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Sample records for adapter protein tsad

  1. Protein Adaptations in Archaeal Extremophiles

    Reed, Christopher J; Hunter Lewis; Eric Trejo; Vern Winston; Caryn Evilia

    2013-01-01

    Extremophiles, especially those in Archaea, have a myriad of adaptations that keep their cellular proteins stable and active under the extreme conditions in which they live. Rather than having one basic set of adaptations that works for all environments, Archaea have evolved separate protein features that are customized for each environment. We categorized the Archaea into three general groups to describe what is known about their protein adaptations: thermophilic, psychrophilic, and halophil...

  2. Protein Adaptations in Archaeal Extremophiles

    Christopher J. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extremophiles, especially those in Archaea, have a myriad of adaptations that keep their cellular proteins stable and active under the extreme conditions in which they live. Rather than having one basic set of adaptations that works for all environments, Archaea have evolved separate protein features that are customized for each environment. We categorized the Archaea into three general groups to describe what is known about their protein adaptations: thermophilic, psychrophilic, and halophilic. Thermophilic proteins tend to have a prominent hydrophobic core and increased electrostatic interactions to maintain activity at high temperatures. Psychrophilic proteins have a reduced hydrophobic core and a less charged protein surface to maintain flexibility and activity under cold temperatures. Halophilic proteins are characterized by increased negative surface charge due to increased acidic amino acid content and peptide insertions, which compensates for the extreme ionic conditions. While acidophiles, alkaliphiles, and piezophiles are their own class of Archaea, their protein adaptations toward pH and pressure are less discernible. By understanding the protein adaptations used by archaeal extremophiles, we hope to be able to engineer and utilize proteins for industrial, environmental, and biotechnological applications where function in extreme conditions is required for activity.

  3. Pervasive Adaptive Evolution in Primate Seminal Proteins.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Seminal fluid proteins show striking effects on reproduction, involving manipulation of female behavior and physiology, mechanisms of sperm competition, and pathogen defense. Strong adaptive pressures are expected for such manifestations of sexual selection and host defense, but the extent of positive selection in seminal fluid proteins from divergent taxa is unknown. We identified adaptive evolution in primate seminal proteins using genomic resources in a tissue-specific study. We found extensive signatures of positive selection when comparing 161 human seminal fluid proteins and 2,858 prostate-expressed genes to those in chimpanzee. Seven of eight outstanding genes yielded statistically significant evidence of positive selection when analyzed in divergent primates. Functional clues were gained through divergent analysis, including several cases of species-specific loss of function in copulatory plug genes, and statistically significant spatial clustering of positively selected sites near the active site of kallikrein 2. This study reveals previously unidentified positive selection in seven primate seminal proteins, and when considered with findings in Drosophila, indicates that extensive positive selection is found in seminal fluid across divergent taxonomic groups.

  4. Evidence for Pervasive Adaptive Protein Evolution in Wild Mice

    Halligan, D.; Oliver, F.; Eyre-Walker, A.; Harr, B; Keightley, P

    2010-01-01

    The relative contributions of neutral and adaptive substitutions to molecular evolution has been one of the most controversial issues in evolutionary biology for more than 40 years. The analysis of within-species nucleotide polymorphism and between-species divergence data supports a widespread role for adaptive protein evolution in certain taxa. For example, estimates of the proportion of adaptive amino acid substitutions (alpha) are 50% or more in enteric bacteria and Drosophila. In contrast...

  5. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    2014-01-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coa

  6. Plant NBS-LRR proteins: adaptable guards

    McHale, Leah; Tan, Xiaoping; Koehl, Patrice; Michelmore, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    The majority of disease resistance genes in plants encode nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins. This large family is encoded by hundreds of diverse genes per genome and can be subdivided into the functionally distinct TIR-domain-containing (TNL) and CC-domain-containing (CNL) subfamilies. Their precise role in recognition is unknown; however, they are thought to monitor the status of plant proteins that are targeted by pathogen effectors.

  7. Adaptation in protein fitness landscapes is facilitated by indirect paths.

    Wu, N.; Dai, L.; Olson, CA; Lloyd-Smith, JO; Sun, R

    2016-01-01

    The structure of fitness landscapes is critical for understanding adaptive protein evolution. Previous empirical studies on fitness landscapes were confined to either the neighborhood around the wild type sequence, involving mostly single and double mutants, or a combinatorially complete subgraph involving only two amino acids at each site. In reality, the dimensionality of protein sequence space is higher (20(L)) and there may be higher-order interactions among more than two sites. Here we e...

  8. Adaptation in protein fitness landscapes is facilitated by indirect paths

    Wu, Nicholas C; Dai, Lei; Olson, C Anders; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Sun, Ren

    2016-01-01

    The structure of fitness landscapes is critical for understanding adaptive protein evolution. Previous empirical studies on fitness landscapes were confined to either the neighborhood around the wild type sequence, involving mostly single and double mutants, or a combinatorially complete subgraph involving only two amino acids at each site. In reality, the dimensionality of protein sequence space is higher (20L) and there may be higher-order interactions among more than two sites. Here we experimentally characterized the fitness landscape of four sites in protein GB1, containing 204 = 160,000 variants. We found that while reciprocal sign epistasis blocked many direct paths of adaptation, such evolutionary traps could be circumvented by indirect paths through genotype space involving gain and subsequent loss of mutations. These indirect paths alleviate the constraint on adaptive protein evolution, suggesting that the heretofore neglected dimensions of sequence space may change our views on how proteins evolve. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16965.001 PMID:27391790

  9. Protein and ligand adaptation in a retinoic acid binding protein.

    Pattanayek, R.; Newcomer, M E

    1999-01-01

    A retinoic acid binding protein isolated from the lumen of the rat epididymis (ERABP) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily. ERABP binds both the all-trans and 9-cis isomers of retinoic acid, as well as the synthetic retinoid (E)-4-[2-(5,6,7,8)-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2 napthalenyl-1 propenyl]-benzoic acid (TTNPB), a structural analog of all-trans retinoic acid. The structure of ERABP with a mixture of all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid has previously been reported. To elucidate any ...

  10. Role of conservative mutations in protein multi-property adaptation.

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Delgado-Delgado, Asuncion; Fernandez, Julio M; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2010-07-15

    Protein physicochemical properties must undergo complex changes during evolution, as a response to modifications in the organism environment, the result of the proteins taking up new roles or because of the need to cope with the evolution of molecular interacting partners. Recent work has emphasized the role of stability and stability-function trade-offs in these protein adaptation processes. In the present study, on the other hand, we report that combinations of a few conservative, high-frequency-of-fixation mutations in the thioredoxin molecule lead to largely independent changes in both stability and the diversity of catalytic mechanisms, as revealed by single-molecule atomic force spectroscopy. Furthermore, the changes found are evolutionarily significant, as they combine typically hyperthermophilic stability enhancements with modulations in function that span the ranges defined by the quite different catalytic patterns of thioredoxins from bacterial and eukaryotic origin. These results suggest that evolutionary protein adaptation may use, in some cases at least, the potential of conservative mutations to originate a multiplicity of evolutionarily allowed mutational paths leading to a variety of protein modulation patterns. In addition the results support the feasibility of using evolutionary information to achieve protein multi-feature optimization, an important biotechnological goal. PMID:20446918

  11. Energy-protein requirements and adaptation during nutritional recovery

    Malnutrition is one of the world's most widely prevalent pathological conditions that affects people of all ages. The detrimental effects of malnutrition often become evident in children, in whom both physical and mental development are compromised. The present paper reports preliminary results of a project to asses the protein and energy requirements for nutritional recovery. It is also planned to investigate the adaptive mechanisms resulting from chronic low food intake in severely malnourished children. 12 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  12. Adaptive Simulated Annealing Based Protein Loop Modeling of Neurotoxins

    陈杰; 黄丽娜; 彭志红

    2003-01-01

    A loop modeling method, adaptive simulated annealing, for ab initio prediction of protein loop structures, as an optimization problem of searching the global minimum of a given energy function, is proposed. An interface-friendly toolbox-LoopModeller in Windows and Linux systems, VC++ and OpenGL environments is developed for analysis and visualization. Simulation results of three short-chain neurotoxins modeled by LoopModeller show that the method proposed is fast and efficient.

  13. Adaption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a heterologous protein

    Krogh, Astrid Mørkeberg; Beck, Vibe; Højlund Christensen, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    Production of the heterologous protein, bovine aprotinin, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was shown to affect the metabolism of the host cell to various extent depending on the strain genotype. Strains with different genotypes, industrial and laboroatory, respectively, were investigated. The maximal ...... result of the adaptation. Determination of the level of mRNA encoding aprotinin and the plasmid copy number pointed to different mechanisms responsible for the decline in aprotinin yield in the different strains. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  14. Adaptive evolution of centromere proteins in plants and animals

    Henikoff Steven

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromeres represent the last frontiers of plant and animal genomics. Although they perform a conserved function in chromosome segregation, centromeres are typically composed of repetitive satellite sequences that are rapidly evolving. The nucleosomes of centromeres are characterized by a special H3-like histone (CenH3, which evolves rapidly and adaptively in Drosophila and Arabidopsis. Most plant, animal and fungal centromeres also bind a large protein, centromere protein C (CENP-C, that is characterized by a single 24 amino-acid motif (CENPC motif. Results Whereas we find no evidence that mammalian CenH3 (CENP-A has been evolving adaptively, mammalian CENP-C proteins contain adaptively evolving regions that overlap with regions of DNA-binding activity. In plants we find that CENP-C proteins have complex duplicated regions, with conserved amino and carboxyl termini that are dissimilar in sequence to their counterparts in animals and fungi. Comparisons of Cenpc genes from Arabidopsis species and from grasses revealed multiple regions that are under positive selection, including duplicated exons in some grasses. In contrast to plants and animals, yeast CENP-C (Mif2p is under negative selection. Conclusions CENP-Cs in all plant and animal lineages examined have regions that are rapidly and adaptively evolving. To explain these remarkable evolutionary features for a single-copy gene that is needed at every mitosis, we propose that CENP-Cs, like some CenH3s, suppress meiotic drive of centromeres during female meiosis. This process can account for the rapid evolution and the complexity of centromeric DNA in plants and animals as compared to fungi.

  15. Adaptive evolution of centromere proteins in plants and animals

    Henikoff Steven; Bryson Terri D; Talbert Paul B

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Centromeres represent the last frontiers of plant and animal genomics. Although they perform a conserved function in chromosome segregation, centromeres are typically composed of repetitive satellite sequences that are rapidly evolving. The nucleosomes of centromeres are characterized by a special H3-like histone (CenH3), which evolves rapidly and adaptively in Drosophila and Arabidopsis. Most plant, animal and fungal centromeres also bind a large protein, centromere prote...

  16. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coarse-grained model via a 4-to-1 molecule coarse-grain mapping by using bundled water models, i.e., we restrict the relative movement of water molecules that are mapped to the same coarse-grained bead employing harmonic springs. The water molecules change their resolution from four molecules to one coarse-grained particle and vice versa adaptively on-the-fly. Having performed 15 ns long molecular dynamics simulations, we observe within our error bars no differences between structural (e.g., root-mean-squared deviation and fluctuations of backbone atoms, radius of gyration, the stability of native contacts and secondary structure, and the solvent accessible surface area) and dynamical properties of the protein in the adaptive resolution approach compared to the fully atomistically solvated model. Our multiscale model is compatible with the widely used MARTINI force field and will therefore significantly enhance the scope of biomolecular simulations

  17. Nck adapter proteins: functional versatility in T cells

    Janssen Ottmar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nck is a ubiquitously expressed adapter protein that is almost exclusively built of one SH2 domain and three SH3 domains. The two isoproteins of Nck are functionally redundant in many aspects and differ in only few amino acids that are mostly located in the linker regions between the interaction modules. Nck proteins connect receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases to the machinery of actin reorganisation. Thereby, Nck regulates activation-dependent processes during cell polarisation and migration and plays a crucial role in the signal transduction of a variety of receptors including for instance PDGF-, HGF-, VEGF- and Ephrin receptors. In most cases, the SH2 domain mediates binding to the phosphorylated receptor or associated phosphoproteins, while SH3 domain interactions lead to the formation of larger protein complexes. In T lymphocytes, Nck plays a pivotal role in the T cell receptor (TCR-induced reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of the immunological synapse. However, in this context, two different mechanisms and adapter complexes are discussed. In the first scenario, dependent on an activation-induced conformational change in the CD3ε subunits, a direct binding of Nck to components of the TCR/CD3 complex was shown. In the second scenario, Nck is recruited to the TCR complex via phosphorylated Slp76, another central constituent of the membrane proximal activation complex. Over the past years, a large number of putative Nck interactors have been identified in different cellular systems that point to diverse additional functions of the adapter protein, e.g. in the control of gene expression and proliferation.

  18. Metabolic adaptation in transplastomic plants massively accumulating recombinant proteins.

    Julia Bally

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant chloroplasts are endowed with an astonishing capacity to accumulate foreign proteins. However, knowledge about the impact on resident proteins of such high levels of recombinant protein accumulation is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used proteomics to characterize tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum plastid transformants massively accumulating a p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD or a green fluorescent protein (GFP. While under the conditions used no obvious modifications in plant phenotype could be observed, these proteins accumulated to even higher levels than ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, the most abundant protein on the planet. This accumulation occurred at the expense of a limited number of leaf proteins including Rubisco. In particular, enzymes involved in CO(2 metabolism such as nuclear-encoded plastidial Calvin cycle enzymes and mitochondrial glycine decarboxylase were found to adjust their accumulation level to these novel physiological conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results document how protein synthetic capacity is limited in plant cells. They may provide new avenues to evaluate possible bottlenecks in recombinant protein technology and to maintain plant fitness in future studies aiming at producing recombinant proteins of interest through chloroplast transformation.

  19. Effect of adaptation to ethanol on cytoplasmic and membrane protein profiles of Oenococcus oeni

    Silveira, da, Fabio Land; Baumgärtner, M.; Rombouts, F. M.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    The practical application of commercial malolactic starter cultures of Oenococcus oeni surviving direct inoculation in wine requires insight into mechanisms of ethanol toxicity and of acquired ethanol tolerance in this organism. Therefore, the site-specific location of proteins involved in ethanol adaptation, including cytoplasmic, membrane-associated, and integral membrane proteins, was investigated. Ethanol triggers alterations in protein patterns of O. oeni cells stressed with 12% ethanol ...

  20. Effect of Adaptation to Ethanol on Cytoplasmic and Membrane Protein Profiles of Oenococcus oeni

    2004-01-01

    The practical application of commercial malolactic starter cultures of Oenococcus oeni surviving direct inoculation in wine requires insight into mechanisms of ethanol toxicity and of acquired ethanol tolerance in this organism. Therefore, the site-specific location of proteins involved in ethanol adaptation, including cytoplasmic, membrane-associated, and integral membrane proteins, was investigated. Ethanol triggers alterations in protein patterns of O. oeni cells stressed with 12% ethanol ...

  1. Heat shock proteins and hypometabolism: adaptive strategy for proteome preservation

    Storey KB

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth B Storey, Janet M StoreyDepartments of Biology and Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, CanadaAbstract: To survive under harsh environmental conditions many organisms retreat into hypometabolic states where metabolic rate may be reduced by 80% or more and energy use is reprioritized to emphasize key functions that sustain viability and provide cytoprotection. ATP-expensive activities, such as gene expression, protein turnover (synthesis and degradation, and the cell cycle, are largely shut down. As a consequence, mechanisms that stabilize the existing cellular proteome can become critical for long-term survival. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are well-known for their actions as chaperones that act to fold new proteins or refold proteins that are damaged. Indeed, they are part of the “minimal stress proteome” that appears to be a ubiquitous response by all cells as they attempt, successfully or unsuccessfully, to deal with stress. The present review summarizes evidence that HSPs are also a conserved feature of natural animal hypometabolism including the phenomena of estivation, hibernation, diapause, cold-hardiness, anaerobiosis, and anhydrobiosis. That is, organisms that retreat into dormant or torpid states in anticipation that environmental conditions may become too difficult for normal life also integrate the use of HSPs to protect their proteome while hypometabolic. Multiple studies show a common upregulation of expression of hsp genes and/or HSP proteins prior to or during hypometabolism in organisms as diverse as ground squirrels, turtles, land snails, insects, and brine shrimp and in situations of both preprogrammed dormancies (eg, seasonal or life stage specific and opportunistic hypometabolism (eg, triggered by desiccation or lack of oxygen. Hence, HSPs are not just a “shock” response that attempts to rescue cells from damaging stress but are a key protective strategy that is an integral component of natural states of

  2. Adaptations of proteins to cellular and subcellular pH

    Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    Bioinformatics-based searches for correlations between subcellular localization and pI or charge distribution of proteins have failed to detect meaningful correlations. Recent work published in BMC Biology finds that a physicochemical metric of charge distribution correlates better with subcellular pH than does pI. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/7/69

  3. Symmetry-adapted digital modeling I. Axial symmetric proteins.

    Janner, A

    2016-05-01

    Considered are axial symmetric proteins exemplified by the octameric mitochondrial creatine kinase, the Pyr RNA-binding attenuation protein, the D-aminopeptidase and the cyclophilin A-cyclosporin complex, with tetragonal (422), trigonal (32), pentagonal (52) and pentagonal (52) point-group symmetry, respectively. One starts from the protein enclosing form, which is characterized by vertices at points of a lattice (the form lattice) whose dimension depends on the point group. This allows the indexing of Cα's at extreme radial positions. The indexing is extended to additional residues on the basis of a finer lattice, the digital modeling lattice Λ, which includes the form lattice as a sublattice. This leads to a coarse-grained description of the protein. In the crystallographic point-group case, the planar indices are obtained from a projection of atomic positions along the rotation axis, taken as the z axis. The planar indices of a Cα are then those of the nearest projected lattice point. In the non-crystallographic case, low indices are an additional requirement. The coarse-grained bead follows from the condition imposed on the residues selected to have a z coordinate within a band of value δ above and below the height of lattice points. The choice of δ permits a variation of the coarse-grained bead model. For example, the value δ = 0.5 leads to a fine-grained indexing of the full set of residues, whereas with δ = 0.25 one gets a coarse-grained model which includes only about half of these residues. Within this procedure, the indexing of the Cα only depends on the choice of the digital modeling lattice and not on the value of δ. The characteristics which distinguish the present approach from other coarse-grained models of proteins on lattices are summarized at the end. PMID:27126107

  4. Characterization of Adapter Protein NRBP as a Negative Regulator of T Cell Activation

    WANG Hui; LIN Zhi-xin; WU Jun

    2008-01-01

    Adapter proteins can regulate the gene transcriptions in disparate signaling pathway by interacting with multiple signaling molecules, including T cell activation signaling. Nuclear receptor binding protein (NRBP), a novel adapter protein, represents a small family of evolutionarily conserved proteins with homologs in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), Drosophila melanogaster (D.melanogaster), mouse and human. Here, we demonstrated that overexpression of NRBP in Jurkat TAg cells specifically impairs T cell receptor (TCR) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)/ionomycin-mediated signaling leading to nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) promoter activation. Furthermore, the N-terminal of NRBP is necessary for its regulation of NFAT activation. Finally, we showed that NRBP has minimal effect on both TCR- and PMA-induced CD69 up-regulation in Jurkat TAg cells, which suggests that NRBP may function downstream of protein kinase C (PKC)/Ras pathway.

  5. Adaptations of proteins to cellular and subcellular pH.

    Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    Bioinformatics-based searches for correlations between subcellular localization and pI or charge distribution of proteins have failed to detect meaningful correlations. Recent work published in BMC Biology finds that a physicochemical metric of charge distribution correlates better with subcellular pH than does pI. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/7/69. PMID:20017887

  6. Influence of Histidine-Containing Tags on the Biodistribution of ADAPT Scaffold Proteins.

    Lindbo, Sarah; Garousi, Javad; Åstrand, Mikael; Honarvar, Hadis; Orlova, Anna; Hober, Sophia; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-03-16

    Engineered scaffold proteins (ESP) are high-affinity binders that can be used as probes for radionuclide imaging. Histidine-containing tags enable both efficient purification of ESP and radiolabeling with (99m)Tc(CO)3. Earlier studies demonstrated that the use of a histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate (HE)3-tag instead of the commonly used hexahistidine (H6)-tag reduces hepatic uptake of radiolabeled ESP and short peptides. Here, we investigated the influence of histidine-containing tags on the biodistribution of a novel type of ESP, ADAPTs. A series of anti-HER2 ADAPT probes having H6- or (HE)3-tags in the N-termini were prepared. The constructs, (HE)3-ADAPT6 and H6-ADAPT6, were labeled with two different nuclides, (99m)Tc or (111)In. The labeling with (99m)Tc(CO)3 utilized the histidine-containing tags, while (111)In was attached through a maleimido derivative of DOTA conjugated to the N-terminus. For (111)In-labeled ADAPTs, the use of (HE)3 provided a significantly (p < 0.05) lower hepatic uptake at 1 h after injection, but there was no significant difference in hepatic uptake of (111)In-(HE)3-ADAPT6 and H6-ADAPT6 at later time points. Interestingly, in the case of (99m)Tc, (99m)Tc(CO)3-H6-ADAPT6 provided significantly (p < 0.05) lower uptake in a number of normal tissues and was more suitable as an imaging probe. Thus, the influence of histidine-containing tags on the biodistribution of the novel ADAPT scaffold proteins was different compared to its influence on other ESPs studied so far. Apparently, the effect of a histidine-containing tag on the biodistribution is highly dependent on the scaffold composition of the ESP. PMID:26781756

  7. Mammalian keratin associated proteins (KRTAPs) subgenomes: disentangling hair diversity and adaptation to terrestrial and aquatic environments

    Khan, Imran; Maldonado, Emanuel; Vasconcelos, Vítor; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    Background Adaptation of mammals to terrestrial life was facilitated by the unique vertebrate trait of body hair, which occurs in a range of morphological patterns. Keratin associated proteins (KRTAPs), the major structural hair shaft proteins, are largely responsible for hair variation. Results We exhaustively characterized the KRTAP gene family in 22 mammalian genomes, confirming the existence of 30 KRTAP subfamilies evolving at different rates with varying degrees of diversification and ho...

  8. In the light of directed evolution: Pathways of adaptive protein evolution

    Bloom, Jesse D; Arnold, Frances H.

    2009-01-01

    Directed evolution is a widely-used engineering strategy for improving the stabilities or biochemical functions of proteins by repeated rounds of mutation and selection. These experiments offer empirical lessons about how proteins evolve in the face of clearly-defined laboratory selection pressures. Directed evolution has revealed that single amino acid mutations can enhance properties such as catalytic activity or stability and that adaptation can often occur through pathways consisting of s...

  9. RUMEN MICROBE ADAPTATION TO RED CLOVER POLYPHENOL OXIDASE PROTEIN AND LIPID PROTECTION

    Introduction: Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce both proteolysis and lipolysis in incubated red clover (Lee et al. 2004). However it has not been determined whether rumen microbes can adapt to utilize PPO-protected protein and lipid. This study investigated whether rumen inoculum fro...

  10. Dynamics and adaptive benefits of protein domain emergence and arrangements during plant genome evolution.

    Kersting, Anna R; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Moore, Andrew D; Grath, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Plant genomes are generally very large, mostly paleopolyploid, and have numerous gene duplicates and complex genomic features such as repeats and transposable elements. Many of these features have been hypothesized to enable plants, which cannot easily escape environmental challenges, to rapidly adapt. Another mechanism, which has recently been well described as a major facilitator of rapid adaptation in bacteria, animals, and fungi but not yet for plants, is modular rearrangement of protein-coding genes. Due to the high precision of profile-based methods, rearrangements can be well captured at the protein level by characterizing the emergence, loss, and rearrangements of protein domains, their structural, functional, and evolutionary building blocks. Here, we study the dynamics of domain rearrangements and explore their adaptive benefit in 27 plant and 3 algal genomes. We use a phylogenomic approach by which we can explain the formation of 88% of all arrangements by single-step events, such as fusion, fission, and terminal loss of domains. We find many domains are lost along every lineage, but at least 500 domains are novel, that is, they are unique to green plants and emerged more or less recently. These novel domains duplicate and rearrange more readily within their genomes than ancient domains and are overproportionally involved in stress response and developmental innovations. Novel domains more often affect regulatory proteins and show a higher degree of structural disorder than ancient domains. Whereas a relatively large and well-conserved core set of single-domain proteins exists, long multi-domain arrangements tend to be species-specific. We find that duplicated genes are more often involved in rearrangements. Although fission events typically impact metabolic proteins, fusion events often create new signaling proteins essential for environmental sensing. Taken together, the high volatility of single domains and complex arrangements in plant genomes

  11. [Small heat shock proteins and adaptation to hypertermia in various Drosophila species].

    Shilova, V Iu; Garbuz, D G; Evgen'ev, M B; Zatsepina, O G

    2006-01-01

    Expression level and kinetics of accumulation of small heat shock proteins (21-27 kDa group) have been investigated in three Drosophila species differing significantly by temperature niche and thermosensitivity. It was shown that low-latitude thermotolerant species D. virilis exceeds the high-latitude thermosensitive closely-related species D. lummei as well as distant thermosensitive species D. melanogaster in terms of small heat shock proteins expression and accumulation after temperature elevation. The data obtained enable to postulate an important role of small heat shock proteins in organism basal thermotolerance and general adaptation to adverse conditions of environment. PMID:16637267

  12. Using maximum likelihood method to detect adaptive evolution of HCV envelope protein-coding genes

    ZHANG Wenjuan; ZHANG Yuan; ZHONG Yang

    2006-01-01

    Nonsynonymous-synonymous substitution rate ratio (dN/dS) is an important measure for evaluating selective pressure based on the protein-coding sequences. Maximum likelihood (ML) method with codon-substitution models is a powerful statistic tool for detecting amino acid sites under positive selection and adaptive evolution. We analyzed the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein-coding sequences from 18 general geno/ subtypes worldwide, and found 4 amino acid sites under positive selection. Since these sites are located in different immune epitopes, it is reasonable to anticipate that our study would have potential values in biomedicine. It also suggests that the ML method is an effective way to detect adaptive evolution in virus proteins with relatively high genetic diversity.

  13. Differential protein expression during colonic adaptation in ultra-short bowel rats

    Hai-Ping Jiang; Tao Chen; Guang-Rong Yan; Dan Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the proteins involved in colonic adaptation and molecular mechanisms of colonic adaptation in rats with ultra-short bowel syndrome (USBS). METHODS: Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: USBS group (10 rats) undergoing an approximately 90%-95% small bowel resection; sham-operation group (10 rats) undergoing small bowel transaction and anastomosis; and control group (ten normal rats). Colon morphology and differential protein expression was analyzed after rats were given postsurgical enteral nutrition for 21 d. Protein expression in the colonic mucosa was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) in all groups. Differential protein spots were detected by ImageMaster 2D Platinum software and were further analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flightmass spectrometric (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) analysis. RESULTS: The colonic mucosal thickness significantly increased in the USBS group compared with the control group (302.1 ± 16.9 μm vs 273.7 ± 16.0 μm, P 0.05). The height of colon plica markedly improved in USBS group compared with the control group (998.4 ± 81.2 μm vs 883.4 ± 39.0 μm, P 0.05). A total of 141 differential protein spots were found in the USBS group. Forty-nine of these spots were down-regulated while 92 protein spots were up-regulated by over 2-folds. There were 133 differential protein spots in USBS group. Thirty of these spots were down-regulated and 103 were upregulated. There were 47 common differential protein spots among the three groups, including 17 downregulated protein spots and 30 up-regulated spots. Among 47 differential spots, eight up-regulated proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. These proteins were previously reported to be involved in sugar and fat metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidation reduction, which are associated with colonic adaption. CONCLUSION: Eight proteins found in this study play important roles in colonic compensation

  14. Effects of protein conformation in docking: improved pose prediction through protein pocket adaptation

    Jain, Ajay N.

    2009-01-01

    Computational methods for docking ligands have been shown to be remarkably dependent on precise protein conformation, where acceptable results in pose prediction have been generally possible only in the artificial case of re-docking a ligand into a protein binding site whose conformation was determined in the presence of the same ligand (the “cognate” docking problem). In such cases, on well curated protein/ligand complexes, accurate dockings can be returned as top-scoring over 75% of the tim...

  15. Adapt

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  16. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  17. Massively parallel sampling of lattice proteins reveals foundations of thermal adaptation

    Venev, Sergey V.; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.

    2015-08-01

    Evolution of proteins in bacteria and archaea living in different conditions leads to significant correlations between amino acid usage and environmental temperature. The origins of these correlations are poorly understood, and an important question of protein theory, physics-based prediction of types of amino acids overrepresented in highly thermostable proteins, remains largely unsolved. Here, we extend the random energy model of protein folding by weighting the interaction energies of amino acids by their frequencies in protein sequences and predict the energy gap of proteins designed to fold well at elevated temperatures. To test the model, we present a novel scalable algorithm for simultaneous energy calculation for many sequences in many structures, targeting massively parallel computing architectures such as graphics processing unit. The energy calculation is performed by multiplying two matrices, one representing the complete set of sequences, and the other describing the contact maps of all structural templates. An implementation of the algorithm for the CUDA platform is available at http://www.github.com/kzeldovich/galeprot and calculates protein folding energies over 250 times faster than a single central processing unit. Analysis of amino acid usage in 64-mer cubic lattice proteins designed to fold well at different temperatures demonstrates an excellent agreement between theoretical and simulated values of energy gap. The theoretical predictions of temperature trends of amino acid frequencies are significantly correlated with bioinformatics data on 191 bacteria and archaea, and highlight protein folding constraints as a fundamental selection pressure during thermal adaptation in biological evolution.

  18. Shared and Unique Proteins in Human, Mouse and Rat Saliva Proteomes: Footprints of Functional Adaptation

    Robert C. Karn

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of our study was to compare the proteins found in the saliva proteomes of three mammals: human, mouse and rat. Our first objective was to compare two human proteomes with very different analysis depths. The 89 shared proteins in this comparison apparently represent a core of highly-expressed human salivary proteins. Of the proteins unique to each proteome, one-half to 2/3 lack signal peptides and probably are contaminants instead of less highly-represented salivary proteins. We recently published the first rodent saliva proteomes with saliva collected from the genome mouse (C57BL/6 and the genome rat (BN/SsNHsd/Mcwi. Our second objective was to compare the proteins in the human proteome with those we identified in the genome mouse and rat to determine those common to all three mammals, as well as the specialized rodent subset. We also identified proteins unique to each of the three mammals, because differences in the secreted protein constitutions can provide clues to differences in the evolutionary adaptation of the secretions in the three different mammals.

  19. Comparative Proteomics of Mouse Tears and Saliva: Evidence from Large Protein Families for Functional Adaptation

    Robert C. Karn

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We produced a tear proteome of the genome mouse, C57BL/6, that contained 139 different protein identifications: 110 from a two-dimensional (2D gel with subsequent trypsin digestion, 19 from a one-dimensional (1D gel with subsequent trypsin digestion and ten from a 1D gel with subsequent Asp-N digestion. We compared this tear proteome with a C57BL/6 mouse saliva proteome produced previously. Sixteen of the 139 tear proteins are shared between the two proteomes, including six proteins that combat microbial growth. Among the 123 other tear proteins, were members of four large protein families that have no counterparts in humans: Androgen-binding proteins (ABPs with different members expressed in the two proteomes, Exocrine secreted peptides (ESPs expressed exclusively in the tear proteome, major urinary proteins (MUPs expressed in one or both proteomes and the mouse-specific Kallikreins (subfamily b KLKs expressed exclusively in the saliva proteome. All four families have members with suggested roles in mouse communication, which may influence some aspect of reproductive behavior. We discuss this in the context of functional adaptation involving tear and saliva proteins in the secretions of mouse lacrimal and salivary glands, respectively.

  20. Adaptive protein evolution grants organismal fitness by improving catalysis and flexibility

    Tomatis, Pablo E.; Fabiane, Stella M.; Simona, Fabio; Carloni, Paolo; Sutton, Brian J.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2008-01-01

    Protein evolution is crucial for organismal adaptation and fitness. This process takes place by shaping a given 3-dimensional fold for its particular biochemical function within the metabolic requirements and constraints of the environment. The complex interplay between sequence, structure, functionality, and stability that gives rise to a particular phenotype has limited the identification of traits acquired through evolution. This is further complicated by the fact that mutations are pleiot...

  1. An adaptive bin framework search method for a beta-sheet protein homopolymer model

    Hoos Holger H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The problem of protein structure prediction consists of predicting the functional or native structure of a protein given its linear sequence of amino acids. This problem has played a prominent role in the fields of biomolecular physics and algorithm design for over 50 years. Additionally, its importance increases continually as a result of an exponential growth over time in the number of known protein sequences in contrast to a linear increase in the number of determined structures. Our work focuses on the problem of searching an exponentially large space of possible conformations as efficiently as possible, with the goal of finding a global optimum with respect to a given energy function. This problem plays an important role in the analysis of systems with complex search landscapes, and particularly in the context of ab initio protein structure prediction. Results In this work, we introduce a novel approach for solving this conformation search problem based on the use of a bin framework for adaptively storing and retrieving promising locally optimal solutions. Our approach provides a rich and general framework within which a broad range of adaptive or reactive search strategies can be realized. Here, we introduce adaptive mechanisms for choosing which conformations should be stored, based on the set of conformations already stored in memory, and for biasing choices when retrieving conformations from memory in order to overcome search stagnation. Conclusion We show that our bin framework combined with a widely used optimization method, Monte Carlo search, achieves significantly better performance than state-of-the-art generalized ensemble methods for a well-known protein-like homopolymer model on the face-centered cubic lattice.

  2. Protein supplementation augments the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to resistance-type exercise training: a meta-analysis

    Cermak, N.M.; Res, P.T.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Saris, W.H.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein ingestion after a single bout of resistance-type exercise stimulates net muscle protein accretion during acute postexercise recovery. Consequently, it is generally accepted that protein supplementation is required to maximize the adaptive response of the skeletal muscle to prolon

  3. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-01-26

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet\\'s performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis.

  4. The limits of adaptation of functional protein synthesis to sever undernutrition

    Our goal is to determine how the stress of infections alters the adaptation to reduced food intake in children. We think that an important element is the need for hepatic synthesis of rapidly turning over acute-phase proteins, a critical factor in overall maintenance of host defenses. When the child's prior intake has been adequate, even though growth may temporarily cease, the presence of adequate amino acid stores in tissues allows the hepatic response to stress to be maintained at the same time as an adequate rate of synthesis of nutrient transport proteins. However, when the immune system is activated in a children whose nutrition is already suboptimal the ability of the liver to synthesize nutrient transport proteins is compromised thereby further impeding nutrient utilization. We will use stable isotope tracer methodology to determine the effects of severe protein energy malnutrition, with and without infection, on the rates of synthesis of nutrient transport proteins and acute-phase proteins in undernourished children at three time points during treatment; in the early resuscitative period, after appetite has returned, and at the end of the catch-up growth phase when normal growth has resumed. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Comparative proteome analysis of psychrophilic versus mesophilic bacterial species: Insights into the molecular basis of cold adaptation of proteins

    Metpally, Raghu Prasad Rao; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cold adapted or psychrophilic organisms grow at low temperatures, where most of other organisms cannot grow. This adaptation requires a vast array of sequence, structural and physiological adjustments. To understand the molecular basis of cold adaptation of proteins, we analyzed proteomes of psychrophilic and mesophilic bacterial species and compared the differences in amino acid composition and substitution patterns to investigate their likely association with growth temperatures....

  6. Pancreatic adaptive responses in alcohol abuse: Role of the unfolded protein response.

    Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T; Pandol, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The majority of those who drink excessive amounts of alcohol do not develop pancreatic disease. One overarching hypothesis is that alcohol abuse requires additional risk factors, either environmental or genetic, for disease to occur. However, another reason be a result of alcohol-induced activation of adaptive systems that protect the pancreas from the toxic effects of alcohol. We show that mechanisms within the unfolded protein response (UPR) of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can lead to protection of the pancreas from pancreatic diseases with alcohol abuse. The remarkable ability of the pancreas to adapt its machinery to alcohol abuse using UPR systems and continue functioning is the likely reason that pancreatitis from alcohol abuse does not occur in the majority of heavy drinkers. These findings indicate that methods to enhance the protective responses of the UPR can provide opportunities for prevention and treatment of pancreatic diseases. PMID:25736240

  7. Unfolding Thermodynamics of Cysteine-Rich Proteins and Molecular Thermal-Adaptation of Marine Ciliates

    Giorgia Cazzolli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Euplotes nobilii and Euplotes raikovi are phylogenetically closely allied species of marine ciliates, living in polar and temperate waters, respectively. Their evolutional relation and the sharply different temperatures of their natural environments make them ideal organisms to investigate thermal-adaptation. We perform a comparative study of the thermal unfolding of disulfide-rich protein pheromones produced by these ciliates. Recent circular dichroism (CD measurements have shown that the two psychrophilic (E. nobilii and mesophilic (E. raikovi protein families are characterized by very different melting temperatures, despite their close structural homology. The enhanced thermal stability of the E. raikovi pheromones is realized notwithstanding the fact that these proteins form, as a rule, a smaller number of disulfide bonds. We perform Monte Carlo (MC simulations in a structure-based coarse-grained (CG model to show that the higher stability of the E. raikovi pheromones is due to the lower locality of the disulfide bonds, which yields a lower entropy increase in the unfolding process. Our study suggests that the higher stability of the mesophilic E. raikovi phermones is not mainly due to the presence of a strongly hydrophobic core, as it was proposed in the literature. In addition, we argue that the molecular adaptation of these ciliates may have occurred from cold to warm, and not from warm to cold. To provide a testable prediction, we identify a point-mutation of an E. nobilii pheromone that should lead to an unfolding temperature typical of that of E. raikovi pheromones.

  8. Adaptation of Salmonella enterica Hadar under static magnetic field: effects on outer membrane protein pattern

    Snoussi Sarra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Hadar (S. Hadar is a highly prevalent foodborne pathogen and therefore a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Outer membrane proteins whose production is often regulated by environmental conditions also play important roles in the adaptability of bacterial pathogens to various environments. Results The present study investigated the adaptation of S. Hadar under the effect of acute static magnetic field exposure (200 mT, 9 h and the impact on the outer membrane protein pattern. Via two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and LC-MS/MS spectrometry, we compared the proteome of enriched-outer membrane fraction before and after exposure to a magnetic field. A total of 11 proteins, displaying more than a two-fold change, were differentially expressed in exposed cells, among which 7 were up-regulated and 4 down-regulated. These proteins were involved in the integrity of cell envelope (TolB, Pal, in the response to oxidative stress (OmpW, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, UspF, in the oxidative stress status (bacterioferritin, in virulence (OmpX, Yfgl or in motility (FlgE and UspF. Complementary experiments associated the down-regulation of FlgE and UspF with an alteration of swarming, a flagella-driven motility, under SMF. Furthermore, the antibiotic disc diffusion method confirmed a decrease of gentamicin susceptibility in exposed cells. This decrease could be partly associated with the up-regulation of TolC, outer membrane component of an efflux pump. OmpA, a multifunctional protein, was up-regulated. Conclusions SMF (200 mT seems to maintain the cell envelope integrity and to submit the exposed cells to an oxidative stress. Some alterations suggest an increase of the ability of exposed cells to form biofilms.

  9. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Daniil M Prigozhin

    Full Text Available Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.

  10. Structural adaptation of extreme halophilic proteins through decrease of conserved hydrophobic contact surface

    Siglioccolo Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Halophiles are extremophilic microorganisms growing optimally at high salt concentrations. There are two strategies used by halophiles to maintain proper osmotic pressure in their cytoplasm: accumulation of molar concentrations of potassium and chloride with extensive adaptation of the intracellular macromolecules ("salt-in" strategy or biosynthesis and/or accumulation of organic osmotic solutes ("osmolyte" strategy. Our work was aimed at contributing to the understanding of the shared molecular mechanisms of protein haloadaptation through a detailed and systematic comparison of a sample of several three-dimensional structures of halophilic and non-halophilic proteins. Structural differences observed between the "salt-in" and the mesophilic homologous proteins were contrasted to those observed between the "osmolyte" and mesophilic pairs. Results The results suggest that haloadaptation strategy in the presence of molar salt concentration, but not of osmolytes, necessitates a weakening of the hydrophobic interactions, in particular at the level of conserved hydrophobic contacts. Weakening of these interactions counterbalances their strengthening by the presence of salts in solution and may help the structure preventing aggregation and/or loss of function in hypersaline environments. Conclusions Considering the significant increase of biotechnology applications of halophiles, the understanding of halophilicity can provide the theoretical basis for the engineering of proteins of great interest because stable at concentrations of salts that cause the denaturation or aggregation of the majority of macromolecules.

  11. FK506 binding protein 51 integrates pathways of adaptation: FKBP51 shapes the reactivity to environmental change.

    Rein, Theo

    2016-09-01

    This review portraits FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 as "reactivity protein" and collates recent publications to develop the concept of FKBP51 as contributor to different levels of adaptation. Adaptation is a fundamental process that enables unicellular and multicellular organisms to adjust their molecular circuits and structural conditions in reaction to environmental changes threatening their homeostasis. FKBP51 is known as chaperone and co-chaperone of heat shock protein (HSP) 90, thus involved in processes ensuring correct protein folding in response to proteotoxic stress. In mammals, FKBP51 both shapes the stress response and is calibrated by the stress levels through an ultrashort molecular feedback loop. More recently, it has been linked to several intracellular pathways related to the reactivity to drug exposure and stress. Through its role in autophagy and DNA methylation in particular it influences adaptive pathways, possibly also in a transgenerational fashion. Also see the video abstract here. PMID:27374865

  12. Adaptive mutations in the JC virus protein capsid are associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML.

    Shamil R Sunyaev

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PML is a progressive and mostly fatal demyelinating disease caused by JC virus infection and destruction of infected oligodendrocytes in multiple brain foci of susceptible individuals. While JC virus is highly prevalent in the human population, PML is a rare disease that exclusively afflicts only a small percentage of immunocompromised individuals including those affected by HIV (AIDS or immunosuppressive drugs. Viral- and/or host-specific factors, and not simply immune status, must be at play to account for the very large discrepancy between viral prevalence and low disease incidence. Here, we show that several amino acids on the surface of the JC virus capsid protein VP1 display accelerated evolution in viral sequences isolated from PML patients but not in sequences isolated from healthy subjects. We provide strong evidence that at least some of these mutations are involved in binding of sialic acid, a known receptor for the JC virus. Using statistical methods of molecular evolution, we performed a comprehensive analysis of JC virus VP1 sequences isolated from 55 PML patients and 253 sequences isolated from the urine of healthy individuals and found that a subset of amino acids found exclusively among PML VP1 sequences is acquired via adaptive evolution. By modeling of the 3-D structure of the JC virus capsid, we showed that these residues are located within the sialic acid binding site, a JC virus receptor for cell infection. Finally, we go on to demonstrate the involvement of some of these sites in receptor binding by demonstrating a profound reduction in hemagglutination properties of viral-like particles made of the VP1 protein carrying these mutations. Collectively, these results suggest that a more virulent PML causing phenotype of JC virus is acquired via adaptive evolution that changes viral specificity for its cellular receptor(s.

  13. A reduced amino acid alphabet for understanding and designing protein adaptation to mutation.

    Etchebest, C; Benros, C; Bornot, A; Camproux, A-C; de Brevern, A G

    2007-11-01

    Protein sequence world is considerably larger than structure world. In consequence, numerous non-related sequences may adopt similar 3D folds and different kinds of amino acids may thus be found in similar 3D structures. By grouping together the 20 amino acids into a smaller number of representative residues with similar features, sequence world simplification may be achieved. This clustering hence defines a reduced amino acid alphabet (reduced AAA). Numerous works have shown that protein 3D structures are composed of a limited number of building blocks, defining a structural alphabet. We previously identified such an alphabet composed of 16 representative structural motifs (5-residues length) called Protein Blocks (PBs). This alphabet permits to translate the structure (3D) in sequence of PBs (1D). Based on these two concepts, reduced AAA and PBs, we analyzed the distributions of the different kinds of amino acids and their equivalences in the structural context. Different reduced sets were considered. Recurrent amino acid associations were found in all the local structures while other were specific of some local structures (PBs) (e.g Cysteine, Histidine, Threonine and Serine for the alpha-helix Ncap). Some similar associations are found in other reduced AAAs, e.g Ile with Val, or hydrophobic aromatic residues Trp with Phe and Tyr. We put into evidence interesting alternative associations. This highlights the dependence on the information considered (sequence or structure). This approach, equivalent to a substitution matrix, could be useful for designing protein sequence with different features (for instance adaptation to environment) while preserving mainly the 3D fold. PMID:17565494

  14. Adaptive evolution of tight junction protein claudin-14 in echolocating whales.

    Xu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; He, Guimei; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-11-10

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved specialized ultrasonic hearing for echolocation. Recent findings have suggested that several genes including Prestin, Tmc1, Pjvk and KCNQ4 appear to have undergone molecular adaptations associated with the evolution of this ultrasonic hearing in mammals. Here we studied the hearing gene Cldn14, which encodes the claudin-14 protein and is a member of tight junction proteins that functions in the organ of Corti in the inner ear to maintain a cationic gradient between endolymph and perilymph. Particular mutations in human claudin-14 give rise to non-syndromic deafness, suggesting an essential role in hearing. Our results uncovered two bursts of positive selection, one in the ancestral branch of all toothed whales and a second in the branch leading to the delphinid, phocoenid and ziphiid whales. These two branches are the same as those previously reported to show positive selection in the Prestin gene. Furthermore, as with Prestin, the estimated hearing frequencies of whales significantly correlate with numbers of branch-wise non-synonymous substitutions in Cldn14, but not with synonymous changes. However, in contrast to Prestin, we found no evidence of positive selection in bats. Our findings from Cldn14, and comparisons with Prestin, strongly implicate multiple loci in the acquisition of echolocation in cetaceans, but also highlight possible differences in the evolutionary route to echolocation taken by whales and bats. PMID:23965379

  15. Object-adapted trapping and shape-tracking to probe a bacterial protein chain motor

    Roth, Julian; Koch, Matthias; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The helical bacterium Spiroplasma is a motile plant and anthropod pathogen which swims by propagating pairs of kinks along its cell body. As a well suited model system for bacterial locomotion, understanding the cell's molecular motor is of vital interest also regarding the combat of bacterial diseases. The extensive deformations related to these kinks are caused by a contractile cytoskeletal protein ribbon representing a linear motor in contrast to common rotary motors as, e.g., flagella. We present new insights into the working of this motor through experiments with object-adapted optical traps and shape-tracking techniques. We use the given laser irradiation from the optical trap to hinder bacterial energy (ATP) production through the production of O2 radicals. The results are compared with experiments performed under the influence of an O2-Scavenger and ATP inhibitors, respectively. Our results show clear dependences of the kinking properties on the ATP concentration inside the bacterium. The experiments are supported by a theoretical model which we developed to describe the switching of the ribbon's protein subunits.

  16. Development of a Cold-Adapted Pseudoalteromonas Expression System for the Pseudoalteromonas Proteins Intractable for the Escherichia coli System

    Zi-Chao Yu; Bai-Lu Tang; Dian-Li Zhao; Xiuhua Pang; Qi-Long Qin; Bai-Cheng Zhou; Xi-Ying Zhang; Xiu-Lan Chen; Yu-Zhong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Although the Escherichia coli expression system is the most commonly used expression system, some proteins are still difficult to be expressed by this system, such as proteins with high thermolability and enzymes that cannot mature by autoprocessing. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative expression systems. In this study, a cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system was developed. A shuttle vector was constructed, and a conjugational transfer system between E. coli and psych...

  17. Similar rates of protein adaptation in Drosophila miranda and D. melanogaster, two species with different current effective population sizes

    Bachtrog Doris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adaptive protein evolution is common in several Drosophila species investigated. Some studies point to very weak selection operating on amino-acid mutations, with average selection intensities on the order of Nes ~ 5 in D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Species with lower effective population sizes should undergo less adaptation since they generate fewer mutations and selection is ineffective on a greater proportion of beneficial mutations. Results Here I study patterns of polymorphism and divergence at 91 X-linked loci in D. miranda, a species with a roughly 5-fold smaller effective population size than D. melanogaster. Surprisingly, I find a similar fraction of amino-acid mutations being driven to fixation by positive selection in D. miranda and D. melanogaster. Genes with higher rates of amino-acid evolution show lower levels of neutral diversity, a pattern predicted by recurrent adaptive protein evolution. I fit a hitchhiking model to patterns of polymorphism in D. miranda and D. melanogaster and estimate an order of magnitude higher selection coefficients for beneficial mutations in D. miranda. Conclusion This analysis suggests that effective population size may not be a major determinant in rates of protein adaptation. Instead, adaptation may not be mutation-limited, or the distribution of fitness effects for beneficial mutations might differ vastly between different species or populations. Alternative explanation such as biases in estimating the fraction of beneficial mutations or slightly deleterious mutation models are also discussed.

  18. Interacting proteins on human spermatozoa: adaptive evolution of the binding of semenogelin I to EPPIN.

    Erick J R Silva

    Full Text Available Semenogelin I (SEMG1 is found in human semen coagulum and on the surface of spermatozoa bound to EPPIN. The physiological significance of the SEMG1/EPPIN interaction on the surface of spermatozoa is its capacity to modulate sperm progressive motility. The present study investigates the hypothesis that the interacting surface of SEMG1 and EPPIN co-evolved within the Hominoidea time scale, as a result of adaptive pressures applied by their roles in sperm protection and reproductive fitness. Our results indicate that some amino acid residues of SEMG1 and EPPIN possess a remarkable deficiency of variation among hominoid primates. We observe a distinct residue change unique to humans within the EPPIN sequence containing a SEMG1 interacting surface, namely His92. In addition, Bayes Empirical Bayes analysis for positive selection indicates that the SEMG1 Cys239 residue underwent positive selection in humans, probably as a consequence of its role in increasing the binding affinity of these interacting proteins. We confirm the critical role of Cys239 residue for SEMG1 binding to EPPIN and inhibition of sperm motility by showing that recombinant SEMG1 mutants in which Cys239 residue was changed to glycine, aspartic acid, histidine, serine or arginine have reduced capacity to interact to EPPIN and to inhibit human sperm motility in vitro. In conclusion, our results indicate that EPPIN and SEMG1 rapidly co-evolved in primates due to their critical role in the modulation of sperm motility in the semen coagulum, providing unique insights into the molecular co-evolution of sperm surface interacting proteins.

  19. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T;

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...... "adapter" proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human...... hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ...

  20. Structural Basis for Phosphotyrosine Recognition by the Src Homology-2 Domains of the Adapter Proteins SH2-B and APS

    Hu,J.; Hubbard, S.

    2006-01-01

    SH2-B, APS, and Lnk constitute a family of adapter proteins that modulate signaling by protein tyrosine kinases. These adapters contain an N-terminal dimerization region, a pleckstrin homology domain, and a C-terminal Src homology-2 (SH2) domain. SH2-B is recruited via its SH2 domain to various protein tyrosine kinases, including Janus kinase-2 (Jak2) and the insulin receptor. Here, we present the crystal structure at 2.35 Angstroms resolution of the SH2 domain of SH2-B in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the SH2-B recruitment site in Jak2 (pTyr813). The structure reveals a canonical SH2 domain-phosphopeptide binding mode, but with specific recognition of a glutamate at the +1 position relative to phosphotyrosine, in addition to recognition of a hydrophobic residue at the +3 position. Biochemical studies of SH2-B and APS demonstrate that, although the SH2 domains of these two adapter proteins share 79% sequence identity, the SH2-B SH2 domain binds preferentially to Jak2, whereas the APS SH2 domain has higher affinity for the insulin receptor. This differential specificity is attributable to the difference in the oligomeric states of the two SH2 domains: monomeric for SH2-B and dimeric for APS.

  1. Development of a Cold-Adapted Pseudoalteromonas Expression System for the Pseudoalteromonas Proteins Intractable for the Escherichia coli System.

    Zi-Chao Yu

    Full Text Available Although the Escherichia coli expression system is the most commonly used expression system, some proteins are still difficult to be expressed by this system, such as proteins with high thermolability and enzymes that cannot mature by autoprocessing. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative expression systems. In this study, a cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system was developed. A shuttle vector was constructed, and a conjugational transfer system between E. coli and psychrophilic strain Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429 was established. Based on the shuttle vector, three reporter vectors were constructed to compare the strength of the cloned promoters at low temperature. The promoter of xylanase gene from Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429 was chosen due to its high activity at 10-15°C. An expression vector pEV containing the chosen promoter, multiple cloning sites and a His tag was constructed for protein expression and purification. With pEV as expression vector and SM20429 as the host, a cold-adapted protease, pseudoalterin, which cannot be maturely expressed in E. coli, was successfully expressed as an active extracellular enzyme when induced by 2% oat spelt xylan at 15°C for 48 h. Recombinant pseudoalterin purified from the culture by Ni affinity chromatography had identical N-terminal sequence, similar molecular mass and substrate specificity as the native pseudoalterin. In addition, another two cold-adapted enzymes were also successfully expressed by this system. Our results indicate that this cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system will provide an alternative choice for protein expression, especially for the Pseudoalteromonas proteins intractable for the E. coli system.

  2. Development of a Cold-Adapted Pseudoalteromonas Expression System for the Pseudoalteromonas Proteins Intractable for the Escherichia coli System.

    Yu, Zi-Chao; Tang, Bai-Lu; Zhao, Dian-Li; Pang, Xiuhua; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Although the Escherichia coli expression system is the most commonly used expression system, some proteins are still difficult to be expressed by this system, such as proteins with high thermolability and enzymes that cannot mature by autoprocessing. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative expression systems. In this study, a cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system was developed. A shuttle vector was constructed, and a conjugational transfer system between E. coli and psychrophilic strain Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429 was established. Based on the shuttle vector, three reporter vectors were constructed to compare the strength of the cloned promoters at low temperature. The promoter of xylanase gene from Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429 was chosen due to its high activity at 10-15°C. An expression vector pEV containing the chosen promoter, multiple cloning sites and a His tag was constructed for protein expression and purification. With pEV as expression vector and SM20429 as the host, a cold-adapted protease, pseudoalterin, which cannot be maturely expressed in E. coli, was successfully expressed as an active extracellular enzyme when induced by 2% oat spelt xylan at 15°C for 48 h. Recombinant pseudoalterin purified from the culture by Ni affinity chromatography had identical N-terminal sequence, similar molecular mass and substrate specificity as the native pseudoalterin. In addition, another two cold-adapted enzymes were also successfully expressed by this system. Our results indicate that this cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system will provide an alternative choice for protein expression, especially for the Pseudoalteromonas proteins intractable for the E. coli system. PMID:26333173

  3. DOC2 Proteins in rat brain: Complementary distriburion and proposed function as vesicular adapter proteins in early stages of secretion

    Gispen, W.H.; Verhage, M.; Vries, K.J. de; Röshol, H.; Burbach, J.P.H.; Südhof, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    DOC2 proteins constitute a novel protein family that may function in secretion and contain a double C2 domain. We have cloned and characterized two DOC2 isoforms in rat brain and studied their interactions with other proteins implicated in secretion. DOC2A was virtually brain specific, DOC2B ubiquit

  4. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Ari Morgenthau

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  5. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  6. Plant natriuretic peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-26

    In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs). PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologs are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0) cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM) concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO) terms “oxidation-reduction process,” “translation” and “response to salt stress” and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions.

  7. Plant Natriuretic Peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    Ilona eTurek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs. PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologues are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0 cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO terms oxidation-reduction process, translation and response to salt stress and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions.

  8. Cardiac hypertrophy and failure--a disease of adaptation. Modifications in membrane proteins provide a molecular basis for arrhythmogenicity.

    Moalic, J M; Charlemagne, D; Mansier, P; Chevalier, B; Swynghedauw, B

    1993-05-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the physiological adaptation of the heart to chronic mechanical overload. Cardiac failure indicates the limits of the process. Cardiac hypertrophy is only one example of biological adaptation and results from the induction of several changes in gene expression, mostly of the fetal type, including those coding for the myosin heavy chain or the alpha-subunit of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase. From a thermodynamic point of view, the decrease in Vmax allows the heart to produce a normal tension at a lower cost. This process results from changes both in the sarcomere and in the expression of certain membrane proteins. The decrease in calcium transient is determined by several changes in membrane proteins that result in a rather fragile equilibrium in terms of calcium homeostasis. Any abnormal input in calcium will have exaggerated detrimental consequences on a hypertrophied myocyte and may cause automaticity and arrhythmias or an exaggerated response to anoxia in terms of compliance. PMID:8485830

  9. Human Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells in Adaptations to Exercise; Effects of Resistance Exercise Contraction Mode and Protein Supplementation

    Farup, Jean

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human skeletal muscle has a remarkable capability of adapting to a change in demands. The preservation of this adaptability relies partly on a pool of resident myogenic stem cells (satellite cells, SCs). Extrinsic factors such as mechanical load (e.g. resistance exercise) and dietary...... supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle cell growth. The aim of paper III was to investigate the fiber type specific SC and myonuclei content, as well as myofiber CSA in response to the 12 weeks Ecc or Conc resistance exercise training combined with Whey or Placebo...... protein constitute key factors in regulation of human skeletal muscle mass; however, the influence of divergent resistance exercise contraction modes and protein supplementation on SC content, is not well described. The overall aim of the present thesis was to investigate whether eccentric versus...

  10. Gab1 Acts as an Adapter Molecule Linking the Cytokine Receptor gp130 to ERK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    Takahashi-Tezuka, Mariko; Yoshida, Yuichi; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Ohtani, Takuya; Yamanaka, Yojiro; Nishida, Keigo; NAKAJIMA, Koichi; Hibi, Masahiko; Hirano, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Gab1 has structural similarities with Drosophila DOS (daughter of sevenless), which is a substrate of the protein tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew. Both Gab1 and DOS have a pleckstrin homology domain and tyrosine residues, potential binding sites for various SH2 domain-containing adapter molecules when they are phosphorylated. We found that Gab1 was tyrosine phosphorylated in response to various cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-3, alpha interferon (IFN-α), and IFN-γ. Upon the stimula...

  11. Model-based adaptive control of acetate concentration during the production of recombinant proteins with E. coli

    Rocha, I; Ferreira, E. C.

    2003-01-01

    A model-based adaptive linearizing control law was derived for the regulation of the acetate concentration during the fed-batch fermentation of recombinant proteins with high cell density culture of Escherichia coli growing on glucose. An unstructured model for the growth was applied to the major metabolic pathways: oxidative growth on glucose, fermentative growth on glucose, oxidative growth on acetate, and maintenance. A model order reduction method was used to allow the d...

  12. Application of heat shock protein expression for detecting natural adaptation and exposure to stress in natural populations

    Jesper Givskov SØRENSEN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat-shock proteins (HSPs play an undisputed role for maintaining cellular functioning under environmental challenges and protein denaturing conditions. Compelling evidence points to an evolutionary important role of HSPs and a strict evolutionary control of these proteins as a balance between benefits and costs. While there is a great potential for using HSP expression for detecting natural adaptation and exposure to stress in natural populations, some obstacles and key issues await investigation. From an ecological perspective these key issues needs to be resolved in order to fully appreciate the complex responses and adaptations to stress and to increase our understanding of HSPs and other molecular chaperones for stress adaptation and potential use as biomarkers. Here, the current knowledge and understanding of HSPs is reviewed and a number of key issues including the interpretation of elevated HSP levels, the complications of extrapolating between laboratory and field conditions, the effects of choice of traits and methodology and the larger intra-and extracellular networks of interactions that HSPs participate in are discussed [Current Zoology 56 (6: 703–713, 2010].

  13. A comparative pan-genome perspective of niche-adaptable cell-surface protein phenotypes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    Ravi Kant

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a ubiquitously adaptable Gram-positive bacterium and as a typical commensal can be recovered from various microbe-accessible bodily orifices and cavities. Then again, other isolates are food-borne, with some of these having been long associated with naturally fermented cheeses and yogurts. Additionally, because of perceived health benefits to humans and animals, numerous L. rhamnosus strains have been selected for use as so-called probiotics and are often taken in the form of dietary supplements and functional foods. At the genome level, it is anticipated that certain genetic variances will have provided the niche-related phenotypes that augment the flexible adaptiveness of this species, thus enabling its strains to grow and survive in their respective host environments. For this present study, we considered it functionally informative to examine and catalogue the genotype-phenotype variation existing at the cell surface between different L. rhamnosus strains, with the presumption that this might be relatable to habitat preferences and ecological adaptability. Here, we conducted a pan-genomic study involving 13 genomes from L. rhamnosus isolates with various origins. In using a benchmark strain (gut-adapted L. rhamnosus GG for our pan-genome comparison, we had focused our efforts on a detailed examination and description of gene products for certain functionally relevant surface-exposed proteins, each of which in effect might also play a part in niche adaptability among the other strains. Perhaps most significantly of the surface protein loci we had analyzed, it would appear that the spaCBA operon (known to encode SpaCBA-called pili having a mucoadhesive phenotype is a genomic rarity and an uncommon occurrence in L. rhamnosus. However, for any of the so-piliated L. rhamnosus strains, they will likely possess an increased niche-specific fitness, which functionally might presumably be manifested by a protracted transient

  14. A Comparative Pan-Genome Perspective of Niche-Adaptable Cell-Surface Protein Phenotypes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    Kant, Ravi; Sigvart-Mattila, Pia; Paulin, Lars; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Saarela, Maria; Palva, Airi; von Ossowski, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a ubiquitously adaptable Gram-positive bacterium and as a typical commensal can be recovered from various microbe-accessible bodily orifices and cavities. Then again, other isolates are food-borne, with some of these having been long associated with naturally fermented cheeses and yogurts. Additionally, because of perceived health benefits to humans and animals, numerous L. rhamnosus strains have been selected for use as so-called probiotics and are often taken in the form of dietary supplements and functional foods. At the genome level, it is anticipated that certain genetic variances will have provided the niche-related phenotypes that augment the flexible adaptiveness of this species, thus enabling its strains to grow and survive in their respective host environments. For this present study, we considered it functionally informative to examine and catalogue the genotype-phenotype variation existing at the cell surface between different L. rhamnosus strains, with the presumption that this might be relatable to habitat preferences and ecological adaptability. Here, we conducted a pan-genomic study involving 13 genomes from L. rhamnosus isolates with various origins. In using a benchmark strain (gut-adapted L. rhamnosus GG) for our pan-genome comparison, we had focused our efforts on a detailed examination and description of gene products for certain functionally relevant surface-exposed proteins, each of which in effect might also play a part in niche adaptability among the other strains. Perhaps most significantly of the surface protein loci we had analyzed, it would appear that the spaCBA operon (known to encode SpaCBA-called pili having a mucoadhesive phenotype) is a genomic rarity and an uncommon occurrence in L. rhamnosus. However, for any of the so-piliated L. rhamnosus strains, they will likely possess an increased niche-specific fitness, which functionally might presumably be manifested by a protracted transient colonization of

  15. Self-adaptive differential evolution algorithm incorporating local search for protein-ligand docking

    Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm is powerful in optimization problems over several real parameters. DE depends on strategies to generate new trial solutions and the associated parameter values for searching performance. In self-adaptive DE, the automatic learning about previous evolution was used to determine the best mutation strategy and its parameter settings. By combining the self-adaptive DE and Hooke Jeeves local search, we developed a new docking method named SADock (Strategy Adaptation Dock) with the help of AutoDock4 scoring function. As the accuracy and performance of SADock was evaluated in self-docking using the Astex diverse set, the introduced SADock showed better success ratio (89%) than the success ratio (60%) of the Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA) of AutoDock4. The self-adapting scheme enabled our new docking method to converge fast and to be robust through the various docking problems.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts.

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Hane, James K; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Singh, Karam B

    2016-04-01

    Rhizoctonia solaniis an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about howR. solanicauses disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility toR. solaniwhen expressed inNicotiana benthamiana In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts*

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Hane, James K.; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L.; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility to R. solani when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  18. Phages have adapted the same protein fold to fulfill multiple functions in virion assembly

    Cardarelli, Lia; Pell, Lisa G.; Neudecker, Philipp; Pirani, Nawaz; Liu, Amanda; Baker, Lindsay A.; Rubinstein, John L.; Maxwell, Karen L.; Davidson, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships may exist among very diverse groups of proteins even though they perform different functions and display little sequence similarity. The tailed bacteriophages present a uniquely amenable system for identifying such groups because of their huge diversity yet conserved genome structures. In this work, we used structural, functional, and genomic context comparisons to conclude that the head–tail connector protein and tail tube protein of bacteriophage λ diverged from a common ancestral protein. Further comparisons of tertiary and quaternary structures indicate that the baseplate hub and tail terminator proteins of bacteriophage may also be part of this same family. We propose that all of these proteins evolved from a single ancestral tail tube protein fold, and that gene duplication followed by differentiation led to the specialized roles of these proteins seen in bacteriophages today. Although this type of evolutionary mechanism has been proposed for other systems, our work provides an evolutionary mechanism for a group of proteins with different functions that bear no sequence similarity. Our data also indicate that the addition of a structural element at the N terminus of the λ head–tail connector protein endows it with a distinctive protein interaction capability compared with many of its putative homologues. PMID:20660769

  19. Comparative proteome analysis of psychrophilic versus mesophilic bacterial species: Insights into the molecular basis of cold adaptation of proteins

    Reddy Boojala; Metpally Raghu

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Cold adapted or psychrophilic organisms grow at low temperatures, where most of other organisms cannot grow. This adaptation requires a vast array of sequence, structural and physiological adjustments. To understand the molecular basis of cold adaptation of proteins, we analyzed proteomes of psychrophilic and mesophilic bacterial species and compared the differences in amino acid composition and substitution patterns to investigate their likely association with growth temp...

  20. Testing for adaptive evolution of the female reproductive protein ZPC in mammals, birds and fishes reveals problems with the M7-M8 likelihood ratio test

    Berlin Sofia; Smith Nick GC

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Adaptive evolution appears to be a common feature of reproductive proteins across a very wide range of organisms. A promising way of addressing the evolutionary forces responsible for this general phenomenon is to test for adaptive evolution in the same gene but among groups of species, which differ in their reproductive biology. One can then test evolutionary hypotheses by asking whether the variation in adaptive evolution is consistent with the variation in reproductive ...

  1. Disruption of the acyl-coa binding protein gene delays hepatic adaptation to metabolic changes at weaning

    Neess, Ditte; Bloksgaard, Maria; Sørensen, Signe Bek; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Elle, Ida C; Helledie, Torben; Due, Marianne; Pagmantidis, Vasileios; Finsen, Bente; Wilbertz, Johannes; Kruhoeffer, Mogens; Faergeman, Nils; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    , little is known about the in vivo function in mammalian cells. We have generated mice with targeted disruption of ACBP (ACBP-/-). These mice are viable and fertile and develop normally. However, around weaning the ACBP-/- mice go through a crisis with overall weakness, and a slightly decreased growth...... rate. Using microarray analysis we show that the liver of ACBP-/- mice display a significantly delayed adaptation to weaning with late induction of target genes of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) family. As a result, hepatic de novo cholesterogenesis is decreased at weaning. The...... delayed induction of SREBP target genes around weaning is caused by a compromised processing and decreased expression of SREBP precursors leading to reduced binding of SREBP to target sites in chromatin. In conclusion, lack of ACBP interferes with the normal metabolic adaptation to weaning and leads to...

  2. Duplication and Adaptive Evolution of a Key Centromeric Protein in Mimulus, a Genus with Female Meiotic Drive.

    Finseth, Findley R; Dong, Yuzhu; Saunders, Arpiar; Fishman, Lila

    2015-10-01

    The fundamental asymmetry of female meiosis creates an arena for genetic elements to compete for inclusion in the egg, promoting the selfish evolution of centromere variants that maximize their transmission to the future egg. Such "female meiotic drive" has been hypothesized to explain the paradoxically complex and rapidly evolving nature of centromeric DNA and proteins. Although theoretically widespread, few cases of active drive have been observed, thereby limiting the opportunities to directly assess the impact of centromeric drive on molecular variation at centromeres and binding proteins. Here, we characterize the molecular evolutionary patterns of CENH3, the centromere-defining histone variant, in Mimulus monkeyflowers, a genus with one of the few known cases of active centromere-associated female meiotic drive. First, we identify a novel duplication of CENH3 in diploid Mimulus, including in lineages with actively driving centromeres. Second, we demonstrate long-term adaptive evolution at several sites in the N-terminus of CENH3, a region with some meiosis-specific functions that putatively interacts with centromeric DNA. Finally, we infer that the paralogs evolve under different selective regimes; some sites in the N-terminus evolve under positive selection in the pro-orthologs or only one paralog (CENH3_B) and the paralogs exhibit significantly different patterns of polymorphism within populations. Our finding of long-term, adaptive evolution at CENH3 in the context of centromere-associated meiotic drive supports an antagonistic, coevolutionary battle for evolutionary dominance between centromeric DNA and binding proteins. PMID:26104011

  3. Thermal adaptation analyzed by comparison of protein sequences from mesophilic and extremely thermophilic Methanococcus species

    Haney, Paul J.; Jonathan H Badger; Buldak, Gerald L.; Reich, Claudia I.; Woese, Carl R.; Olsen, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    The genome sequence of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii provides a wealth of data on proteins from a thermophile. In this paper, sequences of 115 proteins from M. jannaschii are compared with their homologs from mesophilic Methanococcus species. Although the growth temperatures of the mesophiles are about 50°C below that of M. jannaschii, their genomic G+C contents are nearly identical. The properties most correlated with the proteins of the thermophile include hig...

  4. Early origin and adaptive evolution of the GW182 protein family, the key component of RNA silencing in animals.

    Zielezinski, Andrzej; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2015-01-01

    The GW182 proteins are a key component of the miRNA-dependent post-transcriptional silencing pathway in animals. They function as scaffold proteins to mediate the interaction of Argonaute (AGO)-containing complexes with cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins (PABP) and PAN2-PAN3 and CCR4-NOT deadenylases. The AGO-GW182 complexes mediate silencing of the target mRNA through induction of translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. Although the GW182 proteins are a subject of extensive experimental research in the recent years, very little is known about their origin and evolution. Here, based on complex functional annotation and phylogenetic analyses, we reveal 448 members of the GW182 protein family from the earliest animals to humans. Our results indicate that a single-copy GW182/TNRC6C progenitor gene arose with the emergence of multicellularity and it multiplied in the last common ancestor of vertebrates in 2 rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) resulting in 3 genes. Before the divergence of vertebrates, both the AGO- and CCR4-NOT-binding regions of GW182s showed significant acceleration in the accumulation of amino acid changes, suggesting functional adaptation toward higher specificity to the molecules of the silencing complex. We conclude that the silencing ability of the GW182 proteins improves with higher position in the taxonomic classification and increasing complexity of the organism. The first reconstruction of the molecular journey of GW182 proteins from the ancestral metazoan protein to the current mammalian configuration provides new insight into development of the miRNA-dependent post-transcriptional silencing pathway in animals. PMID:26106978

  5. APSLAP: an adaptive boosting technique for predicting subcellular localization of apoptosis protein.

    Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Lakshmi, P T V

    2013-12-01

    Apoptotic proteins play key roles in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. Knowledge about the subcellular localization of apoptotic protein is constructive in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death, determining the functional characterization of the protein, screening candidates in drug design, and selecting protein for relevant studies. It is also proclaimed that the information required for determining the subcellular localization of protein resides in their corresponding amino acid sequence. In this work, a new biological feature, class pattern frequency of physiochemical descriptor, was effectively used in accordance with the amino acid composition, protein similarity measure, CTD (composition, translation, and distribution) of physiochemical descriptors, and sequence similarity to predict the subcellular localization of apoptosis protein. AdaBoost with the weak learner as Random-Forest was designed for the five modules and prediction is made based on the weighted voting system. Bench mark dataset of 317 apoptosis proteins were subjected to prediction by our system and the accuracy was found to be 100.0 and 92.4 %, and 90.1 % for self-consistency test, jack-knife test, and tenfold cross validation test respectively, which is 0.9 % higher than that of other existing methods. Beside this, the independent data (N151 and ZW98) set prediction resulted in the accuracy of 90.7 and 87.7 %, respectively. These results show that the protein feature represented by a combined feature vector along with AdaBoost algorithm holds well in effective prediction of subcellular localization of apoptosis proteins. The user friendly web interface "APSLAP" has been constructed, which is freely available at http://apslap.bicpu.edu.in and it is anticipated that this tool will play a significant role in determining the specific role of apoptosis proteins with reliability. PMID:23982307

  6. The adaptive response of human lymphocytes to very low doses of ionizing radiation: a case of induced chromosomal repair with the induction of specific proteins

    It appears that the adaptive response of human lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays can be mimicked by exposure to low levels of a truly radiomimetic compound, bleomycin, that induces double-strand breaks in DNA. Similarly, the adaptive response can be induced by exposure to low levels of H2O2, which produces reactive species similar to those induced by ionizing radiation. This adaptive response, which is attributed to the induction of a repair mechanism, i.e. repair enzymes, can be prevented if protein synthesis, and thus enzyme synthesis, is inhibited by cycloheximide at the crucial time (4-6 h) after exposure to the adaptive dose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has shown that 1 cGy of X-rays can reproducibly induce several proteins not found in unirradiated lymphocytes. These proteins are considered to be excellent candidates for the actual repair enzyme(s). (author)

  7. Elucidation of phenotypic adaptations: Molecular analyses of dim-light vision proteins in vertebrates

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi; Zhang, Huan; Britt, Lyle

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate ancestors appeared in a uniform, shallow water environment, but modern species flourish in highly variable niches. A striking array of phenotypes exhibited by contemporary animals is assumed to have evolved by accumulating a series of selectively advantageous mutations. However, the experimental test of such adaptive events at the molecular level is remarkably difficult. One testable phenotype, dim-light vision, is mediated by rhodopsins. Here, we engineered 11 ancestral rhodopsins...

  8. Adaptive thermogenesis and uncoupling proteins: a reappraisal of their roles in fat metabolism and energy balance

    Dulloo, Abdul G; Seydoux, Josiane; JACQUET, JEAN

    2005-01-01

    After decades of controversies about the quantitative importance of autoregulatory adjustments in energy expenditure in weight regulation, there is now increasing recognition that even subtle variations in thermogenesis could, in dynamic systems and over the long term, be important in determining weight maintenance in some and obesity in others. The main challenge nowadays is to provide a mechanistic explanation for the role of adaptive thermogenesis in attenuating and correcting deviations o...

  9. Accumulation of small heat shock proteins, including mitochondrial HSP22, induced by oxidative stress and adaptive response in tomato cells

    Changes in gene expression, by application of H2O2, O2.- generating agents (methyl viologen, digitonin) and gamma irradiation to tomato suspension cultures, were investigated and compared to the well-described heat shock response. Two-dimensional gel protein mapping analyses gave the first indication that at least small heat shock proteins (smHSP) accumulated in response to application of H2O2 and gamma irradiation, but not to O2.- generating agents. While some proteins seemed to be induced specifically by each treatment, only part of the heat shock response was observed. On the basis of Northern hybridization experiments performed with four heterologous cDNA, corresponding to classes I-IV of pea smHSP, it could be concluded that significant amounts of class I and II smHSP mRNA are induced by H2O2 and by irradiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in plants some HSP genes are inducible by oxidative stresses, as in micro-organisms and other eukaryotic cells. HSP22, the main stress protein that accumulates following H2O2 action or gamma irradiation, was also purified. Sequence homology of amino terminal and internal sequences, and immunoreactivity with Chenopodium rubrum mitochondrial smHSP antibody, indicated that the protein belongs to the recently discovered class of plant mitochondrial smHSP. Heat shock or a mild H2O2 pretreatment was also shown to lead to plant cell protection against oxidative injury. Therefore, the synthesis of these stress proteins can be considered as an adaptive mechanism in which mitochondrial protection could be essential

  10. Proteins modulation in human skeletal muscle in the early phase of adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia

    Vigano, A.; Ripamonti, M.; Palma, S. De;

    2008-01-01

    level featuring a reduction of mitochondrial volume density, accumulation of lipofuscin, a product of lipid peroxidation, and dysregulation of enzymes whose time course is unknown. The effects of 7-9 days exposure to 4559 m (Margherita Hut, Monte Rosa, Italy) on the muscle proteins pattern were......High altitude hypoxia is a paraphysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. In man, skeletal muscle, after prolonged exposure to hypoxia, undergoes mass reduction and alterations at the cellular...... investigated, pre- and post-exposure, in ten young subjects, by 2-D DIGE and MS. Ten milligram biopsies were obtained from the mid part of the vastus lateralis muscle at sea level (control) and at altitude, after 7-9 days hypoxia. Differential analysis indicates that proteins involved in iron transport...

  11. Pervasive adaptive protein evolution apparent in diversity patterns around amino acid substitutions in Drosophila simulans.

    Shmuel Sattath

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, multiple lines of evidence converge in suggesting that beneficial substitutions to the genome may be common. All suffer from confounding factors, however, such that the interpretation of the evidence-in particular, conclusions about the rate and strength of beneficial substitutions-remains tentative. Here, we use genome-wide polymorphism data in D. simulans and sequenced genomes of its close relatives to construct a readily interpretable characterization of the effects of positive selection: the shape of average neutral diversity around amino acid substitutions. As expected under recurrent selective sweeps, we find a trough in diversity levels around amino acid but not around synonymous substitutions, a distinctive pattern that is not expected under alternative models. This characterization is richer than previous approaches, which relied on limited summaries of the data (e.g., the slope of a scatter plot, and relates to underlying selection parameters in a straightforward way, allowing us to make more reliable inferences about the prevalence and strength of adaptation. Specifically, we develop a coalescent-based model for the shape of the entire curve and use it to infer adaptive parameters by maximum likelihood. Our inference suggests that ∼13% of amino acid substitutions cause selective sweeps. Interestingly, it reveals two classes of beneficial fixations: a minority (approximately 3% that appears to have had large selective effects and accounts for most of the reduction in diversity, and the remaining 10%, which seem to have had very weak selective effects. These estimates therefore help to reconcile the apparent conflict among previously published estimates of the strength of selection. More generally, our findings provide unequivocal evidence for strongly beneficial substitutions in Drosophila and illustrate how the rapidly accumulating genome-wide data can be leveraged to address enduring questions about the genetic basis

  12. Adaptive Smith-Waterman residue match seeding for protein structural alignment.

    Topham, Christopher M; Rouquier, Mickaël; Tarrat, Nathalie; André, Isabelle

    2013-10-01

    The POLYFIT rigid-body algorithm for automated global pairwise and multiple protein structural alignment is presented. Smith-Waterman local alignment is used to establish a set of seed equivalences that are extended using Needleman-Wunsch dynamic programming techniques. Structural and functional interaction constraints provided by evolution are encoded as one-dimensional residue physical environment strings for alignment of highly structurally overlapped protein pairs. Local structure alignment of more distantly related pairs is carried out using rigid-body conformational matching of 15-residue fragments, with allowance made for less stringent conformational matching of metal-ion and small molecule ligand-contact, disulphide bridge, and cis-peptide correspondences. Protein structural plasticity is accommodated through the stepped adjustment of a single empirical distance parameter value in the calculation of the Smith-Waterman dynamic programming matrix. Structural overlap is used both as a measure of similarity and to assess alignment quality. Pairwise alignment accuracy has been benchmarked against that of 10 widely used aligners on the Sippl and Wiederstein set of difficult pairwise structure alignment problems, and more extensively against that of Matt, SALIGN, and MUSTANG in pairwise and multiple structural alignments of protein domains with low shared sequence identity in the SCOP-ASTRAL 40% compendium. The results demonstrate the advantages of POLYFIT over other aligners in the efficient and robust identification of matching seed residue positions in distantly related protein targets and in the generation of longer structurally overlapped alignment lengths. Superposition-based application areas include comparative modeling and protein and ligand design. POLYFIT is available on the Web server at http://polyfit.insa-toulouse.fr. PMID:23720362

  13. Symmetry Breaking and Adaptation The Genetic Code of Retroviral Env Proteins

    Vera, S

    1996-01-01

    Although several synonymous codons can encode the same aminoacid, this symmetry is generally broken in natural genetic systems. In this article, we show that the symmetry breaking can result from selective pressures due to the violation of the synonym symmetry by mutation and recombination. We conjecture that this enhances the probability to produce mutants that are well-adapted to the current environment. Evidence is found in the codon frequencies of the HIV resistant to the current immunological attack, are found with a greater frequency than their less mutable synonyms.

  14. Role of hypothalamic melanocortin system in adaptation of food intake to food protein increase in mice.

    Pillot, Bruno; Duraffourd, Céline; Bégeot, Martine; Joly, Aurélie; Luquet, Serge; Houberdon, Isabelle; Naville, Danielle; Vigier, Michèle; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Magnan, Christophe; Mithieux, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The hypothalamic melanocortin system--the melanocortin receptor of type 4 (MC4R) and its ligands: α-melanin-stimulating hormone (α-MSH, agonist, inducing hypophagia), and agouti-related protein (AgRP, antagonist, inducing hyperphagia)--is considered to play a central role in the control of food intake. We tested its implication in the mediation of the hunger-curbing effects of protein-enriched diets (PED) in mice. Whereas there was a 20% decrease in food intake in mice fed on the PED, compare...

  15. Identifying the adaptive mechanism in globular proteins: Fluctuations in densely packed regions manipulate flexible parts

    Yilmaz, Lutfu Safak; Atilgan, Ali Rana

    2000-09-01

    A low-resolution structural model based on the packing geometry of α-carbons is utilized to establish a connection between the flexible and rigid parts of a folded protein. The former commonly recognizes a complementing molecule for making a complex, while the latter manipulates the necessary conformational change for binding. We attempt analytically to distinguish this control architecture that intrinsically exists in globular proteins. First with two-dimensional simple models, then for a native protein, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, we explicitly demonstrate that inserting fluctuations in tertiary contacts supported by the stable core, one can regulate the displacement of residues on loop regions. The positional fluctuations of the flexible regions are annihilated by the rest of the protein in conformity with the Le Chatelier-Braun principle. The results indicate that the distortion of the principal nonbonded contacts between highly packed residues is accompanied by that of the slavery fluctuations that are widely distributed over the native structure. These positional arrangements do not appear in a reciprocal relation between a perturbation and the associated response; the effect of a movement of residue i on residue j is not equal to that of the same movement of residue j on residue i.

  16. The Role of the NHERF-1 and NHERF-2 Adapter Proteins in Intestinal Ion Transport Regulation

    N. Broere (Nellie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe chloride channel CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) and the sodium/proton exchanger NHE3 are key proteins involved in transepithelial ion and water transport in several epithelial tissues, including the intestine. In this thesis we mainly focus on the role of

  17. Genome adaptations of a tripartite motif protein for retroviral defense in cattle and sheep

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) genes encode proteins composed of RING, B-box, and coiled coil motif domains. Primate TRIM5' has been shown to be a primary determinant of retroviral host cell range restriction in primates. TRIM5 restriction was originally thought to be a primate-specific defense mechanism...

  18. Differential metabolic and endocrine adaptations in llamas, sheep, and goats fed high- and low-protein grass-based diets.

    Kiani, A; Alstrup, L; Nielsen, M O

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to elucidate whether distinct endocrine and metabolic adaptations provide llamas superior ability to adapt to low protein content grass-based diets as compared with the true ruminants. Eighteen adult, nonpregnant females (6 llamas, 6 goats, and 6 sheep) were fed either green grass hay with (HP) or grass seed straw (LP) in a cross-over design experiment over 2 periods of 21 d. Blood samples were taken on day 21 in each period at -30, 60, 150, and 240 min after feeding the morning meal and analyzed for plasma contents of glucose, triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acids, β-hydroxy butyrate (BOHB), urea, creatinine, insulin, and leptin. Results showed that llamas vs sheep and goats had higher plasma concentrations of glucose (7.1 vs 3.5 and 3.6 ± 0.18 mmol/L), creatinine (209 vs 110 and 103 ± 10 μmol/L), and urea (6.7 vs 5.6 and 4.9 ± 0.5 mmol/L) but lower leptin (0.33 vs 1.49 and 1.05 ± 0.1 ng/mL) and BOHB (0.05 vs 0.26 and 0.12 ± 0.02 mmol/L), respectively. BOHB in llamas was extremely low for a ruminating animal. Llamas showed that hyperglycemia coexisted with hyperinsulinemia (in general on the HP diet; postprandially on the LP diet). Llamas were clearly hypercreatinemic compared with the true ruminants, which became further exacerbated on the LP diet, where they also sustained plasma urea at markedly higher concentrations. However, llamas had markedly lower leptin concentrations than the true ruminants. In conclusion, llamas appear to have an intrinsic insulin resistant phenotype. Augmentation of creatinine and sustenance of elevated plasma urea concentrations in llamas when fed the LP diet must reflect distinct metabolic adaptations of intermediary protein and/or nitrogen metabolism, not observed in the true ruminants. These features can contribute to explain lower metabolic rates in llamas compared with the true ruminants, which must improve the chances of survival on low protein content diets. PMID:26073222

  19. Scaling properties of evolutionary paths in a biophysical model of protein adaptation

    Manhart, Michael; Morozov, Alexandre V.

    2015-07-01

    The enormous size and complexity of genotypic sequence space frequently requires consideration of coarse-grained sequences in empirical models. We develop scaling relations to quantify the effect of this coarse-graining on properties of fitness landscapes and evolutionary paths. We first consider evolution on a simple Mount Fuji fitness landscape, focusing on how the length and predictability of evolutionary paths scale with the coarse-grained sequence length and alphabet. We obtain simple scaling relations for both the weak- and strong-selection limits, with a non-trivial crossover regime at intermediate selection strengths. We apply these results to evolution on a biophysical fitness landscape that describes how proteins evolve new binding interactions while maintaining their folding stability. We combine the scaling relations with numerical calculations for coarse-grained protein sequences to obtain quantitative properties of the model for realistic binding interfaces and a full amino acid alphabet.

  20. Adaptation of aphid stylectomy for analyses of proteins and mRNAs in barley phloem sap

    Gaupels, Frank; Buhtz, Anja; Knauer, Torsten; Deshmukh, Sachin; Waller, Frank; van Bel, Aart J. E.; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Kehr, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Sieve tubes are transport conduits not only for photoassimilates but also for macromolecules and other compounds that are involved in sieve tube maintenance and systemic signalling. In order to gain sufficient amounts of pure phloem exudates from barley plants for analyses of the protein and mRNA composition, a previously described stylectomy set-up was optimized. Aphids were placed in sealed cages, which, immediately after microcauterization of the stylets, were flooded with water-saturated ...

  1. TAL effectors: highly adaptable phytobacterial virulence factors and readily engineered DNA targeting proteins

    Doyle, Erin L.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are transcription factors injected into plant cells by pathogenic bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas. They function as virulence factors by activating host genes important for disease, or as avirulence factors by turning on genes that provide resistance. DNA binding specificity is encoded by polymorphic repeats in each protein that correspond one-to-one with different nucleotides. This code has facilitated target identification and opened new avenue...

  2. Adaptive hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions of mussel foot proteins with organic thin films

    Yu, J; Kan, Y.; M. Rapp; Danner, E; Wei, W.; Das, S.; Miller, DR; Chen, Y.; Waite, JH; Israelachvili, JN

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion of mussel foot proteins (Mfps) to a variety of specially engineered mineral and metal oxide surfaces has previously been investigated extensively, but the relevance of these studies to adhesion in biological environments remains unknown. Most solid surfaces exposed to seawater or physiological fluids become fouled by organic conditioning films and biofilms within minutes. Understanding the binding mechanisms of Mfps to organic films with known chemical and physical properties the...

  3. Adaptive BLASTing through the Sequence Dataspace: Theories on Protein Sequence Embedding

    Hong, Yoojin; Kang, Jaewoo; Lee, Dongwon; Patterson, Randen L.; van Rossum, Damian B.

    2009-01-01

    We theorize that phylogenetic profiles provide a quantitative method that can relate the structural and functional properties of proteins, as well as their evolutionary relationships. A key feature of phylogenetic profiles is the interoperable data format (e.g. alignment information, physiochemical information, genomic information, etc). Indeed, we have previously demonstrated Position Specific Scoring Matrices (PSSMs) are an informative M-dimension which can be scored from quantitative measu...

  4. COMPARISON OF STRESS PROTEINS PARTICIPATION IN ADAPTATION MECHANISMS OF BAIKALIAN AND PALEARCTIC AMPHIPOD (AMPHIPODA; CRUSTACEA) SPECIES

    Timofeyev M.A; Shatilina Zh.M.; Bedulina D.S.; Protopopova M.V.; Grabelnych O.I.; Pobezhimova T.P.; Kolesnichenko A.V.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was a study of the influence different stressful factor on syntheses and activity of the stress proteins (HSP70, sHSP and peroxidase) of freshwater organism. Six freshwater amphipod species were investigated: Eulimnogammarus cyaneus (Dyb.), E verrucosus (Gerstf.), E vittatus (Dyb.) - endemic species from Lake Baikal which were compared with Palearctic species - Gammarus lacustris Sars., G tigrinus (Sexton), Chaetogammarus ischnus (Stebbins). It was shown expressio...

  5. Expression of Uncoupling Protein 1 in Mouse Brown Adipose Tissue Is Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Isoform Specific and Required for Adaptive Thermogenesis

    Ribeiro, Miriam O.; Bianco, Suzy D. C.; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Schultz, James J.; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Bianco, Antonio C.; Brent, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    Cold-induced adaptive (or nonshivering) thermogenesis in small mammals is produced primarily in brown adipose tissue (BAT). BAT has been identified in humans and becomes more active after cold exposure. Heat production from BAT requires sympathetic nervous system stimulation, T3, and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression. Our previous studies with a thyroid hormone receptor-β (TRβ) isoform-selective agonist demonstrated that after TRβ stimulation alone, adaptive thermogenesis was markedly im...

  6. Characterization of an adapter subunit to a phosphatidylinositol (3)P 3-phosphatase: Identification of a myotubularin-related protein lacking catalytic activity

    Nandurkar, H. H.; Caldwell, K K; Whisstock, J C; Layton, M. J.; Gaudet, E. A.; Norris, F. A.; Majerus, P W; Mitchell, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The D3-phosphoinositides act as second messengers by recruiting, and thereby activating, diverse signaling proteins. We have previously described the purification of a rat phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] 3-phosphatase, comprising a heterodimer of a 78-kDa adapter subunit in complex with a 65-kDa catalytic subunit. Here, we have cloned and characterized the cDNA encoding the human 3-phosphatase adapter subunit (3-PAP). Sequence alignment showed that 3-PAP ...

  7. Effects of inhibitors of protein kinase C and NO-synthase on the radiation-induced cytogenetic adaptive response in Chinese hamster cells in culture

    The effect of the serine-threonin kinase inhibitor - staurosporine and inhibitor of NO-synthase - L-NAME on the radiation-induced adaptive response were studied in fibroblasts of Chinese hamster in culture. It is shown that staurosporine and L-NAME inhibit cytogenetic adaptive response induced by β-particles in low doses. Inhibition is not connected with radiosensitizing effect of these agents. L-NAME decreases significantly the γ-rays-induced chromosome aberration yield also. Study confirms the role of protein kinase C in induction of the adaptive response and participation of NO-synthase in this process is noticed for the first time

  8. Adaptation of Clostridium difficile toxin A for use as a protein translocation system

    Research highlights: → Catalytic domain of TcdA was replaced by a luciferase reporter. → Each functional domain retains activity in the context of the fusion protein. → We provide evidence that reporter proteins are delivered into vero cells. → System releases cargo into the cytosol, providing a powerful new biotechnology tool. -- Abstract: A cellular delivery system is a useful biotechnology tool, with many possible applications. Two derivatives of Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) have been constructed (GFP-TcdA and Luc-TcdA), by fusing reporter genes to functional domains of TcdA, and evaluated for their ability to translocate their cargo into mammalian cells. The cysteine protease and receptor binding domains of TcdA have been examined and found to be functional when expressed in the chimeric construct. Whereas GFP failed to internalize in the context of the TcdA fusion, significant cellular luciferase activity was detected in vero cell lysates after treatment with Luc-TcdA. Treatment with bafilomycin A1, which inhibits endosomal acidification, traps the luciferase activity within endosomes. To further understand these results, clarified lysates were subjected to molecular weight sieving, demonstrating that active luciferase was released from Luc-TcdA after translocation and internal processing.

  9. Role of hypothalamic melanocortin system in adaptation of food intake to food protein increase in mice.

    Bruno Pillot

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic melanocortin system--the melanocortin receptor of type 4 (MC4R and its ligands: α-melanin-stimulating hormone (α-MSH, agonist, inducing hypophagia, and agouti-related protein (AgRP, antagonist, inducing hyperphagia--is considered to play a central role in the control of food intake. We tested its implication in the mediation of the hunger-curbing effects of protein-enriched diets (PED in mice. Whereas there was a 20% decrease in food intake in mice fed on the PED, compared to mice fed on an isocaloric starch-enriched diet, there was a paradoxical decrease in expression of the hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin gene, precursor of α-MSH, and increase in expression of the gene encoding AgRP. The hypophagia effect of PED took place in mice with invalidation of either MC4R or POMC, and was even strengthened in mice with ablation of the AgRP-expressing neurons. These data strongly suggest that the hypothalamic melanocortin system does not mediate the hunger-curbing effects induced by changes in the macronutrient composition of food. Rather, the role of this system might be to defend the body against the variations in food intake generated by the nutritional environment.

  10. Adaptation of Clostridium difficile toxin A for use as a protein translocation system

    Kern, Stephanie M. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, 5101 Cass Ave, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Feig, Andrew L., E-mail: afeig@chem.wayne.edu [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, 5101 Cass Ave, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Catalytic domain of TcdA was replaced by a luciferase reporter. {yields} Each functional domain retains activity in the context of the fusion protein. {yields} We provide evidence that reporter proteins are delivered into vero cells. {yields} System releases cargo into the cytosol, providing a powerful new biotechnology tool. -- Abstract: A cellular delivery system is a useful biotechnology tool, with many possible applications. Two derivatives of Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) have been constructed (GFP-TcdA and Luc-TcdA), by fusing reporter genes to functional domains of TcdA, and evaluated for their ability to translocate their cargo into mammalian cells. The cysteine protease and receptor binding domains of TcdA have been examined and found to be functional when expressed in the chimeric construct. Whereas GFP failed to internalize in the context of the TcdA fusion, significant cellular luciferase activity was detected in vero cell lysates after treatment with Luc-TcdA. Treatment with bafilomycin A1, which inhibits endosomal acidification, traps the luciferase activity within endosomes. To further understand these results, clarified lysates were subjected to molecular weight sieving, demonstrating that active luciferase was released from Luc-TcdA after translocation and internal processing.

  11. The adaptive metabolic response involves specific protein glutathionylation during the filamentation process in the pathogen Candida albicans.

    Gergondey, R; Garcia, C; Serre, V; Camadro, J M; Auchère, F

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunist pathogen responsible for a large spectrum of infections, from superficial mycosis to the systemic disease candidiasis. Its ability to adopt various morphological forms, such as unicellular yeasts, filamentous pseudohyphae and hyphae, contributes to its ability to survive within the host. It has been suggested that the antioxidant glutathione is involved in the filamentation process. We investigated S-glutathionylation, the reversible binding of glutathione to proteins, and the functional consequences on C. albicans metabolic remodeling during the yeast-to-hyphae transition. Our work provided evidence for the specific glutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins involved in bioenergetics pathways in filamentous forms and a regulation of the main enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase, by glutathionylation. Isocitrate lyase inactivation in the hyphal forms was reversed by glutaredoxin treatment, in agreement with a glutathionylation process, which was confirmed by proteomic data showing the binding of one glutathione molecule to the enzyme (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003685). We also assessed the effect of alternative carbon sources on glutathione levels and isocitrate lyase activity. Changes in nutrient availability led to morphological flexibility and were related to perturbations in glutathione levels and isocitrate lyase activity, confirming the key role of the maintenance of intracellular redox status in the adaptive metabolic strategy of the pathogen. PMID:27083931

  12. COMPARISON OF STRESS PROTEINS PARTICIPATION IN ADAPTATION MECHANISMS OF BAIKALIAN AND PALEARCTIC AMPHIPOD (AMPHIPODA; CRUSTACEA SPECIES

    Timofeyev M.A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was a study of the influence different stressful factor on syntheses and activity of the stress proteins (HSP70, sHSP and peroxidase of freshwater organism. Six freshwater amphipod species were investigated: Eulimnogammarus cyaneus (Dyb., E verrucosus (Gerstf., E vittatus (Dyb. - endemic species from Lake Baikal which were compared with Palearctic species - Gammarus lacustris Sars., G tigrinus (Sexton, Chaetogammarus ischnus (Stebbins. It was shown expression of sHSP by heat and toxic stresses for all amphipods species. Oxidative stress induced HSP70 for Palearctic species G tigrinus and C ischnus but not for baikalian species. Heat stress did not caused the increase of HSP70 level for Baikalian species of amphipods. The activity of the peroxidase was decrease by heat and toxic stresses. Oxidative stress caused the increase of peroxidase activity for Palearctic species, and the decrease for Baikalian once.

  13. Adaptive and maladaptive expression of the mRNA regulatory protein HuR

    Suman; Govindaraju; Beth; S; Lee

    2013-01-01

    The RNA-binding proteins involved in regulation of mRNA post-transcriptional processing and translation control the fates of thousands of mRNA transcripts and basic cellular processes. The best studied of these, HuR, is well characterized as a mediator of mRNA stability and translation, and more recently, as a factor in nuclear functions such as pre-mRNA splicing. Due to HuR’s role in regulating thousands of mRNA transcripts, including those for other RNA-binding proteins, HuR can act as a master regulator of cell survival and proliferation. HuR itself is subject to multiple post-translationa modifications including regulation of its nucleocytoplasmic distribution. However, the mechanisms that govern HuR levels in the cell have only recently begun to be defined. These mechanisms are critical to cell health, as it has become clear in recent years that aberrant expression of HuR can lead alternately to decreased cell viability or to promotion of pathological proliferation and invasiveness. HuR is expressed as alternate mRNAs that vary in their untranslated regions, leading to differences in transcript stability and translatability. Multiple transcription factors and modulators of mRNA stability that regulate HuR mRNA expression have been identified. In addition, translation of HuR is regulated by numerous microRNAs, several of which have been demonstrated to have anti-tumor properties due to their suppression of HuR expression. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the factors that regulate HuR expression, along with the circumstances under which these factors contribute to cancer and inflammation.

  14. Parameters of the reproductive tract, spermatogenesis, daily sperm production and major seminal plasma proteins of tropically adapted morada nova rams.

    Sousa, F M L; Lobo, C H; Menezes, E S B; Rego, J P A; Oliveira, R V; Lima-Souza, A C; Fioramonte, M; Gozzo, F C; Pompeu, R C F F; Cândido, M J D; Oliveira, J T; Moura, A A

    2014-06-01

    This study describes the reproductive parameters of Morada Nova rams, a breed of hair sheep from Brazil and with unique adaption to tropical environments. At 42 weeks of age, 15 rams were subjected to semen collection and, 1 week later, animals were slaughtered for collection of testes, epididymis and accessory sex glands. We conducted 2-D electrophoresis of seminal plasma proteins and major spots of stained gels were identified by LC-MS/MS. Total RNA was isolated from testis, epididymis and vesicular glands and subjected to qPCR. At slaughter, scrotal circumference and testicular weight were 27.5 ± 0.5 cm and 109.5 ± 6.0 g, respectively. Seminiferous tubule (ST) diameter was 188.3 ± 4.0 μm and each testis contained 1.9 ± 0.1 Sertoli cells (×10(9) ). Each Sertoli cell supported 0.1 ± 0.01 A spermatogonia, 3.0 ± 0.2 pachytene spermatocytes and 7.7 ± 0.5 round spermatids/tubule cross section. Daily sperm production reached 5.6 × 10(6)  cells/g of testis parenchyma. Testis size appeared as indicative of ST diameter and associated with epididymal measurements, as well as with the population of round spermatids and Sertoli cells/testis. Rams with heavier testes had greater daily sperm production and more Sertoli cells/testis. We detected 90.9 ± 9.6 spots per 2-D gel of seminal plasma. Major seminal proteins were identified as ram seminal vesicle proteins at 14 and 22 kDa, representing 16.2% and 12.8% of the total intensity of valid spots in the gels, respectively. Expression of both genes was greater in the vesicular glands as compared to testis and epididymis. Pixel intensity for those proteins in the 2-D gels was significantly correlated with seminal vesicle weight. This is the first description of the basic reproductive aspects of Morada Nova rams, including protein profiles of their seminal plasma. These findings will allow a better understanding of their reproductive physiology. PMID:24716618

  15. Peptide-polymer ligands for a tandem WW-domain, an adaptive multivalent protein-protein interaction: lessons on the thermodynamic fitness of flexible ligands.

    Koschek, Katharina; Durmaz, Vedat; Krylova, Oxana; Wieczorek, Marek; Gupta, Shilpi; Richter, Martin; Bujotzek, Alexander; Fischer, Christina; Haag, Rainer; Freund, Christian; Weber, Marcus; Rademann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Three polymers, poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (pHPMA), hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG), and dextran were investigated as carriers for multivalent ligands targeting the adaptive tandem WW-domain of formin-binding protein (FBP21). Polymer carriers were conjugated with 3-9 copies of the proline-rich decapeptide GPPPRGPPPR-NH2 (P1). Binding of the obtained peptide-polymer conjugates to the tandem WW-domain was investigated employing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to determine the binding affinity, the enthalpic and entropic contributions to free binding energy, and the stoichiometry of binding for all peptide-polymer conjugates. Binding affinities of all multivalent ligands were in the µM range, strongly amplified compared to the monovalent ligand P1 with a K D > 1 mM. In addition, concise differences were observed, pHPMA and hPG carriers showed moderate affinity and bound 2.3-2.8 peptides per protein binding site resulting in the formation of aggregates. Dextran-based conjugates displayed affinities down to 1.2 µM, forming complexes with low stoichiometry, and no precipitation. Experimental results were compared with parameters obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the observed differences between the three carrier materials. In summary, the more rigid and condensed peptide-polymer conjugates based on the dextran scaffold seem to be superior to induce multivalent binding and to increase affinity, while the more flexible and dendritic polymers, pHPMA and hPG are suitable to induce crosslinking upon binding. PMID:26124884

  16. Gene 33/Mig-6, a Transcriptionally Inducible Adapter Protein That Binds GTP-Cdc42 and Activates SAPK/JNK*

    Makkinje, Anthony; Quinn, Deborah A.; Chen, Ang; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Force, Thomas; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Kyriakis, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extra-cellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  17. Adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is a central hub for phosphotyrosine-mediated interactions in T cells.

    Marc Sylvester

    Full Text Available TCR stimulation leads to an increase in cellular adhesion among other outcomes. The adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is known to be rapidly phosphorylated after T cell stimulation and relays the TCR signal to adhesion molecules of the integrin family. While three tyrosine phosphorylation sites have been characterized biochemically, the binding capabilities and associated functions of several other potential phosphotyrosine motifs remain unclear. Here, we utilize in vitro phosphorylation and mass spectrometry to map novel phosphotyrosine sites in the C-terminal part of human ADAP (486-783. Individual tyrosines were then mutated to phenylalanine and their relevance for cellular adhesion and migration was tested experimentally. Functionally important tyrosine residues include two sites within the folded hSH3 domains of ADAP and two at the C-terminus. Furthermore, using a peptide pulldown approach in combination with stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC we identified SLP-76, PLCgamma, PIK3R1, Nck, CRK, Gads, and RasGAP as phospho-dependent binding partners of a central YDDV motif of ADAP. The phosphorylation-dependent interaction between ADAP and Nck was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, immunoprecipitation and binary pulldown experiments, indicating that ADAP directly links integrins to modulators of the cytoskeleton independent of SLP-76.

  18. Time course analysis reveals gene-specific transcript and protein kinetics of adaptation to short-term aerobic exercise training in human skeletal muscle

    Brendan Egan; Paul L O'Connor; Juleen R. Zierath; Donal J O'Gorman

    2013-01-01

    Repeated bouts of episodic myofibrillar contraction associated with exercise training are potent stimuli for physiological adaptation. However, the time course of adaptation and the continuity between alterations in mRNA expression and protein content are not well described in human skeletal muscle. Eight healthy, sedentary males cycled for 60 min at 80% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) each day for fourteen consecutive days, resulting in an increase in VO2peak of 17.5±3.8%. Skeletal musc...

  19. Effects of dihydrocapsiate on adaptive and diet-induced thermogenesis with a high protein very low calorie diet: a randomized control trial

    Zerlin Alona; Li Zhaoping; Lee TszYing; Heber David

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Dihydrocapsiate (DCT) is a natural safe food ingredient which is structurally related to capsaicin from chili pepper and is found in the non-pungent pepper strain, CH-19 Sweet. It has been shown to elicit the thermogenic effects of capsaicin but without its gastrointestinal side effects. Methods The present study was designed to examine the effects of DCT on both adaptive thermogenesis as the result of caloric restriction with a high protein very low calorie diet (VLCD) an...

  20. How to Make a Non-Antigenic Protein (Auto) Antigenic: Molecular Complementarity Alters Antigen Processing and Activates Adaptive-Innate Immunity Synergy.

    Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that complementary proteins and peptides form complexes with increased antigenicity and/or autoimmunogenicity. Five case studies are highlighted: 1) diphtheria toxin-antitoxin (antibody), which induces immunity to the normally non-antigenic toxin, and autoimmune neuritis; 2) tryptophan peptide of myelin basic protein and muramyl dipeptide ("adjuvant peptide"), which form a complex that induces experimental allergic encephalomyelitis; 3) an insulin and glucagon complex that is far more antigenic than either component individually; 4) various causes of experimental autoimmune myocarditis such as C protein in combination with its antibody, or coxsackie B virus in combination with the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor; 5) influenza A virus haemagglutinin with the outer membrane protein of the Haemophilus influenzae, which increases antigenicity. Several mechanisms cooperate to alter immunogenicity. Complexation alters antigen processing, protecting the components against proteolysis, altering fragmentation and presenting novel antigens to the immune system. Complementary antigens induce complementary adaptive immune responses (complementary antibodies and/or T cell receptors) that produce circulating immune complexes (CIC). CIC stimulate innate immunity. Concurrently, complementary antigens stimulate multiple Toll-like receptors that synergize to over-produce cytokines, which further stimulate adaptive immunity. Thus innate and adaptive immunity form a positive feedback loop. If components of the complex mimic a host protein, then autoimmunity may result. Enhanced antigenicity for production of improved vaccines and/or therapeutic autoimmunity (e.g., against cancer cells) might be achieved by using information from antibody or TCR recognition sites to complement an antigen; by panning for complements in randomized peptide libraries; or using antisense peptide strategies to design complements. PMID:26179268

  1. Shift in the isoelectric-point of milk proteins as a consequence of adaptive divergence between the milks of mammalian species.

    Khaldi, Nora

    2011-07-29

    Abstract Background Milk proteins are required to proceed through a variety of conditions of radically varying pH, which are not identical across mammalian digestive systems. We wished to investigate if the shifts in these requirements have resulted in marked changes in the isoelectric point and charge of milk proteins during evolution. Results We investigated nine major milk proteins in 13 mammals. In comparison with a group of orthologous non-milk proteins, we found that 3 proteins κ-casein, lactadherin, and muc1 have undergone the highest change in isoelectric point during evolution. The pattern of non-synonymous substitutions indicate that selection has played a role in the isoelectric point shift, since residues that show significant evidence of positive selection are much more likely to be charged (p = 0.03 for κ-casein; p < 10-8 for muc1). However, this selection does not appear to be solely due to adaptation to the diversity of mammalian digestive systems, since striking changes are seen among species that resemble each other in terms of their digestion. Conclusion The changes in charge are most likely due to changes of other protein functions, rather than an adaptation to the different mammalian digestive systems. These functions may include differences in bioactive peptide releases in the gut between different mammals, which are known to be a major contributing factor in the functional and nutritional value of mammalian milk. This raises the question of whether bovine milk is optimal in terms of particular protein functions, for human nutrition and possibly disease resistance. This article was reviewed by Fyodor Kondrashov, David Liberles (nominated by David Ardell), and Christophe Lefevre (nominated by Mark Ragan).

  2. Reconstruction of the most recent common ancestor sequences of SARS-Cov S gene and detection of adaptive evolution in the spike protein

    ZHANG Yuan; ZHENG Nan; HAO Pei; ZHONG Yang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The genome organization and expression strategy of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARSCoV) have been described extensivelyl1- 10]. As a structural glycoprotein on the virion surface, the spike protein is responsible for binding to host cellular receptors and for the fusion between the viral envelope and the cellular membrane. It also induces neutralizing antibodies in the host and mediates cellular immunity[11]. Previous studies suggested that amino acid replacements in the spike protein could dramatically alter the pathogenesis and virulence of some coronaviruses[11]. It is therefore reasonable to test the hypothesis that radical amino acid replacements in the spike protein, favored by environmental selective pressure during the process of SARS-CoV interspecific transmission[10], might make this pathogen adapt to a new host. In this study, we investigated a total of 108complete sequences of the SARS-CoV S gene from GenBank (until March 23, 2004). After omission of those records containing frame-shift mutations or low quality sequences, e.g. ZJ01, and selection of one sequence for identical records, an alignment of 42 sequences was obtained using the program Clustal-X[13]. Then, we reconstructed the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) sequences of the SARS-CoV S gene and detected the adaptive evolution in the spike protein.

  3. Natural selection of adaptive mutations in non-structural genes increases trans-encapsidation of hepatitis C virus replicons lacking envelope protein genes.

    Fournier, Carole; Helle, François; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; François, Catherine; Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2013-05-01

    A trans-packaging system for hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons lacking envelope glycoproteins was developed. The replicons were efficiently encapsidated into infectious particles after expression in trans of homologous HCV envelope proteins under the control of an adenoviral vector. Interestingly, expression in trans of core or core, p7 and NS2 with envelope proteins did not enhance trans-encapsidation. Expression of heterologous envelope proteins, in the presence or absence of heterologous core, p7 and NS2, did not rescue single-round infectious particle production. To increase the titre of homologous, single-round infectious particles in our system, successive cycles of trans-encapsidation and infection were performed. Four cycles resulted in a 100-fold increase in the yield of particles. Sequence analysis revealed a total of 16 potential adaptive mutations in two independent experiments. Except for a core mutation in one experiment, all the mutations were located in non-structural regions mainly in NS5A (four in domain III and two near the junction with the NS5B gene). Reverse genetics studies suggested that D2437A and S2443T adaptive mutations, which are located at the NS5A-B cleavage site did not affect viral replication, but enhanced the single-round infectious particles assembly only in trans-encapsidation model. In conclusion, our trans-encapsidation system enables the production of HCV single-round infectious particles. This system is adaptable and can positively select variants. The adapted variants promote trans-encapsidation and should constitute a valuable tool in the development of replicon-based HCV vaccines. PMID:23288424

  4. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  5. Rapid and Adaptable Measurement of Protein Thermal Stability by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry: Updating a Common Biochemical Laboratory Experiment

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Hoops, Geoffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of protein denaturation and protein folding is a common laboratory technique used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring protein thermal stability in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the thermal…

  6. High-intensity interval training-induced metabolic adaptation coupled with an increase in Hif-1α and glycolytic protein expression.

    Abe, Takaaki; Kitaoka, Yu; Kikuchi, Dale Manjiro; Takeda, Kohei; Numata, Osamu; Takemasa, Tohru

    2015-12-01

    It is known that repeated bouts of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) lead to enhanced levels of glycolysis, glycogenesis, and lactate transport proteins in skeletal muscle; however, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptations. To decipher the mechanism leading to improvement of skeletal muscle glycolytic capacity associated with HIIT, we examined the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (Hif-1α), the major transcription factor regulating the expression of genes related to anaerobic metabolism, in the adaptation to HIIT. First, we induced Hif-1α accumulation using ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB) to assess the potential role of Hif-1α in skeletal muscle. Treatment with EDHB significantly increased the protein levels of Hif-1α in gastrocnemius muscles, accompanied by elevated expression of genes related to glycolysis, glycogenesis, and lactate transport. Daily administration of EDHB for 1 wk resulted in elevated glycolytic enzyme activity in gastrocnemius muscles. Second, we examined whether a single bout of HIIT could induce Hif-1α protein accumulation and subsequent increase in the expression of genes related to anaerobic metabolism in skeletal muscle. We observed that the protein levels of Hif-1α and expression of the target genes were elevated 3 h after an acute bout of HIIT in gastrocnemius muscles. Last, we examined the effects of long-term HIIT. We found that long-term HIIT increased the basal levels of Hif-1α as well as the glycolytic capacity in gastrocnemius muscles. Our results suggest that Hif-1α is a key regulator in the metabolic adaptation to high-intensity training. PMID:26429867

  7. Adaptation of HepG2 cells to a steady-state reduction in the content of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) catalytic subunit

    Boylan, Joan M. [Department of Pediatrics, Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Salomon, Arthur R. [Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Tantravahi, Umadevi [Division of Genetics, Department of Pathology, Brown University and Women and Infants Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Gruppuso, Philip A., E-mail: philip_gruppuso@brown.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is a ubiquitous Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in an array of cellular processes. To assess the potential of PP6 as a therapeutic target in liver disorders, we attenuated expression of the PP6 catalytic subunit in HepG2 cells using lentiviral-transduced shRNA. Two PP6 knock-down (PP6KD) cell lines (90% reduction of PP6-C protein content) were studied in depth. Both proliferated at a rate similar to control cells. However, flow cytometry indicated G2/M cell cycle arrest that was accounted for by a shift of the cells from a diploid to tetraploid state. PP6KD cells did not show an increase in apoptosis, nor did they exhibit reduced viability in the presence of bleomycin or taxol. Gene expression analysis by microarray showed attenuated anti-inflammatory signaling. Genes associated with DNA replication were downregulated. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis yielded 80 phosphopeptides representing 56 proteins that were significantly affected by a stable reduction in PP6-C. Proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and pre-mRNA splicing were overrepresented among these. PP6KD cells showed intact mTOR signaling. Our studies demonstrated involvement of PP6 in a diverse set of biological pathways and an adaptive response that may limit the effectiveness of targeting PP6 in liver disorders. - Highlights: • Lentiviral-transduced shRNA was used to generate a stable knockdown of PP6 in HepG2 cells. • Cells adapted to reduced PP6; cell proliferation was unaffected, and cell survival was normal. • However, PP6 knockdown was associated with a transition to a tetraploid state. • Genomic profiling showed downregulated anti-inflammatory signaling and DNA replication. • Phosphoproteomic profiling showed changes in proteins associated with DNA replication and repair.

  8. Adaptation of HepG2 cells to a steady-state reduction in the content of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) catalytic subunit

    Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is a ubiquitous Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in an array of cellular processes. To assess the potential of PP6 as a therapeutic target in liver disorders, we attenuated expression of the PP6 catalytic subunit in HepG2 cells using lentiviral-transduced shRNA. Two PP6 knock-down (PP6KD) cell lines (90% reduction of PP6-C protein content) were studied in depth. Both proliferated at a rate similar to control cells. However, flow cytometry indicated G2/M cell cycle arrest that was accounted for by a shift of the cells from a diploid to tetraploid state. PP6KD cells did not show an increase in apoptosis, nor did they exhibit reduced viability in the presence of bleomycin or taxol. Gene expression analysis by microarray showed attenuated anti-inflammatory signaling. Genes associated with DNA replication were downregulated. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis yielded 80 phosphopeptides representing 56 proteins that were significantly affected by a stable reduction in PP6-C. Proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and pre-mRNA splicing were overrepresented among these. PP6KD cells showed intact mTOR signaling. Our studies demonstrated involvement of PP6 in a diverse set of biological pathways and an adaptive response that may limit the effectiveness of targeting PP6 in liver disorders. - Highlights: • Lentiviral-transduced shRNA was used to generate a stable knockdown of PP6 in HepG2 cells. • Cells adapted to reduced PP6; cell proliferation was unaffected, and cell survival was normal. • However, PP6 knockdown was associated with a transition to a tetraploid state. • Genomic profiling showed downregulated anti-inflammatory signaling and DNA replication. • Phosphoproteomic profiling showed changes in proteins associated with DNA replication and repair

  9. Peptide–polymer ligands for a tandem WW-domain, an adaptive multivalent protein–protein interaction: lessons on the thermodynamic fitness of flexible ligands

    Katharina Koschek; Vedat Durmaz; Oxana Krylova; Marek Wieczorek; Shilpi Gupta; Martin Richter; Alexander Bujotzek; Christina Fischer; Rainer Haag; Christian Freund; Marcus Weber; Jörg Rademann

    2015-01-01

    Three polymers, poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (pHPMA), hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG), and dextran were investigated as carriers for multivalent ligands targeting the adaptive tandem WW-domain of formin-binding protein (FBP21). Polymer carriers were conjugated with 3–9 copies of the proline-rich decapeptide GPPPRGPPPR-NH2 (P1). Binding of the obtained peptide–polymer conjugates to the tandem WW-domain was investigated employing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to determine t...

  10. Multi-omic profiling of EPO-producing Chinese hamster ovary cell panel reveals metabolic adaptation to heterologous protein production

    Ley, Daniel; Kazemi Seresht, Ali; Engmark, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. The production of heterologous proteins in CHO cells imposes a burden on the host cell metabolism and impact cellular physiology on a global scale. In this work, a multi-omics approach was applied t...

  11. Adaptation of low-resolution methods for the study of yeast microsomal polytopic membrane proteins: a methodological review.

    Bochud, Arlette; Ramachandra, Nagaraju; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Most integral membrane proteins of yeast with two or more membrane-spanning sequences have not yet been crystallized and for many of them the side on which the active sites or ligand-binding domains reside is unknown. Also, bioinformatic topology predictions are not yet fully reliable. However, so-called low-resolution biochemical methods can be used to locate hydrophilic loops or individual residues of polytopic membrane proteins at one or the other side of the membrane. The advantages and limitations of several such methods for topological studies with yeast ER integral membrane proteins are discussed. We also describe new tools that allow us to better control and validate results obtained with SCAM (substituted cysteine accessibility method), an approach that determines the position of individual residues with respect to the membrane plane, whereby only minimal changes in the primary sequence have to be introduced into the protein of interest. PMID:23356255

  12. Stress proteins synthesis as a plant adaptive response on the different irradiation conditions and heavy metal influence

    Prokhnevsky, A.I.; Sorochinsky, B.V. [Institute of Cell Biology and Genetic Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-03-01

    Irradiance in low doses and heavy metal salt can be a strong stress factor, which affect plants. The role of this influence has increased after Chernobyl accident. Stress proteins (metallothioneins 1 and 2, and heat shock protein 70) induction for 14-days Pisum sativum and Zea mays seedings has been investigated under different stress factors. Acute and chronic irradiation, growth of seedings in Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and {sup 137}Cs salt solutions, and high temperature we used as stress factors. Dependence of stress proteins synthesis of plants from different physical and chemical factors were investigated by the methods of Laemmli-electrophoresis and western-blotting with antibody against MT-1, MT-2 and HSP-70. The stress proteins participation in the protection of plants from different environmental conditions are discussed. (authors)

  13. Self-selection of dietary protein and energy by broilers grown under a tropical climate: adaptation when exposed to choice feeding at different ages.

    Yo, T; Siegel, P B; Faure, J M; Picard, M

    1998-04-01

    Three hundred broiler chicks (Hubbard) of both sexes were assigned to five feeding treatments: T0 received a complete diet (control), T1 was a choice feeding system with simultaneous access to an energy-rich feed (ground corn) and a protein concentrate (43.7% CP), and T2, T3, and T4 were introduced to choice feeding after 1, 3, and 5 wk, respectively, of consuming the complete diet. At 1-d-old, T1 chicks showed a marked preference for corn, with only 21.4% of their intake being the protein concentrate diet. Intake of the concentrate progressively increased to 40 to 45% after 3 d of adaptation, resulting in diets with 22.5 to 24.3% CP. When broilers fed the complete diet for 1 to 5 wk (T2, T3, T4) were changed to choice feeding, on the 1st d, their feed choice intake was similar to that of T1 chicks at the same age. Visual observation and tactile assessment of the feed particles during the initial period allowed the chicks to quickly evaluate the new feeds and to adapt their feeding behavior. Although total feed intake to 6 wk of age was not significantly affected by the feeding treatments, broilers on choice feeding selected diets with a lower percentage of CP and had lower live body weights at 6 wk than those fed the complete diet (T0). PMID:9565230

  14. Testis-enriched heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2): Adaptive advantages of the birds with internal testes over the mammals with testicular descent.

    Padhi, Abinash; Ghaly, Mona M; Ma, Li

    2016-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2), a member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) family, plays an important role in spermatogenesis and male fertility. Although HSPA2 is evolutionarily highly conserved across the metazoan lineages, the observation of striking differences in temperature-sensitive expressions, testicular physiology, spermatogenesis, as well as its role in male fertility indicates that avian and mammalian HSPA2 may exhibit distinct evolutionary trajectory. The present study reports that while mammalian HSPA2 is constrained by intense purifying selection, avian HSPA2 has been subjected to positive selection. The majority of the positively selected amino acid residues fall on the α-helix and β-sheets of the peptide-binding domain located at the carboxyl-terminal region of the avian HSPA2. The detection of positively selected sites at the helix and β-sheets, which are less tolerant to molecular adaptation, indicates an important functional consequence and contribution to the structural and functional diversification of the avian HSPA2. Collectively, avian HSPA2 may have an adaptive advantage over the mammals in response to heat stress, and therefore, mammals with testicular descent may be at a greater risk in the event of scrotal temperature rise. PMID:26733092

  15. Signature of protein adaptation to warm deep sea environments: the case of Initiation Factor 6 studied by molecular simulation and neutron scattering

    The protein Initiation Factor 6 (IF6) takes part in the protein synthesis regulation of several organisms. It was also found in archeaebacteria such as Methanococcus jannaschii which lives in deep-seas near hydrothermal vents where temperature reaches 80 C and pressure is between 250 bar and 500 bar. The aim of this work was to study for the first time dynamical and structural properties of IF6 produced by M. jannaschii and comparing them with those of the IF6 homologue present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae which lives at 'normal' environmental conditions (27 C and 1 bar). Molecular simulation gave here new insights into the adaptation of these two proteins to their respective physiological conditions and showed that the latter induced similar dynamical and structural properties: in their respective 'natural' conditions, IF6s show very similar structural fluctuations and the characteristic relaxation times which define their dynamical properties shows similar changes when comparing unfavorable conditions to physiological ones. The creation of these corresponding states between the two homologues has been interpreted by the fractional Brownian dynamics model and by a novel method for the characterization of protein secondary structures. The latter is presented here in detail together with some examples of other applications. Experimental data obtained from quasi-elastic neutron scattering seemed to support the results obtained by molecular simulations. (author)

  16. Identification and modulation of a growth hormone-binding protein in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) plasma during seawater adaptation.

    Sohm, F.; Manfroid, Isabelle; Pezet, A.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise; Rand-Weaver, M; Kelly, P A; Boeuf, G.; Postel-Vinay, M C; de Luze, A; Edery, M.

    1998-01-01

    A soluble protein that specifically bound 125I-human growth hormone (hGH) was identified in rainbow trout plasma, using HPLC-gel filtration. The binding affinity of the protein for hGH was 1.2 x 10(9)M-1. 125I-rainbow trout GH (tGH) was also able to bind to the protein albeit with a lower affinity (6.6 x 10(7)M-1) than hGH. Crosslinking experiments using 125I-hGH revealed two specific bands of 150 and 130 kDa. The complex 125I-hGH-BP could be precipitated by a monoclonal anti-GH receptor anti...

  17. Population Growth of the Generalist Mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Acaridida) Following Adaptation to High- or Low-Fat and High- or Low-Protein Diets and the Effect of Dietary Switch.

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Hubert, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is a cosmopolitan generalist feeder that prefers foodstuffs of high-fat and high-protein content. Our aim was to investigate the population growth of T. putrescentiae after long-term nutritional adaptation to two distinct diets that are commonly infested in the synanthropic environment. Crushed dry dog food kernels provided a high-fat, high-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet, whereas wholemeal spelt flour provided a low-protein, low-fat, and high-carbohydrate diet. After >6 mo of nutritional adaptation, each of the two populations were used in two 28-d population growth tests: one that mites remained on their adaptation diet (homogenous diet treatment) and one that mites underwent a dietary switch (dietary switch treatment). Dietary treatment, nutritional adaptation, and their interaction all significantly influenced population growth. The homogenous diet treatment showed 7.5 times higher growth on the dog food diet than on flour. In the dietary switch, flour-adapted mites switching to dog food experienced five times greater population growth than the flour-adapted mites remained on flour, whereas the dog food-adapted population showed a 2.8-fold decrease in population growth when transferred to the flour. A comparison of means between the two dietary switch treatments showed a 1.9-fold higher population growth after flour-adapted mites were shifted to dog food than when the dog food-adapted mites were shifted to flour. We demonstrated that T. putrescentiae is able survive and reproduce for many generations on dry dog food and flour with different levels of success. High-fat and -protein food accelerated T. putrescentiae population growth compared with the high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:26314031

  18. The G-protein gamma subunit gpc-1 of the nematode C.elegans is involved in taste adaptation.

    G. Jansen (Gert); D. Weinkove (David); R.A. Plasterk (Ronald)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCaenorhabditis elegans has two heterotrimeric G-protein gamma subunits, gpc-1 and gpc-2. Although GPC-1 is specifically expressed in sensory neurons, it is not essential for the detection of odorants or salts. To test whether GPC-1 is involved in sensory plasticity, we

  19. Contrast in adaptive mass gains : Eurasian golden plovers store fat before midwinter and protein before prebreeding flight

    Piersma, T; Jukema, J

    2002-01-01

    Before predictable periods of high nutritional demand and little or no intake, vertebrates store fuel mainly composed of energy-dense lipids or energy-poor but protein-rich muscle tissue. Documenting contrasts in fuel composition and storage patterns within species, or even within individuals, would

  20. Lysine(63)-linked ubiquitylation of PIN2 auxin carrier protein governs hormonally controlled adaptation of Arabidopsis root growth

    Leitner, J.; Petrášek, Jan; Tomanov, K.; Retzer, K.; Pařezová, Markéta; Korbei, B.; Bachmair, A.; Zažímalová, Eva; Luschnig, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 21 (2012), s. 8322-8327. ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2476 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : PLASMA-MEMBRANE PROTEIN * EFFLUX CARRIER * INTRACELLULAR TRAFFICKING Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of the membrane proteins of two Haemophilus parasuis strains to identify proteins that may help in habitat adaptation and pathogenesis

    Zhang, Luhua; Wen, Yiping; Ying LI; Wei, Xingliang; Yan, Xuefeng; wen, Xintian; Wu, Rui; Huang, Xiaobo; Huang, Yong; Yan, Qigui; Liu, Mafeng; Cao, Sanjie

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer’s disease characterized by polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis in pig, leading to serious economic loss. Despite many years of study, virulence factors and the mechanisms of the entire infection process remain largely unclear. So two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to search for distinctions at the membrane protein expression level between two H. parasuis isolates aimed at uncovering some pr...

  2. Effects of dihydrocapsiate on adaptive and diet-induced thermogenesis with a high protein very low calorie diet: a randomized control trial

    Zerlin Alona

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrocapsiate (DCT is a natural safe food ingredient which is structurally related to capsaicin from chili pepper and is found in the non-pungent pepper strain, CH-19 Sweet. It has been shown to elicit the thermogenic effects of capsaicin but without its gastrointestinal side effects. Methods The present study was designed to examine the effects of DCT on both adaptive thermogenesis as the result of caloric restriction with a high protein very low calorie diet (VLCD and to determine whether DCT would increase post-prandial energy expenditure (PPEE in response to a 400 kcal/60 g protein liquid test meal. Thirty-three subjects completed an outpatient very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day providing 120 g/day protein over 4 weeks and were randomly assigned to receive either DCT capsules three times per day (3 mg or 9 mg or placebo. At baseline and 4 weeks, fasting basal metabolic rate and PPEE were measured in a metabolic hood and fat free mass (FFM determined using displacement plethysmography (BOD POD. Results PPEE normalized to FFM was increased significantly in subjects receiving 9 mg/day DCT by comparison to placebo (p Conclusions These data provide evidence for postprandial increases in thermogenesis and fat oxidation secondary to administration of dihydrocapsiate. Trial registration clinicaltrial.govNCT01142687

  3. Translational arrest due to cytoplasmic redox stress delays adaptation to growth on methanol and heterologous protein expression in a typical fed-batch culture of Pichia pastoris.

    Bryn Edwards-Jones

    Full Text Available We have followed a typical fed-batch induction regime for heterologous protein production under the control of the AOX1 promoter using both microarray and metabolomic analysis. The genetic constructs involved 1 and 3 copies of the TRY1 gene, encoding human trypsinogen. In small-scale laboratory cultures, expression of the 3 copy-number construct induced the unfolded protein response (UPR sufficiently that titres of extracellular trypsinogen were lower in the 3-copy construct than with the 1-copy construct. In the fed-batch-culture, a similar pattern was observed, with higher expression from the 1-copy construct, but in this case there was no significant induction of UPR with the 3-copy strain. Analysis of the microarray and metabolomic information indicates that the 3-copy strain was undergoing cytoplasmic redox stress at the point of induction with methanol. In this Crabtree-negative yeast, this redox stress appeared to delay the adaptation to growth on methanol and supressed heterologous protein production, probably due to a block in translation.Although redox imbalance as a result of artificially imposed hypoxia has previously been described, this is the first time that it has been characterised as a result of a transient metabolic imbalance and shown to involve a stress response which can lead to translational arrest. Without detailed analysis of the underlying processes it could easily have been mis-interpreted as secretion stress, transmitted through the UPR.

  4. A homogeneous fluorescence polarization assay adaptable for a range of protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases.

    Gaudet, Elizabeth A; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Wei; Mark, David; Sportsman, J Richard

    2003-04-01

    Recently, a new technology for high-throughput screening has been developed, called IMAP(patent pending). IMAP technology has previously been implemented in an assay for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE). The authors describe the development of a homogeneous, non-antibody-based fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for a variety of protein kinases. In this assay, fluorescently labeled peptide substrate phosphorylated by the kinase is captured on modified nanoparticles through interactions with immobilized metal (M(III)) coordination complexes, resulting in a change from low to high polarization values. This assay is applicable to protein kinases that phosphorylate serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues. The IMAP platform is very compatible with high-throughput robotics and can be applied to the 1536-well format. As there are hundreds of different kinases coded for in the human genome, the assay platform described in this report is a valuable new tool in drug discovery. PMID:12844437

  5. Grp78 Heterozygosity Promotes Adaptive Unfolded Protein Response and Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Ye, Risheng; Jung, Dae Young; Jun, John Y.; Li, Jianze; Luo, Shengzhan; Ko, Hwi Jin; Kim, Jason K.; Lee, Amy S

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78/BiP in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male Grp78 +/− mice and their wild-type littermates were subjected to a high-fat diet (HFD) regimen. Pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes was examined by multiple approaches of metabolic phenotyping. Tissue-specific insulin sensitivity was analyzed by hyperinsulinemic-eug...

  6. Protein C Activity in Dogs: Adaptation of a Commercial Human Colorimetric Assay and Evaluation of Effects of Storage Time and Temperature

    Michael M. Fry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives of this study were to adapt a commercial human protein C (PC colorimetric assay for use in dogs and to investigate effects of various storage conditions. The human assay was modified by using pooled canine plasma for calibration and by increasing the activation time. PC activity was measured in fresh canine plasma and in plasma stored under various conditions. PC activity of some stored samples was significantly different from that of fresh plasma; however, differences were small. No difference was detected in samples stored under similar conditions but analyzed in different laboratories using similar methodology. Results of this study indicate that the human colorimetric assay is suitable for canine samples if pooled canine plasma is used for calibration, that Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute sample storage guidelines developed for testing in humans are appropriate for dogs, and that comparisons of results from laboratories using similar methodology are legitimate.

  7. Comparison of two adaptive temperature-based replica exchange methods applied to a sharp phase transition of protein unfolding-folding

    Lee, Michael S.; Olson, Mark A.

    2011-06-01

    Temperature-based replica exchange (T-ReX) enhances sampling of molecular dynamics simulations by autonomously heating and cooling simulation clients via a Metropolis exchange criterion. A pathological case for T-ReX can occur when a change in state (e.g., folding to unfolding of a protein) has a large energetic difference over a short temperature interval leading to insufficient exchanges amongst replica clients near the transition temperature. One solution is to allow the temperature set to dynamically adapt in the temperature space, thereby enriching the population of clients near the transition temperature. In this work, we evaluated two approaches for adapting the temperature set: a method that equalizes exchange rates over all neighbor temperature pairs and a method that attempts to induce clients to visit all temperatures (dubbed "current maximization") by positioning many clients at or near the transition temperature. As a test case, we simulated the 57-residue SH3 domain of alpha-spectrin. Exchange rate equalization yielded the same unfolding-folding transition temperature as fixed-temperature ReX with much smoother convergence of this value. Surprisingly, the current maximization method yielded a significantly lower transition temperature, in close agreement with experimental observation, likely due to more extensive sampling of the transition state.

  8. Adaptive resynthesis of O/sup 6/-methylguanine-accepting protein can explain the differences between mammalian cells proficient and deficient in methyl excision repair

    Waldstein, E.A.; Cao, E.H.; Setlow, R.B.

    1982-09-01

    Mammalian cells have been classified as proficient (Mer/sup +/) or deficient (Mer/sup -/) in methyl excision repair in terms of their cytotoxic reactions to agents that form O/sup 6/-alkylguanine and their abilities to reactivate alkylated adenoviruses. O/sup 6/-Methylguanine (O/sup 6/MeGua) is considered to be a lethal, mutagenic, and carciogenic lesion. We measured the abilities of cell extracts to transfer the methyl group from an exogenous DNA containing O/sup 6/MeGua to acceptor protein. The constitutive level of acceptor activity was independent of the Mer phenotype and was approx. = 100,000 acceptor sites per cell. Treatment of cells with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) results in a dose-dependent decrease in the acceptor activity in extracts because the rapid reaction between endogenous O/sup 6/MeGua and acceptor protein makes the latter unavailable for further reaction. Treatment of cells with multiple low doses of MNNG results in the enhanced production of O/sup 6/MeGua-accepting protein in levels 2.5-fold above the constitutive values for Mer/sup +/ tumor cells and to approx. = 1.5-fold for Mer/sup +/ fibroblasts or Mer/sup -/ simian virus 40-transformed cells. Such treatments reduce the activities in Mer/sup -/ tumor cells and Chinese hamster cells. We concluded; (i) estimates of O/sup 6/MeGua in cellular DNA shortly after treatment may be seriously in error because of the rapid repair of this lesion, and (ii) the adaptive resynthesis of acceptor protein, not its constitutive level, is the important correlate of cell resistance to methylating agents.

  9. Transgenerational adaptation of Arabidopsis to stress requires DNA methylation and the function of Dicer-like proteins.

    Alex Boyko

    Full Text Available Epigenetic states and certain environmental responses in mammals and seed plants can persist in the next sexual generation. These transgenerational effects have potential adaptative significance as well as medical and agronomic ramifications. Recent evidence suggests that some abiotic and biotic stress responses of plants are transgenerational. For example, viral infection of tobacco plants and exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to UVC and flagellin can induce transgenerational increases in homologous recombination frequency (HRF. Here we show that exposure of Arabidopsis plants to stresses, including salt, UVC, cold, heat and flood, resulted in a higher HRF, increased global genome methylation, and higher tolerance to stress in the untreated progeny. This transgenerational effect did not, however, persist in successive generations. Treatment of the progeny of stressed plants with 5-azacytidine was shown to decrease global genomic methylation and enhance stress tolerance. Dicer-like (DCL 2 and DCL3 encode Dicer activities important for small RNA-dependent gene silencing. Stress-induced HRF and DNA methylation were impaired in dcl2 and dcl3 deficiency mutants, while in dcl2 mutants, only stress-induced stress tolerance was impaired. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that stress-induced transgenerational responses in Arabidopsis depend on altered DNA methylation and smRNA silencing pathways.

  10. Cyclic di-GMP contributes to adaption and virulence of Bacillus thuringiensis through a riboswitch-regulated collagen adhesion protein.

    Tang, Qing; Yin, Kang; Qian, Hongliang; Zhao, Youwen; Wang, Wen; Chou, Shan-Ho; Fu, Yang; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes in bacteria by binding to various protein or riboswitch effectors. In Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171, a c-di-GMP riboswitch termed Bc2 RNA resides in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of an mRNA that encodes a collagen adhesion protein (Cap). The expression of cap was strongly repressed in parent strain BMB171 because of the presence of Bc2 RNA but was significantly promoted in the Bc2 RNA markerless deletion mutant. Bc2 RNA acts as a genetic "on" switch, which forms an anti-terminator structure to promote cap read-through transcription upon c-di-GMP binding. As a result, cap transcription was de-repressed under high c-di-GMP levels. Therefore, Bc2 RNA regulates cap expression using a repression/de-repression model. Bc2 RNA-regulated Cap was also found to be tightly associated with motility, aggregation, exopolysaccharide secretion, biofilm formation, and virulence of B. thuringiensis BMB171 against its host insect Helicoverpa armigera. PMID:27381437

  11. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Related to Protein Complexes Based on Protein Interaction Networks

    Peng Liu; Lei Yang; Daming Shi; Xianglong Tang

    2015-01-01

    A method for predicting protein-protein interactions based on detected protein complexes is proposed to repair deficient interactions derived from high-throughput biological experiments. Protein complexes are pruned and decomposed into small parts based on the adaptive k-cores method to predict protein-protein interactions associated with the complexes. The proposed method is adaptive to protein complexes with different structure, number, and size of nodes in a protein-protein interaction net...

  12. Protein-protein interactions

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers. The...

  13. Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage by the Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AlkB as Studied by ESI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Deyu Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA alkylation can cause mutations, epigenetic changes, and even cell death. All living organisms have evolved enzymatic and non-enzymatic strategies for repairing such alkylation damage. AlkB, one of the Escherichia coli adaptive response proteins, uses an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II-dependent mechanism that, by chemical oxidation, removes a variety of alkyl lesions from DNA, thus affording protection of the genome against alkylation. In an effort to understand the range of acceptable substrates for AlkB, the enzyme was incubated with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides containing alkyl lesions, and the reaction products were analyzed by electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF mass spectrometry. Consistent with the literature, but studied comparatively here for the first time, it was found that 1-methyladenine, 1,N 6-ethenoadenine, 3-methylcytosine, and 3-ethylcytosine were completely transformed by AlkB, while 1-methylguanine and 3-methylthymine were partially repaired. The repair intermediates (epoxide and possibly glycol of 3,N 4-ethenocytosine are reported for the first time. It is also demonstrated that O 6-methylguanine and 5-methylcytosine are refractory to AlkB, lending support to the hypothesis that AlkB repairs only alkyl lesions attached to the nitrogen atoms of the nucleobase. ESI-TOF mass spectrometry is shown to be a sensitive and efficient tool for probing the comparative substrate specificities of DNA repair proteins in vitro.

  14. Inhibitory function of adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit in the process of nuclear translocation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome

    The transfection of human cells with siRNA against adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit (AP2α) was revealed to significantly up-regulate the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This effect was confirmed by cell infection with vesicular stomatitis virus G protein-pseudotyped HIV-1 as well as CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Viral adsorption, viral entry and reverse transcription processes were not affected by cell transfection with siRNA against AP2α. In contrast, viral nuclear translocation as well as the integration process was significantly up-regulated in cells transfected with siRNA against AP2α. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that a subpopulation of AP2α was not only localized in the cytoplasm but was also partly co-localized with lamin B, importin β and Nup153, implying that AP2α negatively regulates HIV-1 replication in the process of nuclear translocation of viral DNA in the cytoplasm or the perinuclear region. We propose that AP2α may be a novel target for disrupting HIV-1 replication in the early stage of the viral life cycle

  15. Disruption of the Acyl-CoA binding protein gene delays hepatic adaptation to metabolic changes at weaning

    Neess, Ditte; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Bloksgaard, Maria; Bek, Signe; Elle, Ida Coordt; Færgeman, Nils J.; Mandrup, Susanne

    -CoA esters between different enzymatic systems. However, little is known about the in vivo function in mammalian cells. We have generated mice with targeted disruption of ACBP (ACBP-/-). These mice are viable and fertile and develop normally. However, around weaning the ACBP-/- mice show decreased growth...... rate and increased levels of plasma cholesterol combined with hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesteryl esters. We show by microarray analysis that the liver of ACBP-/- mice displays a significantly delayed induction of target genes of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP......) family, around the weaning period. As a result, the hepatic de novo cholesterogenesis is significantly decreased at weaning. The delayed induction of SREBP target genes around weaning is caused by a compromised processing and decreased expression of SREBP precursors leading to reduced binding of SREBP to...

  16. Adaptive resynthesis of O6-methylguanine-accepting protein can explain the differences between mammalian cells proficient and deficient in methyl excision repair.

    Waldstein, E A; Cao, E H; Setlow, R B

    1982-09-01

    Mammalian cells have been classified as proficient (Mer(+)) or deficient (Mer(-)) in methyl excision repair in terms of their cytotoxic reactions to agents that form O(6)-alkylguanine and their abilities to reactivate alkylated adenoviruses. O(6)-Methylguanine (O(6)MeGua) is considered to be a lethal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic lesion. We measured the abilities of cell extracts to transfer the methyl group from an exogenous DNA containing O(6)MeGua to acceptor protein. The constitutive level of acceptor activity was independent of the Mer phenotype and was approximately 100,000 acceptor sites per cell. Treatment of cells with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) results in a dose-dependent decrease in the acceptor activity in extracts because the rapid reaction between endogenous O(6)MeGua and acceptor protein makes the latter unavailable for further reaction. Treatment of cells with 1 muM MNNG for 15 min or 2 muM for approximately 2 min uses up >95% of the constitutive activity. However, Mer(+) cells, which are resistant to MNNG, rapidly resynthesize new acceptor protein, and the activity returns to the basal level in approximately 90 min. In Mer(-) tumor cells and Chinese hamster cells, which are sensitive to MNNG, resynthesis is not detectable in 90 min. Mer(-) simian virus 40-transformed fibroblasts, known to have an intermediate sensitivity to MNNG, have an intermediate resynthesis rate. Treatment of cells with multiple low doses of MNNG results in the enhanced production of O(6)MeGua-accepting protein in levels 2.5-fold above the constitutive values for Mer(+) tumor cells and to approximately 1.5-fold for Mer(+) fibroblasts or Mer(-) simian virus 40-transformed cells. Such treatments reduce the activities in Mer(-) tumor cells and Chinese hamster cells. We conclude: (i) estimates of O(6)MeGua in cellular DNA shortly after treatment may be seriously in error because of the rapid repair of this lesion, and (ii) the adaptive resynthesis of acceptor

  17. Molecular adaptation within the coat protein-encoding gene of Tunisian almond isolates of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus

    Moncef Boulila; Sawssen Ben Tiba; Saoussen Jilani

    2013-04-01

    The sequence alignments of five Tunisian isolates of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) were searched for evidence of recombination and diversifying selection. Since failing to account for recombination can elevate the false positive error rate in positive selection inference, a genetic algorithm (GARD) was used first and led to the detection of potential recombination events in the coat protein-encoding gene of that virus. The Recco algorithm confirmed these results by identifying, additionally, the potential recombinants. For neutrality testing and evaluation of nucleotide polymorphism in PNRSV CP gene, Tajima’s , and Fu and Li’s and statistical tests were used. About selection inference, eight algorithms (SLAC, FEL, IFEL, REL, FUBAR, MEME, PARRIS, and GA branch) incorporated in HyPhy package were utilized to assess the selection pressure exerted on the expression of PNRSV capsid. Inferred phylogenies pointed out, in addition to the three classical groups (PE-5, PV-32, and PV-96), the delineation of a fourth cluster having the new proposed designation SW6, and a fifth clade comprising four Tunisian PNRSV isolates which underwent recombination and selective pressure and to which the name Tunisian outgroup was allocated.

  18. Peptide–polymer ligands for a tandem WW-domain, an adaptive multivalent protein–protein interaction: lessons on the thermodynamic fitness of flexible ligands

    Katharina Koschek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three polymers, poly(N-(2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (pHPMA, hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG, and dextran were investigated as carriers for multivalent ligands targeting the adaptive tandem WW-domain of formin-binding protein (FBP21. Polymer carriers were conjugated with 3–9 copies of the proline-rich decapeptide GPPPRGPPPR-NH2 (P1. Binding of the obtained peptide–polymer conjugates to the tandem WW-domain was investigated employing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC to determine the binding affinity, the enthalpic and entropic contributions to free binding energy, and the stoichiometry of binding for all peptide–polymer conjugates. Binding affinities of all multivalent ligands were in the µM range, strongly amplified compared to the monovalent ligand P1 with a KD > 1 mM. In addition, concise differences were observed, pHPMA and hPG carriers showed moderate affinity and bound 2.3–2.8 peptides per protein binding site resulting in the formation of aggregates. Dextran-based conjugates displayed affinities down to 1.2 µM, forming complexes with low stoichiometry, and no precipitation. Experimental results were compared with parameters obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the observed differences between the three carrier materials. In summary, the more rigid and condensed peptide–polymer conjugates based on the dextran scaffold seem to be superior to induce multivalent binding and to increase affinity, while the more flexible and dendritic polymers, pHPMA and hPG are suitable to induce crosslinking upon binding.

  19. Peptide–polymer ligands for a tandem WW-domain, an adaptive multivalent protein–protein interaction: lessons on the thermodynamic fitness of flexible ligands

    Koschek, Katharina; Durmaz, Vedat; Krylova, Oxana; Wieczorek, Marek; Gupta, Shilpi; Richter, Martin; Bujotzek, Alexander; Fischer, Christina; Haag, Rainer; Freund, Christian; Weber, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Three polymers, poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (pHPMA), hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG), and dextran were investigated as carriers for multivalent ligands targeting the adaptive tandem WW-domain of formin-binding protein (FBP21). Polymer carriers were conjugated with 3–9 copies of the proline-rich decapeptide GPPPRGPPPR-NH2 (P1). Binding of the obtained peptide–polymer conjugates to the tandem WW-domain was investigated employing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to determine the binding affinity, the enthalpic and entropic contributions to free binding energy, and the stoichiometry of binding for all peptide–polymer conjugates. Binding affinities of all multivalent ligands were in the µM range, strongly amplified compared to the monovalent ligand P1 with a K D > 1 mM. In addition, concise differences were observed, pHPMA and hPG carriers showed moderate affinity and bound 2.3–2.8 peptides per protein binding site resulting in the formation of aggregates. Dextran-based conjugates displayed affinities down to 1.2 µM, forming complexes with low stoichiometry, and no precipitation. Experimental results were compared with parameters obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the observed differences between the three carrier materials. In summary, the more rigid and condensed peptide–polymer conjugates based on the dextran scaffold seem to be superior to induce multivalent binding and to increase affinity, while the more flexible and dendritic polymers, pHPMA and hPG are suitable to induce crosslinking upon binding. PMID:26124884

  20. Increases in mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain during chronic sleep restriction in rats: possible role in initiating allostatic adaptation.

    Wallingford, J K; Deurveilher, S; Currie, R W; Fawcett, J P; Semba, K

    2014-09-26

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) has various negative consequences on cognitive performance and health. Using a rat model of CSR that uses alternating cycles of 3h of sleep deprivation (using slowly rotating activity wheels) and 1h of sleep opportunity continuously for 4 days ('3/1' protocol), we previously observed not only homeostatic but also allostatic (adaptive) sleep responses to CSR. In particular, non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) electroencephalogram (EEG) delta power, an index of sleep intensity, increased initially and then declined gradually during CSR, with no rebound during a 2-day recovery period. To study underlying mechanisms of these allostatic responses, we examined the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is known to regulate NREMS EEG delta activity, during the same CSR protocol. Mature BDNF protein levels were measured in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain, two brain regions involved in sleep and EEG regulation, and the hippocampus, using Western blot analysis. Adult male Wistar rats were housed in motorized activity wheels, and underwent the 3/1 CSR protocol for 27 h, for 99 h, or for 99 h followed by 24h of recovery. Additional rats were housed in either locked wheels (locked wheel controls [LWCs]) or unlocked wheels that rats could rotate freely (wheel-running controls [WRCs]). BDNF levels did not differ between WRC and LWC groups. BDNF levels were increased, compared to the control levels, in all three brain regions after 27 h, and were increased less strongly after 99 h, of CSR. After 24h of recovery, BDNF levels were at the control levels. This time course of BDNF levels parallels the previously reported changes in NREMS delta power during the same CSR protocol. Changes in BDNF protein levels in the cortex and basal forebrain may be part of the molecular mechanisms underlying allostatic sleep responses to CSR. PMID:25010399

  1. Adaptive Lighting

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive LightingAdaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled i...

  2. Adhesion- and Degranulation-Promoting Adapter Protein Promotes CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Resident Memory Formation and Function during an Acute Infection.

    Fiege, Jessica K; Beura, Lalit K; Burbach, Brandon J; Shimizu, Yoji

    2016-09-15

    During acute infections, naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into effector T cells, most of which undergo contraction after pathogen clearance. A small population of CD8 T cells persists as memory to protect against future infections. We investigated the role of adhesion- and degranulation-promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in promoting CD8 T cell responses to a systemic infection. Naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells lacking ADAP exhibited a modest expansion defect early after Listeria monocytogenes or vesicular stomatitis virus infection but comparable cytolytic function at the peak of response. However, reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient CD8 T cells were present in the spleen after the peak of the response. ADAP deficiency resulted in a greater frequency of CD127(+) CD8 memory precursors in secondary lymphoid organs during the contraction phase. Reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient killer cell lectin-like receptor G1(-) CD8 resident memory T (TRM) cell precursors were present in a variety of nonlymphoid tissues at the peak of the immune response, and consequently the total numbers of ADAP-deficient TRM cells were reduced at memory time points. TRM cells that did form in the absence of ADAP were defective in effector molecule expression. ADAP-deficient TRM cells exhibited impaired effector function after Ag rechallenge, correlating with defects in their ability to form T cell-APC conjugates. However, ADAP-deficient TRM cells responded to TGF-β signals and recruited circulating memory CD8 T cells. Thus, ADAP regulates CD8 T cell differentiation events following acute pathogen challenge that are critical for the formation and selected functions of TRM cells in nonlymphoid tissues. PMID:27521337

  3. Adaptive skills

    Staša Stropnik; Jana Kodrič

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive skills are defined as a collection of conceptual, social and practical skills that are learned by people in order to function in their everyday lives. They include an individual's ability to adapt to and manage her or his surroundings to effectively function and meet social or community expectations. Good adaptive skills promote individual's independence in different environments, whereas poorly developed adaptive skills are connected to individual's dependency and with g...

  4. Adaptive Lighting

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... distributed differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial...

  5. Adaptive Lighting

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... the investigations of lighting scenarios carried out in two test installations: White Cube and White Box. The test installations are discussed as large-scale experiential instruments. In these test installations we examine what could potentially occur when light using LED technology is integrated and...

  6. Adaptive skills

    Staša Stropnik

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive skills are defined as a collection of conceptual, social and practical skills that are learned by people in order to function in their everyday lives. They include an individual's ability to adapt to and manage her or his surroundings to effectively function and meet social or community expectations. Good adaptive skills promote individual's independence in different environments, whereas poorly developed adaptive skills are connected to individual's dependency and with greater need for control and help with everyday tasks. Assessment of adaptive skills is often connected to assessment of intellectual disability, due to the reason that the diagnosis of intellectual disability includes lower levels of achievements on standardized tests of intellectual abilities as well as important deficits in adaptive skills. Assessment of adaptive behavior is a part of standard assessment battery with children and adults with different problems, disorders or disabilities that affect their everyday functioning. This contribution also presents psychometric tools most regularly used for assessment of adaptive skills and characteristics of adaptive skills with individual clinical groups.

  7. ADAPT Dataset

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) Project Lead: Scott Poll Subject Fault diagnosis in electrical power systems Description The Advanced...

  8. Cleavage of group 1 coronavirus spike proteins: how furin cleavage is traded off against heparan sulfate binding upon cell culture adaptation

    Haan, de C.A.M.; Haijema, B.J.; Schellen, P.; Wichgers Schreur, P.J.; Lintelo, te E.; Vennema, H.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A longstanding enigmatic feature of the group 1 coronaviruses is the uncleaved phenotype of their spike protein, an exceptional property among class I fusion proteins. Here, however, we show that some group 1 coronavirus spike proteins carry a furin enzyme recognition motif and can actually be cleav

  9. Expression of protein encoded by apoptosis-associated gene p53, bcl-2, and bax in adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by low dose radiation with X-rays

    Objective: To explore the regulative mechanism of apoptosis-associated gene proteins on the adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by low dose radiation with X-rays. Methods: Kunming male mice were irradiated with the inductive doses (D1: 25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 mGy; dose rate: 12.5 mGy ·min-1) and the challenging dose (D2: 1.5 Gy; dose rate: 287 mGy·min-1). The time interval between D1 and D2 was 6 h. The expressive levels of thymocyte apoptosis-associated gene proteins were measured with flow cytometry. Results: As compared with the sham-irradiation, the positive percentage of thymocyte Bcl-2 protein expression decreased significantly in D2 group (P<0.05), Bax increased significantly (P<0.05), and Bcl-2/Bax decreased significantly (P<0.001); p 53 increased significantly (P<0.001). As compared with D2 group, the positive percentage of thymocyte Bcl-2 protein expression increased in varying degree in D1+ D2 group of 25-75 mGy D1, Bax decreased in varying degree, and Bcl-2/Bax increased significantly (P<0.01); p53 decreased significantly (P<0.001 or P<0.05). Conclusion: The apoptotic thymocytes in the adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by irradiation with 25-75 mGy decrease significantly due to the increase of apoptosis-associated gene Bcl-2 protein expression and Bcl-2/Bax, the decrease of Bax and p53 protein expressions. (authors)

  10. Expression of cold-adapted β-1,3-xylanase as a fusion protein with a ProS2 tag and purification using immobilized metal affinity chromatography with a high concentration of ArgHCl.

    Kudou, Motonori; Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Asai-Nakashima, Nanami; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cold-adapted β-1,3-xylanase (P.t.Xyn26A) from the psychrotrophic bacterium, Psychroflexus torquis, was expressed as a fusion protein with tandem repeats of the N-terminal domain of Protein S from Myxocuccus xanthus (ProS2) in Escherichia coli. After cell lysis in phosphate buffer, most of the ProS2-P.t.Xyn26A was located in the insoluble fraction and aggregated during purification. Arginine hydrochloride (ArgHCl) efficiently solubilized the ProS2-P.t.Xyn26A. The solubilized ProS2-P.t.Xyn26A was purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) with 500 mM ArgHCl. After cleavage of ProS2-P.t.Xyn26A by human rhinovirus 3C protease, we confirmed that recombinant P.t.Xyn26A maintained its native fold. This is the first report of the expression of a cold-adapted enzyme fused with a ProS2 tag under IMAC purification using a high concentration of ArgHCl. These insights into the expression and purification should be useful during the handling of cold-adapted enzymes. PMID:25214227

  11. Ambiguous Adaptation

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Lyngsie, Jacob

    We investigate why some exchange relationships terminate prematurely. We argue that investments in informal governance structures induce premature termination in relationships already governed by formal contracts. The formalized adaptive behavior of formal governance structures and the flexible and...... reciprocal adaptation of informal governance structure create ambiguity in situations of contingencies, which, subsequently, increases the likelihood of premature relationship termination. Using a large sample of exchange relationships in the global service provider industry, we find support for a hypothesis...

  12. Strategic Adaptation

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of theoretical contributions that have influenced the discourse around strategic adaptation including contingency perspectives, strategic fit reasoning, decision structure, information processing, corporate entrepreneurship, and strategy process. The related...... concepts of strategic renewal, dynamic managerial capabilities, dynamic capabilities, and strategic response capabilities are discussed and contextualized against strategic responsiveness. The insights derived from this article are used to outline the contours of a dynamic process of strategic adaptation...

  13. Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation? Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation?

    Thais Flores Nogueira Diniz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition, joined with the study of recycling, remaking, and every form of retelling. The film deals with the attempt by the scriptwriter Charles Kaufman, cast by Nicholas Cage, to adapt/translate a non-fictional book to the cinema, but ends up with a kind of film which is by no means what it intended to be: a film of action in the model of Hollywood productions. During the process of creation, Charles and his twin brother, Donald, undergo a series of adventures involving some real persons from the world of film, the author and the protagonist of the book, all of them turning into fictional characters in the film. In the film, adaptation then signifies something different from itstraditional meaning. The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition

  14. Radio-adaptive response

    An adaptive response to radiation stress was found as a suppressed induction of chromosomal damage including micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells pre-exposed to very low doses of ionizing radiations. The mechanism underlying this novel chromosomal response, called 'radio-adaptive response (RAR)' has been studied progressively. The following results were obtained in recent experiments. 1. Low doses of β-rays from tritiated water (HTO) as well as tritium-thymidine can cause RAR. 2. Thermal neutrons, a high LET radiation, can not act as tritium β-rays or γ-rays. 3. The RAR expression is suppressed not only by the treatment with an inhibitor of protein synthesis but also by RNA synthesis inhibition. 4. Several proteins are newly synthesized concurrently with the RAR expression after the adapting doses, viewed by two-dimensional electrophoresis of cellular proteins. These results suggests that the RAR might be a cellular stress response to a signal produced preferentially by very low doses of low LET radiation under restricted conditions, accompany the inducible specific gene expression. (author)

  15. Adaptive test

    Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Eriksen, Mette Rose

    2010-01-01

    Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale.......Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale....

  16. Molecular evolution and thermal adaptation

    Chen, Peiqiu

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, we address problems in molecular evolution, thermal adaptation, and the kinetics of adaptation of bacteria and viruses to elevated environmental temperatures. We use a nearly neutral fitness model where the replication speed of an organism is proportional to the copy number of folded proteins. Our model reproduces the distribution of stabilities of natural proteins in excellent agreement with experiment. We find that species with high mutation rates tend to have less stable proteins compared to species with low mutation rate. We found that a broad distribution of protein stabilities observed in the model and in experiment is the key determinant of thermal response for viruses and bacteria. Our results explain most of the earlier experimental observations: striking asymmetry of thermal response curves, the absence of evolutionary trade-off which was expected but not found in experiments, correlation between denaturation temperature for several protein families and the Optimal Growth Temperature (OGT) of their carrier organisms, and proximity of bacterial or viral OGTs to their evolutionary temperatures. Our theory quantitatively and with high accuracy described thermal response curves for 35 bacterial species. The model also addresses the key to adaptation is in weak-link genes (WLG), which encode least thermodynamically stable essential proteins in the proteome. We observe, as in experiment, a two-stage adaptation process. The first stage is a Luria-Delbruck type of selection, whereby rare WLG alleles, whose proteins are more stable than WLG proteins of the majority of the population (either due to standing genetic variation or due to an early acquired mutation), rapidly rise to fixation. The second stage constitutes subsequent slow accumulation of mutations in an adapted population. As adaptation progresses, selection regime changes from positive to neutral: Selection coefficient of beneficial mutations scales as a negative power of number of

  17. Capsid proteins from field strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus confer a pathogenic phenotype in cattle on an attenuated, cell-culture-adapted virus

    Bøtner, Anette; Kakker, Naresh K.; Barbezange, Cyril;

    2011-01-01

    Chimeric foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDVs) have been generated from plasmids containing full-length FMDV cDNAs and characterized. The parental virus cDNA was derived from the cell-culture-adapted O1Kaufbeuren B64 (O1K B64) strain. Chimeric viruses, containing capsid coding sequences derived...... region within the O1K B64 strain that inhibits replication in cattle. These chimeric infectious cDNA plasmids provide a basis for the analysis of FMDV pathogenicity and characterization of receptor utilization in vivo....

  18. The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED)

    Liberles, David A; Schreiber, David R.; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Chamberlin, Stephen G.; Steven A Benner

    2001-01-01

    Background The Master Catalog is a collection of evolutionary families, including multiple sequence alignments, phylogenetic trees and reconstructed ancestral sequences, for all protein-sequence modules encoded by genes in GenBank. It can therefore support large-scale genomic surveys, of which we present here The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED). In TAED, potential examples of positive adaptation are identified by high values for the normalized ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotid...

  19. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.; (Duke)

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  20. Estimation of immune complexes by a microplate-adapted C1q-Protein A enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay (C1q-PA-ELISA)

    Bjerrum, L; Glikmann, G; Jensenius, J C;

    1983-01-01

    . Bound IC was measured by use of alkaline phosphatase-labelled Protein A followed by the substrate para-nitro-phenyl-phosphate. A dose response was found for both delta IgG and BSA anti-BSA complexes, while variations in the concentration of monomer IgG did not affect the optical density. Elevated levels...

  1. Adaptation Laboratory

    Huq, Saleemul

    2011-11-15

    Efforts to help the world's poor will face crises in coming decades as climate change radically alters conditions. Action Research for Community Adapation in Bangladesh (ARCAB) is an action-research programme on responding to climate change impacts through community-based adaptation. Set in Bangladesh at 20 sites that are vulnerable to floods, droughts, cyclones and sea level rise, ARCAB will follow impacts and adaptation as they evolve over half a century or more. National and international 'research partners', collaborating with ten NGO 'action partners' with global reach, seek knowledge and solutions applicable worldwide. After a year setting up ARCAB, we share lessons on the programme's design and move into our first research cycle.

  2. Hedonic "adaptation"

    Paul Rozin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available People live in a world in which they are surrounded by potential disgust elicitors such as ``used'' chairs, air, silverware, and money as well as excretory activities. People function in this world by ignoring most of these, by active avoidance, reframing, or adaptation. The issue is particularly striking for professions, such as morticians, surgeons, or sanitation workers, in which there is frequent contact with major disgust elicitors. In this study, we study the ``adaptation'' process to dead bodies as disgust elicitors, by measuring specific types of disgust sensitivity in medical students before and after they have spent a few months dissecting a cadaver. Using the Disgust Scale, we find a significant reduction in disgust responses to death and body envelope violation elicitors, but no significant change in any other specific type of disgust. There is a clear reduction in discomfort at touching a cold dead body, but not in touching a human body which is still warm after death.

  3. Adaptive ethnography

    Berth, Mette

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of an adaptive ethnography when studying such phenomena as young people's use of mobile media in a learning perspective. Mobile media such as PDAs and mobile phones have a number of affordances which make them potential tools for learning. However, before we begin to...... design and develop educational materials for mobile media platforms we must first understand everyday use and behaviour with a medium such as a mobile phone. The paper outlines the research design for a PhD project on mobile learning which focuses on mobile phones as a way to bridge the gap between...... formal and informal learning contexts. The paper also proposes several adaptive methodological techniques for studying young people's interaction with mobiles....

  4. Proteomics-based Identification of Proapoptotic Caspase Adapter Protein 
as A Novel Serum Marker of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Zhang, Heng; Chen, Shengxi; Huang, Lingjin

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective Early diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer contribute to a patient’s prolonged survival. Proteomics and tissue culture were used to screen potential serum markers of lung cancer. Methods The differential proteomic technique and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were used to identify overexpressed proteins from cultured tumor tissues in a conditioned medium. Paired lung tissues in a conditioned medium were used as the contro...

  5. Forty-eight-hour cycle sequential feeding with diets varying in protein and energy contents: adaptation in broilers at different ages.

    Bouvarel, I; Chagneau, A M; Lescoat, P; Tesseraud, S; Leterrier, C

    2008-01-01

    Sequential feeding is a cyclic feeding program with 2 diets for 1 or several days used to induce lower feed costs or to improve welfare quality. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of energy [2,800 (E-) and 3,200 kcal/kg (E+)] and protein [230 (P+) and 150 g/kg (P-)] content on daily feed intake and growth in 900 male broiler chickens, and to compare these results with standard feeding (CP = 190 g/kg and ME = 3,000 kcal/kg). Sequential feeding was carried out during 48-h cycles in 2 periods (period 1 = 10 to 17 d of age, period 2 = 18 to 29 d of age). Four treatments were compared during periods 1 and 2: 1) complete diet (C), 2) alternation of diets varying in CP (SP = P+ followed by P-), 3) in energy (S(E) = E- followed by E+), 4) in protein and energy contents (S(EPA) = P+E- followed by P-E+). A fifth treatment (S(EPB)) used an alternation in protein and energy contents during period 2 only. All chickens received the same feed during the finishing period (30 to 35 d of age). Feed intake was similar with sequential feeding and complete feed, but in proportion to total feed intake, chickens overconsumed high energy feeds (E+ and E+P-) during each period, and P- only for period 2 (P Feed to gain ratio was similar for all treatments for period 1 and increased for S(P), S(EPA), and S(EPB) compared with C and S(E) for period 2 (P feeding can be reached with 48-h cycle sequential feeding using diets varying in protein and energy contents. PMID:18079471

  6. Adaptable positioner

    This paper describes the circuits and programs in assembly language, developed to control the two DC motors that give mobility to a mechanical arm with two degrees of freedom. As a whole, the system is based in a adaptable regulator designed around a 8 bit microprocessor that, starting from a mode of regulation based in the successive approximation method, evolve to another mode through which, only one approximation is sufficient to get the right position of each motor. (Author) 22 fig. 6 ref

  7. Adaptive positioner

    This paper describes the circuits and programs in assembly language, developed to control the two DC motors that give mobility to a mechanical arm with two degrees of freedom. As a whole, the system is based in a adaptable regulator designed around a 8 bit microprocessor that, starting from a mode of regulation based in the successive approximation method, evolve to another mode through which, only one approximation is sufficient to get the right position of each motor. (Author) 6 refs

  8. Adaptive noise

    Viney, Mark; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    In biology, noise implies error and disorder and is therefore something which organisms may seek to minimize and mitigate against. We argue that such noise can be adaptive. Recent studies have shown that gene expression can be noisy, noise can be genetically controlled, genes and gene networks vary in how noisy they are and noise generates phenotypic differences among genetically identical cells. Such phenotypic differences can have fitness benefits, suggesting that evolution can shape noise ...

  9. Harmonin-b, an actin-binding scaffold protein, is involved in the adaptation of mechanoelectrical transduction by sensory hair cells

    Michalski, Nicolas; Michel, Vincent; Caberlotto, Elisa; Lefèvre, Gaelle M.; Van Aken, Alexander F J; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Bizard, Emilie; Houbron, Christophe; Weil, Dominique; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Richardson, Guy P.; Kros, Corné J.; Martin, Pascal; Petit, Christine

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the involvement of harmonin-b, a submembranous protein containing PDZ domains, in the mechanoelectrical transduction machinery of inner ear hair cells. Harmonin-b is located in the region of the upper insertion point of the tip link that joins adjacent stereocilia from different rows and that is believed to gate transducer channel(s) located in the region of the tip link's lower insertion point. In Ush1c dfcr-2J/dfcr-2J mutant mice defective for harmonin-b, step deflections of the...

  10. Efficacy of an adapted granzyme B-based anti-CD30 cytolytic fusion protein against PI-9-positive classical Hodgkin lymphoma cells in a murine model

    Tumors develop when infiltrating immune cells contribute growth stimuli, and cancer cells are selected to survive within such a cytotoxic microenvironment. One possible immune-escape mechanism is the upregulation of PI-9 (Serpin B9) within cancer cells. This serine proteinase inhibitor selectively inactivates apoptosis-inducing granzyme B (GrB) from cytotoxic granules of innate immune cells. We demonstrate that most classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL)-derived cell lines express PI-9, which protects them against the GrB attack and thereby renders them resistant against GrB-based immunotherapeutics. To circumvent this disadvantage, we developed PI-9-insensitive human GrB mutants as fusion proteins to target the Hodgkin-selective receptor CD30. In contrast to the wild-type GrB, a R201K point-mutated GrB construct most efficiently killed PI-9-positive and -negative cHL cells. This was tested in vitro and also in vivo whereby a novel optical imaging-based tumor model with HL cell line L428 was applied. Therefore, this variant, as part of the next generation immunotherapeutics, also named cytolytic fusion proteins showing reduced immunogenicity, is a promising molecule for (targeted) therapy of patients with relapsing malignancies, such as cHL, and possibly other PI-9-positive malignancies, such as breast or lung carcinoma

  11. A conserved KIN17 curved DNA-binding domain protein assembles with SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 to adapt Arabidopsis growth and development to limiting copper availability.

    Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Xing, Shuping; Huijser, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Proper copper (Cu) homeostasis is required by living organisms to maintain essential cellular functions. In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 (SPL7) transcription factor participates in reprogramming global gene expression during Cu insufficiency in order to improve the metal uptake and prioritize its distribution to Cu proteins of major importance. As a consequence, spl7 null mutants show morphological and physiological disorders during Cu-limited growth, resulting in lower fresh weight, reduced root elongation, and chlorosis. On the other hand, the Arabidopsis KIN17 homolog belongs to a well-conserved family of essential eukaryotic nuclear proteins known to be stress activated and involved in DNA and possibly RNA metabolism in mammals. In the study presented here, we uncovered that Arabidopsis KIN17 participates in promoting the Cu deficiency response by means of a direct interaction with SPL7. Moreover, the double mutant kin17-1 spl7-2 displays an enhanced Cu-dependent phenotype involving growth arrest, oxidative stress, floral bud abortion, and pollen inviability. Taken together, the data presented here provide evidence for SPL7 and KIN17 protein interaction as a point of convergence in response to both Cu deficiency and oxidative stress. PMID:24335506

  12. Fluorescent protein-mediated colour polymorphism in reef corals: multicopy genes extend the adaptation/acclimatization potential to variable light environments.

    Gittins, John R; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Oswald, Franz; Edwards, Richard J; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The genomic framework that enables corals to adjust to unfavourable conditions is crucial for coral reef survival in a rapidly changing climate. We have explored the striking intraspecific variability in the expression of coral pigments from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family to elucidate the genomic basis for the plasticity of stress responses among reef corals. We show that multicopy genes can greatly increase the dynamic range over which corals can modulate transcript levels in response to the light environment. Using the red fluorescent protein amilFP597 in the coral Acropora millepora as a model, we demonstrate that its expression increases with light intensity, but both the minimal and maximal gene transcript levels vary markedly among colour morphs. The pigment concentration in the tissue of different morphs is strongly correlated with the number of gene copies with a particular promoter type. These findings indicate that colour polymorphism in reef corals can be caused by the environmentally regulated expression of multicopy genes. High-level expression of amilFP597 is correlated with reduced photodamage of zooxanthellae under acute light stress, supporting a photoprotective function of this pigment. The cluster of light-regulated pigment genes can enable corals to invest either in expensive high-level pigmentation, offering benefits under light stress, or to rely on low tissue pigment concentrations and use the conserved resources for other purposes, which is preferable in less light-exposed environments. The genomic framework described here allows corals to pursue different strategies to succeed in habitats with highly variable light stress levels. In summary, our results suggest that the intraspecific plasticity of reef corals' stress responses is larger than previously thought. PMID:25496144

  13. Adaptive management

    Rist, Lucy; Campbell, Bruce Morgan; Frost, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in scientific articles, policy documents and management plans, but both understanding and application of the concept is mixed. This paper reviews recent literature from conservation and natural resource management journals to assess diversity in how the term is used, highlight ambiguities and consider how......Adaptive management (AM) emerged in the literature in the mid-1970s in response both to a realization of the extent of uncertainty involved in management, and a frustration with attempts to use modelling to integrate knowledge and make predictions. The term has since become increasingly widely used...... the concept might be further assessed. AM is currently being used to describe many different management contexts, scales and locations. Few authors define the term explicitly or describe how it offers a means to improve management outcomes in their specific management context. Many do not adhere to the idea...

  14. CRISPR adaptive immune systems of Archaea

    Vestergaard, Gisle; Garrett, Roger A.; Shah, Shiraz A.

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR adaptive immune systems were analyzed for all available completed genomes of archaea, which included representatives of each of the main archaeal phyla. Initially, all proteins encoded within, and proximal to, CRISPR-cas loci were clustered and analyzed using a profile–profile approach. Then cas genes were assigned to gene cassettes and to functional modules for adaptation and interference. CRISPR systems were then classified primarily on the basis of their concatenated Cas protein seq...

  15. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Full Text Available MPA1 TLR signaling molecules Mavs Ips1, Visa Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein CARD adap ... ta, Interferon beta promoter stimulator protein 1, Virus -induced-signaling adapter 10090 Mus musculus 22860 ...

  16. Gene 33/Mig-6, a transcriptionally inducible adapter protein that binds GTP-Cdc42 and activates SAPK/JNK. A potential marker transcript for chronic pathologic conditions, such as diabetic nephropathy. Possible role in the response to persistent stress.

    Makkinje, A; Quinn, D A; Chen, A; Cadilla, C L; Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Kyriakis, J M

    2000-06-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extracellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  17. Use Case Design for AdaptIVe

    Wolter, Stefan; Kelsch, Johann

    2014-01-01

    AdaptIVe is a large scale European project on vehicle automation and the pertaining human-machine interaction. The use case design process is a crucial part of the system design process and a part of the human-vehicle integration subproject. This paper explains the methodology for describing use cases in AdaptIVe. They are primarily based on sequence diagrams with main and alternative flows.

  18. Adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors

    CUI Xianqiang; YANG Yuanxi

    2006-01-01

    The key problems in applying the adaptively robust filtering to navigation are to establish an equivalent weight matrix for the measurements and a suitable adaptive factor for balancing the contributions of the measurements and the predicted state information to the state parameter estimates. In this paper, an adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors was proposed, based on the principles of the adaptively robust filtering and bi-factor robust estimation for correlated observations. According to the constant velocity model of Kalman filtering, the state parameter vector was divided into two groups, namely position and velocity. The estimator of the adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors was derived, and the calculation expressions of the classified adaptive factors were presented. Test results show that the adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors is not only robust in controlling the measurement outliers and the kinematic state disturbing but also reasonable in balancing the contributions of the predicted position and velocity, respectively, and its filtering accuracy is superior to the adaptively robust filter with single adaptive factor based on the discrepancy of the predicted position or the predicted velocity.

  19. Biodiversity and cold adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles

    Yuhua Xin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-adapted bacteria and archaea are widely distributed in cold environments on Earth, such as permafrost, cold soils and deserts, glaciers, lakes, sea ice in the Arctic, Antarctic and high mountains, as well as the deep sea, ice caves and the atmospheric stratosphere etc. Cold-adapted organisms inhabiting these environments exhibit rich diversity. Studies on the biogeography of psychrophiles will enable us to understand their biodiversity, distribution and origins. Due to long-term living in cold regions, cold-adapted bacteria and archeae have developed specific physiological mechanisms of adaptation to cold environments. These mechanisms include: regulating the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane through adjusting the composition of membrane lipids; achieving low-temperature protection through compatibility solute, antifreeze proteins, ice-binding proteins, ice-nucleation proteins and anti-nucleating proteins; production of heat-shock and coldshock proteins, cold acclimation protein and DEAD-box RNA helicase at low temperatures; production of cold-active enzymes; increasing energy generation and conservation. With the rapid development of sequencing technology, various omics-based approaches have been used to reveal cold-adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles at the genomic level.

  20. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27416593

  1. Adaptive Modular Playware

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Þorsteinsson, Arnar Tumi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the concept of adaptive modular playware, where the playware adapts to the interaction of the individual user. We hypothesize that there are individual differences in user interaction capabilities and styles, and that adaptive playware may adapt to the individual user’s...

  2. Adaptive Sticky Generalized Metropolis

    Fabrizio Leisen; Roberto Casarin; David Luengo; Luca Martino

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new class of adaptive Metropolis algorithms called adaptive sticky algorithms for efficient general-purpose simulation from a target probability distribution. The transition of the Metropolis chain is based on a multiple-try scheme and the different proposals are generated by adaptive nonparametric distributions. Our adaptation strategy uses the interpolation of support points from the past history of the chain as in the adaptive rejection Metropolis. The algorithm efficiency i...

  3. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  4. Uncertainty in adaptive capacity

    The capacity to adapt is a critical element of the process of adaptation: it is the vector of resources that represent the asset base from which adaptation actions can be made. Adaptive capacity can in theory be identified and measured at various scales, from the individual to the nation. The assessment of uncertainty within such measures comes from the contested knowledge domain and theories surrounding the nature of the determinants of adaptive capacity and the human action of adaptation. While generic adaptive capacity at the national level, for example, is often postulated as being dependent on health, governance and political rights, and literacy, and economic well-being, the determinants of these variables at national levels are not widely understood. We outline the nature of this uncertainty for the major elements of adaptive capacity and illustrate these issues with the example of a social vulnerability index for countries in Africa. (authors)

  5. Adaptive Rationality, Adaptive Behavior and Institutions

    Volchik Vyacheslav, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The economic literature focused on understanding decision-making and choice processes reveals a vast collection of approaches to human rationality. Theorists’ attention has moved from absolutely rational, utility-maximizing individuals to boundedly rational and adaptive ones. A number of economists have criticized the concepts of adaptive rationality and adaptive behavior. One of the recent trends in the economic literature is to consider humans irrational. This paper offers an approach which examines adaptive behavior in the context of existing institutions and constantly changing institutional environment. It is assumed that adaptive behavior is a process of evolutionary adjustment to fundamental uncertainty. We emphasize the importance of actors’ engagement in trial and error learning, since if they are involved in this process, they obtain experience and are able to adapt to existing and new institutions. The paper aims at identifying relevant institutions, adaptive mechanisms, informal working rules and practices that influence actors’ behavior in the field of Higher Education in Russia (Rostov Region education services market has been taken as an example. The paper emphasizes the application of qualitative interpretative methods (interviews and discourse analysis in examining actors’ behavior.

  6. Adaptive Coordinate Descent

    Loshchilov, Ilya; Schoenauer, Marc; Sebag, Michèle

    2011-01-01

    Independence from the coordinate system is one source of efficiency and robustness for the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES). The recently proposed Adaptive Encoding (AE) procedure generalizes CMA-ES adaptive mechanism, and can be used together with any optimization algorithm. Adaptive Encoding gradually builds a transformation of the coordinate system such that the new coordinates are as decorrelated as possible with respect to the objective function. But any optimizat...

  7. Adaptation to climate change

    J. Carmin; K. Tierney; E. Chu; L.M. Hunter; J.T. Roberts; L. Shi

    2015-01-01

    Climate change adaptation involves major global and societal challenges such as finding adequate and equitable adaptation funding and integrating adaptation and development programs. Current funding is insufficient. Debates between the Global North and South center on how best to allocate the financ

  8. Adaptation to High Grain Diets Proceeds Through Minimal Immune System Stimulation and Differences in Extracellular Matrix Protein Expression in A Model of Subacute Ruminal Acidosis in Non-lactating Dairy Cows

    L. Dionissopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Subacute Ruminal Acidosis (SARA is a metabolic disorder affecting approximately 20% of all dairy cattle in North America. Although the presence of SARA has been described for some time, the etiology of the disorder remains uncertain. For example, many animals diagnosed with SARA seem to remodel and adapt their epithelium to accommodate the stresses imposed by SARA, but not before exacting a significant health and economic toll. Specifically, a search is on in which a desire to identify the system and associated pathways that are causative agents in the progression and development of SARA is evident. We hypothesize that adaptation to SARA is facilitated by the immune system. Approach: In order to answer of this question, 4 mature, non-lactating dairy cattle were transitioned from a High Fiber (HF; 0% grain diet to High Grain (HG; 65% grain diet. Having fed the HG diet for three weeks, the cattle were then transitioned back to the HF diet for an additional three weeks to facilitate adaptation. SARA was diagnosed by pH data only during the first week and not during the remaining weeks, indicating that adaptation to the HG diet took place within one week. Results: In this study, significant (pConclusion: These results indicate that the immune system is involved in the adaptation of the rumen epithelium to a HG diet, but to a lesser extent than was previously thought. This is the first time an attempt has been made to link the immune system and wound healing in the adaptation of the bovine rumen to a HG diet."""

  9. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity. PMID:21395512

  10. Technology transfer for adaptation

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  11. Diffusion Adaptation over Networks

    Sayed, Ali H

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive networks are well-suited to perform decentralized information processing and optimization tasks and to model various types of self organized and complex behavior encountered in nature. Adaptive networks consist of a collection of agents with processing and learning abilities. The agents are linked together through a connection topology, and they cooperate with each other through local interactions to solve distributed inference problems in real-time. The continuous diffusion of information across the network enables agents to adapt their performance in relation to changing data and network conditions; it also results in improved adaptation and learning performance relative to non-cooperative networks. This article provides an overview of diffusion strategies for adaptation and learning over networks. The article is divided into several sections: 1. Motivation; 2. Mean-Square-Error Estimation; 3. Distributed Optimization via Diffusion Strategies; 4. Adaptive Diffusion Strategies; 5. Performance of Ste...

  12. Pathogenesis and micro-anatomic characterization of a cell-adapted mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle: impact of the Jumonji C-domain containing protein 6 (JMJD6) and route of innoculation

    In a companion study, we reported that the cellular Jumonji-C Domain containing Protein 6 (JMJD6) protein is involved in an alternate integrin- and HS-independent pathway of FMDV infection in CHO cells. Here, we investigated the JMJD6 localization in animal tissues from cattle infected with either ...

  13. Consciousness And Adaptive Behavior

    Sieb, Richard/A.

    2005-01-01

    Consciousness has resisted scientific explanation for centuries. The main problem in explaining consciousness is its subjectivity. Subjective systems may be adaptive. Humans can produce voluntary new or novel intentional (adaptive) action and such action is always accompanied by consciousness. Action normally arises from perception. Perception must be rerepresented in order to produce new or novel adaptive action. The internal explicit states produced by a widespread nonlinear emergen...

  14. Human Adaptations: Free divers

    Tournat, Troy Z.

    2014-01-01

    Freediving has been around for thousands of years and was only way to dive until the inventionof oxygen tanks in the 19th century. Around the world, people dove for goods such as pearls, andtoday people freedive for sport. Divers stretch the limit of their body and mind’s capabilitiesthrough psychological adaptations from thermal, respiratory, and cardiovascular responses.Findings conclude that thermal adaptations are a similar process to cold adaptive response. Withthe implementation of wets...

  15. Adaptive Multimedia Retrieval: Semantics, Context, and Adaptation

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Adaptive Multimedia Retrieval, AMR 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in October 2012. The 17 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissi......This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Adaptive Multimedia Retrieval, AMR 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in October 2012. The 17 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous...

  16. Decentralized adaptive control

    Oh, B. J.; Jamshidi, M.; Seraji, H.

    1988-01-01

    A decentralized adaptive control is proposed to stabilize and track the nonlinear, interconnected subsystems with unknown parameters. The adaptation of the controller gain is derived by using model reference adaptive control theory based on Lyapunov's direct method. The adaptive gains consist of sigma, proportional, and integral combination of the measured and reference values of the corresponding subsystem. The proposed control is applied to the joint control of a two-link robot manipulator, and the performance in computer simulation corresponds with what is expected in theoretical development.

  17. Adaptive Wireless Transceiver Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless technologies are an increasingly attractive means for spatial data, input, manipulation, and distribution. Mobitrum is proposing an innovative Adaptive...

  18. Formation and Regulation of Adaptive Response in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Y.-L. Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All organisms respond to environmental stresses (e.g., heavy metal, heat, UV irradiation, hyperoxia, food limitation, etc. with coordinated adjustments in order to deal with the consequences and/or injuries caused by the severe stress. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans often exerts adaptive responses if preconditioned with low concentrations of agents or stressor. In C. elegans, three types of adaptive responses can be formed: hormesis, cross-adaptation, and dietary restriction. Several factors influence the formation of adaptive responses in nematodes, and some mechanisms can explain their response formation. In particular, antioxidation system, heat-shock proteins, metallothioneins, glutathione, signaling transduction, and metabolic signals may play important roles in regulating the formation of adaptive responses. In this paper, we summarize the published evidence demonstrating that several types of adaptive responses have converged in C. elegans and discussed some possible alternative theories explaining the adaptive response control.

  19. Is There a Need for Protein Ingestion During Exercise?

    Luc J. C. Van Loon

    2014-01-01

    Dietary protein ingestion following exercise increases muscle protein synthesis rates, stimulates net muscle protein accretion, and facilitates the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged exercise training. Furthermore, recent studies show that protein ingestion before and during exercise also increases muscle protein synthesis rates during resistance- and endurance-type exercise. Therefore, protein ingestion before and during prolonged exercise may represent an effective dietary strat...

  20. Behavioral Adaptation and Acceptance

    Martens, M.H.; Jenssen, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of Intelligent Vehicles is to improve road safety, throughput, and emissions. However, the predicted effects are not always as large as aimed for. Part of this is due to indirect behavioral changes of drivers, also called behavioral adaptation. Behavioral adaptation (BA) refers to uninte

  1. Behavioural adaptation and acceptance

    Martens, M.H.; Jenssen, G.D.; Eskandarian, A.

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of Intelligent Vehicles is to improve road safety, throughput, and emissions. However, the predicted effects are not always as large as aimed for. Part of this is due to indirect behavioral changes of drivers, also called behavioral adaptation. Behavioral adaptation (BA) refers to uninte

  2. Adaptive Capacity and Traps

    William A. Brock

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive capacity is the ability of a living system, such as a social–ecological system, to adjust responses to changing internal demands and external drivers. Although adaptive capacity is a frequent topic of study in the resilience literature, there are few formal models. This paper introduces such a model and uses it to explore adaptive capacity by contrast with the opposite condition, or traps. In a social–ecological rigidity trap, strong self-reinforcing controls prevent the flexibility needed for adaptation. In the model, too much control erodes adaptive capacity and thereby increases the risk of catastrophic breakdown. In a social–ecological poverty trap, loose connections prevent the mobilization of ideas and resources to solve problems. In the model, too little control impedes the focus needed for adaptation. Fluctuations of internal demand or external shocks generate pulses of adaptive capacity, which may gain traction and pull the system out of the poverty trap. The model suggests some general properties of traps in social–ecological systems. It is general and flexible, so it can be used as a building block in more specific and detailed models of adaptive capacity for a particular region.

  3. Adapt or Become Extinct!

    Goumas, Georgios; McKee, Sally A.; Själander, Magnus;

    2011-01-01

    boundaries (walls) for applications which limit software development (parallel programming wall), performance (memory wall, communication wall) and viability (power wall). The only way to survive in such a demanding environment is by adaptation. In this paper we discuss how dynamic information collected...... during the execution of an application can be utilized to adapt the execution context and may lead to performance gains beyond those provided by static information and compile-time adaptation. We consider specialization based on dynamic information like user input, architectural characteristics such as...... from static analysis (either during ahead-of-time or just-in-time) compilation. We extend the notion of information-driven adaptation and outline the architecture of an infrastructure designed to enable information ow and adaptation throughout the life-cycle of an application....

  4. Appraising Adaptive Management

    Kai N. Lee

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive management is appraised as a policy implementation approach by examining its conceptual, technical, equity, and practical strengths and limitations. Three conclusions are drawn: (1 Adaptive management has been more influential, so far, as an idea than as a practical means of gaining insight into the behavior of ecosystems utilized and inhabited by humans. (2 Adaptive management should be used only after disputing parties have agreed to an agenda of questions to be answered using the adaptive approach; this is not how the approach has been used. (3 Efficient, effective social learning, of the kind facilitated by adaptive management, is likely to be of strategic importance in governing ecosystems as humanity searches for a sustainable economy.

  5. Adaptive noise cancellation

    In this report we describe the concept of adaptive noise canceling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise of interference. The method uses 'primary' input containing the corrupted signal and a 'reference' input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise, the reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. When the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met then noise in the primary input can be essentially eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that the adaptive filter also acts as notch filter. Simulated results illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise canceling technique. (author)

  6. Adaptive signal processor

    An experimental, general purpose adaptive signal processor system has been developed, utilizing a quantized (clipped) version of the Widrow-Hoff least-mean-square adaptive algorithm developed by Moschner. The system accommodates 64 adaptive weight channels with 8-bit resolution for each weight. Internal weight update arithmetic is performed with 16-bit resolution, and the system error signal is measured with 12-bit resolution. An adapt cycle of adjusting all 64 weight channels is accomplished in 8 μsec. Hardware of the signal processor utilizes primarily Schottky-TTL type integrated circuits. A prototype system with 24 weight channels has been constructed and tested. This report presents details of the system design and describes basic experiments performed with the prototype signal processor. Finally some system configurations and applications for this adaptive signal processor are discussed

  7. Extensive X-linked adaptive evolution in central chimpanzees

    Hvilsom, Christina; Qian, Yu; Bataillon, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    dominance of beneficial (adaptive) and deleterious mutations. Here we capture and sequence the complete exomes of 12 chimpanzees and present the largest set of protein-coding polymorphism to date. We report extensive adaptive evolution specifically targeting the X chromosome of chimpanzees with as much as...... 30% of all amino acid replacements being adaptive. Adaptive evolution is barely detectable on the autosomes except for a few striking cases of recent selective sweeps associated with immunity gene clusters. We also find much stronger purifying selection than observed in humans, and in contrast to...

  8. The process of organisational adaptation through innovations, and organisational adaptability

    Tikka, Tommi

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the process of organisational adaptation and organisational adaptability. The study generates a theoretical framework about organisational adaptation behaviour and conditions that have influence on success of organisational adaptation. The research questions of the study are: How does an organisation adapt through innovations, and which conditions enhance or impede organisational adaptation through innovations? The data were gathered from five case organisations withi...

  9. Adaptive network countermeasures.

    McClelland-Bane, Randy; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Carathimas, Anthony G.; Thomas, Eric D.

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year LDRD funded by the Differentiating Technologies investment area. The project investigated the use of countermeasures in protecting computer networks as well as how current countermeasures could be changed in order to adapt with both evolving networks and evolving attackers. The work involved collaboration between Sandia employees and students in the Sandia - California Center for Cyber Defenders (CCD) program. We include an explanation of the need for adaptive countermeasures, a description of the architecture we designed to provide adaptive countermeasures, and evaluations of the system.

  10. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  11. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy. PMID:27019970

  12. Theory of adaptive adjustment

    Weihong Huang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional adaptive expectation as a mechanism of stabilizing an unstable economic process is reexamined through a generalization to an adaptive adjustment framework. The generic structures of equilibria that can be stabilized through an adaptive adjustment mechanism are identified. The generalization can be applied to a broad class of discrete economic processes where the variables interested can be adjusted or controlled directly by economic agents such as in cobweb dynamics, Cournot games, Oligopoly markets, tatonnement price adjustment, tariff games, population control through immigration etc.

  13. Symmetry Adapted Basis Sets

    Avery, John Scales; Rettrup, Sten; Avery, James Emil

    In theoretical physics, theoretical chemistry and engineering, one often wishes to solve partial differential equations subject to a set of boundary conditions. This gives rise to eigenvalue problems of which some solutions may be very difficult to find. For example, the problem of finding...... such problems can be much reduced by making use of symmetry-adapted basis functions. The conventional method for generating symmetry-adapted basis sets is through the application of group theory, but this can be difficult. This book describes an easier method for generating symmetry-adapted basis sets...

  14. Adaptive functional evolution of leptin in cold-adaptive pika family

    2008-01-01

    @@ Aresearch team led by Prof.ZHAO Xinquan with the CAS Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology has put forward the viewpoint for the first time that adaptive functional evolution may occur in the leptin protein of the pika (Ochotona) family, a typical coldadaptive mammal.

  15. Asimovian Adaptive Agents

    Gordon, D F

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop agents that are adaptive and predictable and timely. At first blush, these three requirements seem contradictory. For example, adaptation risks introducing undesirable side effects, thereby making agents' behavior less predictable. Furthermore, although formal verification can assist in ensuring behavioral predictability, it is known to be time-consuming. Our solution to the challenge of satisfying all three requirements is the following. Agents have finite-state automaton plans, which are adapted online via evolutionary learning (perturbation) operators. To ensure that critical behavioral constraints are always satisfied, agents' plans are first formally verified. They are then reverified after every adaptation. If reverification concludes that constraints are violated, the plans are repaired. The main objective of this paper is to improve the efficiency of reverification after learning, so that agents have a sufficiently rapid response time. We present two solutions: ...

  16. Limits to adaptation

    Dow, Kirstin; Berkhout, Frans; Preston, Benjamin L.; Klein, Richard J. T.; Midgley, Guy; Shaw, M. Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society's responses to climate change.

  17. The genomics of adaptation.

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation. PMID:23097510

  18. Adaptive shared control system

    Sanders, David

    2009-01-01

    A control system to aid mobility is presented that is intended to assist living independently and that provides physical guidance. The system has two levels: a human machine interface and an adaptive shared controller.

  19. Adaptations, exaptations, and spandrels.

    Buss, D M; Haselton, M G; Shackelford, T K; Bleske, A L; Wakefield, J C

    1998-05-01

    Adaptation and natural selection are central concepts in the emerging science of evolutionary psychology. Natural selection is the only known causal process capable of producing complex functional organic mechanisms. These adaptations, along with their incidental by-products and a residue of noise, comprise all forms of life. Recently, S. J. Gould (1991) proposed that exaptations and spandrels may be more important than adaptations for evolutionary psychology. These refer to features that did not originally arise for their current use but rather were co-opted for new purposes. He suggested that many important phenomena--such as art, language, commerce, and war--although evolutionary in origin, are incidental spandrels of the large human brain. The authors outline the conceptual and evidentiary standards that apply to adaptations, exaptations, and spandrels and discuss the relative utility of these concepts for psychological science. PMID:9612136

  20. Adapt or Die

    Brody, Joshua Eric; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the role non-adaptivity plays in maintaining dynamic data structures. Roughly speaking, a data structure is non-adaptive if the memory locations it reads and/or writes when processing a query or update depend only on the query or update and not on the contents of previously...... read cells. We study such non-adaptive data structures in the cell probe model. This model is one of the least restrictive lower bound models and in particular, cell probe lower bounds apply to data structures developed in the popular word-RAM model. Unfortunately, this generality comes at a high cost......: the highest lower bound proved for any data structure problem is only polylogarithmic. Our main result is to demonstrate that one can in fact obtain polynomial cell probe lower bounds for non-adaptive data structures. To shed more light on the seemingly inherent polylogarithmic lower bound barrier, we...

  1. Adaptive Space Structures

    Wada, B.

    1993-01-01

    The term adaptive structures refers to a structural control approach in which sensors, actuators, electronics, materials, structures, structural concepts, and system-performance-validation strategies are integrated to achieve specific objectives.

  2. Adaptive Spectral Doppler Estimation

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence....... The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to pro- vide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the ob- servation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and...... compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch’s method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of...

  3. Adaptive multiresolution methods

    Schneider Kai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available These lecture notes present adaptive multiresolution schemes for evolutionary PDEs in Cartesian geometries. The discretization schemes are based either on finite volume or finite difference schemes. The concept of multiresolution analyses, including Harten’s approach for point and cell averages, is described in some detail. Then the sparse point representation method is discussed. Different strategies for adaptive time-stepping, like local scale dependent time stepping and time step control, are presented. Numerous numerical examples in one, two and three space dimensions validate the adaptive schemes and illustrate the accuracy and the gain in computational efficiency in terms of CPU time and memory requirements. Another aspect, modeling of turbulent flows using multiresolution decompositions, the so-called Coherent Vortex Simulation approach is also described and examples are given for computations of three-dimensional weakly compressible mixing layers. Most of the material concerning applications to PDEs is assembled and adapted from previous publications [27, 31, 32, 34, 67, 69].

  4. Adaptive Heat Engine

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Babajanyan, S. G.; Martirosyan, N. H.; Melkikh, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    A major limitation of many heat engines is that their functioning demands on-line control and/or an external fitting between the environmental parameters (e.g., temperatures of thermal baths) and internal parameters of the engine. We study a model for an adaptive heat engine, where—due to feedback from the functional part—the engine's structure adapts to given thermal baths. Hence, no on-line control and no external fitting are needed. The engine can employ unknown resources; it can also adapt to results of its own functioning that make the bath temperatures closer. We determine resources of adaptation and relate them to the prior information available about the environment.

  5. Adaptive Architectural Envelope

    Foged, Isak Worre; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing variety of applications of adaptive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability....... The general scopes of this paper are to develop a new adaptive kinetic architectural structure, particularly a reconfigurable architectural structure which can transform body shape from planar geometries to hyper-surfaces using different control strategies, i.e. a transformation into more than one or...... two different shape alternatives. The adaptive structure is a proposal for a responsive building envelope which is an idea of a first level operational framework for present and future investigations towards performance based responsive architectures through a set of responsive typologies. A mock- up...

  6. Statistical Physics of Adaptation

    Perunov, Nikolai; England, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    All living things exhibit adaptations that enable them to survive and reproduce in the natural environment that they inhabit. From a biological standpoint, it has long been understood that adaptation comes from natural selection, whereby maladapted individuals do not pass their traits effectively to future generations. However, we may also consider the phenomenon of adaptation from the standpoint of physics, and ask whether it is possible to delineate what the difference is in terms of physical properties between something that is well-adapted to its surrounding environment, and something that is not. In this work, we undertake to address this question from a theoretical standpoint. Building on past fundamental results in far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics, we demonstrate a generalization of the Helmholtz free energy for the finite-time stochastic evolution of driven Newtonian matter. By analyzing this expression term by term, we are able to argue for a general tendency in driven many-particle systems...

  7. Adaptive trial designs.

    Lai, Tze Leung; Lavori, Philip William; Shih, Mei-Chiung

    2012-01-01

    We review adaptive designs for clinical trials, giving special attention to the control of the Type I error in late-phase confirmatory trials, when the trial planner wishes to adjust the final sample size of the study in response to an unblinded analysis of interim estimates of treatment effects. We point out that there is considerable inefficiency in using the adaptive designs that employ conditional power calculations to reestimate the sample size and that maintain the Type I error by using certain weighted test statistics. Although these adaptive designs have little advantage over familiar group-sequential designs, our review also describes recent developments in adaptive designs that are both flexible and efficient. We also discuss the use of Bayesian designs, when the context of use demands control over operating characteristics (Type I and II errors) and correction of the bias of estimated treatment effects. PMID:21838549

  8. Leak test adapter for containers

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  9. Frustratingly Easy Domain Adaptation

    Daumé, Hal

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach to domain adaptation that is appropriate exactly in the case when one has enough ``target'' data to do slightly better than just using only ``source'' data. Our approach is incredibly simple, easy to implement as a preprocessing step (10 lines of Perl!) and outperforms state-of-the-art approaches on a range of datasets. Moreover, it is trivially extended to a multi-domain adaptation problem, where one has data from a variety of different domains.

  10. Adaptive quantum teleportation

    Modlawska, Joanna; Grudka, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    We consider multiple teleportation in the Knill-Laflamme-Milburn (KLM) scheme. We introduce adaptive teleportation, i.e., such that the choice of entangled state used in the next teleportation depends on the results of the measurements performed during the previous teleportations. We show that adaptive teleportation enables an increase in the probability of faithful multiple teleportation in the KLM scheme. In particular if a qubit is to be teleported more than once then it is better to use n...

  11. The Adaptive Automation Design

    Calefato, Caterina; Montanari, Roberto; TESAURI, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    After considering the positive effects of adaptive automation implementation, this chapter focuses on two partly overlapping phenomena: on the one hand, the role of trust in automation is considered, particularly as to the effects of overtrust and mistrust in automation's reliability; on the other hand, long-term lack of exercise on specific operation may lead users to skill deterioration. As a future work, it will be interesting and challenging to explore the conjunction of adaptive automati...

  12. The genomics of adaptation

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far ...

  13. Facilitation of CRISPR adaptation

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    CRISPR systems, as bacterial defenses against phages, logically must display in their functioning a sequence of at least three major steps. These, in order of occurrence, are “facilitation,” adaptation and interference, where the facilitation step is the main issue considered in this commentary. Interference is the blocking of phage infections as mediated in part by CRISPR spacer sequences. Adaptation, at least as narrowly defined, is the acquisition of these spacer sequences by CRISPR loci. ...

  14. Robust Adaptive Control

    Narendra, K. S.; Annaswamy, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Several concepts and results in robust adaptive control are are discussed and is organized in three parts. The first part surveys existing algorithms. Different formulations of the problem and theoretical solutions that have been suggested are reviewed here. The second part contains new results related to the role of persistent excitation in robust adaptive systems and the use of hybrid control to improve robustness. In the third part promising new areas for future research are suggested which combine different approaches currently known.

  15. Climate Adaptation in Europe

    At the Conference of Parties in Copenhagen, Denmark, December 7-18, 2009 Change Magazine will present a special issue on 'Climate Adaptation in Europe'. The magazine contains articles on climate policy strategies in European countries and cross-border studies on climate change, articles on climate adaptation in the Alps, on water quality as a bottleneck for the agricultural sector, and drought in the mediterranean countries. How will member countries in the European Union tackle the climate crisis?.

  16. Network and adaptive sampling

    Chaudhuri, Arijit

    2014-01-01

    Combining the two statistical techniques of network sampling and adaptive sampling, this book illustrates the advantages of using them in tandem to effectively capture sparsely located elements in unknown pockets. It shows how network sampling is a reliable guide in capturing inaccessible entities through linked auxiliaries. The text also explores how adaptive sampling is strengthened in information content through subsidiary sampling with devices to mitigate unmanageable expanding sample sizes. Empirical data illustrates the applicability of both methods.

  17. Opportunistic Adaptation Knowledge Discovery

    Badra, Fadi; Cordier, Amélie; Lieber, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com International audience Adaptation has long been considered as the Achilles' heel of case-based reasoning since it requires some domain-specific knowledge that is difficult to acquire. In this paper, two strategies are combined in order to reduce the knowledge engineering cost induced by the adaptation knowledge (CA) acquisition task: CA is learned from the case base by the means of knowledge discovery techniques, and the CA a...

  18. Learning to Adapt. Organisational Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts

    Analysis of human adaptation to climate change should be based on realistic models of adaptive behaviour at the level of organisations and individuals. The paper sets out a framework for analysing adaptation to the direct and indirect impacts of climate change in business organisations with new evidence presented from empirical research into adaptation in nine case-study companies. It argues that adaptation to climate change has many similarities with processes of organisational learning. The paper suggests that business organisations face a number of obstacles in learning how to adapt to climate change impacts, especially in relation to the weakness and ambiguity of signals about climate change and the uncertainty about benefits flowing from adaptation measures. Organisations rarely adapt 'autonomously', since their adaptive behaviour is influenced by policy and market conditions, and draws on resources external to the organisation. The paper identifies four adaptation strategies that pattern organisational adaptive behaviour

  19. Adaptation and perceptual norms

    Webster, Michael A.; Yasuda, Maiko; Haber, Sara; Leonard, Deanne; Ballardini, Nicole

    2007-02-01

    We used adaptation to examine the relationship between perceptual norms--the stimuli observers describe as psychologically neutral, and response norms--the stimulus levels that leave visual sensitivity in a neutral or balanced state. Adapting to stimuli on opposite sides of a neutral point (e.g. redder or greener than white) biases appearance in opposite ways. Thus the adapting stimulus can be titrated to find the unique adapting level that does not bias appearance. We compared these response norms to subjectively defined neutral points both within the same observer (at different retinal eccentricities) and between observers. These comparisons were made for visual judgments of color, image focus, and human faces, stimuli that are very different and may depend on very different levels of processing, yet which share the property that for each there is a well defined and perceptually salient norm. In each case the adaptation aftereffects were consistent with an underlying sensitivity basis for the perceptual norm. Specifically, response norms were similar to and thus covaried with the perceptual norm, and under common adaptation differences between subjectively defined norms were reduced. These results are consistent with models of norm-based codes and suggest that these codes underlie an important link between visual coding and visual experience.

  20. Protein Foods

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Best Protein Choices The best choices are: Plant-based proteins ...

  1. On Adaptive vs. Non-adaptive Security of Multiparty Protocols

    Canetti, Ran; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Dziembowski, Stefan; Ishai, Yuval; Malkin, Tal

    course of the computation. We study the relations between adaptive security (i.e., security in the adaptive setting) and non-adaptive security, according to two definitions and in several models of computation. While affirming some prevailing beliefs, we also obtain some unexpected results. Some...... definition of Canetti, for honest-but-curious adversaries, adaptive security is equivalent to non-adaptive security when the number of parties is logarithmic, and is strictly stronger than non-adaptive security when the number of parties is super-logarithmic. For Byzantine adversaries, adaptive security is...

  2. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    is important in protein-protein association. It has been estimated that a large fraction of cellular proteins are `natively disordered', i.e., unstable in solution. The disordered state has a significant residual structure. In this state, a protein exists in an ensemble of rapidly interconverting conformers. They play roles in cell-cycle control, signal transduction, transcriptional and translational regulation, and in large macromolecular complexes. It has been suggested that natively disordered proteins are more `adaptive', and thus advantageous in regulation and in binding diverse ligands. Alternatively, since the native conformation is still likely to be the most abundant within the ensemble, disordered proteins, which typically have larger interface to size ratios, lead to smaller protein, genome and cell sizes, and thus are functionally advantageous. To be able to predict protein-protein interactions, we need to discern various aspects of their associations: from their shape complementarity to the organization and relative contributions of the different physical components to their stability. They involve the static and the dynamic. Proteins interact through their surfaces. Thus, to analyze their interactions, we typically study residues (or atoms) which are in contact across the two-chain interface. In addition, we often inspect the residues in their vicinity, exploring their supporting matrix. The hope is that through the understanding of the principles and mechanisms of the interactions, we shall eventually be able to solve the protein-protein interaction puzzle.

  3. Solar Adaptive Optics

    Thomas R. Rimmele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO will be given.

  4. Adaptation and risk management

    Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation assessment methods are compatible with the international risk management standard ISO:31000. Risk management approaches are increasingly being recommended for adaptation assessments at both national and local levels. Two orientations to assessments can commonly be identified: top-down and bottom-up, and prescriptive and diagnostic. Combinations of these orientations favor different types of assessments. The choice of orientation can be related to uncertainties in prediction and taking action, in the type of adaptation and in the degree of system stress. Adopting multiple viewpoints is to be encouraged, especially in complex situations. The bulk of current guidance material is consistent with top-down and predictive approaches, thus is most suitable for risk scoping and identification. Abroad range ofmaterial fromwithin and beyond the climate change literature can be used to select methods to be used in assessing and implementing adaptation. The framing of risk, correct formulation of the questions being investigated and assessment methodology are critical aspects of the scoping phase. Only when these issues have been addressed should be issue of specific methods and tools be addressed. The reorientation of adaptation from an assessment focused solely on anthropogenic climate change to broader issues of vulnerability/resilience, sustainable development and disaster risk, especially through a risk management framework, can draw from existing policy and management understanding in communities, professions and agencies, incorporating existing agendas, knowledge, risks, and issues they already face.

  5. Decoupled Adapt-then-Combine diffusion networks with adaptive combiners

    Fernandez-Bes, Jesus; Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Silva, Magno T. M.; Azpicueta-Ruiz, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a novel diffusion strategy for adaptive networks called Decoupled Adapt-then-Combine, which keeps a fully local estimate of the solution for the adaptation step. Our strategy, which is specially convenient for heterogeneous networks, is compared with the standard Adapt-then-Combine scheme and theoretically analyzed using energy conservation arguments. Such comparison shows the need of implementing adaptive combiners for both schemes to obtain a good performance in cas...

  6. Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death.

    Gorban, Alexander N; Tyukina, Tatiana A; Smirnova, Elena V; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I

    2016-09-21

    In 1938, Selye proposed the notion of adaptation energy and published 'Experimental evidence supporting the conception of adaptation energy.' Adaptation of an animal to different factors appears as the spending of one resource. Adaptation energy is a hypothetical extensive quantity spent for adaptation. This term causes much debate when one takes it literally, as a physical quantity, i.e. a sort of energy. The controversial points of view impede the systematic use of the notion of adaptation energy despite experimental evidence. Nevertheless, the response to many harmful factors often has general non-specific form and we suggest that the mechanisms of physiological adaptation admit a very general and nonspecific description. We aim to demonstrate that Selye׳s adaptation energy is the cornerstone of the top-down approach to modelling of non-specific adaptation processes. We analyze Selye׳s axioms of adaptation energy together with Goldstone׳s modifications and propose a series of models for interpretation of these axioms. Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the 'dominant path' in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of 'oscillating death' and 'oscillating remission' are predicted on the base of the dynamical models of adaptation. Natural selection plays a key role in the evolution of mechanisms of physiological adaptation. We use the fitness optimization approach to study of the distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors, during adaptation to a multifactor environment, and analyze the optimal strategies for different systems of factors. PMID:26801872

  7. Adaptive cancellation techniques

    1983-11-01

    An adaptive signal canceller has been evaluated for the enhancement of pulse signal reception during the transmission of a high power ECM jamming signal. The canceller design is based on the use of DRFM(Digital RF Memory) technology as part of an adaptive multiple tapped delay line. The study includes analysis of relationship of tap spacing and waveform bandwidth, survey of related documents in areas of sidelobe cancellers, transversal equalizers, and adaptive filters, and derivation of control equations and corresponding control processes. The simulation of overall processes included geometric analysis of the multibeam transmitting antenna, multiple reflection sources and the receiving antenna; waveforms, tap spacings and bandwidths; and alternate control algorithms. Conclusions are provided regarding practical system control algorithms, design characteristics and limitations.

  8. Adaptable Embedded Systems

    Lisbôa, Carlos; Carro, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    As embedded systems become more complex, designers face a number of challenges at different levels: they need to boost performance, while keeping energy consumption as low as possible, they need to reuse existent software code, and at the same time they need to take advantage of the extra logic available in the chip, represented by multiple processors working together.  This book describes several strategies to achieve such different and interrelated goals, by the use of adaptability. Coverage includes reconfigurable systems, dynamic optimization techniques such as binary translation and trace reuse, new memory architectures including homogeneous and heterogeneous multiprocessor systems, communication issues and NOCs, fault tolerance against fabrication defects and soft errors, and finally, how one can combine several of these techniques together to achieve higher levels of performance and adaptability.  The discussion also includes how to employ specialized software to improve this new adaptive system, and...

  9. Engineering Adaptive Web Applications

    Dolog, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Information and services on the web are accessible for everyone. Users of the web differ in their background, culture, political and social environment, interests and so on. Ambient intelligence was envisioned as a concept for systems which are able to adapt to user actions and needs....... With the growing amount of information and services, the web applications become natural candidates to adopt the concepts of ambient intelligence. Such applications can deal with divers user intentions and actions based on the user profile and can suggest the combination of information content and services which...... suit the user profile the most. This paper summarizes the domain engineering framework for such adaptive web applications. The framework provides guidelines to develop adaptive web applications as members of a family. It suggests how to utilize the design artifacts as knowledge which can be used...

  10. Affinity purification of proteins binding to GST fusion proteins.

    Swaffield, J C; Johnston, S A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the use of proteins fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST fusion proteins) to affinity purify other proteins, a technique also known as GST pulldown purification. The describes a strategy in which a GST fusion protein is bound to agarose affinity beads and the complex is then used to assay the binding of a specific test protein that has been labeled with [35S]methionine by in vitro translation. However, this method can be adapted for use with other types of fusion proteins; for example, His6, biotin tags, or maltose-binding protein fusions (MBP), and these may offer particular advantages. A describes preparation of an E. coli extract that is added to the reaction mixture with purified test protein to reduce nonspecific binding. PMID:18265191

  11. Adaptive Metric Kernel Regression

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Kernel smoothing is a widely used nonparametric pattern recognition technique. By nature, it suffers from the curse of dimensionality and is usually difficult to apply to high input dimensions. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that adapts the input metric used in multivariate regression by...... minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows one to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms the standard...

  12. STUDYING COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS

    John H. Holland

    2006-01-01

    Complex adaptive systems (cas) - systems that involve many components that adapt or learn as they interact - are at the heart of important contemporary problems. The study of cas poses unique challenges: Some of our most powerful mathematical tools, particularly methods involving fixed points, attractors, and the like, are of limited help in understanding the development of cas. This paper suggests ways to modify research methods and tools, with an emphasis on the role of computer-based models, to increase our understanding of cas.

  13. Adaptive metric kernel regression

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Kernel smoothing is a widely used non-parametric pattern recognition technique. By nature, it suffers from the curse of dimensionality and is usually difficult to apply to high input dimensions. In this contribution, we propose an algorithm that adapts the input metric used in multivariate...... regression by minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms the...

  14. Adaptive radar resource management

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  15. The Adaptability of Teams

    Jørgensen, Frances; Boer, Harry

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, data from a longitudinal case study in an organization attempting to adapt its internal work processes to changes in its external context are presented, analyzed and discussed. Specifically, functionally structured work teams in one department of a Danish production facility were...... proper alignment between the structuring of the work processes and characteristics of the external context (Lawrence & Lorsch, 1967) – it provides a unique opportunity to explore the adaptation process in practice. The paper contributes to the development of contingency theory by lending support to the...

  16. Adaptive heat engine

    Allahverdyan, A.E.; Babajanyan, S. G.; Martirosyan, N. H.; Melkikh, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    A major limitations for many heat engines is that their functioning demands on-line control, and/or an external fitting between environmental parameters (e.g. temperatures of thermal baths) and internal parameters of the engine. We study a model for an adaptive heat engine, where---due to feedback from the functional part---the engine's structure adapts to given thermal baths. Hence no on-line control and no external fitting are needed. The engine can employ unknown resources, it can also ada...

  17. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications.

  18. How harmful are adaptation restrictions

    Bruin, de, B.; Dellink, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant assumption in economic models of climate policy remains that adaptation will be implemented in an optimal manner. There are, however, several reasons why optimal levels of adaptation may not be attainable. This paper investigates the effects of suboptimal levels of adaptation, i.e. adaptation restrictions, on the composition and level of climate change costs and on welfare. Several adaptation restrictions are identified and then simulated in a revised DICE model, extended with ad...

  19. Grit, a GTPase-Activating Protein for the Rho Family, Regulates Neurite Extension through Association with the TrkA Receptor and N-Shc and CrkL/Crk Adapter Molecules

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Komiya, Misako; Sone, Kiyoaki; Hirose, Eiji; Gotoh, Noriko; Morii, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yasutaka; Mori, Nozomu

    2002-01-01

    Neurotrophins are key regulators of the fate and shape of neuronal cells and act as guidance cues for growth cones by remodeling the actin cytoskeleton. Actin dynamics is controlled by Rho GTPases. We identified a novel Rho GTPase-activating protein (Grit) for Rho/Rac/Cdc42 small GTPases. Grit was abundant in neuronal cells and directly interacted with TrkA, a high-affinity receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF). Another pool of Grit was recruited to the activated receptor tyrosine kinase thr...

  20. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  1. Adaptive Evolution Coupled with Retrotransposon Exaptation Allowed for the Generation of a Human-Protein-Specific Coding Gene That Promotes Cancer Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Both Haematological Malignancies and Solid Tumours: The Extraordinary Case of MYEOV Gene.

    Papamichos, Spyros I; Margaritis, Dimitrios; Kotsianidis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer in human is high as compared to chimpanzee. However previous analysis has documented that numerous human cancer-related genes are highly conserved in chimpanzee. Till date whether human genome includes species-specific cancer-related genes that could potentially contribute to a higher cancer susceptibility remains obscure. This study focuses on MYEOV, an oncogene encoding for two protein isoforms, reported as causally involved in promoting cancer cell proliferation and metastasis in both haematological malignancies and solid tumours. First we document, via stringent in silico analysis, that MYEOV arose de novo in Catarrhini. We show that MYEOV short-isoform start codon was evolutionarily acquired after Catarrhini/Platyrrhini divergence. Throughout the course of Catarrhini evolution MYEOV acquired a gradually elongated translatable open reading frame (ORF), a gradually shortened translation-regulatory upstream ORF, and alternatively spliced mRNA variants. A point mutation introduced in human allowed for the acquisition of MYEOV long-isoform start codon. Second, we demonstrate the precious impact of exonized transposable elements on the creation of MYEOV gene structure. Third, we highlight that the initial part of MYEOV long-isoform coding DNA sequence was under positive selection pressure during Catarrhini evolution. MYEOV represents a Primate Orphan Gene that acquired, via ORF expansion, a human-protein-specific coding potential. PMID:26568894

  2. Adaptive Evolution Coupled with Retrotransposon Exaptation Allowed for the Generation of a Human-Protein-Specific Coding Gene That Promotes Cancer Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Both Haematological Malignancies and Solid Tumours: The Extraordinary Case of MYEOV Gene

    Spyros I. Papamichos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of cancer in human is high as compared to chimpanzee. However previous analysis has documented that numerous human cancer-related genes are highly conserved in chimpanzee. Till date whether human genome includes species-specific cancer-related genes that could potentially contribute to a higher cancer susceptibility remains obscure. This study focuses on MYEOV, an oncogene encoding for two protein isoforms, reported as causally involved in promoting cancer cell proliferation and metastasis in both haematological malignancies and solid tumours. First we document, via stringent in silico analysis, that MYEOV arose de novo in Catarrhini. We show that MYEOV short-isoform start codon was evolutionarily acquired after Catarrhini/Platyrrhini divergence. Throughout the course of Catarrhini evolution MYEOV acquired a gradually elongated translatable open reading frame (ORF, a gradually shortened translation-regulatory upstream ORF, and alternatively spliced mRNA variants. A point mutation introduced in human allowed for the acquisition of MYEOV long-isoform start codon. Second, we demonstrate the precious impact of exonized transposable elements on the creation of MYEOV gene structure. Third, we highlight that the initial part of MYEOV long-isoform coding DNA sequence was under positive selection pressure during Catarrhini evolution. MYEOV represents a Primate Orphan Gene that acquired, via ORF expansion, a human-protein-specific coding potential.

  3. Adaptive Evolution Coupled with Retrotransposon Exaptation Allowed for the Generation of a Human-Protein-Specific Coding Gene That Promotes Cancer Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Both Haematological Malignancies and Solid Tumours: The Extraordinary Case of MYEOV Gene

    Papamichos, Spyros I.; Margaritis, Dimitrios; Kotsianidis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer in human is high as compared to chimpanzee. However previous analysis has documented that numerous human cancer-related genes are highly conserved in chimpanzee. Till date whether human genome includes species-specific cancer-related genes that could potentially contribute to a higher cancer susceptibility remains obscure. This study focuses on MYEOV, an oncogene encoding for two protein isoforms, reported as causally involved in promoting cancer cell proliferation and metastasis in both haematological malignancies and solid tumours. First we document, via stringent in silico analysis, that MYEOV arose de novo in Catarrhini. We show that MYEOV short-isoform start codon was evolutionarily acquired after Catarrhini/Platyrrhini divergence. Throughout the course of Catarrhini evolution MYEOV acquired a gradually elongated translatable open reading frame (ORF), a gradually shortened translation-regulatory upstream ORF, and alternatively spliced mRNA variants. A point mutation introduced in human allowed for the acquisition of MYEOV long-isoform start codon. Second, we demonstrate the precious impact of exonized transposable elements on the creation of MYEOV gene structure. Third, we highlight that the initial part of MYEOV long-isoform coding DNA sequence was under positive selection pressure during Catarrhini evolution. MYEOV represents a Primate Orphan Gene that acquired, via ORF expansion, a human-protein-specific coding potential. PMID:26568894

  4. Magnetic adaptive testing

    Tomáš, Ivan; Vértesy, G.

    Rijeka : INTECHWEB.ORG, 2012 - (Omar, M.), s. 145-184 ISBN 978-953-51-0108-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferromagnetic materials * nondestructive testing * steel * cast iron * industrial degradation * Magnetic Adaptive Testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  5. Prism Adaptation in Schizophrenia

    Bigelow, Nirav O.; Turner, Beth M.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Paulsen, Jane S.; O'Leary, Daniel S.; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2006-01-01

    The prism adaptation test examines procedural learning (PL) in which performance facilitation occurs with practice on tasks without the need for conscious awareness. Dynamic interactions between frontostriatal cortices, basal ganglia, and the cerebellum have been shown to play key roles in PL. Disruptions within these neural networks have also…

  6. Generalization of Prism Adaptation

    Redding, Gordon M.; Wallace, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Prism exposure produces 2 kinds of adaptive response. Recalibration is ordinary strategic remapping of spatially coded movement commands to rapidly reduce performance error. Realignment is the extraordinary process of transforming spatial maps to bring the origins of coordinate systems into correspondence. Realignment occurs when spatial…

  7. Adaptive municipal electronic forms

    Kuiper, Pieter; Dijk, van Betsy; Bondarouk, Tanya; Ruël, Huub; Guiderdoni-Jourdain, Karine; Oiry, Ewan

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation of electronic forms (e-forms) seems to be a step forward to reduce the burden for people who fill in forms. Municipalities more and more offer e-forms online that can be used by citizens to request a municipal product or service or by municipal employees to place a request on behalf of a

  8. Adaptive Computerized Instruction.

    Ray, Roger D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an artificially intelligent multimedia computerized instruction system capable of developing a conceptual image of what a student is learning while the student is learning it. It focuses on principles of learning and adaptive behavioral control systems theory upon which the system is designed and demonstrates multiple user modes.…

  9. Robust Adaptive Structural Control

    Yang, Chi-Ming; Beck, James L.

    1995-01-01

    A new robust adaptive structural control design methodology is developed and presented which treats modeling uncertainties and limitations of control devices. Furthermore, no restriction is imposed on the structural models and the nature of the control devices so that the proposed method is very general. A simple linear single degree-of-freedom numerical example is presented to illustrate this approach.

  10. Adenosine in exercise adaptation.

    Simpson, R E; Phillis, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    By influencing the regulation of the mechanisms of angiogenesis, erythropoietin production, blood flow, myocardial glucose uptake, glycogenolysis, systolic blood pressure, respiration, plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels, adenosine may exert a significant effect on the body's adaptation response to exercise. However, adenosine's possible influence over the vasodilatory response to exercise in skeletal muscle is controversial and more research is required to resolve this issue. Variou...

  11. Adapting to Environmental Jolts.

    Meyer, Alan D.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the reactions of three San Francisco (California) hospitals to the 1975 doctors' strike. Analyzes the anticipatory, responsive, and readjustment phases of the hospitals' adaptations in terms of each hospital's previous market strategy, organizational structure and ideology, and deployment of slack resources, including financial, human,…

  12. ADAM: ADaptive Autonomous Machine

    Oosten, van Daan C.; Nijenhuis, Lucas F.J.; Bakkers, André W.P.; Vervoort, Wiek A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a part of the development of an adaptive autonomous machine that is able to move in an unknown world extract knowledge out of the perceived data, has the possibility to reason, and finally has the capability to exchange experiences and knowledge with other agents. The agent is n

  13. Adaptation investments and homeownership

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Skak, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This article develops a model where ownership improves efficiency of the housing market as it enhances the utility of housing consumption for some consumers. The model is based on an extended Hotelling-Lancaster utility approach in which the ideal variant of housing is obtainable only by adapting...

  14. Unbiased Adaptive Expectation Schemes

    Antonio Palestrini; Mauro Gallegati

    2015-01-01

    There are situations in which the old-fashioned adaptive expectation process seems to provide a good description of agents' behavior (Chow, 2011). Unfortunately, this expectation scheme may not satisfy the necessary rationality condition (unconditional mean-zero error). This paper shows how to simply fix the problem introducing a bias correction term.

  15. Exploring Adaptive Program Behavior

    Bonnichsen, Lars Frydendal; Probst, Christian W.

    . Both solutions come at a cost; adaptivity issues a runtime overhead and requires more design effort, while dynamic recompilation takes time to perform. In this project, we plan to investigate the possibilities, limitations, and benefits of these techniques. This abstract covers our thoughts on how...

  16. Aging and dark adaptation.

    Jackson, G R; Owsley, C; McGwin, G

    1999-11-01

    Older adults have serious difficulty seeing under low illumination and at night, even in the absence of ocular disease. Optical changes in the aged eye, such as pupillary miosis and increased lens density, cannot account for the severity of this problem, and little is known about its neural basis. Dark adaptation functions were measured on 94 adults ranging in age from the 20s to the 80s to assess the rate of rod-mediated sensitivity recovery after exposure to a 98% bleach. Fundus photography and a grading scale were used to characterize macular health in subjects over age 49 in order to control for macular disease. Thresholds for each subject were corrected for lens density based on individual estimates, and pupil diameter was controlled. Results indicated that during human aging there is a dramatic slowing in rod-mediated dark adaptation that can be attributed to delayed rhodopsin regeneration. During the second component of the rod-mediated phase of dark adaptation, the rate of sensitivity recovery decreased 0.02 log unit/min per decade, and the time constant of rhodopsin regeneration increased 8.4 s/decade. The amount of time to reach within 0.3 log units of baseline scotopic sensitivity increased 2.76 min/decade. These aging-related changes in rod-mediated dark adaptation may contribute to night vision problems commonly experienced by the elderly. PMID:10748929

  17. Adaptive acoustooptic filter

    Psaltis, Demetri; Hong, John

    1984-01-01

    A new adaptive filter utilizing acoustooptic devices in a space integrating architecture is described. Two configurations are presented; one of them, suitable for signal estimation, is shown to approximate the Wiener filter, while the other, suitable for detection, is shown to approximate the matched filter.

  18. The adaptive evolution of the mammalian mitochondrial genome

    O'Brien Stephen J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondria produce up to 95% of a eukaryotic cell's energy through oxidative phosphorylation. The proteins involved in this vital process are under high functional constraints. However, metabolic requirements vary across species, potentially modifying selective pressures. We evaluate the adaptive evolution of 12 protein-coding mitochondrial genes in 41 placental mammalian species by assessing amino acid sequence variation and exploring the functional implications of observed variation in secondary and tertiary protein structures. Results Wide variation in the properties of amino acids were observed at functionally important regions of cytochrome b in species with more-specialized metabolic requirements (such as adaptation to low energy diet or large body size, such as in elephant, dugong, sloth, and pangolin, and adaptation to unusual oxygen requirements, for example diving in cetaceans, flying in bats, and living at high altitudes in alpacas. Signatures of adaptive variation in the NADH dehydrogenase complex were restricted to the loop regions of the transmembrane units which likely function as protons pumps. Evidence of adaptive variation in the cytochrome c oxidase complex was observed mostly at the interface between the mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits, perhaps evidence of co-evolution. The ATP8 subunit, which has an important role in the assembly of F0, exhibited the highest signal of adaptive variation. ATP6, which has an essential role in rotor performance, showed a high adaptive variation in predicted loop areas. Conclusion Our study provides insight into the adaptive evolution of the mtDNA genome in mammals and its implications for the molecular mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation. We present a framework for future experimental characterization of the impact of specific mutations in the function, physiology, and interactions of the mtDNA encoded proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation.

  19. Exercise, PGC-1α and metabolic adaptation in skeletal muscle

    Yan, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Endurance exercise promotes skeletal muscle adaptation, and exercise-induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (Pgc-1α) gene expression may play a pivotal role in the adaptive processes. Recent applications of mouse genetic models and in vivo imaging in exercise studies started to delineate the signaling-transcription pathways that are involved in the regulation of the Pgc-1α gene. These studies revealed the importance of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/...

  20. Fine-scale recombination and adaptive radiation could be linked.

    Bodilis, Josselin

    2013-09-15

    The difficult reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the major surface protein gene oprF highlighted an adaptive radiation in the Pseudomonas fluorescens group. The recent work of Hao (2013) showed that partial recombination events in oprF gene occurred specifically in a P. fluorescens lineage under ecological niche segregation. So, I suggest that identification of lineage-specific fine-scale recombination may be a way to detect putative adaptive radiation in bacteria. PMID:23774687

  1. Mechanisms of modification of radiosensitivity of lymphoid organs of animals adapted to high altitudes

    It was established, according to DNA metabolism indices, that postradiation destruction of lymphoid organs increases at the early period of adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia and markedly decreases during long-term stay at high altitudes. The radiation effect is ehhanced against the background of inhibited DNA and protein syntheses. With increasing time of adaptation, radiosensitivity diminishes irrespective of the protein and DNA metabolism condition. It was demonstrated that the protein SH-group content of spleen increases concurrently with growing radioresistance

  2. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient.

    Kates, Robert W; Travis, William R; Wilbanks, Thomas J

    2012-05-01

    All human-environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations. PMID:22509036

  3. Unraveling adaptation in eukaryotic pathways: lessons from protocells.

    De Palo, Giovanna; Endres, Robert G

    2013-10-01

    Eukaryotic adaptation pathways operate within wide-ranging environmental conditions without stimulus saturation. Despite numerous differences in the adaptation mechanisms employed by bacteria and eukaryotes, all require energy consumption. Here, we present two minimal models showing that expenditure of energy by the cell is not essential for adaptation. Both models share important features with large eukaryotic cells: they employ small diffusible molecules and involve receptor subunits resembling highly conserved G-protein cascades. Analyzing the drawbacks of these models helps us understand the benefits of energy consumption, in terms of adjustability of response and adaptation times as well as separation of cell-external sensing and cell-internal signaling. Our work thus sheds new light on the evolution of adaptation mechanisms in complex systems. PMID:24204235

  4. Unraveling adaptation in eukaryotic pathways: lessons from protocells.

    Giovanna De Palo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic adaptation pathways operate within wide-ranging environmental conditions without stimulus saturation. Despite numerous differences in the adaptation mechanisms employed by bacteria and eukaryotes, all require energy consumption. Here, we present two minimal models showing that expenditure of energy by the cell is not essential for adaptation. Both models share important features with large eukaryotic cells: they employ small diffusible molecules and involve receptor subunits resembling highly conserved G-protein cascades. Analyzing the drawbacks of these models helps us understand the benefits of energy consumption, in terms of adjustability of response and adaptation times as well as separation of cell-external sensing and cell-internal signaling. Our work thus sheds new light on the evolution of adaptation mechanisms in complex systems.

  5. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Jonathan S Weissman; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respec...

  6. Lipid-transfer proteins.

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are basic proteins found in abundance in higher plants. LTPs play lots of roles in plants such as participation in cutin formation, embryogenesis, defense reactions against phytopathogens, symbiosis, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. In addition, LTPs from field mustard and Chinese daffodil exhibit antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. LTPs from chili pepper and coffee manifest inhibitory activity against fungi pathogenic to humans such as Candida species. The intent of this article is to review LTPs in the plant kingdom. PMID:23193591

  7. Adaptation: Needs, Financing and Institutions

    Klein, Richard J.T.; Kartha, Sivan; Persson, Aasa; Watkiss, Paul; Ackerman, Frank; Downing, Thomas E.; Kjellen, Bo; Schipper, Lisa (Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm (SE))

    2008-07-01

    Regardless of the efforts put into mitigation, some impacts of climate change are already unavoidable. Adaptation to climate change has therefore become a key component of domestic climate policy, along with mitigation. Adaptation has also become key to the success of global climate policy. Without an agreement on supporting adaptation in developing countries, there will be no agreement on mitigation. Strong mitigation efforts make it more likely that adaptation will be effective and affordable. The world cannot rely on adaptation alone: it would eventually lead to a level of climate change to which adaptation is no longer feasible. Government action is needed to create an enabling environment for adaptation. This includes removing existing financial, legal, institutional and knowledge barriers to adaptation, and strengthening the capacity of people and organisations to adapt. The success of adaptation relies on the success of development, and vice versa. Poverty reduction, good governance, education, environmental protection, health and gender equality all contribute to adaptive capacity. Substantially more money is needed to support adaptation in developing countries. Current levels of funding will soon have to be scaled up by two orders of magnitude (from US$ hundreds of million to US$ tens of billion per year). An agreement on adaptation in Copenhagen in 2009 will need to include concrete steps towards a strengthened knowledge base for adaptation, substantially more funding for developing countries, and enhanced adaptation planning and implementation at the national level. Recommendations: Developed countries should accept a transparent, principle-based allocation of responsibility for adaptation funding, resulting in adequate, new and additional money to support adaptation programmes in developing countries. Levies on carbon market transactions and auctioning emission permits are two existing mechanisms of generating new and additional funds consistent with

  8. Performance Comparison of Adaptive Algorithms for Adaptive line Enhancer

    Sanjeev Kumar Dhull; Sandeep K. Arya; O. P. Sahu

    2011-01-01

    We have designed and simulated an adaptive line enhancer system for conferencing. This system is based upon a least-mean-square (LMS) and recursive adaptive algorithm (RLS) Performance of ALE is compared for LMSandRLS algorithms.

  9. Protein stress and stress proteins: implications in aging and disease

    C Sőti; Péter Csermely

    2007-04-01

    Environmantal stress induces damage that activates an adaptive response in any organism. The cellular stress response is based on the induction of cytoprotective proteins, the so called stress or heat shock proteins. The stress response as well as stress proteins are ubiquitous, highly conserved mechanism, and genes, respectively, already present in prokaryotes. Chaperones protect the proteome against conformational damage, promoting the function of protein networks. Protein damage takes place during aging and in several degenerative diseases, and presents a threat to overload the cellular defense mechanisms. The preservation of a robust stress response and protein disposal is indispensable for health and longevity. This review summarizes the present knowledge of protein damage, turnover, and the stress response in aging and degenerative diseases.

  10. Adaptive versus non-adaptive strategies for quantum channel discrimination

    Harrow, Aram W.; Hassidim, Avinatan; Leung, Debbie W.; Watrous, John

    2009-01-01

    We provide a simple example that illustrates the advantage of adaptive over non-adaptive strategies for quantum channel discrimination. In particular, we give a pair of entanglement-breaking channels that can be perfectly discriminated by means of an adaptive strategy that requires just two channel evaluations, but for which no non-adaptive strategy can give a perfect discrimination using any finite number of channel evaluations.

  11. AdaptME toolkit : adaptation monitoring and evaluation

    Pringle, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Organisations that have undertaken adaptation activities now face the challenge of evaluating what worked, what didn’t, how and why. This toolkit responds to a growing demand for practical support in evaluating adaptation progress and performance. AdaptME will help you to think through some of the factors that can make an evaluation of adaptation activities inherently challenging, and equip you to design a robust evaluation. You will be able to ‘tweak’ a single part of your evaluation des...

  12. SpotADAPT

    Kaulakiene, Dalia; Thomsen, Christian; Pedersen, Torben Bach;

    2015-01-01

    Amazon Web Services (AWS). The users aiming for the spot market are presented with many instance types placed in multiple datacenters in the world, and thus it is difficult to choose the optimal deployment. In this paper, we propose the framework SpotADAPT (Spot-Aware (re-)Deployment of Analytical...... Processing Tasks) which is designed to help users by first, estimating the workload execution time on different AWS instance types, and, second, proposing the deployment (i.e., specific availability zone, instance type, pricing model) aligned with user-provided optimization goals (fastest or cheapest...... execution within boundaries). Moreover, during the execution of the workload, SpotADAPT suggests a redeployment if the current spot instance gets terminated by Amazon or a better deployment becomes possible due to fluctuations of the spot prices. The approach is evaluated using the actual execution times of...

  13. Unconsciously triggered conflict adaptation.

    Simon van Gaal

    Full Text Available In conflict tasks such as the Stroop, the Eriksen flanker or the Simon task, it is generally observed that the detection of conflict in the current trial reduces the impact of conflicting information in the subsequent trial; a phenomenon termed conflict adaptation. This higher-order cognitive control function has been assumed to be restricted to cases where conflict is experienced consciously. In the present experiment we manipulated the awareness of conflict-inducing stimuli in a metacontrast masking paradigm to directly test this assumption. Conflicting response tendencies were elicited either consciously (through primes that were weakly masked or unconsciously (strongly masked primes. We demonstrate trial-by-trial conflict adaptation effects after conscious as well as unconscious conflict, which could not be explained by direct stimulus/response repetitions. These findings show that unconscious information can have a longer-lasting influence on our behavior than previously thought and further stretch the functional boundaries of unconscious cognition.

  14. NEEDS - Information Adaptive System

    Kelly, W. L.; Benz, H. F.; Meredith, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Information Adaptive System (IAS) is an element of the NASA End-to-End Data System (NEEDS) Phase II and is focused toward onboard image processing. The IAS is a data preprocessing system which is closely coupled to the sensor system. Some of the functions planned for the IAS include sensor response nonuniformity correction, geometric correction, data set selection, data formatting, packetization, and adaptive system control. The inclusion of these sensor data preprocessing functions onboard the spacecraft will significantly improve the extraction of information from the sensor data in a timely and cost effective manner, and provide the opportunity to design sensor systems which can be reconfigured in near real-time for optimum performance. The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary design of the IAS and the plans for its development.

  15. Adaptive manifold learning.

    Zhang, Zhenyue; Wang, Jing; Zha, Hongyuan

    2012-02-01

    Manifold learning algorithms seek to find a low-dimensional parameterization of high-dimensional data. They heavily rely on the notion of what can be considered as local, how accurately the manifold can be approximated locally, and, last but not least, how the local structures can be patched together to produce the global parameterization. In this paper, we develop algorithms that address two key issues in manifold learning: 1) the adaptive selection of the local neighborhood sizes when imposing a connectivity structure on the given set of high-dimensional data points and 2) the adaptive bias reduction in the local low-dimensional embedding by accounting for the variations in the curvature of the manifold as well as its interplay with the sampling density of the data set. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods for improving the performance of manifold learning algorithms using both synthetic and real-world data sets. PMID:21670485

  16. Adaptive Large Neighbourhood Search

    Røpke, Stefan

    Large neighborhood search is a metaheuristic that has gained popularity in recent years. The heuristic repeatedly moves from solution to solution by first partially destroying the solution and then repairing it. The best solution observed during this search is presented as the final solution. This...... tutorial introduces the large neighborhood search metaheuristic and the variant adaptive large neighborhood search that dynamically tunes parameters of the heuristic while it is running. Both heuristics belong to a broader class of heuristics that are searching a solution space using very large...... neighborhoods. The tutorial also present applications of the adaptive large neighborhood search, mostly related to vehicle routing problems for which the heuristic has been extremely successful. We discuss how the heuristic can be parallelized and thereby take advantage of modern desktop computers that...

  17. Adaptive semantics visualization

    Nazemi, Kawa

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces a novel approach for intelligent visualizations that adapts the different visual variables and data processing to human’s behavior and given tasks. Thereby a number of new algorithms and methods are introduced to satisfy the human need of information and knowledge and enable a usable and attractive way of information acquisition. Each method and algorithm is illustrated in a replicable way to enable the reproduction of the entire “SemaVis” system or parts of it. The introduced evaluation is scientifically well-designed and performed with more than enough participants to validate the benefits of the methods. Beside the introduced new approaches and algorithms, readers may find a sophisticated literature review in Information Visualization and Visual Analytics, Semantics and information extraction, and intelligent and adaptive systems. This book is based on an awarded and distinguished doctoral thesis in computer science.

  18. Adaptive Inflow Control System

    Volkov, Vasily Y; Zhuravlev, Oleg N; Nukhaev, Marat T; Shchelushkin, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the idea and realization for the unique Adaptive Inflow Control System being a part of well completion, able to adjust to the changing in time production conditions. This system allows to limit the flow rate from each interval at a certain level, which solves the problem of water and gas breakthroughs. We present the results of laboratory tests and numerical calculations obtaining the characteristics of the experimental setup with dual-in-position valves as parts of adaptive inflow control system, depending on the operating conditions. The flow distribution in the system was also studied with the help of three-dimensional computer model. The control ranges dependences are determined, an influence of the individual elements on the entire system is revealed.

  19. Adaptive sensor fusion

    Kadar, Ivan

    1995-07-01

    A perceptual reasoning system adaptively extracting, associating, and fusing information from multiple sources, at various levels of abstraction, is considered as the building block for the next generation of surveillance systems. A system architecture is presented which makes use of both centralized and distributed predetection fusion combined with intelligent monitor and control coupling both on-platform and off-board track and decision level fusion results. The goal of this system is to create a `gestalt fused sensor system' whose information product is greater than the sum of the information products from the individual sensors and has performance superior to either individual or a sub-group of combined sensors. The application of this architectural concept to the law enforcement arena (e.g. drug interdiction) utilizing multiple spatially and temporally diverse surveillance platforms and/or information sources, is used to illustrate the benefits of the adaptive perceptual reasoning system concept.

  20. Adapting Mathematical Domain Reasoners

    Heeren, Bastiaan

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical learning environments help students in mastering mathematical knowledge. Mature environments typically offer thousands of interactive exercises. Providing feedback to students solving interactive exercises requires domain reasoners for doing the exercise-specific calculations. Since a domain reasoner has to solve an exercise in the same way a student should solve it, the structure of domain reasoners should follow the layered structure of the mathematical domains. Furthermore, learners, teachers, and environment builders have different requirements for adapting domain reasoners, such as providing more details, disallowing or enforcing certain solutions, and combining multiple mathematical domains in a new domain. In previous work we have shown how domain reasoners for solving interactive exercises can be expressed in terms of rewrite strategies, rewrite rules, and views. This paper shows how users can adapt and configure such domain reasoners to their own needs. This is achieved by enabling users...

  1. Engineering Adaptive Applications

    Dolog, Peter

    Applications on the Web are accessible for users with different background, technical environment used, political, social environment where they reside, interests, goals and so on. The different user types have slightly different requirements for features which such Web applications should have....... The different requirements might be satisfied by different variants of features maintained and provided by Web applications. An adaptive Web application can be seen as a family of Web applications where application instances are those generated for particular user based on his characteristics relevant...... for a domain.In this book, we propose a new domain engineering framework which extends a development process of Web applications with techniques required when designing such adaptive customizable Web applications. The framework is provided with design abstractions which deal separately with...

  2. An Adaptive Robot Game

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg; Svenstrup, Mikael; Dalgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe an adaptive robot game, which motivates elderly people to do a regular amount of physical exercise while playing. One of the advantages of robot based games is that the initiative to play can be taken autonomously by the robot. In this case, the goal is to...... improve the mental and physical state of the user by playing a physical game with the robot. Ideally, a robot game should be simple to learn but difficult to master, providing an appropriate degree of challenge for players with different skills. In order to achieve that, the robot should be able to adapt...... to the behavior of the interacting person. This paper presents a simple ball game between a single player and a mobile robot platform. The algorithm has been validated using simulation and real world experiments....

  3. Designing Adaptive Web Applications

    Dolog, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The unique characteristic of web applications is that they are supposed to be used by much bigger and diverse set of users and stakeholders. An example application area is e-Learning or business to business interaction. In eLearning environment, various users with different background use the e......Learning system to study a discipline. In business to business interaction, different requirements and parameters of exchanged business requests might be served by different services from third parties. Such applications require certain intelligence and a slightly different approach to design. Adpative web...... adaptation to the changed parameters of environments, user or context. Adaptation can be seen as an orthogonal concern or viewpoint in a design process. In this paper I will discuss design abstractions which are employed in current design methods for web applications. I will exemplify the use...

  4. Adaptive method of lines

    Saucez, Ph

    2001-01-01

    The general Method of Lines (MOL) procedure provides a flexible format for the solution of all the major classes of partial differential equations (PDEs) and is particularly well suited to evolutionary, nonlinear wave PDEs. Despite its utility, however, there are relatively few texts that explore it at a more advanced level and reflect the method''s current state of development.Written by distinguished researchers in the field, Adaptive Method of Lines reflects the diversity of techniques and applications related to the MOL. Most of its chapters focus on a particular application but also provide a discussion of underlying philosophy and technique. Particular attention is paid to the concept of both temporal and spatial adaptivity in solving time-dependent PDEs. Many important ideas and methods are introduced, including moving grids and grid refinement, static and dynamic gridding, the equidistribution principle and the concept of a monitor function, the minimization of a functional, and the moving finite elem...

  5. Semantische Adaption von Komponenten

    Söldner, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Im Bereich der Informationstechnik ist die Adaption von Software an veränderte Gegebenheiten und Umgebungen ein wichtiges Thema. Dabei bestimmen vor allem die konkret verwendete Software-Programmiersprache, die benutzten Entwurfsmuster und die der Applikation zugrundeliegende Software-Architektur, mit welchem Aufwand eine Anwendung auf neue Anforderungen eingehen kann. Darüber hinaus war und ist es interessant, Mechanismen zu entwickeln, mit denen Applikationen selbst auf spontane Änderungen ...

  6. Traffic-Adaptive Routing

    Kammenhuber, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Despite the bursty and highly volatile traffic, routing in the Internet today is optimised only on coarse time scales, as load-adaptive routing is known to induce performance deterioration by causing massive oscillations. We describe ReplEx, an universally applicable distributed algorithm for dynamic routing/traffic engineering, which is based on game theory. We show through extensive realistic simulations that ReplEx does not oscillate, and that it achieves performance gains comparable to tr...

  7. Invited article: Adaptability

    Olivia Parr Rud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last several decades, organizations have dealt with economic shifts using change management. Based on the new science, there are two major flaws with this approach. First, the word change implies an event with an ending. Second, it implies that change can be managed. In a world of economic volatility, this approach is no longer viable. The continuous climate of uncertainty and volatility demands another view, one that supports adaptability and resilience.

  8. Adaptive positioner; Posicionador adaptativo

    Labrador Pavon, I.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes the circuits and programs in assembly language, developed to control the two DC motors that give mobility to a mechanical arm with two degrees of freedom. As a whole, the system is based in a adaptable regulator designed around a 8 bit microprocessor that, starting from a mode of regulation based in the successive approximation method, evolve to another mode through which, only one approximation is sufficient to get the right position of each motor. (Author) 6 refs.

  9. Homeowiscous adaptation in fish

    Flipiak, Anna; Gondko, Roman; Gabryelak, Teresa

    1997-01-01

    Homeowiscous adaptation is a common phenomenon observed in poikilotherms which remain active at different temperatures. It is usually caused by changes in fatty acids pool in cellular membranes, what enable to maintain the physical structure of their membranes within tolerable limits. The increased unsaturaition of membrane lipids has as its basis some changes in activity of the appropriate enzymes. Fluctuations in fluidity of membrame lipids activate transcription of the genes...

  10. Adaptive modulations of martensites

    Kaufmann, S.; Roßler, U.K.; Heczko, Oleg; Wuttig, M.; Buschbeck, J.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 14 (2010), 145702/1-145702/4. ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : adaptive concept of modulated martensite * martensitic Ni-Mn-Ga films * austenite * 14M martensite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.621, year: 2010 http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.145702

  11. Reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing

    Coxe, Robin L. (Inventor); Galica, Gary E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Described are methods and apparatus, including computer program products, for reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing technology. An environmental signal representative of an external environmental condition is received. A processing configuration is automatically selected, based on the environmental signal, from a plurality of processing configurations. A reconfigurable processing element is reconfigured to operate according to the selected processing configuration. In some examples, the environmental condition is detected and the environmental signal is generated based on the detected condition.

  12. Improved Adaptive Fingerprint Binarization

    Bartunek, Josef Ström; Nilsson, Mikael; Nordberg, Jörgen; Claesson, Ingvar

    2008-01-01

    In this paper improvements to a previous work are presented. Removing the redundant artifacts in the fingerprint mask is introduced enhancing the final result. The proposed method is entirely adaptive process adjusting to each fingerprint without any further supervision of the user. Hence, the algorithm is insensitive to the characteristics of the fingerprint sensor and the various physical appearances of the fingerprints. Further, a detailed description of fingerprint mask generation not ful...

  13. Adaptive Mobile Work Processes

    Hauso, Frode; Røed, Øivind

    2005-01-01

    Systems that efficiently provide support for adaptive work processes in a mobile environment do not exist according to our knowledge. Such systems would increase efficiency and safety in environments where work is inherently mobile, ad-hoc, and requires input from a set of heterogeneous sources. Traditional work support systems are normally not capable of dynamic change and plans must be made before work is started. This conflicts with most work processes, which are dynamic and where plans ca...

  14. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  15. Adaptive Consumption Behavior

    Peter Howitt; Ömer Özak

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes and studies a theory of adaptive consumption behavior under income uncertainty and liquidity constraints. We assume that consumption is governed by a linear function of wealth, whose coefficients are revised each period by a procedure, which, although sophisticated, places few informational or computational demands on the consumer. We show that under a variety of settings, our procedure converges quickly to a set of coefficients with low welfare cost relative to a fully op...

  16. Adaptive Brain Interfaces

    Millán, José del R.

    2003-01-01

    Severely disabled people are largely excluded from the benefits information and communication technologies have brought to our industries, economies, appliances, and general quality of life. But what if that technology would allow them to communicate their wishes or control electronic devices directly through their thoughts alone? This is the goal and promise of the Adaptive Brain Interfaces (ABI) project, which aims to augment natural human capabilities by enabling people to interact with co...

  17. Adaptive optical processors.

    Ghosh, A

    1989-06-15

    There are two different approaches for improving the accuracy of analog optical associative processors: postprocessing with a bimodal system and preprocessing with a preconditioner. These two approaches can be combined to develop an adaptive optical multiprocessor that can adjust the computational steps depending on the data and produce solutions of linear algebra problems with a specified accuracy in a given amount of time. PMID:19752909

  18. Creative Adaptation through Learning

    Cully, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Robots have transformed many industries, most notably manufacturing, and have the power to deliver tremendous benefits to society, for example in search and rescue, disaster response, health care, and transportation. They are also invaluable tools for scientific exploration of distant planets or deep oceans. A major obstacle to their widespread adoption in more complex environments and outside of factories is their fragility. While animals can quickly adapt to injuries, current robots cannot ...

  19. Pathogenesis and micro-anatomic characterization of a cell-adapted mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle: Impact of the Jumonji C-domain containing protein 6 (JMJD6) and route of inoculation.

    Lawrence, Paul; Pacheco, Juan; Stenfeldt, Carolina; Arzt, Jonathan; Rai, Devendra K; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    A companion study reported Jumonji-C domain containing protein 6 (JMJD6) is involved in an integrin- and HS-independent pathway of FMDV infection in CHO cells. JMJD6 localization was investigated in animal tissues from cattle infected with either wild type A24-FMDV (A24-WT) or mutant FMDV (JMJD6-FMDV) carrying E95K/S96L and RGD to KGE mutations in VP1. Additionally, pathogenesis of mutant JMJD6-FMDV was investigated in cattle through aerosol and intraepithelial lingual (IEL) inoculation. Interestingly, JMJD6-FMDV pathogenesis was equivalent to A24-WT administered by IEL route. In contrast, JMJD6-FMDV aerosol-infected cattle did not manifest signs of FMD and animals showed no detectable viremia. Immunofluorescent microscopy of post-mortem tissue revealed JMJD6-FMDV exclusively co-localized with JMJD6(+) cells while A24-WT was occasionally found in JMJD6(+) cells. In vitro, chemical uptake inhibitors demonstrated JMJD6-FMDV entered cells via clathrin-coated pit endocytosis. In vivo, JMJD6-FMDV exhibited preference for JMJD6(+) cells, but availability of this alternative receptor likely depends on route of inoculation. PMID:26914509

  20. Adaptive Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    Ng, B M

    2007-10-26

    A discrete-time Markov process can be compactly modeled as a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN)--a graphical model with nodes representing random variables and directed edges indicating causality between variables. Each node has a probability distribution, conditional on the variables represented by the parent nodes. A DBN's graphical structure encodes fixed conditional dependencies between variables. But in real-world systems, conditional dependencies between variables may be unknown a priori or may vary over time. Model errors can result if the DBN fails to capture all possible interactions between variables. Thus, we explore the representational framework of adaptive DBNs, whose structure and parameters can change from one time step to the next: a distribution's parameters and its set of conditional variables are dynamic. This work builds on recent work in nonparametric Bayesian modeling, such as hierarchical Dirichlet processes, infinite-state hidden Markov networks and structured priors for Bayes net learning. In this paper, we will explain the motivation for our interest in adaptive DBNs, show how popular nonparametric methods are combined to formulate the foundations for adaptive DBNs, and present preliminary results.

  1. Vestibulospinal adaptation to microgravity

    Paloski, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Human balance control is known to be transiently disrupted after spaceflight; however, the mechanisms responsible for postflight postural ataxia are still under investigation. In this report, we propose a conceptual model of vestibulospinal adaptation based on theoretical adaptive control concepts and supported by the results from a comprehensive study of balance control recovery after spaceflight. The conceptual model predicts that immediately after spaceflight the balance control system of a returning astronaut does not expect to receive gravity-induced afferent inputs and that descending vestibulospinal control of balance is disrupted until the central nervous system is able to cope with the newly available vestibular otolith information. Predictions of the model are tested using data from a study of the neurosensory control of balance in astronauts immediately after landing. In that study, the mechanisms of sensorimotor balance control were assessed under normal, reduced, and/or altered (sway-referenced) visual and somatosensory input conditions. We conclude that the adaptive control model accurately describes the neurobehavioral responses to spaceflight and that similar models of altered sensory, motor, or environmental constraints are needed clinically to predict responses that patients with sensorimotor pathologies may have to various visual-vestibular or changing stimulus environments.

  2. Adaptation to High Altitude

    H. S. Nayar

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is inconsequential for physiologically fit persons below an effective altitude of 2640 metres. At higher altitudes, the adaptation is brought about by four main factors, viz., hyperventilation, increased diffusion of oxygen across alveolar membrane, erythrocythemia and maintenance of body hydration. Carbon dioxide sensitivity is markedly elevated at high altitude, both in sojourners and acclimatized low-landers. The greater pulmonary diffusing capacity observed in high altitude natives is well documented. RBC count, haemoglobin and haematocrit increase whereas arterial oxyhaemoglobin saturation percentage decreases at high altitude. Diuretics (Furosemide have no role in adaptation to high altitude and adequate body hydration must be maintained.The ultimate adaptive mechanisms occur at tissue level which facilitate the diffusion of oxygen from blood to tissue and its utilization. The work capacity decreases at high altitude and a relationship between load carried and speed of marching has been determined at various altitudes. Although altitude has an adverse effect on process of cold acclimatization, yet it is possible to induce cold acclimatization by exposing subjects to a temperature of 0° to -5°C for a period of three hours daily for three weeks. The caloric requirements increase at high altitudes and are 4,286 K Cal and 4,380 K Cal at 13000 feet (3950 m and 17000 feet (5170 m, respectively.

  3. Adaptive building skin structures

    The concept of adaptive and morphing structures has gained considerable attention in the recent years in many fields of engineering. In civil engineering very few practical applications are reported to date however. Non-conventional structural concepts like deployable, inflatable and morphing structures may indeed provide innovative solutions to some of the problems that the construction industry is being called to face. To give some examples, searches for low-energy consumption or even energy-harvesting green buildings are amongst such problems. This paper first presents a review of the above problems and technologies, which shows how the solution to these problems requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving the integration of architectural and engineering disciplines. The discussion continues with the presentation of a possible application of two adaptive and dynamically morphing structures which are proposed for the realization of an acoustic envelope. The core of the two applications is the use of a novel optimization process which leads the search for optimal solutions by means of an evolutionary technique while the compatibility of the resulting configurations of the adaptive envelope is ensured by the virtual force density method

  4. AdapterRemoval v2

    Schubert, Mikkel; Lindgreen, Stinus; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As high-throughput sequencing platforms produce longer and longer reads, sequences generated from short inserts, such as those obtained from fossil and degraded material, are increasingly expected to contain adapter sequences. Efficient adapter trimming algorithms are also needed to...... process the growing amount of data generated per sequencing run. FINDINGS: We introduce AdapterRemoval v2, a major revision of AdapterRemoval v1, which introduces (i) striking improvements in throughput, through the use of single instruction, multiple data (SIMD; SSE1 and SSE2) instructions and multi......-threading support, (ii) the ability to handle datasets containing reads or read-pairs with different adapters or adapter pairs, (iii) simultaneous demultiplexing and adapter trimming, (iv) the ability to reconstruct adapter sequences from paired-end reads for poorly documented data sets, and (v) native gzip and...

  5. Adaptive Structural Mode Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes the development of an adaptive structural mode control system. The adaptive control system will begin from a "baseline" dynamic model of the...

  6. Feature-Level Domain Adaptation

    Kouw, Wouter M.; Krijthe, Jesse H.; Loog, Marco; van der Maaten, Laurens J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Domain adaptation is the supervised learning setting in which the training and test data originate from different domains: the so-called source and target domains. In this paper, we propose and study a domain adaption approach, called feature-level domain adaptation (flda), that models the dependence between two domains by means of a feature-level transfer distribution. The domain adapted classifier is trained by minimizing the expected loss under this transfer distribution. Our empirical eva...

  7. Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    The absence of a global agreement on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions calls for adaptation to climate change. The associated paper explains the need for climate change adaptation of the building stock and suggests a pattern for a strategic approach to how to reach the climate change...... adaptation needed. Issues that must be addressed in case a strategic approach is not developed, as the building sector is continuously investing in measures to adapt to climate change as impacts emerge are described....

  8. Attention modulates visual size adaptation.

    Kreutzer, Sylvia; Fink, G R; R. Weidner

    2015-01-01

    The current study determined in healthy subjects (n = 16) whether size adaptation occurs at early, i.e., preattentive, levels of processing or whether higher cognitive processes such as attention can modulate the illusion. To investigate this issue, bottom-up stimulation was kept constant across conditions by using a single adaptation display containing both small and large adapter stimuli. Subjects' attention was directed to either the large or small adapter stimulus by means of a luminance ...

  9. Chapter 17 - Economics of adaptation

    Chambwera, M.; Heal, G.; Dubeux, C.; Hallegatte, S.; Leclerc, L.; Markandya, A.; McCarl, B.A.; Mechler, R; Neumann, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter assesses the literature on the economics of climate change adaptation, building on the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) and the increasing role that economic considerations are playing in adaptation decisionmaking and policy. AR4 provided a limited assessment of the costs and benefits of adaptation, based on narrow and fragmented sectoral and regional literature (Adger et al, 2007). Substantial advances have been made in the economics of climate change adaptation after AR4.

  10. The trypanocidal benznidazole promotes adaptive response to oxidative injury: Involvement of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (MRP2).

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Perdomo, Virginia Gabriela; Ciriaci, Nadia; Francés, Daniel Eleazar Antonio; Ronco, María Teresa; Bataille, Amy Michele; Ghanem, Carolina Inés; Ruiz, María Laura; Manautou, José Enrique; Catania, Viviana Alicia

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a frequent cause underlying drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Benznidazole (BZL) is the only trypanocidal agent available for treatment of Chagas disease in endemic areas. Its use is associated with side effects, including increases in biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. However, BZL potential to cause oxidative stress has been poorly investigated. Here, we evaluated the effect of a pharmacologically relevant BZL concentration (200μM) at different time points on redox status and the counteracting mechanisms in the human hepatic cell line HepG2. BZL increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 1 and 3h of exposure, returning to normality at 24h. Additionally, BZL increased glutathione peroxidase activity at 12h and the oxidized glutathione/total glutathione (GSSG/GSSG+GSH) ratio that reached a peak at 24h. Thus, an enhanced detoxification of peroxide and GSSG formation could account for ROS normalization. GSSG/GSSG+GSH returned to control values at 48h. Expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) and GSSG efflux via MRP2 were induced by BZL at 24 and 48h, explaining normalization of GSSG/GSSG+GSH. BZL activated the nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), already shown to modulate MRP2 expression in response to oxidative stress. Nrf2 participation was confirmed using Nrf2-knockout mice in which MRP2 mRNA expression was not affected by BZL. In summary, we demonstrated a ROS increase by BZL in HepG2 cells and a glutathione peroxidase- and MRP2 driven counteracting mechanism, being Nrf2 a key modulator of this response. Our results could explain hepatic alterations associated with BZL therapy. PMID:27180241

  11. How Harmful are Adaptation Restrictions

    Bruin, de K.C.; Dellink, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant assumption in economic models of climate policy remains that adaptation will be implemented in an optimal manner. There are, however, several reasons why optimal levels of adaptation may not be attainable. This paper investigates the effects of suboptimal levels of adaptation, i.e. adap

  12. Evolving concepts of sensory adaptation

    Webster, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems constantly adapt their responses to match the current environment. These adjustments occur at many levels of the system and increasingly appear to calibrate even for highly abstract perceptual representations of the stimulus. The similar effects of adaptation across very different stimulus domains point to common design principles but also continue to raise questions about the purpose of adaptation.

  13. Theory of psychological adaptive modes.

    Lehti, Juha

    2016-05-01

    When an individual is facing a stressor and normal stress-response mechanism cannot guarantee sufficient adaptation, special emotional states, adaptive modes, are activated (for example a depressive reaction). Adaptive modes are involuntary states of mind, they are of comprehensive nature, they interfere with normal functioning, and they cannot be repressed or controlled the same way as many emotions. Their transformational nature differentiates them from other emotional states. The object of the adaptive mode is to optimize the problem-solving abilities according to the situation that has provoked the mode. Cognitions and emotions during the adaptive mode are different than in a normal mental state. These altered cognitions and emotional reactions guide the individual to use the correct coping skills in order to deal with the stressor. Successful adaptation will cause the adaptive mode to fade off since the adaptive mode is no longer necessary, and the process as a whole will lead to raised well-being. However, if the adaptation process is inadequate, then the transformation period is prolonged, and the adaptive mode will turn into a dysfunctional state. Many psychiatric disorders are such maladaptive processes. The maladaptive processes can be turned into functional ones by using adaptive skills that are used in functional adaptive processes. PMID:27063089

  14. Adaptation : A Partially Automated Approach

    Manjing, Tham; Bukhsh, F.A.; Weigand, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper showcases the possibility of creating an adaptive auditing system. Adaptation in an audit environment need human intervention at some point. Based on a case study this paper focuses on automation of adaptation process. It is divided into solution design and validation parts. The artifact

  15. Genomics of ecological adaptation in cactophilic Drosophila.

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G; Dias, Guilherme B; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P; Kuhn, Gustavo C S; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene-environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  16. : Protein flexibility

    Bornot, Aurélie; Offmann, Bernard; De Brevern, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    Protein structures and protein structural models are great tools to reach protein function and provide very relevant information for drug design. Nevertheless, protein structures are not rigid entities. Cutting-edge bioinformatics methods tend to take into account the flexibility of these macromolecules. We present new approaches used to define protein structure flexibility.

  17. Adaptive filtering prediction and control

    Goodwin, Graham C

    2009-01-01

    Preface1. Introduction to Adaptive TechniquesPart 1. Deterministic Systems2. Models for Deterministic Dynamical Systems3. Parameter Estimation for Deterministic Systems4. Deterministic Adaptive Prediction5. Control of Linear Deterministic Systems6. Adaptive Control of Linear Deterministic SystemsPart 2. Stochastic Systems7. Optimal Filtering and Prediction8. Parameter Estimation for Stochastic Dynamic Systems9. Adaptive Filtering and Prediction10. Control of Stochastic Systems11. Adaptive Control of Stochastic SystemsAppendicesA. A Brief Review of Some Results from Systems TheoryB. A Summary o

  18. Adaptability Responding Effectively to Change

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership; Calarco, Allan

    2011-01-01

    In today's business world, the complexity and pace of change can be daunting. Adaptability has become recognized as a necessary skill for leaders to develop to be effective in this environment. Even so, leaders rarely know what they can do to become more adaptable and foster adaptability in others. This guidebook contributes to a greater understanding of adaptability and the cognitive, emotional, and dispositional flexibility it requires. Leaders will learn how to develop their adaptability and to become more effective for themselves, the people they lead, and their organizations.

  19. Adaptive immune responses of legumin nanoparticles.

    Mirshahi, T; Irache, J M; Nicolas, C; Mirshahi, M; Faure, J P; Gueguen, J; Hecquet, C; Orecchioni, A M

    2002-12-01

    Legumin is one of the main storage proteins in the pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) and the molecules of this protein have the capacity of binding together to form nanoparticles after aggregation and chemical cross-linkage with glutaraldehyde. The aim of this work was to study the adaptive immune response of legumin nanoparticles in rats. Following intradermal immunisation with the native protein legumin and legumin nanoparticles of about 250 nm, the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were analysed in rats. The humoral responses against legumin and legumin nanoparticles were examined by western blot and ELISA analysis. Both techniques clearly showed that sera from rats immunised with legumin strongly expressed antibodies against this protein. On the contrary, serum samples from rats inoculated with legumin nanoparticles did not contain detectable amounts of antibodies. These results may be explained by a reduction on the antigenic epitopes of the protein induced by the glutaraldehyde used during the cross-linking step. Concerning the cell-mediated response, neither legumin nor legumin nanoparticles stimulated an immunogenic response. This absence of response of spleen lymphocytes for legumin and legumin nanoparticles may be explained by a cytostatic effect of legumin which was corroborated by the evaluation of the middle phase of cell apoptose. In fact, both legumin and legumin nanoparticles are potent inductors of a cytostatic phenomenon and showed a significant increase of the chromatin condensation (p < 0.05) as compared with control. PMID:12683667

  20. Total protein

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  1. Adaptive antennas and receivers

    Weiner, Melvin M

    2005-01-01

    In our modern age of remote sensing, wireless communication, and the nearly endless list of other antenna-based applications, complex problems require increasingly sophisticated solutions. Conventional antenna systems are no longer suited to high-noise or low-signal applications such as intrusion detection. Detailing highly effective approaches to non-Gaussian weak signal detection, Adaptive Antennas and Receivers provides an authoritative introduction to state-of-the-art research on the modeling, testing, and application of these technologies.Edited by innovative researcher and eminent expert

  2. Adaptive Noise Reduction System

    Ivana Ropuš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is an all-present environment pollutant, considered to be one of the greatest contemporary pollutants. World-wide, co-ordinated actions are conducted in order to develop systems which minimise the noise influence onto society.In this article we argue that novel approach to suppression of influence of noise is useful. Furthermore, we argue that the efficient approach is formulation of the efficient, broadly applicable, ubiquituous, adaptive noise-protection system. The approach combines the natural noise-protection form based on plants with the artificially formed coatings.Elements of the system are discussed, its formation and maintenance analysed and perspectives conjectured.

  3. The Adaptation Finance Gap Report

    UNEP’s Adaptation Gap Report series focuses on Finance, Technology and Knowledge gaps in climate change adaptation. It compliments the Emissions Gap Report series, and explores the implications of failing to close the emissions gap. The report builds on a 2014 assessment by the United Nations...... Environment Programme (UNEP), which laid out the concept of ‘adaptation gaps’ and outlined three such gaps: technology, finance and knowledge. The 2016 Adaptation Gap Report assesses the difference between the financial costs of adapting to climate change in developing countries and the amount of money...... actually available to meet these costs – a difference known as the “adaptation finance gap”. Like the 2014 report, the 2016 report focuses on developing countries, where adaptation capacity is often the lowest and needs the highest, and concentrates on the period up to 2050. The report identifies trends...

  4. AdapterRemoval v2

    Schubert, Mikkel; Lindgreen, Stinus; Orlando, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    process the growing amount of data generated per sequencing run. FINDINGS: We introduce AdapterRemoval v2, a major revision of AdapterRemoval v1, which introduces (i) striking improvements in throughput, through the use of single instruction, multiple data (SIMD; SSE1 and SSE2) instructions and multi......-threading support, (ii) the ability to handle datasets containing reads or read-pairs with different adapters or adapter pairs, (iii) simultaneous demultiplexing and adapter trimming, (iv) the ability to reconstruct adapter sequences from paired-end reads for poorly documented data sets, and (v) native gzip and...... bzip2 support. CONCLUSIONS: We show that AdapterRemoval v2 compares favorably with existing tools, while offering superior throughput to most alternatives examined here, both for single and multi-threaded operations....

  5. Science of adaptation to climate change and science for adaptation

    RobSwart

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation to climate change has gained a prominent place next to mitigation on global, national and local policy agendas. However, while an abundance of adaptation strategies, plans and programmes have been developed, progress in turning these into action has been slow. The development of a sound knowledge basis to support adaptation globally is suggested to accelerate progress, but has lagged behind. The emphasis in both current and newly proposed programmes is very much on practice-oriented research with strong stakeholder participation. This paper supports such practice-oriented research, but argues that this is insufficient to support adaptation policy and practice in a productive manner. We argue that there is not only a need for science for adaptation, but also a science of adaptation. The paper argues that participatory, practice-oriented research is indeed essential, but has to be complemented by and connected to more fundamental inquiry and concept development, which takes into account knowledge that has been developed in disciplinary sciences and on issues other than climate change adaptation. At the same time, the level and method of participation in science for adaptation should be determined on the basis of the specific project context and goals. More emphasis on science of adaptation can lead to improved understanding of the conditions for successful science for adaptation.

  6. Classifying climate change adaptation frameworks

    Armstrong, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Complex socio-ecological demographics are factors that must be considered when addressing adaptation to the potential effects of climate change. As such, a suite of deployable climate change adaptation frameworks is necessary. Multiple frameworks that are required to communicate the risks of climate change and facilitate adaptation. Three principal adaptation frameworks have emerged from the literature; Scenario - Led (SL), Vulnerability - Led (VL) and Decision - Centric (DC). This study aims to identify to what extent these adaptation frameworks; either, planned or deployed are used in a neighbourhood vulnerable to climate change. This work presents a criterion that may be used as a tool for identifying the hallmarks of adaptation frameworks and thus enabling categorisation of projects. The study focussed on the coastal zone surrounding the Sizewell nuclear power plant in Suffolk in the UK. An online survey was conducted identifying climate change adaptation projects operating in the study area. This inventory was analysed to identify the hallmarks of each adaptation project; Levels of dependency on climate model information, Metrics/units of analysis utilised, Level of demographic knowledge, Level of stakeholder engagement, Adaptation implementation strategies and Scale of adaptation implementation. The study found that climate change adaptation projects could be categorised, based on the hallmarks identified, in accordance with the published literature. As such, the criterion may be used to establish the matrix of adaptation frameworks present in a given area. A comprehensive summary of the nature of adaptation frameworks in operation in a locality provides a platform for further comparative analysis. Such analysis, enabled by the criterion, may aid the selection of appropriate frameworks enhancing the efficacy of climate change adaptation.

  7. Identifying Key Attributes for Protein Beverages.

    Oltman, A E; Lopetcharat, K; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2015-06-01

    This study identified key attributes of protein beverages and evaluated effects of priming on liking of protein beverages. An adaptive choice-based conjoint study was conducted along with Kano analysis to gain insight on protein beverage consumers (n = 432). Attributes evaluated included label claim, protein type, amount of protein, carbohydrates, sweeteners, and metabolic benefits. Utility scores for levels and importance scores for attributes were determined. Subsequently, two pairs of clear acidic whey protein beverages were manufactured that differed by age of protein source or the amount of whey protein per serving. Beverages were evaluated by 151 consumers on two occasions with or without priming statements. One priming statement declared "great flavor," the other priming statement declared 20 g protein per serving. A two way analysis of variance was applied to discern the role of each priming statement. The most important attribute for protein beverages was sweetener type, followed by amount of protein, followed by type of protein followed by label claim. Beverages with whey protein, naturally sweetened, reduced sugar and ≥15 g protein per serving were most desired. Three consumer clusters were identified, differentiated by their preferences for protein type, sweetener and amount of protein. Priming statements positively impacted concept liking (P 0.05). Consistent with trained panel profiles of increased cardboard flavor with higher protein content, consumers liked beverages with 10 g protein more than beverages with 20 g protein (6.8 compared with 5.7, P consumer appeal. PMID:25943857

  8. Bayesian Adaptive Exploration

    Loredo, Thomas J.

    2004-04-01

    I describe a framework for adaptive scientific exploration based on iterating an Observation-Inference-Design cycle that allows adjustment of hypotheses and observing protocols in response to the results of observation on-the-fly, as data are gathered. The framework uses a unified Bayesian methodology for the inference and design stages: Bayesian inference to quantify what we have learned from the available data and predict future data, and Bayesian decision theory to identify which new observations would teach us the most. When the goal of the experiment is simply to make inferences, the framework identifies a computationally efficient iterative ``maximum entropy sampling'' strategy as the optimal strategy in settings where the noise statistics are independent of signal properties. Results of applying the method to two ``toy'' problems with simulated data-measuring the orbit of an extrasolar planet, and locating a hidden one-dimensional object-show the approach can significantly improve observational efficiency in settings that have well-defined nonlinear models. I conclude with a list of open issues that must be addressed to make Bayesian adaptive exploration a practical and reliable tool for optimizing scientific exploration.

  9. Protein Detection with Aptamer Biosensors

    Regina Stoltenburg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers have been developed for different applications. Their use as new biological recognition elements in biosensors promises progress for fast and easy detection of proteins. This new generation of biosensor (aptasensors will be more stable and well adapted to the conditions of real samples because of the specific properties of aptamers.

  10. Europe adapts to climate change: Comparing National Adaptation Strategies

    Biesbroek, G. Robbert; Swart, Rob J.; Carter, Timothy R.;

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation Strategies in the wider governance of adaptation differs between countries but clearly benchmarks a new political commitment to adaptation at national policy levels. However, we also find that in most cases approaches for implementing and evaluating the strategies are yet to be defined. The paper......For the last two decades, European climate policy has focused almost exclusively on mitigation of climate change. It was only well after the turn of the century, with impacts of climate change increasingly being observed, that adaptation was added to the policy agenda and EU Member States started...... to develop National Adaptation Strategies (NASs). This paper reviews seven National Adaptation Strategies that were either formally adopted or under development by Member States at the end of 2008. The strategies are analysed under the following six themes. Firstly, the factors motivating and...

  11. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for ...

  12. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  13. Global network reorganization during dynamic adaptations of Bacillus subtilis metabolism

    Buescher, Joerg Martin; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Jules, Matthieu;

    2012-01-01

    known transcription regulation network. Interactions across multiple levels of regulation were involved in adaptive changes that could also be achieved by controlling single genes. Our analysis suggests that global trade-offs and evolutionary constraints provide incentives to favor complex control......Adaptation of cells to environmental changes requires dynamic interactions between metabolic and regulatory networks, but studies typically address only one or a few layers of regulation. For nutritional shifts between two preferred carbon sources of Bacillus subtilis, we combined statistical and...... model-based data analyses of dynamic transcript, protein, and metabolite abundances and promoter activities. Adaptation to malate was rapid and primarily controlled posttranscriptionally compared with the slow, mainly transcriptionally controlled adaptation to glucose that entailed nearly half of the...

  14. Adaptive resummation of Markovian quantum dynamics

    Lucas, Felix

    2014-08-06

    In this thesis we derive a highly convergent, nonperturbative expansion of Markovian open quantum dynamics. It is based on a splitting of the incoherent dynamics into periods of continuous evolution and abrupt jumps and attains its favorable convergence properties from an adaptive resummation of this so-called jump expansion. By means of the long-standing problems of spatial particle detection and Landau-Zener tunneling in the presence of dephasing, we show that this adaptive resummation technique facilitates new highly accurate analytic approximations of Markovian open systems. The open Landau-Zener model leads us to propose an efficient and robust incoherent control technique for the isomerization reaction of the visual pigment protein rhodopsin. Besides leading to approximate analytic descriptions of Markovian open quantum dynamics, the adaptive resummation of the jump expansion implies an efficient numerical simulation method. We spell out the corresponding numerical algorithm by means of Monte Carlo integration of the relevant terms in the jump expansion and demonstrate it in a set of paradigmatic open quantum systems.

  15. Adaptive resummation of Markovian quantum dynamics

    In this thesis we derive a highly convergent, nonperturbative expansion of Markovian open quantum dynamics. It is based on a splitting of the incoherent dynamics into periods of continuous evolution and abrupt jumps and attains its favorable convergence properties from an adaptive resummation of this so-called jump expansion. By means of the long-standing problems of spatial particle detection and Landau-Zener tunneling in the presence of dephasing, we show that this adaptive resummation technique facilitates new highly accurate analytic approximations of Markovian open systems. The open Landau-Zener model leads us to propose an efficient and robust incoherent control technique for the isomerization reaction of the visual pigment protein rhodopsin. Besides leading to approximate analytic descriptions of Markovian open quantum dynamics, the adaptive resummation of the jump expansion implies an efficient numerical simulation method. We spell out the corresponding numerical algorithm by means of Monte Carlo integration of the relevant terms in the jump expansion and demonstrate it in a set of paradigmatic open quantum systems.

  16. Adaptive Playware in Physical Games

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Thorsteinsson, Arnar Tumi

    2011-01-01

    We describe how playware and games may adapt to the interaction of the individual user. We hypothesize that in physical games there are individual differences in user interaction capabilities and styles, and that adaptive playware may adapt to the individual user’s capabilities, so that the...... activity automatically will match the capability of the individual user. With small test groups, we investigate how different age groups and gender groups physically interact with some playware games, and find indications of differences between the groups. Despite the small test set, the results are a...... proof of existence of differences and of the need for adaptation, and therefore we investigate adaptation as an important issue for playware. With simple playware games, we show that the adaptation will speed the physical game up and down to find the appropriate level that matches the reaction speed of...

  17. Adaptive challenges in medical practices.

    Daiker, Barbara L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to describe the theoretical structures of the strategies used by medical practices to navigate adaptive challenges. The process of responding to adaptive challenges in five medical practices was studied using a grounded theory approach, collecting data from interviews with the organizations' leaders and managers. The leadership of these medical practices had successfully navigated adaptive challenges within two years of the study. The analysis revealed a model that describes the key elements in finding solutions to adaptive challenges. The model was named the Adaptation Solution Dynamic, which explains the elements of Rational Tools, Relationship Commitment, and Achievement Drive. The findings from the results of this study provide a theoretical basis for studying how leaders support identifying solutions to adaptive challenges. PMID:23866647

  18. Adapting to climate change

    Arndt, Channing; Strzepek, Kenneth; Tarp, Finn;

    2011-01-01

    Mozambique, like many African countries, is already highly susceptible to climate variability and extreme weather events. Climate change threatens to heighten this vulnerability. In order to evaluate potential impacts and adaptation options for Mozambique, we develop an integrated modeling...... framework that translates atmospheric changes from general circulation model projections into biophysical outcomes via detailed hydrologic, crop, hydropower and infrastructure models. These sector models simulate a historical baseline and four extreme climate change scenarios. Sector results are then passed...... down to a dynamic computable general equilibrium model, which is used to estimate economy-wide impacts on national welfare, as well as the total cost of damages caused by climate change. Potential damages without changes in policy are significant; our discounted estimates range from US2.3 to US2.3toUS7...

  19. Mobile, Flexible, and Adaptable

    Agergaard, Jytte; Thao, Thi Vu

    2011-01-01

    Industrialisation and urban growth are constitutive aspects of Vietnam's new economy and are important driving forces behind increasing rural-to-urban migration. Growth in informal sector employment is a significant aspect of this development, which has provided for both male and female migrants...... networking, and remittance practices. The paper is organised around why and how migrants have entered the informal labour market in Hanoi and how they make their livings there while also maintaining ties with their rural homes. In conclusion, we discuss how the migration networks and remittance practices of...... the female porters demonstrate a particular way of adapting to the migration process. Also, it is emphasised how women's flexible practices are facilitated by women's own village-based networks. It is suggested that ‘in-betweenness’, which stands for the simultaneous and overlapping presence of urban...

  20. SAR based adaptive GMTI

    Vu, Duc; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian

    2010-04-01

    We consider ground moving target indication (GMTI) and target velocity estimation based on multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Via forming velocity versus cross-range images, we show that small moving targets can be detected even in the presence of strong stationary ground clutter. Moreover, the velocities of the moving targets can be estimated, and the misplaced moving targets can be placed back to their original locations based on the estimated velocities. Adaptive beamforming techniques, including Capon and generalizedlikelihood ratio test (GLRT), are used to form velocity versus cross-range images for each range bin of interest. The velocity estimation ambiguities caused by the multi-channel array geometry are analyzed. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches using the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) publicly-released Gotcha SAR based GMTI data set.

  1. Adaptively Compressed Exchange Operator

    Lin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Fock exchange operator plays a central role in modern quantum chemistry. The large computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator hinders Hartree-Fock calculations and Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, even for systems consisting of hundreds of atoms. We develop the adaptively compressed exchange operator (ACE) formulation, which greatly reduces the computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator without loss of accuracy. The ACE formulation does not depend on the size of the band gap, and thus can be applied to insulating, semiconducting as well as metallic systems. In an iterative framework for solving Hartree-Fock-like systems, the ACE formulation only requires moderate modification of the code, and can be potentially beneficial for all electronic structure software packages involving exchange calculations. Numerical results indicate that the ACE formulation can become advantageous even for small systems with tens...

  2. Bayesian Adaptive Exploration

    Loredo, T J

    2004-01-01

    I describe a framework for adaptive scientific exploration based on iterating an Observation--Inference--Design cycle that allows adjustment of hypotheses and observing protocols in response to the results of observation on-the-fly, as data are gathered. The framework uses a unified Bayesian methodology for the inference and design stages: Bayesian inference to quantify what we have learned from the available data and predict future data, and Bayesian decision theory to identify which new observations would teach us the most. When the goal of the experiment is simply to make inferences, the framework identifies a computationally efficient iterative ``maximum entropy sampling'' strategy as the optimal strategy in settings where the noise statistics are independent of signal properties. Results of applying the method to two ``toy'' problems with simulated data--measuring the orbit of an extrasolar planet, and locating a hidden one-dimensional object--show the approach can significantly improve observational eff...

  3. Adaptive Sentence Boundary Disambiguation

    Palmer, D D; Palmer, David D.; Hearst, Marti A.

    1994-01-01

    Labeling of sentence boundaries is a necessary prerequisite for many natural language processing tasks, including part-of-speech tagging and sentence alignment. End-of-sentence punctuation marks are ambiguous; to disambiguate them most systems use brittle, special-purpose regular expression grammars and exception rules. As an alternative, we have developed an efficient, trainable algorithm that uses a lexicon with part-of-speech probabilities and a feed-forward neural network. After training for less than one minute, the method correctly labels over 98.5\\% of sentence boundaries in a corpus of over 27,000 sentence-boundary marks. We show the method to be efficient and easily adaptable to different text genres, including single-case texts.

  4. Climate Change Adaptation

    Hudecz, Adriána

    The European Union ROADEX Project 1998 – 2012 was a trans-national roads co-operation aimed at developing ways for interactive and innovative management of low traffic volume roads throughout the cold climate regions of the Northern Periphery Area of Europe. Its goals were to facilitate co......-operation and research into the common problems of the Northern Periphery. This report is an output of the ROADEX “Implementing Accessibility” project (2009-2012). It gives a summary of the results of research into adaptation measures to combat climate change effects on low volume roads in the Northern...... Periphery. The research was carried out between January 2000 and March 2012. One of the biggest challenges that mankind has to face is the prospect of climate change resulting from emissions of greenhouse gases. These gases trap energy in the atmosphere and cause global surface temperatures to rise. This...

  5. PCMAT, an adaptive learning platform

    Couto, Paulo; Fernandes, Marta; Martins, Constantino; Faria, Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This paper is about PCMAT, an adaptive learning platform for Mathematics in Basic Education schools. Based on a constructivist approach, PCMAT aims at verifying how techniques from adaptive hypermedia systems can improve e-learning based systems. To achieve this goal, PCMAT includes a Pedagogical Model that contains a set of adaptation rules that influence the student-platform interaction. PCMAT was subject to a preliminary testing with students aged between 12 and 14 years old on th...

  6. Adaptive designs for sequential experiments

    林正炎; 张立新

    2003-01-01

    Various adaptive designs have been proposed and applied to clinical trials, bioassay, psychophysics, etc.Adaptive designs are also useful in high cost engineering trials.More and more people have been paying attention to these design methods. This paper introduces several broad families of designs, such as the play-the-winner rule, randomized play-the-winner rule and its generalization to the multi-arm case, doubly biased coin adaptive design, Markov chain model.

  7. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CTH

    This paper reports progress on implementing a new capability of adaptive mesh refinement into the Eulerian multimaterial shock- physics code CTH. The adaptivity is block-based with refinement and unrefinement occurring in an isotropic 2:1 manner. The code is designed to run on serial, multiprocessor and massive parallel platforms. An approximate factor of three in memory and performance improvements over comparable resolution non-adaptive calculations has-been demonstrated for a number of problems

  8. Staff Adaptation in Selected Company

    Štolcová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The work focuses on personnel actions of employee adaptation as, nowadays, it is very important to maintain a good and skilled staff. The main aim of this work is to analyze and evaluate the process of adaptation of new employees at the headquarters of the BILLA, Ltd., which operates more than 200 supermarkets around the Czech Republic,. Another task is to propose partial measures which would improve the process of adaptation in the society. The literature review discusses the importance of ...

  9. Maritime adaptive optics beam control

    Corley, Melissa S.

    2010-01-01

    The Navy is interested in developing systems for horizontal, near ocean surface, high-energy laser propagation through the atmosphere. Laser propagation in the maritime environment requires adaptive optics control of aberrations caused by atmospheric distortion. In this research, a multichannel transverse adaptive filter is formulated in Matlab's Simulink environment and compared to a complex lattice filter that has previously been implemented in large system simulations. The adaptive fil...

  10. Staff Adaptation in Selected Company

    Haňáčková, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the management system adaptation workers in the chosen company . Staffing adaptation of workers today is very important because it helps businesses maintain a good and loyal employee. The main goal of this work is to analyze the management system to evaluate the adaptation of workers in terms of a particular company ie company Primagra, a.s. and if identified deficiencies propose appropriate measures. The theoretical part of the paper summarizes the findings of the lite...

  11. Understanding Adaptation in Large Populations

    Talia Karasov; Messer, Philipp W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation in eukaryotes is generally assumed to be mutation-limited because of small effective population sizes. This view is difficult to reconcile, however, with the observation that adaptation to anthropogenic changes, such as the introduction of pesticides, can occur very rapidly. Here we investigate adaptation at a key insecticide resistance locus (Ace) in Drosophila melanogaster and show that multiple simple and complex resistance alleles evolved quickly and repeatedly within individua...

  12. Stored waveform adaptive motor control

    Beall, Jeffery C.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates an adaptive control scheme designed to maintain accurate motor speed control in spite of high-frequency periodic variations in load torque, load inertia, and motor parameters. The controller adapts, stores and replays a schedule of torques to be delivered at discrete points throughout the periodic load cycle. The controller also adapts to non-periodic changes in load conditions which occur over several load cycles and contains inherent integrator control action to ...

  13. TCP Reno over Adaptive CSMA

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Yue; Chen, Minghua; Liew, Soung Chang

    2010-01-01

    An interesting distributed adaptive CSMA MAC protocol, called adaptive CSMA, was proposed recently to schedule any strictly feasible achievable rates inside the capacity region. Of particular interest is the fact that the adaptive CSMA can achieve a system utility arbitrarily close to that is achievable under a central scheduler. However, a specially designed transport-layer rate controller is needed for this result. An outstanding question is whether the widely-installed TCP Reno is compatib...

  14. Content adaptive screen image scaling

    Zhai, Yao; Wang, Qifei; Lu, Yan; Li, Shipeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient content adaptive screen image scaling scheme for the real-time screen applications like remote desktop and screen sharing. In the proposed screen scaling scheme, a screen content classification step is first introduced to classify the screen image into text and pictorial regions. Afterward, we propose an adaptive shift linear interpolation algorithm to predict the new pixel values with the shift offset adapted to the content type of each pixel. The shift offse...

  15. Covariance-Adaptive Slice Sampling

    Thompson, Madeleine; Neal, Radford M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe two slice sampling methods for taking multivariate steps using the crumb framework. These methods use the gradients at rejected proposals to adapt to the local curvature of the log-density surface, a technique that can produce much better proposals when parameters are highly correlated. We evaluate our methods on four distributions and compare their performance to that of a non-adaptive slice sampling method and a Metropolis method. The adaptive methods perform favorably on low-di...

  16. Structural differences between thermophilic and mesophilic membrane proteins

    Meruelo, Alejandro D.; Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Sanguk; Bowie, James U.

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary adaptations of thermophilic water-soluble proteins required for maintaining stability at high temperature have been extensively investigated. Little is known about the adaptations in membrane proteins, however. Here, we compare many properties of mesophilic and thermophilic membrane protein structures, including side-chain burial, packing, hydrogen bonding, transmembrane kinks, loop lengths, hydrophobicity, and other sequence features. Most of these properties are quite simil...

  17. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  18. Insight into Enabling Adaptive Management

    Lorne A. Greig

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. National Commission on Science for Sustainable Forestry recognized a need for effective adaptive management to support management for biological diversity. However, difficulties in implementing adaptive management in the U.S. Northwest Forest Plan led the Commission to wonder if comparisons across multiple adaptive management trials in the forest sector could provide insight into the factors that serve to enable or inhibit adaptive management. This comparison and the resulting discussions among a group of seasoned practitioners, with adaptive management experience at a variety of scales and levels of complexity, led to insights into a hierarchy of ten factors that can serve to either enable or inhibit implementation. Doing high quality adaptive management is about doing good science to enable learning from management experience. Enabling adaptive management though is about working with people to understand their concerns, to develop a common understanding and an environment of trust that allows adaptive management to proceed. Careful attention to enabling factors is critical to fulfilling the promise of adaptive management.

  19. Adaptive filtering and change detection

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    2003-01-01

    Adaptive filtering is a classical branch of digital signal processing (DSP). Industrial interest in adaptive filtering grows continuously with the increase in computer performance that allows ever more conplex algorithms to be run in real-time. Change detection is a type of adaptive filtering for non-stationary signals and is also the basic tool in fault detection and diagnosis. Often considered as separate subjects Adaptive Filtering and Change Detection bridges a gap in the literature with a unified treatment of these areas, emphasizing that change detection is a natural extensi

  20. Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System: Indigenous Australian Adaptation Model (ABAS: IAAM)

    du Plessis, Santie

    2015-01-01

    The study objectives were to develop, trial and evaluate a cross-cultural adaptation of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition Teacher Form (ABAS-II TF) ages 5-21 for use with Indigenous Australian students ages 5-14. This study introduced a multiphase mixed-method design with semi-structured and informal interviews, school…

  1. Computerized adaptive testing item selection in computerized adaptive learning systems

    Eggen, T.J.H.M.; Veldkamp, B.P.

    2012-01-01

    Item selection methods traditionally developed for computerized adaptive testing (CAT) are explored for their usefulness in item-based computerized adaptive learning (CAL) systems. While in CAT Fisher information-based selection is optimal, for recovering learning populations in CAL systems item selection based on Kullback-Leibner information is an alternative

  2. Epistatic adaptive evolution of human color vision.

    Shozo Yokoyama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Establishing genotype-phenotype relationship is the key to understand the molecular mechanism of phenotypic adaptation. This initial step may be untangled by analyzing appropriate ancestral molecules, but it is a daunting task to recapitulate the evolution of non-additive (epistatic interactions of amino acids and function of a protein separately. To adapt to the ultraviolet (UV-free retinal environment, the short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1 visual pigment in human (human S1 switched from detecting UV to absorbing blue light during the last 90 million years. Mutagenesis experiments of the UV-sensitive pigment in the Boreoeutherian ancestor show that the blue-sensitivity was achieved by seven mutations. The experimental and quantum chemical analyses show that 4,008 of all 5,040 possible evolutionary trajectories are terminated prematurely by containing a dehydrated nonfunctional pigment. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests that human ancestors achieved the blue-sensitivity gradually and almost exclusively by epistasis. When the final stage of spectral tuning of human S1 was underway 45-30 million years ago, the middle and long wavelength-sensitive (MWS/LWS pigments appeared and so-called trichromatic color vision was established by interprotein epistasis. The adaptive evolution of human S1 differs dramatically from orthologous pigments with a major mutational effect used in achieving blue-sensitivity in a fish and several mammalian species and in regaining UV vision in birds. These observations imply that the mechanisms of epistatic interactions must be understood by studying various orthologues in different species that have adapted to various ecological and physiological environments.

  3. Smartphone adapters for digital photomicrography

    Somak Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Photomicrographs in Anatomic Pathology provide a means of quickly sharing information from a glass slide for consultation, education, documentation and publication. While static image acquisition historically involved the use of a permanently mounted camera unit on a microscope, such cameras may be expensive, need to be connected to a computer, and often require proprietary software to acquire and process images. Another novel approach for capturing digital microscopic images is to use smartphones coupled with the eyepiece of a microscope. Recently, several smartphone adapters have emerged that allow users to attach mobile phones to the microscope. The aim of this study was to test the utility of these various smartphone adapters. Materials and Methods: We surveyed the market for adapters to attach smartphones to the ocular lens of a conventional light microscope. Three adapters (Magnifi, Skylight and Snapzoom were tested. We assessed the designs of these adapters and their effectiveness at acquiring static microscopic digital images. Results: All adapters facilitated the acquisition of digital microscopic images with a smartphone. The optimal adapter was dependent on the type of phone used. The Magnifi adapters for iPhone were incompatible when using a protective case. The Snapzoom adapter was easiest to use with iPhones and other smartphones even with protective cases. Conclusions: Smartphone adapters are inexpensive and easy to use for acquiring digital microscopic images. However, they require some adjustment by the user in order to optimize focus and obtain good quality images. Smartphone microscope adapters provide an economically feasible method of acquiring and sharing digital pathology photomicrographs.

  4. Cold adaptation of tropomyosin.

    Hayley, Michael; Chevaldina, Tatiana; Heeley, David H

    2011-08-01

    The conformational stability of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated α,α-striated tropomyosins from rabbit and shark (95% identical sequences) has been investigated. Three additional core positions are occupied by atypical amino acids in the protein from shark: Thr179(d), Ser190(a), and Ser211(a). These changes are thought to have further destabilized most, if not all, of the carboxyl-terminal half of the molecule. Heat-induced unfolding of shark tropomyosin (2 mg/mL, 0.1 M salt, pH 7) as monitored by far-UV circular dichroism is biphasic [T(m1) ∼ 33 °C (main), and T(m2) ∼ 54 °C] and takes place over a wider temperature span than that of the mammalian protein. The relationship between ellipticity (and excess heat) and temperature is insensitive to the presence in either tropomyosin of covalently bound phosphate. At ∼10 mg/mL, the minor endotherm of shark tropomyosin is shifted to ∼60 °C and T(m2) - T(m1) is increased to 25 °C; otherwise, the results of calorimetry are in agreement with those of circular dichroism. Analyses of cyanogen bromide fragments by far-UV circular dichroism and intact protein by near-UV circular dichroism (T(m) ∼ 32 °C) show that the most stable sizable portion of shark tropomyosin is located within the amino-terminal half of the molecule. These findings illuminate those regions in tropomyosin where flexibility is critical and show that substitutions predicted to be unfavorable in one temperature regime are desirable in another. PMID:21707054

  5. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    the entire process, so that more and larger problems can be attempted. Currently, the program designers are working to make ProteinShop more applicable and adaptable to different protein folding methodologies. If users could manipulate structures from a biological point of view, and then put them back in the queue for more optimization, the process of experimentation and discovery in protein research could be greatly enhanced. The group is also investigating the use of stereoscopic rendering and three-dimensional input devices to remove the limitations of a two-dimensional interface. Clearly, protein-folding research will have far-reaching ramifications. It could lead to new insights about diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to Cystic fibrosis, which scientists believe are caused by protein folding gone wrong. A better understanding of protein structures could also lead to the engineering of altogether new proteins, and shed light on how drugs bind proteins to alter their structure and function. Above all, ProteinShop is an important tool that will help scientists unravel one of the most challenging problems that theoretical and computational chemistry has to offer.

  6. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  7. Strength and power training: physiological mechanisms of adaptation.

    Kraemer, W J; Fleck, S J; Evans, W J

    1996-01-01

    Adaptations in resistance training are focused on the development and maintenance of the neuromuscular unit needed for force production [97, 136]. The effects of training, when using this system, affect many other physiological systems of the body (e.g., the connective tissue, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems) [16, 18, 37, 77, 83]. Training programs are highly specific to the types of adaptation that occur. Activation of specific patterns of motor units in training dictate what tissue and how other physiological systems will be affected by the exercise training. The time course of the development of the neuromuscular system appears to be dominated in the early phase by neural factors with associated changes in the types of contractile proteins. In the later adaptation phase, muscle protein increases, and the contractile unit begins to contribute the most to the changes in performance capabilities. A host of other factors can affect the adaptations, such as functional capabilities of the individual, age, nutritional status, and behavioral factors (e.g., sleep and health habits). Optimal adaptation appears to be related to the use of specific resistance training programs to meet individual training objectives. PMID:8744256

  8. Techniques of English Textbooks Adaptation

    张婧雯; 杨竞欧

    2014-01-01

    This essay attempts to aim English teachers to evaluate and adapt the current English textbooks.According to different levels and majors of the students,English teachers can enhance the teaching materials and their teaching skills.This paper would provide several useful techniques for teachers to make evaluations and adaptations of using teaching materials.

  9. Dynamic adaption of vascular morphology

    Okkels, Fridolin; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-01-01

    The structure of vascular networks adapts continuously to meet changes in demand of the surrounding tissue. Most of the known vascular adaptation mechanisms are based on local reactions to local stimuli such as pressure and flow, which in turn reflects influence from the surrounding tissue. Here ...

  10. Adaptive Assessments Using Open Specifications

    Leon, Hector Barbosa; Garcia-Penalvo, Francisco J.; Rodriguez-Conde, Maria Jose; Morales, Erla M.; de Pablos, Patricia Ordonez

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation is a key element in formal education processes; it must be constructed in a way that the item questions within help students understand by adapting them to the learning style as well. The focus of the present research work specifically in the convenience to adapt an associated multimedia material in each single question besides the…

  11. Interdisciplinarity in Adapted Physical Activity

    Bouffard, Marcel; Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that inquiry in adapted physical activity involves the use of different disciplines to address questions. It is often advanced today that complex problems of the kind frequently encountered in adapted physical activity require a combination of disciplines for their solution. At the present time, individual research…

  12. Tracking adaptation and measuring development

    Brooks, Nick; Anderson, Simon; Ayers, Jessica; Burton, Ian; Tellam, Ian

    2011-11-15

    This is the first paper in the new IIED Climate Change Working Paper series. As adaptation to climate change becomes the focus of increasing attention and the target of significant spending, there is a growing need for frameworks and tools that enable organisations to track and assess the outcomes of adaptation interventions. This paper presents a coherent framework for climate change adaptation programming, including potential indicators, or indicator categories/types, for tracking and evaluating the success of adaptation support and adaptation interventions. The paper begins with a discussion of some of the key issues related to the evaluation of adaptation, and outlines some of the main difficulties and constraints with respect to the development of adaptation indicators. Next, an evaluation framework is proposed and indicator categories or 'domains' are identified. Lastly, key conclusions are provided and a theory of change is outlined that shows how development and use of the framework could lead to more effective adaptation investments for climate resilient development.

  13. Adapting playware to multiple players

    Þorsteinsson, Arnar Tumi; Lund, Henrik Hautop; Mastorakis, Nikos;

    2011-01-01

    With the creation of playware as intelligent hardware and software that creates play, it is possible to adapt the play tool to the individual user, and even to multiple users playing at the same time with the play tool. In this paper, we show how it is possible to implement adaptivity in modular...

  14. The adaptation to climate change

    The authors address the issue of adaptation to climate change. They first address the physical aspects related to this issue: scenarios of temperature evolution, main possible impacts. Then, they address the social impacts related to climate risks, and the adaptation strategies which aim at reducing the exposure and vulnerability of human societies, or at increasing their resilience. Some examples of losses of human lives and of economic damages due to recent catastrophes related to climate change are evoked. The authors address the international framework, the emergence of an international regime on climate, the quite recent emergence of adaptation within international negotiations in 2001, the emergence of the idea of a support to developing countries. National and local policies are presented in the next chapter (in the European Union, the Netherlands which are faced with the issue of sea level rise, programs in developing countries) and their limitations are also outlined. The next chapter addresses the adaptation actions performed by private actors (enterprises, households, associations, civil society, and so on) with example of vulnerability, and adaptation opportunities and possibilities in some specific sectors. The last chapter presents a typology of actions of adaptation, indicators of adaptation to climate change, and examples of mistaken adaptation

  15. Lessons in Protein Design from Combined Evolution and Conformational Dynamics

    Swarnendu Tripathi; M Neal Waxham; Cheung, Margaret S.; Yin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play important roles in the control of every cellular process. How natural selection has optimized protein design to produce molecules capable of binding to many partner proteins is a fascinating problem but not well understood. Here, we performed a combinatorial analysis of protein sequence evolution and conformational dynamics to study how calmodulin (CaM), which plays essential roles in calcium signaling pathways, has adapted to bind to a large number of partne...

  16. Formation of functional cell membrane domains: the interplay of lipid- and protein-mediated interactions.

    Harder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Numerous cell membrane associated processes, including signal transduction, membrane sorting, protein processing and virus trafficking take place in membrane subdomains. Protein-protein interactions provide the frameworks necessary to generate biologically functional membrane domains. For example, coat proteins define membrane areas destined for sorting processes, viral proteins self-assemble to generate a budding virus, and adapter molecules organize multimolecular signalling assemblies, whi...

  17. Statistical Physics of Adaptation

    Perunov, Nikolay; Marsland, Robert A.; England, Jeremy L.

    2016-04-01

    Whether by virtue of being prepared in a slowly relaxing, high-free energy initial condition, or because they are constantly dissipating energy absorbed from a strong external drive, many systems subject to thermal fluctuations are not expected to behave in the way they would at thermal equilibrium. Rather, the probability of finding such a system in a given microscopic arrangement may deviate strongly from the Boltzmann distribution, raising the question of whether thermodynamics still has anything to tell us about which arrangements are the most likely to be observed. In this work, we build on past results governing nonequilibrium thermodynamics and define a generalized Helmholtz free energy that exactly delineates the various factors that quantitatively contribute to the relative probabilities of different outcomes in far-from-equilibrium stochastic dynamics. By applying this expression to the analysis of two examples—namely, a particle hopping in an oscillating energy landscape and a population composed of two types of exponentially growing self-replicators—we illustrate a simple relationship between outcome-likelihood and dissipative history. In closing, we discuss the possible relevance of such a thermodynamic principle for our understanding of self-organization in complex systems, paying particular attention to a possible analogy to the way evolutionary adaptations emerge in living things.

  18. Adapt or die?

    Visser, S S; Nel, A H

    1996-12-01

    The worldwide economic recession and the concomitant limited stock of finances have had an influence on the available money of every household and have also inhibited the improvement of socio-economic conditions and medicine. The Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) has the objective of improving the living conditions of the people with regard to housing, education, training and health care. The latter seems to be a major problem which has to be addressed with the emphasis on the preventive and promotional aspects of health care. A comprehensive health care system did not come into being property in the past because of the maldistribution of health care services, personnel and differences in culture and health care beliefs and values. The question that now arises, is how to render a quality health care service within the constraints of inadequate financing and resources. A comprehensive literature study has been done with reference to quality health care and financing followed by a survey of existing health services and finances. Recommendations are made about minimum requirements to be accepted if one were to adapt rather than die in terms of the provision of healthcare: the decentralization and rationalization of the administration of health care, the stress on and realization of effective and efficient primary health care, the acceptance of participative management in health providing organizations, the provision of financial management training for health care managers and the application of management accounting principles for the improvement of the efficiency and effectiveness of management. PMID:9283343

  19. Adapting to an aftereffect.

    Sheth, Bhavin R; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    We report a new type of orientation-contingent color aftereffect in which the color aftereffect is opposite to the classical McCollough effect, i.e., the perceived color of the aftereffect is the same as the inducer's color. Interleaved exposure to red, horizontal and achromatic (gray), horizontal gratings led to a long-lasting aftereffect in which achromatic horizontal gratings appeared reddish. The effect, termed the anti-McCollough effect, although weaker than the classical aftereffect, remained stable for a moderate duration of time (24 hours). Unlike the classical aftereffect, which is known to not transfer interocularly, the new after-aftereffect transferred 100%, suggesting that its locus in the brain was downstream of the classical effect. It is likely that neurons in a higher-order area adapted to the classical color aftereffect that was represented in a lower-order area, thus forming an aftereffect of an aftereffect, i.e., an after-aftereffect. Our finding has implications as to how neural activity in lower- and higher-level areas in the brain interacts to yield conscious visual experience. PMID:18484835

  20. Success and adaptation

    2013-01-01

    Yesterday morning, the last colliding proton beams of 2013 were extracted from the LHC, heralding the start of the machine’s first long shutdown (LS1) and crowning its first three glorious years of running. I hardly need to tell the CERN community what a fabulous performance all the people running the machine, the experiments, the computing and all supporting infrastructures put in. Those people are you, and you all know very well what a great job everyone did.   Nevertheless, I would like to express my thanks to all the people who made this first LHC run such a success. Re-measuring the whole Standard Model in such a short period, and then completing it with the discovery of what looks increasingly like the Higgs boson, is no mean feat. What I’d like to focus on today is another aspect of our field: its remarkable ability to adapt. When I started out in research, experiments involved a handful of people and lasted a few years at most. The timescale for the development of ...

  1. Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2014-01-01

    . This absence of an agreement calls for adaptation to climate change. Emphasis should be put on buildings, as they play a vital economic and social role in society and are vulnerable to climate change. Therefore, the building stock deserves its own policy and implementation plans as well as tools that...... enable adequate and cost-efficient adaptation to climate change. This paper explains the need for climate change adaptation of the building stock and suggests a pattern for a strategic approach to how to reach the climate change adaptation needed. The suggested and presented need of a strategic approach...... is based on three main initiatives consisting of the need to examine the potential impacts of climate change on the building stock, the need to assess and develop a roadmap of current and future adaptation measures that can withstand the effects of climate change, and the need to engage relevant...

  2. Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2013-01-01

    . This absence of an agreement calls for adaptation to climate change. Emphasis should be put on buildings, as they play a vital economic and social role in society and are vulnerable to climate change. Therefore, the building stock deserves its own policy and implementation plans as well as tools that...... enable adequate and cost-efficient adaptation to climate change. This paper explains the need for climate change adaptation of the building stock and suggests a pattern for a strategic approach to how to reach the climate change adaptation needed. The suggested and presented need of a strategic approach...... is based on three main initiatives consisting of the need to examine the potential impacts of climate change on the building stock, the need to assess and develop a roadmap of current and future adaptation measures that can withstand the effects of climate change, and the need to engage relevant...

  3. Adapting Playware to Rehabilitation Practices

    Nielsen, Camilla Balslev; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2012-01-01

    We describe how playware and games may become adaptive to the interaction of the individual user and how therapists use this adaptation property to apply modular interactive tiles in rehabilitation practices that demand highly individualized training. Therapists may use the interactive modular ti...... patients modulating exercises and difficulty levels. We also find that in physical games there are individual differences in patient interaction capabilities and styles, and that modularity allows the therapist to adapt exercises to the individual patient’s capabilities.......We describe how playware and games may become adaptive to the interaction of the individual user and how therapists use this adaptation property to apply modular interactive tiles in rehabilitation practices that demand highly individualized training. Therapists may use the interactive modular...

  4. Adapting Playware to Rehabilitation Practices

    Nielsen, Camilla Balslev; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2011-01-01

    We describe how playware and games may become adaptive to the interaction of the individual user and how therapists use this adaptation property to apply modular interactive tiles in rehabilitation practices that demand highly individualized training. Therapists may use the interactive modular ti...... patients modulating exercises and difficulty levels. We also find that in physical games there are individual differences in patient interaction capabilities and styles, and that modularity allows the therapist to adapt exercises to the individual patient’s capabilities.......We describe how playware and games may become adaptive to the interaction of the individual user and how therapists use this adaptation property to apply modular interactive tiles in rehabilitation practices that demand highly individualized training. Therapists may use the interactive modular...

  5. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    Microgravity is an abnormal environmental condition that plays no role in the functioning of biosphere. Nevertheless, the chronic effect of microgravity in space flight as an unfamiliar factor does not prevent the development of adaptive reactions at the cellular level. In real microgravity in space flight under the more or less optimal conditions for plant growing, namely temperature, humidity, CO2, light intensity and directivity in the hardware angiosperm plants perform an “reproductive imperative”, i.e. they flower, fruit and yield viable seeds. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part on reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of the identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and subcellular level in real and simulated microgravity is considered. Cytological studies of plants developing in real and simulated microgravity made it possible to establish that the processes of mitosis, cytokinesis, and tissue differentiation of vegetative and generative organs are largely normal. At the same time, under microgravity, essential reconstruction in the structural and functional organization of cell organelles and cytoskeleton, as well as changes in cell metabolism and homeostasis have been described. In addition, new interesting data concerning the influence of altered gravity on lipid peroxidation intensity, the level of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant system activity, just like on the level of gene expression and synthesis of low-molecular and high-molecular heat shock proteins were recently obtained. So, altered gravity caused time-dependent increasing of the HSP70 and HSP90 levels in cells, that may indicate temporary strengthening of their functional loads that is necessary for re-establish a new cellular homeostasis. Relative qPCR results showed that

  6. Investigation of the parallel tempering method for protein folding

    Schug, Alexander; Herges, Thomas; Verma, Abhinav; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the suitability and efficiency of an adapted version of the parallel tempering method for all-atom protein folding. We have recently developed an all-atom free energy force field (PFF01) for protein structure prediction with stochastic optimization methods. Here we report reproducible folding of the 20-amino-acid trp-cage protein and the conserved 40-amino-acid three-helix HIV accessory protein with an adapted parallel tempering method. We find that the native state, for both proteins, is correctly predicted to 2 Å backbone root mean square deviation and analyse the efficiency of the simulation approach.

  7. Total protein

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  8. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    Yi-Ming He; Bin-Guang Ma

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophil...

  9. Protein Structure

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  10. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  11. Simultaneous expression of regulatory genes associated with specific drought-adaptive traits improves drought adaptation in peanut.

    Ramu, Vemanna S; Swetha, Thavarekere N; Sheela, Shekarappa H; Babitha, Chandrashekar K; Rohini, Sreevathsa; Reddy, Malireddy K; Tuteja, Narendra; Reddy, Chandrashekar P; Prasad, Trichi Ganesh; Udayakumar, Makarla

    2016-03-01

    Adaptation of crops to drought-prone rain-fed conditions can be achieved by improving plant traits such as efficient water mining (by superior root characters) and cellular-level tolerance mechanisms. Pyramiding these drought-adaptive traits by simultaneous expression of genes regulating drought-adaptive mechanisms has phenomenal relevance in improving stress tolerance. In this study, we provide evidence that peanut transgenic plants expressing Alfalfa zinc finger 1 (Alfin1), a root growth-associated transcription factor gene, Pennisetum glaucum heat-shock factor (PgHSF4) and Pea DNA helicase (PDH45) involved in protein turnover and protection showed improved tolerance, higher growth and productivity under drought stress conditions. Stable integration of all the transgenes was noticed in transgenic lines. The transgenic lines showed higher root growth, cooler crop canopy air temperature difference (less CCATD) and higher relative water content (RWC) under drought stress. Low proline levels in transgenic lines substantiate the maintenance of higher water status. The survival and recovery of transgenic lines was significantly higher under gradual moisture stress conditions with higher biomass. Transgenic lines also showed significant tolerance to ethrel-induced senescence and methyl viologen-induced oxidative stress. Several stress-responsive genes such as heat-shock proteins (HSPs), RING box protein-1 (RBX1), Aldose reductase, late embryogenesis abundant-5 (LEA5) and proline-rich protein-2 (PRP2), a gene involved in root growth, showed enhanced expression under stress in transgenic lines. Thus, the simultaneous expression of regulatory genes contributing for drought-adaptive traits can improve crop adaptation and productivity under water-limited conditions. PMID:26383697

  12. Molecular mechanisms underlying thermal adaptation of xeric animals

    M B Evgen'Ev; D G Garbuz; V Y Shilova; O G Zatsepina

    2007-04-01

    For many years, we and our collaborators have investigated the adaptive role of heat shock proteins in different animals, including the representatives of homothermic and poikilothermic species that inhabit regions with contrasting thermal conditions. Adaptive evolution of the response to hyperthermia has led to different results depending upon the species. The thermal threshold of induction of heat shock proteins in desert thermophylic species is, as a rule, higher than in the species from less extreme climates. In addition, thermoresistant poikilothermic species often exhibit a certain level of heat shock proteins in cells even at a physiologically normal temperature. Furthermore, there is often a positive correlation between the characteristic temperature of the ecological niche of a given species and the amount of Hsp70-like proteins in the cells at normal temperature. Although in most cases adaptation to hyperthermia occurs without changes in the number of heat shock genes, these genes can be amplified in some xeric species. It was shown that mobile genetic elements may play an important role in the evolution and fine-tuning of the heat shock response system, and can be used for direct introduction of mutations in the promoter regions of these genes.

  13. Characterization of bortezomib-adapted I-45 mesothelioma cells

    Peddaboina Chander

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bortezomib, a proteasome-specific inhibitor, has emerged as a promising cancer therapeutic agent. However, development of resistance to bortezomib may pose a challenge to effective anticancer therapy. Therefore, characterization of cellular mechanisms involved in bortezomib resistance and development of effective strategies to overcome this resistance represent important steps in the advancement of bortezomib-mediated cancer therapy. Results The present study reports the development of I-45-BTZ-R, a bortezomib-resistant cell line, from the bortezomib-sensitive mesothelioma cell line I-45. I-45-BTZ-R cells showed no cross-resistance to the chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin. Moreover, the bortezomib-adapted I-45-BTZ-R cells had decreased growth kinemics and did not over express proteasome subunit β5 (PSMB5 as compared to parental I-45 cells. I-45-BTZ-R cells and parental I-45 cells showed similar inhibition of proteasome activity, but I-45-BTZ-R cells exhibited much less accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins following exposure to 40 nm bortezomib. Further studies revealed that relatively low doses of bortezomib did not induce an unfolded protein response (UPR in the bortezomib-adapted cells, while higher doses induced UPR with concomitant cell death, as evidenced by higher expression of the mitochondrial chaperone protein Bip and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related pro-apoptotic protein CHOP. In addition, bortezomib exposure did not induce the accumulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins p53, Mcl-1S, and noxa in the bortezomib-adapted cells. Conclusion These results suggest that UPR evasion, together with reduced pro-apoptotic gene induction, accounts for bortezomib resistance in the bortezomib-adapted mesothelioma cell line I-45-BTZ-R.

  14. Adaptability and stability of soybean genotypes in off-season cultivation.

    Batista, R O; Hamawaki, R L; Sousa, L B; Nogueira, A P O; Hamawaki, O T

    2015-01-01

    The oil and protein contents of soybean grains are important quantitative traits for use in breeding. However, few breeding programs perform selection based on these traits in different environments. This study assessed the adaptability and stability of 14 elite early soybean breeding lines in off-season cultivation with respect to yield, and oil and protein contents. A range of statistical methods was applied and these analyses indicated that for off-season cultivation, the lines UFUS 5 and UFUS 10 could be recommended due to their superior performance in grain yield, oil content, and specific adaptability to unfavorable environments along with high stability in these characteristics. Also recommended were UFUS 06, which demonstrated superior performance in all three tested characteristics and showed adaptation to favorable environments, and UFUS 13, which showed high adaptability and stability and a superior performance for protein content. PMID:26345896

  15. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants

    Florencio ePazos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signalling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms can not escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  16. Tau protein

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased...... concentration of tau protein in CSF from patients with relapsing-remitting MS and patients monosymptomatic at onset who progressed to MS, but interestingly no increased tau protein concentration in monosymptomatic ON. The concentration of tau protein was significantly correlated to Expanded Disability Status...

  17. Adaptive designs for sequential experiments

    林正炎; 张立新

    2003-01-01

    Various adaptive designe have been proposed and applied to clinical trials,bioassay,psycho-physics,etc.Adaptive designs are also useful in high cost engineering trials.More and More people have been paying attention to these desing methods.This paper introduces several broad families of designs,such as the play-the-winner rele,randomized play-the-winner rule and its generalization to the multi-arm case,doubly bi-ased coin adaptive design,Markov chain model.

  18. Racism in America through adaptation

    Munk, Jakob; Jakobsen, Sebastian; Chung, Jacinta; Schulze, Anja; Papakonstantinou, Vaitza

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the adaptation of the movie 12 Years a Slave from the memoir of Solomon Northup. In order to analyse the adaptation, several theories will be used as guidelines for our research such as adaptation theories and film techniques. The analysis will lead through the different chapters of the book focusing on atmosphere, characters and religion. The main themes dealt with in the book as well as the movie will be linked with the events which unfolded in Ferguson and Baltimore. In...

  19. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  20. FDM adaptive optics technology development

    Thibault, Simon; Doucet, Michel; Rioux, Myriam

    2004-10-01

    INO supports research on Ferrofluidic Deformable Mirror (FDM) adaptive optics technologies and, as such, its research activities include the development and characterization of FDM and high resolution (ExAO) adaptive optics systems using such FDMs. Liquid mirrors have long been recognized as a potential low-cost alternative to conventional solid mirrors. Since the trend is towards advanced adaptive optics systems, a need for deformable mirrors with a large number of low-cost actuators exists. This paper presents updated experimental results using a new INO FDM prototype (271 actuators, 50 µm stroke) as well as a theoretical model of surface behaviors.

  1. Resource-adaptive cognitive processes

    Crocker, Matthew W

    2010-01-01

    This book investigates the adaptation of cognitive processes to limited resources. The central topics of this book are heuristics considered as results of the adaptation to resource limitations, through natural evolution in the case of humans, or through artificial construction in the case of computational systems; the construction and analysis of resource control in cognitive processes; and an analysis of resource-adaptivity within the paradigm of concurrent computation. The editors integrated the results of a collaborative 5-year research project that involved over 50 scientists. After a mot

  2. The Vulnerability of Threatened Species: Adaptive Capability and Adaptation Opportunity

    Andrew McVey

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Global targets to halt the loss of biodiversity have not been met, and there is now an additional Aichi target for preventing the extinction of known threatened species and improving their conservation status. Climate change increasingly needs to be factored in to these, and thus there is a need to identify the extent to which it could increase species vulnerability. This paper uses the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity framework to assess the vulnerability of a selection of WWF global priority large mammals and marine species to climate change. However, it divides adaptive capacity into adaptive capability and adaptation opportunity, in order to identify whether adaptation is more constrained by the biology of the species or by its environmental setting. Lack of evidence makes it difficult to apply the framework consistently across the species, but it was found that, particularly for the terrestrial mammals, adaptation opportunities seems to be the greater constraint. This framework and analysis could be used by conservationists and those wishing to enhance the resilience of species to climate change.

  3. Farming System Evolution and Adaptive Capacity: Insights for Adaptation Support

    Jami L. Dixon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of climate impacts on agriculture and adaptation often provide current or future assessments, ignoring the historical contexts farming systems are situated within. We investigate how historical trends have influenced farming system adaptive capacity in Uganda using data from household surveys, semi-structured interviews, focus-group discussions and observations. By comparing two farming systems, we note three major findings: (1 similar trends in farming system evolution have had differential impacts on the diversity of farming systems; (2 trends have contributed to the erosion of informal social and cultural institutions and an increasing dependence on formal institutions; and (3 trade-offs between components of adaptive capacity are made at the farm-scale, thus influencing farming system adaptive capacity. To identify the actual impacts of future climate change and variability, it is important to recognize the dynamic nature of adaptation. In practice, areas identified for further adaptation support include: shift away from one-size-fits-all approach the identification and integration of appropriate modern farming method; a greater focus on building inclusive formal and informal institutions; and a more nuanced understanding regarding the roles and decision-making processes of influential, but external, actors. More research is needed to understand farm-scale trade-offs and the resulting impacts across spatial and temporal scales.

  4. Externalizing Research Through Adaptive Frameworks

    Vedel, Jane Bjørn; Irwin, Alan; Høngaard Andersen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive approaches to collaborations between industry and academic research institutions can enable both parties to achieve their goals more effectively. Here, we discuss our experience with such approaches and suggest recommendations for addressing the associated management challenges....

  5. Adaptation : climate change briefing paper

    Acclimatise

    2009-01-01

    Climate change adaptation means recognising what is happening to our climate on a global and local scale, and developing strategies to manage the risks that this presents is crucial to the growth, development and continuing success of any organisation.

  6. Viewer preferences for adaptive playout

    Deshpande, Sachin

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive media playout techniques are used to avoid buffer underflow in a dynamic streaming environment where the available bandwidth may be fluctuating. In this paper we report human perceptions from audio quality studies that we performed on speech and music samples for adaptive audio playout. Test methods based on ITU-R BS. 1534-1 recommendation were used. Studies were conducted for both slow playout and fast playout. Two scales - a coarse scale and a finer scale was used for the slow and fast audio playout factors. Results from our study can be used to determine acceptable slow and fast playout factors for speech and music content. An adaptive media playout algorithm could use knowledge of these upper and lower bounds on playback speeds to decide its adaptive playback schedule.

  7. Genetic Algorithms for Case Adaptation

    Case based reasoning (CBR) paradigm has been widely used to provide computer support for recalling and adapting known cases to novel situations. Case adaptation algorithms generally rely on knowledge based and heuristics in order to change the past solutions to solve new problems. However, case adaptation has always been a difficult process to engineers within (CBR) cycle. Its difficulties can be referred to its domain dependency; and computational cost. In an effort to solve this problem, this research explores a general-purpose method that applying a genetic algorithm (GA) to CBR adaptation. Therefore, it can decrease the computational complexity of the search space in the problems having a great dependency on their domain knowledge. The proposed model can be used to perform a variety of design tasks on a broad set of application domains. However, it has been implemented for the tablet formulation as a domain of application. The proposed system has improved the performance of the CBR design systems

  8. Color Ratios and Chromatic Adaptation

    Finlayson, Graham D.; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the performance of chromatic adaptation transforms based on stable color ratios is investigated.It was found that for three different sets of reflectance data, their performance was not statistically different from CMCCAT2000,when applying the chromatic adaptation transforms to Lam’s corresponding color data set and using a perceptual error metric of CIE Delta E94.The sensors with the best color ratio stability are much sharper and more de-correlated than the CMCCAT2000 sensors...

  9. Face Adaptation Without a Face

    Ghuman, Avniel Singh; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Martin, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged viewing of a stimulus results in a subsequent perceptual bias [1], [2] and [3]. This perceptual adaptation and the resulting aftereffect reveal important characteristics regarding how perceptual systems are tuned [2], [4], [5] and [6]. These aftereffects occur not only for simple stimulus features but also for high-level stimulus properties [7], [8], [9] and [10]. Here we report a novel cross-category adaptation aftereffect demonstrating that prolonged viewing of a human body withou...

  10. Adaptive oxide electronics: A review

    Ha, Sieu D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2011-10-01

    Novel information processing techniques are being actively explored to overcome fundamental limitations associated with CMOS scaling. A new paradigm of adaptive electronic devices is emerging that may reshape the frontiers of electronics and enable new modalities. Creating systems that can learn and adapt to various inputs has generally been a complex algorithm problem in information science, albeit with wide-ranging and powerful applications from medical diagnosis to control systems. Recent work in oxide electronics suggests that it may be plausible to implement such systems at the device level, thereby drastically increasing computational density and power efficiency and expanding the potential for electronics beyond Boolean computation. Intriguing possibilities of adaptive electronics include fabrication of devices that mimic human brain functionality: the strengthening and weakening of synapses emulated by electrically, magnetically, thermally, or optically tunable properties of materials.In this review, we detail materials and device physics studies on functional metal oxides that may be utilized for adaptive electronics. It has been shown that properties, such as resistivity, polarization, and magnetization, of many oxides can be modified electrically in a non-volatile manner, suggesting that these materials respond to electrical stimulus similarly as a neural synapse. We discuss what device characteristics will likely be relevant for integration into adaptive platforms and then survey a variety of oxides with respect to these properties, such as, but not limited to, TaOx, SrTiO3, and Bi4-xLaxTi3O12. The physical mechanisms in each case are detailed and analyzed within the framework of adaptive electronics. We then review theoretically formulated and current experimentally realized adaptive devices with functional oxides, such as self-programmable logic and neuromorphic circuits. Finally, we speculate on what advances in materials physics and engineering may

  11. Algebraic and Adaptive MIMO Radar

    Morency, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Breaking causality is the main distinction of the multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) paradigm as used for active sensing/radar. This is because the transmitting side can be optimized in many ways to manipulate the capabilities of the system. Adaptive beamforming is a fundamental problem in array-processing, communications, and radar among other fields which has once again garnered significant research interest in recent years within the MIMO paradigm. In this work, transmit adaptive beamfo...

  12. Adaptive constraints for feature tracking

    K. I. Hodges

    1999-01-01

    In this paper extensions to an existing tracking algorithm are described. These extensions implement adaptive tracking constraints in the form of regional upper-bound displacements and an adaptive track smoothness constraint. Together, these constraints make the tracking algorithm more flexible than the original algorithm (which used fixed tracking parameters) and provide greater confidence in the tracking results. The result of applying the new algorithm to high-resolution ...

  13. Fitness seascapes and adaptive evolution of the influenza virus

    Lassig, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The seasonal human influenza A virus undergoes rapid genome evolution. This process is triggered by interactions with the host immune system and produces significant year-to-year sequence turnover in the population of circulating viral strains. We develop a dynamical fitness model that predicts the evolution of the viral population from one year to the next. Two factors are shown to determine the fitness of a viral strain: adaptive changes, which are under positive selection, and deleterious mutations, which affect conserved viral functions such as protein stability. Combined with the influenza strain tree, this fitness model maps the adaptive history of influenza A. We discuss the implications of our results for the statistical theory of adaptive evolution in asexual populations. Based on this and related systems, we touch upon the fundamental question of when evolution can be predicted. Joint work with Marta Luksza, Columbia University.

  14. The Geobiochemistry of Methanogen Proteins

    Prasad, A.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    A principle of geobiochemistry is that adaptation over evolutionary time includes a thermodynamic drive to minimize costs of making biomolecules like proteins and lipids. If so, then biomolecule abundances will reflect, at least in part, their relative stabilities at the conditions imposed by external environments. We tested this hypothesis by comparing relative stabilities of 138 orthologous proteins between a representative lake-sediment methanogen (Methanoculleus marisnigri) and a representative rumen methanogen (Methanospirillum hungatei) at the compositional constraints of their respective environments. Chemical affinities of the proteins were calculated based on pH, temperature, and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen, bicarbonate, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide, together with standard Gibbs energies of formation of proteins from the elements predicted with a group additivity algorithm for unfolded proteins [1]. Methanogens were chosen as they are chemoautotrophs and their metabolism proceeds at relatively small affinities. Also, they are found in a variety of compositionally varying habitats like rumen, sediments, hydrothermal systems and sewage. The methanogens selected belong to the same order of taxonomy and are closely related. Preliminary results show that a majority of the proteins belonging to the rumen methanogen (66%) are more stable in the rumen environment, while a majority of the proteins belonging to the lake-sediment methanogen (58%) are more stable at sediment conditions. In a separate observation, it was noted that while the complete protein ';proteasome subunit alpha' of another rumen methanogen (Methanobrevibacter smithii) was less stable in its more reducing habitat as compared to a sewage methanogen (Methanothermobacter thermoautotophicus), its first 26 amino acid residues (N terminal) were in fact more stable in its own environment. These 26 residues are reported to be unique as compared to other proteasome proteins and are suggested to

  15. Mechanisms of temperature adaptation in poikilotherms.

    Guschina, Irina A; Harwood, John L

    2006-10-01

    For good function, membrane lipids have to be arranged appropriately and be in the correct physical state. In poikilotherms, exposure to cold stress or heat shock can alter membrane properties such that, unless they are corrected quickly, damage and, possibly, death can result. Low temperature stress is countered by modifying membrane lipids such that their average transition temperature is lowered. There are various ways in which this can be achieved but an increase in fatty acid unsaturation is the most common. For heat shock, various changes in lipids have been noted and some defensive strategies involving heat shock proteins noted. In this short review, we will describe recent results where adaptive lipid changes, as a result of temperature stress, have been found. Mechanisms for bringing about such alterations are discussed, together with the contrasting data for different organisms. PMID:16824520

  16. Fair adaptation to climate change

    This article identifies social justice dilemmas associated with the necessity to adapt to climate change, examines how they are currently addressed by the climate change regime, and proposes solutions to overcome prevailing gaps and ambiguities. We argue that the key justice dilemmas of adaptation include responsibility for climate change impacts, the level and burden sharing of assistance to vulnerable countries for adaptation, distribution of assistance between recipient countries and adaptation measures, and fair participation in planning and making decisions on adaptation. We demonstrate how the climate change regime largely omits responsibility but makes a general commitment to assistance. However, the regime has so far failed to operationalise assistance and has made only minor progress towards eliminating obstacles for fair participation. We propose the adoption of four principles for fair adaptation in the climate change regime. These include avoiding dangerous climate change, forward-looking responsibility, putting the most vulnerable first and equal participation of all. We argue that a safe maximum standard of 400-500 ppm of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere and a carbon tax of $20-50 per carbon equivalent ton could provide the initial instruments for operationalising the principles. (author)

  17. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of

  18. How seabirds adapt to ocean processes

    Powers, K.D.

    A general review is presented of the adaptations made by seabirds to their environments. Included in the discussion are behavioral, morphological and physiological adaptation to the ocean environment.

  19. Burkholderia pseudomallei transcriptional adaptation in macrophages

    Chieng Sylvia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen of phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. How the bacterium interacts with host macrophage cells is still not well understood and is critical to appreciate the strategies used by this bacterium to survive and how intracellular survival leads to disease manifestation. Results Here we report the expression profile of intracellular B. pseudomallei following infection of human macrophage-like U937 cells. During intracellular growth over the 6 h infection period, approximately 22 % of the B. pseudomallei genome showed significant transcriptional adaptation. B. pseudomallei adapted rapidly to the intracellular environment by down-regulating numerous genes involved in metabolism, cell envelope, motility, replication, amino acid and ion transport system and regulatory function pathways. Reduced expression in catabolic and housekeeping genes suggested lower energy requirement and growth arrest during macrophage infection, while expression of genes encoding anaerobic metabolism functions were up regulated. However, whilst the type VI secretion system was up regulated, expression of many known virulence factors was not significantly modulated over the 6hours of infection. Conclusions The transcriptome profile described here provides the first comprehensive view of how B. pseudomallei survives within host cells and will help identify potential virulence factors and proteins that are important for the survival and growth of B. pseudomallei within human cells.

  20. Protein breakdown in cancer cachexia.

    Sandri, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptive tissue, capable of altering muscle fiber size, functional capacity and metabolism in response to physiological stimuli. However, pathological conditions such as cancer growth compromise the mechanisms that regulate muscle homeostasis, resulting in loss of muscle mass, functional impairment and compromised metabolism. This tumor-induced condition is characterized by enhanced muscle protein breakdown and amino acids release that sustain liver gluconeogenesis and tissue protein synthesis. Proteolysis is controlled by the two most important cellular degradation systems, the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome. These systems are carefully regulated by different signalling pathways that determine protein and organelle turnover. In this review we will describe the involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome systems in cancer cachexia and the principal signalling pathways that regulate tumor-induced protein breakdown in muscle. PMID:26564688

  1. Protein politics

    Vijver, Marike

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of the program of the interdisciplinary research group Profetas (protein foods, environment, technology and society). Profetas consists of technological, environmental and socio-economic research projects on protein food systems which result in the development of scenarios and strategies for guiding a shift towards a more plant protein based diet. The different research projects focus on the goal of identifying viable options for a more sustainable food system. Profetas aro...

  2. Principles of protein-protein interactions.

    Jones, S; Thornton, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    This review examines protein complexes in the Brookhaven Protein Databank to gain a better understanding of the principles governing the interactions involved in protein-protein recognition. The factors that influence the formation of protein-protein complexes are explored in four different types of protein-protein complexes--homodimeric proteins, heterodimeric proteins, enzyme-inhibitor complexes, and antibody-protein complexes. The comparison between the complexes highlights differences tha...

  3. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  4. Studying of Phenomenon of Biological Adaptation to Heavy Water

    Oleg Mosin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological influence of deuterium on cells of various taxonomic groups of prokaryotic and eucaryotic microorganisms realizing methylotrophic, chemoheterotrophic, photo-organotrophic, and photosynthetic ways of assimilation of carbon substrates (methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, chemoheterotrophic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, photo-organotrophic halobacteria Halobacterium halobium, and green micro algae Chlorella vulgaris was investigated at the growth on media with heavy water (2H2O. For investigated microorganisms are submitted the data on growth and adaptation on the growth media containing as sources of deuterated substrates 2H2O, [2H]methanol and hydrolisates of deutero-biomass of methylotrophic bacteria B. methylicum, obtained after multistage adaptation to 2H2O. The qualitative and quantitative composition of intra- and endocellular amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and fatty acids in conditions of adaptation to 2H2O is investigated. It is shown, that the effects observed at adaptation to 2H2O, possess a complex multifactorial character and connected to cytological, morphological and physiological changes – the magnitude of the lag- period, time of cellular generation, output of biomass, a parity ratio of synthesized amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, and also with an evolutionary level of the organization of the investigated object and the pathways of assimilation of carbon substrates as well.

  5. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    Pesko, Kendra; Voigt, Emily A.; Swick, Adam; Morley, Valerie J.; Timm, Collin; Yin, John; Paul E. Turner

    2015-01-01

    Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wild type gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense non-segmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales) have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelo...

  6. Phenotyping for drought adaptation in wheat using physiological traits

    PhilippeMonneveux; RuilianJing; SatishMisra

    2012-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum spp) is one of the first domesticated food crops. It represents the first source of calories (after rice) and an important source of proteins in developing countries. As a result of the Green Revolution, wheat yield sharply increased due to the use of improved varieties, irrigation, pesticides and fertilizers. The rate of increase in world wheat production however slowed after 1980, except in China, India and Pakistan. Being adapted to a wide range of moisture conditions, whea...

  7. Phenotyping for drought adaptation in wheat using physiological traits

    MONNEVEUX, Philippe; Jing, Ruilian; Misra, Satish C.

    2012-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum spp) is one of the first domesticated food crops. It represents the first source of calories (after rice) and an important source of proteins in developing countries. As a result of the Green Revolution, wheat yield sharply increased due to the use of improved varieties, irrigation, pesticides, and fertilizers. The rate of increase in world wheat production, however, slowed after 1980, except in China, India, and Pakistan. Being adapted to a wide range of moisture conditions, ...

  8. Low dose effects. Adaptive response

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate if there are disturbancies in adaptive response when lymphocytes of people living on the polluted with radionuclides area after Chernobyl disaster and liquidators suffered from accident have been investigated. The level of lymphocytes with micronuclei have been scored in Moscow donors and people living in Bryansk region with the degree of contamination 15 - 40 Ci/km. The doses that liquidators have been obtained were not higher then 25 cGy. The mean spontaneous level of MN in control people and people from Chernobyl zones does't differ significantly but the individual variability in the mean value between two populations does not differ significantly too. And in this case it seems that persons of exposed areas. Then another important fact in lymphocytes of people living on polluted areas the chronic low dose irradiation does not induce the adaptive response. In Moscow people in most cases (≅ 59 %) the adaptive response is observed and in some cases the demonstration of adaptive response is not significant (≅1%). In Chernobyl population exposed to chronic low level, low dose rate irradiation there are fewer people here with distinct adaptive response (≅38%). And there appear beings with increased radiosensitivity after conditioned dose. Such population with enhanced radiosensitivity have not observed in Moscow. In liquidators the same types of effects have been registered. These results have been obtained on adults. Adaptive response in children 8 - 14 old population living in Moscow and in Chernobyl zone have been investigated too. In this case the spontaneous level of MN is higher in children living in polluted areas, after the 1.0 Gy irradiation the individual variability is very large. Only 5 % of children have distinct is very large. Only 5 % of children have distinct adaptive response, the enhancement of radiosensitivity after conditioned dose is observed. (authors)

  9. Adaptive Multilevel Monte Carlo Simulation

    Hoel, H

    2011-08-23

    This work generalizes a multilevel forward Euler Monte Carlo method introduced in Michael B. Giles. (Michael Giles. Oper. Res. 56(3):607–617, 2008.) for the approximation of expected values depending on the solution to an Itô stochastic differential equation. The work (Michael Giles. Oper. Res. 56(3):607– 617, 2008.) proposed and analyzed a forward Euler multilevelMonte Carlo method based on a hierarchy of uniform time discretizations and control variates to reduce the computational effort required by a standard, single level, Forward Euler Monte Carlo method. This work introduces an adaptive hierarchy of non uniform time discretizations, generated by an adaptive algorithmintroduced in (AnnaDzougoutov et al. Raùl Tempone. Adaptive Monte Carlo algorithms for stopped diffusion. In Multiscale methods in science and engineering, volume 44 of Lect. Notes Comput. Sci. Eng., pages 59–88. Springer, Berlin, 2005; Kyoung-Sook Moon et al. Stoch. Anal. Appl. 23(3):511–558, 2005; Kyoung-Sook Moon et al. An adaptive algorithm for ordinary, stochastic and partial differential equations. In Recent advances in adaptive computation, volume 383 of Contemp. Math., pages 325–343. Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, 2005.). This form of the adaptive algorithm generates stochastic, path dependent, time steps and is based on a posteriori error expansions first developed in (Anders Szepessy et al. Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 54(10):1169– 1214, 2001). Our numerical results for a stopped diffusion problem, exhibit savings in the computational cost to achieve an accuracy of ϑ(TOL),from(TOL−3), from using a single level version of the adaptive algorithm to ϑ(((TOL−1)log(TOL))2).

  10. Evolution or adaptation? What do heritable adaptive changes imply?

    M. Kemal Irmak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between environmental factors and epigenetic inheritance system produce a great deal of variation from one geographic region to another in human craniofacial morphology, skin color, hair form, stature and body proportions. In this system, while environmental factors produce modifications in the body, they simultaneously induce long-term epigenetic modifications in the germ cells that are inherited to offspring. This kind of heritable changes is called biological adaptation. It was previously reported that biological adaptation is limited to neural crest derivatives such as craniofacial tissues, melanocytes, and structures related to hair form, stature and body proportions. Thus, inheritance of adaptive changes is limited to a number of traits and species-to-species evolution seems unlikely. [J Exp Integr Med 2014; 4(1.000: 13-16

  11. Adaptations to chronic rapamycin in mice

    Sherry G. Dodds

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin inhibits mechanistic (or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR that promotes protein production in cells by facilitating ribosome biogenesis (RiBi and eIF4E-mediated 5'cap mRNA translation. Chronic treatment with encapsulated rapamycin (eRapa extended health and life span for wild-type and cancer-prone mice. Yet, the long-term consequences of chronic eRapa treatment are not known at the organ level. Here, we report our observations of chronic eRapa treatment on mTORC1 signaling and RiBi in mouse colon and visceral adipose. As expected, chronic eRapa treatment decreased detection of phosphorylated mTORC1/S6K substrate, ribosomal protein (rpS6 in colon and fat. However, in colon, contrary to expectations, there was an upregulation of 18S rRNA and some ribosomal protein genes (RPGs suggesting increased RiBi. Among RPGs, eRapa increases rpl22l1 mRNA but not its paralog rpl22. Furthermore, there was an increase in the cap-binding protein, eIF4E relative to its repressor 4E-BP1 suggesting increased translation. By comparison, in fat, there was a decrease in the level of 18S rRNA (opposite to colon, while overall mRNAs encoding ribosomal protein genes appeared to increase, including rpl22, but not rpl22l1 (opposite to colon. In fat, there was a decrease in eIF4E relative to actin (opposite to colon but also an increase in the eIF4E/4E-BP1 ratio likely due to reductions in 4E-BP1 at our lower eRapa dose (similar to colon. Thus, in contrast to predictions of decreased protein production seen in cell-based studies, we provide evidence that colon from chronically treated mice exhibited an adaptive ‘pseudo-anabolic’ state, which is only partially present in fat, which might relate to differing tissue levels of rapamycin, cell-type-specific responses, and/or strain differences.

  12. A case study of evolutionary computation of biochemical adaptation

    Simulations of evolution have a long history, but their relation to biology is questioned because of the perceived contingency of evolution. Here we provide an example of a biological process, adaptation, where simulations are argued to approach closer to biology. Adaptation is a common feature of sensory systems, and a plausible component of other biochemical networks because it rescales upstream signals to facilitate downstream processing. We create random gene networks numerically, by linking genes with interactions that model transcription, phosphorylation and protein–protein association. We define a fitness function for adaptation in terms of two functional metrics, and show that any reasonable combination of them will yield the same adaptive networks after repeated rounds of mutation and selection. Convergence to these networks is driven by positive selection and thus fast. There is always a path in parameter space of continuously improving fitness that leads to perfect adaptation, implying that the actual mutation rates we use in the simulation do not bias the results. Our results imply a kinetic view of evolution, i.e., it favors gene networks that can be learned quickly from the random examples supplied by mutation. This formulation allows for deductive predictions of the networks realized in nature

  13. Aneuploidy as a mechanism of adaptation to telomerase insufficiency.

    Millet, Caroline; Makovets, Svetlana

    2016-08-01

    Cells' survival is determined by their ability to adapt to constantly changing environment. Adaptation responses involve global changes in transcription, translation, and posttranslational modifications of proteins. In recent years, karyotype changes in adapting populations of single cell organisms have been reported in a number of studies. More recently, we have described aneuploidy as an adaptation mechanism used by populations of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive telomerase insufficiency induced by elevated growth temperature. Genetic evidence suggests that telomerase insufficiency is caused by decreased levels of the telomerase catalytic subunit Est2. Here, we present experiments arguing that the underlying cause of this phenomenon may be within the telomerase RNA TLC1: changes in the expression of TLC1 as well as mutations in the TLC1 template region affect telomere length equilibrium and the temperature threshold for the induction of telomerase insufficiency. We discuss what lies at the root of telomerase insufficiency, how cell populations overcome it through aneuploidy and whether reversible aneuploidy could be an adaptation mechanism for a variety of environmental stresses. PMID:26758992

  14. Ecological adaptation of diverse honey bee (Apis mellifera populations.

    Robert Parker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Honey bees are complex eusocial insects that provide a critical contribution to human agricultural food production. Their natural migration has selected for traits that increase fitness within geographical areas, but in parallel their domestication has selected for traits that enhance productivity and survival under local conditions. Elucidating the biochemical mechanisms of these local adaptive processes is a key goal of evolutionary biology. Proteomics provides tools unique among the major 'omics disciplines for identifying the mechanisms employed by an organism in adapting to environmental challenges. RESULTS: Through proteome profiling of adult honey bee midgut from geographically dispersed, domesticated populations combined with multiple parallel statistical treatments, the data presented here suggest some of the major cellular processes involved in adapting to different climates. These findings provide insight into the molecular underpinnings that may confer an advantage to honey bee populations. Significantly, the major energy-producing pathways of the mitochondria, the organelle most closely involved in heat production, were consistently higher in bees that had adapted to colder climates. In opposition, up-regulation of protein metabolism capacity, from biosynthesis to degradation, had been selected for in bees from warmer climates. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our results present a proteomic interpretation of expression polymorphisms between honey bee ecotypes and provide insight into molecular aspects of local adaptation or selection with consequences for honey bee management and breeding. The implications of our findings extend beyond apiculture as they underscore the need to consider the interdependence of animal populations and their agro-ecological context.

  15. On Adaptation of Loss Functions in Decentralized Adaptive Control

    Šmídl, Václav

    Villeneuve d'Ascq: IFAC, 2010, s. 1-6. [12th LSS symposium, Large Scale Systems: Theory and Applications. Villeneuve d'Ascq (FR), 12.07.2010-14.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GP102/08/P250 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : decentralized control * LQG control * fully probabilistic design Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/AS/smidl-on adaptation of loss functions in decentralized adaptive control .pdf

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in plants

    Rodriguez, Maria Cristina Suarez; Petersen, Morten; Mundy, John

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have evolved to transduce environmental and developmental signals into adaptive and programmed responses. MAPK cascades relay and amplify signals via three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases leading to the phosphorylation of...... substrate proteins, whose altered activities mediate a wide array of responses, including changes in gene expression. Cascades may share kinase components, but their signaling specificity is maintained by spaciotemporal constraints and dynamic protein-protein interactions and by mechanisms that include...

  17. Adaptive evolution in ecological communities.

    Martin M Turcotte

    Full Text Available Understanding how natural selection drives evolution is a key challenge in evolutionary biology. Most studies of adaptation focus on how a single environmental factor, such as increased temperature, affects evolution within a single species. The biological relevance of these experiments is limited because nature is infinitely more complex. Most species are embedded within communities containing many species that interact with one another and the physical environment. To understand the evolutionary significance of such ecological complexity, experiments must test the evolutionary impact of interactions among multiple species during adaptation. Here we highlight an experiment that manipulates species composition and tracks evolutionary responses within each species, while testing for the mechanisms by which species interact and adapt to their environment. We also discuss limitations of previous studies of adaptive evolution and emphasize how an experimental evolution approach can circumvent such shortcomings. Understanding how community composition acts as a selective force will improve our ability to predict how species adapt to natural and human-induced environmental change.

  18. Molecular mechanism of radioadaptive response: A cross-adaptive response for enhanced repair of DNA damage in adapted cells

    The radioadaptive response (RAR) has been attributed to the induction of a repair mechanism by low doses of ionizing radiation, but the molecular nature of the mechanism is not yet elucidated. We have characterized RAR in a series of experiments in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells. A 4-h interval is required for the full expression of RAR, which decays with the progression of cell proliferation. Treatments with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, protein- or RNA synthesis, and protein kinase C suppress the RAR expression. The RAR cross-reacts on clastogenic lesions induced by other physical and chemical DNA-damaging agents. The presence of newly synthesised proteins has been detected during the expression period. Experiments performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis provided more direct evidence for a faster and enhaced DNA repair rate in adapted cells. Here, using single-cell gel electrophoresis, a cross-adaptive response has been demonstrated for enhanced repair of DNA damage induced by neocarzinostatin in radio-adapted cells. (author)

  19. Toward Adaptability: Where to from Here?

    Parsons, Seth A.; Vaughn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the collection of articles in this issue are synthesized to discuss conceptualizations of adaptive teaching as a means to foster spaces for adaptive teaching in today's complex educational system. Themes that exist across this collection of articles include adaptive teachers as constructivists, adaptive teachers as knowledgeable…

  20. Predicting the dynamics of protein abundance.

    Mehdi, Ahmed M; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA-protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation efficiency

  1. The Adaptive Immune System of Haloferax volcanii

    Lisa-Katharina Maier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To fight off invading genetic elements, prokaryotes have developed an elaborate defence system that is both adaptable and heritable—the CRISPR-Cas system (CRISPR is short for: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and Cas: CRISPR associated. Comprised of proteins and multiple small RNAs, this prokaryotic defence system is present in 90% of archaeal and 40% of bacterial species, and enables foreign intruders to be eliminated in a sequence-specific manner. There are three major types (I–III and at least 14 subtypes of this system, with only some of the subtypes having been analysed in detail, and many aspects of the defence reaction remaining to be elucidated. Few archaeal examples have so far been analysed. Here we summarize the characteristics of the CRISPR-Cas system of Haloferax volcanii, an extremely halophilic archaeon originally isolated from the Dead Sea. It carries a single CRISPR-Cas system of type I-B, with a Cascade like complex composed of Cas proteins Cas5, Cas6b and Cas7. Cas6b is essential for CRISPR RNA (crRNA maturation but is otherwise not required for the defence reaction. A systematic search revealed that six protospacer adjacent motif (PAM sequences are recognised by the Haloferax defence system. For successful invader recognition, a non-contiguous seed sequence of 10 base-pairs between the crRNA and the invader is required.

  2. Training Adaptive Decision-Making.

    Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James C.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptive Thinking has been defined here as the capacity to recognize when a course of action that may have previously been effective is no longer effective and there is need to adjust strategy. Research was undertaken with human test subjects to identify the factors that contribute to adaptive thinking. It was discovered that those most effective in settings that call for adaptive thinking tend to possess a superior capacity to quickly and effectively generate possible courses of action, as measured using the Category Generation test. Software developed for this research has been applied to develop capabilities enabling analysts to identify crucial factors that are predictive of outcomes in fore-on-force simulation exercises.

  3. Adaptive sampling for noisy problems

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2004-03-26

    The usual approach to deal with noise present in many real-world optimization problems is to take an arbitrary number of samples of the objective function and use the sample average as an estimate of the true objective value. The number of samples is typically chosen arbitrarily and remains constant for the entire optimization process. This paper studies an adaptive sampling technique that varies the number of samples based on the uncertainty of deciding between two individuals. Experiments demonstrate the effect of adaptive sampling on the final solution quality reached by a genetic algorithm and the computational cost required to find the solution. The results suggest that the adaptive technique can effectively eliminate the need to set the sample size a priori, but in many cases it requires high computational costs.

  4. Adaptive Radiation for Lung Cancer

    Daniel R. Gomez

    2011-01-01

    need to spare surrounding critical structures. Evolving radiotherapy technologies, such as four-dimensional (4D image-based motion management, daily on-board imaging and adaptive radiotherapy based on volumetric images over the course of radiotherapy, have enabled us to deliver higher dose to target while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. The image-guided radiotherapy adapted to changes of motion and anatomy has made the radiotherapy more precise and allowed ablative dose delivered to the target using novel treatment approaches such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and proton therapy in lung cancer, techniques used to be considered very sensitive to motion change. Future clinical trials using real time tracking and biological adaptive radiotherapy based on functional images are proposed.

  5. Adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms.

    Kisdi, Éva; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-03-01

    We study the joint adaptive dynamics of n scalar-valued strategies in ecosystems where n is the maximum number of coexisting strategies permitted by the (generalized) competitive exclusion principle. The adaptive dynamics of such saturated systems exhibits special characteristics, which we first demonstrate in a simple example of a host-pathogen-predator model. The main part of the paper characterizes the adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms in general. In order to investigate convergence stability, we give a new sufficient condition for absolute stability of an arbitrary (not necessarily saturated) polymorphic singularity and show that saturated evolutionarily stable polymorphisms satisfy it. For the case [Formula: see text], we also introduce a method to construct different pairwise invasibility plots of the monomorphic population without changing the selection gradients of the saturated dimorphism. PMID:26676357

  6. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  7. Time-adaptive quantile regression

    Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Madsen, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm for time-adaptive quantile regression is presented. The algorithm is based on the simplex algorithm, and the linear optimization formulation of the quantile regression problem is given. The observations have been split to allow a direct use of the simplex algorithm. The simplex method...... and an updating procedure are combined into a new algorithm for time-adaptive quantile regression, which generates new solutions on the basis of the old solution, leading to savings in computation time. The suggested algorithm is tested against a static quantile regression model on a data set with...... wind power production, where the models combine splines and quantile regression. The comparison indicates superior performance for the time-adaptive quantile regression in all the performance parameters considered....

  8. Adaptive filters: stable but divergent

    Rupp, Markus

    2015-12-01

    The pros and cons of a quadratic error measure in the context of various applications have often been discussed. In this tutorial, we argue that it is not only a suboptimal but definitely the wrong choice when describing the stability behavior of adaptive filters. We take a walk through the past and recent history of adaptive filters and present 14 canonical forms of adaptive algorithms and even more variants thereof contrasting their mean-square with their l 2-stability conditions. In particular, in safety critical applications, the convergence in the mean-square sense turns out to provide wrong results, often not leading to stability at all. Only the robustness concept with its l 2-stability conditions ensures the absence of divergence.

  9. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments

  10. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  11. An Adaptive Memory Evolution Algorithm

    Caihong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory mechanism is applied to the optimization algorithm by more study. In order to improve the algorithm of adaptive ability, introducing memory ability in evolutionary algorithm framework, an Adaptive Memory Evolution Algorithm (AMEA is proposed. The algorithm set matrix to record the exploring experiences and exploring results of the individual parent. The algorithm uses these records to guide the generation of offspring. And thus AMEA can adaptively select the dimension to mutate and exploring radius. In addition, to improve the algorithm accuracy, the algorithm raises the best opportunities by using super-variation operator. In the simulation test, compared with similar algorithms, the results show that AMEA has fast convergence speed and optimum performance of global convergence.

  12. Dietas com nitrogênio não-proteico para fêmeas bovinas superovuladas sem prévia adaptação durante curto tempo e em diferentes fases do ciclo estral Effect of short term non-protein nitrogen feeding for superovulated beef cows without previous adaptation and at different periods of the oestrus cycle

    Flávio Rocha Alves

    2010-09-01

    effects of short term non-protein nitrogen feeding at different periods of the oestrus cycle in superovulated cows, without previous adaptation, on yield, quality and development degree of recovered embryos. A total of sixty-eight Nelore cows were distributed in three groups: the control group (C and two groups with urea supply before (UB; urea supply from day -5 to day 0 and after (UA; supply from day 0 to day 5 artificial insemination. Animals were kept grazing and received 3.0 kg/animal/day of concentrate during 16 days. Two concentrates were formulated and the total diets (concentrate and estimate forage intake showed 12.0% (control diet and 14.6% (non-protein diet of crude protein. Animals were synchronized, superovulated and inseminated. The embryos were collected and analysed seven days (day 7 after insemination (day 0. Blood samples were collected on days -5, 0 and 5 to determine concentration of plasmatic urea nitrogen, glucose, insulin and progesterone. The time of urea supply affected average plasmatic urea nitrogen concentration on days -5, 0 5 but it did not affect concetrations of glucose, insulin and progesterone. The moment of urea inclusion had effect on compact morula percentage in relation to the total number of structures (UB = 51.4 vs. UA = 15.3%, to the total number of fertilized oocytes (UB = 62.5 vs. UA = 30.6% and to the total number of viable embryos (UB = 68.8 vs. UA = 38.6%. In the after insemination group of urea supply there was 70.2% of reduction on compact morula proportion over the total structures in relation to the group that received urea before insemination. Non-protein nitrogen feeding immediately after insemination promotes faster rates of embryo development.

  13. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware...

  14. Model reference adaptive control and adaptive stability augmentation

    Henningsen, Arne; Ravn, Ole

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of the standard concepts in MRAC design suggests that a combination of the implicit and the explicit design techniques may lead to an improvement of the overall system performance in the presence of unmodelled dynamics. Using the ideas of adaptive stability augmentation a combined...

  15. Model reference adaptive control and adaptive stability augmentation

    Henningsen, Arne; Ravn, Ole

    A comparison of the standard concepts in MRAC design suggests that a combination of the implicit and the explicit design techniques may lead to an improvement of the overall system performance in the presence of unmodelled dynamics. Using the ideas of adaptive stability augmentation a combined...

  16. ADAPTER: Analysing & Developing Adaptability & Performance in Teams to Enhance Resilience

    Beek, F.A. van der; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, the concept of team resilience was operationalized by developing a first version of a questionnaire (ADAPTER) driven by the four essential abilities of resilience (Hollnagel, 2011) and expanded with more relation-oriented abilities of leadership and cooperation. The development

  17. Adapting Books: Ready, Set, Read!: EAT: Equipment, Adaptations, and Technology

    Schoonover, Judith; Norton-Darr, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Developing multimodal materials to introduce or extend literacy experiences sets the stage for literacy success. Alternative ways to organize, display and arrange, interact and respond to information produces greater understanding of concepts. Adaptations include making books easier to use (turning pages or holding), and text easier to read…

  18. Redox meets protein trafficking.

    Bölter, Bettina; Soll, Jürgen; Schwenkert, Serena

    2015-09-01

    After the engulfment of two prokaryotic organisms, the thus emerged eukaryotic cell needed to establish means of communication and signaling to properly integrate the acquired organelles into its metabolism. Regulatory mechanisms had to evolve to ensure that chloroplasts and mitochondria smoothly function in accordance with all other cellular processes. One essential process is the post-translational import of nuclear encoded organellar proteins, which needs to be adapted according to the requirements of the plant. The demand for protein import is constantly changing depending on varying environmental conditions, as well as external and internal stimuli or different developmental stages. Apart from long-term regulatory mechanisms such as transcriptional/translation control, possibilities for short-term acclimation are mandatory. To this end, protein import is integrated into the cellular redox network, utilizing the recognition of signals from within the organelles and modifying the efficiency of the translocon complexes. Thereby, cellular requirements can be communicated throughout the whole organism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25626173

  19. Adaptation and diversification on islands.

    Losos, Jonathan B; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2009-02-12

    Charles Darwin's travels on HMS Beagle taught him that islands are an important source of evidence for evolution. Because many islands are young and have relatively few species, evolutionary adaptation and species proliferation are obvious and easy to study. In addition, the geographical isolation of many islands has allowed evolution to take its own course, free of influence from other areas, resulting in unusual faunas and floras, often unlike those found anywhere else. For these reasons, island research provides valuable insights into speciation and adaptive radiation, and into the relative importance of contingency and determinism in evolutionary diversification. PMID:19212401

  20. Adapting agriculture with traditional knowledge

    Swiderska, Krystyna; Reid, Hannah [IIED, London (United Kingdom); Song, Yiching; Li, Jingsong [Centre for Chinese Agriculutral Policy (China); Mutta, Doris [Kenya Forestry Research Institute (Kenya)

    2011-10-15

    Over the coming decades, climate change is likely to pose a major challenge to agriculture; temperatures are rising, rainfall is becoming more variable and extreme weather is becoming a more common event. Researchers and policymakers agree that adapting agriculture to these impacts is a priority for ensuring future food security. Strategies to achieve that in practice tend to focus on modern science. But evidence, both old and new, suggests that the traditional knowledge and crop varieties of indigenous peoples and local communities could prove even more important in adapting agriculture to climate change.