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Sample records for adam hiv-1 non-nucleoside

  1. Systematic evaluation of methyl ester bioisosteres in the context of developing alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) for anti-HIV-1 chemotherapy.

    Hoshi, Ayako; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Takayama, Jun; Xuan, Meiyan; Okazaki, Mari; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Pannecouque, Christophe; Cushman, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) are a class of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) targeting HIV-1. Four chemically and metabolically stabilized ADAMs incorporating N-methoxyimidoyl halide replacements of the methyl esters of the lead compound were previously reported. In this study, twenty-five new ADAMs were synthesized in order to investigate the biological consequences of installing nine different methyl ester bioisosteres at three different locations. Attempts to define a universal rank order of methyl ester bioisosteres and discover the 'best' one in terms of inhibitory activity versus HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) led to the realization that the potencies are critically dependent on the surrounding structure at each location, and therefore the definition of universal rank order is impossible. This investigation produced several new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in which all three of the three methyl esters of the lead compound were replaced by methyl ester bioisosteres, resulting in compounds that are more potent as HIV-1 RT inhibitors and antiviral agents than the lead compound itself and are expected to also be more metabolically stable than the lead compound. PMID:27234889

  2. Focus on Chirality of HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Valeria Famiglini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chiral HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are of great interest since one enantiomer is often more potent than the corresponding counterpart against the HIV-1 wild type (WT and the HIV-1 drug resistant mutant strains. This review exemplifies the various studies made to investigate the effect of chirality on the antiretroviral activity of top HIV-1 NNRTI compounds, such as nevirapine (NVP, efavirenz (EFV, alkynyl- and alkenylquinazolinone DuPont compounds (DPC, diarylpyrimidine (DAPY, dihydroalkyloxybenzyloxopyrimidine (DABO, phenethylthiazolylthiourea (PETT, indolylarylsulfone (IAS, arylphosphoindole (API and trifluoromethylated indole (TFMI The chiral separation, the enantiosynthesis, along with the biological properties of these HIV-1 NNRTIs, are discussed.

  3. Substituted indoles as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a patent evaluation (WO2015044928).

    Li, Xiao; Gao, Ping; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-05-01

    The invention described in this patent (WO2015044928) is related to compounds based on the substituted indole scaffold, their synthetic process and application to inhibit HIV-1 replication as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Some of the newly claimed compounds presented improved potency against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 strain in comparison to previously disclosed indole-based NNRTIs and were also shown to be effective against common resistant HIV-1 strains. In light of their novel structural characteristics, simple synthetic route and improved anti-HIV activity, these compounds deserve further study as promising NNRTIs. PMID:26742549

  4. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs

  5. Biophysical Insights into the Inhibitory Mechanism of Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT plays a central role in HIV infection. Current United States Federal Drug Administration (USFDA-approved antiretroviral therapies can include one of five approved non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs, which are potent inhibitors of RT activity. Despite their crucial clinical role in treating and preventing HIV-1 infection, their mechanism of action remains elusive. In this review, we introduce RT and highlight major advances from experimental and computational biophysical experiments toward an understanding of RT function and the inhibitory mechanism(s of NNRTIs.

  6. Discovery, characterization, and lead optimization of 7-azaindole non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Stanton, Richard A; Lu, Xiao; Detorio, Mervi; Montero, Catherine; Hammond, Emily T; Ehteshami, Maryam; Domaoal, Robert A; Nettles, James H; Feraud, Michel; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2016-08-15

    A library of 585 compounds built off a 7-azaindole core was evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity, and ten hits emerged with submicromolar potency and therapeutic index >100. Of these, three were identified as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors and were assayed against relevant resistant mutants. Lead compound 8 inhibited RT with submicromolar potency (IC50=0.73μM) and also maintained some activity against the clinically important RT mutants K103N and Y181C (IC50=9.2, 3.5μM) in cell-free assays. Free energy perturbation guided lead optimization resulted in the development of a compound with a two-fold increase in potency against RT (IC50=0.36μM). These data highlight the discovery of a unique scaffold with the potential to move forward as next-generation anti-HIV-1 agents. PMID:27390064

  7. Synthesis and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity of Non-Nucleoside Phthalimide Derivatives

    UNGWITAYATORN Jiraporn; WIWAT Chanpen; MATAYATSUK Chutima; PIMTHON Jutarat; PIYAVIRIYAKUL Suratsawadee

    2008-01-01

    A new type of non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors in phthalimide series has been synthesized from either the reaction of N-carboethoxyphthalimide with amines or phthalimide with appropriate alkyl halides.The in vitro inhibitory activity of the synthesized compounds was studied by a radiometric assay at a concentration of 200 μg/mL using poly(rA)-oligo(dT) as a template-primer and methyl-[3H]dTTP as a substrate.The three most potent compounds, N-(m,p-dihydroxybenzyl)phthalimide (11), N-[2-(a-furyl)ethyl]phthalimide (29) and N-(5-methylpyrazin-2-ylmethyl)phthalimide (25) exhibited IC50 values of 60.90, 98.10 and 120.75 μg/mL, respecas a substrate).

  8. Global Conformational Dynamics of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Bound to Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors

    Peter V. Coveney

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT is a multifunctional enzyme responsible for the transcription of the RNA genome of the HIV virus into DNA suitable for incorporation within the DNA of human host cells. Its crucial role in the viral life cycle has made it one of the major targets for antiretroviral drug therapy. The Non-Nucleoside RT Inhibitor (NNRTI class of drugs binds allosterically to the enzyme, affecting many aspects of its activity. We use both coarse grained network models and atomistic molecular dynamics to explore the changes in protein dynamics induced by NNRTI binding. We identify changes in the flexibility and conformation of residue Glu396 in the RNaseH primer grip which could provide an explanation for the acceleration in RNaseH cleavage rate observed experimentally in NNRTI bound HIV-1 RT. We further suggest a plausible path for conformational and dynamic changes to be communicated from the vicinity of the NNRTI binding pocket to the RNaseH at the other end of the enzyme.

  9. Searching for novel scaffold of triazole non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Frączek, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Kamiński, Rafał; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Azoles are a promising class of the new generation of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). From thousands of reported compounds, many possess the same basic structure of an aryl substituted azole ring linked by a thioglycolamide chain with another aromatic ring. In order to find novel extensions for this basic scaffold, we explored the 5-position substitution pattern of triazole NNRTIs using molecular docking followed by the synthesis of selected compounds. We found that heterocyclic substituents in the 5-position of the triazole ring are detrimental to the inhibitory activity of compounds with four-membered thioglycolamide linker and this substitution seems to be viable only for compounds with shorter two-membered linker. Promising compound, N-(4-carboxy-2-chlorophenyl)-2-((4-benzyl-5-methyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)sulfanyl)acetamide, with potent inhibitory activity and acceptable aqueous solubility has been identified in this study that could serve as lead scaffold for the development of novel water-soluble salts of triazole NNRTIs. PMID:25942362

  10. Screening of new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 based on traditional Chinese medicines database

    Tao Liu; Ai Xiu Li; You Pan Miao; Ke Zhu Wu; Yi Ma

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 RT is an important target for the treatment of AIDS. There are two major classes of antiviral agents that inhibit HIV-1 RT have been identified, nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). In this report, a noval class of non-nucleoside compound with potential RT inhibitory activity were found from the traditional Chinese medicines database (TCMD) using a combination of virtual screening, docking, molecular dynamic simulations, where results were ranked by scoring function of the docking tool. The result indicates that M4753 (a compound derived from TCMD) has not only the lowest bonding energy but also the best match in geometric conformation with the forthcoming NNRTIs. Accordingly M4753 might possibly become a promising lead compound of NNRTIs for AIDS therapy.

  11. Discovery of diarylpyridine derivatives as novel non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Tian, Xingtao; Qin, Bingjie; LU, Hong; Lai, Weihong; Jiang, Shibo; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Ho Chen, Chin; Xie, Lan

    2009-01-01

    Two series (4 and 5) of diarylpyridine derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity. The most promising compound, 5e, inhibited HIV-1 IIIB, NL4-3, and RTMDR1 with low nanomolar EC50 values and selectivity indexes of >10,000. The results of this study indicate that diarylpyridine can be used as a novel scaffold to derive a new class of potent NNRTIs, active against both wild-type and drug resistant HIV-1 strains.

  12. Synthesis of Novel Uracil Non-Nucleoside Derivatives as Potential Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors of HIV-1

    El-Brollosy, Nasser R.; Al-Deeb, Omar. A.; El-Emam, Ali A.;

    2009-01-01

    with cyclopropylmethyloxymethyl 9a-d, 2-phenylethyloxymethyl 9e-h, and 3-phenylprop-1-yloxymethyl 9i-l were prepared on treatment of the corresponding uracils with the appropriate acetals 8a-c. Some of the tested compounds showed good activity against HIV-1 wild type. Among them, 1-cyclopropylmethyloxymethyl-5-ethyl-6...

  13. Discovery of potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors from arylthioacetanilide structural motif.

    Li, Wenxin; Li, Xiao; De Clercq, Erik; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-09-18

    The poor pharmacokinetics, side effects and particularly the rapid emergence of drug resistance compromise the efficiency of the clinically used anti-HIV drugs. Therefore, the discovery of novel and effective NNRTIs is still an extremely primary mission. Arylthioacetanilide family is one of the highly active HIV-1 NNRTIs against wide-type (WT) HIV-1 and a wide range of drug-resistant mutant strains. Especially, VRX-480773 and RDEA806 have been chosen as candidates for further clinical studies. In this article, we review the discovery and development of the arylthioacetanilides, and, especially, pay much attention to the structural modifications, SARs conclusions and molecular modeling. Moreover, several medicinal chemistry strategies to overcome drug resistance involved in the optimization process of arylthioacetanilides are highlighted, providing valuable clues for further investigations. PMID:26276432

  14. Inhibitory activity of 9-phenylcyclohepta[d]pyrimidinedione derivatives against different strains of HIV-1 as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Shao Yiming

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI, as a major component of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART to HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients, required the development of new NNRTIs with improved resistance profile and decreased toxicity. Therefore, a series of novel compounds, 9-phenylcyclohepta[d]pyrimidinedione derivatives (PCPs, were designed based on the chemical structure of TNK-651, to detect anti-HIV-1 activity. Results 1-[(benzyloxymethyl]-9-phenyl-cyclohepta[d] pyrimidinedione (BmPCP among four PCPs has antiviral activity on laboratory-adapted HIV strains (HIV-1 SF33. The results showed 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50s of BmPCP were 0.34 μM, 1.72 μM and 1.96 μM on TZM-bl, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and MT4, respectively. It was also effective against infection by the predominant HIV-1 isolates in China, with IC50s at low μM levels. Its selectivity index (SI ranged from 67 to 266 in different cells. The results of time-of-addition assay demonstrated that BmPCP inhibited HIV-1 infection by targeting the post entry of the HIV-1 replication cycle. For inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity, the IC50 values of BmPCP and NVP were 1.51 and 3.67 μM, respectively. Conclusions BmPCP with a novel structure acts as a NNRTI to inhibit HIV-1 replication and can serve as a lead compound for further development of new anti-HIV-1 drugs.

  15. QSAR Studies on 6-(1-Naphthylmethyl) Substituted S-DABO Derivatives as Novel Non-nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    YIN Li-Qin; YU Shi-Wen; YAO Ling-Feng; HE Yan-Ping; XIE Xiao-Guang

    2008-01-01

    The AM1 and B3LYP methods were employed to calculate the structural pro- perties of 20 6-(1-naphthylmethyl) substituted S-DABO derivatives with β-carbonyl group on the C(2) side chain as novel potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The correlation analysis (CA) and stepwise multiple regression analysis (SMR) were performed. The QSAR models indicate that the physicochemical parameters of QC9, MRR1, ELUMO, ∏R2 and μ have significant influence on the activities of these derivatives. The substitution of hydrophobic R2 and bulky aromatic R1 to form a conjugated system with the frame of those S-DABO series compounds should be considered to design new potent compounds for anti-HIV-1.

  16. Liver injury in HIV-1-infected patients receiving non-nucleosides reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based antiretroviral therapy

    LI Zai-cun; LI Hong-jun; DAI Li-li; GAO Yan-qing; CAI Wei-ping; LI Hai-ying; HUANG Xiao-jie; ZHANG Tong; WU Hao

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver injury is one of the most important adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy, leading to therapy changing or discontinuation. Data on liver injury in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy are limited in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the features of liver injury in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving non-nucleosides reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based antiretroviral therapy in China.Methods Seventy-five patients on antiretroviral therapy containing non-nucleosides reverse transcriptase inhibitors were retrospectively studied. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (with liver injury, n=45) and group 2(without liver injury, n=30). The features of liver injury were analyzed. The sex, age, baseline CD4 counts, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection, hepatotoxic drug use and nevirapine or efavirenz use were compared between two groups.Results Forty-five patients (60.0%), 31 (68.9%) males and 14 (31.1%) females, aged 12 to 52 years (averaged (3g±9)years), experienced at least one episode of liver injury. Forty (53.3%) patients were co-infected with HBV and/or HCV, 42 (56%) patients had concomitant use of antituberculosis drugs or cotrimoxazole, 46 (61.3%) and 29 (38.7%) patients received regimen containing nevirapine and efavirenz, respectively. Grade 1 liver injuries were observed in 26 (57.8%)patients, grade 2 in 16 (35.6%), grade 3 in 2 (4.0%) and grade 4 in 1 (2.2%). Three (6.7%) patients discontinued highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) due to liver injury. In group 1, there were 29 (64.4%) patients co-infected with HBV and/or HCV, 32 (71.1%) patients received regimen containing nevirapine, and 30 (66.7%) patients had concomitant use of anti-tuberculosis drugs or cotrimoxazole, respectively, significantly higher than those in group 2 (11 (36.7%), 14 (46.7%)and 12 (40%), respectively; P=0.018, 0.033, 0

  17. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of Some Novel MC-1220 Analogs as Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta;

    2016-01-01

    Some novel MC-1220 analogs were synthesized by condensation of 4,6-dichloro-N-methylpyrimidin-2-amine derivatives (1a,b and 15) and/or 4-chloro-6-methoxy-N,N,5-trimethylpyrimidin-2-amine (2a) with the sodium salt of 2,6-difluorophenylacetonitrile followed by treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide...... in methanol, alkylation, reduction, halogenation, and/or acidic hydrolysis. All synthesized compounds were evaluated for their activity against HIV-1. The most active compound in this study was compound 7, which showed activity against HIV-1 comparable to that of MC-1220. The only difference in structure...

  18. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  19. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of Some Novel MC-1220 Analogs as Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta; La Colla, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Some novel MC-1220 analogs were synthesized by condensation of 4,6-dichloro-N-methylpyrimidin-2-amine derivatives (1a,b and 15) and/or 4-chloro-6-methoxy-N,N,5-trimethylpyrimidin-2-amine (2a) with the sodium salt of 2,6-difluorophenylacetonitrile followed by treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide in methanol, alkylation, reduction, halogenation, and/or acidic hydrolysis. All synthesized compounds were evaluated for their activity against HIV-1. The most active compound in this study was compound 7, which showed activity against HIV-1 comparable to that of MC-1220. The only difference in structure between compound 7 and MC-1220 is a fluoro atom instead of a CH3 group. PMID:26996241

  20. C-2-Aryl O-substituted HI-236 derivatives as non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase inhibitors

    Hunter, Roger; Younis, Yassir; Muhanji, Clare I; Curtin, Tanith-lea; Naidoo, Kevin J.; Petersen, Melissa; Bailey, Christopher M.; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Anderson, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    Several novel thiourea derivatives of the NNRTI HI-236 substituted at the C-2 oxygen of the phenyl ring have been synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against HIV-1 (IIIB) replication in MT-2 cell cultures. The compounds were synthesized in order to fine-tune the activity of HI-236 as well as to gain insight into spatial characteristics in the pocket pertaining to the positional choice of tether in the design of [NRTI]-tether-[HI-236] bifunctional inhibitors. Two of the thi...

  1. Identification of a novel sulfonamide non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor by a phenotypic HIV-1 full replication assay.

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Ko, Yoonae; Christophe, Thierry; Cechetto, Jonathan; Kim, Junwon; Kim, Kyoung-Ae; Boese, Annette S; Garcia, Jean-Michel; Fenistein, Denis; Ju, Moon Kyeong; Kim, Junghwan; Han, Sung-Jun; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Brondani, Vincent; Sommer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Classical target-based, high-throughput screening has been useful for the identification of inhibitors for known molecular mechanisms involved in the HIV life cycle. In this study, the development of a cell-based assay that uses a phenotypic drug discovery approach based on automated high-content screening is described. Using this screening approach, the antiviral activity of 26,500 small molecules from a relevant chemical scaffold library was evaluated. Among the selected hits, one sulfonamide compound showed strong anti-HIV activity against wild-type and clinically relevant multidrug resistant HIV strains. The biochemical inhibition, point resistance mutations and the activity of structural analogs allowed us to understand the mode of action and propose a binding model for this compound with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. PMID:23874756

  2. Identification of a novel sulfonamide non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor by a phenotypic HIV-1 full replication assay.

    Tae-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available Classical target-based, high-throughput screening has been useful for the identification of inhibitors for known molecular mechanisms involved in the HIV life cycle. In this study, the development of a cell-based assay that uses a phenotypic drug discovery approach based on automated high-content screening is described. Using this screening approach, the antiviral activity of 26,500 small molecules from a relevant chemical scaffold library was evaluated. Among the selected hits, one sulfonamide compound showed strong anti-HIV activity against wild-type and clinically relevant multidrug resistant HIV strains. The biochemical inhibition, point resistance mutations and the activity of structural analogs allowed us to understand the mode of action and propose a binding model for this compound with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  3. Effects of the protonation state in the interaction of an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) amino acid, Lys101, and a non nucleoside RT inhibitor, GW420867X.

    Galembeck, Sérgio E; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between an inhibitor and amino acids from a binding pocket could help not only to understand the nature of these interactions, but also to support the design of new inhibitors. In this paper, we explore the key interaction between a second generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), GW420867X, and HIV-1 RT amino acid Lys101 (K101), by quantum mechanical methods. The neutral, protonated, and zwitterionic complexes of GW420867X-K101 were studied. The interaction energies were determined by SCS-MP2/def2-cc-pVQZ, and the electron density was analyzed by natural bond orbital (NBO), atoms in molecules (AIM) and reduced gradient analysis. A large increase in the interaction was observed with the tautomerization of neutral or neutral protonated species. The monomers interact by two medium-strength hydrogen bonds, one partially covalent and another noncovalent. There are some van der Waals intramolecular interactions that are topologically unstable. The nature of the intermolecular interactions was also analyzed using quantitative molecular orbital (MO) theory in combination with an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) at BLYP-D/TZ2P. PMID:24965933

  4. Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on the ADAM10 intracellular domain

    Previously, we showed that ADAM10 is necessary for HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages and immortalized cell lines. Silencing ADAM10 expression interrupted the HIV-1 life cycle prior to nuclear translocation of viral cDNA. Furthermore, our data indicated that HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase, which proteolytically processes ADAM10. Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits HIV-1 replication between reverse transcription and nuclear entry. Here, we show that ADAM10 expression also supports replication in CD4+ T lymphocytes. The intracellular domain (ICD) of ADAM10 associates with the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) in the cytoplasm and immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with HIV-1 integrase, a key component of PIC. Taken together, our data support a model whereby ADAM15/γ-secretase processing of ADAM10 releases the ICD, which then incorporates into HIV-1 PIC to facilitate nuclear trafficking. Thus, these studies suggest ADAM10 as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting HIV-1 prior to nuclear entry. - Highlights: • Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on ADAM10. • ADAM10 associates with HIV-1 integrase in the pre-integration complex. • HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase. • Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits nuclear import of viral cDNA. • ADAM10 is important for HIV-1 replication in human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes

  5. Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on the ADAM10 intracellular domain

    Endsley, Mark A., E-mail: maendsle@utmb.edu [Department Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Somasunderam, Anoma D., E-mail: asomasun@utmb.edu [Department Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Li, Guangyu, E-mail: LIG001@mail.etsu.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Oezguen, Numan, E-mail: numan.oezguen@bcm.edu [Department of Pathology and Immunology, Microbiome Center, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa, E-mail: Varatharasa.Thiviyanathan@uth.tmc.edu [Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Murray, James L., E-mail: jmurray100@yahoo.com [GeneTAG Technology, Inc., 3155 Northwoods Place, Norcross, GA 30071 (United States); Rubin, Donald H., E-mail: don.h.rubin@vanderbilt.edu [Research Medicine, VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, 1310 24th Ave. South, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States); Departments of Medicine, Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Ave South, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Hodge, Thomas W., E-mail: twhodge3@gmail.com [Pre-clinical and Antiviral Research, Tamir Biotechnology, Inc., 12625 High Bluff Dr., Suite 113, San Diego, CA 92130 (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Previously, we showed that ADAM10 is necessary for HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages and immortalized cell lines. Silencing ADAM10 expression interrupted the HIV-1 life cycle prior to nuclear translocation of viral cDNA. Furthermore, our data indicated that HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase, which proteolytically processes ADAM10. Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits HIV-1 replication between reverse transcription and nuclear entry. Here, we show that ADAM10 expression also supports replication in CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes. The intracellular domain (ICD) of ADAM10 associates with the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) in the cytoplasm and immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with HIV-1 integrase, a key component of PIC. Taken together, our data support a model whereby ADAM15/γ-secretase processing of ADAM10 releases the ICD, which then incorporates into HIV-1 PIC to facilitate nuclear trafficking. Thus, these studies suggest ADAM10 as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting HIV-1 prior to nuclear entry. - Highlights: • Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on ADAM10. • ADAM10 associates with HIV-1 integrase in the pre-integration complex. • HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase. • Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits nuclear import of viral cDNA. • ADAM10 is important for HIV-1 replication in human macrophages and CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes.

  6. HIV-1逆转录酶抑制剂的合成及活性评价%Synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity evaluation of N-1-alkyl-5-halogeno-6-alkylamino uracils as novel non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    闫寒; 王孝伟; 郭盈; 张志丽; 刘俊义

    2011-01-01

    N-1-alkyl-5-halogeno-6-alkylamino uracils, which are novel 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT)analogues, were synthesized as the selective and potent non-nucleoside human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Some of the compounds showed potent inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. For instance, compounds ld, lm and In exhibited potent anti-HIV-1 activity with the ICso values of 13.3, 11.7 and 3.15 gM, respectively,which are comparable to that of nevirapinc(IC5O 8.38 μM).%本研究以HIV-1逆转录酶为靶点,设计了一类具有HEPT类结构的化合物:1-乙氧基甲基/苄氧基甲基-5-卤代-6-脂肪胺尿嘧啶作为抑制剂,并对合成的目标化合物进行了生物活性测定,一些化合物显示出较强的抗HIV生物活性,与对照物奈韦拉平相比(IC50 8.30μM)化合物1d,1m和1n的IC50 值分别达到了13.3,11.7和3.15 μM.

  7. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 2-Thioxopyrimidin-4(1H-one Derivatives as Potential Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Nagy M. Khalifa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 5-allyl-6-benzylpyrimidin-4(3H-ones bearing different substituents at the C-2 position of the pyrimidine core have been synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro activities against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in the human T-lymphotropic type (MT-4 cell cultures. The majority of the title compounds showed moderate to good activities against HIV-1. Amongst them, 5-allyl-6-benzyl-2-(3-hydroxypropylthiopyrimidin-4(3H-one analogue 11c exhibited the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (IC50 0.32 µM. The biological testing results clearly indicated that the substitution at C-2 position of the pyrimidine ring could increase the anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT activity.

  8. Design, discovery, modelling, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel and small, low toxicity s-triazine derivatives as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Viira, Birgit; Selyutina, Anastasia; García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Karonen, Maarit; Sinkkonen, Jari; Merits, Andres; Maran, Uko

    2016-06-01

    A set of top-ranked compounds from a multi-objective in silico screen was experimentally tested for toxicity and the ability to inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in cell-free assay and in cell-based assay using HIV-1 based virus-like particles. Detailed analysis of a commercial sample that indicated specific inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription revealed that a minor component that was structurally similar to that of the main compound was responsible for the strongest inhibition. As a result, novel s-triazine derivatives were proposed, modelled, discovered, and synthesised, and their antiviral activity and cellular toxicity were tested. Compounds 18a and 18b were found to be efficient HIV-1 RT inhibitors, with an IC50 of 5.6±1.1μM and 0.16±0.05μM in a cell-based assay using infectious HIV-1, respectively. Compound 18b also had no detectable toxicity for different human cell lines. Their binding mode and interactions with the RT suggest that there was strong and adaptable binding in a tight (NNRTI) hydrophobic pocket. In summary, this iterative study produced structural clues and led to a group of non-toxic, novel compounds to inhibit HIV-RT with up to nanomolar potency. PMID:27108399

  9. Synthesis of Novel Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-1-(3-Phthalimido-2-oxobutyl)-4-Substituted-phenylpiperazines

    2000-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a series of new phthalimidopiperazines, biological activity test show that the target compounds(Ic, Ie, Ii) can inhibit HIV-1 RT with IC50 20.0, 43.8, and 63.7δ M, respectively.

  10. Novel (2,6-difluorophenyl)(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanones with restricted conformation as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1.

    Šimon, Petr; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Šaman, David; Stepan, George; Hu, Eric; Lansdon, Eric B; Jansa, Petr; Janeba, Zlatko

    2016-10-21

    To elucidate the structure-geometry-activity relationship in diarylpyrimidine family (DAPYs) containing carbonyl linker between the central pyrimidine core and phenyl type B-arm, a series of (2,6-difluorophenyl)(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanones was designed, prepared and tested for their anti-HIV-1 activity. The carbonyl linker bearing B phenyl arm was successfully attached at both C-2 and C-4 positions of the central pyrimidine ring using a new synthetic approach. Further modifications of target compounds are present at C-5 position of the pyrimidine ring. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity study performed on a series of 22 compounds confirmed the crucial importance of both conformational rigidity between phenyl B arm and the pyrimidine core linked through the carbonyl bridge, as well as presence of fluoro substituents in ortho-positions of phenyl B moiety. The most potent derivative of the series, compound 17, having almost perpendicular angle within the two planes made from the B aromatic arm and the pyrimidine ring, exhibited low nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 4 nM) with no significant toxicity (CC50 > 57.1 μM). PMID:27371922

  11. Novel HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Agents: Optimization of Diarylanilines with High Potency against Wild-Type and Rilpivirine-Resistant E138K Mutant Virus.

    Liu, Na; Wei, Lei; Huang, Li; Yu, Fei; Zheng, Weifan; Qin, Bingjie; Zhu, Dong-Qin; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Jiang, Shibo; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2016-04-28

    Three series (6, 13, and 14) of new diarylaniline (DAAN) analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for anti-HIV potency, especially against the E138K viral strain with a major mutation conferring resistance to the new-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug rilpivirine (1b). Promising new compounds were then assessed for physicochemical and associated pharmaceutical properties, including aqueous solubility, log P value, and metabolic stability, as well as predicted lipophilic parameters of ligand efficiency, ligand lipophilic efficiency, and ligand efficiency-dependent lipophilicity indices, which are associated with ADME property profiles. Compounds 6a, 14c, and 14d showed high potency against the 1b-resistant E138K mutated viral strain as well as good balance between anti-HIV-1 activity and desirable druglike properties. From the perspective of optimizing future NNRTI compounds as clinical trial candidates, computational modeling results provided valuable information about how the R(1) group might provide greater efficacy against the E138K mutant. PMID:27070547

  12. Estudio Teórico Preliminar de Fármacos Anti-VIH, Inhibidores No Nucleosídicos de la Transcriptasa Reversa Preliminary Theoretical Study on HIV-1, Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Martín A Dragonetti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Una serie de compuestos derivados de quinoxalina, benzoxazina y benzodiazepina fue utilizada para realizar un estudio teórico preliminar que permita plantear un potencial grupo farmacóforo que conduzca a la síntesis de posibles inhibidores no-nucleosídicos de la transcriptasa reversa del virus del SIDA. El estudio teórico se llevó a cabo utilizando modelado molecular asistido por computadora. Se analizaron las conformaciones obtenidas para los compuestos en estudio (densidad atómica de carga y del arreglo espacial de los grupos atómicos. Los resultados se compararon con la información aportada por los complejos cristalográficos (fármaco-transcriptasa reversa extraídos de una base de datos de proteínas. Este estudio permitió establecer los requerimientos esenciales para que un compuesto se comporte como inhibidor de la transcriptasa reversa del VIH-1 y encontrar el potencial farmacóforo común a este tipo de fármacos.A series of quinoxaline, benzooxazine and benzodiazepine derivatives was selected to perform a preliminary theoretical study tending to find a potential pharmacophoric group that could lead to the synthesis of non nucleoside inhibitors of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. The theoretical study was performed using computer-assisted molecular modeling. The achieved final conformations of the selected compounds were compared and analyzed in terms of the atomic charge density and the atomic groups arrangements. The results were compared with information extracted from the crystallographic complexes (drug-reverse transcriptase reported in a protein data bank. This analysis enables to establish the essential requirements for a compound inhibition behavior of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and to find a potential pharmacophore common to this type of compounds.

  13. Establishment of pharmacological evaluation system for non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors resistant HIV-1%非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂耐药型HIV-1药理评价体系的建立

    曹颖莉; 李少雄; 陈虹; 郭颖

    2009-01-01

    建立9种临床常见的对非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂(non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors,NNRTIs)耐药型HIV-1重组病毒药理评价模型.应用重叠PCR定点突变技术将耐药突变位点引入HIV-1核心基因(pNL4-3.Luc.R-E-),以水泡性口膜炎病毒的外壳糖蛋白(vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein,VSV-G)包装含耐药突变位点的HIV-1核心,形成耐药型HIV-1重组假病毒颗粒,简称VSVG/HIV-mut(包括VSVG/HIV-wt、VSVG/HIV-K103N、VSVG/HIV-Y181C、VSVG/HIV-L100I,K103N、VSVG/HIV.Y188L、VSVG/HIV-K103N,181C、VSVG/HIV-K103N,P225H、VSVG/HIV-K103N,Y188L、VSVG/HIV-K103N,G109A和VSVG/HIV-K103N,V1081).经验证9种NNRTIs耐药型HIV-1重组病毒颗粒均具有高感染能力,对核苷类阳性药物不耐药,而对非核苷类阳性药物呈现不同程度的耐药性(17~10 000倍),且耐药倍数与报道的数据基本一致.所建立的耐药型模型是针对NNRTIs耐药的HIV-1复制环节的细胞水平药效学评价体系,野生型和9种耐药型HIV-1模型的联合应用,可为新型非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂的研发提供更全面药效学评价的安全平台.

  14. IOPY/ISPY类HIV-1逆转录酶抑制剂的定量构效关系研究%Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship of IOPY/ISPY Analogues as HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    朱瑞新; 王飞; 刘琦; 康廷国

    2011-01-01

    C-5修饰的3-碘-4-芳氧基/芳硫基吡啶酮(IOPY/ISPY)类化合物是一类潜在的HIV-1非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂,特别是这类化合物因具有同时抑制野生型和突变型病毒株的特性,而受到更加广泛的关注.首先利用两套2D通用描述符同时构建了该类化合物的线性和非线性定量构效关系模型.结果表明这些模型都具有较好的预测能力,并且非线性模型较线性模型预测能力更好些.为了更好、更形象地描述逆转录酶抑制剂的特征,进一步结合三维定量构效关系(3D-QSAR)模型,以及SAReport分析对该类化合物同时抑制野生型和突变型病%A series of C-5 modified 3-iodo-4-aryloxypyridinones(IOPY’s) and 3-iodo-4-arylthio-pyridinones(ISPY’s) serves as a potential class of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.These two pyridinone analogues are attracting more attentions mainly due to their potential abilities to si-multaneously inhibit wild type and mutant HIV-1 strains.In this study,two sets of traditional two-dimensional descriptors were applied respectively to create linear and binary QSAR models for these compounds.Our results indicated the well prediction ability of the obtained models.It is also indicated that binary model achieved a better prediction results than the linear one.Furthermore,in order to obtain a better description of the structure characteristics of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors,3D-QSAR models and SAReport analysis were used to explore the compound features which contribute to the inhibition of wild type as well as mutant HIV-1 strains.Our analysis reveals that there may existed three principles to follow when the compounds are modified:(i) the electrostatic potentials distribution of R-groups plays a key role in determining the biological activities of the compounds;(ii) an aromatic ring or aromatic heterocycle for R-groups is favorable to enhance the biological activity

  15. Discovery of 3-{5-[(6-Amino-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-3-yl)methoxy]-2-chlorophenoxy}-5-chlorobenzonitrile (MK-4965): A Potent, Orally Bioavailable HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor with Improved Potency against Key Mutant Viruses

    Tucker, Thomas J.; Sisko, John T.; Tynebor, Robert M.; Williams, Theresa M.; Felock, Peter J.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Lai, Ming-Tain; Liang, Yuexia; McGaughey, Georgia; Liu, Meiquing; Miller, Mike; Moyer, Gregory; Munshi, Vandna; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Prasad, Sridhar; Reid, John C.; Sanchez, Rosa; Torrent, Maricel; Vacca, Joseph P.; Wan, Bang-Lin; Yan, Youwei (Merck)

    2009-07-10

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have been shown to be a key component of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The use of NNRTIs has become part of standard combination antiviral therapies producing clinical outcomes with efficacy comparable to other antiviral regimens. There is, however, a critical issue with the emergence of clinical resistance, and a need has arisen for novel NNRTIs with a broad spectrum of activity against key HIV-1 RT mutations. Using a combination of traditional medicinal chemistry/SAR analyses, crystallography, and molecular modeling, we have designed and synthesized a series of novel, highly potent NNRTIs that possess broad spectrum antiviral activity and good pharmacokinetic profiles. Further refinement of key compounds in this series to optimize physical properties and pharmacokinetics has resulted in the identification of 8e (MK-4965), which has high levels of potency against wild-type and key mutant viruses, excellent oral bioavailability and overall pharmacokinetics, and a clean ancillary profile.

  16. HIV-1非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂药效团模型构建及新抑制剂的搜索%Pharmacophore model building of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and searching for new inhibitors

    肖泽云; 李凯; 李爱秀; 王晓辉; 刘勇庆

    2016-01-01

    [目的]构建Ⅰ型人类免疫缺陷病毒(human immunodeficiency virus type 1,HIV-1)非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂(non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors,NNRTIs)的药效团模型,通过对中药化学数据库(traditional Chinese medicine database,TCMD)的搜索,在中药中寻找新型抗耐药的NNRTIs.[方法]从已知的NNRTIs与逆转录酶复合物的晶体结构出发,通过构象分析和药效团识别等方法,构建NNRTIs的药效团模型并检验其可靠性;基于药效团模型对TCMD进行数据库搜索,发现新型潜在的NNRTIs.[结果]从PDB中检索出2010年至2014年RT与NNRTIs复合物的晶体结构30个,从中抽提出其活性配体,建立了一个包含30个活性配体的小分子数据库;通过对上市药物TMC278和TMC125及高活性抑制剂DJZ的构象叠合和药效特征基团分析构建了新的NNRTIs药效团模型,该模型包含了5个药效特征基团;以符合这5个药效特征基团中任意4个为条件,在活性配体小分子数据库中验证性搜索出18个化合物,检出率为60.0%;基于五点药效团模型对TCMD进行数据库搜索得到272个化合物.[结论]以TMC278、TMC 125和DJZ构建的五点药效团模型,以符合其中任意4个为条件,在活性配体小分子数据库中的检出率达到60.0%,表明所建药效团模型是可靠的.

  17. Synthesis, evaluation and molecular modelling studies of some novel 3-(3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1)-yl)--(substitutedphenyl) propanamides as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    S Murugesan; Swastika Ganguly; Giovanni Maga

    2010-03-01

    A novel series of fifteen 3-(3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1)-yl)--(substituted phenyl) propanamides 3(a-o) were synthesized by reacting the corresponding 3-chloro--(aryl) propanamides 2(a-o) with 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline 1 in acetonitrile. The compounds have been characterized on the basis of elemental analysis and spectral data. All the compounds were evaluated for their HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity. Among the synthesized compounds, 3-(3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1)-yl)---tolyl propanamide 3d and 3-(3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1)-yl)--(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)propanamide 3f were identified as significant inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with 56% and 43% residual RT activity respectively at the final concentration of 40 M when compared with the standard drug Efavirenz. Docking studies with HIV-1 RT (PDB ID 1rt2) were also performed in order to investigate the binding pattern of these compounds.

  18. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study.

    Porter, Danielle P; Daeumer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Chang, Silvia; Martin, Ross; Cohen, Cal; Miller, Michael D; White, Kirsten L

    2015-12-01

    At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR) study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF) developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV)/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33), as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118). Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20%) were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study. PMID:26690199

  19. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study

    Danielle P. Porter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33, as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118. Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20% were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study.

  20. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel 2-Arylalkylthio-5-iodine-6-substituted-benzyl-pyrimidine-4(3H-ones as Potent HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Liang Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of 2-arylalkylthio-5-iodine-6-substitutedbenzyl-pyrimidine-4(3H-ones (S-DABOs 8a–x had been synthesized via an efficient method. Their biological activity against HIV virus and RT assay were evaluated. Some compounds, especially 8h, 8l and 8n, displayed promising activity against HIV-1 RT with IC50 values in a range of 0.41 μM to 0.71 μM, which were much better than that of nevirapine. Molecular modeling studies revealed that the binding mode would be affected via forming an additional hydrogen bond by incorporating an oxygen atom on the C-2 side chain. The biological activity was in accordance with the docking results.

  1. Novel phenyl(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanones as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Šimon, Petr; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Šaman, David; Bahador, G.; Stepan, G.; Hu, E.; Lansdon, E.; Jansa, P.; Janeba, Zlatko

    Rome: International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR), 2015. s. 96. [International Conference on Antiviral Research /28./. 11.05.2015-15.05.2015, Rome] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors * pyrimidine * HIV -1 Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  2. Functional non-nucleoside adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

    Lelle, Marco; Hameed, Abdul; Ackermann, Lisa-Maria; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Wagner, Manfred; Berisha, Filip; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we describe the synthesis of novel functional non-nucleoside adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, which can be easily modified with thiol containing biomolecules such as tumour targeting structures. The linkage between inhibitor and biomolecule contains cleavable bonds to enable efficient intracellular delivery in the reductive milieu of the cytosol as well as in the acidic environment within endosomes and lysosomes. The suitability of this synthetic approach was shown by the successful bioconjugation of a poor cell-permeable inhibitor with a cell-penetrating peptide. Additionally, we have demonstrated the excellent inhibitory effect of the compounds presented here in a live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer-based assay in human embryonic kidney cells. PMID:25319071

  3. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs): past, present, and future.

    De Clercq, Erik

    2004-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) have become an inherent ingredient of the drug combination schemes that are currently used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections. Starting from the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylsulfanyl)thymine (HEPT) and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione (TIBO) derivatives, numerous classes of compounds have been described as NNRTIs. Only three compounds have so far been approved for clinical use: nevirapine, delavirdine, and efavirenz. NNRTIs are notorious for rapidly leading to virus-drug resistance development, primarily based on the emergence of the K103N and Y181C mutations in the HIV-1 RT. Newer NNRTIs, such as capravirine, dapivirine (TMC 125), and DPC 083, are resilient to these 'NNRTI' mutations, and, therefore, offer considerable promise as future anti-HIV-1 drugs. NNRTIs are targeted at a specific 'pocket' binding site within the HIV-1 RT, that is distinct from, but both spatially and functionally related to, the catalytic site, where the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and nucleotide RT inhibitors (NtRTIs) interact. NNRTIs have acquired a definitive position, as part of a combination regimen with NRTIs and NtRTIs, in the first-line treatment of HIV-1 infections. PMID:17191775

  4. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 2-arylalkylthio-5-iodo-6-benzyl S-DABOs as potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors%新型2-芳硫基-5-碘-6-苄基S-DABOs类化合物的合成及作为非核苷类HIV-1RT抑制剂的活性评估

    张亮; 王孝伟; 刘俊义

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel dihydro-alkylthio-benzyl-oxopyrimidines (S-DABOs) 7a-f have been designed and synthesized with an efficient method.Biological evaluation of their HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities was performed using Nevirapine (NVP) as a reference compound.Among the series,compound 7d shows the highest reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity,which is better than Nevirapine.%我们设计了一系列新型S-DABOs类目标化合物7a-f,通过简单有效的方法合成了该系列化合物,并进行了逆转录酶活性检测,发现该类化合物具有较好的生物活性,其中化合物7d的IC50值达到了3.64 μmol/L,是Nevirapine的IC50值的1/2.

  5. Virological and immunological outcomes at 3 years after starting antiretroviral therapy with regimens containing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or both in INITIO: open-label randomised trial

    Yeni, P; Cooper, DA; Aboulker, J-P;

    2006-01-01

    antiretroviral therapy with two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (didanosine+stavudine) plus either a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (efavirenz, EFV) or a protease inhibitor (nelfinavir, NFV), or both (EFV/NFV), in patients with HIV-1 infection who had not previously received...

  6. Exploring QSAR of Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors by Neural Networks: TIBO Derivatives

    Driss Cherqaoui

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is an important target for chemotherapeutic agents against the AIDS disease. 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydro-5-methylimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H-ones (TIBO derivatives are potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. In the present work, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR analysis for a set of 82 TIBO derivatives has been investigated by means of a three-layered neural network (NN. It has been shown that NN can be a potential tool in the investigation of QSAR analysis compared with the models given in the literature. NN gave good statistical results both in fitting and prediction processes (0.861 ≤ r² ≤ 0.928, 0.839 ≤q² ≤ 0.845. The relevant factors controlling the anti-HIV-1 activity of TIBO derivatives have been identified. The results are along the same lines as those of our previous studies on HEPT derivatives and indicate the importance of the hydrophobic parameter in modeling the QSAR for TIBO derivatives.

  7. Optimization of 2,4-Diarylanilines as Non-nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Sun, Lian-Qi; Qin, Bingjie; Huang, Li; Qian, Keduo; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2012-01-01

    The current optimization of 2,4-diarylaniline analogs (DAANs) on the central phenyl ring provided a series of new active DAAN derivatives 9a–9e, indicating an accessible modification approach that could improve anti-HIV potency against wild-type and resistant strains, aqueous solubility, and metabolic stability. A new compound 9e not only exhibited extremely high potency against wild-type virus (EC50 0.53 nM) and several resistant viral strains (EC50 0.36 – 3.9 nM), but also showed desirable ...

  8. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Antiviral Drug Resistance (Part 1 of 2)

    Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) contributes to the development of resistance to all anti-AIDS drugs by introducing mutations into the viral genome. At the molecular level, mutations in RT result in resistance to RT inhibitors. Eight nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NRTIs) and five non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) are approved HIV-1 drugs. Structures of RT have been determined in complexes with substrates and/or inhibitors, and the structures have revealed different conforma...

  9. Discovery of the Aryl-phospho-indole IDX899, a Highly Potent Anti-HIV Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor.

    Dousson, Cyril; Alexandre, François-René; Amador, Agnès; Bonaric, Séverine; Bot, Stéphanie; Caillet, Catherine; Convard, Thierry; da Costa, Daniel; Lioure, Marie-Pierre; Roland, Arlène; Rosinovsky, Elodie; Maldonado, Sébastien; Parsy, Christophe; Trochet, Christophe; Storer, Richard; Stewart, Alistair; Wang, Jingyang; Mayes, Benjamin A; Musiu, Chiara; Poddesu, Barbara; Vargiu, Luana; Liuzzi, Michel; Moussa, Adel; Jakubik, Jocelyn; Hubbard, Luke; Seifer, Maria; Standring, David

    2016-03-10

    Here, we describe the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and identification of a clinical candidate non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a novel aryl-phospho-indole (APhI) scaffold. NNRTIs are recommended components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV-1. Since a major problem associated with NNRTI treatment is the emergence of drug resistant virus, this work focused on optimization of the APhI against clinically relevant HIV-1 Y181C and K103N mutants and the Y181C/K103N double mutant. Optimization of the phosphinate aryl substituent led to the discovery of the 3-Me,5-acrylonitrile-phenyl analogue RP-13s (IDX899) having an EC50 of 11 nM against the Y181C/K103N double mutant. PMID:26804933

  10. Novel indole-3-sulfonamides as potent HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs)

    Zhao, Zhijian; Wolkenberg, Scott E.; Lu, Meiqing; Munshi, Vandna; Moyer, Gregory; Feng, Meizhen; Carella, Anthony V.; Ecto, Linda T.; Gabryelski, Lori J.; Lai, Ming-Tain; Prasad, Sridar G.; Yan, Youwei; McGaughey, Georgia B.; Miller, Michael D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Hartman, George D.; Vacca, Joseph P.; Williams, Theresa M. (Merck)

    2008-09-29

    This Letter describes the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 3-indole sulfonamides as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with balanced profiles against common HIV RT mutants K103N and Y181C.

  11. Ligand similarity guided receptor selection enhances docking accuracy and recall for non-nucleoside HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Stanton, Richard A; Nettles, James H; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2015-11-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) are allosteric inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), a viral polymerase essential to infection. Despite the availability of >150 NNRTI-bound RT crystal structures, rational design of new NNRTI remains challenging because of the variability of their induced fit, hydrophobic binding patterns. Docking NNRTI yields inconsistent results that vary markedly depending on the receptor structure used, as only 27% of the >20k cross-docking calculations we performed using known NNRTI were accurate. In order to determine if a hospitable receptor for docking could be selected a priori, we evaluated more than 40 chemical descriptors for their ability to pre-select a best receptor for NNRTI cross-docking. The receptor selection was based on similarity scores between the bound- and target-ligands generated by each descriptor. The top descriptors were able to double the probability of cross-docking accuracy over random receptor selection. Additionally, recall of known NNRTI from a large library of similar decoys was increased using the same approach. The results demonstrate the utility of pre-selecting receptors when docking into difficult targets. Graphical Abstract Cross-docking accuracy increases when using chemical descriptors to determine the NNRTI with maximum similarity to the new compound and then docking into its respective receptor. PMID:26450349

  12. Prevalence of genotypic HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand, 2002

    Watitpun Chotip

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prices of reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitors in Thailand have been reduced since December 1, 2001. It is expected that reduction in the price of these inhibitors may influence the drug resistance mutation pattern of HIV-1 among infected people. This study reports the frequency of HIV-1 genetic mutation associated with drug resistance in antiretroviral-treated patients from Thailand. Methods Genotypic resistance testing was performed on samples collected in 2002 from 88 HIV-1 infected individuals. Automated DNA sequencing was used to genotype the HIV-1 polymerase gene isolated from patients' plasma. Results Resistance to protease inhibitors, nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were found in 10 (12%, 42 (48% and 19 (21% patients, respectively. The most common drug resistance mutations in the protease gene were at codon 82 (8%, 90 (7% and 54 (6%, whereas resistant mutations at codon 215 (45%, 67 (40%, 41 (38% and 184 (27% were commonly found in the RT gene. This finding indicates that genotypic resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was prevalent in 2002. The frequency of resistant mutations corresponding to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was three times higher-, while resistant mutation corresponding to protease inhibitors was two times lower than those frequencies determined in 2001. Conclusion This study shows that the frequencies of RT inhibitor resistance mutations have been increased after the reduction in the price of RT inhibitors since December 2001. We believe that this was an important factor that influenced the mutation patterns of HIV-1 protease and RT genes in Thailand.

  13. A Simplifed and Efficient Synthesis of 7-Hydroxymethyl-6,7- Dihydropyrro- [ 1,2- c ]-Pyrimidine-1,3-Dione as a Potent Anti- HIV-1 Agent

    WANG Xiao-Wei; ZHANG Zhi-Li; HAN Peng; MA Xiao-Yan; LIU Jun-Yi

    2003-01-01

    @@ The reverse transcriptase of HIV provides a key target for the development of anti-AIDS drugs. The discovery of 1-[ 2-hydroxyethoxymethyl]-6-phenylthio-thymine (HEPT) as a compound with potent and selective in vivo activity against HIV-1[1] has led to the synthesis many new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.[2

  14. Synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of 1-substiuted 6-(3-cyanobenzoyl) and [(3-cyanophenyl)fluoromethyl]-5-ethyl-uracils

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta;

    2009-01-01

    1-Substiuted 6-(3-cyanobenzoyl) and [(3-cyanophenyl)fluoromethyl]-5-ethyl-uracils were synthesized and evaluated in cell-based assays against HIV-1 wild-type and its clinically relevant non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant mutants. Some of the synthesized compounds...

  15. Identification of a Novel Sulfonamide Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor by a Phenotypic HIV-1 Full Replication Assay.

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Ko, Yoonae; Christophe, Thierry; Cechetto, Jonathan; Kim, Junwon; Kim, Kyoung-Ae; Boese, Annette S; Garcia, Jean-Michel; Fenistein, Denis; Ju, Moon Kyeong; Kim, Junghwan; Han, Sung-Jun; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Brondani, Vincent; Sommer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Classical target-based, high-throughput screening has been useful for the identification of inhibitors for known molecular mechanisms involved in the HIV life cycle. In this study, the development of a cell-based assay that uses a phenotypic drug discovery approach based on automated high-content screening is described. Using this screening approach, the antiviral activity of 26,500 small molecules from a relevant chemical scaffold library was evaluated. Among the selected hits, one sulfonami...

  16. Increase in transmitted resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infections in Europe

    D. Frentz (Dineke); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); A.B. Abecasis (Ana ); J. Albert (Jan); O. Hamouda (Osamah); L.B. Jørgensen (Louise); C. Ku¨cherer (Claudia); D. Struck (Daniel); J.-C. Schmit (Jean-Claude); J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); B. A˚sjo¨ (Birgitta); C. Balotta (Claudia); D. Beshkov (Danail); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); B. Clotet (Bonaventura); S. Coughlan (Suzie); A. Griskevicius (Algis); Z. Grossman (Zehava); A. Horban (Andrzej); T. Kolupajeva (Tatjana); K. Korn (Klaus); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); M. Linka (Marek); C. Nielsen (Claus); D. Otelea (Dan); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); R. Paredes (Roger); M. Poljak (Mario); E. Puchhammer-Sto¨ckl (Elisabeth); A. So¨nnerborg (Anders); D. Stanekova (Danica); M. Stanojevic (Maja); E. van Wijngaerden (Eric); A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); E. Puchhammer-Stöckl (Elisabeth); M. Sarcletti (M.); B. Schmied (B.); M. Geit (M.); G. Balluch (G.); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); I. Derdelinck (Inge); A. Sasse (A.); M. Bogaert (M.); H. Ceunen (H.); A. de Roo (Annie); M. De Wit (Meike); F. Echahidi (F.); K. Fransen (K.); J.-C. Goffard (J.); P. Goubau; E. Goudeseune (E.); J.-C. Yombi (J.); P. Lacor (Patrick); C. Liesnard (C.); M. Moutschen; L.A. Pierard; R. Rens (R.); J. Schrooten; D. Vaira (D.); L.P.R. Vandekerckhove; A. van den Heuvel (A.); B. van der Gucht (B.); M. van Ranst (Marc); E. Van Wijngaerden; B. Vandercam; M. Vekemans (M.); C. Verhofstede; N. Clumeck (N.); K. van Laethem (Kristel); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); I. Demetriades (I.); I. Kousiappa (Ioanna); V.L. Demetriou (Victoria); J. Hezka (Johana); M. Bruckova (Marie); M. Linka; L. Machala (L.); C. Nielsen; L.B. Jørgensen; J. Gerstoft (J.); L. Mathiesen (L.); C. Pedersen (Court); H. Nielsen; A. Laursen (A.); B. Kvinesdal (B.); M. Salminen (Mika); M. Ristola (M.); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); J. Suni (J.); J. Sutinen (J.); K. Korn; C. Ku¨cherer; T. Berg (Trine); P. Braun (P.); G. Poggensee (G.); M. Da¨umer; D. Eberle (David); O. Hamouda (Osamah); H. Heiken; R. Kaiser (R.); H. Knechten (H.); H. Mu¨ller; S. Neifer; J.-C. Schmit (Jean-Claude); H. Walter (Hauke); B. Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer (B.); T. Harrer (T.); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); A. Hatzakis (Angelos); G. Magiorkinis (Gkikas); E. Hatzitheodorou (E.); C. Haida; A. Zavitsanou (A.); G. Magiorkinis (Gkikas); M. Lazanas; L. Chini; N. Magafas (N.); N. Tsogas (N.); V. Paparizos (V.); S. Kourkounti (S.); A. Antoniadou (A.); A. Papadopoulos; P. Panagopoulos (P.); G. Poulakou; V. Sakka (V.); G. Chryssos (G.); S. Drimis (S.); P. Gargalianos; M. Lelekis (M.); G. Chilomenos; M. Psichogiou (M.); G.L. Daikos (G.); G. Panos (G.); G. Haratsis (G.); T. Kordossis (T.); A. Kontos (Angelos); G. Koratzanis (G.); M. Theodoridou; G. Mostrou (G.); V. Spoulou; S. Coughlan (Suzie); C. de Gascun (Cillian); C. Byrne; M. Duffy; P. Bergin; D. Reidy; G. Farrell; J. Lambert (Julien); E. O'Connor; A. Rochford; J. Low (J.); P. Coakely (P.); S. O'Dea; W. Hall (W.); Z. Grossman (Zehava); I. Levi (I.); D. Chemtob (D.); C. Balotta (Claudia); C. Riva (Chiara); C. Mussini (C.); I. Caramma (I.); A. Capetti (A.); M.C. Colombo (M.); C. Rossi; F. Prati (Francesco); F. Tramuto; F. Vitale (F.); M. Ciccozzi; G. Angarano (Guiseppe); G. Rezza (G.); J.C. Schmit; D. Struck (Daniel); R. Hemmer (R.); V. Arendt (V.); T. Staub (T.); F. Schneider (François); F. Roman; A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); A. van Kessel; P.H.M. Van Bentum; K. Brinkman; E.L.M. Op de Coul (Eline); M.E. van der Ende (Marchina); I. Hoepelman (M.); M. Van Kasteren (Marjo); J. Juttmann (Job); M. Kuipers; N. Langebeek (Nienke); C. Richter (Clemens); R. Santegoets (M.W.J.); L. Schrijnders-Gudde (L.); R. Schuurman (Rob); B.J.M. van de Ven (B. J M); B. A˚sjo¨; V. Ormaasen (Vidar); P. Aavitsland (P.); A. Horban (Andrzej); J. Stanczak (J.); G.P. Stanczak (G.); E. Firlag-Burkacka (E.); A. Wiercinska-Drapalo; E. Jablonowska (E.); E. Malolepsza (E.); M. Leszczyszyn-Pynka (M.); W. Szata (W.); R. Camacho; A. de Palma (Andre); F. Borges (F.); T. Paixa&tild; o; V. Duque (V.); F. Araújo; D.J. Jevtovic (D.); D. Salemovic (D.); D. Stanekova; M. Habekova (M.); M. Mokras; P. Truska; M. Poljak (Mario); M.M. Lunar (Maja M.); D. Babic; J. Tomazic (J.); S. Vidmar (Suzanna); T. Vovko; P. Karner (P.); B. Clotet (Bonaventura); P. Domingo; M.J. Galindo; C. Miralles; M.A. del Pozo; E. Ribera; C. Iribarren (Carlos); L. Ruiz (Lidia); J. de la Torre; F. Vidal; F. Garcia; R. Paredes (Roger); J. Albert (Jan); A. Heidarian; K. Aperia-Peipke (K.); M. Axelsson; M. Mild; A. Karlsson; A. So¨nnerborg; A. Thalme; L. Nave´r; G. Bratt (G.); A. Karlsson; A. Blaxhult; M. Gissle´n; B. Svennerholm; I.-M. Bergbrant (I.); P. Bjo¨rkman; C. Sa¨ll; A. Mellgren; A. Lindholm; N. Kuylenstierna; R. Montelius; F. Azimi; B. Johansson; M. Carlsson; E. Johansson; B. Ljungberg; H. Ekvall; A. Strand; S. Ma¨kitalo; S. o¨berg; P. Holmblad; M. Ho¨fer; H. Holmberg; P. Josefson; U. Ryding

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: One out of ten newly diagnosed patients in Europe was infected with a virus carrying a drug resistant mutation. We analysed the patterns over time for transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) using data from the European Spread program.Methods: Clinical, epidemiological a

  17. Efavirenz Has the Highest Anti-Proliferative Effect of Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors against Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Markus Hecht

    Full Text Available Cancer prevention and therapy in HIV-1-infected patients will play an important role in future. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI Efavirenz and Nevirapine are cytotoxic against cancer cells in vitro. As other NNRTIs have not been studied so far, all clinically used NNRTIs were tested and the in vitro toxic concentrations were compared to drug levels in patients to predict possible anti-cancer effects in vivo.Cytotoxicity was studied by Annexin-V-APC/7AAD staining and flow cytometry in the pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3 and Panc-1 and confirmed by colony formation assays. The 50% effective cytotoxic concentrations (EC50 were calculated and compared to the blood levels in our patients and published data.The in vitro EC50 of the different drugs in the BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells were: Efavirenz 31.5 μmol/l (= 9944 ng/ml, Nevirapine 239 μmol/l (= 63,786 ng/ml, Etravirine 89.0 μmol/l (= 38,740 ng/ml, Lersivirine 543 μmol/l (= 168,523 ng/ml, Delavirdine 171 μmol/l (= 78,072 ng/ml, Rilpivirine 24.4 μmol/l (= 8941 ng/ml. As Efavirenz and Rilpivirine had the highest cytotoxic potential and Nevirapine is frequently used in HIV-1 positive patients, the results of these three drugs were further studied in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells and confirmed with colony formation assays. 205 patient blood levels of Efavirenz, 127 of Rilpivirine and 31 of Nevirapine were analyzed. The mean blood level of Efavirenz was 3587 ng/ml (range 162-15,363 ng/ml, of Rilpivirine 144 ng/ml (range 0-572 ng/ml and of Nevirapine 4955 ng/ml (range 1856-8697 ng/ml. Blood levels from our patients and from published data had comparable Efavirenz levels to the in vitro toxic EC50 in about 1 to 5% of all patients.All studied NNRTIs were toxic against cancer cells. A low percentage of patients taking Efavirenz reached in vitro cytotoxic blood levels. It can be speculated that in HIV-1 positive patients having high Efavirenz blood levels pancreatic

  18. Molecular modeling, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-heteroaryl compounds as reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1.

    Singh, Anuradha; Yadav, Dipti; Yadav, Madhu; Dhamanage, Ashwini; Kulkarni, Smita; Singh, Ramendra K

    2015-03-01

    Different N-heteroaryl compounds bearing pyrimidine and benzimidazole moieties have been designed in silico using Discovery studio 2.5 software, synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity as reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1 replication using laboratory adapted strains HIV-1IIIB (X4, subtype B) and HIV-1Ada5 (R5, subtype B), and the primary isolates HIV-1UG070 (X4, subtype D) and HIV-1VB59 (R5, subtype C). Cell-based assay showed that compounds were active at 1.394 μm concentrations (Selectivity Index: 1.29-38.39). The studies on structure-activity relationship clearly suggested anti-HIV activity of pyrimidine and benzimidazole derivatives and these findings were consistent with the in vitro cell-based experimental data. The results of molecular modeling and docking confirmed that all compounds assumed a butterfly-like conformation and showed H-bond, 'π-π' and 'π-+' and hydrophobic interactions within flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, similar to known non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as nevirapine. In view of the results obtained, it can be said that the chemical skeletons of N, N'-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)-succinamide (14 and 15) and 1, 4-bis-benzoimidazol-1-yl-butane-1, 4-dione (16 and 17) may be used for developing potent inhibitors of HIV-1 replication, with suitable structure/pharmacophore modifications. PMID:25055732

  19. Drugs That Fight HIV-1

    ... program of the National Institutes of Health Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV- ... these products are on last page.) Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and alter reverse transcriptase, ...

  20. A Functional Role for ADAM10 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Replication

    Rubin Donald H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene trap insertional mutagenesis was used as a high-throughput approach to discover cellular genes participating in viral infection by screening libraries of cells selected for survival from lytic infection with a variety of viruses. Cells harboring a disrupted ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 10 allele survived reovirus infection, and subsequently ADAM10 was shown by RNA interference to be important for replication of HIV-1. Results Silencing ADAM10 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA 48 hours before infection significantly inhibited HIV-1 replication in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in CD4+ cell lines. In agreement, ADAM10 over-expression significantly increased HIV-1 replication. ADAM10 down-regulation did not inhibit viral reverse transcription, indicating that viral entry and uncoating are also independent of ADAM10 expression. Integration of HIV-1 cDNA was reduced in ADAM10 down-regulated cells; however, concomitant 2-LTR circle formation was not detected, suggesting that HIV-1 does not enter the nucleus. Further, ADAM10 silencing inhibited downstream reporter gene expression and viral protein translation. Interestingly, we found that while the metalloprotease domain of ADAM10 is not required for HIV-1 replication, ADAM15 and γ-secretase (which proteolytically release the extracellular and intracellular domains of ADAM10 from the plasma membrane, respectively do support productive infection. Conclusions We propose that ADAM10 facilitates replication at the level of nuclear trafficking. Collectively, our data support a model whereby ADAM10 is cleaved by ADAM15 and γ-secretase and that the ADAM10 intracellular domain directly facilitates HIV-1 nuclear trafficking. Thus, ADAM10 represents a novel cellular target class for development of antiretroviral drugs.

  1. Cross-validated stepwise regression for identification of novel non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance associated mutations

    Van Houtte Margriet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Linear regression models are used to quantitatively predict drug resistance, the phenotype, from the HIV-1 viral genotype. As new antiretroviral drugs become available, new resistance pathways emerge and the number of resistance associated mutations continues to increase. To accurately identify which drug options are left, the main goal of the modeling has been to maximize predictivity and not interpretability. However, we originally selected linear regression as the preferred method for its transparency as opposed to other techniques such as neural networks. Here, we apply a method to lower the complexity of these phenotype prediction models using a 3-fold cross-validated selection of mutations. Results Compared to standard stepwise regression we were able to reduce the number of mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitor models as well as the number of interaction terms accounting for synergistic and antagonistic effects. This reduction in complexity was most significant for the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI models, while maintaining prediction accuracy and retaining virtually all known resistance associated mutations as first order terms in the models. Furthermore, for etravirine (ETR a better performance was seen on two years of unseen data. By analyzing the phenotype prediction models we identified a list of forty novel NNRTI mutations, putatively associated with resistance. The resistance association of novel variants at known NNRTI resistance positions: 100, 101, 181, 190, 221 and of mutations at positions not previously linked with NNRTI resistance: 102, 139, 219, 241, 376 and 382 was confirmed by phenotyping site-directed mutants. Conclusions We successfully identified and validated novel NNRTI resistance associated mutations by developing parsimonious resistance prediction models in which repeated cross-validation within the stepwise regression was applied. Our model selection

  2. The case for addressing primary resistance mutations to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors to treat children born from mothers living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

    Khady Kébé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV drug resistance mutations (DRMs was estimated in 25 untreated infants who were living with HIV-1, younger than 13 months and living in Senegal. Antiretroviral DRMs were detected in 8 of 25 (32% children. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI DRMs were present in all (100% children whose viruses harboured DRMs: K103N in 43%; Y181C, K101E and V106M each in 29%; and Y188L in 14%. The D67N thymidine-analogue mutation was observed in only two children whose mothers had received chemoprophylaxis of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT. The proportion of children whose viruses harboured DRMs was then 6.5-fold higher in children whose mother–child couples had received nevirapine (NVP-based chemoprophylaxis than in other couples without prophylaxis [7 of 13 (53.8% vs. 1 of 12 (8.3%]. These findings point to the absolute need to address primary resistance mutations in case of virological failure in young children treated by antiretroviral drugs, and to make more effective treatment regimens available to NVP-exposed infants living with HIV-1 in Senegal.

  3. Metabolic Abnormalities Associated with the Use of Protease Inhibitors and Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Madhu N. Rao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS has been associated with multiple abnormalities in glucose and lipid metabolism. Specifically, these abnormalities include insulin resistance, increased triglycerides and increased LDL cholesterol levels. The metabolic disturbances are due to a combination of factors, including the direct effect of medications, restoration to health and HIV disease, as well as individual genetic predisposition. Of the available anti-retroviral medications, indinavir has been associated with causing the most insulin resistance and ritonavir with causing the most hypertriglyceridemia.

  4. Revisiting HIV-1 uncoating

    Arhel Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract HIV uncoating is defined as the loss of viral capsid that occurs within the cytoplasm of infected cells before entry of the viral genome into the nucleus. It is an obligatory step of HIV-1 early infection and accompanies the transition between reverse transcription complexes (RTCs), in which reverse transcription occurs, and pre-integration complexes (PICs), which are competent to integrate into the host genome. The study of the nature and timing of HIV-1 uncoating has been paved wit...

  5. analisi del contributo delle poliproteine GAG e POL nello sviluppo della resistenza in pazienti HIV-1 positivi sottoposti a terapia antiretrovirale

    Carli, Ilaria

    2013-01-01

    The introduction in the mid 1990s of Antiretroviral Therapy in the cure of AIDS has dramatically decreased the morbidity and mortality rate and has significantly extended the lifespan and the quality of life of HIV-1 positive patients. Today there are more than 20 drugs licensed for clinical use, targeting different steps of viral life cycle including viral entry (coreceptor antagonists and fusion inhibitors), reverse transcription (nucleoside, NRTIs, and non-nucleoside inhibitors, NNRTIs, of...

  6. ART suppresses plasma HIV-1 RNA to a stable set point predicted by pretherapy viremia.

    Frank Maldarelli

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Current antiretroviral therapy is effective in suppressing but not eliminating HIV-1 infection. Understanding the source of viral persistence is essential for developing strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. We therefore investigated the level of plasma HIV-1 RNA in patients with viremia suppressed to less than 50-75 copies/ml on standard protease inhibitor- or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing antiretroviral therapy using a new, real-time PCR-based assay for HIV-1 RNA with a limit of detection of one copy of HIV-1 RNA. Single copy assay results revealed that >80% of patients on initial antiretroviral therapy for 60 wk had persistent viremia of one copy/ml or more with an overall median of 3.1 copies/ml. The level of viremia correlated with pretherapy plasma HIV-1 RNA but not with the specific treatment regimen. Longitudinal studies revealed no significant decline in the level of viremia between 60 and 110 wk of suppressive antiretroviral therapy. These data suggest that the persistent viremia on current antiretroviral therapy is derived, at least in part, from long-lived cells that are infected prior to initiation of therapy.

  7. Aggressive HIV-1?

    van der Hoek Lia; de Ronde Anthony; Berkhout Ben

    2005-01-01

    Abstract New York City health officials announced on February 11, 2005 that a patient rapidly developed full-blown AIDS shortly after being diagnosed with a rare, drug-resistant strain of HIV-1. The New York City Department of Health issued an alert to all hospitals and doctors and a press conference was held to announce the emergence of an aggressive HIV-1 strain that may be difficult to treat and that appears to trigger rapid progression to AIDS. Is the panic justified?

  8. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a review on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability

    Iris Usach

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type-1 non-nucleoside and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are key drugs of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in the clinical management of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS/HIV infection. Discussion: First-generation NNRTIs, nevirapine (NVP, delavirdine (DLV and efavirenz (EFV are drugs with a low genetic barrier and poor resistance profile, which has led to the development of new generations of NNRTIs. Second-generation NNRTIs, etravirine (ETR and rilpivirine (RPV have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and European Union, and the next generation of drugs is currently being clinically developed. This review describes recent clinical data, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of commercialized NNRTIs, including the effects of sex, race and age differences on pharmacokinetics and safety. Moreover, it summarizes the characteristics of next-generation NNRTIs: lersivirine, GSK 2248761, RDEA806, BILR 355 BS, calanolide A, MK-4965, MK-1439 and MK-6186. Conclusions: This review presents a wide description of NNRTIs, providing useful information for researchers interested in this field, both in clinical use and in research.

  9. Influence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (efavirenz and nevirapine) on the pharmacodynamic activity of gliclazide in animal models

    Mastan SK; Kumar K Eswar

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes may occur as a result of HIV infection and/or its treatment. Gliclazide is a widely used drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Efavirenz and nevirapine are widely used non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection. The role of Efavirenz and nevirapine on the pharmacodynamic activity of gliclazide is not currently known. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of oral administration of efavirenz and nev...

  10. The HCV Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor Tegobuvir Utilizes a Novel Mechanism of Action to Inhibit NS5B Polymerase Function

    Hebner, Christy M.; Han, Bin; Brendza, Katherine M.; Nash, Michelle; Sulfab, Maisoun; Tian, Yang; Hung, Magdeleine; Fung, Wanchi; Vivian, Randall W.; Trenkle, James; Taylor, James; Bjornson, Kyla; Bondy, Steven; Liu, Xiaohong; Link, John

    2012-01-01

    Tegobuvir (TGV) is a novel non-nucleoside inhibitor (NNI) of HCV RNA replication with demonstrated antiviral activity in patients with genotype 1 chronic HCV infection. The mechanism of action of TGV has not been clearly defined despite the identification of resistance mutations mapping to the NS5B polymerase region. TGV does not inhibit NS5B enzymatic activity in biochemical assays in vitro, suggesting a more complex antiviral mechanism with cellular components. Here, we demonstrate that TGV...

  11. Rapid CD4 decline after interruption of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy in a resource-limited setting

    Watcharananan Siriorn

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI with stavudine and lamivudine is widely used as the first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART in resource-limited settings. Lipodystrophy is common and options for switching ART regimen are limited; this situation can lead to patients' poor adherence and antiretroviral resistance. Treatment interruption (TI in patients with high CD4 cell counts, lipodystrophy, and limited options may be an alternative in resource-limited settings. This study aimed to determine time to resume ART after TI and predictors for early resumption of ART in a resource-limited setting. Methods A prospective study was conducted in January 2005 to December 2006 and enrolled HIV-infected patients with HIV-1 RNA 350 cells/mm3, and willing to interrupt ART. CD4 cell count, HIV-1 RNA, lipid profile, and lipodystrophy were assessed at baseline and every 3 months. ART was resumed when CD4 declined to 3 or developed HIV-related symptoms. Patients were grouped based on ART regimens [NNRTI or protease inhibitor (PI] prior to TI. Results There were 99 patients, 85 in NNRTI group and 14 in PI group. Mean age was 40.6 years; 46% were males. Median duration of ART was 47 months. Median nadir CD4 and baseline CD4 were 151 and 535 cells/mm3, respectively. Median CD4 change at 3 months after TI were -259 (NNRTI and -105 (PI cells/mm3 (p = 0.038. At 13-month median follow-up, there was no AIDS-defining illness; 38% (NNRTI and 29% (PI of patients developed HIV-related symptoms. ART was resumed in 51% (NNRTI and 36% (PI of patients (p = 0.022. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, median time to resume ART was 5.5 (NNRTI and 14.2 (PI months (log rank test, p = 0.026. By Cox's regression analysis, NNRTI-based ART (HR 4.9; 95%CI, 1.5–16.3, nadir CD4 3 (HR 2.7; 95%CI 1.4–5.3 and baseline CD4 3 (HR 1.6; 95%CI, 1.2–3.1 were predictors for early ART resumption. Conclusion TI of NNRTI-based ART leads to rapid CD4 decline and high

  12. Selective killing of human immunodeficiency virus infected cells by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-induced activation of HIV protease

    Smeulders Liesbeth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current antiretroviral therapy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 reduces viral load and thereby prevents viral spread, but it cannot eradicate proviral genomes from infected cells. Cells in immunological sanctuaries as well as cells producing low levels of virus apparently contribute to a reservoir that maintains HIV persistence in the presence of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Thus, accelerated elimination of virus producing cells may represent a complementary strategy to control HIV infection. Here we sought to exploit HIV protease (PR related cytotoxicity in order to develop a strategy for drug induced killing of HIV producing cells. PR processes the viral Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins during virus maturation, but is also implicated in killing of virus producing cells through off-target cleavage of host proteins. It has been observed previously that micromolar concentrations of certain non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs can stimulate intracellular PR activity, presumably by enhancing Gag-Pol dimerization. Results Using a newly developed cell-based assay we compared the degree of PR activation displayed by various NNRTIs. We identified inhibitors showing higher potency with respect to PR activation than previously described for NNRTIs, with the most potent compounds resulting in ~2-fold increase of the Gag processing signal at 250 nM. The degree of enhancement of intracellular Gag processing correlated with the compound's ability to enhance RT dimerization in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Compounds were analyzed for their potential to mediate specific killing of chronically infected MT-4 cells. Levels of cytotoxicity on HIV infected cells determined for the different NNRTIs corresponded to the relative degree of drug induced intracellular PR activation, with CC50 values ranging from ~0.3 μM to above the tested concentration range (10 μM. Specific cytotoxicity was reverted by addition

  13. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Therapy

    Arts, Eric J.; Hazuda, Daria J.

    2012-01-01

    The most significant advance in the medical management of HIV-1 infection has been the treatment of patients with antiviral drugs, which can suppress HIV-1 replication to undetectable levels. The discovery of HIV-1 as the causative agent of AIDS together with an ever-increasing understanding of the virus replication cycle have been instrumental in this effort by providing researchers with the knowledge and tools required to prosecute drug discovery efforts focused on targeted inhibition with ...

  14. Molecular modelling studies on 2-amino 6-aryl-sulphonylbenzonitriles as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1: A QSPR approach

    Nitin S Sapre; Nilanjana Pancholi; Swagata Gupta; Arun Sikrwar; Neelima Sapre

    2007-11-01

    Lipophilicity or hydrophobicity is a crucial physico-chemical property of an oral drug compound. In the present study, we have analysed the structural parameters responsible for enhancing the lipophilicity expressed in terms of Octanol-Water partition coefficient, log , of 2-amino-6-arylsulfonylbenzonitrile (AASBN) derivatives used as NNRTIs in AIDS therapy. Connectivity based Randic () and Balaban () and atomistic Kier-Hall electrotopological state (-state) indices have been used to develop Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) and to predict the effect of substitution on the log . Model has been developed using multiple linear regression analysis (MLR) for the training set (67 compounds) and the model was tested on a test set (7 compounds). Significant results were obtained for the training set (2 = 0.948, $R^2_{\\text{adj}} = 0.939$, = 0.177, -ratio = 101.22). The results of the test set too implicated a good fit (2 = 0.941, $R^2_{\\text{adj}} = 0.929$, = 0.157, -ratio = 80.05). Among the two connectivity based topological indices; Randic () index showed better predictive ability than the Balaban () index. Kier-Hall -state indices indicated that among the functional groups, methyl, bromo, chloro groups on ring A, with their positive coefficients enhanced the lipophilicity. Amino, cyano group on ring B and the bridging S, SO, SO2 with their negative coefficients showed an adverse effect on the lipophilicity parameter. Thus, Kier-Hall -state indices along with topological indices could be well applied for deriving QSPR models and analysing substitution effects of various functional groups. The training set, correlation matrix and observed and experimental log values are available as supplementary material for this article.

  15. A Functional Role for ADAM10 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Replication

    Rubin Donald H; Hodge Thomas W; Sheng Jinsong; Li Guangyu; Murray James L; Friedrich Brian M; O'Brien William A; Ferguson Monique R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene trap insertional mutagenesis was used as a high-throughput approach to discover cellular genes participating in viral infection by screening libraries of cells selected for survival from lytic infection with a variety of viruses. Cells harboring a disrupted ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 10) allele survived reovirus infection, and subsequently ADAM10 was shown by RNA interference to be important for replication of HIV-1. Results Silencing ADAM10 expression ...

  16. Revisiting HIV-1 uncoating

    Arhel Nathalie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV uncoating is defined as the loss of viral capsid that occurs within the cytoplasm of infected cells before entry of the viral genome into the nucleus. It is an obligatory step of HIV-1 early infection and accompanies the transition between reverse transcription complexes (RTCs, in which reverse transcription occurs, and pre-integration complexes (PICs, which are competent to integrate into the host genome. The study of the nature and timing of HIV-1 uncoating has been paved with difficulties, particularly as a result of the vulnerability of the capsid assembly to experimental manipulation. Nevertheless, recent studies of capsid structure, retroviral restriction and mechanisms of nuclear import, as well as the recent expansion of technical advances in genome-wide studies and cell imagery approaches, have substantially changed our understanding of HIV uncoating. Although early work suggested that uncoating occurs immediately following viral entry in the cell, thus attributing a trivial role for the capsid in infected cells, recent data suggest that uncoating occurs several hours later and that capsid has an all-important role in the cell that it infects: for transport towards the nucleus, reverse transcription and nuclear import. Knowing that uncoating occurs at a later stage suggests that the viral capsid interacts extensively with the cytoskeleton and other cytoplasmic components during its transport to the nucleus, which leads to a considerable reassessment of our efforts to identify potential therapeutic targets for HIV therapy. This review discusses our current understanding of HIV uncoating, the functional interplay between infectivity and timely uncoating, as well as exposing the appropriate methods to study uncoating and addressing the many questions that remain unanswered.

  17. Revisiting HIV-1 uncoating.

    Arhel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    HIV uncoating is defined as the loss of viral capsid that occurs within the cytoplasm of infected cells before entry of the viral genome into the nucleus. It is an obligatory step of HIV-1 early infection and accompanies the transition between reverse transcription complexes (RTCs), in which reverse transcription occurs, and pre-integration complexes (PICs), which are competent to integrate into the host genome. The study of the nature and timing of HIV-1 uncoating has been paved with difficulties, particularly as a result of the vulnerability of the capsid assembly to experimental manipulation. Nevertheless, recent studies of capsid structure, retroviral restriction and mechanisms of nuclear import, as well as the recent expansion of technical advances in genome-wide studies and cell imagery approaches, have substantially changed our understanding of HIV uncoating. Although early work suggested that uncoating occurs immediately following viral entry in the cell, thus attributing a trivial role for the capsid in infected cells, recent data suggest that uncoating occurs several hours later and that capsid has an all-important role in the cell that it infects: for transport towards the nucleus, reverse transcription and nuclear import. Knowing that uncoating occurs at a later stage suggests that the viral capsid interacts extensively with the cytoskeleton and other cytoplasmic components during its transport to the nucleus, which leads to a considerable reassessment of our efforts to identify potential therapeutic targets for HIV therapy. This review discusses our current understanding of HIV uncoating, the functional interplay between infectivity and timely uncoating, as well as exposing the appropriate methods to study uncoating and addressing the many questions that remain unanswered. PMID:21083892

  18. Novel diarylpyrimidines and diaryltriazines as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs with dramatically improved solubility: a patent evaluation of US20140378443A1.

    Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; Yang, Jiapei; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-02-01

    Diarylpyrimidine and diaryltriazine derivatives, two representative structurally related classes of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with robust potencies against wild-type and several mutant strains of HIV-1, have attracted more and more attention in the last decade. However, they have been suffering from poor aqueous solubility. A series of novel diarylpyrimidines and diaryltriazines with solubilizing substituents attached to the central rings were reported as potent NNRTIs in the patent US20140378443A1. Some compounds exhibited potencies against wild-type HIV-1 which were comparable or even superior to those of dapivirine, etravirine and rilpivirine. In addition, dramatically enhanced solubilities were observed for these new compounds. Moreover, some structure optimization strategies for improving aqueous solubility are detailed in this review, providing new insights into development of next-generation NNRTIs endowed with favorable solubility. We anticipate that application of these strategies will ultimately lead to discovery of new anti-HIV drug candidates. PMID:26559996

  19. Design, synthesis and in-vitro evaluation of novel tetrahydroquinoline carbamates as HIV-1 RT inhibitor and their antifungal activity.

    Chander, Subhash; Ashok, Penta; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Wang, Ping; Raja, Krishnamohan S; Taneja, Akash; Murugesan, Sankaranarayanan

    2016-02-01

    Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) are vital class of drugs in treating HIV-1 infection, but drug resistance and toxicity drive the need for effective new inhibitors with potent antiviral activity, less toxicity and improved physicochemical properties. In the present study, twelve novel 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)ethyl phenylcarbamate derivatives were designed as inhibitor of HIV-1 RT using the ligand based drug design approach and in-silico evaluated for drug-likeness properties. Designed compounds were synthesized, characterized and in-vitro evaluated for RT inhibitory activity against wild HIV-1 RT. Among these, four compounds (6b, 6i, 6j and 6l) exhibited significant inhibition of HIV-1 RT (IC50 ⩽ 20 μM). Among four compounds, most active compounds 6b and 6j inhibited the RT activity with IC50 8.12 and 5.42 μM respectively. Docking studies of compounds 6b and 6j were performed against wild HIV-1 RT in order to predict their putative binding mode with selected target. Further, cytotoxicity and anti-HIV activity of compounds 6b and 6j were evaluated on T lymphocytes (C8166 cells). All the synthesized compounds were also evaluated for antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger fungal strains. PMID:26717022

  20. Developing strategies for HIV-1 eradication

    Durand, Christine M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, transforming the outlook for infected patients. However, reservoirs of replication-competent forms of the virus persist during HAART, and when treatment is stopped, high rates of HIV-1 replication return. Recent insights into HIV-1 latency, as well as a report that HIV-1 infection was eradicated in one individual, have renewed interest in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Strategies for HIV-1 eradication include gene...

  1. Regional Differences in Prevalence of HIV-1 Discordance in Africa and Enrollment of HIV-1 Discordant Couples into an HIV-1 Prevention Trial

    Jairam R Lingappa; Lambdin, Barrot; Bukusi, Elizabeth Ann; Ngure, Kenneth; Kavuma, Linda; Inambao, Mubiana; Kanweka, William; Allen, Susan; Kiarie, James N.; Were, Edwin; Manongi, Rachel; Coetzee, David; de Bruyn, Guy; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; MAGARET, Amalia

    2008-01-01

    Background: Most HIV-1 transmission in Africa occurs among HIV-1-discordant couples (one partner HIV-1 infected and one uninfected) who are unaware of their discordant HIV-1 serostatus. Given the high HIV-1 incidence among HIV-1 discordant couples and to assess efficacy of interventions for reducing HIV-1 transmission, HIV-1 discordant couples represent a critical target population for HIV-1 prevention interventions and prevention trials. Substantial regional differences exist in HIV-1 preval...

  2. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Ferdinand Roesch; Oussama Meziane; Anna Kula; Sébastien Nisole; Françoise Porrot; Ian Anderson; Fabrizio Mammano; Ariberto Fassati; Alessandro Marcello; Monsef Benkirane; Olivier Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    International audience HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively inve...

  3. What's an Adam's Apple?

    ... Skating Crushes What's a Booger? What's an Adam's Apple? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's an Adam's Apple? Print A A A Text Size You're ... the throat. This is what's called an Adam's apple. Everyone's larynx grows during puberty, but a girl's ...

  4. Exploring isoxazole and carboxamide derivatives as potential non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Kurup, Sudheer S; Joshi, Kaustubh A

    2016-04-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transciptase inhibitors (NNRTI) are a class of drug molecules with a specific target of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). In the present work, we evaluated a set of selected oxazole and carboxamide derivatives to identify potential pharmacophoric features using molecular docking approach. The docking approach employed has been validated by enrichment factor calculation at top 1% (EF1%). It shows a considerable improvement in EF1%value compared to earlier reported study carried out on specific dataset of ligands and decoys for RT, in the directory of useful decoys (DUD). The carboxamide derivatives show better activity as NNRT inhibitors than oxazole derivatives. From this study, four pharmacophoric groups including a triazine ring, an aniline substituent, a benzyl amide moiety and a trimethylphenoxy substituent have been recognized and used for designing new NNRT inhibitors. Newly designed molecules show significant enhancement in docking scores over the native ligand, parent and other training set molecules. In addition, some functional groups have also been identified to assist in improving the activity of these pharmacophores. Thus a nitrile group, an amide and fluoro substitution turn out to be an important requisite for NNRT potential inhibitors. PMID:26973048

  5. The HCV non-nucleoside inhibitor Tegobuvir utilizes a novel mechanism of action to inhibit NS5B polymerase function.

    Hebner, Christy M; Han, Bin; Brendza, Katherine M; Nash, Michelle; Sulfab, Maisoun; Tian, Yang; Hung, Magdeleine; Fung, Wanchi; Vivian, Randall W; Trenkle, James; Taylor, James; Bjornson, Kyla; Bondy, Steven; Liu, Xiaohong; Link, John; Neyts, Johan; Sakowicz, Roman; Zhong, Weidong; Tang, Hengli; Schmitz, Uli

    2012-01-01

    Tegobuvir (TGV) is a novel non-nucleoside inhibitor (NNI) of HCV RNA replication with demonstrated antiviral activity in patients with genotype 1 chronic HCV infection. The mechanism of action of TGV has not been clearly defined despite the identification of resistance mutations mapping to the NS5B polymerase region. TGV does not inhibit NS5B enzymatic activity in biochemical assays in vitro, suggesting a more complex antiviral mechanism with cellular components. Here, we demonstrate that TGV exerts anti-HCV activity utilizing a unique chemical activation and subsequent direct interaction with the NS5B protein. Treatment of HCV subgenomic replicon cells with TGV results in a modified form of NS5B with a distinctly altered mobility on a SDS-PAGE gel. Further analysis reveals that the aberrantly migrating NS5B species contains the inhibitor molecule. Formation of this complex does not require the presence of any other HCV proteins. The intensity of the aberrantly migrating NS5B species is strongly dependent on cellular glutathione levels as well as CYP 1A activity. Furthermore analysis of NS5B protein purified from a heterologous expression system treated with TGV by mass spectrometry suggests that TGV undergoes a CYP- mediated intracellular activation step and the resulting metabolite, after forming a glutathione conjugate, directly and specifically interacts with NS5B. Taken together, these data demonstrate that upon metabolic activation TGV is a specific, covalent inhibitor of the HCV NS5B polymerase and is mechanistically distinct from other classes of the non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNI) of the viral polymerase. PMID:22720059

  6. The HCV non-nucleoside inhibitor Tegobuvir utilizes a novel mechanism of action to inhibit NS5B polymerase function.

    Christy M Hebner

    Full Text Available Tegobuvir (TGV is a novel non-nucleoside inhibitor (NNI of HCV RNA replication with demonstrated antiviral activity in patients with genotype 1 chronic HCV infection. The mechanism of action of TGV has not been clearly defined despite the identification of resistance mutations mapping to the NS5B polymerase region. TGV does not inhibit NS5B enzymatic activity in biochemical assays in vitro, suggesting a more complex antiviral mechanism with cellular components. Here, we demonstrate that TGV exerts anti-HCV activity utilizing a unique chemical activation and subsequent direct interaction with the NS5B protein. Treatment of HCV subgenomic replicon cells with TGV results in a modified form of NS5B with a distinctly altered mobility on a SDS-PAGE gel. Further analysis reveals that the aberrantly migrating NS5B species contains the inhibitor molecule. Formation of this complex does not require the presence of any other HCV proteins. The intensity of the aberrantly migrating NS5B species is strongly dependent on cellular glutathione levels as well as CYP 1A activity. Furthermore analysis of NS5B protein purified from a heterologous expression system treated with TGV by mass spectrometry suggests that TGV undergoes a CYP- mediated intracellular activation step and the resulting metabolite, after forming a glutathione conjugate, directly and specifically interacts with NS5B. Taken together, these data demonstrate that upon metabolic activation TGV is a specific, covalent inhibitor of the HCV NS5B polymerase and is mechanistically distinct from other classes of the non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNI of the viral polymerase.

  7. Viral resuppression and detection of drug resistance following interruption of a suppressive non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen

    Fox, Zoe; Phillips, Andrew; Cohen, Cal;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interruption of a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-regimen is often necessary, but must be performed with caution because NNRTIs have a low genetic barrier to resistance. Limited data exist to guide clinical practice on the best interruption strategy to use...

  8. Arylazolyl(azinyl)thioacetanilides. Part 20: Discovery of novel purinylthioacetanilides derivatives as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs via a structure-based bioisosterism approach.

    Lu, Xueyi; Li, Xiao; Yang, Jiapei; Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; Zhao, Fabao; Zhou, Zhongxia; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-15

    By means of structure-based bioisosterism approach, a series of novel purinylthioacetanilide derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Some of the tested compounds were found to be active against wild-type (WT) HIV-1(IIIB) with EC50 in the range of 0.78-4.46μM. Among them, LAD-8 displayed the most potent anti-HIV activity (EC50=0.78μM, SI=24). In addition, LBD-6 showed moderate activity against L100I mutant (EC50=5.64μM) and double mutant strain RES056 (EC50=22.24μM). Preliminary structure-activity relationships (SARs) were discussed in detail. Molecular modeling study was used to predict the optimal conformation in the NNRTI binding site, which may play a guiding role in further rational optimization. PMID:27501911

  9. Structural Aspects of Drug Resistance and Inhibition of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    Stefan G. Sarafianos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (HIV-1 RT has been the target of numerous approved anti-AIDS drugs that are key components of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapies (HAART. It remains the target of extensive structural studies that continue unabated for almost twenty years. The crystal structures of wild-type or drug-resistant mutant HIV RTs in the unliganded form or in complex with substrates and/or drugs have offered valuable glimpses into the enzyme’s folding and its interactions with DNA and dNTP substrates, as well as with nucleos(tide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTIs drugs. These studies have been used to interpret a large body of biochemical results and have paved the way for innovative biochemical experiments designed to elucidate the mechanisms of catalysis and drug inhibition of polymerase and RNase H functions of RT. In turn, the combined use of structural biology and biochemical approaches has led to the discovery of novel mechanisms of drug resistance and has contributed to the design of new drugs with improved potency and ability to suppress multi-drug resistant strains.

  10. Hiv-1 Drug Resistance Among Newly Hiv-1 Infected Individuals Attending Tertiary Referral Center in Chennai, India

    Hussain Syed Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In the era of free HAART, accessibility and availability of ARV has been dramatically increased in India. However, rates of treatment literacy and adherence appear to be sub-optimal. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the extent of primary drug resistance in such settings. Materials and Methods: Between July and October 2006, 18 anti-retroviral-naοve individuals were identified as recent infected by the BED-Capture enzyme immunoassay in a VCTC clinic in Chennai. Specimens from these individuals were subjected to genotypic drug resistance testing. Phylogenetic trees were generated using MEGA for Windows version 4.0 using neighbor-joining method. The significant differences in polymorphic mutation frequencies between the study specimens and established subtype C-specific polymorphisms were examined using the Chi-square test. Results: Amino acid substitution (K103N and V106MV at drug resistance positions occurred in two (11% isolates, conferring high-level resistance to the non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors nevirapine (NVP, efavirenz (EFV, delavirdine (DLV and notably extensive genetic variations were observed. K122E (94.4% and K49R/KR (11.1% polymorphisms identified in this study have not been previously described in established subtype-C specific polymorphisms. The rate of polymorphisms showed marked difference at the locations V60, D121, V35, and D123 (P < 0.0001. All the sequences showed maximum homology with Indian HIV-1 subtype C reference strain C.IN.95IN21068. Conclusions: The finding of resistance to NNRTIs is of public health importance. There is an urgent need to establish surveillance for primary drug resistance in large scale. Further studies are required to determine the phenotype impact of newer polymorphic mutations in relation to drug resistance and viral fitness.

  11. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  12. Methylation: a regulator of HIV-1 replication?

    Jeang Kuan-Teh; Yedavalli Venkat RK

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Recent characterizations of methyl transferases as regulators of cellular processes have spurred investigations into how methylation events might influence the HIV-1 life cycle. Emerging evidence suggests that protein-methylation can positively and negatively regulate HIV-1 replication. How DNA- and RNA- methylation might impact HIV-1 is also discussed.

  13. Recent advances in the discovery and development of novel HIV-1 NNRTI platforms (Part II): 2009-2013 update.

    Song, Yu'ning; Fang, Zengjun; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2014-01-01

    The long-term usage of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) eventually leads to rapid emergence of drug-resistant viruses and severe side effect. Therefore, it is imperative to seek the additional NNRTIs with potent and broad spectrum anti-mutant activities, and excellent pharmacokinetic profiles. The discovery of etravirine, rilpivirine and other successful examples has influenced the NNRTIs design strategy profoundly. Sustained efforts in this area have led to the identification of many promising NNRTIs hits, leads and candidates for the last few years. Hence, this review aims to highlight recent prominent advances in this field as well as contributions from our laboratory toward the discovery of novel potent NNRTIs from 2009 to 2013 (by May). PMID:24164196

  14. Diagnostik af HIV-1 infektionen

    Christiansen, C B; Dickmeiss, E; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    1991-01-01

    Different methods have been developed for the diagnosis of HIV infection, i.e. detection of antibodies, antigen and proviral DNA. ELISA methods for detecting HIV-1 antibodies are widely used as screening assays. A sample which is repeatedly positive with ELISA is re-tested with a confirmatory test......, e.g. western blot. Antibodies to HIV-1 are not detectable until 2-3 months after infection, but antigens may be detectable during the last weeks of this initial period, though they disappear with the appearance of the antibodies. In the later stages of HIV infection, HIV antigen is again detectable...... in a proportion of patients. Detection and quantitation of HIV antigen are used as indicators of disease progression and for monitoring the antiviral efficacy of therapeutic interventions. When no antibodies or antigens can be detected in persons suspected of having HIV infection, culture of HIV can...

  15. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

    Dollfus Catherine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%: drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8 suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10 and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8 suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%, drug

  16. Clinical significance of HIV-1 coreceptor usage

    Lusso Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of phenotypically distinct HIV-1 variants with different prevalence during the progression of the disease has been one of the earliest discoveries in HIV-1 biology, but its relevance to AIDS pathogenesis remains only partially understood. The physiological basis for the phenotypic variability of HIV-1 was elucidated with the discovery of distinct coreceptors employed by the virus to infect susceptible cells. The role of the viral phenotype in the variable clinical course and treatment outcome of HIV-1 infection has been extensively investigated over the past two decades. In this review, we summarize the major findings on the clinical significance of the HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  17. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo

  18. Purification and Biochemical Characterisation of Rabbit Calicivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases and Identification of Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors

    Nadya Urakova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV is a calicivirus that causes acute infections in both domestic and wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus. The virus causes significant economic losses in rabbit farming and reduces wild rabbit populations. The recent emergence of RHDV variants capable of overcoming immunity to other strains emphasises the need to develop universally effective antivirals to enable quick responses during outbreaks until new vaccines become available. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp is a primary target for the development of such antiviral drugs. In this study, we used cell-free in vitro assays to examine the biochemical characteristics of two rabbit calicivirus RdRps and the effects of several antivirals that were previously identified as human norovirus RdRp inhibitors. The non-nucleoside inhibitor NIC02 was identified as a potential scaffold for further drug development against rabbit caliciviruses. Our experiments revealed an unusually high temperature optimum (between 40 and 45 °C for RdRps derived from both a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus, possibly demonstrating an adaptation to a host with a physiological body temperature of more than 38 °C. Interestingly, the in vitro polymerase activity of the non-pathogenic calicivirus RdRp was at least two times higher than that of the RdRp of the highly virulent RHDV.

  19. Purification and Biochemical Characterisation of Rabbit Calicivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases and Identification of Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors

    Urakova, Nadya; Netzler, Natalie; Kelly, Andrew G.; Frese, Michael; White, Peter A.; Strive, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus that causes acute infections in both domestic and wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The virus causes significant economic losses in rabbit farming and reduces wild rabbit populations. The recent emergence of RHDV variants capable of overcoming immunity to other strains emphasises the need to develop universally effective antivirals to enable quick responses during outbreaks until new vaccines become available. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a primary target for the development of such antiviral drugs. In this study, we used cell-free in vitro assays to examine the biochemical characteristics of two rabbit calicivirus RdRps and the effects of several antivirals that were previously identified as human norovirus RdRp inhibitors. The non-nucleoside inhibitor NIC02 was identified as a potential scaffold for further drug development against rabbit caliciviruses. Our experiments revealed an unusually high temperature optimum (between 40 and 45 °C) for RdRps derived from both a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus, possibly demonstrating an adaptation to a host with a physiological body temperature of more than 38 °C. Interestingly, the in vitro polymerase activity of the non-pathogenic calicivirus RdRp was at least two times higher than that of the RdRp of the highly virulent RHDV. PMID:27089358

  20. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 strains in the south-east and east of Turkey

    Mustafa; Kemal; ?elen; Murat; Sayan; Tuba; Dal; Celal; Ayaz; Alicem; Tekin; Tuncer; ?zekinci; Suda; Tekin; Koruk; Tunga; Barcin; Recep; Tekin; Mehmet; Sinan; Dal; Sevgi; Kalkanl?

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To detect the subtype characterization and drug-resistant mutations in HIV-1 strains after the refugee movement from Syria to Turkey between 2011 and 2014 in south east border lines. Methods: A total of 65 patients were included in this study, of which 57(88%) patients were antiretroviral therapy-naive patients. HIV-1 RNA was detected and quantii ed by realtime PCR assay. HIV-1 subtypes and circulating recombinant forms(CRFs) were identii ed by phylogenetic analysis(neighbor-joining method), and drug-resistant mutations were analyzed.Results: Three major HIV groups were indicated. Two of these groups were located in subtype B. The other group showed heterogeneity. Subtype B(48/65, 73.8%), followed by CRFs(12/65, 18.5%) was the most common strain. Subtype of CRFs consisted of CRF01_AE(9/65, 13.8%) and CRF02_AG(3/65, 4.6%). Subtype C(1/65, 1.5%), sub-subtypes A1(2/65, 3.1%) and F1(2/65, 3.1%) were also detected with low prevalence. The rate of overall primary antiretroviral resistance was 4.9%(3/61). Drug-resistant rate for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was 4.9%. The thymidine analogue mutation rate was 13.1%(8/61).Conclusions: HIV molecular epidemiology studies are necessary to determine transmission patterns and spread. Subtype B and CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG are the most prevalent strains in the south-east of Turkey. However, subtype C, sub-subtypes A1 and F1 are of low prevalence but persist in the south-east of Turkey. In the near future, changing of HIV epidemiology will be possible in Turkey due to migration movement in border lines and resistance testing will play an important role in HIV management.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 strains in the south-east and east of Turkey

    Mustafa Kemal elen; Mehmet Sinan Dal; Sevgi Kalkanl; Murat Sayan; Tuba Dal; Celal Ayaz; Alicem Tekin; Tuncer zekinci; Suda Tekin Koruk; Tunga Barcin; Recep Tekin

    2015-01-01

    To detect the subtype characterization and drug-resistant mutations in HIV-1 strains after the refugee movement from Syria to Turkey between 2011 and 2014 in south east border lines. Methods: A total of 65 patients were included in this study, of which 57 (88%) patients were antiretroviral therapy-naive patients. HIV-1 RNA was detected and quantified by real-time PCR assay. HIV-1 subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) were identified by phylogenetic analysis (neighbor-joining method), and drug-resistant mutations were analyzed. Results: Three major HIV groups were indicated. Two of these groups were located in subtype B. The other group showed heterogeneity. Subtype B (48/65, 73.8%), followed by CRFs (12/65, 18.5%) was the most common strain. Subtype of CRFs consisted of CRF01_AE (9/65, 13.8%) and CRF02_AG (3/65, 4.6%). Subtype C (1/65, 1.5%), sub-subtypes A1 (2/65, 3.1%) and F1 (2/65, 3.1%) were also detected with low prevalence. The rate of overall primary antiretroviral resistance was 4.9% (3/61). Drug-resistant rate for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was 4.9%. The thymidine analogue mutation rate was 13.1% (8/61). Conclusions: HIV molecular epidemiology studies are necessary to determine transmission patterns and spread. Subtype B and CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG are the most prevalent strains in the south-east of Turkey. However, subtype C, sub-subtypes A1 and F1 are of low prevalence but persist in the south-east of Turkey. In the near future, changing of HIV epidemiology will be possible in Turkey due to migration movement in border lines and resistance testing will play an important role in HIV management.

  2. Adam Smith: Critical Theorist?

    Keith Tribe

    1999-01-01

    The bicentenary of Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations in 1976 was marked by the publication of a new complete edition of his works and correspondence, bringing together for the first time all extant published and unpublished writings. A basis was thereby provided for serious reconsideration of Adam Smith's work, and since the early 1980s many conventional assumptions concerning Smith's work and contemporary significance have been challenged. This paper surveys the foundations upon which this new,...

  3. The Lipid-Lowering Efficacy of Switching Within Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors in HIV-Infected Patients

    A. M. Bain

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present research is to evaluate the lipid lowering efficacy and safety of switching within non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI in HIV-infected patients. This is a multicenter, retrospective study utilizing a comprehensive electronic patient registry to identify all adult HIV-infected patients seen from October 1, 1998 through October 1, 2006, who substituted efavirenz for nevirapine (EFV→NVP or vice-versa (NVP→EFV, without change in other antiretrovirals. Lipid profiles before and after the switch were analyzed. A total of 124 patients were identified with 14 male (EFV→NVP, n = 9; NVP→EFV, n = 5 patients meeting the strict criteria for inclusion. An EFV→NVP switch resulted in significant reductions in TC -16% and non-HDL -25% (p≤0.02 and a trend towards a reduction in LDL-C -12%, TG -27%, TC/HDL -23%, TG/HDL -48% and an increase in HDL-C +15% without any changes to BMI, viral or immunological control. However, a NVP→EFV switch appeared to result in a non-significant worsening of LDL-C +29%, HDL-C -8%, TG +36%, non-HDL +28%, TC/HDL +57% and TG/HDL +46%. Lastly, more patients achieved their lipid goals when switched from EFV to NVP. These data suggest that switching from EFV to NVP-based HAART is associated with lipid improvement, however, switching from NVP to EFV-based HAART is associated with worsening of serum lipids.

  4. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Paulina Pawlica; Lionel Berthoux

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral capsid (CA) cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus), and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted d...

  5. HIV-1 associated dementia: symptoms and causes

    Khalili Kamel; Amini Shohreh; Ghafouri Mohammad; Sawaya Bassel E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), neuronal cell death remains a problem that is frequently found in the brains of HIV-1-infected patients. HAART has successfully prevented many of the former end-stage complications of AIDS, however, with increased survival times, the prevalence of minor HIV-1 associated cognitive impairment appears to be rising among AIDS patients. Further, HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) is still prevalent in treated patients as well a...

  6. HIV-1初始传播病毒药物敏感性研究%The sensitivity of transmitted/founder HIV-1 to anti-HIV drugs

    丁寄葳; 赵建元; 米泽云; 魏涛; 岑山

    2016-01-01

    人类免疫缺陷病毒(human immunodeficiency virus type 1,HIV-1)黏膜感染绝大多数由一个或者少数几个病毒建立并最终发展为系统感染,上述病毒称为初始传播病毒(transmitted/founder virus,T/F病毒).研究T/F病毒对不同抗HIV-1药物的敏感性,可为艾滋病高危人群提供优化的暴露前预防性治疗(pre-exposure prophylaxis,PrEP)策略.本文首先构建了含荧光素酶报告基因的T/F病毒单轮感染系统,进而分析比较了长期感染病毒和T/F病毒对不同抗HIV-1药物的敏感性.实验结果显示,与同一亚型的长期感染病毒相比,T/F病毒对HIV-1核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂(nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors,NRTIs)、整合酶抑制剂(integrase inhibitors,INIs)及蛋白酶抑制剂(protease inhibitors,PIs)的敏感性并没有表现出显著性差异(P>0.05),而对非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂(non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors,NNRTIs)表现出一定的耐药性,IC50显著提高(P<0.05).这一结果提示,对于艾滋病高危人群的暴露前预防性治疗应避免选择NNRTIs.

  7. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  8. Influence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (efavirenz and nevirapine on the pharmacodynamic activity of gliclazide in animal models

    Mastan SK

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes may occur as a result of HIV infection and/or its treatment. Gliclazide is a widely used drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Efavirenz and nevirapine are widely used non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection. The role of Efavirenz and nevirapine on the pharmacodynamic activity of gliclazide is not currently known. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of oral administration of efavirenz and nevirapine on blood glucose and investigate their effect on the activity of gliclazide in rats (normal and diabetic and rabbits to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the combination. Methods Studies in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats were conducted with oral doses of 2 mg/kg bd. wt. of gliclazide, 54 mg/kg bd. wt. of efavirenz or 18 mg/kg bd. wt. of nevirapine and their combination with adequate washout periods in between treatments. Studies in normal rabbits were conducted with 5.6 mg/1.5 kg bd. wt. of gliclazide, 42 mg/1.5 kg bd. wt. of efavirenz or 14 mg/1.5 kg bd. wt. of nevirapine and their combination given orally. Blood samples were collected at regular time intervals in rats from retro orbital puncture and by marginal ear vein puncture in rabbits. All the blood samples were analysed for blood glucose by GOD/POD method. Results Efavirenz and nevirapine alone have no significant effect on the blood glucose level in rats and rabbits. Gliclazide produced hypoglycaemic/antidiabetic activity in normal and diabetic rats with peak activity at 2 h and 8 h and hypoglycaemic activity in normal rabbits at 3 h. In combination, efavirenz reduced the effect of gliclazide in rats and rabbits, and the reduction was more significant with the single dose administration of efavirenz than multiple dose administration. In combination, nevirapine has no effect on the activity of gliclazide in rats and rabbits. Conclusion Thus, it can be concluded that the

  9. Sensitive assessment of the virologic outcomes of stopping and restarting non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Anna Maria Geretti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-resistant mutants have been shown to emerge after interruption of suppressive NNRTI-based antiretroviral therapy (ART using routine testing. The aim of this study was to quantify the risk of resistance by sensitive testing and correlate the detection of resistance with NNRTI concentrations after treatment interruption and virologic responses after treatment resumption. METHODS: Resistance-associated mutations (RAMs and NNRTI concentrations were studied in plasma from 132 patients who interrupted suppressive ART within SMART. RAMs were detected by Sanger sequencing, allele-specific PCR, and ultra-deep sequencing. NNRTI concentrations were measured by sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: Four weeks after NNRTI interruption, 19/31 (61.3% and 34/39 (87.2% patients showed measurable nevirapine (>0.25 ng/ml or efavirenz (>5 ng/ml concentrations, respectively. Median eight weeks after interruption, 22/131 (16.8% patients showed ≥1 NNRTI-RAM, including eight patients with NNRTI-RAMs detected only by sensitive testing. The adjusted odds ratio (OR of NNRTI-RAM detection was 7.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52, 38.30; p = 0.01 with nevirapine or efavirenz concentrations above vs. below the median measured in the study population. Staggered interruption, whereby nucleos(tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs were continued for median nine days after NNRTI interruption, did not prevent NNRTI-RAMs, but increased detection of NRTI-RAMs (OR 4.25; 95% CI 1.02, 17.77; p = 0.03. After restarting NNRTI-based ART (n = 90, virologic suppression rates <400 copies/ml were 8/13 (61.5% with NNRTI-RAMs, 7/11 (63.6% with NRTI-RAMs only, and 51/59 (86.4% without RAMs. The ORs of re-suppression were 0.18 (95% CI 0.03, 0.89 and 0.17 (95% CI 0.03, 1.15 for patients with NNRTI-RAMs or NRTI-RAMs only respectively vs. those without RAMs (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS

  10. Pharmacokinetics of the Experimental Non-Nucleosidic DNA Methyl Transferase Inhibitor N-Phthalyl-l-Tryptophan (RG 108) in Rats.

    Schneeberger, Yvonne; Stenzig, Justus; Hübner, Florian; Schaefer, Andreas; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    DNA methyl transferase (DNMT) inhibitors can re-establish the expression of tumour suppressor genes in malignant diseases, but might also be useful in other diseases. Inhibitors in clinical use are nucleosidic cytotoxic agents that need to be integrated into the DNA of dividing cells. Here, we assessed the in vivo kinetics of a non-nucleosidic inhibitor that is potentially free of cytotoxic effects and does not require cell division. The non-specific DNMT inhibitor N-phthalyl-l-tryptophan (RG 108) was injected subcutaneously in rats. Blood was drawn 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 24 hr after injection and RG 108 in plasma was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Trough levels and area under the curve (AUC) were significantly higher with multiple-dose administration and cytochrome inhibition. In this group, time to maximal plasma concentration (tmax , mean ± S.D.) was 37.5 ± 15 min., terminal plasma half-life was approximately 3.7 h (60% CI: 2.1-15.6 h), maximal plasma concentration (Cmax ) was 61.3 ± 7.6 μM, and AUC was 200 ± 54 μmol·h/l. RG 108 peak levels were not influenced by cytochrome inhibition or multiple-dose administration regimens. Maximal tissue levels (Cmax in μmol/kg) were 6.9 ± 6.7, 1.6 ± 0.4 and 3.4 ± 1.1 in liver, skeletal and heart muscle, respectively. We conclude that despite its high lipophilicity, RG 108 can be used for in vivo experiments, appears safe and yields plasma and tissue levels in the range of the described 50% inhibitory concentration of around 1 to 5 μM. RG 108 can therefore be a useful tool for in vivo DNMT inhibition. PMID:26525153

  11. Nevirapine and Efavirenz Elicit Different Changes in Lipid Profiles in Antiretroviral- Therapy-Naive Patients Infected with HIV-1

    van Leth Frank

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Patients infected with HIV-1 initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART containing a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI show presumably fewer atherogenic lipid changes than those initiating most ARTs containing a protease inhibitor. We analysed whether lipid changes differed between the two most commonly used NNRTIs, nevirapine (NVP and efavirenz (EFV. Methods and Findings Prospective analysis of lipids and lipoproteins was performed in patients enrolled in the NVP and EFV treatment groups of the 2NN study who remained on allocated treatment during 48 wk of follow-up. Patients were allocated to NVP (n = 417, or EFV (n = 289 in combination with stavudine and lamivudine. The primary endpoint was percentage change over 48 wk in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, total cholesterol (TC, TC:HDL-c ratio, non-HDL-c, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. The increase of HDL-c was significantly larger for patients receiving NVP (42.5% than for patients receiving EFV (33.7%; p = 0.036, while the increase in TC was lower (26.9% and 31.1%, respectively; p = 0.073, resulting in a decrease of the TC:HDL-c ratio for patients receiving NVP (-4.1% and an increase for patients receiving EFV (+5.9%; p < 0.001. The increase of non-HDL-c was smaller for patients receiving NVP (24.7% than for patients receiving EFV (33.6%; p = 0.007, as were the increases of triglycerides (20.1% and 49.0%, respectively; p < 0.001 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (35.0% and 40.0%, respectively; p = 0.378. These differences remained, or even increased, after adjusting for changes in HIV-1 RNA and CD4+ cell levels, indicating an effect of the drugs on lipids over and above that which may be explained by suppression of HIV-1 infection. The increases in HDL-c were of the same order of magnitude as those seen with the use of the investigational HDL-c-increasing drugs. Conclusion NVP-containing ART shows larger increases

  12. Conformational Plasticity of the NNRTI-Binding Pocket in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A Fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study.

    Sharaf, Naima G; Ishima, Rieko; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-07-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major drug target in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. RT inhibitors currently in use include non-nucleoside, allosteric RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), which bind to a hydrophobic pocket, distinct from the enzyme's active site. We investigated RT-NNRTI interactions by solution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using singly (19)F-labeled RT proteins. Comparison of (19)F chemical shifts of fluorinated RT and drug-resistant variants revealed that the fluorine resonance is a sensitive probe for identifying mutation-induced changes in the enzyme. Our data show that in the unliganded enzyme, the NNRTI-binding pocket is highly plastic and not locked into a single conformation. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding pocket becomes rigidified. In the inhibitor-bound state, the (19)F signal of RT is similar to that of drug-resistant mutant enzymes, distinct from what is observed for the free state. Our results demonstrate the power of (19)F NMR spectroscopy to characterize conformational properties using selectively (19)F-labeled protein. PMID:27163463

  13. Transmission dynamics of HIV-1 subtype B in the Basque Country, Spain.

    Patiño-Galindo, J A; Thomson, Michael M; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Delgado, Elena; Cuevas, María Teresa; Fernández-García, Aurora; Nájera, Rafael; Iribarren, José A; Cilla, Gustavo; López-Soria, Leyre; Lezaun, María J; Cisterna, Ramón; González-Candelas, F

    2016-06-01

    This work was aimed to study the HIV-1 subtype B epidemics in the Basque Country, Spain. 1727 HIV-1 subtype B sequences comprising protease and reverse transcriptase (PR/RT) coding regions, sampled between 2001 and 2008, were analyzed. 156 transmission clusters were detected by means of phylogenetic analyses. Most of them comprised less than 4 individuals and, in total, they included 441 patients. Six clusters comprised 10 or more patients and were further analyzed in order to study their origin and diversification. Four clusters included men who had unprotected homosexual sex (MSM), one group was formed by intravenous drug users (IDUs), and another included both IDUs and people infected through unprotected heterosexual sex (HTs). Most of these clusters originated from the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. Only one cluster, formed by MSM, originated after 2000. The time between infections was significantly lower in MSM groups than in those containing IDUs (P-value <0.0001). Nucleoside RT and non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI and NNRTI)-resistance mutations to antiretroviral treatment were found in these six clusters except the most recent MSM group, but only the IDU clusters presented protease inhibitor (PI)-resistance mutations. The most prevalent mutations for each inhibitor class were PI L90M, NRTI T215D/Y/F, and NNRTI K103N, which were also among the most prevalent resistant variants in the whole dataset. In conclusion, while most infections occur as isolated introductions into the population, the number of infections found to be epidemiologically related within the Basque Country is significant. Public health control measures should be reinforced to prevent the further expansion of transmission clusters and resistant mutations occurring within them. PMID:26921800

  14. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Paulina Pawlica

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral capsid (CA cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus, and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating.

  15. Cytoplasmic dynein promotes HIV-1 uncoating.

    Pawlica, Paulina; Berthoux, Lionel

    2014-11-01

    Retroviral capsid (CA) cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus), and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC) using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable) CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating. PMID:25375884

  16. In vitro uncoating of HIV-1 cores.

    Shah, Vaibhav B; Aiken, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the retroviruses is encased in a capsid surrounded by a lipid envelope. For lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, the conical capsid shell is composed of CA protein arranged as a lattice of hexagon. The capsid is closed by 7 pentamers at the broad end and 5 at the narrow end of the cone(1, 2). Encased in this capsid shell is the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, and together they comprise the core. Following fusion of the viral membrane with the target cell membrane, the HIV-1 is released into the cytoplasm. The capsid then disassembles releasing free CA in the soluble form(3) in a process referred to as uncoating. The intracellular location and timing of HIV-1 uncoating are poorly understood. Single amino-acid substitutions in CA that alter the stability of the capsid also impair the ability of HIV-1 to infect cells(4). This indicates that the stability of the capsid is critical for HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 uncoating has been difficult to study due to lack of availability of sensitive and reliable assays for this process. Here we describe a quantitative method for studying uncoating in vitro using cores isolated from infectious HIV-1 particles. The approach involves isolation of cores by sedimentation of concentrated virions through a layer of detergent and into a linear sucrose gradient, in the cold. To quantify uncoating, the isolated cores are incubated at 37°C for various timed intervals and subsequently pelleted by ultracentrifugation. The extent of uncoating is analyzed by quantifying the fraction of CA in the supernatant. This approach has been employed to analyze effects of viral mutations on HIV-1 capsid stability(4, 5, 6). It should also be useful for studying the role of cellular factors in HIV-1 uncoating. PMID:22105356

  17. In vitro Uncoating of HIV-1 Cores

    Shah, Vaibhav B.; Aiken, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the retroviruses is encased in a capsid surrounded by a lipid envelope. For lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, the conical capsid shell is composed of CA protein arranged as a lattice of hexagon. The capsid is closed by 7 pentamers at the broad end and 5 at the narrow end of the cone1, 2. Encased in this capsid shell is the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, and together they comprise the core. Following fusion of the viral membrane with the target cell membrane, the HIV-1 is released into the cytoplasm. The capsid then disassembles releasing free CA in the soluble form3 in a process referred to as uncoating. The intracellular location and timing of HIV-1 uncoating are poorly understood. Single amino-acid substitutions in CA that alter the stability of the capsid also impair the ability of HIV-1 to infect cells4. This indicates that the stability of the capsid is critical for HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 uncoating has been difficult to study due to lack of availability of sensitive and reliable assays for this process. Here we describe a quantitative method for studying uncoating in vitro using cores isolated from infectious HIV-1 particles. The approach involves isolation of cores by sedimentation of concentrated virions through a layer of detergent and into a linear sucrose gradient, in the cold. To quantify uncoating, the isolated cores are incubated at 37°C for various timed intervals and subsequently pelleted by ultracentrifugation. The extent of uncoating is analyzed by quantifying the fraction of CA in the supernatant. This approach has been employed to analyze effects of viral mutations on HIV-1 capsid stability4, 5, 6. It should also be useful for studying the role of cellular factors in HIV-1 uncoating. PMID:22105356

  18. HIV-1 RNA quantification in CRF02_AG HIV-1 infection: too easy to make mistakes.

    Tatarelli, Paola; Taramasso, Lucia; Di Biagio, Antonio; Sticchi, Laura; Nigro, Nicola; Barresi, Renata; Viscoli, Claudio; Bruzzone, Bianca

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients newly infected by HIV-1 non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) is increasing worldwide, including in the western countries. We report on a primary HIV-1 infection in a Caucasian patient. A routine quantitative assay (Nuclisens EasyQ HIV-1 2.0, BioMérieux SA) showed 6,700 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. A combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) consistent with low baseline HIV-1 RNA was started. Few days later, the analysis performed with REGA HIV-1 Subtyping Tool - Version 3.0 attributed the HIV-1 sequence to the CRF02_AG recombinant form. Therefore, a second real-time PCR assay was performed, using the Versant HIV-1 RNA 1.0 Assay (kPCR) (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics) which revealed a HIV-1 RNA of 230,000 copies/ml. Consequently, the ongoing cART was potentiated. This case suggests that the wide genetic variability of HIV-1 subtypes may affect the capability of the commonly used assays to detect and accurately quantify HIV-1 RNA in non-B subtypes and CRFs. In presence of CRFs different commercial HIV-1 RNA tests should be performed to find the most reliable for viral load quantification at the diagnosis, because it influences the choice of cART, and during the follow-up. Indeed, international guidelines for HIV-1 infection management suggest to monitor patient' HIV-RNA with the same assay over the course of treatment. As different commercial tests can be performed in the same laboratory with considerable difficulty, the laboratory should select an assay that is suitable not only for the more prevalent strain, but also for less frequent ones that, nevertheless, can occur. Then, knowing and investigating the spread of non-B strains has essential clinical and laboratory implications. PMID:27196556

  19. The prevalence and determinants of drug-resistance-associated mutations in the HIV-1-infected MSM population of Henan Province in China.

    Hou, Li-Juan; Wang, Hong-Wei; Duan, Shu-Peng; Zhuo, Ya; Zhou, Yan-Cai; Wu, Hong-Jie; Shen, Bao-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    To estimate the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance (DR) in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM) from Henan Province of China and to identify the DR-associated HIV-1 mutations in these MSM. The HIV-positive status of the MSM subjects in this study was confirmed using ELISA and Western blotting. The MSM subjects were classified into non-treatment group (n = 106) and treatment group (n = 313). CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts were obtained by flow cytometry, and viral load was measured by branched DNA (bDNA) signal amplification assay. HIV-1 genotypic resistance tests were performed by sequence analysis of the HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase genes. In the non-treatment group, 15 patients (14.2 %) displayed DR to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). In the treatment group, the failure rate of viral suppression was 38.33 % and the DR rate was 33.2 %, which was higher than the rate observed in the non-treatment group (P homosexual orientation are the major risk factors for DR in this MSM population (all P homosexual orientation were identified as the risk factors for DR in the MSM population from Henan Province in China. PMID:26077516

  20. HIV-1 Eradication: Early Trials (and Tribulations).

    Spivak, Adam M; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV-1 infection a manageable illness for those with access to treatment. However, ART does not lead to viral eradication owing to the persistence of replication-competent, unexpressed proviruses in long-lived cellular reservoirs. The potential for long-term drug toxicities and the lack of access to ART for most people living with HIV-1 infection have fueled scientific interest in understanding the nature of this latent reservoir. Exploration of HIV-1 persistence at the cellular and molecular level in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, the predominant viral reservoir in patients on ART, has uncovered potential strategies to reverse latency. We review recent advances in pharmacologically based 'shock and kill' HIV-1 eradication strategies, including comparative analysis of early clinical trials. PMID:26691297

  1. Small animal model for HIV-1 Disease

    Yoshio; Koyanagi

    2005-01-01

    Development of a viral infection model of the humanimmune systemusingsmall animalsis animportant goal in biomedi-cal research,especiallyinstudiesof HIV-1infection.Thisis particularlyimportant since susceptibilityto HIV-1islimit-edto humans.The C.B-17-scid/scid-mouselacks mature Tand Bcells dueto a defective rearrangement of the Tcell re-ceptor andimmunoglobulin genes.Twotypes of humanlymphoid chimeras have been establishedin scid-mice.The firstsuccess withthe human mouse chimera was achieved.Human fetal liv...

  2. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Campbell, Mary S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Mullins, James I [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Hughes, James P [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wong, Kim G [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Raugi, Dana N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Scrensen, Stefanie [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  3. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  4. Infected Cell Killing by HIV-1 Protease Promotes NF-κB Dependent HIV-1 Replication

    Bren, Gary D.; Joe Whitman; Nathan Cummins; Brett Shepard; Rizza, Stacey A; Trushin, Sergey A.; Badley, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Acute HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells often results in apoptotic death of infected cells, yet it is unclear what evolutionary advantage this offers to HIV-1. Given the independent observations that acute T cell HIV-1 infection results in (1) NF-kappaB activation, (2) caspase 8 dependent apoptosis, and that (3) caspase 8 directly activates NF-kappaB, we questioned whether these three events might be interrelated. We first show that HIV-1 infected T cell apoptosis, NF-kappaB activation, and casp...

  5. The role of ADAMs in disease pathophysiology.

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    The ADAMs are a family of multidomain transmembrane and secreted proteins involved in both proteolysis and cell adhesion. Altered expression of specific ADAMs is implicated in the pathophysiology of several diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer\\'s disease, cardiac hypertrophy, asthma and cancer. Of these different diseases, it is in cancer where most research has been carried out. Multiple ADAMs, including ADAM-9, ADAM-10, ADAM-12, ADAM-15 and ADAM-17, have been shown to play a role in either cancer formation or progression. Consistent with these findings, increased expression of specific ADAMs in several cancer types was found to correlate with features of aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Currently, selective ADAM inhibitors against ADAM-10 and ADAM-17 are undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Further work is required in order to establish a causative role for ADAMs in rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer\\'s disease, cardiac hypertrophy and asthma.

  6. Sentinel surveillance of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance, acute infection and recent infection.

    Hong-Ha M Truong

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acute infection, recent infection and transmitted drug resistance screening was integrated into voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT services to enhance the existing surveillance program in San Francisco. This study describes newly-diagnosed HIV cases and characterizes correlates associated with infection.A consecutive sample of persons presenting for HIV VCT at the municipal sexually transmitted infections (STI clinic from 2004 to 2006 (N = 9,868 were evaluated by standard enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA. HIV antibody-positive specimens were characterized as recent infections using a less-sensitive EIA. HIV-RNA pooled testing was performed on HIV antibody-negative specimens to identify acute infections. HIV antibody-positive and acute infection specimens were evaluated for drug resistance by sequence analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations. The 380 newly-diagnosed HIV cases included 29 acute infections, 128 recent infections, and 47 drug-resistant cases, with no significant increases or decreases in prevalence over the three years studied. HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 11.0% in 2004, 13.4% in 2005 and 14.9% in 2006 (p = 0.36. Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI was the most common pattern detected, present in 28 cases of resistance (59.6%. Among MSM, recent infection was associated with amphetamine use (AOR = 2.67; p<0.001, unprotected anal intercourse (AOR = 2.27; p<0.001, sex with a known HIV-infected partner (AOR = 1.64; p = 0.02, and history of gonorrhea (AOR = 1.62; p = 0.03.New HIV diagnoses, recent infections, acute infections and transmitted drug resistance prevalence remained stable between 2004 and 2006. Resistance to NNRTI comprised more than half of the drug-resistant cases, a worrisome finding given its role as the backbone of first-line antiretroviral therapy in San Francisco as well as worldwide. The integration of HIV-1 drug

  7. Measuring enzymatic HIV-1 susceptibility to two reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a rapid and simple approach to HIV-1 drug-resistance testing.

    Dieter Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective approaches for HIV drug-resistance testing are highly desirable for managing increasingly expanding HIV-1 infected populations who initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly in resource-limited settings. Non-nucleoside reverse trancriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based regimens with an NRTI backbone containing lamivudine (3TC or emtricitabine (FTC are preferred first ART regimens. Failure with these drug combinations typically involves the selection of NNRTI- and/or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses. Therefore, the availability of simple assays to measure both types of drug resistance is critical. We have developed a high throughput screening test for assessing enzymatic resistance of the HIV-1 RT in plasma to 3TC/FTC and NNRTIs. The test uses the sensitive "Amp-RT" assay with a newly-developed real-time PCR format to screen biochemically for drug resistance in single reactions containing either 3TC-triphosphate (3TC-TP or nevirapine (NVP. Assay cut-offs were defined based on testing a large panel of subtype B and non-subtype B clinical samples with known genotypic profiles. Enzymatic 3TC resistance correlated well with the presence of M184I/V, and reduced NVP susceptibility was strongly associated with the presence of K103N, Y181C/I, Y188L, and G190A/Q. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting resistance were 97.0% and 96.0% in samples with M184V, and 97.4% and 96.2% for samples with NNRTI mutations, respectively. We further demonstrate the utility of an HIV capture method in plasma by using magnetic beads coated with CD44 antibody that eliminates the need for ultracentifugation. Thus our results support the use of this simple approach for distinguishing WT from NNRTI- or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses in clinical samples. This enzymatic testing is subtype-independent and can assist in the clinical management of diverse populations particularly in resource-limited settings.

  8. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  9. μ-opioid modulation of HIV-1 coreceptor expressionand HIV-1 replication

    A substantial proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals are intravenous drug users (IVDUs) who abuse opiates. Opioids induce a number of immunomodulatory effects that may directly influence HIV-1 disease progression. In the present report, we have investigated the effect of opioids on the expression of the major HIV-1 coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5. For these studies we have focused on opiates which are ligands for the μ-opioid receptor. Our results show that DAMGO, a selective μ-opioid agonist, increases CXCR4 and CCR5 expression in both CD3+ lymphoblasts and CD14+ monocytes three- to fivefold. Furthermore, DAMGO-induced elevation of HIV-1 coreceptor expression translates into enhanced replication of both X4 and R5 viral strains of HIV-1. We have confirmed the role of the μ-opioid receptor based on the ability of a μ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist to block the effects of DAMGO. We have also found that morphine enhances CXCR4 and CCR5 expression and subsequently increases both X4 and R5 HIV-1 infection. We suggest that the capacity of μ-opioids to increase HIV-1 coreceptor expression and replication may promote viral binding, trafficking of HIV-1-infected cells, and enhanced disease progression

  10. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  11. TopoisomeraseIIβ in HIV-1 transactivation.

    Chekuri, Anil; Bhaskar, C; Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-03-01

    TopoisomeraseIIβ, an isoform of type II topoisomerase, was found to be functional in various viral infections. Its plausible role in HIV life cycle was also suggested earlier, but not clearly established. In the present study, we have investigated the role of TopoIIβ in HIV-1 infection by its gain and loss of function. Overexpression of TopoIIβ lead to an increase in viral replication, resulting in enhanced virion production. HIV-1 replication was impaired when TopoIIβ was down regulated by siRNA and inhibited by ICRF-193 and merbarone. The role of TopoIIβ in HIV-1 transcription was shown through its interaction with Tat and recruitement to long terminal repeat (LTR) region by co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assays. Involvement of TopoIIβ in transactivation of HIV-1 LTR was confirmed by luciferase assay in reporter cell line, TZM bl and also by transfection of reporter exogenously. It was also observed that LTR transactivation commensurated with the expression of TopoIIβ in the presence of Tat. In addition, a decreased viral gene expression on treatment with merbarone exemplifies the importance of catalytic activity of TopoIIβ in viral replication. These observations indicate that TopoIIβ is involved in the cascade of coactivator complexes that are recruited to LTR for regulation of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:26876283

  12. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results. PMID:16839248

  13. Significant impact of non-B HIV-1 variants genetic diversity in Gabon on plasma HIV-1 RNA quantitation

    Mouinga-Ondeme, A.; Mabika-Mabika, A.; Alalade, P.; Mongo, A. D.; Sica, J.; Liégeois, Florian; Rouet, F.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of HIV-1 RNA viral load assays are lacking in Central Africa. The main objective of our study was to assess the reliability of HIV-1 RNA results obtained with three different assays for samples collected in Gabon. A total of 137 plasma specimens were assessed for HIV-1 RNA using the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (R) and Nuclisens HIV-1 EasyQ (R) version 2.0 assays. It included HIV-1 non-B samples (n = 113) representing six subtypes, 10 CRFs and 18 URFs from patients infected with HIV-1 an...

  14. Discovery of Potent Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors of Dengue Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase from a Fragment Hit Using Structure-Based Drug Design.

    Yokokawa, Fumiaki; Nilar, Shahul; Noble, Christian G; Lim, Siew Pheng; Rao, Ranga; Tania, Stefani; Wang, Gang; Lee, Gladys; Hunziker, Jürg; Karuna, Ratna; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Shi, Pei-Yong; Smith, Paul W

    2016-04-28

    The discovery and optimization of non-nucleoside dengue viral RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) inhibitors are described. An X-ray-based fragment screen of Novartis' fragment collection resulted in the identification of a biphenyl acetic acid fragment 3, which bound in the palm subdomain of RdRp. Subsequent optimization of the fragment hit 3, relying on structure-based design, resulted in a >1000-fold improvement in potency in vitro and acquired antidengue activity against all four serotypes with low micromolar EC50 in cell-based assays. The lead candidate 27 interacts with a novel binding pocket in the palm subdomain of the RdRp and exerts a promising activity against all clinically relevant dengue serotypes. PMID:26984786

  15. John Adams in 1959

    1959-01-01

    On 24 November 1959, the Proton Synchrotron accelerated particles to 24 GeV. John Adams, leader of the construction team, announced the achievement in the Main Auditorium. In his hand can be seen an empty vodka bottle, which he had received from Nikitin with the message that it was to be drunk when CERN passed Dubna's world record energy of 10 Gev. The bottle now contains a polaroid photograph of the 24 GeV pulse ready to be sent to the Soviet Union.

  16. Adam Smith's Invisible Hands

    Persky, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    William Grampp’s JPE article on Adam Smith is creative and provocative. It errs, however, by disparaging the invisible hand’s importance as a symbol of various economic processes that help societies prosper in ways that individuals neither intend nor comprehend. Four specific problems stand out. First, Grampp unsoundly tries to limit the relevance of the invisible hand within the Wealth of Nations to situations in which a merchant increases domestic capital and strengthens national defens...

  17. Predicting Pregnancy in HIV-1-Discordant Couples

    Guthrie, Brandon L.; Choi, Robert Y.; Bosire, Rose; Kiarie, James N.; Mackelprang, Romel D.; Gatuguta, Anne; John-Stewart, Grace C.; FARQUHAR, Carey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the incidence and predictors of pregnancy in HIV-1-discordant couples from Nairobi, Kenya. Women from 454 discordant couples were followed for up to 2 years. One-year cumulative incidence of pregnancy was 9.7%. Pregnancy rates did not differ significantly between HIV-1-infected and uninfected women (HR = 1.46). The majority of pregnancies occurred among women < 30 years old reporting a desire for future children (1-year incidence 22.2%). Pregnancy rates may be high among d...

  18. Lipid domains in HIV-1 assembly

    CyrilFavard

    2014-01-01

    In CD+ 4 T cells, HIV-1 buds from the host cell plasma membrane. The viral Gag polyprotein is mainly responsible for this process. However, the intimate interaction of Gag and lipids at the plasma membrane as well as its consequences, in terms of lipids lateral organization and virus assembly, is still under debate. In this review we propose to revisit the role of plasma membrane lipids in HIV-1 Gag targeting and assembly, at the light of lipid membranes biophysics and literature dealing with...

  19. HIV-1 therapy with monoclonal antibody 3BNC117 elicits host immune responses against HIV-1

    Schoofs, Till; Klein, Florian; Braunschweig, Malte; Kreider, Edward F.; Feldmann, Anna; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; West, Anthony P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Seaman, Michael S.; Czartoski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    3BNC117 is a broad and potent neutralizing antibody to HIV-1 that targets the CD4 binding site on the viral envelope spike. When administered passively, this antibody can prevent infection in animal models and suppress viremia in HIV-1–infected individuals. Here we report that HIV-1 immunotherapy with a single injection of 3BNC117 affects host antibody responses in viremic individuals. In comparison to untreated controls that showed little change in their neutralizing activity over a 6-month ...

  20. Immunodeficient Parameters in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Model

    Chang, Sulie L.; Frank Ocasio; Joseq A. Beltran

    2007-01-01

    Recently an HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat model was created that carries a gag-pol-deleted HIV-1 genome under the control of the HIV-1 viral promoter. However, other viral proteins are expressed in most organs and tissues, and are found in the circulating blood. Since HIV-1 targets the immune system in humans, we examined two immunological parameters, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion (LEA) and inflammatory cytokine production, in 5 mo old HIV-1Tg rats to identify immune functions that may be i...

  1. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    Li Huang

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  2. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:27199430

  3. Discovery of novel inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through virtual screening of experimental and theoretical ensembles.

    Ivetac, Anthony; Swift, Sara E; Boyer, Paul L; Diaz, Arturo; Naughton, John; Young, John A T; Hughes, Stephen H; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are potent anti-HIV chemotherapeutics. Although there are FDA-approved NNRTIs, challenges such as the development of resistance have limited their utility. Here, we describe the identification of novel NNRTIs through a combination of computational and experimental approaches. Based on the known plasticity of the NNRTI binding pocket (NNIBP), we adopted an ensemble-based virtual screening strategy: coupling receptor conformations from 10 X-ray crystal structures with 120 snapshots from a total of 480 ns of molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. A screening library of 2864 National Cancer Institute (NCI) compounds was built and docked against the ensembles in a hierarchical fashion. Sixteen diverse compounds were tested for their ability to block HIV infection in human tissue cultures using a luciferase-based reporter assay. Three promising compounds were further characterized, using a HIV-1 RT-based polymerase assay, to determine the specific mechanism of inhibition. We found that 2 of the three compounds inhibited the polymerase activity of RT (with potency similar to the positive control, the FDA-approved drug nevirapine). Through a computational approach, we were able to discover two compounds which inhibit HIV replication and block the activity of RT, thus offering the potential for optimization into mature inhibitors. PMID:24405985

  4. Prevalence of drug resistance mutations in HAART patients infected with HIV-1 CRF06_cpx in Estonia.

    Avi, Radko; Pauskar, Merit; Karki, Tõnis; Kallas, Eveli; Jõgeda, Ene-Ly; Margus, Tõnu; Huik, Kristi; Lutsar, Irja

    2016-03-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance mutations (DRMs) and substitutions were assessed after the failure of the first line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) + 2 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) treatment regimens (efavirenz [EFV] + lamivudine[3TC] + zidovudine [ZDV] vs. EFV + 3TC + ddI) among the HIV-1 CRF06_cpx infected subjects in Estonia. HIV-1 genomic RNA was sequenced; DRMs and amino acid substitutions were compared in 44 treatment naïve and 45 first-line NNRTI + 2 NRTI treatment failed patients consisting of EFV + 3TC + ZDV (n = 17) and EFV + 3TC + didanosine[ddI] (n = 21) therapy failed sub-populations. At least one DRM was found in 78% of treatment experienced patients. The most common NRTI mutations were M184V (80%), L74V (31%), L74I (17%), K219E (9%), and M184I (9%), NNRTI mutations were K103N (83%), P225H (14%), L100I (11%), and Y188L (11%), reflecting generally the similar pattern of DRMs to that seen in treatment failed subtype B viruses. Sub-population analysis revealed that EFV + 3TC + ddI failed patients had more DRMs compared to EFV + 3TC + ZDV failed patients, especially the ddI DRM L74IV and several additional NNRTI DRMs. Additionally, CRF06_cpx specific mutation E179V and substitutions R32K, K122E, and V200AE were also detected in treatment experienced population. After the failure of the first-line EFV + 3TC + ddI therapy HIV-1 CRF06_cpx viruses develop additional NRTI and NNRTI mutations compared to EFV + 3TC + ZDV regimen. Therefore the usage of EFV + 3TC + ddI in this subtype decreases the options for next regimens containing abacavir, and NNRTI class agents. PMID:26291050

  5. Adam Smith's contribution to secularisation

    Petrus Simons

    2013-01-01

    This article examined several crucial themes in Adam Smith’s philosophy with the purpose of highlighting and assessing his contribution to the secularisation of Western society. The article, written from the perspective of reformational philosophy, begins with a brief biography and sketch of Adam Smith’s influence on modern society, followed by a summary of Ponti Venter’s view on Smith. This sets the scene for a discussion of Adam Smith’s project, his method of tackling it, and his views on s...

  6. Novel HIV-1 Therapeutics through Targeting Altered Host Cell Pathways

    Coley, William; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Van Duyne, Rachel; KASHANCHI, FATAH

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) strains presents a challenge for the design of new drugs. Anti-HIV compounds currently in use are the subject of advanced clinical trials using either HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase, viral protease, or integrase inhibitors. Recent studies show an increase in the number of HIV-1 variants resistant to anti-retroviral agents in newly infected individuals. Targeting host cell factors involved in the regulation of HIV-1 repli...

  7. HIV-1 vaccine design: Learning from natural infection

    T.L.G.M. van den Kerkhof

    2016-01-01

    Het humane immuundeficiëntie virus type 1 (hiv-1) is het virus dat aids veroorzaakt. Er is nog steeds geen bescherming tegen een hiv-1 infectie en de beëindiging van de wereldwijde epidemie kan waarschijnlijk alleen worden bereikt met behulp van een vaccin. Een hiv-1 vaccin zal bescherming moeten bi

  8. NKT cells in HIV-1 infection

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell population that have important immunoregulatory functions and have been shown to be involved in host immunity against a range of microorganisms. It also emerges that they might play a role in HIV-1 infection, and therefore be selectively depleted during the early stages of infection. Recent studies are reviewed regarding the dynamics of NKT depletion during HIV-I infection and their recovery under highly active antiretrovirai treatment (HAART). Possible mechanisms for these changes are proposed based on the recent developments in HIV pathogenesis. Further discussions are focused on HIV's disruption of NKT activation by downregulating CDId expression on antigen presentation cells (APC). HIV-1 protein Nefis found to play the major role by interrupting the intraceilular trafficking of nascent and recycling CDId molecules.

  9. Intestinal microbiota and HIV-1 infection

    E. B. S. M. Trindade

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota consists of a qualitatively and quantitatively diverse range of microorganisms dynamically interacting with the host. It is remarkably stable with regard to the presence of microorganisms and their roles which, however, can be altered due to pathological conditions, diet composition, gastrointestinal disturbances and/or drug ingestion. The present review aimed at contributing to the discussion about changes in the intestinal microbiota due to HIV-1 infection, focusing on the triad infection-microbiota-nutrition as factors that promote intestinal bacterial imbalance. Intestinal microbiota alterations can be due to the HIV-1 infection as a primary factor or the pharmacotherapy employed, or they can be one of the consequences of the disease.

  10. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on ef...

  11. Novel Approaches to Inhibiting HIV-1 Replication

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, and more than two-dozen antiretroviral drugs are available targeting several distinct steps in the viral replication cycle. However, resistance to these compounds emerges readily, even in the context of combination therapy. Drug toxicity, adverse drug-drug interactions, and accompanying poor patient adherence can also lead to treatment failure. These considerations make continued development of novel antiretroviral th...

  12. In vitro Uncoating of HIV-1 Cores

    Shah, Vaibhav B.; Aiken, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the retroviruses is encased in a capsid surrounded by a lipid envelope. For lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, the conical capsid shell is composed of CA protein arranged as a lattice of hexagon. The capsid is closed by 7 pentamers at the broad end and 5 at the narrow end of the cone1, 2. Encased in this capsid shell is the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, and together they comprise the core.

  13. Methamphetamine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in CD4+ T Cells by Modulating Anti–HIV-1 miRNA Expression

    Mantri, Chinmay K.; Mantri, Jyoti V.; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamph...

  14. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    Di Nunzio, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.di-nunzio@pasteur.fr [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Fricke, Thomas [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Miccio, Annarita [University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Centro di Medicina Rigenerativa, Modena (Italy); Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Souque, Philippe [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco [Institute of Biomedical Technologies, CNR, Milano (Italy); Mavilio, Fulvio [University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Centro di Medicina Rigenerativa, Modena (Italy); Genethon, Evry (France); Charneau, Pierre [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Diaz-Griffero, Felipe, E-mail: felipe.diaz-griffero@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  15. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites

  16. A radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease

    A rapid, high-throughput radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease has been developed using ion-exchange chromatography performed in 96-well filtration plates. The assay monitors the activity of the HIV-1 protease on the radiolabeled form of a heptapeptide substrate, [tyrosyl-3,5-3H]Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2, which is based on the p17-p24 cleavage site found in the viral polyprotein substrate Pr55gag. Specific cleavage of this uncharged heptapeptide substrate by HIV-1 protease releases the anionic product [tyrosyl-3,5-3H]Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr, which is retained upon minicolumns of the anion-exchange resin AG1-X8. Protease activity is determined from the recovery of this radiolabeled product following elution with formic acid. This facile and highly sensitive assay may be utilized for steady-state kinetic analysis of the protease, for measurements of enzyme activity during its purification, and as a routine assay for the evaluation of protease inhibitors from natural product or synthetic sources

  17. Morphogenesis of the infectious HIV-1 virion

    Jun-Ichi eSakuragi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The virion of HIV-1 is spherical and viral glycoprotein spikes (gp120, gp41 protrude from its envelope. The characteristic cone-shaped core exists within the virion, caging the ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex, which is comprised of viral RNA, nucleocapsid (NC and viral enzymes. The HIV-1 virion is budded and released from the infected cell as an immature donut-shaped particle. During or immediately after release, viral protease (PR is activated and subsequently processes the viral structural protein Gag. Through this maturation process, virions acquire infectivity, but its mechanism and transition of morphology largely remain unclear. Recent technological advances in experimental devices and techniques have made it possible to closely dissect the viral production site on the cell, the exterior – or even the interior – of an individual virion, and many new aspects on virion morphology and maturation. In this manuscript, I review the morphogenesis of HIV-1 virions. I focus on several studies, including some of our recent findings, which examined virion formation and/or maturation processes. The story of novel compound, which inhibits virion maturation, and the importance of maturation research are also discussed.

  18. Adam Smith and dependency.

    Ozler, Sule

    2012-06-01

    The focus of this paper is the works and life of Adam Smith, who is widely recognized as the father and founder of contemporary economics. Latent content analysis is applied to his seminal text in economics, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). The results reveal that Smith considers dependence on others a problem and sees the solution to this problem in impersonalized interdependence. In addition, his views on social dependency and personal dependency, reflected in his Lectures on Jurisprudence (1963) and The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), are analyzed. This analysis suggests a central tension between dependence and independence in Smith's writings. The personal dependency patterns he exhibited in his life, which also suggest a tension between dependence and independence, are identified through a reading of his biographies. Based on insights from psychoanalytic literature, this paper proposes that developing the ideas in the Wealth of Nations was part of Smith's creative solution to this tension. In particular, his solution to one individual's dependence on another was through a system of impersonalized interdependence. In other words, Smith defended against his personal dependence through his economic theorizing. PMID:22712591

  19. John Adams Lecture

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    13 December 2010 14:30 - Council Chamber, Bldg.503-1-001 Accelerator Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron Collider V. Shiltsev / Fermilab’s Accelerator Physics Centre This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron. For two and a half decades the Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics as the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8 TeV center of mass energy. While funding agencies are deciding on a 3-year extension of the Collider Run II operation through 2014, we – in this 2010 John Adams Lecture - will take a look in exciting story of the Tevatron: the story of long preparations, great expectations, numerous difficulties, years of “blood and sweat”, continuous upgrades, exceeding original goals (by a factor of 400) and high emotions. An accelerator scientist prospective will be given on a wide spectrum o...

  20. Immunodeficient Parameters in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Model

    Sulie L. Chang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently an HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rat model was created that carries a gag-pol-deleted HIV-1 genome under the control of the HIV-1 viral promoter. However, other viral proteins are expressed in most organs and tissues, and are found in the circulating blood. Since HIV-1 targets the immune system in humans, we examined two immunological parameters, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion (LEA and inflammatory cytokine production, in 5 mo old HIV-1Tg rats to identify immune functions that may be impaired even before the onset of symptoms of HIV-1 infection. We administered a single injection (i.p. of the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 250 ug/kg, to 5 mo old HIV-1Tg rats, age-matched transgenic control (Tg rats, and F344/NHsd (F344 control background strain rats. LPS induced an LEA response in both the Tg control and F344 control animals. However, in the HIV-1Tg rats, there was no LEA response to LPS. Following LPS administration, there was significantly greater serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, two pro-inflammatory cytokines, in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to the control animals. In contrast, the serum level of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was comparable in the HIV-1Tg, Tg control, and F344 control rats. Our data show that, in the HIV-1Tg rat, there is a negative correlation between the LEA response and the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to bacterial endotoxin. These findings suggest that the persistent presence of viral proteins may be, at least, partially responsible for the immunodeficiency that occurs with HIV-1 infection, and that the HIV-1Tg rat could be a valid rodent model in which to study various aspects of HIV-1 infection.

  1. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  2. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship and molecular docking of cyclohexenone based analogous as potent non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors

    Nazar, Muhammad Faizan; Abdullah, Muhammad Imran; Badshah, Amir; Mahmood, Asif; Rana, Usman Ali; Khan, Salah Ud-Din

    2015-04-01

    The chalcones core in compounds is advantageously chosen effective synthons, which offer exciting perspectives in biological and pharmacological research. The present study reports the successful development of eight new cyclohexenone based anti-reverse transcriptase analogous using rational drug design synthesis principles. These new cyclohexenone derivatives (CDs) were synthesized by following a convenient route of Robinson annulation, and the molecular structure of these CDs were later confirmed by various analytical techniques such as 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FT-IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. All the synthesized compounds were screened theoretically and experimentally against reverse transcriptase (RT) and found potentially active reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. Of the compounds studied, the compound 2FC4 showed high interaction with RT at non-nucleoside binding site, contributing high free binding energy (ΔG -8.01 Kcal) and IC50 (0.207 μg/ml), respectively. Further results revealed that the compounds bearing more halogen groups, with additional hydrophobic character, offered superior anti-reverse transcriptase activity as compared to rest of compounds. It is anticipate that the present study would be very useful for the selection of potential reverse transcriptase inhibitors featuring inclusive pharmacological profiles.

  3. Structure-based optimization and derivatization of 2-substituted quinolone-based non-nucleoside HCV NS5B inhibitors with submicromolar cellular replicon potency.

    Cheng, Yu; Shen, Jian; Peng, Run-Ze; Wang, Gui-Feng; Zuo, Jian-Ping; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2016-06-15

    HCV NS5B polymerase is an attractive and validated target for anti-HCV therapy. Starting from our previously identified 2-aryl quinolones as novel non-nucleoside NS5B polymerase inhibitors, structure-based optimization furnished 2-alkyl-N-benzyl quinolones with improved antiviral potency by employing privileged fragment hybridization strategy. The N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-2-(methoxymethyl)quinolone derivative 5f proved to be the best compound of this series, exhibiting a selective sub-micromolar antiviral effect (EC50=0.4μM, SI=10.8) in Huh7.5.1 cells carrying a HCV genotype 2a. Considering the undesirable pharmacokinetic property of the highly substituted quinolones, a novel chemotype of 1,6-naphthyridine-4,5-diones were evolved via scaffold hopping, affording brand new structure HCV inhibitors with compound 6h (EC50 (gt2a)=2.5μM, SI=7.2) as a promising hit. Molecular modeling studies suggest that both of 2-alkyl quinolones and 1,6-naphthyridine-4,5-diones function as HCV NS5B thumb pocket II inhibitors. PMID:27133482

  4. Efficient Quantification of HIV-1 in Heparin Plasma Spiked with Cultured HIV-1 by the Roche Cobas TaqMan and Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Tests

    Jagodzinski, Linda L; Weston, Holly R.; Liu, Ying; O'Connell, Robert J.; Peel, Sheila A

    2012-01-01

    The current automated real-time HIV-1 viral load assays, the Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan test and the Abbott RealTime test, are FDA cleared for use with EDTA plasma. We show that both real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) tests reliably quantify HIV-1 RNA in heparin plasma specimens spiked with HIV-1 isolate MN.

  5. Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry by targeting gp41

    Lin L(U); Shu-wen LIU; Shi-bo JIANG; Shu-guang WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism by which tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells. METHODS: The inhibitory activity of tannin on HIV-1 replication and entry was detected by p24 production and HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, respectively. The inhibitory activity on the gp41 six-helix bundle formation was determined by an improved sandwich ELISA. RESULTS: Tannins from different sources showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 replication,HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, and the gp4 six-helix bundle formation. CONCLUSION: Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells by interfering with the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, thus blocking HIV-1 fusion with the target cell.

  6. Bookshelf. John Adams biography

    Full text: When John Bertram Adams died on 3 March 1984, CERN lost one of its principal architects. The late Sir John Adams was a very private person who rarely confided in his colleagues. This made the job of his biographer particularly difficult. Michael Crowley- Milling has succeeded admirably, and has performed a very important service. Is it a potted history of CERN, or the story of the building of the PS, or of the SPS? Yes, all of these, but most of all it is a thoughtful and discerning biography and a fitting tribute to a veritable giant of European science and technology. The sub-title,' Engineer Extraordinary' refers not only to John's outstanding ability as a builder of accelerators, but perhaps even more importantly, as a builder of teams and an 'engineer of opinions'. The book describes how John's attention to detail and intuitive engineering skills developed during the early part of his career, when working in radar research, and how he emerged as a natural leader in the building of the CERN PS. Then later, how his statesmanship enabled him to ''...rescue it (the 300 GeV Programme) from seeming political disaster and nurse it through technical problems to a successful conclusion.'' One crucial part of this process described is the visit to CERN in 1970 by Margaret Thatcher, at that time UK Secretary of State for Education and Science, and her subsequent letters of thanks, not only to Bernard Gregory as Director General, but also to John. It is interesting to speculate to what extent the good impression made on that occasion helped many years later, when as Prime Minister Mrs Thatcher decided that Britain should stay in CERN! After the successful commissioning of the SPS, the book goes on to describe the period when the two CERN Laboratories were merged under two Directors General. Unfortunately I found this part a little too low key, given that John and Leon van Hove presided over what was undoubtedly

  7. Using dried blood spots collected under field condition to determine HIV-1 diversity and drug resistance mutations in resource limited Tanzania

    James Kimaro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A dried blood spot (DBS on filter paper has been used for different tests globally and has gained popularities in resource limited settings especially during HIV/AIDS epidemic. We assessed the efficiency of molecular characterization of HIV-1 subtypes using DBS collected under field conditions in northern Tanzania. Materials and Methods: In 2011 and 2012, 60 DBS samples were collected under field conditions from exposed and newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected children from Kilimanjaro (n=20, Arusha (n=20, Tanga (n=10 and Manyara (n=10. Results and discussion: Of 60 DBS analyzed at both Protease (PR and Reverse Transcriptase (RT regions, 45 (75% were analyzed, including 17 (85% from Kilimanjaro, 15 (75% from Arusha, 8 (80% from Tanga, and 5 (50% from Manyara region. All 45 DBS characterized had viral load above 1000 copies/mL with mean log10 viral loads of 3.87 copies/mL (SD 0.995. The phylogenetic results indicated presence of subtype and circulating recombinant form (CRF. In which, 24 were subtype A1 (53.33%, 16 were subtype C (35.55%, 3 were subtype D (6.67% and 2 were CRF10_CD (4.35%. All major mutations were detected in the RT region, none from protease (PR region. The mutations detected were Y181C (n=8, K103 (n=4 and G190A (n=1, conferring resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, and M184V (n=1, conferring resistance to lamivudine and emtricitabine. Conclusions: Our results indicate that DBS collected from field conditions in resource scarcity areas can be used to determine the phylogeny of the virus and drug resistance mutations in areas with diverse HIV-1 group M subtypes.

  8. Role of endolysosomes in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity

    Liang Hui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Combined anti-retroviral therapeutic drugs effectively increase the lifespan of HIV-1-infected individuals who then have a higher prevalence of HAND (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder. Soluble factors including HIV-1 proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, and particular attention has been paid to the HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription protein because of its ability to directly excite neurons and cause neuronal cell death. Since HIV-1 Tat enters cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and since endolysosomes play an important role in neuronal cell life and death, we tested here the hypothesis that HIV-1 Tat neurotoxicity is associated with changes in the endolysosome structure and function and also autophagy. Following the treatment of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons with HIV-1 Tat or as controls mutant-Tat or PBS, neuronal viability was determined using a triple staining method. Preceding observations of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death, we observed statistically significant changes in the structure and membrane integrity of endolysosomes, endolysosome pH and autophagy. As early as 24 h after HIV-1 Tat was applied to neurons, HIV-1 Tat accumulated in endolysosomes, endolysosome morphology was affected and their size increased, endolysosome membrane integrity was disrupted, endolysosome pH increased, specific activities of endolysosome enzymes decreased and autophagy was inhibited, as indicated by the significant changes in three markers for autophagy. In contrast, statistically significant levels of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death were observed only after 48 h of HIV-1 Tat treatment. Our findings suggest that endolysosomes are involved in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention against HAND.

  9. Short Communication: Circulating Plasma HIV-1 Viral Protein R in Dual HIV-1/Tuberculosis Infection

    Toossi, Zahra; Liu, Shigou; Wu, Mianda; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Hirsch, Christina S.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating free HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is found in up to one third of subjects with HIV-1 infection. Free Vpr presumably shares some of the immunopathogenic effects of cell-associated Vpr. Here we assessed Vpr in plasma and pleural fluid from HIV/tuberculosis (TB) dually infected subjects with pleural TB and from plasma of patients with pulmonary HIV/TB. Vpr was assessed by western blot analysis. In plasma from HIV/TB subjects with pulmonary TB free Vpr could be detected in 47%. Only on...

  10. A conditionally replicating HIV-1 vector interferes with wild-type HIV-1 replication and spread.

    Dropulić, B; Hĕrmánková, M; Pitha, P M

    1996-01-01

    Defective-interfering viruses are known to modulate virus pathogenicity. We describe conditionally replicating HIV-1 (crHIV) vectors that interfere with wild-type HIV-1 (wt-HIV) replication and spread. crHIV vectors are defective-interfering HIV genomes that do not encode viral proteins and replicate only in the presence of wt-HIV helper virus. In cells that contain both wt-HIV and crHIV genomes, the latter are shown to have a selective advantage for packaging into progeny virions because the...

  11. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba

    Kouri, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Pérez, Lissette; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Limia, Celia; Soto, Yudira; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. Methods This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009–2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Results Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years) and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens) compared to patients from 2011–2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR) to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR) were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients) and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients). Subtype B (32.5%), BG recombinants (19.6%) and CRF19_cpx (16.2%) were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009–2010 and 2011–2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002). Conclusions Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure. PMID:25397499

  12. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba

    Vivian Kouri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. Methods: This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009–2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Results: Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens compared to patients from 2011–2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI, non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients. Subtype B (32.5%, BG recombinants (19.6% and CRF19_cpx (16.2% were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009–2010 and 2011–2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002. Conclusions: Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure.

  13. Adams inequalities on measure spaces

    Fontana, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    In 1988 Adams obtained sharp Moser-Trudinger inequalities on bounded domains of R^n. The main step was a sharp exponential integral inequality for convolutions with the Riesz potential. In this paper we extend and improve Adams' results to functions defined on arbitrary measure spaces with finite measure. The Riesz fractional integral is replaced by general integral operators, whose kernels satisfy suitable and explicit growth conditions, given in terms of their distribution functions; natural conditions for sharpness are also given. Most of the known results about Moser-Trudinger inequalities can be easily adapted to our unified scheme. We give some new applications of our theorems, including: sharp higher order Moser-Trudinger trace inequalities, sharp Adams/Moser-Trudinger inequalities for general elliptic differential operators (scalar and vector-valued), for sums of weighted potentials, and for operators in the CR setting.

  14. Valproic acid inhibits the release of soluble CD40L induced by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals.

    Donna C Davidson

    Full Text Available Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART, a majority of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV infected individuals continually develop HIV - Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND, indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistent with this notion, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L are elevated in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of HIV infected, cognitively impaired individuals, and that excess sCD40L can contribute to blood brain barrier (BBB permeability in vivo, thereby signifying the importance of this inflammatory mediator in the pathogenesis of HAND. Here we demonstrate that the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI efavirenz (EFV induces the release of circulating sCD40L in both HIV infected individuals and in an in vitro suspension of washed human platelets, which are the main source of circulating sCD40L. Additionally, EFV was found to activate glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β in platelets, and we now show that valproic acid (VPA, a known GSK3β inhibitor, was able to attenuate the release of sCD40L in HIV infected individuals receiving EFV, and in isolated human platelets. Collectively these results have important implications in determining the pro-inflammatory role that some antiretroviral regimens may have. The use of antiretrovirals remains the best strategy to prevent HIV-associated illnesses, including HAND, however these drugs have clear limitations to this end, and thus, these results underscore the need to develop adjunctive therapies for HAND that can also minimize the undesired negative effects of the antiretrovirals.

  15. The prevalence of transmitted resistance to first-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and its potential economic impact in HIV-infected patients.

    Sonya J Snedecor

    Full Text Available Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART including efavirenz is recommended as a 1(st-line treatment choice in international HIV guidelines, and it is one of the most common components of initial therapy. Resistance to 1(st-generation NNRTIs is found among treated and untreated HIV-infected individuals creating a subpopulation of HIV-infected individuals in whom efavirenz is not fully effective. This analysis reviewed published articles and conference abstracts to examine the prevalence of 1(st-generation NNRTI resistance in Europe, the United States (US, and Canada and to identify published evidence of the economic consequences of resistance. The reported prevalence of NNRTI resistance was generally higher in US/Canada than in Europe and increased in both regions from their introduction in the late 1990s until the early 2000s. The most recent time-based trends suggest that NNRTI-resistance prevalence may be stable or decreasing. These estimates of resistance may be understated as resistance estimates using ultra-sensitive genotypic testing methods, which identify low-frequency mutations undetected by standard testing methods, showed increased prevalence of resistance by more than two-fold. No studies were identified that explicitly investigated the costs of drug resistance. Rather, most studies reported costs of treatment change, failure, or disease progression. Among those studies, annual HIV medical costs of those infected with HIV increased 1 as CD4 cells decreased, driven in part by hospitalization at lower CD4 cell counts; 2 for treatment changes, and 3 for each virologic failure. The possible erosion of efficacy or of therapy choices through resistance transmission or selection, even when present with low frequency, may become a barrier to the use of 1(st-generation NNRTIs and the increased costs associated with regimen failure and disease progression underlie the importance

  16. Fucoidans as Potential Inhibitors of HIV-1

    Vladimir S. Prassolov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV. It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001–100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001–0.05 µg/mL. High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan, and S. japonica (galactofucan were the most effective inhibitors.

  17. Novel approaches to inhibiting HIV-1 replication.

    Adamson, Catherine S; Freed, Eric O

    2010-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, and more than two-dozen antiretroviral drugs are available targeting several distinct steps in the viral replication cycle. However, resistance to these compounds emerges readily, even in the context of combination therapy. Drug toxicity, adverse drug-drug interactions, and accompanying poor patient adherence can also lead to treatment failure. These considerations make continued development of novel antiretroviral therapeutics necessary. In this article, we highlight a number of steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle that represent promising targets for drug discovery. These include lipid raft microdomains, the RNase H activity of the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase, uncoating of the viral core, host cell machinery involved in the integration of the viral DNA into host cell chromatin, virus assembly, maturation, and budding, and the functions of several viral accessory proteins. We discuss the relevant molecular and cell biology, and describe progress to date in developing inhibitors against these novel targets. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010. PMID:19782103

  18. Rational development of radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings

  19. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    Mounerou Salou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antiretroviral treatment (ART has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods: HIV viral load (VL testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014. Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA. Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion: Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59% were adolescents and 116 (41% were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months. For 228 (80.6%, the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs (zidovudine and lamivudine and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI (nevirapine or efavirenz. Only 28 (9.9% were on a protease inhibitor (PI-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml for 102 (36%, between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4% and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%. Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%; 110/125 (88.0% were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8% to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2% to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125 of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  20. Molecular Modeling, Synthesis, and Anti-HIV Activity of Novel Isoindolinedione Analogues as Potent Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Kumari, Garima; Singh, Ramendra K

    2016-02-01

    Different isoindolinedione derivatives bearing imine, amide, thioamide, and sulfonamide linkages have been designed in silico using discovery studio software (BIOVIA, San Diego, CA, USA), synthesized, and evaluated for their anti-HIV activity. SAR studies revealed that the linkages in these molecules did affect their anti-HIV activity and the molecules having sulfonamide linkages were the most potent HIV-RT inhibitors as the S=O bonds of the sulfonamide moiety interacted with Lys103 (NH or carbonyl or both) and Pro236; the NH part of the sulfonamide linkage formed bond with carbonyl of Lys101. blood-brain barrier (BBB) plots were also studied, and it was found that all the designed molecules have potential to cross BBB, a very vital criteria for anti-HIV drugs. In vitro screening was performed using HIV-1 strain IIIB in MT-4 cells using the MTT assay, and it was seen that some of these molecules were effective inhibitors of HIV-1 replication at nanomolar concentration with selectivity indices ranging from 33.75 to 73.33 under in vitro conditions. Some of these molecules have shown good anti-HIV activity at 3-4 nm concentrations. These derivatives have potential to be developed as lead molecules effective against HIV-1. Novel isoindolinedione derivatives as probable NNRTIs have been synthesized and characterized. Some of these molecules have shown good anti-HIV activity at 3-4 nm concentrations. PMID:26212217

  1. Dual role of autophagy in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis

    Killian M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Autophagy, the major mechanism for degrading long-lived intracellular proteins and organelles, is essential for eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Autophagy also defends the cell against invasion by microorganisms and has important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Increasingly evident is that HIV-1 replication is dependent on select components of autophagy. Fittingly, HIV-1 proteins are able to modulate autophagy to maximize virus production. At the same time, HIV-1 proteins appear t...

  2. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    Jane Rasaiyaah; Choon Ping Tan; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Caroline Blondeau; Laura Hilditch; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Mahdad Noursadeghi; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively re...

  3. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation

    Swartz, Talia H.; Dubyak, George R.; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 30 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent antiretroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV-1 have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV-1 pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are ...

  4. HIV-1 western blot assay: What determines an indeterminate status?

    Syed Iqbal; Balakrishnan P; Solomon Sunil; Murugavel K; Kumarasamy N; Vidya S; Martin S; Thyagarajan S; Mayer Kenneth; Solomon S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Western blot assay is the gold standard for the detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type1 (HIV-1). However, indeterminate Western blot reactivity to HIV-1 proteins may occur in individuals, who may not be infected with HIV. Aim: This retrospective study was aimed to determine the diagnostic value of the interpretation criteria in relation to commercial kits for HIV -1 diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 556 serum/plasma specimens collected from h...

  5. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    Pinar Iyidogan; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis...

  6. Human erythrocytes selectively bind and enrich infectious HIV-1 virions.

    Zoltan Beck

    Full Text Available Although CD4(+ cells represent the major target for HIV infection in blood, claims of complement-independent binding of HIV-1 to erythrocytes and the possible role of Duffy blood group antigen, have generated controversy. To examine the question of binding to erythrocytes, HIV-1 was incubated in vitro with erythrocytes from 30 healthy leukapheresis donors, and binding was determined by p24 analysis and adsorption of HIV-1 with reduction of infectivity for CD4(+ target cells. All of the cells, regardless of blood group type, bound HIV-1 p24. A typical preparation of erythrocytes bound <2.4% of the added p24, but erythrocytes selectively removed essentially all of the viral infectivity as determined by decreased infection of CD4(+ target cells; however, cell-associated HIV-1 was approximately 100-fold more efficient, via trans infection, than unadsorbed virus for infection of CD4(+ cells. All of the bound HIV-1 p24 was released by treatment of the cells with EDTA, and binding was optimized by adding Ca(2+ and Mg(2+ during the washing of erythrocytes containing bound HIV-1. Although the small number of contaminating leukocytes in the erythrocyte preparation also bound HIV-1 p24, there was no significant binding to CD4, and it thus appears that the binding occurred on leukocytes at non-CD4 sites. Furthermore, binding occurred to erythrocyte ghosts from which contaminating leukocytes had been previously removed. The results demonstrate that erythrocytes incubated in vitro with HIV-1 differentially adsorb all of the infectious HIV-1 virions (as opposed to non-infectious or degraded virions in the absence of complement and independent of blood group, and binding is dependent on divalent cations. By analogy with HIV-1 bound to DC-SIGN on dendritic cells, erythrocyte-bound HIV-1 might comprise an important surface reservoir for trans infection of permissive cells.

  7. Characteristics of HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples Enrolled in a Clinical Trial of Antiretroviral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV-1 Prevention

    Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Ndase, Patrick; MUGO, Nelly R.; Barnes, Linda; Campbell, James D.; Wangisi, Jonathan; Tappero, Jordan W.; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Were, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stable heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa have high HIV-1 transmission rates and are a critical population for evaluation of new HIV-1 prevention strategies. The Partners PrEP Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir and emtricitabine-tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis to decrease HIV-1 acquisition within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. We describe the trial design and characteristics of the study cohort. Methods HIV-1...

  8. HIV-1 vaccine design: Learning from natural infection

    Kerkhof, van den, T.L.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Het humane immuundeficiëntie virus type 1 (hiv-1) is het virus dat aids veroorzaakt. Er is nog steeds geen bescherming tegen een hiv-1 infectie en de beëindiging van de wereldwijde epidemie kan waarschijnlijk alleen worden bereikt met behulp van een vaccin. Een hiv-1 vaccin zal bescherming moeten bieden tegen de verschillende subtypes die wereldwijd voorkomen. Ongeveer 10-30% van de hiv-1 geïnfecteerde patiënten ontwikkelen zogenoemde "breed-neutraliserende" antistoffen. Alhoewel deze antisto...

  9. HIV-1 vaccine design: Learning from natural infection

    Schuitemaker, J.; Sanders, R W; Kerkhof, van den, T.L.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Het humane immuundeficiëntie virus type 1 (hiv-1) is het virus dat aids veroorzaakt. Er is nog steeds geen bescherming tegen een hiv-1 infectie en de beëindiging van de wereldwijde epidemie kan waarschijnlijk alleen worden bereikt met behulp van een vaccin. Een hiv-1 vaccin zal bescherming moeten bieden tegen de verschillende subtypes die wereldwijd voorkomen. Ongeveer 10-30% van de hiv-1 geïnfecteerde patiënten ontwikkelen zogenoemde “breed-neutraliserende” antistoffen. Alhoewel deze antisto...

  10. Coamplification of HIV-1 Proviral DNA and Viral RNA in Assays Used for Quantification of HIV-1 RNA▿

    Wan, H; Seth, A; Rainen, L; Fernandes, H.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated HIV-1 viral load (VL) observed in specimens frozen in situ in plasma preparation tubes (PPTs) compared to EDTA plasma specimens may affect therapeutic monitoring of HIV-infected patients. The increase in viral load is cell associated and minimized when plasma from the PPT is aspirated or recentrifuged prior to freezing. This study investigates the contribution of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA to elevated VL in the quantification of HIV-1 RNA in plasma. Fifty paired specimens collecte...

  11. Protonation states in HIV-1 proteas

    Molecular dynamics simulations combined with the molecular mechanics-Poisson/Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) are used to study the different protonation states in HIV-1 protease and ABT-538. The results obtained demonstrate that different protonation states have strong influence on the B-factor of protease, the binding free energy between protease and inhibitor and the hydrogen bond. The computation using the MM-PBSA method shows that protonation at the OD1 of Asp25 in B chain has the strongest binding free energy and the B-factor calculated is in agreement with the experiment data. Otherwise, the hydrogen analysis shows the hydrogen bonds between the inhibitor and protease, inhibitor and the bridged-water (W301), and W301 and protease are most stable in the MD. (authors)

  12. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this...... infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...

  13. MxB binds to the HIV-1 core and prevents the uncoating process of HIV-1

    Fricke, Thomas; White, Tommy E; Schulte, Bianca; de Souza Aranha Vieira, Daniel A.; Dharan, Adarsh; Campbell, Edward M; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Background The IFN-α-inducible restriction factor MxB blocks HIV-1 infection after reverse transcription but prior to integration. Genetic evidence suggested that capsid is the viral determinant for restriction by MxB. This work explores the ability of MxB to bind to the HIV-1 core, and the role of capsid-binding in restriction. Results We showed that MxB binds to the HIV-1 core and that this interaction leads to inhibition of the uncoating process of HIV-1. These results identify MxB as an e...

  14. The Fate of HIV-1 Capsid: A Biochemical Assay for HIV-1 Uncoating

    Yang, Yang; Luban, Jeremy; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The uncoating process of HIV-1 is a poorly understood process, so the development of a reliable assay to study uncoating is critical for moving the field forward. Here we describe an uncoating assay that currently represents the state-of-the-art biochemical procedure for monitoring uncoating and core stability during infection. This assay is based on the biochemical separation of soluble capsid protein from particulate capsid cores and provides information about the fate of the capsid during ...

  15. The fate of HIV-1 capsid: a biochemical assay for HIV-1 uncoating.

    Yang, Yang; Luban, Jeremy; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The uncoating process of HIV-1 is a poorly understood process, so the development of a reliable assay to study uncoating is critical for moving the field forward. Here we describe an uncoating assay that currently represents the state-of-the-art biochemical procedure for monitoring uncoating and core stability during infection. This assay is based on the biochemical separation of soluble capsid protein from particulate capsid cores and provides information about the fate of the capsid during infection. PMID:24158811

  16. Stability of the resistance to the thiosemicarbazone derived from 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone, a non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor of bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Castro, Eliana F; Campos, Rodolfo H; Cavallaro, Lucía V

    2014-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is the prototype Pestivirus. BVDV infection is distributed worldwide and causes serious problems for the livestock industry. The thiosemicarbazone of 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone (TSC) is a non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor (NNI) of BVDV. All TSC-resistant BVDV variants (BVDV-TSCr T1-5) present an N264D mutation in the NS5B gene (RdRp) whereas the variant BVDV-TSCr T1 also presents an NS5B A392E mutation. In the present study, we carried out twenty passages of BVDV-TSCr T1-5 in MDBK cells in the absence of TSC to evaluate the stability of the resistance. The viral populations obtained (BVDV R1-5) remained resistant to the antiviral compound and conserved the mutations in NS5B associated with this phenotype. Along the passages, BVDV R2, R3 and R5 presented a delay in the production of cytopathic effect that correlated with a decrease in cell apoptosis and intracellular accumulation of viral RNA. The complete genome sequences that encode for NS2 to NS5B, Npro and Erns were analyzed. Additional mutations were detected in the NS5B of BVDV R1, R3 and R4. In both BVDV R2 and R3, most of the mutations found were localized in NS5A, whereas in BVDV R5, the only mutation fixed was NS5A V177A. These results suggest that mutations in NS5A could alter BVDV cytopathogenicity. In conclusion, the stability of the resistance to TSC may be due to the fixation of different compensatory mutations in each BVDV-TSCr. During their replication in a TSC-free medium, some virus populations presented a kind of interaction with the host cell that resembled a persistent infection: decreased cytopathogenicity and viral genome synthesis. This is the first report on the stability of antiviral resistance and on the evolution of NNI-resistant BVDV variants. The results obtained for BVDV-TSCr could also be applied for other NNIs. PMID:24950191

  17. Stability of the resistance to the thiosemicarbazone derived from 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone, a non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor of bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Eliana F Castro

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is the prototype Pestivirus. BVDV infection is distributed worldwide and causes serious problems for the livestock industry. The thiosemicarbazone of 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone (TSC is a non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor (NNI of BVDV. All TSC-resistant BVDV variants (BVDV-TSCr T1-5 present an N264D mutation in the NS5B gene (RdRp whereas the variant BVDV-TSCr T1 also presents an NS5B A392E mutation. In the present study, we carried out twenty passages of BVDV-TSCr T1-5 in MDBK cells in the absence of TSC to evaluate the stability of the resistance. The viral populations obtained (BVDV R1-5 remained resistant to the antiviral compound and conserved the mutations in NS5B associated with this phenotype. Along the passages, BVDV R2, R3 and R5 presented a delay in the production of cytopathic effect that correlated with a decrease in cell apoptosis and intracellular accumulation of viral RNA. The complete genome sequences that encode for NS2 to NS5B, Npro and Erns were analyzed. Additional mutations were detected in the NS5B of BVDV R1, R3 and R4. In both BVDV R2 and R3, most of the mutations found were localized in NS5A, whereas in BVDV R5, the only mutation fixed was NS5A V177A. These results suggest that mutations in NS5A could alter BVDV cytopathogenicity. In conclusion, the stability of the resistance to TSC may be due to the fixation of different compensatory mutations in each BVDV-TSCr. During their replication in a TSC-free medium, some virus populations presented a kind of interaction with the host cell that resembled a persistent infection: decreased cytopathogenicity and viral genome synthesis. This is the first report on the stability of antiviral resistance and on the evolution of NNI-resistant BVDV variants. The results obtained for BVDV-TSCr could also be applied for other NNIs.

  18. Efficacy of Pravastatin in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NNRTI and Protease Inhibitor (PI-based HAART in HIV-Infected Patients

    Susan A. Eaton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pravastatin has generally been considered a safe and effective option for HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. However, pravastatin concentrations are known to significantly decrease with concomitant efavirenz (EFV use. Currently there are no studies determining if these reductions in pravastatin possibly translate into an attenuation of its lipid lowering efficacy when used in HIV-infected patients on non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based HAART. To evaluate the differences in the lipid lowering efficacy of pravastatin for the treatment of dyslipidemia in HIV-infected patients on NNRTI-based HAART compared to protease inhibitor (PI-based regimens. A single center, retrospective evaluation of a comprehensive electronic HIV registry that identified HIV-infected, Veterans Affairs (VA patients who received pravastatin 20 mg plus NNRTI or PI-based HAART from January 1997 to November 2006 who met the strict criteria for inclusion. A total of 18 patients [NNRTI (n = 7 and PI (n = 11] met the strict criteria for inclusion. In HIV-infected patients taking NNRTI-based HAART there was a reduction in TC by -10.1%, LDL by -12% and non-HDL by -12.2% within 6 months after starting pravastatin 20 mg. In HIV-infected patients taking PI-based HAART, there was a reduction in TC by -10.1%, in LDL by -21.1% and in non-HDL by -13.8% within 6 months after starting pravastatin 20 mg. In both groups, only one additional patient achieved their patient specific lipid goals. In either group these reductions were seen without any apparent adverse drug events or compromise to virologic or immunologic control. This initial evaluation suggests that pravastatin’s efficacy may be attenuated with NNRTIs versus PI-based HAART, possibly due to known reductions in pravastatin concentrations when administered with NNRTI-based regimens. These effects were seen without any apparent compromises to safety and should be validated in

  19. Impact of the number of failed therapeutic regimes on the development of resistance mutations to HIV-1 in northeast Brazil

    Melissa Soares Medeiros

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Highly-potent antiretroviral therapy is necessary to avoid viral replication in HIV patients; however, it can favor the appearance of resistance mutations. The mutations 41L, 67N, 70R, 210W, 215Y/F, 219E/Q, 44D and 118I are defined as nucleoside analogous mutations (NAMs, because they affect the efficacy of all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI. The mutation most frequently associated with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs is 103N. 33W/F, 82A/F/L/T, 84V and 90M are called protease inhibitor resistance-associated mutations (PRAM, because they are associated with resistance to several protease inhibitors (PI. This study evaluated the development of resistance mutations and examine the susceptibility of HIV with these mutations to antiretrovirals in HIV-1 patients who have failed one or more therapy regimes. Analyses were made of 101 genotypic tests of patients with therapeutic failure to 2 or 3-drug regimens with NRTI, NNRTI or PI. We used the Stanford database to define the susceptibility profile of the viruses. The samples were divided into three treatment-failure groups: first (F, second (S and multi-failure (MF to antiretroviral regimens, and we correlated these groups with resistance profiles and principal mutations. There was a significant increase in resistance mutations V82A/F/L/T, I84V, L90M, M41L, K70R, L210W, T215Y/F and K219Q/E in MF. We also found significantly higher resistance to zidovudine, didanosine, stavudine and abacavir in MF. There was no increase in resistance to tenofovir (p=0.28 and lopinavir (p=0.079 in MF. A high degree of resistance to NNRTIs was observed in all groups. Increased resistance mutations will affect future therapeutic options for HIV patients in Brazil because it results in a significant increase in resistance to antiretroviral drugs.

  20. Schistosomiasis and HIV-1 infection in rural Zimbabwe

    Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo; Gomo, Exnevia; Butterworth, Anthony E; van Dam, Govert J; Erikstrup, Christian; Ullum, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Stunted development and reduced fecundity of Schistosoma parasites in immunodeficient mice and the impaired ability of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected humans to excrete schistosome eggs have been described. This study explores the effect that HIV-1-associated immunodeficiency has ...

  1. Structure and Dynamics of the Native HIV-1 Env Trimer

    Munro, James B.; Mothes, Walther

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1/AIDS remains one of the worst pandemics in human history. Despite tremendous efforts, no effective vaccine has been found. Recent reports give new insights into the structure and dynamics of the HIV-1 Env trimer and renew hopes that a better understanding of Env will translate into new vaccine candidates and more-effective antiretroviral therapies.

  2. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics

  3. Neutralizing antibodies in slowly progressing HIV-1 infection

    Schønning, Kristian; Nielsen, C; Iversen, Johan;

    1995-01-01

    Ten asymptomatic individuals who had experienced only limited CD4+ cell loss after prolonged infection with HIV-1 were studied. These individuals had a mean CD4+ cell count of 674 x 10(6) cells/L and a mean duration of infection of 8.5 years. Also included were 10 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected indi...

  4. Dipyridodiazepinone derivatives; synthesis and anti HIV-1 activity

    Nisachon Khunnawutmanotham; Nitirat Chimnoi; Arunee Thitithanyanont; Patchreenart Saparpakorn; Kiattawee Choowongkomon; Pornpan Pungpo; Supa Hannongbua; Supanna Techasakul

    2009-01-01

    Ten dipyridodiazepinone derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity against wild-type and mutant type enzymes, K103N and Y181C. Two of them were found to be promising inhibitors for HIV-1 RT.

  5. Varicella vaccination in HIV-1-infected children after immune reconstitution

    V. Bekker; G.H.A. Westerlaken; H. Scherpbier; S. Alders; H. Zaaijer; D. van Baarle; T. Kuijper

    2006-01-01

    Background: HIV-1-infected children have an increased risk of severe chickenpox. However, vaccination is not recommended in severely immunocompromised children. Objective: Can the live-attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) Oka strain be safely and effectively given to HIV-1-infected children despi

  6. The origin and emergence of an HIV-1 epidemic:

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Audelin, Anne M.; Helleberg, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    To describe, at patient-level detail, the determining events and factors involved in the development of a country's HIV-1 epidemic.......To describe, at patient-level detail, the determining events and factors involved in the development of a country's HIV-1 epidemic....

  7. Global human genetics of HIV-1 infection and China

    Tuo Fu ZHU; Tie Jian FENG; Xin XIAO; Hui WANG; Bo Ping ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in human genes can influence the risk for HIV-1 infection and disease progression, although the reported effects of these alleles have been inconsistent. This review highlights the recent discoveries on global and Chinese genetic polymorphisms and their association with HIV-1 transmission and disease progression.

  8. Introducing Catastrophe-QSAR. Application on Modeling Molecular Mechanisms of Pyridinone Derivative-Type HIV Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Marius Lazea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The classical method of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR is enriched using non-linear models, as Thom’s polynomials allow either uni- or bi-variate structural parameters. In this context, catastrophe QSAR algorithms are applied to the anti-HIV-1 activity of pyridinone derivatives. This requires calculation of the so-called relative statistical power and of its minimum principle in various QSAR models. A new index, known as a statistical relative power, is constructed as an Euclidian measure for the combined ratio of the Pearson correlation to algebraic correlation, with normalized t-Student and the Fisher tests. First and second order inter-model paths are considered for mono-variate catastrophes, whereas for bi-variate catastrophes the direct minimum path is provided, allowing the QSAR models to be tested for predictive purposes. At this stage, the max-to-min hierarchies of the tested models allow the interaction mechanism to be identified using structural parameter succession and the typical catastrophes involved. Minimized differences between these catastrophe models in the common structurally influential domains that span both the trial and tested compounds identify the “optimal molecular structural domains” and the molecules with the best output with respect to the modeled activity, which in this case is human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 inhibition. The best molecules are characterized by hydrophobic interactions with the HIV-1 p66 subunit protein, and they concur with those identified in other 3D-QSAR analyses. Moreover, the importance of aromatic ring stacking interactions for increasing the binding affinity of the inhibitor-reverse transcriptase ligand-substrate complex is highlighted.

  9. Alterations in HIV-1 LTR promoter activity during AIDS progression

    HIV-1 variants evolving in AIDS patients frequently show increased replicative capacity compared to those present during early asymptomatic infection. It is known that late stage HIV-1 variants often show an expanded coreceptor tropism and altered Nef function. In the present study we investigated whether enhanced HIV-1 LTR promoter activity might also evolve during disease progression. Our results demonstrate increased LTR promoter activity after AIDS progression in 3 of 12 HIV-1-infected individuals studied. Further analysis revealed that multiple alterations in the U3 core-enhancer and in the transactivation-response (TAR) region seem to be responsible for the enhanced functional activity. Our findings show that in a subset of HIV-1-infected individuals enhanced LTR transcription contributes to the increased replicative potential of late stage virus isolates and might accelerate disease progression

  10. Evaluation of the Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay for HIV-1 RNA viral load detection and quantitation in plasma of HIV-1-infected individuals: A comparison with Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

    Amendola, Alessandra; Pisciotta, Maria; Aleo, Loredana; Ferraioli, Valeria; Angeletti, Claudio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-09-01

    The Hologic Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima HIV) is a real-time transcription-mediated amplification method CE-approved for use in diagnosis and monitoring of HIV-1 infection. The analytical performance of this new assay was compared to the FDA-approved Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime). The evaluation was performed using 220 clinical plasma samples, the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard, and the QCMD HIV-1 RNA EQA. Concordance on qualitative results, correlation between quantitative results, accuracy, and reproducibility of viral load data were analyzed. The ability to measure HIV-1 subtypes was assessed on the second WHO International Reference Preparation Panel for HIV-1 Subtypes. With clinical samples, inter-assay agreement for qualitative results was high (91.8%) with Cohen's kappa statistic equal to 0.836. For samples with quantitative results in both assays (n = 93), Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.980 (P R(2)  > 0.970) and showed higher sensitivity compared to RealTime being able to detect HIV-1 RNA in 10 out of 10 replicates containing down to 7 cp/ml (20 IU/ml). Reproducibility was very high, even at low HIV-1 RNA values. The Aptima HIV was able to detect and accurately quantify all the main HIV-1 subtypes in both reference panels and clinical samples. Besides excellent performance, Aptima HIV shows full automation, ease of use, and improved workflow compared to RealTime. J. Med. Virol. 88:1535-1544, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864171

  11. Sexually transmitted infections among HIV-1-discordant couples.

    Brandon L Guthrie

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: More new HIV-1 infections occur within stable HIV-1-discordant couples than in any other group in Africa, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs may increase transmission risk among discordant couples, accounting for a large proportion of new HIV-1 infections. Understanding correlates of STIs among discordant couples will aid in optimizing interventions to prevent HIV-1 transmission in these couples. METHODS: HIV-1-discordant couples in which HIV-1-infected partners were HSV-2-seropositive were tested for syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis, and HIV-1-uninfected partners were tested for HSV-2. We assessed sociodemographic, behavioral, and biological correlates of a current STI. RESULTS: Of 416 couples enrolled, 16% were affected by a treatable STI, and among these both partners were infected in 17% of couples. A treatable STI was found in 46 (11% females and 30 (7% males. The most prevalent infections were trichomoniasis (5.9% and syphilis (2.6%. Participants were 5.9-fold more likely to have an STI if their partner had an STI (P<0.01, and STIs were more common among those reporting any unprotected sex (OR = 2.43; P<0.01 and those with low education (OR = 3.00; P<0.01. Among HIV-1-uninfected participants with an HSV-2-seropositive partner, females were significantly more likely to be HSV-2-seropositive than males (78% versus 50%, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Treatable STIs were common among HIV-1-discordant couples and the majority of couples affected by an STI were discordant for the STI, with relatively high HSV-2 discordance. Awareness of STI correlates and treatment of both partners may reduce HIV-1 transmission. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519.

  12. Comparison of glycerolisation with cryopreservation methods on HIV-1 inactivation

    Cryopreservation and glycerolisation are two successful long-term preservation methods for human cadaveric donor skin, which is used in the treatment of bum patients. High concentrations of glycerol has been shown to be antibacterial and virucidal. Because fear of possible transmission of HIV-1 following allograft transplantation, this study was undertaken to investigate whether HIV can be effectively eliminated from skin explants. HIV-1 Ba-L, which has been shown to infect monocytes in skin explants and also dendritic cells, was. For the experiments we used cell-free virus, exogenously HIV infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and exogenously HIV infected cadaver split skin. Different concentrations of glycerol at various temperatures and the glycerolisation procedure as used by the Euro Skin Bank were used to determine the effects on HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity. For the cryopreservation technique we used 10% DMSO and a controlled rate freezer. HIV-1 Ba-L transfer was determined by adding uninfected PBMCs to the infected material and reverse transcriptase was measured. Cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by 50% glycerol but was effectively inactivated within 30 minutes by 70% and 85% glycerol at 4 degree C, room temperature and 37 degree C. In contrast, cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by cryopreservation. Most importantly, we have shown that HIV-1 Ba-L present in split skin is inactivated by incubating skin in 70% glycerol for three hours at 37-C. HIV in exogenously infected skin was not inactivated by cryopreservation. High concentrations of glycerol effectively inactivates free HIV-1 Ba-L and intracellular HIV-1 Ba-L. Also the current glycerolisation procedure carried out by the Euro Skin Bank effectively inactivates infectious virus. However, the cryopreservation technique did not show any reduction in HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity

  13. Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in treatment naive East-African and Caucasian patients detected by allele-specific real-time PCR.

    Halime Ekici

    Full Text Available To assess the presence of two major non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI drug resistance mutations (DRMs, Y181C and K103N, in minor viral quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected East-African and Swedish patients by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR.Treatment naïve adults (n=191 with three epidemiological backgrounds were included: 92 Ethiopians living in Ethiopia; 55 East-Africans who had migrated to Sweden; and 44 Caucasians living in Sweden. The pol gene was analysed by standard population sequencing and by AS-PCR for the detection of Y181C and K103N.The Y181C was detected in the minority quasispecies of six Ethiopians (6.5%, in two Caucasians (4.5%, and in one East-African (1.8%. The K103N was detected in one East- African (1.8%, by both methods. The proportion of mutants ranged from 0.25% to 17.5%. Additional DRMs were found in all three treatment naïve patient groups by population sequencing.Major NNRTI mutations can be found by AS-PCR in minor quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected Ethiopians living in Ethiopia, in East-African and Caucasian patients living in Sweden in whom population sequencing reveal wild-type virus only. Surveys with standard sequencing are likely to underestimate transmitted drug resistance and the presence of resistant minor quasispecies in treatment naïve patients should be topic for future large scale studies.

  14. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this...... infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... CD4 and that post binding events may be common to the infection of lymphocytes. Anti HIV-1 sera showed neutralizing activity against heterologous and even autologous escape virus. This finding, together with the observation that monocytes and M phi s are infected in vivo, suggests that protection...

  15. Performance Characteristics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Genotyping Systems in Sequence-Based Analysis of Subtypes Other than HIV-1 Subtype B

    Jagodzinski, Linda L; Cooley, John D.; Weber, Mark; Michael, Nelson L.

    2003-01-01

    Given the diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes and the emergence of subtypes other than HIV-1 subtype B in the United States, genotypic assays must be capable of delivering sequence data on diverse HIV-1 subtypes. We evaluated the performance of Visible Genetics TRUGENE HIV-1 genotyping kit and Applied Biosystems ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system on a panel of 34 well-characterized HIV-1 viral stocks (subtypes A through H). Both assays perform well on diverse HIV-1 ...

  16. Virological outcome and patterns of HIV-1 drug resistance in patients with 36 months’ antiretroviral therapy experience in Cameroon

    Avelin F Aghokeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The current expansion of antiretroviral treatment (ART in the developing world without routine virological monitoring still raises concerns on the outcome of the strategy in terms of virological success and drug resistance burden. We assessed the virological outcome and drug resistance mutations in patients with 36 months’ ART experience, and monitored according to the WHO public health approach in Cameroon. Methods: We consecutively recruited between 2008 and 2009 patients attending a national reference clinic in Yaoundé – Cameroon, for their routine medical visits at month 36±2. Observance data and treatment histories were extracted from medical records. Blood samples were collected for viral load (VL testing and genotyping of drug resistance when HIV-1 RNA≥1000 copies/ml. Results: Overall, 376 HIV-1 infected adults were recruited during the study period. All, but four who received PMTCT, were ART-naïve at treatment initiation, and 371/376 (98.7% started on a first-line regimen that included 3TC +d4T/AZT+NVP/EFV. Sixty-six (17.6% patients experienced virological failure (VL≥1000 copies/ml and 53 carried a resistant virus, thus representing 81.5% (53/65 of the patients who failed. Forty-two out of 53 were resistant to nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs+NNRTIs, one to protease inhibitors (PI and NNRTIs, two to NRTIs only and eight to NNRTIs only. Among patients with NRTI resistance, 18/44 (40.9% carried Thymidine Analog Mutations (TAMs, and 13/44 (29.5% accumulated at least three NRTI resistance mutations. Observed NNRTI resistance mutations affected drugs of the regimen, essentially nevirapine and efavirenz, but several patients (10/51, 19.6% accumulated mutations that may have compromised etravirine use. Conclusions: We observed a moderate level of virological failure after 36 months of treatment, but a high proportion of patients who failed developed drug resistance. Although we

  17. HIV-1 Tat and HIV-associated Dementia%HIV-1Tat蛋白与艾滋病脑病

    周勤华; 姚鑫; 惠斌

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 gene expression requires the transcriptional activator protein Tal of human immunodeficiency virus-1 ( HIV-1) , which stimulates viral transcript elongation. A significant number of people infected with the HIV develop neurologic complications. HIV-1-associated dementia( HAD) is a severe central nervous system(CNS) disorder neurologically induced by HIV-1. HAD represents the most severe form of HIV-related neuropsychiatric impairment and is characterized by motor dysfunction and impaired cognitions and behaviors. HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription( Tat) is an important factor in viral pathogenesis. The Tat protein not only drives the regulatory regions of the virus, but also might be actively released from the cells and then interacts with the cell surface receptors of other uninfected cells in the brain leading to cellular dysfunction. Growing evidence indicates that HIV-1 Tat protein play a major role in pathogenesis of HAD. This article reviewed the pleomorphic actions of Tat protein and the evidence supporting its central role in the neuropathogenesis of HAD.%Tat蛋白是HIV-1编码的反式转录激活因子,其主要功能是反式激活HIV-1病毒基因组转录的起始和延伸,启动病毒复制,近年来研究发现,Tat蛋白在HIV-1感染所引起的严重中枢神经系统(CNS)并发症——艾滋病脑病中起重要作用,是艾滋病脑病发生与发展的重要致病因子.本文就HIV-1 Tat蛋白在艾滋病脑病中的研究进展作一综述.

  18. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    Silvana Pasetto

    Full Text Available HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic, H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic, and the dual tropic (X4R5 HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration

    Hakan Ozdener

    2005-06-01

    Since identification of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), numerous studies suggest a link between neurological impairments, in particular dementia, with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with alarming occurrence worldwide. Approximately, 60% of HIV-infected people show some form of neurological impairment, and neuropathological changes are found in 90% of autopsied cases. Approximately 30% of untreated HIV-infected persons may develop dementia. The mechanisms behind these pathological changes are still not understood. Mounting data obtained by in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that neuronal apoptosis is a major feature of HIV associated dementia (HAD), which can occur in the absence of direct infection of neurons. The major pathway of neuronal apoptosis occurs indirectly through release of neurotoxins by activated cells in the central nervous system (CNS) involving the induction of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. In addition a direct mechanism induced by viral proteins in the pathogenesis of HAD may also play a role. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated dementia and possible therapeutic strategies.

  20. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection.

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. PMID:26774171

  1. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:27056720

  2. Correlates of HIV-1 genital shedding in Tanzanian women.

    Clare Tanton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the correlates of HIV shedding is important to inform strategies to reduce HIV infectiousness. We examined correlates of genital HIV-1 RNA in women who were seropositive for both herpes simplex virus (HSV-2 and HIV-1 and who were enrolled in a randomised controlled trial of HSV suppressive therapy (aciclovir 400 mg b.i.d vs. placebo in Tanzania. METHODOLOGY: Samples, including a cervico-vaginal lavage, were collected and tested for genital HIV-1 and HSV and reproductive tract infections (RTIs at randomisation and 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. Data from all women at randomisation and women in the placebo arm during follow-up were analysed using generalised estimating equations to determine the correlates of cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA detection and load. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA was detected at 52.0% of 971 visits among 482 women, and was independently associated with plasma viral load, presence of genital ulcers, pregnancy, bloody cervical or vaginal discharge, abnormal vaginal discharge, cervical ectopy, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, an intermediate bacterial vaginosis score and HSV DNA detection. Similar factors were associated with genital HIV-1 RNA load. CONCLUSIONS: RTIs were associated with increased presence and quantity of genital HIV-1 RNA in this population. These results highlight the importance of integrating effective RTI treatment into HIV care services.

  3. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry

    Heredia A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alonso Heredia,1,3 Olga S Latinovic,2,3 Florent Barbault,4 Erik PH de Leeuw3,5 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 3Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMRCNRS7086, Paris, France; 5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV-1 infection into a managed condition with near-normal life expectancy. However, a significant number of patients remain with limited therapeutic options due to HIV-1 resistance, side effects, or drug costs. Further, it is likely that current drugs will not retain efficacy, due to risks of side effects and transmitted resistance.Results: We describe compound 5660386 (3-ethyl-2-[3-(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidene-1-propen-1-yl]-1,3-benzothiazol-3-ium as a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 entry. Compound 5660386 inhibits HIV-1 entry in cell lines and primary cells, binds to HIV-1 envelope protein, and inhibits the interaction of GP120 to CD4. Further, compound 5660386 showed a unique and broad-range activity against primary HIV-1 isolates from different subtypes and geographical areas.Conclusion: Development of small-molecule entry inhibitors of HIV-1 such as 5660386 may lead to novel classes of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. These inhibitors may be particularly effective against viruses resistant to current antiretroviral drugs and could have potential applications in both treatment and prevention. Keywords: HIV-1, defensin, drug, entry, antiviral therapy, CD4

  4. Extreme genetic fragility of the HIV-1 capsid.

    Rihn, Suzannah J; Wilson, Sam J; Loman, Nick J; Alim, Mudathir; Bakker, Saskia E; Bhella, David; Gifford, Robert J; Rixon, Frazer J; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Genetic robustness, or fragility, is defined as the ability, or lack thereof, of a biological entity to maintain function in the face of mutations. Viruses that replicate via RNA intermediates exhibit high mutation rates, and robustness should be particularly advantageous to them. The capsid (CA) domain of the HIV-1 Gag protein is under strong pressure to conserve functional roles in viral assembly, maturation, uncoating, and nuclear import. However, CA is also under strong immunological pressure to diversify. Therefore, it would be particularly advantageous for CA to evolve genetic robustness. To measure the genetic robustness of HIV-1 CA, we generated a library of single amino acid substitution mutants, encompassing almost half the residues in CA. Strikingly, we found HIV-1 CA to be the most genetically fragile protein that has been analyzed using such an approach, with 70% of mutations yielding replication-defective viruses. Although CA participates in several steps in HIV-1 replication, analysis of conditionally (temperature sensitive) and constitutively non-viable mutants revealed that the biological basis for its genetic fragility was primarily the need to coordinate the accurate and efficient assembly of mature virions. All mutations that exist in naturally occurring HIV-1 subtype B populations at a frequency >3%, and were also present in the mutant library, had fitness levels that were >40% of WT. However, a substantial fraction of mutations with high fitness did not occur in natural populations, suggesting another form of selection pressure limiting variation in vivo. Additionally, known protective CTL epitopes occurred preferentially in domains of the HIV-1 CA that were even more genetically fragile than HIV-1 CA as a whole. The extreme genetic fragility of HIV-1 CA may be one reason why cell-mediated immune responses to Gag correlate with better prognosis in HIV-1 infection, and suggests that CA is a good target for therapy and vaccination strategies

  5. The anti-HIV-1 effect of scutellarin

    Scutellarin was purified from the plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. The activity against 3 strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was determined in vitro in this study. These were laboratory-derived virus (HIV-1IIIB), drug-resistant virus (HIV-174V), and low-passage clinical isolated virus (HIV-1KM018). From syncytia inhibition study, the EC50 of scutellarin against HIV-1IIIB direct infection in C8166 cells was 26 μM with a therapeutic index of 36. When the mode of infection changed from acute infection to cell-to-cell infection, this compound became even more potent and the EC50 reduced to 15 μM. This suggested that cell fusion might be affected by this compound. By comparing the inhibitory effects on p24 antigen, scutellarin was also found to be active against HIV-174V (EC50 253 μM) and HIV-1KM018 (EC50 136 μM) infection with significant difference in potency. The mechanism of its action was also explored in this study. At a concentration of 433 μM, scutellarin inhibited 48% of the cell free recombinant HIV-1 RT activity. It also caused 82% inhibition of HIV-1 particle attachment and 45% inhibition of fusion at the concentrations of 54 μM. In summary, scutellarin was found to inhibit several strains of HIV-1 replication with different potencies. It appeared to inhibit HIV-1 RT activity, HIV-1 particle attachment and cell fusion. These are essential activities for viral transmission and replication

  6. Efficient Gene Transfer Mediated by HIV-1-based Defective Lentivector and Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication

    2007-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have drawn considerable attention recently and show great promise to become important delivery vehicles for future gene transfer manipulation. In the present study we have optimized a protocol for preparation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-based defective lentiviral vectors (DLV) and characterized these vectors in terms of their transduction of different cells. Transient co-transfection of 293T packaging cells with DNA plasmids encoding lentiviral vector constituents resulted in production of high-titer DLV (0.5-1.2 × 107IU/mL), which can be further concentrated over 100-fold through a single step ultracentrifugation. These vectors were capable of transducing a variety of cells from both primate and non-primate sources and high transduction efficiency was achieved using concentrated vectors. Assessment of potential generation of RCV revealed no detection of infection by infectious particles in DLV-transduced CEM, SupT-1 and MT-2 cells. Long-term culture of transduced cells showed a stable expression of transgenes without apparent alteration in cellular morphology and growth kinetics. Vector mobilization to untransduced cells mediated by wild-type HIV-1 infection was confirmed in this test. Challenge of transduced human T-lymphocytes with wild-type HIV-1 showed these cells are totally resistant to the viral infection. Considering the effective gene transfer and stable gene expression, safety and anti-HIV activity, these DLV vectors warrant further exploration for their potential use as a gene transfer vehicle in the development of gene therapy protocols.

  7. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Santiago Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

  8. HIV-1 replication and the cellular eukaryotic translation apparatus.

    Guerrero, Santiago; Batisse, Julien; Libre, Camille; Bernacchi, Serena; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication. PMID:25606970

  9. Impact of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1+2 dual infection on the outcome of tuberculosis

    Wejse, C; Patsche, C B; Kühle, A;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infection has been shown to impact the outcome of patients with tuberculosis (TB), but data regarding the impact of HIV-2 on TB outcomes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HIV types on mortality among TB patients in Guinea-Bissau and to examine the...... predictive ability of the TBscoreII, a clinical score used to assess disease severity. METHODS: In a prospective follow-up study, we examined the prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1+2 co-infection in TB patients in Guinea-Bissau, and the impact on outcomes at 12 months of follow-up. We included all adult...... seventy-nine patients were HIV-infected: 241 had HIV-1, 93 had HIV-2, and 45 were HIV-1+2 dual infected. The HIV type-associated risk of TB was 6-fold higher for HIV-1, 7-fold higher for HIV-1+2 dual infection, and 2-fold higher for HIV-2 compared with the HIV-uninfected. Of the patients included, 144 (11...

  10. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  11. Effectiveness of first-line antiretroviral therapy based on NNRTIs vs ritonavir-boosted PIs in HIV-1 infected patients with high plasma viral load

    A Imaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: Few clinical trials have compared non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/r as initial combined antiretroviral therapy (cART for HIV-1-infected patients with high plasma viral load (pVL, and non-conclusive results have been reported. We compared the effectiveness between NNRTI and PI/r as first-line cART for HIV-1-infected patients with high pVL. Methods: Observational retrospective study of 664 consecutive treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients with pVL (HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL who initiated NNRTI or PI/r-based cART between 2000–2010 in three University hospitals. Only currently preferred or alternative regimens in clinical guidelines were included. Primary endpoint: percentage of therapeutic failures at week 48. Virologic failure was defined as: a lack of virologic response (<1 log RNA HIV-1 decrease in first 3 months; b RNA HIV-1 >50 c/mL at week 48; c confirmed rebound >50 c/ml after a previous value <50 c/mL. Intent-to-treat (ITT noncompleter=failure and on-treatment (OT analyses were performed. Results: 62% of patients initiated NNRTI-regimens (83% efavirenz and 38% PI/r-regimens (62% lopinavir/. Baseline characteristics: male 83%; median age 39 yrs; median CD4 count: 212/µL (NNRTI 232 vs PI/r 177, p=0.028; pVL 5.83 log10 c/mL (NNRTI 5.43 vs PI/r 5.55, p=0.007; AIDS 24% (NNRTI 21% vs PI/r 29%, p=0.015. NRTI backbones were tenofovir plus 3TC or FTC in 72%. The percentage of therapeutic failure was higher in the PI/r group (ITT NC=F 26% vs 18%, p=0.012 with no differences in virologic failures (PI/r 5%, NNRTI 6%, p=0.688. The rate of treatment changes due to toxicity and/or voluntary discontinuations was higher in the PI/r group (15% vs 8%, p=0.008. A multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, CD4 count, VL and AIDS showed NNRTI vs PI/r as the only variable associated with treatment response (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.41–0.88. Median pVL and rate of

  12. Smith, Adam (1723-90)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Adam Smith is often said to have been the founder of the science of economics and the father of liberalism in the sphere of economics. In fact he was neither. He lived at a turning point in western economic and political history, one that was littered with disruptive developments. He came up...... with a masterful synthesis of the economic knowledge of his period and emphasized both the relative autonomy of these phenomena and their importance in terms of generating wealth from, and in the interests of, everyone. Nevertheless, Smith never denied the moral foundation of economic behavior....

  13. Impact of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1+2 dual infection on the outcome of tuberculosis

    C. Wejse; C.B. Patsche; Kühle, A.; F.J.V. Bamba; Mendes, M. S.; G. Lemvik; V.F. Gomes; F. Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Background: HIV-1 infection has been shown to impact the outcome of patients with tuberculosis (TB), but data regarding the impact of HIV-2 on TB outcomes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HIV types on mortality among TB patients in Guinea-Bissau and to examine the predictive ability of the TBscoreII, a clinical score used to assess disease severity. Methods: In a prospective follow-up study, we examined the prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1+2 co-infection ...

  14. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Suppress HIV-1 Replication but Contribute to HIV-1 Induced Immunopathogenesis in Humanized Mice

    Guangming Li; Menglan Cheng; Jun-Ichi Nunoya; Liang Cheng; Haitao Guo; Haisheng Yu; Yong-Jun Liu; Lishan Su; Liguo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I) induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were de...

  15. Inhibiting Early-Stage Events in HIV-1 Replication by Small-Molecule Targeting of the HIV-1 Capsid

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Madani, Navid; Mankowski, Marie K.; Schön, Arne; Zentner, Isaac; Swaminathan, Gokul; Princiotto, Amy; Anthony, Kevin; Oza, Apara; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Passic, Shendra R.; Wang, Xiaozhao; Jones, David M; Stavale, Eric; Fred C. Krebs

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays essential roles in both early and late stages of virl replication and has emerged as a novel drug target. We report hybrid structure-based virtual screening to identify small molecules with the potential to interact with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of HIV-1 CA and disrupt early, preintegration steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. The small molecule 4,4′-[dibenzo[b,d]furan-2,8-diylbis(5-phenyl-1H-imidazole-4,2-diyl)]dibenzoic acid (CK026), which had anti-HI...

  16. Characteristics, Immunological Response & Treatment Outcomes of HIV-2 Compared with HIV-1 & Dual Infections (HIV 1/2) in Mumbai

    Chiara, Montaldo; Rony, Zachariah; Homa, Mansoor; Bhanumati, Varghese; Ladomirska, Joanna; Manzi, M.; Wilson, N; Alaka, Deshpande; Harries, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background & objectives: Information available on HIV-2 and dual infection (HIV-1/2) is limited. This study was carried out among HIV positive individuals in an urban referral clinic in Khar, Mumbai, India, to report on relative proportions of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 and baseline characteristics, response to and outcomes on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods: Retrospective analysis of programme data (May 2006-May 2009) at Khar HIV/AIDS clinic at Mumbai, India was done. Three test algori...

  17. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  18. Chimpanzee reservoirs of pandemic and nonpandemic HIV-1.

    Keele, Brandon F; Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Li, Yingying; Bailes, Elizabeth; Takehisa, Jun; Santiago, Mario L; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Chen, Yalu; Wain, Louise V; Liegeois, Florian; Loul, Severin; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Bienvenue, Yanga; Delaporte, Eric; Brookfield, John F Y; Sharp, Paul M; Shaw, George M; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2006-07-28

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cause of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is a zoonotic infection of staggering proportions and social impact. Yet uncertainty persists regarding its natural reservoir. The virus most closely related to HIV-1 is a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) thus far identified only in captive members of the chimpanzee subspecies Pan troglodytes troglodytes. Here we report the detection of SIVcpz antibodies and nucleic acids in fecal samples from wild-living P. t. troglodytes apes in southern Cameroon, where prevalence rates in some communities reached 29 to 35%. By sequence analysis of endemic SIVcpz strains, we could trace the origins of pandemic (group M) and nonpandemic (group N) HIV-1 to distinct, geographically isolated chimpanzee communities. These findings establish P. t. troglodytes as a natural reservoir of HIV-1. PMID:16728595

  19. Role of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in CD16b Shedding Mediated by Different Stimulators

    Sha Guo; Min Peng; Qing Zhao; Wei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the main proteinases responsible for CD16b shedding under different stimulators.Methods HEK293 cell line stably expressing CD16b was constructed by lentivirus system.The cell line was then overexpressed with a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) or ADAM17,suppressed with short hairpin RNA of ADAM10 or ADAM17,and reconstituted with ADAMi0 or ADAM17,respectively.After each treatment,the cell line was stimulated with ionomycin or phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) for 12 hours.The soluble CD 16b released from cell membrane was detected by immunoprecipition and immtmoblot.Quantitation was then implemented to compare the amount of soluble CD 16b in cell supernatant after stimulation.Results HEK293 cell line stably expressing CD16b was successfully established.When CD16b expressing cell line was overexpressed with ADAM1 0,shedding of CD 16b was increased after stimulation with ionomycin but not PMA; when the cell line overexpressed with ADAM 17,shedding of CD 16b was increased after stimulation with PMA but not ionomycin.Similarly,when ADAM10 was suppressed by short hairpin RNA,CD16b shedding was decreased after stimulation with ionomycin; when ADAM17 was suppressed by short hairpin RNA,CD16b shedding was decreased after stimulation with PMA.The shedding of CD16b was increased again when CD16b expressing cell line was reconstituted with ADAM10 and stimulated by ionomycin or reconstituted with ADAM 17 and stimulated by PMA.Conclusions Both ADAM10 and ADAM17 could shed CD16b,but they possess differed preferences.ADAM10 is the main sheddase under stimulation of ionomycin,while ADAM17 is the main sheddase under stimulation of PMA.

  20. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    Doherty Kathleen M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the

  1. Imaging HIV-1 nuclear pre-integration complexes.

    Cereseto, Anna; Giacca, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in fluorescent microscopy techniques now permit investigation of HIV-1 biology exploiting tools alternative to conventional molecular biology. Here we describe a novel, fluorescence-based method to visualize HIV-1 viral particles within intact nuclei of infected cells. This method allows investigating the localization of pre-integration complexes within the nuclear compartment with respect to the nuclear envelope and the chromatin territories. PMID:24158813

  2. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Santiago Guerrero; Julien Batisse; Camille Libre; Serena Bernacchi; Roland Marquet; Jean-Christophe Paillart

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by ta...

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of HIV-1 protease complexed with saquinavir

    Watson, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibition of the Human Immunode�ficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease enzyme blocks HIV-1 replication. Protease inhibitor drugs have successfully been used as a therapy for HIV-infected individuals to reduce their viral loads and slow the progression to Acquired Immune Defi�ciency Syndrome (AIDS). However, mutations readily and rapidly accrue in the protease gene resulting in a reduced sensitivity of the protein to the inhibitor. In this thesis, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS)...

  4. HIV-1 infected monozygotic twins: a tale of two outcomes

    Pérez-Losada Marcos; Orsega Susan; Metcalf Julia A; Hirschfeld Steven; Imamichi Hiromi; Tazi Loubna; Posada David; Lane H Clifford; Crandall Keith A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Replicate experiments are often difficult to find in evolutionary biology, as this field is inherently an historical science. However, viruses, bacteria and phages provide opportunities to study evolution in both natural and experimental contexts, due to their accelerated rates of evolution and short generation times. Here we investigate HIV-1 evolution by using a natural model represented by monozygotic twins infected synchronically at birth with an HIV-1 population from ...

  5. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    Amjad Ali; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected...

  6. Cell-free Assays for HIV-1 Uncoating

    Aiken, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Uncoating is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle about which little is known. Uncoating is defined as the specific dissociation of the capsid shell from the viral core in the host cell cytoplasm. In this chapter, biochemical assays for studying HIV-1 uncoating in vitro are described. These techniques have proven useful for characterizing HIV-1 mutants that exhibit defects in the uncoating step of infection.

  7. Cell-free assays for HIV-1 uncoating.

    Aiken, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Uncoating is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle about which little is known. Uncoating is defined as the specific dissociation of the capsid shell from the viral core in the host cell cytoplasm. In this chapter, biochemical assays for studying HIV-1 uncoating in vitro are described. These techniques have proven useful for characterizing HIV-1 mutants that exhibit defects in the uncoating step of infection. PMID:19020817

  8. Protein methylation is required to maintain optimal HIV-1 infectivity

    Piller Sabine C; Warrilow David; Apolloni Ann; Bodetti Tracey J; Hitchen Eleanor M; Willemsen Nicole M; Harrich David

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background: Protein methylation is recognized as a major protein modification pathway regulating diverse cellular events such as protein trafficking, transcription, and signal transduction. More recently, protein arginine methyltransferase activity has been shown to regulate HIV-1 transcription via Tat. In this study, adenosine periodate (AdOx) was used to globally inhibit protein methyltransferase activity so that the effect of protein methylation on HIV-1 infectivity could be asses...

  9. Lipids and Membrane Microdomains in HIV-1 Replication

    Waheed, Abdul A.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Several critical steps in the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) – entry, assembly and budding – are complex processes that take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell. A growing body of data indicates that these early and late steps in HIV-1 replication take place in specialized plasma membrane microdomains, and that many of the viral and cellular components required for entry, assembly, and budding are concentrated in these microdomains. In particular, a...

  10. Targeting HIV-1 entry and reverse transcription by vaccination

    Zuber, Bartek

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) is a complex retrovirus, which uses the CD4 receptor and chemokine receptors to infect its target cells. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is essential for primary HIV-1 infection. The hallmark of retroviruses is the enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT), which transcribes the virus genome from RNA to DNA. RT is a major target for HIV drugs but antiviral treatment often selects for drug resistant virus variants. RT lacks proofreading, which ...