate divergence among whitefish morphs.

    Kahilainen, Kimmo Kalevi; Patterson, William Paul; Sonninen, Eloni; Harrod, Chris; Kiljunen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive radiation is considered an important mechanism for the development of new species, but very little is known about the role of thermal adaptation during this process. Such adaptation should be especially important in poikilothermic animals that are often subjected to pronounced seasonal temperature variation that directly affects metabolic function. We conducted a preliminary study of individual lifetime thermal habitat use and respiration rates of four whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus (L.)) morphs (two pelagic, one littoral and one profundal) using stable carbon and oxygen isotope values of otolith carbonate. These morphs, two of which utilized pelagic habitats, one littoral and one profundal recently diverged via adaptive radiation to exploit different major niches in a deep and thermally stratified subarctic lake. We found evidence that the morphs used different thermal niches. The profundal morph had the most distinct thermal niche and consistently occupied the coldest thermal habitat of the lake, whereas differences were less pronounced among the shallow water pelagic and littoral morphs. Our results indicated ontogenetic shifts in thermal niches: juveniles of all whitefish morphs inhabited warmer ambient temperatures than adults. According to sampling of the otolith nucleus, hatching temperatures were higher for benthic compared to pelagic morphs. Estimated respiration rate was the lowest for benthivorous profundal morph, contrasting with the higher values estimated for the other morphs that inhabited shallower and warmer water. These preliminary results suggest that physiological adaptation to different thermal habitats shown by the sympatric morphs may play a significant role in maintaining or strengthening niche segregation and divergence in life-history traits, potentially contributing to reproductive isolation and incipient speciation. PMID:25405979

  10. Adaptive Radiation along a Thermal Gradient: Preliminary Results of Habitat Use and Respiration Rate Divergence among Whitefish Morphs

    Kahilainen, Kimmo Kalevi; Patterson, William Paul; Sonninen, Eloni; Harrod, Chris; Kiljunen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive radiation is considered an important mechanism for the development of new species, but very little is known about the role of thermal adaptation during this process. Such adaptation should be especially important in poikilothermic animals that are often subjected to pronounced seasonal temperature variation that directly affects metabolic function. We conducted a preliminary study of individual lifetime thermal habitat use and respiration rates of four whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus (L.)) morphs (two pelagic, one littoral and one profundal) using stable carbon and oxygen isotope values of otolith carbonate. These morphs, two of which utilized pelagic habitats, one littoral and one profundal recently diverged via adaptive radiation to exploit different major niches in a deep and thermally stratified subarctic lake. We found evidence that the morphs used different thermal niches. The profundal morph had the most distinct thermal niche and consistently occupied the coldest thermal habitat of the lake, whereas differences were less pronounced among the shallow water pelagic and littoral morphs. Our results indicated ontogenetic shifts in thermal niches: juveniles of all whitefish morphs inhabited warmer ambient temperatures than adults. According to sampling of the otolith nucleus, hatching temperatures were higher for benthic compared to pelagic morphs. Estimated respiration rate was the lowest for benthivorous profundal morph, contrasting with the higher values estimated for the other morphs that inhabited shallower and warmer water. These preliminary results suggest that physiological adaptation to different thermal habitats shown by the sympatric morphs may play a significant role in maintaining or strengthening niche segregation and divergence in life-history traits, potentially contributing to reproductive isolation and incipient speciation. PMID:25405979

  11. Development of Microsatellite Markers in the Branched Broomrape Phelipanche ramosa L. (Pomel and Evidence for Host-Associated Genetic Divergence

    Valérie Le Corre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phelipanche ramosa is a parasitic plant that infects numerous crops worldwide. In Western Europe it recently expanded to a new host crop, oilseed rape, in which it can cause severe yield losses. We developed 13 microsatellite markers for P. ramosa using next-generation 454 sequencing data. The polymorphism at each locus was assessed in a sample of 96 individuals collected in France within 6 fields cultivated with tobacco, hemp or oilseed rape. Two loci were monomorphic. At the other 11 loci, the number of alleles and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 3 to 6 and from 0.31 to 0.60, respectively. Genetic diversity within each cultivated field was very low. The host crop from which individuals were collected was the key factor structuring genetic variation. Individuals collected on oilseed rape were strongly differentiated from individuals collected on hemp or tobacco, which suggests that P. ramosa infecting oilseed rape forms a genetically diverged race. The microsatellites we developed will be useful for population genetics studies and for elucidating host-associated genetic divergence in P. ramosa.

  12. Adaptive process control using fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms

    Karr, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  13. Adaptive Process Control with Fuzzy Logic and Genetic Algorithms

    Karr, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision-making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, an analysis element to recognize changes in the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  14. Adaptive interactive genetic algorithms with individual interval fitness

    Dunwei Gong; Guangsong Guo; Li Lu; Hongmei Ma

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to enhance the performance of interactive genetic algorithms in order to apply them to complicated optimization problems successfully. An adaptive interactive genetic algorithm with individual interval fitness is proposed in this paper in which an individual fitness is expressed by an interval. Through analyzing the fitness, information reflecting the distribution of an evolutionary population is picked up, namely, the difference of evaluating superior individuals and the difference of evaluating a population. Based on these, the adaptive probabilities of crossover and mutation operators of an individual are presented. The algorithm proposed in this paper is applied to a fashion evolutionary design system, and the results show that it can find many satisfactory solutions per generation. The achievement of the paper provides a new approach to enhance the performance of interactive genetic algorithms.

  15. Adaptable Constrained Genetic Programming: Extensions and Applications

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    2005-01-01

    An evolutionary algorithm applies evolution-based principles to problem solving. To solve a problem, the user defines the space of potential solutions, the representation space. Sample solutions are encoded in a chromosome-like structure. The algorithm maintains a population of such samples, which undergo simulated evolution by means of mutation, crossover, and survival of the fittest principles. Genetic Programming (GP) uses tree-like chromosomes, providing very rich representation suitable for many problems of interest. GP has been successfully applied to a number of practical problems such as learning Boolean functions and designing hardware circuits. To apply GP to a problem, the user needs to define the actual representation space, by defining the atomic functions and terminals labeling the actual trees. The sufficiency principle requires that the label set be sufficient to build the desired solution trees. The closure principle allows the labels to mix in any arity-consistent manner. To satisfy both principles, the user is often forced to provide a large label set, with ad hoc interpretations or penalties to deal with undesired local contexts. This unfortunately enlarges the actual representation space, and thus usually slows down the search. In the past few years, three different methodologies have been proposed to allow the user to alleviate the closure principle by providing means to define, and to process, constraints on mixing the labels in the trees. Last summer we proposed a new methodology to further alleviate the problem by discovering local heuristics for building quality solution trees. A pilot system was implemented last summer and tested throughout the year. This summer we have implemented a new revision, and produced a User's Manual so that the pilot system can be made available to other practitioners and researchers. We have also designed, and partly implemented, a larger system capable of dealing with much more powerful heuristics.

  16. Coordinated Bacteriocin Expression and Competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae Contributes to Genetic Adaptation through Neighbor Predation.

    Wei-Yun Wholey

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus has remained a persistent cause of invasive and mucosal disease in humans despite the widespread use of antibiotics and vaccines. The resilience of this organism is due to its capacity for adaptation through the uptake and incorporation of new genetic material from the surrounding microbial community. DNA uptake and recombination is controlled by a tightly regulated quorum sensing system that is triggered by the extracellular accumulation of competence stimulating peptide (CSP. In this study, we demonstrate that CSP can stimulate the production of a diverse array of blp bacteriocins. This cross stimulation occurs through increased production and secretion of the bacteriocin pheromone, BlpC, and requires a functional competence regulatory system. We show that a highly conserved motif in the promoter of the operon encoding BlpC and its transporter mediates the upregulation by CSP. The accumulation of BlpC following CSP stimulation results in augmented activation of the entire blp locus. Using biofilm-grown organisms as a model for competition and genetic exchange on the mucosal surface, we demonstrate that DNA exchange is enhanced by bacteriocin secretion suggesting that co-stimulation of bacteriocins with competence provides an adaptive advantage. The blp and com regulatory pathways are believed to have diverged and specialized in a remote ancestor of pneumococcus. Despite this, the two systems have maintained a regulatory connection that promotes competition and adaptation by targeting for lysis a wide array of potential competitors while simultaneously providing the means for incorporation of their DNA.

  17. Genetic structure and hierarchical population divergence history of Acer mono var. mono in South and Northeast China.

    Chunping Liu

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the genetic structure and evolutionary history of tree species across their ranges is essential for the development of effective conservation and forest management strategies. Acer mono var. mono, an economically and ecologically important maple species, is extensively distributed in Northeast China (NE, whereas it has a scattered and patchy distribution in South China (SC. In this study, the genetic structure and demographic history of 56 natural populations of A. mono var. mono were evaluated using seven nuclear microsatellite markers. Neighbor-joining tree and STRUCTURE analysis clearly separated populations into NE and SC groups with two admixed-like populations. Allelic richness significantly decreased with increasing latitude within the NE group while both allelic richness and expected heterozygosity showed significant positive correlation with latitude within the SC group. Especially in the NE region, previous studies in Quercus mongolica and Fraxinus mandshurica have also detected reductions in genetic diversity with increases in latitude, suggesting this pattern may be common for tree species in this region, probably due to expansion from single refugium following the last glacial maximum (LGM. Approximate Bayesian Computation-based analysis revealed two major features of hierarchical population divergence in the species' evolutionary history. Recent divergence between the NE group and the admixed-like group corresponded to the LGM period and ancient divergence of SC groups took place during mid-late Pleistocene period. The level of genetic differentiation was moderate (FST  = 0.073; G'ST  = 0.278 among all populations, but significantly higher in the SC group than the NE group, mirroring the species' more scattered distribution in SC. Conservation measures for this species are proposed, taking into account the genetic structure and past demographic history identified in this study.

  18. On minimum divergence adaptation of discrete bivariate distributions to given marginals

    Vajda, Igor; van der Meulen, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 1 (2005), s. 313-320. ISSN 0018-9448 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/02/1391; GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : approximation of contingency tables * bivariate discrete distributions * minimization of divergences Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2005

  19. Speciation on oceanic islands: rapid adaptive divergence vs. cryptic speciation in a Guadalupe Island songbird (Aves: Junco.

    Pau Aleixandre

    Full Text Available The evolutionary divergence of island populations, and in particular the tempo and relative importance of neutral and selective factors, is of central interest to the study of speciation. The rate of phenotypic evolution upon island colonization can vary greatly among taxa, and cases of convergent evolution can further confound the inference of correct evolutionary histories. Given the potential lability of phenotypic characters, molecular dating of insular lineages analyzed in a phylogenetic framework provides a critical tool to test hypotheses of phenotypic divergence since colonization. The Guadalupe junco is the only insular form of the polymorphic dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis, and shares eye and plumage color with continental morphs, yet presents an enlarged bill and reduced body size. Here we use variation in mtDNA sequence, morphological traits and song variables to test whether the Guadalupe junco evolved rapidly following a recent colonization by a mainland form of the dark-eyed junco, or instead represents a well-differentiated "cryptic" lineage adapted to the insular environment through long-term isolation, with plumage coloration a result of evolutionary convergence. We found high mtDNA divergence of the island lineage with respect to both continental J. hyemalis and J. phaeonotus, representing a history of isolation of about 600,000 years. The island lineage was also significantly differentiated in morphological and male song variables. Moreover, and contrary to predictions regarding diversity loss on small oceanic islands, we document relatively high levels of both haplotypic and song-unit diversity on Guadalupe Island despite long-term isolation in a very small geographic area. In contrast to prevailing taxonomy, the Guadalupe junco is an old, well-differentiated evolutionary lineage, whose similarity to mainland juncos in plumage and eye color is due to evolutionary convergence. Our findings confirm the role of remote islands

  20. Genetics of cereal adaptation to the man-made habitat

    The wild progenitor species of all cereals are known with various degrees of certainty. Wild and cultivated taxa of the same species cross and their hybrids are generally fertile. This allows for a study of the genetics of domestication. A survey of the literature, however, reveals few such studies. The adaptation to disturbed habitats is genetically complex, and colonizing ability seems to have been a prerequisite for successful domestication. Natural seed dispersal is controlled by one to several linked genes, and behaves genetically as an overall dominant over loss of efficient seed dispersal mechanisms. Apical dominance, synchronized tillering, and increase in fecundity are complex, recessive genetic traits associated with cereal domestication. Racial evolution resulted from conscious selection by man and involves numerous loci. (author). 43 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  1. Adaptive divergence in body size overrides the effects of plasticity across natural habitats in the brown trout.

    Rogell, Björn; Dannewitz, Johan; Palm, Stefan; Dahl, Jonas; Petersson, Erik; Laurila, Anssi

    2013-07-01

    The evolution of life-history traits is characterized by trade-offs between different selection pressures, as well as plasticity across environmental conditions. Yet, studies on local adaptation are often performed under artificial conditions, leaving two issues unexplored: (i) how consistent are laboratory inferred local adaptations under natural conditions and (ii) how much phenotypic variation is attributed to phenotypic plasticity and to adaptive evolution, respectively, across environmental conditions? We reared fish from six locally adapted (domesticated and wild) populations of anadromous brown trout (Salmo trutta) in one semi-natural and three natural streams and recorded a key life-history trait (body size at the end of first growth season). We found that population-specific reaction norms were close to parallel across different streams and Q ST was similar - and larger than F ST - within all streams, indicating a consistency of local adaptation in body size across natural environments. The amount of variation explained by population origin exceeded the variation across stream environments, indicating that genetic effects derived from adaptive processes have a stronger effect on phenotypic variation than plasticity induced by environmental conditions. These results suggest that plasticity does not "swamp" the phenotypic variation, and that selection may thus be efficient in generating genetic change. PMID:23919140

  2. Greenlandic Inuit show genetic signatures of diet and climate adaptation

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Moltke, Ida; Grarup, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    signatures of adaptation revealed signals at several loci, with the strongest signal located in a cluster of fatty acid desaturases that determine PUFA levels. The selected alleles are associated with multiple metabolic and anthropometric phenotypes and have large effect sizes for weight and height, with the...... effect on height replicated in Europeans. By analyzing membrane lipids, we found that the selected alleles modulate fatty acid composition, which may affect the regulation of growth hormones. Thus, the Inuit have genetic and physiological adaptations to a diet rich in PUFAs....

  3. Divergent genetic mechanisms underlie reversals to radial floral symmetry from diverse zygomorphic flowered ancestors

    Wenheng eZhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Malpighiaceae possess flowers with a unique bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy, which is a hypothesized adaptation associated with specialization on neotropical oil bee pollinators. Gene expression of two representatives of the CYC2 lineage of floral symmetry TCP genes, CYC2A and CYC2B, demarcate the adaxial (dorsal region of the flower in the characteristic zygomorphic flowers of most Malpighiaceae. Several clades within the family, however, have independently lost their specialized oil bee pollinators and reverted to radial flowers (actinomorphy like their ancestors. Here, we investigate CYC2 expression associated with four independent reversals to actinomorphy. We demonstrate that these reversals are always associated with alteration of the highly conserved CYC2 expression pattern observed in most New World Malpighiaceae. In New World Lasiocarpus and Old World Microsteria, the expression of CYC2-like genes has expanded to include the ventral region of the corolla. Thus, the pattern of gene expression in these species has become radialized, which is comparable to what has been reported in the radial flowered legume clade Cadia. In striking contrast, in New World Psychopterys and Old World Sphedamnocarpus, CYC2-like expression is entirely absent or at barely detectable levels. This is more similar to the pattern of CYC2 expression observed in radial flowered Arabidopsis. These results collectively indicate that, regardless of geographic distribution, reversals to similar floral phenotypes in this large tropical angiosperm clade have evolved via different genetic changes from an otherwise highly conserved developmental program.

  4. Behavioral adaptations imply a direct link between ecological specialization and reproductive isolation in a sympatrically diverging ground beetle.

    Van Belleghem, Steven M; De Wolf, Katrien; Hendrickx, Frederik

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation to a previously unoccupied niche within a single population is one of the most contentious topics in evolutionary biology as it assumes the simultaneous evolution of ecologically selected and preference traits. Here, we demonstrate behavioral adaptation to contrasting hydrological regimes in a sympatric mosaic of Pogonus chalceus beetle populations, and argue that this adaptation may result in nonrandom gene flow. When exposed to experimental inundations, individuals from tidal marshes, which are naturally subjected to frequent but short floods, showed a higher propensity to remain submerged compared to individuals from seasonal marshes that are inundated for several months. This adaptive behavior is expected to decrease the probability that individuals will settle in the alternative habitat, resulting in spatial sorting and reproductive isolation of both ecotypes. Additionally, we show that this difference in behavior is induced by the environmental conditions experienced by the beetles during their nondispersive larval stages. Hence, accidental or forced ovipositioning in the alternative habitat may induce both an increased performance and preference to the natal habitat type. Such plastic traits could play an important role in the most incipient stages of divergence with gene flow. PMID:27405686

  5. Adaptive divergence of scaling relationships mediates the arms race between a weevil and its host plant.

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sota, Teiji

    2006-12-22

    Coevolution of exaggerated morphologies between insects and plants is a well-known but poorly understood phenomenon in evolutionary biology. In the antagonistic interaction between a seed-predatory insect, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae), and its host plant, Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica), we examined the evolutionary trajectory of an exaggerated offensive trait of the weevil (rostrum length) in terms of scaling relationship. Sampling throughout Japan revealed that the ratio of the rostrum length to overall body size was correlated with the ratio of the pericarp thickness to overall fruit size across the localities. We found a geographical interpopulation divergence in a parameter pertaining to the allometric equation of rostrum length (the coefficient a in y=axb, where y and x denote rostrum and body lengths, respectively), and the pattern of geographical differentiation in the allometric coefficient was closely correlated with the variation in the pericarp thickness of Japanese camellia. Our results provide a novel example of a geographically diverged scaling relationship in an insect morphology resulting from a coevolutionary arms race with its host plant. PMID:17148283

  6. Genetic divergence for growth and wood parameters in different clones of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb

    Kumar A; Bhatt A; Ravichandran S; Pande PK; Dobhal S

    2012-01-01

    The wood analysis for different parameters was carried out in a clonal seed orchard of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.established during 1997 at Hoshiarpur,Punjab,India.Twelve clones with higher index value were subjected to Euclidean Cluster Analysis based on wood and growth parameters to group into seven clusters.Cluster Ⅰ and Ⅱ contained four and three clones,respectively,and remaining clusters had just one clone each.Clone originated from Barielly,Uttar Pradesh of cluster Ⅶ was found to be the most divergent clone.Cluster Ⅱ with three clones maintained greater inter-cluster distance with other clusters.The divergence analysis has confirmed that the clones planted in the clonal seed orchard are sufficiently divergent and seed harvested from the orchard would maintain high diversity.

  7. The Adaptive Analysis of Visual Cognition using Genetic Algorithms

    Cook, Robert G.; Qadri, Muhammad A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments used a novel, open-ended, and adaptive test procedure to examine visual cognition in animals. Using a genetic algorithm, a pigeon was tested repeatedly from a variety of different initial conditions for its solution to an intermediate brightness search task. On each trial, the animal had to accurately locate and peck a target element of intermediate brightness from among a variable number of surrounding darker and lighter distractor elements. Displays were generated from six p...

  8. An adaptive genetic algorithm for solving bilevel linear programming problem

    2007-01-01

    Bilevel linear programming, which consists of the objective functions of the upper level and lower level, is a useful tool for modeling decentralized decision problems.Various methods are proposed for solving this problem. Of all the algorithms, the genetic algorithm is an alternative to conventional approaches to find the solution of the bilevel linear programming. In this paper, we describe an adaptive genetic algorithm for solving the bilevel linear programming problem to overcome the difficulty of determining the probabilities of crossover and mutation. In addition, some techniques are adopted not only to deal with the difficulty that most of the chromosomes may be infeasible in solving constrained optimization problem with genetic algorithm but also to improve the efficiency of the algorithm. The performance of this proposed algorithm is illustrated by the examples from references.

  9. The mitochondrial genomes of Campodea fragilis and C. lubbocki(Hexapoda: Diplura): high genetic divergence in a morphologically uniformtaxon

    Podsiadlowski, L.; Carapelli, A.; Nardi, F.; Dallai, R.; Koch,M.; Boore, J.L.; Frati, F.

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial genomes from two dipluran hexapods of the genus Campodea have been sequenced. Gene order is the same as in most other hexapods and crustaceans. Secondary structures of tRNAs reveal specific structural changes in tRNA-C, tRNA-R, tRNA-S1 and tRNA-S2. Comparative analyses of nucleotide and amino acid composition, as well as structural features of both ribosomal RNA subunits, reveal substantial differences among the analyzed taxa. Although the two Campodea species are morphologically highly uniform, genetic divergence is larger than expected, suggesting a long evolutionary history under stable ecological conditions.

  10. Divergência genética entre genótipos de alface por meio de marcadores AFLP Genetics divergence among lettuce genotypes by AFLP markers

    Cristina Soares de Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerando a restrita diversidade de espécies disponíveis para nutrir a carência de vitaminas no Brasil, Kerr e colaboradores, desde 1981, vêm desenvolvendo pesquisas para melhoramento genético de hortaliças ricas em vitamina A. Dentre elas, obtiveram uma cultivar de alface, denominada Uberlândia 10.000 com 10.200 UI de vitamina A em 100 gramas de folha fresca. Este trabalho objetivou comparar o grau de divergência genética entre a cultivar Uberlândia 10.000 e seus parentais para avaliar a eficiência da seleção utilizada, por meio da técnica AFLP. Foram utilizados os seguintes genótipos de alface: Maioba, Salad Bowl-Mimosa, Moreninha-de-Uberlândia, Vitória de Santo Antão, Uberlândia 10.000 lisa 8.ª e 9.ª geração e Uberlândia 10.000 crespa 8.ª e 9.ª geração. A técnica AFLP foi eficiente para identificar genótipos muito próximos e para estudos de progênies em alface. O primer PR15 permitiu a separação da forma lisa e crespa com 1,8% de divergência genética e a oitava da nona geração com apenas 0,71%. Com o estudo da filogenia da cultivar pode-se observar que o programa de melhoramento foi desenvolvido com sucesso, pois a cultivar obtida Uberlândia 10.000 possui alto teor de vitamina A e 92% de similaridade com o parental Vitória de Santo Antão. O primer PR11 conseguiu identificar polimorfismo entre cultivares de alta e baixa resistência à septoriose, sugerindo a possibilidade destas bandas estarem relacionadas à resistência.Considering the restricted diversity of species available to counteract vitamin deficiencies in Brazil, Kerr and coworkers have been engaged since 1981, in developing genetic improved garden vegetables rich in vitamin A. One of these vegetables is the lettuce cultivar Uberlândia 10,000, which contains 10,200 UI of vitamin A per 100 grams of fresh leaves. This study compares the genetic diversity between Uberlândia 10,000 and its parental, evaluating selection efficiency through

  11. Genetic divergence of peripherally disjunct populations of the gastropod Batillariella estuarina in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia.

    Pudovskis, M S; Johnson, M S; Black, R

    2001-11-01

    Geographically disjunct populations are unusual in marine species, but the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia, provide opportunities to study highly disjunct peripheral isolates of several species. The intertidal snail Batillariella estuarina occurs in isolated tidal ponds in the Abrolhos Islands, where it is at its northern limit, disjunct from mainland populations by 600-900 km. The species is thus disjunct both geographically and among the peripherally isolated populations in the Abrolhos Islands. Comparisons of allozymes at 11 polymorphic loci were made among populations from 10 ponds in the Abrolhos Islands and six sites from relatively continuous tidal flats at Albany, 900 km away, the nearest major set of populations. Among all 16 populations, subdivision was high (FST = 0.455). Although there were subtle differences between the geographical regions, the large majority of divergence occurred among the isolated ponds in the Abrolhos (FST = 0.441), and divergence on the tidal flats at Albany was only moderate (FST = 0.085). Characteristic of peripheral isolates, the pond populations have less polymorphism and fewer alleles than the more connected populations at Albany. Combined with evidence of genetic divergence in the gastropods Bembicium vittatum and Austrocochlea constricta, which have very similar geographical distributions to that of B. estuarina, these results indicate the potential evolutionary significance of peripherally isolated marine populations in the unusual habitats of the Abrolhos Islands. PMID:11883876

  12. Testing founder effect speciation: Divergence population genetics of the Spoonbills Platalea regia and Pl. minor (Threskiornithidae, Aves)

    Yeung, Carol K.L.; Tsai, Pi-Wen; Chesser, R. Terry; Lin, Rong-Chien; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Although founder effect speciation has been a popular theoretical model for the speciation of geographically isolated taxa, its empirical importance has remained difficult to evaluate due to the intractability of past demography, which in a founder effect speciation scenario would involve a speciational bottleneck in the emergent species and the complete cessation of gene flow following divergence. Using regression-weighted approximate Bayesian computation, we tested the validity of these two fundamental conditions of founder effect speciation in a pair of sister species with disjunct distributions: the royal spoonbill Platalea regia in Australasia and the black-faced spoonbill Pl. minor in eastern Asia. When compared with genetic polymorphism observed at 20 nuclear loci in the two species, simulations showed that the founder effect speciation model had an extremely low posterior probability (1.55 × 10-8) of producing the extant genetic pattern. In contrast, speciation models that allowed for postdivergence gene flow were much more probable (posterior probabilities were 0.37 and 0.50 for the bottleneck with gene flow and the gene flow models, respectively) and postdivergence gene flow persisted for a considerable period of time (more than 80% of the divergence history in both models) following initial divergence (median = 197,000 generations, 95% credible interval [CI]: 50,000-478,000, for the bottleneck with gene flow model; and 186,000 generations, 95% CI: 45,000-477,000, for the gene flow model). Furthermore, the estimated population size reduction in Pl. regia to 7,000 individuals (median, 95% CI: 487-12,000, according to the bottleneck with gene flow model) was unlikely to have been severe enough to be considered a bottleneck. Therefore, these results do not support founder effect speciation in Pl. regia but indicate instead that the divergence between Pl. regia and Pl. minor was probably driven by selection despite continuous gene flow. In this light, we

  13. Genetic structure and subspecies divergence of wild boars Sus scrofa in mainland China based on the microsatellite variation analysis

    ZHANG Bao-Wei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to discuss the subspecies classification of wild boar Sus scrofa in China, We studied their genetic structure using 11 microsatellites, with emphasis on South China. High levels of genetic variationwere detected in South China (SC, North China (NC and Northeast China (NE wild boar populations. This was consistent with the huge population size of the wild boar and its status as a widely-distributed species. Weak genetic divergence was observed in all subspecies involved in this study. Individuals from all subspecies were highly mixed in the phylogeny tree based on the allele sharing distance (DAS, no distinct clade was found according to the defined subspecies. Even considering the two main factors, which reflect the biggest genetic differentiation among the populations, it is impossible to distinguish SC,NC and NE from each other by FCA (Factor Correspondence Analysis. Using the F-statistic test, weak genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.014 was detected between SC and NC population, which indicated a high gene flow between two sides of the Yangtze River. The Yangtze River is an insurmountable geographical hindrance for wild boars. The stronger population differentiations were observed between NE and NC population, and between NE and SC population(Fst = 0.040, 0.042 respectively), this may suggest that the wild boars in NE area could be defined as the subspecies S. s. ussuricus.[Acta Zoologica Sinica 54(5: 753 – 761, 2008].

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Historically Important, Spatiotemporally Distinct, and Genetically Divergent Strains of Zika Virus: MR-766, P6-740, and PRVABC-59

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Frank, Jordan C.; Julander, Justin G.; Polejaeva, Irina A.; Davies, Christopher J.; White, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 10,807-nucleotide-long consensus RNA genome sequences of three spatiotemporally distinct and genetically divergent Zika virus strains, with the functionality of their genomic sequences substantiated by reverse genetics: MR-766 (African lineage, Uganda, 1947), P6-740 (Asian lineage, Malaysia, 1966), and PRVABC-59 (Asian lineage-derived American strain, Puerto Rico, 2015). PMID:27540058

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Historically Important, Spatiotemporally Distinct, and Genetically Divergent Strains of Zika Virus: MR-766, P6-740, and PRVABC-59.

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Frank, Jordan C; Julander, Justin G; Polejaeva, Irina A; Davies, Christopher J; White, Kenneth L; Lee, Young-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 10,807-nucleotide-long consensus RNA genome sequences of three spatiotemporally distinct and genetically divergent Zika virus strains, with the functionality of their genomic sequences substantiated by reverse genetics: MR-766 (African lineage, Uganda, 1947), P6-740 (Asian lineage, Malaysia, 1966), and PRVABC-59 (Asian lineage-derived American strain, Puerto Rico, 2015). PMID:27540058

  16. Selection and geographic isolation influence hummingbird speciation: genetic, acoustic and morphological divergence in the wedge-tailed sabrewing (Campylopterus curvipennis

    Ornelas Juan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesoamerica is one of the most threatened biodiversity hotspots in the world, yet we are far from understanding the geologic history and the processes driving population divergence and speciation for most endemic taxa. In species with highly differentiated populations selective and/or neutral factors can induce rapid changes to traits involved in mate choice, promoting reproductive isolation between allopatric populations that can eventually lead to speciation. We present the results of genetic differentiation, and explore drift and selection effects in promoting acoustic and morphological divergence among populations of Campylopterus curvipennis, a lekking hummingbird with an extraordinary vocal variability across Mesoamerica. Results Analyses of two mitochondrial genes and ten microsatellite loci genotyped for 160 individuals revealed the presence of three lineages with no contemporary gene flow: C. c. curvipennis, C. c. excellens, and C. c. pampa disjunctly distributed in the Sierra Madre Oriental, the Tuxtlas region and the Yucatan Peninsula, respectively. Sequence mtDNA and microsatellite data were congruent with two diversification events: an old vicariance event at the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (c. 1.4 Ma, and a more recent Pleistocene split, isolating populations in the Tuxtlas region. Hummingbirds of the excellens group were larger, and those of the pampa group had shorter bills, and lineages that have been isolated the longest shared fewer syllables and differed in spectral and temporal traits of a shared syllable. Coalescent simulations showed that fixation of song types has occurred faster than expected under neutrality but the null hypothesis that morphological divergence resulted from drift was not rejected. Conclusions Our phylogeographic analyses uncovered the presence of three Mesoamerican wedge-tailed sabrewing lineages, which diverged at different time scales. These results highlight the importance of the

  17. Adaptive phylogeography: functional divergence between haemoglobins derived from different glacial refugia in the bank vole

    Kotlík, Petr; Marková, Silvia; Vojtek, L.; Stratil, Antonín; Šlechta, Vlastimil; Hyršl, P.; Searle, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 281, č. 1786 (2014). ISSN 0962-8452 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600450901; GA ČR GAP506/11/1872 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : adaptation * antioxidative capacity * climate changes * cysteine * oxidative stress * redox Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 5.051, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.0021

  18. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H. James, II

    2015-03-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or ``chemistry space.'' Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  19. Nonmetric Skull Divergence in the Otter - Assessing Genetic Insulation of Populations

    Stubbe, M; Ansorge, H.

    1995-01-01

    The craniometric variation and non-metric skull divergence between populations of the otter Lutra lutra (Linné, 1758) were studied using more than 430 skulls from different regions of Eastern Germany. No direct regional differences in skull measurements could be established for this area. The comparison of the morphological variation by non-metric skull characters adduces not or unimportant differentiations for most regions. Otter populations with greater geographic distances have partly high...

  20. Antigenic and genetic characterization of a divergent African virus, Ikoma lyssavirus

    Horton, Daniel L.; Banyard, Ashley C.; Marston, Denise A.; Wise, Emma; Selden, David; Nunez, Alejandro; Hicks, Daniel; Lembo, Tiziana; Cleaveland, Sarah; Peel, Alison J.; Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Fooks, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, a novel lyssavirus (subsequently named Ikoma lyssavirus, IKOV) was detected in the brain of an African civet (Civettictis civetta) with clinical rabies in the Serengeti National Park of Tanzania. The degree of nucleotide divergence between the genome of IKOV and those of other lyssaviruses predicted antigenic distinction from, and lack of protection provided by, available rabies vaccines. In addition, the index case was considered likely to be an incidental spillover event, and there...

  1. Insulin-like signaling (IIS) responses to temperature, genetic background, and growth variation in garter snakes with divergent life histories.

    Reding, Dawn M; Addis, Elizabeth A; Palacios, Maria G; Schwartz, Tonia S; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2016-07-01

    The insulin/insulin-like signaling pathway (IIS) has been shown to mediate life history trade-offs in mammalian model organisms, but the function of this pathway in wild and non-mammalian organisms is understudied. Populations of western terrestrial garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) around Eagle Lake, California, have evolved variation in growth and maturation rates, mortality senescence rates, and annual reproductive output that partition into two ecotypes: "fast-living" and "slow-living". Thus, genes associated with the IIS network are good candidates for investigating the mechanisms underlying ecological divergence in this system. We reared neonates from each ecotype for 1.5years under two thermal treatments. We then used qPCR to compare mRNA expression levels in three tissue types (brain, liver, skeletal muscle) for four genes (igf1, igf2, igf1r, igf2r), and we used radioimmunoassay to measure plasma IGF-1 and IGF-2 protein levels. Our results show that, in contrast to most mammalian model systems, igf2 mRNA and protein levels exceed those of igf1 and suggest an important role for igf2 in postnatal growth in reptiles. Thermal rearing treatment and recent growth had greater impacts on IGF levels than genetic background (i.e., ecotype), and the two ecotypes responded similarly. This suggests that observed ecotypic differences in field measures of IGFs may more strongly reflect plastic responses in different environments than evolutionary divergence. Future analyses of additional components of the IIS pathway and sequence divergence between the ecotypes will further illuminate how environmental and genetic factors influence the endocrine system and its role in mediating life history trade-offs. PMID:27181752

  2. Assessment of genetic divergence among coffee genotypes by Ward-MLM procedure in association with mixed models.

    Rodrigues, W P; Vieira, H D; Teodoro, P E; Partelli, F L; Barbosa, D H S G

    2016-01-01

    Mixed linear models have been used for the analysis of the genetic diversity and provided further accurate results in crops such as eucalyptus, castor, and sugarcane. However, to date, research that combined this analysis with Ward-MLM procedure has not been reported. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to identify divergent coffee genotypes by Ward-MLM procedure, in association with the mixed-decision models. The experiment was initiated in February 2007, in the northwestern Rio de Janeiro State. The 25 evaluated genotypes were grown with a spacing of 2.5 x 0.8 m, in a randomized block design, with 5 replications, containing 8 plants each. The following agronomic traits were evaluated: plant height, stem diameter, plagiotropic branch number, and productivity. Four measurements were performed for each character from 2009 to 2012, between May and July. Data were analyzed using REML/BLUP analysis and Ward- MLM procedure. The Ward-MLM procedure in association with mixed linear models demonstrated the genetic variability among the studied coffee genotypes. We identified two groups of most divergent coffee genotypes, which can be combined by crossings and selections in order to obtain genotypes with high productivity and variability. PMID:27173347

  3. Divergence between phenotypic and genetic variation within populations of a common herb across Europe

    Villellas, Jesús; Berjano, Enrique Regina; Terrab, Anass; García González, María Begoña

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the pattern and causes of phenotypic and genetic variation within and among populations might help to understand life history variability in plants, and to predict their responses to changing environmental conditions. Here we compare phenotypic variation and genetic diversity of the widespread herb Plantago coronopus across Europe, and evaluate their relationship with environmental and geographical factors. Genetic diversity was estimated in 18 populations from molecular markers wit...

  4. Genetic divergence of rubber tree estimated by multivariate techniques and microsatellite markers

    Lígia Regina Lima Gouvêa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity of 60 Hevea genotypes, consisting of Asiatic, Amazonian, African and IAC clones, and pertaining to the genetic breeding program of the Agronomic Institute (IAC, Brazil, was estimated. Analyses were based on phenotypic multivariate parameters and microsatellites. Five agronomic descriptors were employed in multivariate procedures, such as Standard Euclidian Distance, Tocher clustering and principal component analysis. Genetic variability among the genotypes was estimated with 68 selected polymorphic SSRs, by way of Modified Rogers Genetic Distance and UPGMA clustering. Structure software in a Bayesian approach was used in discriminating among groups. Genetic diversity was estimated through Nei's statistics. The genotypes were clustered into 12 groups according to the Tocher method, while the molecular analysis identified six groups. In the phenotypic and microsatellite analyses, the Amazonian and IAC genotypes were distributed in several groups, whereas the Asiatic were in only a few. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.05 to 0.96. Both high total diversity (H T' = 0.58 and high gene differentiation (Gst' = 0.61 were observed, and indicated high genetic variation among the 60 genotypes, which may be useful for breeding programs. The analyzed agronomic parameters and SSRs markers were effective in assessing genetic diversity among Hevea genotypes, besides proving to be useful for characterizing genetic variability.

  5. Adaptive Genetic Algorithm for Sensor Coarse Signal Processing

    Xuan Huang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As with the development of computer technology and informatization, network technique, sensor technique and communication technology become three necessary components of information industry. As the core technique of sensor application, signal processing mainly determines the sensor performances. For this reason, study on signal processing mode is very important to sensors and the application of sensor network. In this paper, we introduce a new sensor coarse signal processing mode based on adaptive genetic algorithm. This algorithm selects crossover, mutation probability adaptively and compensates multiple operators commutatively to optimize the search process, so that we can obtain the global optimum solution. Based on the proposed algorithm, using auto-correlative characteristic parameter extraction method, it achieves smaller test error in sensor coarse signal processing mode of processing interference signal. We evaluate the proposed approach on a set of data. The experimental results show that, the proposed approach is able to improve the performance in different experimental setting

  6. Greenlandic Inuit show genetic signatures of diet and climate adaptation.

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Moltke, Ida; Grarup, Niels; Racimo, Fernando; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit E; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Gerbault, Pascale; Skotte, Line; Linneberg, Allan; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Jørgensen, Torben; Huerta-Sánchez, Emilia; Schmidt, Erik B; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Albrechtsen, Anders; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2015-09-18

    The indigenous people of Greenland, the Inuit, have lived for a long time in the extreme conditions of the Arctic, including low annual temperatures, and with a specialized diet rich in protein and fatty acids, particularly omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). A scan of Inuit genomes for signatures of adaptation revealed signals at several loci, with the strongest signal located in a cluster of fatty acid desaturases that determine PUFA levels. The selected alleles are associated with multiple metabolic and anthropometric phenotypes and have large effect sizes for weight and height, with the effect on height replicated in Europeans. By analyzing membrane lipids, we found that the selected alleles modulate fatty acid composition, which may affect the regulation of growth hormones. Thus, the Inuit have genetic and physiological adaptations to a diet rich in PUFAs. PMID:26383953

  7. A New Neuro-Fuzzy Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    ZHU Lili; ZHANG Huanchun; JING Yazhi

    2003-01-01

    Novel neuro-fuzzy techniques are used to dynamically control parameter settings of genetic algorithms (GAs). The benchmark routine is an adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) that uses a fuzzy knowledge-based system to control GA parameters. The self-learning ability of the cerebellar model ariculation controller(CMAC) neural network makes it possible for on-line learning the knowledge on GAs throughout the run. Automatically designing and tuning the fuzzy knowledge-base system, neurofuzzy techniques based on CMAC can find the optimized fuzzy system for AGA by the renhanced learning method. The Results from initial experiments show a Dynamic Parametric AGA system designed by the proposed automatic method and indicate the general applicability of the neuro-fuzzy AGA to a wide range of combinatorial optimization.

  8. Adaptive double chain quantum genetic algorithm for constrained optimization problems

    Kong Haipeng; Li Ni; Shen Yuzhong

    2015-01-01

    Optimization problems are often highly constrained and evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are effective methods to tackle this kind of problems. To further improve search efficiency and con-vergence rate of EAs, this paper presents an adaptive double chain quantum genetic algorithm (ADCQGA) for solving constrained optimization problems. ADCQGA makes use of double-individuals to represent solutions that are classified as feasible and infeasible solutions. Fitness (or evaluation) functions are defined for both types of solutions. Based on the fitness function, three types of step evolution (SE) are defined and utilized for judging evolutionary individuals. An adaptive rotation is proposed and used to facilitate updating individuals in different solutions. To further improve the search capability and convergence rate, ADCQGA utilizes an adaptive evolution process (AEP), adaptive mutation and replacement techniques. ADCQGA was first tested on a widely used benchmark function to illustrate the relationship between initial parameter values and the convergence rate/search capability. Then the proposed ADCQGA is successfully applied to solve other twelve benchmark functions and five well-known constrained engineering design problems. Multi-aircraft cooperative target allocation problem is a typical constrained optimization problem and requires efficient methods to tackle. Finally, ADCQGA is successfully applied to solving the target allocation problem.

  9. Genetic control of the environmental variance for birth weight in seven generations of a divergent selection experiment in mice.

    Formoso-Rafferty, N; Cervantes, I; Ibáñez-Escriche, N; Gutiérrez, J P

    2016-06-01

    Data from seven generations of a divergent selection experiment designed for environmental variability of birth weight were analysed to estimate genetic parameters and to explore signs of selection response. A total of 10 783 birth weight records from 638 females and 1127 litters in combination with 10 007 pedigree records were used. Each record of birth weight was assigned to the mother of the pup in a heteroscedastic model, and after seven generations of selection, evidence of success in the selection process was shown. A Bayesian analysis showed that success of the selection process started from the first generation for birth weight and from the second generation for its environmental variability. Genetic parameters were estimated across generations. However, only from the third generation onwards were the records useful to consider the results to be reliable. The results showed a consistent positive and low genetic correlation between the birth weight trait and its environmental variability, which could allow an independent selection process. This study has demonstrated that the genetic control of the birth weight environmental variability is possible in mice. Nevertheless, before the results are applied directly in farm animals, it would be worth confirming any other implications on other important traits, such as robustness, longevity and welfare. PMID:26150168

  10. Comparing Fifty Natural Languages and Twelve Genetic Languages Using Word Embedding Language Divergence (WELD) as a Quantitative Measure of Language Distance

    Asgari, Ehsaneddin; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new measure of distance between languages based on word embedding, called word embedding language divergence (WELD). WELD is defined as divergence between unified similarity distribution of words between languages. Using such a measure, we perform language comparison for fifty natural languages and twelve genetic languages. Our natural language dataset is a collection of sentence-aligned parallel corpora from bible translations for fifty languages spanning a variety of language...

  11. Imprints from genetic drift and mutation imply relative divergence times across marine transition zones in a Pan European small pelagic fish (Sprattus sprattus)

    Limborg, Morten; Hanel, R.; Debes, P.;

    2012-01-01

    Geographic distributions of most temperate marine fishes are affected by postglacial recolonisation events, which have left complex genetic imprints on populations of marine species. This study investigated population structure and demographic history of European sprat (Sprattus sprattus L.) by......’ southern distribution in the Mediterranean region. These results were interpreted to reflect more recent divergence times between northern populations in accordance with previous findings. This study demonstrates the usefulness of comparing inference from different markers and estimators of divergence for...

  12. Induced genetic divergence in some mutant lines of Brassica juncea L

    Multivariate analysis of divergence of mutant lines belonging to Varuna and BR-40 of Brassica-juncea L. led to their grouping in 6 and 5 clusters, respectively. Cluster I and IV had maximum mutants of Varuna while cluster III accommodated maximum mutants of BR-40. The distance was maximum between cluster V and VI in Varuna and between II and V in BR-40. Based on cluster means, the common major factors of differentiation in mutants of both the varieties remained plant height, secondary branches, siliquae/plant and seeds/siliqua. (author)

  13. Deep genetic structure and ecological divergence in a widespread human commensal toad

    Wogan, GOU; Stuart, BL; Iskandar, DT; McGuire, JA

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved. The Asian common toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus) is a human commensal species that occupies a wide variety of habitats across tropical Southeast Asia. We test the hypothesis that genetic variation in D. melanostictus is weakly associated with geography owing to natural and human-mediated dispersal facilitated by its commensal nature. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequenc...

  14. The population genomic landscape of human genetic structure, admixture history and local adaptation in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Deng, Lian; Hoh, Boon Peng; Lu, Dongsheng; Fu, Ruiqing; Phipps, Maude E; Li, Shilin; Nur-Shafawati, Ab Rajab; Hatin, Wan Isa; Ismail, Endom; Mokhtar, Siti Shuhada; Jin, Li; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Xu, Shuhua

    2014-09-01

    Peninsular Malaysia is a strategic region which might have played an important role in the initial peopling and subsequent human migrations in Asia. However, the genetic diversity and history of human populations--especially indigenous populations--inhabiting this area remain poorly understood. Here, we conducted a genome-wide study using over 900,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four major Malaysian ethnic groups (MEGs; Malay, Proto-Malay, Senoi and Negrito), and made comparisons of 17 world-wide populations. Our data revealed that Peninsular Malaysia has greater genetic diversity corresponding to its role as a contact zone of both early and recent human migrations in Asia. However, each single Orang Asli (indigenous) group was less diverse with a smaller effective population size (N(e)) than a European or an East Asian population, indicating a substantial isolation of some duration for these groups. All four MEGs were genetically more similar to Asian populations than to other continental groups, and the divergence time between MEGs and East Asian populations (12,000--6,000 years ago) was also much shorter than that between East Asians and Europeans. Thus, Malaysian Orang Asli groups, despite their significantly different features, may share a common origin with the other Asian groups. Nevertheless, we identified traces of recent gene flow from non-Asians to MEGs. Finally, natural selection signatures were detected in a batch of genes associated with immune response, human height, skin pigmentation, hair and facial morphology and blood pressure in MEGs. Notable examples include SYN3 which is associated with human height in all Orang Asli groups, a height-related gene (PNPT1) and two blood pressure-related genes (CDH13 and PAX5) in Negritos. We conclude that a long isolation period, subsequent gene flow and local adaptations have jointly shaped the genetic architectures of MEGs, and this study provides insight into the peopling and human migration

  15. Genetic differentiation and evolutionary adaptation in Cryptomeria japonica.

    Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Uchiyama, Kentaro; Moriguchi, Yoshinari; Kimura, Megumi K; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Ujino-Ihara, Tokuko

    2014-12-01

    Local adaptation of plant species is a central issue for survival during global climate change, especially for long-lived forest trees, with their lengthy regeneration time and spatially limited gene flow. Identification of loci and/or genomic regions associated with local adaptation is necessary for knowledge of both evolution and molecular breeding for climate change. Cryptomeria japonica is an important species for forestry in Japan; it has a broad natural distribution and can survive in a range of different environments. The genetic structure of 14 natural populations of this species was investigated using 3930 SNP markers. Populations on the Pacific Ocean side of Japan are clearly different from those on the Japan Sea side, as discussed in previous studies. Structure analysis and population network trees show that peripheral populations, including the most northerly and southerly ones, have unique features. We found that the genetic differentiation coefficient is low, FST = 0.05, although it must account for the presence of important genes associated with adaptation to specific environments. In total, 208 outlier loci were detected, of which 43 were associated with environmental variables. Four clumped regions of outlier loci were detected in the genome by linkage analysis. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was quite high in these clumps of outlier loci, which were found in linkage groups (LGs) 2, 7, 10, and 11, especially between populations of two varieties, and when interchromosomal LD was also detected. The LG7 region is characteristic of the Yakushima population, which is a large, isolated, peripheral population occupying a specific environment resulting from isolation combined with volcanic activity in the region. The detected LD may provide strong evidence for selection between varieties. PMID:25320072

  16. Genetic divergence among elite sugarcane clones (Saccharum officinarum L. based on cane yield and quality traits from Northern India

    Kumar R, Tyagi V

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic divergence among the twenty four sugarcane genotypes collected from various sugarcane research institutions of northern India were tested in a randomized complete block design with three replicates during the cropping seasons 2013 - 14. The assessment of the genetic diversity was based on the eighteen cane yield and quality characters. The results of the study indicated that, the genotypes were grouped into five clusters based on the genetic distance using Mahalanobis's statistics. Higher inter-cluster distance was recorded between cluster II and V (89.668 indicating high genetic diversity among these two clusters. Thus, exploitation of genotypes within these two clusters as parents for crossing could produce good sugarcane segregants. The lowest intra cluster distance was reported in the cluster III (14.897 revealed that clones are identical and can not to be used as parents in crossing that results hybrid not desirable for the characters studied. A critical analysis of cluster means for different traits indicated that cluster I was desirable for cane yield, CCS (t/ha, single cane weight, stalk diameter, germination (%, cluster II was better for juice extraction percentage, cluster III for better juice purity percent, brix (%, sucrose (% and CCS (% for 12 months and cluster V was the best source for NMC (000/ha, stalk length with other good cane and sugar yield traits. The average D2 values among clones ranged from 29.998 (CoH 08262 to 69.791 (CoPb 09214. The maximum genetic distance was noted between clone CoPb 09214 and Co 10039 (97.842 which was followed by clone CoPb 09214 & Co 10036 (96.609, CoPb 09214 & CoS 8436 (92.964 and clone CoH 09264 & Co 10036 (90.091. It is suggested that genotypes with high index for specific characters that fall into different clusters could be intercrossed to generate good number

  17. Morphological Characterization and Assessment of Genetic Variability, Character Association, and Divergence in Soybean Mutants

    M. A. Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is important for crop improvement. An experiment was conducted during 2011 to study genetic variability, character association, and genetic diversity among 27 soybean mutants and four mother genotypes. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the mutants and mothers for nine morphological traits. Eighteen mutants performed superiorly to their mothers in respect to seed yield and some morphological traits including yield attributes. Narrow differences between phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation (PCV and GCV for most of the characters revealed less environmental influence on their expression. High values of heritability and genetic advance with high GCV for branch number, plant height, pod number, and seed weight can be considered as favorable attributes for soybean improvement through phenotypic selection and high expected genetic gain can be achieved. Pod and seed number and maturity period appeared to be the first order traits for higher yield and priority should be given in selection due to their strong associations and high magnitudes of direct effects on yield. Cluster analysis grouped 31 genotypes into five groups at the coefficient value of 235. The mutants/genotypes from cluster I and cluster II could be used for hybridization program with the mutants of clusters IV and V in order to develop high yielding mutant-derived soybean varieties for further improvement.

  18. Genetic divergence in dolichos bean (Dolichos lablab l. var. typicus prain genotypes for yield and yield contributing traits

    V. Chaitanya1, R.V.S.K Reddy2, S.R Pandravada3 and M. Sujatha4

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mahalanobis D2 statistics was used to study the genetic divergence for 19 characters among 48 genotypes of Indian bean. Genotypes were grouped in to eight clusters on the basis of relative magnitude of D2 values. The highest number of genotypes (14 appeared in cluster III. The maximum inter cluster distance was observed between cluster IV and cluster VI followed by cluster IV and VIII. The minimum inter cluster distance was observed between cluster I and cluster IV. Maximum intra cluster distance was in cluster V followed by cluster III. The mean value for most of the traits was highest in cluster VIII. Among the yield contributing characters, the maximum contribution towards divergence was made by protein content followed by number of flowers per inflorescence, pod length and number of pods per plant. Hence, hybridization between cluster IV (NSJ-87-2 and VI (NSJ-87-1/A followed by cluster IV (NSF 87-2 and VIII (ARKA JAY could be utilized for getting the superior recombinants or transgress segregants in segregating generations.

  19. Genetic variability and divergence analyses in Jatropha curcas based on floral and yield traits

    Maurya Ramanuj; Verma Saurabh; Gupta Astha; Singh Bajrang; Yadav Hemant Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variability of 80 accessions of Jatropha curcas showed that oil content varied between 20.8-36.1% (X=26.2±0.38). Thirty seven accessions showed seed weight/plant above average mean value (180.2g) and 26 accessions showed oil content above average mean (26.2%). The hierarchical clustering grouped all the accessions into 4 clusters. Clustering showed that majority of accessions i.e. 56 (70%) were genetically close to each other and grouped in two clus...

  20. Where sociality and relatedness diverge: the genetic basis for hierarchical social organization in African elephants

    Wittemyer, George; Okello, John B. A.; Rasmussen, Henrik B.;

    2009-01-01

    , carrying the same mtDNA control region haplotype, while matrilocality among fourth-tier groups was slightly less than expected at random. Comparison of results to those from a less disturbed population suggests that human depredation, leading to social disruption, altered the genetic underpinning of social...

  1. Genetic variability and divergence analyses in Jatropha curcas based on floral and yield traits

    Maurya Ramanuj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variability of 80 accessions of Jatropha curcas showed that oil content varied between 20.8-36.1% (X=26.2±0.38. Thirty seven accessions showed seed weight/plant above average mean value (180.2g and 26 accessions showed oil content above average mean (26.2%. The hierarchical clustering grouped all the accessions into 4 clusters. Clustering showed that majority of accessions i.e. 56 (70% were genetically close to each other and grouped in two clusters. The maximum intra cluster distance was recorded in cluster IV (30.15. The inter cluster distance varied from 47.59 (between cluster I and cluster II to 211.27 (between cluster III and cluster I. The cluster III showed maximum genetic distance with cluster I, followed by cluster IV and cluster II suggesting comparatively wider genetic diversity among them. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA showed that first four principal components (PCs accounted for more than 93% of the total variation. The first principal components accounted for 42.5% of the total variation mainly due to seed length, seed width, seed weight/plant and number of seeds/plant which had maximum and positive weight on this component. Oil content had negative weight on PC1. Thus, PC1 related to the accessions with thick seeds, moderate to high seed yielder with low oil content.

  2. The effects of medieval dams on genetic divergence and demographic history in brown trout populations

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Limborg, Morten; Ferchaud, A.-L.;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Habitat fragmentation has accelerated within the last century, but may have been ongoing over longer time scales. We analyzed the timing and genetic consequences of fragmentation in two isolated lake-dwelling brown trout populations. They are from the same river system (the Gudenå River...

  3. Research on Grid Resources Schedule Based on an Adaptive Distribute Parallel Genetic Algorithm

    Guangyuan Liu; Jingjun Zhang; Sen Su

    2011-01-01

    In this paper an improved adaptive parallel genetic algorithm is proposed to solve problems of grid resources distribution and matching, comparing with the traditional genetic algorithms, a new adaptive selection operator is introduced, which can prevent the premature convergence of genetic algorithm efficiently. Besides, in this paper, the migration strategy of the parallel genetic algorithm can prevent the population trapped in the local extreme. And a pc-cluster containing eight computers ...

  4. Multi-user cognitive radio network resource allocation based on the adaptive niche immune genetic algorithm

    Multi-user cognitive radio network resource allocation based on the adaptive niche immune genetic algorithm is proposed, and a fitness function is provided. Simulations are conducted using the adaptive niche immune genetic algorithm, the simulated annealing algorithm, the quantum genetic algorithm and the simple genetic algorithm, respectively. The results show that the adaptive niche immune genetic algorithm performs better than the other three algorithms in terms of the multi-user cognitive radio network resource allocation, and has quick convergence speed and strong global searching capability, which effectively reduces the system power consumption and bit error rate. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  5. Multi-user cognitive radio network resource allocation based on the adaptive niche immune genetic algorithm

    Zu Yun-Xiao; Zhou Jie

    2012-01-01

    Multi-user cognitive radio network resource allocation based on the adaptive niche immune genetic algorithm is proposed,and a fitness function is provided.Simulations are conducted using the adaptive niche immune genetic algorithm,the simulated annealing algorithm,the quantum genetic algorithm and the simple genetic algorithm,respectively.The results show that the adaptive niche immune genetic algorithm performs better than the other three algorithms in terms of the multi-user cognitive radio network resource allocation,and has quick convergence speed and strong global searching capability,which effectively reduces the system power consumption and bit error rate.

  6. Genetic divergence in popcorn genotypes using microsatellites in bulk genomic DNA

    Tereza Aparecida da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of 25 popcorn genotypes was estimated based on DNA bulks from 78 plants of eachvariety. The procedure involved 23 microsatellite loci distributed on 9 maize chromosomes. Clustering analysis according tothe Tocher method and the hierarchical clustering procedures (nearest neighbor, furthest neighbor and Unweighted Pair-Group Method Using Arithmetic Averages - UPGMA were performed. The cophenetic correlation coefficients indicated theUPGMA method as adequate to distinguish the varieties. The clusters suggested by the molecular analysis generally groupedgenotypes with the same genealogy together. The genetic dissimilarity of the varieties Argentina, Chile, PA-091 and PR-023was higher than of the others. Therefore, higher heterozygosity is expected in progenies from crosses with the other genotypes.

  7. Divergent genetic mechanisms underlie reversals to radial floral symmetry from diverse zygomorphic flowered ancestors

    Zhang, Wenheng; Steinmann, Victor W.; Nikolov, Lachezar; Kramer, Elena M.; Davis, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Malpighiaceae possess flowers with a unique bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy), which is a hypothesized adaptation associated with specialization on neotropical oil bee pollinators. Gene expression of two representatives of the CYC2 lineage of floral symmetry TCP genes, CYC2A and CYC2B, demarcate the adaxial (dorsal) region of the flower in the characteristic zygomorphic flowers of most Malpighiaceae. Several clades within the family, however, have independently lost their specialized oil bee po...

  8. Assessment of genetic divergence in tomato through agglomerative hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis

    For the improvement of qualitative and quantitative traits, existence of variability has prime importance in plant breeding. Data on different morphological and reproductive traits of 47 tomato genotypes were analyzed for correlation,agglomerative hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) to select genotypes and traits for future breeding program. Correlation analysis revealed significant positive association between yield and yield components like fruit diameter, single fruit weight and number of fruits plant-1. Principal component (PC) analysis depicted first three PCs with Eigen-value higher than 1 contributing 81.72% of total variability for different traits. The PC-I showed positive factor loadings for all the traits except number of fruits plant-1. The contribution of single fruit weight and fruit diameter was highest in PC-1. Cluster analysis grouped all genotypes into five divergent clusters. The genotypes in cluster-II and cluster-V exhibited uniform maturity and higher yield. The D2 statistics confirmed highest distance between cluster- III and cluster-V while maximum similarity was observed in cluster-II and cluster-III. It is therefore suggested that crosses between genotypes of cluster-II and cluster-V with those of cluster-I and cluster-III may exhibit heterosis in F1 for hybrid breeding and for selection of superior genotypes in succeeding generations for cross breeding programme. (author)

  9. Antigenic and genetic characterization of a divergent African virus, Ikoma lyssavirus.

    Horton, Daniel L; Banyard, Ashley C; Marston, Denise A; Wise, Emma; Selden, David; Nunez, Alejandro; Hicks, Daniel; Lembo, Tiziana; Cleaveland, Sarah; Peel, Alison J; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Rupprecht, Charles E; Fooks, Anthony R

    2014-05-01

    In 2009, a novel lyssavirus (subsequently named Ikoma lyssavirus, IKOV) was detected in the brain of an African civet (Civettictis civetta) with clinical rabies in the Serengeti National Park of Tanzania. The degree of nucleotide divergence between the genome of IKOV and those of other lyssaviruses predicted antigenic distinction from, and lack of protection provided by, available rabies vaccines. In addition, the index case was considered likely to be an incidental spillover event, and therefore the true reservoir of IKOV remained to be identified. The advent of sensitive molecular techniques has led to a rapid increase in the discovery of novel viruses. Detecting viral sequence alone, however, only allows for prediction of phenotypic characteristics and not their measurement. In the present study we describe the in vitro and in vivo characterization of IKOV, demonstrating that it is (1) pathogenic by peripheral inoculation in an animal model, (2) antigenically distinct from current rabies vaccine strains and (3) poorly neutralized by sera from humans and animals immunized against rabies. In a laboratory mouse model, no protection was elicited by a licensed rabies vaccine. We also investigated the role of bats as reservoirs of IKOV. We found no evidence for infection among 483 individuals of at least 13 bat species sampled across sites in the Serengeti and Southern Kenya. PMID:24496827

  10. Allopatric speciation in ticks: genetic and reproductive divergence between geographic strains of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus

    Jongejan Frans

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, economically impact cattle industry in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The morphological and genetic differences among R. microplus strains have been documented in the literature, suggesting that biogeographical and ecological separation may have resulted in boophilid ticks from America/Africa and those from Australia being different species. To test the hypothesis of the presence of different boophilid species, herein we performed a series of experiments to characterize the reproductive performance of crosses between R. microplus from Australia, Africa and America and the genetic diversity of strains from Australia, Asia, Africa and America. Results The results showed that the crosses between Australian and Argentinean or Mozambican strains of boophilid ticks are infertile while crosses between Argentinean and Mozambican strains are fertile. These results showed that tick strains from Africa (Mozambique and America (Argentina are the same species, while ticks from Australia may actually represent a separate species. The genetic analysis of mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA and microsatellite loci were not conclusive when taken separately, but provided evidence that Australian tick strains were genetically different from Asian, African and American strains. Conclusion The results reported herein support the hypothesis that at least two different species share the name R. microplus. These species could be redefined as R. microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (for American and African strains and probably the old R. australis Fuller, 1899 (for Australian strains, which needs to be redescribed. However, experiments with a larger number of tick strains from different geographic locations are needed to corroborate these results.

  11. Genetic divergence in popcorn genotypes using microsatellites in bulk genomic DNA

    Tereza Aparecida da Silva; Ronald José Barth Pinto; Carlos Alberto Scapim; Claudete Aparecida Mangolin; Maria de Fátima Pires da Silva Machado; Misael S N Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 25 popcorn genotypes was estimated based on DNA bulks from 78 plants of eachvariety. The procedure involved 23 microsatellite loci distributed on 9 maize chromosomes. Clustering analysis according tothe Tocher method and the hierarchical clustering procedures (nearest neighbor, furthest neighbor and Unweighted Pair-Group Method Using Arithmetic Averages - UPGMA) were performed. The cophenetic correlation coefficients indicated theUPGMA method as adequate to distinguis...

  12. Substantial genetic divergence between morphologically indistinguishable populations of Fasciola suggests the possibility of cryptic speciation.

    Walker, S M; Prodöhl, Paulo; Hoey, E.M.; Fairweather, Ian; Hanna, R.E.B.; Brennan, Gerard; Trudgett, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The liver flukes, Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, are considered to be sister species and between them present a major threat worldwide to livestock production. In this study sequence data have been employed from informative regions of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of over 200 morphologically F. hepatica-like or F. gigantica-like flukes from Europe, sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to assess genetic diversity. Evidence is presented for the existence of four well-separated c...

  13. Population genetic divergence and migration pattern of the Saunders's gull Larus saundersi

    JIANG Hong-Xing; HOU Yun-Qiu; QIAN Fa-Wen; CHU Guo-Zhong; Li, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Hui; Shan Kai; ZHENG Guang-Mei

    2008-01-01

    A molecular method was used to reveal population genetic structure and differentiation of Saunders’s Gull Larus saundersi. The mitochondrial control region (CR) sequence variation was assayed from 50 samples, that were collected from 3 current breeding sites in China: Yancheng of Jiangsu, Yellow River Delta of Shandong and Shuangtaihekou of Liaoning. . With the addition of sequences of 2 South Korean samples obtained from the published literature, a total of 49 variable sites were detected an...

  14. Ecological niche modeling of Bacillus anthracis on three continents: evidence for genetic-ecological divergence?

    Jocelyn C Mullins

    Full Text Available We modeled the ecological niche of a globally successful Bacillus anthracis sublineage in the United States, Italy and Kazakhstan to better understand the geographic distribution of anthrax and potential associations between regional populations and ecology. Country-specific ecological-niche models were developed and reciprocally transferred to the other countries to determine if pathogen presence could be accurately predicted on novel landscapes. Native models accurately predicted endemic areas within each country, but transferred models failed to predict known occurrences in the outside countries. While the effects of variable selection and limitations of the genetic data should be considered, results suggest differing ecological associations for the B. anthracis populations within each country and may reflect niche specialization within the sublineage. Our findings provide guidance for developing accurate ecological niche models for this pathogen; models should be developed regionally, on the native landscape, and with consideration to population genetics. Further genomic analysis will improve our understanding of the genetic-ecological dynamics of B. anthracis across these countries and may lead to more refined predictive models for surveillance and proactive vaccination programs. Further studies should evaluate the impact of variable selection of native and transferred models.

  15. Variation in sexual dimorphism and assortative mating do not predict genetic divergence in the sexually dimorphic Goodeid fish Girardinichthys multiradiatus

    C.MAC(I)AS GARCIA; G SMITH; C.GONZ(A)LEZ ZUARTH; J.A.GRAVES; M.G.RITCHIE

    2012-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism is often used as a proxy for the intensity of sexual selection in comparative studies of sexual selection and diversification.The Mexican Goodeinae are a group of livebearing freshwater fishes with large variation between species in sexual dimorphism in body shape.Previously we found an association between variation in morphological sexual dimorphism between species and the amount of gene flow within populations in the Goodeinae.Here we have examined if morphological differentiation within a single dimorphic species is related to assortative mating or gene flow between populations.In the Amarillo fish Girardinichthys multiradiatus studies have shown that exaggerated male fins are targets of female preferences.We find that populations of the species differ in the level of sexual dimorphism displayed due to faster evolution of differences in male than female morphology.However,this does not predict variation in assortative mating tests in the laboratory; in fact differences in male morphology are negatively correlated with assortative mating.Microsatellite markers reveal significant genetic differences between populations.However,gene flow is not predicted by either morphological differences or assortative mating.Rather,it demonstrates a pattern of isolation by distance with greater differentiation between watersheds.We discuss the caveats of predicting behavioural and genetic divergence from so-called proxies of sexual selection.

  16. Variation in sexual dimorphism and assortative mating do not predict genetic divergence in the sexually dimorphic Goodeid fish Girardinichthys multiradiatus

    C.MACÍAS GARCIA, G.SMITH, C.GONZÁLEZ ZUARTH, J.A. GRAVES,M.G.RITCHIE

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dimorphism is often used as a proxy for the intensity of sexual selection in comparative studies of sexual selection and diversification. The Mexican Goodeinae are a group of livebearing freshwater fishes with large variation between species in sexual dimorphism in body shape. Previously we found an association between variation in morphological sexual dimorphism between species and the amount of gene flow within populations in the Goodeinae. Here we have examined if morphological differentiation within a single dimorphic species is related to assortative mating or gene flow between populations. In the Amarillo fish Girardinichthys multiradiatus studies have shown that exaggerated male fins are targets of female preferences. We find that populations of the species differ in the level of sexual dimorphism displayed due to faster evolution of differences in male than female morphology. However, this does not predict variation in assortative mating tests in the laboratory; in fact differences in male morphology are negatively correlated with assortative mating. Microsatellite markers reveal significant genetic differences between populations. However, gene flow is not predicted by either morphological differences or assortative mating. Rather, it demonstrates a pattern of isolation by distance with greater differentiation between watersheds. We discuss the caveats of predicting behavioural and genetic divergence from so-called proxies of sexual selection [Current Zoology 58 (3: 437-449, 2012].

  17. An adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation and its global convergence property

    李枚毅; 蔡自兴; 孙国荣

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation, which combines adaptive probabilities of crossover and mutation was proposed. By means of homogeneous finite Markov chains, it is proved that adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation and genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation converge to the global optimum if they maintain the best solutions, and the convergence of adaptive genetic algorithms with adaptive probabilities of crossover and mutation was studied. The performances of the above algorithms in optimizing several unimodal and multimodal functions were compared. The results show that for multimodal functions the average convergence generation of the adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation is about 900 less than that of adaptive genetic algorithm with adaptive probabilities and genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation, and the adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation does not lead to premature convergence. It is also shown that the better balance between overcoming premature convergence and quickening convergence speed can be gotten.

  18. Divergência genética entre acessos de cenoura pertencentes a grupos varietais distintos utilizando caracteres morfológicos Genetic divergence among carrot accessions belonging to different varietal groups using morphologic characters

    Jairo Vidal Vieira

    2009-12-01

    divergence among genotypes is a tool to identify superior parents for heterotic hybrid production in breeding programs. However, little is known about the combining ability of tropical-adapted carrot germplasm. The objectives of the present work were: (1 to estimate genetic parameters, (2 to estimate the relative importance of set of four morphological traits in the discrimination of carrot accessions belonging to distinct varietal groups and, (3 to use this morphological dataset combined with clustering techniques to group distinct carrot accessions in order to identify the most promising hybrid combinations. Two experiments were carried out in the field, in the springs of 2000 and 2001, in random block design with two replications. Fifteen competitive plants per accession were evaluated at 90 days after planting for the following traits: leaf length (cm, root length (cm, root diameter (mm, and fresh root weight (g. Analysis of variance as well as dissimilarity analysis and relative importance of each morphological characteristic for accession discrimination were calculated for the traits under study. All four traits displayed either medium or high heritability values as well as ratio of genetic and environmental variation coefficients. The traits root length and root diameter presented the highest contribution to discriminate accessions. The 'Imperator' group was the most divergent one. Therefore, crosses involving this variety group with the remaining accessions would result in progenies with the highest heterotic effects. Tropical-adapted accessions belonging to the 'Brasília' group could be crossed with the majority of the accessions (except for the ones corresponding to the 'Chantenay' and 'Danvers' groups with a high probability of generating superior populations and/or heterotic gains.

  19. Estimating the genetic divergence and identification of three trichinella species by isoenzyme analysis

    Šnábel V.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Isoenzyme-based approach was applied to compare Trichinella spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis species. Among 13 enzyme systems examined, esterase (EST, malic enzyme (ME and phosphoglucomutase (PGM have been found as fully diagnostic, with no common allele in species studied. Adenosine deaminase (ADA, adenylate kinase (AK, hexokinase (HK, peptidase leucyl-alanine (PEP-C and fructose-bis-phosphatase (FBP have been capable of distinguishing the two species from resulting profiles. In addition, ADA, AK and PGM displayed the enzyme expression in the lowest amounts of muscle larvae in systems tested ( 100 larvae/100 μl of extracts. Based on allozyme data, T. pseudospiralis has been found as the most distinct species within the group of taxa. Only a subtle genetic variability was recorded for T. pseudospiralisin which solely phosphoglucomutase exhibited variant patterns. In addition to the study of reference isolates, T. spiralis from lowland fox in Eastern Slovakia has been evidenced by use of genetic markers. This finding has proved that T. britovi is not the exclusive species parasitizing in the sylvatic ecosystem of the Slovak region.

  20. Genetic divergence in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp] for yield components and seed quality parameters

    Brahmaiah M, Jhansi Rani K, Sunil N and Keshavulu K

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Forty cowpea genotypes were evaluated for 18 quantitative characters to estimate the genetic diversity existing among them by using Mahalanobis D2statistics. The genotypes were grouped into six clusters. The cluster strength varied from single genotype (Clusters III, IV and V to 25 genotypes (Cluster I. Clusteres IV and VI had high inter cluster distance. Clusters II, III and I had maximum 100-seed weight, number of seeds per pod and seed yield respectively. Cluster IV had maximum seedling vigour index, germination per cent, peduncle length, number of clusters per plant and number of primary branches. The genotypes from clusters IV and IV may be inter crossed to obtain high variation.

  1. Convergence and divergence of genetic and modular networks between diabetes and breast cancer

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Yingying; Yu, Yanan; Liu, Jun; Yuan, Ye; Zhao, Yijun; Li, Haixia; Wang, Jie; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and breast cancer (BC) can simultaneously occur in the same patient populations, but the molecular relationship between them remains unknown. In this study, we constructed genetic networks and used modularized analysis approaches to investigate the multi-dimensional characteristics of two diseases and one disease subtype. A text search engine (Agilent Literature Search 2.71) and MCODE software were applied to validate potential subnetworks and to divide the modules, respectively. A total of 793 DM-related genes, 386 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) genes and 873 BC-related genes were identified from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database. For DM and BC, a total of 99 overlapping genes, 9 modules, 29 biological processes and 7 pathways were identified. Meanwhile, for T2DM and BC, 56 overlapping genes, 5 modules, 20 biological processes and 12 pathways were identified. Based on the Gene Ontology functional enrichment analysis of the top 10 non-overlapping modules of the two diseases, 10 biological functions and 5 pathways overlapped between them. The glycosphingolipid and lysosome pathways verified molecular mechanisms of cell death related to both DM and BC. We also identified new biological functions of dopamine receptors and four signalling pathways (Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and long-term depression) related to both diseases; these warrant further investigation. Our results illustrate the landscape of the novel molecular substructures between DM and BC, which may support a new model for complex disease classification and rational therapies for multiple diseases. PMID:25752479

  2. Divergent Cumulative Cultural Evolution

    Marriott, Chris; Chebib, Jobran

    2016-01-01

    Divergent cumulative cultural evolution occurs when the cultural evolutionary trajectory diverges from the biological evolutionary trajectory. We consider the conditions under which divergent cumulative cultural evolution can occur. We hypothesize that two conditions are necessary. First that genetic and cultural information are stored separately in the agent. Second cultural information must be transferred horizontally between agents of different generations. We implement a model with these ...

  3. Divergência genética entre populações de cebola com base em marcadores morfológicos Genetic divergence in onion populations based on morphological markers

    Rosa Lía Barbieri

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Bulbos de 16 acessos do Banco Ativo de Germoplasma de Cebola (Allium cepa da Embrapa Clima Temperado foram avaliados quanto a peso, diâmetro, altura, coloração das túnicas externas, formato, uniformidade e conservação pós-colheita nas condições ambientais de Pelotas - RS, com o objetivo de estimar a divergência genética entre populações de cebola. Os dados obtidos foram submetidos a análises de agrupamento e de componentes principais. Foi evidenciada a presença de variabilidade genética para os caracteres considerados. Os acessos foram divididos em três grupos: o primeiro reuniu 13 acessos incluindo todas as variedades locais e as variedades comerciais com bulbos de coloração marrom; o segundo formado por uma variedade local de bulbos roxos; e o terceiro grupo reunindo as duas variedades comerciais de bulbos brancos. Os caracteres que mais contribuíram para a divergência entre os acessos foram a cor, o peso e a conservação pós-colheita.Bulbs of 16 acessions from Onion Gene Bank of Embrapa Clima Temperado were evaluated for weight, diameter, length, skin color, shape, uniformity, and post harvest conservation in Pelotas, RS, Brazil. The objective of this work was to estimate genetic divergence in onion populations. The obtained data were submitted to principal component and cluster analysis. There was genetic variability for evaluated traits. Acessions were separated in three clusters. One cluster had 13 populations including all landraces and cultivars with brown skin color; the second cluster had the landrace with violet bulbs; and the third cluster had the two cultivars with white bulbs. Skin color, weight and post harvest of bulbs showed the highest contribution to divergence among acessions.

  4. Use of genetically modified bacteria to modulate adaptive immunity.

    Bueno, Susan M; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2009-06-01

    Infectious diseases caused by virulent bacteria are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in developing countries. However, attenuated strains derived from pathogenic bacteria, such as Salmonella, are highly immunogenic and can be used as vaccines to promote immunity against parental pathogenic bacteria strains. Further, they can be genetically manipulated to either express foreign antigens or deliver exogenous DNA, in order to induce immunity against other pathogens or antigens. Contrarily, specific structural modifications in attenuated Salmonella have allowed the generation of strains that can be well tolerated by the immune system and reduce inflammatory responses. It is thought that those strains could be considered as vectors to promote specific immune tolerance for certain auto-antigens or allergens and reduce unwanted or self-reactive immune responses. In addition, some structural features of Salmonella can contribute to defining the nature and type of polarization of the adaptive immune response induced after immunization, which can be considered as a tool to modulate antigen-specific immunity. In this article we discuss recent advances in the understanding of immune system modulation by molecular components of bacteria and their exploitation for the rational induction of pathogen immunity or antigen-specific tolerance. PMID:19519362

  5. Genetic divergence among populations and accessions of the spineless peach palm from Pampa Hermosa landrace used in the heart-of-palm agribusiness in Brazil.

    Alves-Pereira, Alessandro; Clement, Charles R; Picanço-Rodrigues, Doriane

    2012-04-01

    Although originally domesticated for its fruit, exploitation of the peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) in the production of gourmet heart-of-palm has also become an important activity, hence the need for improved material for large-scale production, on employing the Pampa Hermosa landrace as the seed source. In this study 11 microsatellite markers were used to evaluate genetic divergence among 96 elite plants representing four populations of spineless peach palm from the above cited source. Genetic variability was high (H(T) = 0.82). The low levels of divergence [F(ST) (0.023), G(ST)' (0.005)] and the high number of migrants (Nm - 3.8 to 52.2) indicated significant interpopulation gene flow. Some of the plants presented high levels of genetic divergence, but the plants were grouped independently of their geographic origins. When combined with morpho-agronomic evaluation, the results found could substantially contribute towards mounting an efficient tool for obtaining superior genotypes with wide genetic variability for improvement programs. PMID:22888298

  6. Genetic divergence among populations and accessions of the spineless peach palm from Pampa Hermosa landrace used in the heart-of-palm agribusiness in Brazil

    Alessandro Alves-Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although originally domesticated for its fruit, exploitation of the peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth in the production of gourmet heart-of-palm has also become an important activity, hence the need for improved material for large-scale production, on employing the Pampa Hermosa landrace as the seed source. In this study 11 microsatellite markers were used to evaluate genetic divergence among 96 elite plants representing four populations of spineless peach palm from the above cited source. Genetic variability was high (H T = 0.82. The low levels of divergence [F ST (0.023, G ST' (0.005] and the high number of migrants (Nm -3.8 to 52.2 indicated significant interpopulation gene flow. Some of the plants presented high levels of genetic divergence, but the plants were grouped independently of their geographic origins. When combined with morpho-agronomic evaluation, the results found could substantially contribute towards mounting an efficient tool for obtaining superior genotypes with wide genetic variability for improvement programs.

  7. Divergência genética entre linhagens de matrizes de corte por meio de análise de agrupamento Genetic divergence in meat-type hens using cluster analysis

    Marcos Yamaki

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar a divergência genética de três linhagens de matrizes de corte do Programa de Melhoramento Genético da UFV. Foram avaliados dados de 270 aves, 90 de cada linhagem, para estudo das características dias para o primeiro ovo (DPPO, taxa de postura da 22ª à 56ª semana (TP, peso médio individual na 32ª (PMI1, 40ª (PMI2, 48ª (PMI3, 56ª (PMI4 e 64ª semanas de idade (PMI5; e peso médio do ovo, obtido pela média da pesagem de três ovos na 32ª (PMO1, 40ª (PMO2, 48ª (PMO3, 56ª (PMO4 e 64ª semanas de idade (PMO5. Para avaliar a divergência, foram utilizados dois métodos: hierárquico do vizinho mais próximo e otimização de Tocher. Pelo método hierárquico do vizinho mais próximo, utilizando-se a distância de Mahalanobis ao quadrado (D² como medida de dissimilaridade, formou-se um único grupo. Pelo método de otimização de Tocher, foram formados dois grupos, comprovando que os dois métodos foram discordantes na avaliação da divergência genética de linhas de aves de corte. As características que apresentaram as contribuições relativas mais expressivas para a divergência foram, respectivamente, PMO1 (25,71%, DDPO (21,76%, PMI4 (17,65% e PMI2 (13,04%.Genetic divergence among three lineages of meat-type hens from the Genetic Breeding Program of the Universidade Federal de Viçosa was evaluated for the following traits: days at first egg (DPPO, egg production rate (TP from 22nd to 56th week, body weight on the 32nd (PMI1, on 40th (PMI2, at 48th (PMI3, at 56th (PMI4 and at the 64th week (PMI5, egg weight on the 32nd (PMO1, on 40th (PMO2, at 48th (PMO3, at 56th (PMO4 and at the 64th week (PMO5. Traits were measured on 270 hens (90 of each lineage and two different methods were used to evaluate genetic divergence. For the single linkage hierarchical method, using the squared Mahalanobis distance (D² as the dissimilarity measure, only one single group was formed. When

  8. Divergência genética entre acessos de pimenta e pimentão utilizando técnicas multivariadas Genetic divergence between 'chili' and sweet pepper accessions using multivariate techniques

    Cláudia P Sudré; Rosana Rodrigues; Elaine M. Riva; Mina Karasawa; Antônio T. do Amaral Júnior

    2005-01-01

    Técnicas multivariadas foram utilizadas para avaliar a divergência genética entre 56 acessos da coleção de germoplasma de Capsicum spp. da UENF. Foram utilizados onze descritores quantitativos propostos pelo International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, em um experimento conduzido em condições de campo, em Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ), no delineamento de blocos ao acaso com três repetições e 10 plantas por parcela. A distância generalizada de Mahalanobis (D²) foi utilizada como medida de dis...

  9. Assessing genetic divergence in interspecific hybrids of Aechmea gomosepala and A. recurvata var. recurvata using inflorescence characteristics and sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    Zhang, F; Ge, Y Y; Wang, W Y; Shen, X L; Yu, X Y

    2012-01-01

    Conventional hybridization and selection techniques have aided the development of new ornamental crop cultivars. However, little information is available on the genetic divergence of bromeliad hybrids. In the present study, we investigated the genetic variability in interspecific hybrids of Aechmea gomosepala and A. recurvata var. recurvata using inflorescence characteristics and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. The morphological analysis showed that the putative hybrids were intermediate between both parental species with respect to inflorescence characteristics. The 16 SRAP primer combinations yield 265 bands, among which 154 (57.72%) were polymorphic. The genetic similarity was an average of 0.59 and ranged from 0.21 to 0.87, indicating moderate genetic divergence among the hybrids. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA)-based cluster analysis distinguished the hybrids from their parents with a genetic distance coefficient of 0.54. The cophenetic correlation was 0.93, indicating a good fit between the dendrogram and the original distance matrix. The two-dimensional plot from the principal coordinate analysis showed that the hybrids were intermediately dispersed between both parents, corresponding to the results of the UPGMA cluster and the morphological analysis. These results suggest that SRAP markers could help to identify breeders, characterize F(1) hybrids of bromeliads at an early stage, and expedite genetic improvement of bromeliad cultivars. PMID:23079994

  10. Divergência genética entre genótipos de pimenta com base em caracteres morfo-agrônomicos Genetic divergence among sub-samples of pepper based on morpho-agronomic characters

    Luis Felipe V Ferrão

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O gênero Capsicum compreende um grupo altamente diversificado de pimentas e pimentões constituído por grande número de espécies. A caracterização dos materiais existentes quanto à divergência genética torna-se de importância fundamental visando trabalhos de melhoramento. Técnicas multivariadas foram utilizadas para avaliar a divergência genética entre 34 subamostras da coleção de germoplasma de Capsicum baccatum da Universidade Federal de Viçosa. Foram utilizados cinco descritores quantitativos propostos pelo International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, em um experimento conduzido em condições de campo, em Viçosa-MG, no delineamento de blocos ao acaso. A divergência genética entre os tratamentos foi determinada pelas técnicas multivariadas, baseadas na análise de agrupamento e de variáveis canônicas. As variáveis analisadas foram matéria fresca do fruto, comprimento do fruto, espessura do pericarpo, número de sementes por frutos e teor de sólidos solúveis. Houve diferença significativa entre as subamostras para todos os descritores avaliados. Observou-se concordância entre as técnicas multivariadas utilizadas e foi possível separar as subamostras em cinco grupos distintos. As subamostras BGH 1739 e BGH 1646 se destacaram apresentando bom potencial para uso em programas de melhoramento, visando à obtenção de bons materiais para consumo in natura ou para industrialização.The genus Capsicum comprises a varied group of hot and sweet peppers with a large number of species. The characterization of materials for genetic divergence becomes of paramount importance for breeding programs. Multivariate techniques were used to evaluated the genetic divergence among 34 sub-samples of Capsicum baccatum peppers from the Horticultural Germplasm Bank from the Federal University of Viçosa. Five quantitative descriptors proposed by International Plant Genetic Resources Institute were utilized in a field experiment