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Sample records for acute regulatory protein

  1. Retinoid regulated macrophage cholesterol efflux involves the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    Manna, Pulak R

    2016-06-01

    Elimination of excess cholesteryl esters from macrophage-derived foam cells is known to be a key process in limiting plaque stability and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux is influenced by liver X receptor (LXR) signaling in mouse macrophages (Manna, P.R. et al., 2015, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 464:312-317). The data presented in this article evaluate the importance of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in retinoid mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux. Overexpression of StAR in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the effects of both all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA on cholesterol efflux, suggesting StAR enhances the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and/or retinoid X receptor (RXR) ligands. Additional data revealed that atRA enhances (Bu)2cAMP induced StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 protein levels. Treatment of macrophages transfected with an LXRE reporter plasmid (pLXREx3-Luc) was found to induce the effects of RAR and RXR analogs on LXR activity. PMID:27081671

  2. Characterization of Novel StAR (Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein) Mutations Causing Non-Classic Lipoid Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Flück, Christa E.; Pandey, Amit V; Dick, Bernhard; Camats, Núria; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Clemente, María; Gussinyé, Miquel; Carrascosa, Antonio; Mullis, Primus E.; Audi, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Context Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH). Objective StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. Design To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure a...

  3. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR: Evidence of Gonadotropin-Induced Steroidogenesis in Alzheimer Disease

    Webber Kate M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer disease (AD is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, impairments in behavior, language and visual-spatial skills and ultimately, death. Epidemiological data reporting the predisposition of women to AD has led to a number of lines of evidence suggesting that age-related changes in hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis following reproductive senescence, may contribute to the etiology of AD. Recent studies from our group and others have reported not only increases in circulating gonadotropins, namely luteinizing hormone (LH in individuals with AD compared with control individuals, but also significant elevations of LH in vulnerable neuronal populations in individuals with AD compared to control cases as well as the highest density of gonadotropin receptors in the brain are found within the hippocampus, a region devastated in AD. However, while LH is higher in AD patients, the downstream consequences of this are incompletely understood. To begin to examine this issue, here, we examined the expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, which regulates the first key event in steroidogenesis, namely, the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, and is regulated by LH through the cyclic AMP second messenger pathway, in AD and control brain tissue. Results Our data revealed that StAR protein was markedly increased in both the cytoplasm of hippocampal pyramidal neurons as well as in the cytoplasm of other non-neuronal cell types from AD brains when compared with age-matched controls. Importantly, and suggestive of a direct mechanistic link, StAR protein expression in AD brains colocalized with LH receptor expression. Conclusion Therefore, our findings suggest that LH is not only able to bind to its receptor and induce potentially pathogenic signaling in AD, but also that steroidogenic pathways regulated by LH may play a role in AD.

  4. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and its regulation by interferon-gamma in rat corpus luteum

    2000-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is the key regulatory protein of steroidogenesis. De novo synthesis of StAR protein is required for intramitochondrial translocation of cholesterol to the cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme which is located on the matrix side of the inner mitochondrial membrane. This is the rate-limiting step of steroid biosynthesis. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we studied StAR expression in various stages of the corpora luteal and its regulation by interferon-gamma (IFNγ) in the adult pseudopregnant rat. The results indicated that expression of StAR in the corpora luteal was correlated with progesteron production and IFNγ was capable of inhibiting its expression.

  5. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    Treg cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by Treg cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of Treg phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic Treg cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing Treg cells in SMAR1−/− mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic Treg cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining Treg physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in Treg cells. • SMAR1−/− Treg cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1−/− mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain Treg phenotype that controls colitis

  6. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bopanna, Ramanamurthy [Experimental Animal Facility, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Chattopadhyay, Samit, E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  7. Retinoid regulated macrophage cholesterol efflux involves the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein

    Manna, Pulak R.

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of excess cholesteryl esters from macrophage-derived foam cells is known to be a key process in limiting plaque stability and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux is influenced by liver X receptor (LXR) signaling in mouse macrophages (Manna, P.R. et al., 2015, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 464:312-317). The data presented in this article evaluate the importance of the steroidogenic acute reg...

  8. Infantile 4-tert-octylphenol exposure transiently inhibits rat ovarian steroidogenesis and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression

    Phenolic compounds, such as 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), have been shown to interfere with rat ovarian steroidogenesis. However, little is known about steroidogenic effects of infantile OP exposure on immature ovary. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of infantile OP exposure on plasma FSH, LH, estradiol, and progesterone levels in 14-day-old female rats. The effect on ovarian steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and FSH receptor (FSHr) expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Ex vivo analysis was carried out for follicular estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and cAMP production. Sprague-Dawley rats were given OP (0, 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg) subcutaneously on postnatal days 6, 8, 10, and 12. On postnatal day 14, plasma FSH was decreased and progesterone increased significantly at a dose of 100 mg OP/kg. In addition, the highest OP dose advanced the time of vaginal opening in puberty. OP had no effect on infantile LH and estradiol levels or ovarian FSHr content. Ovarian StAR protein content and ex vivo hormone and cAMP production were decreased at all OP doses compared to controls. However, hormone levels recovered independent on FSH and even increased above the control level during a prolonged culture. On postnatal day 35, no statistically significant differences were seen between control and OP-exposed animals in plasma FSH, LH, estradiol, and progesterone levels, or in ovarian StAR protein content. The results indicate that the effect of OP on the infantile ovary is reversible, while more permanent effects in the hypothalamus and pituitary, as described earlier, are involved in the reduction of circulating FSH levels and premature vaginal opening

  9. Characterization of novel StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein mutations causing non-classic lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    Christa E Flück

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH. OBJECTIVE: StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. DESIGN: To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure and functional data on two novel StAR mutations, and to compare them with published literature. SETTING: Collaboration between the University Children's Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and the CIBERER, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain. PATIENTS: Two subjects of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family were studied. The 46,XX phenotypic normal female was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the age of 10 months, had normal pubertal development and still has no signs of hypergonodatropic hypogonadism at 32 years of age. Her 46,XY brother was born with normal male external genitalia and was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at 14 months. Puberty was normal and no signs of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism are present at 29 years of age. RESULTS: StAR gene analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygote mutations T44HfsX3 and G221S. T44HfsX3 is a loss-of-function StAR mutation. G221S retains partial activity (∼30% and is therefore responsible for a milder, non-classic phenotype. G221S is located in the cholesterol binding pocket and seems to alter binding/release of cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: StAR mutations located in the cholesterol binding pocket (V187M, R188C, R192C, G221D/S seem to cause non-classic lipoid CAH. Accuracy of genotype-phenotype prediction by in vitro testing may vary with the assays employed.

  10. Quercetin and vitamin E attenuate Bonny Light crude oil-induced alterations in testicular apoptosis, stress proteins and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in Wistar rats.

    Ebokaiwe, Azubuike P; Mathur, Premendu P; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown the reproductive effects of Bonny Light crude oil (BLCO) via the mechanism of oxidative stress and testicular apoptosis. We investigated the protective role of quercetin and vitamin E on BLCO-induced testicular apoptosis. Experimental rats were divided into four groups of four each. Animals were orally administered 2 ml/kg corn oil (control: group 1), BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight + 10 mg/kg quercetin (group 2), BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight + 50 mg/kg vitamin E (group 3) and BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight only (group 4) for 7 d. Protein levels of caspase 3, FasL, NF-kB, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and stress response proteins were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunofluorescence staining was used to quantify the expression of caspase 3, FasL and NF-kB. Apoptosis was quantified by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Administration of BLCO resulted in a significant increase in the levels of stress response proteins and apoptosis-related proteins by 50% and above after 7 d following BLCO exposure and a concomitant increase in expression of caspase 3, FasL and NF-kB expression by immunofluorescence staining. Apoptosis showed a significant increase in TUNEL positive cells. Co-administration with quercetin or vitamin E reversed BLCO-induced apoptosis and levels of stress protein, relative to control. These findings suggest that quercetin and vitamin E may confer protection against BLCO-induced testicular oxidative stress-related apoptosis. PMID:26821606

  11. Potential of acute phase proteins as predictor of postpartum uterine infections during transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle

    A. Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the various systemic reactions against infection or injury, the acute phase response is the cascade of reaction and mostly coordinated by cytokines-mediated acute phase proteins (APPs production. Since APPs are sensitive innate immune molecules, they are useful for early detection of inflammation in bovines and believed to be better discriminators than routine hematological parameters. Therefore, the possibility of using APPs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of inflammation in major bovine health disorders including postpartum uterine infection has been explored by many workers. In this review, we discussed specifically importance of postpartum uterine infection, the role of energy balance in uterine infections and potential of APPs as a predictor of postpartum uterine infections during the transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle.

  12. Exosomes Secreted by Apoptosis-Resistant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Blasts Harbor Regulatory Network Proteins Potentially Involved in Antagonism of Apoptosis.

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Schuurhuis, Gerrit J; Kessler, Floortje L; Piersma, Sander R; Knol, Jaco C; Pham, Thang V; Jansen, Gerrit; Musters, René J P; van Meerloo, Johan; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Zweegman, Sonja; Cloos, Jacqueline; Jimenez, Connie R

    2016-04-01

    Expression of apoptosis-regulating proteins (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 - BCL-2, Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 - MCL-1, BCL-2 like 1 - BCL-X and BCL-2-associated X protein - BAX) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts at diagnosis is associated with disease-free survival. We previously found that the initially high apoptosis-resistance of AML cells decreased after therapy, while regaining high levels at relapse. Herein, we further explored this aspect of dynamic apoptosis regulation in AML. First, we showed that the intraindividualex vivoapoptosis-related profiles of normal lymphocytes and AML blasts within the bone marrow of AML patients were highly correlated. The expression values of apoptosis-regulating proteins were far beyond healthy control lymphocytes, which implicates the influence of microenvironmental factors. Second, we demonstrated that apoptosis-resistant primary AML blasts, as opposed to apoptosis-sensitive cells, were able to up-regulate BCL-2 expression in sensitive AML blasts in contact cultures (p= 0.0067 andp= 1.0, respectively). Using secretome proteomics, we identified novel proteins possibly engaged in apoptosis regulation. Intriguingly, this analysis revealed that major functional protein clusters engaged in global gene regulation, including mRNA splicing, protein translation, and chromatin remodeling, were more abundant (p= 4.01E-06) in secretomes of apoptosis-resistant AML. These findings were confirmed by subsequent extracellular vesicle proteomics. Finally, confocal-microscopy-based colocalization studies show that splicing factors-containing vesicles secreted by high AAI cells are taken up by low AAI cells. The current results constitute the first comprehensive analysis of proteins released by apoptosis-resistant and sensitive primary AML cells. Together, the data point to vesicle-mediated release of global gene regulatory protein clusters as a plausible novel mechanism of induction of apoptosis resistance. Deciphering the modes of communication

  13. Expression of 17beta- and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in non-luteinizing bovine granulosa cells in vitro.

    Sahmi, M; Nicola, E S; Silva, J M; Price, C A

    2004-08-31

    Granulosa cells of small follicles differentiate in vitro in serum-free medium, resulting in increased estradiol secretion and abundance of mRNA encoding cytochrome P450aromatase (P450arom). We tested the hypothesis that differentiation in vitro also involves increased expression of 3beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD) in the absence of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression, as has been observed in vivo. Granulosa cells from small (basal layer of the membrana granulosa) did not affect steroidogenesis. We conclude that under the present cell culture system granulosa cells do not luteinize, and show expression of key steroidogenic enzymes in patterns similar to those occurring in differentiating follicles in vivo. Further, the data suggest that 17beta-HSD may be as important as P450arom in regulating estradiol secretion, and that 3beta-HSD is more important than P450scc as a regulator of progesterone secretion in non-luteinizing granulosa cells. PMID:15279910

  14. Potential of acute phase proteins as predictor of postpartum uterine infections during transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle

    Manimaran, A.; Kumaresan, A.; Jeyakumar, S.; Mohanty, T. K.; Sejian, V.; Narender Kumar; L. Sreela; M. Arul Prakash; Mooventhan, P.; Anantharaj, A.; Das, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Among the various systemic reactions against infection or injury, the acute phase response is the cascade of reaction and mostly coordinated by cytokines-mediated acute phase proteins (APPs) production. Since APPs are sensitive innate immune molecules, they are useful for early detection of inflammation in bovines and believed to be better discriminators than routine hematological parameters. Therefore, the possibility of using APPs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of inflammation in maj...

  15. Overexpression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in rat aortic endothelial cells attenuates palmitic acid-induced inflammation and reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability

    Tian Dai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial dysfunction is a well documented evidence for the onset of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Lipids disorder is among the main risk factors for endothelial dysfunction in these diseases. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR, one of the cholesterol transporters, plays an important role in the maintenance of intracellular lipid homeostasis. However, the effect of StAR on endothelial dysfunction is not well understood. Palmitic acid (PA has been shown to decrease eNOS activity and induce inflammation, both are the causes of endothelial dysfunction, in an endothelial cell culture model. Methods StAR gene was introduced into primary rat aortic endothelial cells by adenovirus infection. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the relative genes and proteins expression level to elucidate the underlying mechanism. The free fatty acid and cholesterol quantification kits were used to detect total cellular free fatty acid and cholesterol. The levels of inflammatory factors and nitric oxide were determined by ELISA and classic Griess reagent methods respectively. Results We successfully overexpressed StAR in primary rat aortic endothelial cells. Following StAR overexpression, mRNA levels of IL-1β, TNFα, IL6 and VCAM-1 and protein levels of IL-1β, , TNFα and IL-6 in culture supernatant were significantly decreased, which duing to blocke NFκB nuclear translocation and activation. Moreover, StAR overexpression attenuated the PA-induced reduction of nitric oxide bioavailability by protecting the bioactivity of pAkt/peNOS/NO pathway. Furthermore, the key genes involved in lipid metabolism were greatly reduced following StAR overexpression. In order to investigate the underlying mechanism, cerulenin and lovastatin, the inhibitor of fatty acid and cholesterol synthase, were added prior to PA treatment. The results showed that both cerulenin and lovastatin had a similar effect as

  16. Comparison of changes in gene expression of transferrin receptor-1 and other iron-regulatory proteins in rat liver and brain during acute-phase response

    Malik, Ihtzaz; Naz, Naila; Sheikh, Nadeem; Khan, Sajjad; Moriconi, Federico; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    The “acute phase” is clinically characterized by homeostatic alterations such as somnolence, adinamia, fever, muscular weakness, and leukocytosis. Dramatic changes in iron metabolism are observed under acute-phase conditions. Rats were administered turpentine oil (TO) intramuscularly to induce a sterile abscess and killed at various time points. Tissue iron content in the liver and brain increased progressively after TO administration. Immunohistology revealed an abundant expression of transf...

  17. Gut regulatory peptides and intestinal permeability in acute infantile gastroenteritis.

    Lawson, G R; Nelson, R.; Laker, M F; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Aynsley-Green, A.

    1992-01-01

    The plasma concentrations of seven gut regulatory peptides were measured in 11 infants suffering from acute gastroenteritis. Samples were taken at the time of the acute illness, upon reintroduction of feeding, and three months after recovery. These results were compared with controls. In the infants with diarrhoea, a massive increase in the fasting plasma mean (SEM) concentrations of enteroglucagon was found at the time of illness (1292 (312) v 79 (27) pmol/l), with concentrations of pancreat...

  18. Review: Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins

    GRUYS E.; TOUSSAINT M.J.M.; NIEWOLD T.A.; KOOPMANS S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes,negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants,they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached.Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need;and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations.

  19. [Regulatory proteins of vertebrate eye tissues].

    Krasnov, M S; Grigorian, E N; Iamskova, V P; Boguslavskiĭ, D V; Iamskov, I A

    2003-01-01

    In our work the new proteins likely belonged to the microenvironment of pigmented epithelium cells and retinal neurons in mammalian eye were studied. We attempted to understand the role of these proteins in the maintenance of normal morphological and functional state of these eye tissues. Earlier for the first time we identified the adhesion molecules with physico-chemical and biological properties much different from other known cell adhesion molecules of bovine eye. Probably, they represent one family of low molecular weigh, highly glicosylated proteins, that express biological activity in extremely low doses--10(-10) mg/ml. The homogeneity of studying proteins is confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. It is shown also that these proteins are N-glycosylated, because they contain mannose and N-acetilglucosamine residues. They demonstrate as well a high calcium-binding activity, with Kd corresponded to 10(-4)-10(-6) mg/ml. For a study of the biological effect of these glycoproteins in extremely low doses, a new experimental model was proposed and developed. It was the cultivation in vitro of the posterior part of the eye obtained from the newt Pleurodeles waltl. In short-time culture system it was demonstrated that the studied glycoproteins could stabilize pigment epithelium cell differentiation and cellular interactions in the neural retina in vitro. In addition, glycoproteins, obtained from the pigmented epithelium of bovine eye could decrease the rate of bipolar cell apoptosis in the neural retina. Therefore, the novel adhesion glycoproteins, expressing their biological activity in extremely low doses, pretend to be the regulatory molecules with vivid gomeostatic effects necessary for the delicate adjustment of cell behavior action and function in sensory tissues. PMID:12881976

  20. Extracting protein regulatory networks with graphical models.

    Grzegorczyk, Marco

    2007-09-01

    During the last decade the development of high-throughput biotechnologies has resulted in the production of exponentially expanding quantities of biological data, such as genomic and proteomic expression data. One fundamental problem in systems biology is to learn the architecture of biochemical pathways and regulatory networks in an inferential way from such postgenomic data. Along with the increasing amount of available data, a lot of novel statistical methods have been developed and proposed in the literature. This article gives a non-mathematical overview of three widely used reverse engineering methods, namely relevance networks, graphical Gaussian models, and Bayesian networks, whereby the focus is on their relative merits and shortcomings. In addition the reverse engineering results of these graphical methods on cytometric protein data from the RAF-signalling network are cross-compared via AUROC scatter plots. PMID:17893851

  1. Acute Phase Proteins and Their Role in Periodontitis: A Review

    Polepalle, Tejaswin; Moogala, Srinivas; Boggarapu, Shalini; Pesala, Divya Sai; Palagi, Firoz Babu

    2015-01-01

    Acute phase proteins are a class of proteins whose plasma concentration increase (positive acute phase proteins) or decrease (negative acute phase proteins) in response to inflammation. This response is called as the acute phase reaction, also called as acute phase response, which occurs approximately 90 minutes after the onset of a systemic inflammatory reaction. In Periodontitis endotoxins released from gram negative organisms present in the sub gingival plaque samples interact with Toll- l...

  2. Acute phase protein response during acute ruminal acidosis in cattle

    Danscher, A. M.; Thoefner, M. B.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the acute phase protein and leukocyte responses in dairy heifers during acute, oligofructose-induced ruminal acidosis. The study included 2 trials involving oral oligofructose overload (17g/kg BW) to nonpregnant Danish Holstein heifers. Trial 1 included 12...... performed.Heifers receiving oligofructose developed a profound ruminal and systemic acidosis (in Trial 1 and 2 lowest ruminal pH was 4.3±0.2 and 3.8±0.02, respectively, and minimum SBE was −9.3±4.1 and −8.9±2.8, respectively). In Trial 1, SAA concentrations were higher than baseline concentrations on all...... than control heifers at 18 and 24h after overload (max. 13.7±4.3 billions/L). Feeding had no effect on plasma fibrinogen concentrations or WBC in Trial 1.Acute ruminal and systemic acidosis caused by oligofructose overload resulted in distinct acute phase protein and leukocyte responses in dairy...

  3. Plant Antifreeze Proteins and Their Expression Regulatory Mechanism

    Lin Yuan-zhen; Lin Shan-zhi; Zhang Zhi-yi; Zhang Wei; Liu Wen-feng

    2005-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the major limiting environmental factors which constitutes the growth, development,productivity and distribution of plants. Over the past several years, the proteins and genes associated with freezing resistance of plants have been widely studied. The recent progress of domestic and foreign research on plant antifreeze proteins and the identification and characterization of plant antifreeze protein genes, especially on expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are reviewed in this paper. Finally, some unsolved problems and the trend of research in physiological functions and gene expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are discussed.

  4. Automated protein-DNA interaction screening of Drosophila regulatory elements

    Hens, Korneel; Feuz, Jean-Daniel; Isakova, Alina; Iagovitina, Antonina; Massouras, Andreas; Bryois, Julien; Callaerts, Patrick; Celniker, Susan E.; Deplancke, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has one of the best characterized metazoan genomes in terms of functionally annotated regulatory elements. To explore how these elements contribute to gene regulation in the context of gene regulatory networks, we need convenient tools to identify the proteins that bind to them. Here, we present the development and validation of a highly automated protein-DNA interaction detection method, enabling the high-throughput yeast one-hybrid-based screening of DNA elements ver...

  5. Energy-coupled outer membrane transport proteins and regulatory proteins.

    Braun, Volkmar; Endriss, Franziska

    2007-06-01

    FhuA and FecA are two examples of energy-coupled outer membrane import proteins of gram-negative bacteria. FhuA transports iron complexed by the siderophore ferrichrome and serves as a receptor for phages, a toxic bacterial peptide, and a toxic protein. FecA transports diferric dicitrate and regulates transcription of an operon encoding five ferric citrate (Fec) transport genes. Properties of FhuA mutants selected according to the FhuA crystal structure are described. FhuA mutants in the TonB box, the hatch, and the beta-barrel are rather robust. TonB box mutants in FhuA FecA, FepA, Cir, and BtuB are compared; some mutations are suppressed by mutations in TonB. Mutant studies have not revealed a ferrichrome diffusion pathway, and tolerance to mutations in the region linking the TonB box to the hatch does not disclose a mechanism for how energy transfer from the cytoplasmic membrane to FhuA changes the conformation of FhuA such that bound substrates are released, the pore is opened, and substrates enter the periplasm, or how surface loops change their conformation such that TonB-dependent phages bind irreversibly and release their DNA into the cells. The FhuA and FecA crystal structures do not disclose the mechanism of these proteins, but they provide important information for specific functional studies. FecA is also a regulatory protein that transduces a signal from the cell surface into the cytoplasm. The interacting subdomains of the proteins in the FecA --> FecR --> FecI --> RNA polymerase signal transduction pathway resulting in fecABCDE transcription have been determined. Energy-coupled transporters transport not only iron and vitamin B12, but also other substrates of very low abundance such as sugars across the outer membrane; transcription regulation of the transport genes may occur similarly to that of the Fec transport genes. PMID:17370038

  6. Acute Phase Proteins and Their Role in Periodontitis: A Review.

    Polepalle, Tejaswin; Moogala, Srinivas; Boggarapu, Shalini; Pesala, Divya Sai; Palagi, Firoz Babu

    2015-11-01

    Acute phase proteins are a class of proteins whose plasma concentration increase (positive acute phase proteins) or decrease (negative acute phase proteins) in response to inflammation. This response is called as the acute phase reaction, also called as acute phase response, which occurs approximately 90 minutes after the onset of a systemic inflammatory reaction. In Periodontitis endotoxins released from gram negative organisms present in the sub gingival plaque samples interact with Toll- like receptors (TLR) that are expressed on the surface of Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) and monocytes which are in abundance in periodontal inflammation. The complex formed due to interaction of Endotoxins and TLR activates the Signal transduction pathway in both innate and adaptive immunity resulting in production of Cytokines that co- ordinate the local and systemic inflammatory response. The pro inflammatory cytokines originating at the diseased site activates the liver cells to produce acute phase proteins as a part of non specific response. The production of Acute phase proteins is regulated to a great extent by Cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and to a lesser extent by Glucocorticoid hormones. These proteins bind to bacteria leading to activation of complement proteins that destroys pathogenic organisms. Studies have shown that levels of acute phase proteins are increased in otherwise healthy adults with poor periodontal status. This article highlights about the synthesis, structure, types and function of acute phase proteins and the associated relation of acute phase proteins in Periodontitis. PMID:26674303

  7. The porcine acute phase protein response to acute clinical and subclinical experimental infection with Streptococcus suis

    Sørensen, Nanna Skall; Tegtmeier, C.; Andresen, Lars Ole;

    2006-01-01

    The pig acute phase protein (APP) response to experimental Streptococcus suis (S. suis) infection was mapped by the measurement of the positive APPs C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and major acute phase protein (pig-MAP) and the negative APPs albumin and apolipop......The pig acute phase protein (APP) response to experimental Streptococcus suis (S. suis) infection was mapped by the measurement of the positive APPs C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and major acute phase protein (pig-MAP) and the negative APPs albumin and...

  8. The porcine acute phase protein response to acute clinical and subclinical experimental infection with Streptococcus suis

    Sørensen, Nanna Skall; Tegtmeier, C.; Andresen, Lars Ole; Pineiro, M.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Campbell, F.M.; Lampreave, F.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    The pig acute phase protein (APP) response to experimental Streptococcus suis (S. suis) infection was mapped by the measurement of the positive APPs C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and major acute phase protein (pig-MAP) and the negative APPs albumin and apolipop...

  9. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    Rubinstein, Rotem [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Ramagopal, Udupi A. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Nathenson, Stanley G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Almo, Steven C. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Fiser, Andras [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  10. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  11. Molecular control of vertebrate iron homeostasis by iron regulatory proteins

    Wallander, Michelle L.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Both deficiencies and excesses of iron represent major public health problems throughout the world. Understanding the cellular and organismal processes controlling iron homeostasis is critical for identifying iron-related diseases and in advancing the clinical treatments for such disorders of iron metabolism. Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are key regulators of vertebrate iron metabolism. These RNA binding proteins post-transcriptionally control the stability or translation of mRNAs ...

  12. Dynamical Analysis of Protein Regulatory Network in Budding Yeast Nucleus

    LI Fang-Ting; JIA Xun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Recent progresses in the protein regulatory network of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided a global picture of its protein network for further dynamical research. We simplify and modularize the protein regulatory networks in yeast nucleus, and study the dynamical properties of the core 37-node network by a Boolean network model, especially the evolution steps and final fixed points. Our simulation results show that the number of fixed points N(k) for a given size of the attraction basin k obeys a power-law distribution N(k)∝k-2.024. The yeast network is more similar to a scale-free network than a random network in the above dynamical properties.

  13. Crystal structure of nitrogen regulatory protein IIANtr from Neisseria meningitidis

    Stammers David K

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NMB0736 gene of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 encodes the putative nitrogen regulatory protein, IIANtr (abbreviated to NM-IIANtr. The homologous protein present in Escherichia coli is implicated in the control of nitrogen assimilation. As part of a structural proteomics approach to the study of pathogenic Neisseria spp., we have selected this protein for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Results The NM-IIANtr was over-expressed in E. coli and was shown to be partially mono-phosphorylated, as assessed by mass spectrometry of the purified protein. Crystals of un-phosphorylated protein were obtained and diffraction data collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The structure of NM-IIANtr was solved by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the E. coli nitrogen regulatory protein IIAntr [PDB: 1A6J] as the starting model. The overall fold of the Neisseria enzyme shows a high degree of similarity to the IIANtr from E. coli, and the position of the phosphoryl acceptor histidine residue (H67 is conserved. The orientation of an adjacent arginine residue (R69 suggests that it may also be involved in coordinating the phosphate group. Comparison of the structure with that of E. coli IIAmtl complexed with HPr [PDB: 1J6T] indicates that NM-IIANtr binds in a similar way to the HPr-like enzyme in Neisseria. Conclusion The structure of NM-IIANtr confirms its assignment as a homologue of the IIANtr proteins found in a range of other Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that the NM- IIANtr protein functions as part of a phosphorylation cascade which, in contrast to E. coli, shares the upstream phosphotransfer protein with the sugar uptake phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS, but in common with E. coli has a distinct downstream effector mechanism.

  14. A homeodomain protein binds to. gamma. -globin gene regulatory sequences

    Lavelle, D.; Ducksworth, J.; Eves, E.; Gomes, G.; Keller, M.; Heller, P.; DeSimone, J. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (United States) Veterans Administration Westside Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1991-08-15

    Developmental regulation of {gamma}-globin gene expression probably occurs through developmental-stage-specific trans-acting factors able to promote the interaction of enhancer elements located in the far upstream locus control region with regulatory elements in the {gamma} gene promoters and 3{prime}{sup A}{gamma} enhancer located in close proximity to the genes. The authors have detected a nuclear protein in K562 and baboon fetal bone marrow nuclear extracts capable of binding to A+T-rich sequences in the locus control region, {gamma} gene promoter, and 3{prime} {sup A}{gamma} enhancer. SDS/polyacrylamide gel analysis of the purified K562 binding activity revealed a single protein of 87 kDa. A K562 cDNA clone was isolated encoding a {beta}-galactosidase fusion protein with a DNA binding specificity identical to that of the K562/fetal bone marrow nuclear protein. The cDNA clone encodes a homeodomain homologous to the Drosophila antennapedia protein.

  15. Acute phase proteins as diagnostic markers in horses with colic

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Scheepers, Elrien; Sanz, Macarena;

    2016-01-01

    Objective - To investigate the diagnostic potential of acute phase proteins (serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin and fibrinogen) measured in blood and peritoneal fluid for differentiating horses with inflammatory colic (entero-colitis and peritonitis) from those with surgical colic. Design...... - Prospective observational multicenter study. Setting - Two university referral hospitals. Animals - Horses referred for severe acute abdominal pain to hospital 1 (n=148) or hospital 2 (n=78). Intervention - Blood and peritoneal fluid samples collected at admission were used for acute phase protein measurement...... significantly. When validated in hospital 2 data, the models had a satisfying integrity and diagnostic performance. Conclusions – Evaluation of SAA in serum improved the ability to differentiate horses with acute inflammatory colic requiring medical treatment from horses with colic requiring surgical treatment...

  16. Redox control of iron regulatory protein 2 stability.

    Hausmann, Anja; Lee, Julie; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-02-18

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a critical switch for cellular and systemic iron homeostasis. In iron-deficient or hypoxic cells, IRP2 binds to mRNAs containing iron responsive elements (IREs) and regulates their expression. Iron promotes proteasomal degradation of IRP2 via the F-box protein FBXL5. Here, we explored the effects of oxygen and cellular redox status on IRP2 stability. We show that iron-dependent decay of tetracycline-inducible IRP2 proceeds efficiently under mild hypoxic conditions (3% oxygen) but is compromised in severe hypoxia (0.1% oxygen). A treatment of cells with exogenous H(2)O(2) protects IRP2 against iron and increases its IRE-binding activity. IRP2 is also stabilized during menadione-induced oxidative stress. These data demonstrate that the degradation of IRP2 in iron-replete cells is not only oxygen-dependent but also sensitive to redox perturbations. PMID:21281640

  17. Cadmium-induced aggregation of iron regulatory protein-1

    Iron regulatory protein-1 (IRP-1) is central to regulation of iron homeostasis, and has been shown to be sensitive to Cd2+ in vitro. Although Cd2+ induces disulfide-bond formation in many proteins, the critical cysteine residues for iron binding in IRP-1 were shown not to be involved in Cd-induced IRP-1 aggregation in vitro. Here we show that Cd2+ causes polymerization and aggregation of IRP-1 in vitro and in vivo, and decreases in a dose-dependent manner both its RNA-binding and aconitase enzymatic activities, as well as its cytosolic expression. We have used two-dimensional electrophoresis to demonstrate thiol-dependent self-association of purified recombinant IRP-1 treated with Cd2+, as well as self-association in Cd2+-exposed mesangial cells. Circular dichroism spectra confirm significant conformational changes in the purified protein upon Cd2+ exposure. Following Cd2+ treatment, there is increased translocation of inactive IRP-1 to the actin cytoskeletal fraction, and this translocation is diminished by both antioxidant (BHA) treatment and inhibition of CaMK-II. These changes differ from those elicited by manipulation of iron levels. Cadmium-induced translocation of proteins to cellular compartments, and particularly to the cytoskeleton, is becoming a recognized event in Cd2+ toxicity. Polymer-dependent translocation of IRP-1 in Cd2+-exposed cells may underlie effects of Cd2+ on iron homeostasis

  18. Impaired circulating CD4+ LAP+ regulatory T cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome and its mechanistic study.

    Zheng-Feng Zhu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: CD4(+ latency-associated peptide (LAP(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are a newly discovered T cell subset in humans and the role of these cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS has not been explored. We designed to investigate whether circulating frequency and function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs are defective in ACS. METHODS: One hundred eleven ACS patients (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina and 117 control patients were enrolled in the study. The control patients consisted of chronic stable angina (CSA and chest pain syndrome (CPS. The frequencies of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs and the expression of the transmembrane protein glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP on CD4(+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. The function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs was detected using thymidine uptake. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β protein (TGF-β levels were detected using ELISA and expression of GARP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: We found ACS patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs, and the function of these cells was reduced compared to controls. The expression of GARP in CD4(+ T cells and the serum levels of TGF-β in ACS patients were lower than those of control patients. The serum levels of IL-10 were similar between the two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: A novel regulatory T cell subset, defined as CD4(+LAP(+ T cells is defective in ACS patients.

  19. Maintaining cholesterol homeostasis:Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins

    Lutz W. Weber; Meinrad Boll; Andreas Stampfl

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of how hepatocytes maintain cholesterol homeostasis has become much more transparent with the discovery of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) in recent years. These membrane proteins are members of the basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) family of transcription factors. They activate the expression of at least 30 genes involved in the synthesis of cholesterol and lipids. SREBPs are synthesized as precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where they form a complex with another protein, SREBP cleavage activating protein (SCAP).The SCAP molecule contains a sterol sensory domain. In the presence of high cellular sterol concentrations SCAP confines SREBP to the ER. With low cellular concentrations, SCAP escorts SREBP to activation in the Golgi. There, SREBP undergoes two proteolytic cleavage steps to release the mature, biologically active transcription factor, nuclear SREBP (nSREBP). nSREBP translocates to the nucleus and binds to sterol response elements (SRE) in the promoter/enhancer regions of target genes. Additional transcription factors are required to activate transcription of these genes. Three different SREBPs are known, SREBPs-1a, -1c and -2. SREBP-1a and -1c are isoforms produced from a single gene by alternate splicing. SREBP-2is encoded by a different gene and does not display any isoforms. It appears that SREBPs alone, in the sequence described above, can exert complete control over cholesterol synthesis, whereas many additional factors (hormones,cytokines, etc.) are required for complete control of lipid metabolism. Medicinal manipulation of the SREBP/SCAP system is expected to prove highly beneficial in the management of cholesterol-related disease.

  20. Enzymatic Mercury Detoxification: The Regulatory Protein MerR

    Ctortecka, B; Walsh, C T; Comess, K M

    2002-01-01

    Mercury ions and organomercurial reagents are extremely toxic due to their affinity for thiol groups. Many bacteria contain an elaborate detoxification system for a metabolic conversion of toxic Hg$^{2+}$ or organomercurials to less toxic elemental Hg$^0$. The main components of the enzymatic mercury detoxification (see Fig. 1) are the regulatory protein MerR (mercury responsive genetic switch), the organomercurial lyase MerB (cleavage of carbon mercury bonds), and the mercuric ion reductase MerA (reduction of mercuric ions). In these proteins Hg$^{2+}$ is usually coordinated by the thiol groups of cysteines. We utilize the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) of ${\\rm^{199m}}$Hg detected by time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) to identify the Hg metal site geometries in these proteins in order to elucidate the molecular origin of the ultrasensitivity, selectivity and reaction mechanism of this detoxification system. The short lived TDPAC probe ${\\rm^{199m}}$Hg ($\\tau_{1/2} =$ 43 min) is su...

  1. Pregnancy associated plasma protein-A in acute coronary pathology.

    Sapozhnikov A.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim: to study pregnancy associated plasma protein A as a potential marker of myocardial necrosis with acute coronary syndrome. Material and methods. The rates of PPPP-A and insulin-like growth factor 1 were determined in 24 patients with acute myocardial infarction, in 18 patients with unstable angina and in the control group as well. Results. The rates of PPPP-A and ILGF-1 are accurately higher in the groups with acute coronary pathology in comparison to the patients with no ischemia. Conclusions. PPPP-A proves to be a marker of ischemia and/ or injury and could be used as a diagnostic predictor of an unstable atherosclerotic plaque in acute coronary development.

  2. Laboratory tests for disorders of complement and complement regulatory proteins.

    Shih, Angela R; Murali, Mandakolathur R

    2015-12-01

    The complement pathway is a cascade of proteases that is involved in immune surveillance and innate immunity, as well as adaptive immunity. Dysfunction of the complement cascade may be mediated by aberrations in the pathways of activation, complement regulatory proteins, or complement deficiencies, and has been linked to a number of hematologic disorders, including paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary angioedema (HAE), and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). Here, current laboratory tests for disorders of the complement pathway are reviewed, and their utility and limitations in hematologic disorders and systemic diseases are discussed. Current therapeutic advances targeting the complement pathway in treatment of complement-mediated hematologic disorders are also reviewed. PMID:26437749

  3. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 7a Accessory Protein Is a Viral Structural Protein

    Huang, Cheng; Ito, Naoto; Tseng, Chien-Te K.; Makino, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SCoV) 7a protein is one of the viral accessory proteins. In expressing cells, 7a protein exhibits a variety of biological activities, including induction of apoptosis, activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, inhibition of host protein translation, and suppression of cell growth progression. Analysis of SCoV particles that were purified by either sucrose gradient equilibrium centrifugation or a virus capture assay, in...

  4. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G., II; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-01

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics applying LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundan...

  5. Acute phase proteins in cattle after exposure to complex stress

    Lomborg, S. R.; Nielsen, L. R.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Stressors such as weaning, mixing and transportation have been shown to lead to increased blood concentrations of acute phase proteins (APP), including serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin, in calves. This study was therefore undertaken to assess whether SAA and haptoglobin levels in bl...

  6. Pleiotropy constrains the evolution of protein but not regulatory sequences in a transcription regulatory network influencing complex social behaviours

    Daria eMolodtsova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly apparent that genes and networks that influence complex behaviour are evolutionary conserved, which is paradoxical considering that behaviour is labile over evolutionary timescales. How does adaptive change in behaviour arise if behaviour is controlled by conserved, pleiotropic, and likely evolutionary constrained genes? Pleiotropy and connectedness are known to constrain the general rate of protein evolution, prompting some to suggest that the evolution of complex traits, including behaviour, is fuelled by regulatory sequence evolution. However, we seldom have data on the strength of selection on mutations in coding and regulatory sequences, and this hinders our ability to study how pleiotropy influences coding and regulatory sequence evolution. Here we use population genomics to estimate the strength of selection on coding and regulatory mutations for a transcriptional regulatory network that influences complex behaviour of honey bees. We found that replacement mutations in highly connected transcription factors and target genes experience significantly stronger negative selection relative to weakly connected transcription factors and targets. Adaptively evolving proteins were significantly more likely to reside at the periphery of the regulatory network, while proteins with signs of negative selection were near the core of the network. Interestingly, connectedness and network structure had minimal influence on the strength of selection on putative regulatory sequences for both transcription factors and their targets. Our study indicates that adaptive evolution of complex behaviour can arise because of positive selection on protein-coding mutations in peripheral genes, and on regulatory sequence mutations in both transcription factors and their targets throughout the network.

  7. Application of acute phase protein measurements in veterinary clinical chemistry

    Petersen, Henning; Nielsen, J. P.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2004-01-01

    The body's early defence in response to trauma, inflammation or infection, the acute phase response, is a complex set of systemic reactions seen shortly after exposure to a triggering event. One of the many components is an acute phase protein response in which increased hepatic synthesis leads to...... possible use as non-specific indicators of health in large animal veterinary medicine such as in the health status surveillance of pigs at the herd level, for the detection of mastitis in dairy cattle and for the prognosis of respiratory diseases in horses....

  8. Application of acute phase protein measurements in veterinary clinical chemistry

    Petersen, Henning; Nielsen, J. P.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2004-01-01

    The body's early defence in response to trauma, inflammation or infection, the acute phase response, is a complex set of systemic reactions seen shortly after exposure to a triggering event. One of the many components is an acute phase protein response in which increased hepatic synthesis leads t...... possible use as non-specific indicators of health in large animal veterinary medicine such as in the health status surveillance of pigs at the herd level, for the detection of mastitis in dairy cattle and for the prognosis of respiratory diseases in horses....

  9. Role of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Arsenic Trioxide-induced Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Apoptosis.

    Pan, Chaoyun; Zhu, Dihan; Zhuo, Jianjiang; Li, Limin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Zen, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) has been shown to operate as a negative regulator in cancer cell survival. The mechanism underneath such function, however, remains poorly defined. In the present study, we demonstrate that overexpression of SIRPα in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells results in apoptosis possibly via inhibiting the β-catenin signaling pathway and upregulating Foxo3a. Pharmacological activation of β-catenin signal pathway attenuates apoptosis caused by SIRPα. Interestingly, we also find that the pro-apoptotic effect of SIRPα plays an important role in arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced apoptosis in APL cells. ATO treatment induces the SIRPα protein expression in APL cells and abrogation of SIRPα induction by lentivirus-mediated SIRPα shRNA significantly reduces the ATO-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic study further shows that induction of SIRPα protein in APL cells by ATO is mediated through suppression of c-Myc, resulting in reduction of three SIRPα-targeting microRNAs: miR-17, miR-20a and miR-106a. In summary, our results demonstrate that SIRPα inhibits tumor cell survival and significantly contributes to ATO-induced APL cell apoptosis. PMID:27010069

  10. Regulatory T cells control diabetes without compromising acute anti-viral defense☆

    Sachithanantham, Sowbarnika; Dave, Amy; Rodriguez-Calvo, Teresa; Miller, Jacqueline; von Herrath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While previous reports have demonstrated the efficacy of regulatory T cell therapy in the prevention of diabetes, systemic immunocompromise and Treg instability remain key safety concerns. Here we examined the influence of induced Treg (iTreg) cell therapy on anti-viral host defense and autoimmune T cell responses during acute viral infection in a murine model of autoimmune diabetes. Protective transfers of iTregs maintained IL-10 expression, and expanded in vivo and controlled diabetes, despite losing FoxP3 expression. Adoptive transfer of iTregs affected neither the primary anti-viral CD8 T cell response nor viral clearance, although a significant and sustained suppression of CD4 T cell responses was observed. Following acute viral clearance, iTregs transferred early suppressed both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, which resulted in the reversion of diabetes. These observations indicate that iTregs suppress local autoimmune processes while preserving the immunocompetent host's ability to combat acute viral infection. PMID:24858581

  11. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0mM) medium for 24h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury. PMID:26976750

  12. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  13. Serum acute phase proteins and swine health status

    Chen, Hsin-Hsin; Lin, Jyh-Hung; Fung, Hang-Pong; Ho, Lin-Lin; Yang, Ping-Chin; Lee, Wen-Chuan; Lee, Yan-Pai; Chu, Rea-Min

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between swine health status and the concentration of the serum acute phase proteins, haptoglobin (HP), and C-reactive protein (CRP). A total of 378 clinically healthy pigs from farms A and B, plus 20 pigs culled from farm A due to poor growth, were used in this experiment. Each pig was examined and blood samples were collected during slaughter. The HP concentration was measured by using an HP-hemoglobin binding assay. The CRP conce...

  14. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  15. Activation of counter-regulatory mechanisms in a rat renal acute rejection model

    Salomon Daniel R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray analysis provides a powerful approach to identify gene expression alterations following transplantation. In patients the heterogeneity of graft specimens, co-morbidity, co-medications and the challenges in sample collection and preparation complicate conclusions regarding the underlying mechanisms of graft injury, rejection and immune regulation. Results We used a rat kidney transplantation model with strict transplant and sample preparation procedures to analyze genome wide changes in gene expression four days after syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation. Both interventions were associated with substantial changes in gene expression. After allogeneic transplantation, genes and pathways related to transport and metabolism were predominantly down-regulated consistent with rejection-mediated graft injury and dysfunction. Up-regulated genes were primarily related to the acute immune response including antigen presentation, T-cell receptor signaling, apoptosis, interferon signaling and complement cascades. We observed a cytokine and chemokine expression profile consistent with activation of a Th1-cell response. A novel finding was up-regulation of several regulatory and protective genes after allogeneic transplantation, specifically IL10, Bcl2a1, C4bpa, Ctla4, HO-1 and the SOCS family. Conclusion Our data indicate that in parallel with the predicted activation of immune response and tissue injury pathways, there is simultaneous activation of pathways for counter regulatory and protective mechanisms that would balance and limit the ongoing inflammatory/immune responses. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind and the clinical consequences of alterations in expression of these gene classes in acute rejection, injury and dysfunction vs. protection and immunoregulation, prompt further analyses and open new aspects for therapeutic approaches.

  16. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  17. Regulatory elements of Caenorhabditis elegans ribosomal protein genes

    Sleumer Monica C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs are essential, tightly regulated, and highly expressed during embryonic development and cell growth. Even though their protein sequences are strongly conserved, their mechanism of regulation is not conserved across yeast, Drosophila, and vertebrates. A recent investigation of genomic sequences conserved across both nematode species and associated with different gene groups indicated the existence of several elements in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs, providing a new insight regarding the regulation of these genes in C. elegans. Results In this study, we performed an in-depth examination of C. elegans RPG regulation and found nine highly conserved motifs in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs using the motif discovery algorithm DME. Four motifs were partially similar to transcription factor binding sites from C. elegans, Drosophila, yeast, and human. One pair of these motifs was found to co-occur in the upstream regions of 250 transcripts including 22 RPGs. The distance between the two motifs displayed a complex frequency pattern that was related to their relative orientation. We tested the impact of three of these motifs on the expression of rpl-2 using a series of reporter gene constructs and showed that all three motifs are necessary to maintain the high natural expression level of this gene. One of the motifs was similar to the binding site of an orthologue of POP-1, and we showed that RNAi knockdown of pop-1 impacts the expression of rpl-2. We further determined the transcription start site of rpl-2 by 5’ RACE and found that the motifs lie 40–90 bases upstream of the start site. We also found evidence that a noncoding RNA, contained within the outron of rpl-2, is co-transcribed with rpl-2 and cleaved during trans-splicing. Conclusions Our results indicate that C. elegans RPGs are regulated by a complex novel series of regulatory elements that is evolutionarily distinct from

  18. Crystal structure of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    Bader, G; Schiffmann, S; Herrmann, A; Fischer, M; Gütlich, M; Auerbach, G; Ploom, T; Bacher, A; Huber, R; Lemm, T

    2001-10-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for hydroxylation of aromatic amino acids regulates its own synthesis in mammals through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I. This mechanism is mediated by a regulatory subunit called GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). The 2.6 A resolution crystal structure of rat GFRP shows that the protein forms a pentamer. This indicates a model for the interaction of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I with its regulator, GFRP. Kinetic investigations of human GTP cyclohydrolase I in complex with rat and human GFRP showed similar regulatory effects of both GFRP proteins. PMID:11580249

  19. Acute hantavirus infection induces galectin-3-binding protein.

    Hepojoki, Jussi; Strandin, Tomas; Hetzel, Udo; Sironen, Tarja; Klingström, Jonas; Sane, Jussi; Mäkelä, Satu; Mustonen, Jukka; Meri, Seppo; Lundkvist, Ake; Vapalahti, Olli; Lankinen, Hilkka; Vaheri, Antti

    2014-11-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses that cause life-threatening diseases when transmitted to humans. Severe hantavirus infection is manifested by impairment of renal function, pulmonary oedema and capillary leakage. Both innate and adaptive immune responses contribute to the pathogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we showed that galectin-3-binding protein (Gal-3BP) was upregulated as a result of hantavirus infection both in vitro and in vivo. Gal-3BP is a secreted glycoprotein found in human serum, and increased Gal-3BP levels have been reported in chronic viral infections and in several types of cancer. Our in vitro experiments showed that, whilst Vero E6 cells (an African green monkey kidney cell line) constitutively expressed and secreted Gal-3BP, this protein was detected in primary human cells only as a result of hantavirus infection. Analysis of Gal-3BP levels in serum samples of cynomolgus macaques infected experimentally with hantavirus indicated that hantavirus infection induced Gal-3BP also in vivo. Finally, analysis of plasma samples collected from patients hospitalized because of acute hantavirus infection showed higher Gal-3BP levels during the acute than the convalescent phase. Furthermore, the Gal-3BP levels in patients with haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome correlated with increased complement activation and with clinical variables reflecting the severity of acute hantavirus infection. PMID:25013204

  20. p42.3 gene expression in gastric cancer cell and its protein regulatory network analysis

    Zhang Jianhua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the p42.3 gene expression in gastric cancer (GC cell, find the relationship between protein structure and function, establish the regulatory network of p42.3 protein molecule and then to obtain the optimal regulatory pathway. Methods The expression of p42.3 gene was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and other biotechnologies. The relationship between the spatial conformation of p42.3 protein molecule and its function was analyzed using bioinformatics, MATLAB and related knowledge about protein structure and function. Furthermore, based on similarity algorithm of spatial layered spherical coordinate, we compared p42.3 molecule with several similar structured proteins which are known for the function, screened the characteristic nodes related to tumorigenesis and development, and established the multi variable relational model between p42.3 protein expression, cell cycle regulation and biological characteristics in the level of molecular regulatory networks. Finally, the optimal regulatory network was found by using Bayesian network. Results (1 The expression amount of p42.3 in G1 and M phase was higher than that in S and G2 phase; (2 The space coordinate systems of different structural domains of p42.3 protein were established in Matlab7.0 software; (3 The optimal pathway of p42.3 gene in protein regulatory network in gastric cancer is Ras protein, Raf-1 protein, MEK, MAPK kinase, MAPK, tubulin, spindle protein, centromere protein and tumor. Conclusion It is of vital significance for mechanism research to find out the action pathway of p42.3 in protein regulatory network, since p42.3 protein plays an important role in the generation and development of GC.

  1. [Sequential changes in acute phase reactant proteins and complement activation in patients with acute head injuries].

    Ikeda, Y; Matsuura, H; Nakazawa, S

    1987-12-01

    The role of immunological mechanisms in head injury is not clearly defined. In this study we investigated the immunological function in patients with acute head injuries. Serum acute phase reactant proteins (APRP), complement activation and immunoglobulines as immunological parameters were studied. APRP are produced in the liver and increase in cancer patients as well as those with acute and chronic inflammations, trauma and autoimmune diseases. APRP are known to be one of the immunosuppressive factors in the serum. Forty patients with acute head injuries were studied. Thirty-four patients were male and six patients were female, ages ranged from 12 to 81 years. Serial blood samples were obtained during the first seven days of trauma. The Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) were recorded at the time of admission for all patients. Clinical outcome was assessed at the time of discharge according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The "good" group consisted of patients with good recovery or moderate disability. The "bad" group consisted of patients with severe disability, persistent vegetative state and death. The concentrations of immunoglobulines (IgG, IgM, IgA) were within normal range and humoral immunity was not affected. Complement activation at the time of admission was closely related to GCS (p less than 0.01), but the levels of C4, C3, and C3 activator except for these of CH50 were within normal range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2451531

  2. Bovine viral diarrhea virus structural protein E2 as a complement regulatory protein.

    Ostachuk, Agustín

    2016-07-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the genus Pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, and is one of the most widely distributed viruses in cattle worldwide. Approximately 60 % of cattle in endemic areas without control measures are infected with BVDV during their lifetime. This wide prevalence of BVDV in cattle populations results in significant economic losses. BVDV is capable of establishing persistent infections in its host due to its ability to infect fetuses, causing immune tolerance. However, this cannot explain how the virus evades the innate immune system. The objective of the present work was to test the potential activity of E2 as a complement regulatory protein. E2 glycoprotein, produced both in soluble and transmembrane forms in stable CHO-K1 cell lines, was able to reduce complement-mediated cell lysis up to 40 % and complement-mediated DNA fragmentation by 50 %, in comparison with cell lines not expressing the glycoprotein. This work provides the first evidence of E2 as a complement regulatory protein and, thus, the finding of a mechanism of immune evasion by BVDV. Furthermore, it is postulated that E2 acts as a self-associated molecular pattern (SAMP), enabling the virus to avoid being targeted by the immune system and to be recognized as self. PMID:27038454

  3. S-100AND#946; protein as a biomarker in acute hemorrhagic stroke

    Omkar Prasad Baidya; Susmita Chaudhuri; Ksh Gomti Devi

    2014-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic stroke, a subtype of acute stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability throughout the world. At present, the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic stroke is mainly based on Computer Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) but till now no biomarkers are routinely used in acute hemorrhagic stroke management. This article is a critical and descriptive review on the role of S100β protein as a biomarker in acute hemorrhagic stroke. Plasma S-100β lev...

  4. Inflammation-induced recombinant protein expression in vivo using promoters from acute-phase protein genes.

    Varley, A.W.; Coulthard, M G; Meidell, R S; Gerard, R D; Munford, R S

    1995-01-01

    We report that promoters for two murine acute-phase protein (APP) genes, complement factor 3 (C3) and serum amyloid A3 (SAA3), can increase recombinant protein expression in response to inflammatory stimuli in vivo. To deliver APP promoter-luciferase reporter gene constructs to the liver, where most endogenous APP synthesis occurs, we introduced them into a nonreplicating adenovirus vector and injected the purified viruses intravenously into mice. When compared with the low levels of basal lu...

  5. cis-Regulatory and Protein Evolution in Orthologous and Duplicate Genes

    Castillo-Davis, Cristian I.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Achaz, Guillaume

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between protein and regulatory sequence evolution is a central question in molecular evolution. It is currently not known to what extent changes in gene expression are coupled with the evolution of protein coding sequences, or whether these changes differ among orthologs (species homologs) and paralogs (duplicate genes). Here, we develop a method to measure the extent of functionally relevant cis-regulatory sequence change in homologous genes, and validate it using microarray...

  6. Complement activation and complement control proteins in acute pancreatitis.

    Whicher, J T; Barnes, M. P.; Brown, A; Cooper, M J; Read, R; Walters, G; Williamson, R C

    1982-01-01

    Serum levels of the complement proteins C3, C4, C1 inhibitor (C1 INH), factor I (C3b inactivator) and factor H (BIH) and plasma levels of cleavage products of C3 (C3c) and factor B were measured in 26 patients with acute pancreatitis. Breakdown of C3 occurred in 19 patients, as shown by a reduction in C3 level and the presence of C3c. C4 levels, however, did not fall and factor B breakdown products were not detected, thus suggesting that enzymatic cleavage of C3 occurred without significant i...

  7. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Selectively Suppress Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein-1 through Proteolytic Processing and Autoloop Regulatory Circuit*

    Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Yahagi, Naoya; Izumida, Yoshihiko; Nishi, Makiko; Kubota, Midori; Teraoka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Sekiya, Motohiro; Iizuka, Yoko; Ohashi, Ken; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Gotoda, Takanari; Ishibashi, Shun

    2010-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1 is a key transcription factor for the regulation of lipogenic enzyme genes in the liver. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) selectively suppress hepatic SREBP-1, but molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To gain insight into this regulation, we established in vivo reporter assays to assess the activities of Srebf1c transcription and proteolytic processing. Using these in vivo reporter assays, we showed that the primary mechanism for P...

  8. No relationship between most polymorphisms of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR gene with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Azadeh-Sadat Nazouri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common endocrine women’s disorders in reproductive age. Hyperandrogenism has a critical role in the etiology of PCOS and it can cause fault in Steroidogenesis process. During steroidogenesis, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR seems to increase the delivery of cholesterol through mitochondrial membrane. Therefore, polymorphisms of StAR might effect on this protein and play a role in the etiology of PCOS. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between StAR SNPs with PCOS. Thus, seven polymorphisms in this gene: rs104894086, rs104894089, rs104894090, rs137852689, rs10489487, rs104894085 were detected. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 45 PCOS women, 40 male factor/unexplained infertile women, and 40 fertile women as two control groups were participated from 2008-2012. Polymorphisms were detected using restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. Results: Heterozygote genotyping for rs137852689 SNP (amino acid 218 C > T was only seen in seven PCOS patients, one in normal ovulatory women, and five in male factor/unexplained infertile women (15.5%, 2.5%, 12.5%, respectively (p= 0.12. While, it has shown no association between other SNPS with PCOs. Conclusion: The RFLP results for seven chosen SNPs, which located in exon 5 and 7 showed normal status in three groups, it means no heterozygous or homozygous forms of selected SNPs were observed. So, it seems evaluation of the active amino acid sites should be investigated and also the study population should be increased.

  9. Acute phase protein response in Alpine ibex with sarcoptic mange.

    Rahman, Md Mizanur; Lecchi, Cristina; Fraquelli, Cristina; Sartorelli, Paola; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2010-03-25

    The acute phase proteins (APP) are a group of serum proteins that change their concentration in animals following external or internal challenges, such as infection, inflammation or stress. The concentrations of four APPs, including serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and ceruloplasmin (Cp) were determined in serum collected from healthy Alpine ibexes (Capra ibex) and ibexes with Sarcoptes scabiei mange. Primary structures of all four APPs were determined by cDNA sequencing. The concentrations of all four APPs were higher in serum of animals with clinical signs of sarcoptic mange when compared to healthy animals. Two of the APPs, including SAA and AGP, acted as major APPs, since their serum concentrations were increased more than 10-folds when compared to healthy animals (Psarcoptic mange in free ranging animals. PMID:20036058

  10. Hunting for Cis-Regulatory Elements in Proteins.

    Gibson, Toby J; Kumar, Manjeet

    2016-02-24

    A new bioinformatics tool predicts natively disordered protein control elements that function in cis, opening the door to more systematic studies of this biomedically important class of protein modules. PMID:27135160

  11. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette;

    2009-01-01

    The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other...... measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14-18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase...... protein response occurring concomitantly with the hepatic response. This suggests that the acute phase protein response is a more disseminated systemic response than previously thought. The current study provides to our knowledge the first example of porcine extrahepatic expression and regulation of C...

  12. Caldesmon, an actin-linked regulatory protein, comes across glucocorticoids

    Sobue, Kenji; Fukumoto, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    The glucocorticoids (GCs), the most downstream effectors of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, are the main mediators of stress response. Stress-triggered GCs as well as acute and chronic GC treatment can impair the structural plasticity and function of the brain. The exposure of perinatal animals and humans to excess stress or GCs can affect the brain development, resulting in altered behaviors in the adult offspring of animals and an increased risk of psychiatric disorders in hu...

  13. Regulatory mechanisms of skeletal muscle protein turnover during exercise

    Rose, Adam John; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    downstream of changes in intracellular Ca(2+) and energy turnover. In particular, a signaling cascade involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin-eEF2 kinase-eEF2 is implicated. The possible functional significance of altered protein turnover in working skeletal muscle during exercise is discussed. Further work with...... available and new techniques will undoubtedly reveal the functional significance and signaling mechanisms behind changes in skeletal muscle protein turnover during exercise. Key words: Exercise, skeletal muscle, protein metabolism, translation....

  14. Anti-thrombin III, Protein C, and Protein S deficiency in acute coronary syndrome

    Dasnan Ismail

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The final most common pathway for the majority of coronary artery disease is occlusion of a coronary vessel. Under normal conditions, antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S as an active protein C cofactor, are natural anticoagulants (hemostatic control that balances procoagulant activity (thrombin antithrombin complex balance to prevent thrombosis. If the condition becomes unbalanced, natural anticoagulants and the procoagulants can lead to thrombosis. Thirty subjects with acute coronary syndrome (ACS were studied for the incidence of antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S deficiencies, and the result were compare to the control group. Among patients with ACS, the frequency of distribution of AT-III with activity < 75% were 23,3% (7 of 30, and only 6,7% ( 2 of 30 in control subject. No one of the 30 control subject have protein C activity deficient, in ACS with activity < 70% were 13,3% (4 of 30. Fifteen out of the 30 (50% control subjects had protein S activity deficiency, while protein S deficiency activity < 70% was found 73.3.% (22 out of 30. On linear regression, the deterministic coefficient of AT-III activity deficiency to the development ACS was 13,25 %, and the deterministic coefficient of protein C activity deficient to the development of ACS was 9,06 %. The cut-off point for AT-III without protein S deficiency expected to contribute to the development of vessel disease was 45%. On discriminant analysis, protein C activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 4,5 greater than non deficient subjects, and AT-III activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 3,5 times greater than non deficient subjects. On binary logistic regression, protein S activity acted only as a reinforcing factor of AT-III activity deficiency in the development of ACS. Protein C and AT III deficiency can trigger ACS, with determinant coefficients of 9,06% and 13,25% respectively. Low levels of protein C posed a greater risk of

  15. STUDY OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Medhini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Ischemic stroke is the 3rd leading cause of death after AMI and cancer. Stroke is also the leading cause of hospital admission causing disability. The study was based on 100 patients with ischemic stroke admitted to the JJM Medical College, Davangere. This study was done to estimate the role of C-reactive protein as a marker of acute inflammation following ischemic stroke and also to determine, its prognostic role, by assessing the functional outcome of patient using modified Barthel index scoring (ADL. Patients with CRP 6 mg/dl suffered severe disease with poor functional outcome. P value <0.05, significant, suggests CRP is a good tool for prognostic indicator

  16. Transient protein losing enteropathy associated with acute gastritis and campylobacter pylori.

    Hill, I. D.; Sinclair-Smith, C; Lastovica, A J; Bowie, M D; Emms, M

    1987-01-01

    Three children presented with acute protein losing enteropathy and were found to have acute gastritis associated with Campylobacter pylori infection. Recovery from protein losing enteropathy was accompanied by resolution of the gastritis and the disappearance of C pylori from the gastric mucosa. Their clinical course suggested that the C pylori had caused the gastritis and the protein losing enteropathy. The association between gastritis caused by C pylori and protein losing enteropathy in ch...

  17. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  18. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  19. A novel regulatory mechanism for whey acidic protein gene expression.

    Chen, L.H.; Bissell, M J

    1989-01-01

    When primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (PMME) are cultured on a basement membrane type matrix, they undergo extensive morphogenesis leading to the formation of 3-dimensional alveoli-like spherical structures surrounding a closed lumen. We show for the first time that cells cultured on basement membrane-type matrix express high levels of whey acidic protein (WAP) mRNA and secrete the protein into the lumen. The expression of WAP appears to be dependent upon the formation of the alveoli-li...

  20. Herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C: molecular mimicry of complement regulatory proteins by a viral protein.

    Huemer, H P; Wang, Y; Garred, P; Koistinen, V; Oppermann, S

    1993-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encodes a protein, glycoprotein C (gC), which binds to the third complement component, the central mediator of complement activation. In this study the structural and functional relationships of gC from HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and known human complement regulatory proteins factor H, properdin, factor B, complement receptor 1 (CR1) and 2 (CR2) were investigated. The interaction of gC with C3b was studied using purified complement components, synthetic peptides, antisera against different C3 fragments and anti-C3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with known inhibitory effects on C3-ligand interactions. All the mAb that inhibited gC/C3b interactions, in a differential manner, also prevented binding of C3 fragments to factors H, B, CR1 or CR2. No blocking was observed with synthetic peptides representing different C3 regions or with factor B and C3d, whereas C3b, C3c and factor H were inhibitory, as well as purified gC. There was no binding of gC to cobra venom factor (CVF), a C3c-like fragment derived from cobra gland. Purified gC bound to iC3, iC3b and C3c, but failed to bind to C3d. Glycoprotein C bound only weakly to iC3 derived from bovine and porcine plasma, thus indicating a preference of the viral protein for the appropriate host. Binding of gC was also observed to proteolytic C3 fragments, especially to the beta-chain, thus suggesting the importance of the C3 region as a binding site. Purified gC from HSV-1, but not HSV-2, inhibited the binding of factor H and properdin but not of CR1 to C3b. The binding of iC3b to CR2, a molecule involved in B-cell activation and binding of the Epstein-Barr virus, was also inhibited by the HSV-1 protein. As factor H and properdin, the binding of which was inhibited by gC, are important regulators of the alternative complement pathway, these data further support a role of gC in the evasion of HSV from a major first-line host defence mechanism, i.e. the complement system. In addition, the inhibition of the C3/CR

  1. The regulatory PII protein controls arginine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Besin, Evelyne; Pichon, Olivier; Meyer, Christian; Hodges, Michael

    2006-04-01

    In higher plants, PII is a nuclear-encoded plastid protein which is homologous to bacterial PII signalling proteins known to be involved in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism. A reduced ornithine, citrulline and arginine accumulation was observed in two Arabidopsis PII knock-out mutants in response to NH4+ resupply after N starvation. This difference could be explained by the regulation of a key enzyme of the arginine biosynthesis pathway, N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) by PII. In vitro assays using purified recombinant proteins showed the catalytic activation of Arabidopsis NAGK by PII giving the first evidence of a physiological role of the PII protein in higher plants. Using Arabidopsis transcriptome microarray (CATMA) and RT-PCR analyses, it was found that none of the genes involved in the arginine biosynthetic or catabolic pathways were differentially expressed in a PII knock-out mutant background. In conclusion, the observed changes in metabolite levels can be explained by the reduced activation of NAGK by PII. PMID:16545809

  2. Cell-cycle regulatory proteins in human wound healing

    Bartkova, Jirina; Grøn, Birgitte; Dabelsteen, Erik;

    2003-01-01

    ) and A, and reduced expression of cyclins D(3) and E, the cyclin D-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the MCM7 component of DNA replication origin complexes and the retinoblastoma protein pRb. Among the CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p16ink4a and p21Cip1 were moderately increased and decreased, respectively, whereas...

  3. Protein kinase Cbeta mediates hepatic induction of sterol-regulatory element binding protein-1c by insulin

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Inoue, Noriyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Ishigaki, Naomi; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yahagi, Naoya; Gotoda, Takanari; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Sterol-regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a transcription factor that controls lipogenesis in the liver. Hepatic SREBP-1c is nutritionally regulated, and its sustained activation causes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. Although regulation of SREBP-1c is known to occur at the transcriptional level, the precise mechanism by which insulin signaling activates SREBP-1c promoter remains to be elucidated. Here we show that protein kinase C beta (PKCbeta) is a key mediator o...

  4. THE REGULATORY EFFECT OF NUCLEOSIDE DIPHOSPHATE KINASE ON G-PROTEIN AND G-PROTEIN MEDIATED PHOSPHOLIPASE C

    张德昌; 张宽仁

    1995-01-01

    The effect of nueleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) on the activity of guanine nueleotide regulatory protein (G-protein) mediated phospholipase C (PLC) and on the [35S ] GTPTτS binding of G-protein was investigated in this work in order to demonstrate the mechanism behind the regulation of G-protein and its effector PLC by NDPK. The stimulation of PLC in turkey erythrocyte membrane by both GTP and GTPτS indicated that the PLC stimulation was msdiated by G-protein, NDPK alone stimulated PLC activity, as well as the stimulation in the presence of GTP and GDP, in a dose-dependent manner. However, NDPK inhibited GTPτS-stimulated PLC, Furthermore, NDPK inhibited [35S] GTPτS binding of purified Gi-protein in a non-competitive manner. A hypothesis implying an important role of direct interaction of G-protein and NDPK in the regulation of their functions is suggested and discussed.

  5. The porcine acute phase response to infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Haptoglobin, C-reactive protein, major acute phase protein and serum amyloid a protein are sensitive indicators of infection

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Klausen, Joan; Nielsen, J.P.;

    1998-01-01

    In an experimental infection model mimicking acute Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Ap) infection in swine (Sus scrofa) by aerosol inoculation, the development of a number of typical clinical signs was accompanied by a prototypic acute phase reaction encompassing fever and an acute phase protein ...

  6. C-Reactive protein predicts acute myocardial infarction during high-risk noncardiac and vascular surgery

    Oscar M. Martins; Fonseca, Vicente F; Ivan Borges; Vaierio Martins; Vera Lucia Portal; Lucia Campos Pellanda

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts cardiovascular events in a wide range of clinical contexts. However, the role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a predictive marker for perioperative acute myocardial infarction during noncardiac surgery is not yet clear. The present study investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels as predictors of acute myocardial infarction risk in patients undergoing high-risk noncardiac surgery. METHODS: This concurrent cohort s...

  7. Characterization of a manganese-dependent regulatory protein, TroR, from Treponema pallidum

    Posey, James E.; Hardham, John M.; Norris, Steven J; Gherardini, Frank C.

    1999-01-01

    Genome sequence analysis of Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, suggests that this bacterium has a limited iron requirement with few, if any, proteins that require iron. Instead, T. pallidum may use manganese-dependent enzymes for metabolic pathways. This strategy apparently alleviates the necessity of T. pallidum to acquire iron from the host, thus overcoming iron limitation, which is a primary host defense. Interestingly, a putative metal-dependent regulatory protein, TroR,...

  8. Control of Alternative Splicing by Signal-dependent Degradation of Splicing-regulatory Proteins*S⃞

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J.; Marengo, Matthew S.; Wassarman, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major gene expression regulatory mechanism in metazoan organisms. Proteins that bind pre-mRNA elements and control assembly of splicing complexes regulate utilization of pre-mRNA alternative splice sites. To understand how signaling pathways impact this mechanism, an RNA interference screen in Drosophila S2 cells was used to identify proteins that regulate TAF1 (TBP-associated factor 1) alternative splicing in response to activation o...

  9. Regulatory roles of Oct proteins in the mammary gland.

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2016-06-01

    The expression of Oct-1 and -2 and their binding to the octamer motif in the mammary gland are developmentally and hormonally regulated, consistent with the expression of milk proteins. Both of these transcription factors constitutively bind to the proximal promoter of the milk protein gene β-casein and might be involved in the inhibition or activation of promoter activity via interactions with other transcription factors or cofactors at different developmental stages. In particular, the lactogenic hormone prolactin and glucocorticoids induce Oct-1 and Oct-2 binding and interaction with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and the glucocorticoid receptor on the β-casein promoter to activate β-casein expression. In addition, increasing evidence has shown the involvement of another Oct factor, Oct-3/4, in mammary tumorigenesis, making Oct-3/4 an emerging prognostic marker of breast cancer and a molecular target for the gene-directed therapeutic intervention, prevention and treatment of breast cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin. PMID:27044595

  10. The impact of RGS and other G-protein regulatory proteins on Gαi-mediated signaling in immunity.

    Kehrl, John H

    2016-08-15

    Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Signaling downstream of these receptors directs the localization, positioning and homeostatic trafficking of leukocytes; as well as their recruitment to, and their retention at, inflammatory sites. Ligand induced changes in the molecular conformation of chemoattractant receptors results in the engagement of heterotrimeric G-proteins, which promotes α subunits to undergo GTP/GDP exchange. This results in the functional release of βγ subunits from the heterotrimers, thereby activating downstream effector molecules, which initiate leukocyte polarization, gradient sensing, and directional migration. Pertussis toxin ADP ribosylates Gαi subunits and prevents chemoattractant receptors from triggering Gαi nucleotide exchange. The use of pertussis toxin revealed the essential importance of Gαi subunit nucleotide exchange for chemoattractant receptor signaling. More recent studies have identified a range of regulatory mechanisms that target these receptors and their associated heterotrimeric G-proteins, thereby helping to control the magnitude, kinetics, and duration of signaling. A failure in these regulatory pathways can lead to impaired receptor signaling and immunopathology. The analysis of mice with targeted deletions of Gαi isoforms as well as some of these G-protein regulatory proteins is providing insights into their roles in chemoattractant receptor signaling. PMID:27071343

  11. Peri-alloHCT IL-33 administration expands recipient T-regulatory cells that protect mice against acute GVHD.

    Matta, Benjamin M; Reichenbach, Dawn K; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mathews, Lisa; Koehn, Brent H; Dwyer, Gaelen K; Lott, Jeremy M; Uhl, Franziska M; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Feser, Colby J; Smith, Michelle J; Liu, Quan; Zeiser, Robert; Blazar, Bruce R; Turnquist, Hēth R

    2016-07-21

    During allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), nonhematopoietic cell interleukin-33 (IL-33) is augmented and released by recipient conditioning to promote type 1 alloimmunity and lethal acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Yet, IL-33 is highly pleiotropic and exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties in the absence of coincident proinflammatory stimuli. We tested whether peri-alloHCT IL-33 delivery can protect against development of GVHD by augmenting IL-33-associated regulatory mechanisms. IL-33 administration augmented the frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing the IL-33 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity-2 (ST2), which persist following total body irradiation. ST2 expression is not exclusive to Tregs and IL-33 expands innate immune cells with regulatory or reparative properties. However, selective depletion of recipient Foxp3(+) cells concurrent with peri-alloHCT IL-33 administration accelerated acute GVHD lethality. IL-33-expanded Tregs protected recipients from GVHD by controlling macrophage activation and preventing accumulation of effector T cells in GVHD-target tissue. IL-33 stimulation of ST2 on Tregs activates p38 MAPK, which drives expansion of the ST2(+) Treg subset. Associated mechanistic studies revealed that proliferating Tregs exhibit IL-33-independent upregulation of ST2 and the adoptive transfer of st2(+) but not st2(-) Tregs mediated GVHD protection. In total, these data demonstrate the protective capacity of peri-alloHCT administration of IL-33 and IL-33-responsive Tregs in mouse models of acute GVHD. These findings provide strong support that the immunoregulatory relationship between IL-33 and Tregs can be harnessed therapeutically to prevent GVHD after alloHCT for treatment of malignancy or as a means for tolerance induction in solid organ transplantation. PMID:27222477

  12. Barriers to the Adoption of Safety-Engineered Needles Following a Regulatory Standard: Lessons Learned from Three Acute Care Hospitals

    Chambers, Andrea; Mustard, Cameron A.; Holness, D. Linn; Nichol, Kathryn; Breslin, F. Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of jurisdictions have introduced regulation to accelerate the adoption of safety-engineered needles (SENs). This study examined the transition to SENs in three acute care hospitals prior to and following the implementation of a regulatory standard in Ontario. This paper focuses on the ongoing barriers to the prevention of needlestick injuries among healthcare workers. Methods: Information from document review and 30 informant interviews were used to prepare three case studies detailing each organization's implementation activities and outcomes. Results: All three hospitals responded to the regulatory requirements with integrity and needlestick injuries declined. However, needlestick injuries continued to occur during the activation of safety devices, during procedures and during instrument disposal. The study documented substantial barriers to further progress in needlestick injury prevention. Conclusions: Healthcare organizations should focus on understanding their site-specific challenges that contribute to ongoing injury risk to better understand issues related to product limitations, practice constraints and the work environment. PMID:26571471

  13. Pig-MAP, porcine acute phase proteins and standardisation of assays in Europe

    Alava, M.A.; Gonzalez-Ramon, N.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    1997-01-01

    during the inflammation. In addition to CRP and Hp, a serum alpha(2)-globulin was observed to be the major acute phase (MAP) protein in pigs. Pig-MAP is a new mammalian plasma protein, which is the pig counterpart of a recently cloned human serum protein denominated PK-120 or MRP. Pig-MAP shows promise...

  14. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection.

    Kazuaki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts.We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course.qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry, was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate.We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR.

  15. Usefulness of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Iversen, Kasper K; Dalsgaard, Morten; Teisner, Ane S; Schoos, Mikkel; Teisner, Borge; Nielsen, Henrik; Clemmensen, Peter; Grande, Peer

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a prognostic marker in patients admitted with high-risk acute coronary syndrome. In patients admitted with high-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction...

  16. The muscle oxidative regulatory response to acute exercise is not impaired in less advanced COPD despite a decreased oxidative phenotype.

    Slot, Ilse G M; van den Borst, Bram; Hellwig, Valéry A C V; Barreiro, Esther; Schols, Annemie M W J; Gosker, Harry R

    2014-01-01

    Already in an early disease stage, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are confronted with impaired skeletal muscle function and physical performance due to a loss of oxidative type I muscle fibers and oxidative capacity (i.e. oxidative phenotype; Oxphen). Physical activity is a well-known stimulus of muscle Oxphen and crucial for its maintenance. We hypothesized that a blunted response of Oxphen genes to an acute bout of exercise could contribute to decreased Oxphen in COPD. For this, 28 patients with less advanced COPD (age 65 ± 7 yrs, FEV1 59 ± 16% predicted) and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls performed an incremental cycle ergometry test. The Oxphen response to exercise was determined by the measurement of gene expression levels of Oxphen markers in pre and 4h-post exercise quadriceps biopsies. Because exercise-induced hypoxia and oxidative stress may interfere with Oxphen response, oxygen saturation and oxidative stress markers were assessed as well. Regardless of oxygen desaturation and absolute exercise intensities, the Oxphen regulatory response to exercise was comparable between COPD patients and controls with no evidence of increased oxidative stress. In conclusion, the muscle Oxphen regulatory response to acute exercise is not blunted in less advanced COPD, regardless of exercise-induced hypoxia. Hence, this study provides further rationale for incorporation of exercise training as integrated part of disease management to prevent or slow down loss of muscle Oxphen and related functional impairment in COPD. PMID:24587251

  17. The muscle oxidative regulatory response to acute exercise is not impaired in less advanced COPD despite a decreased oxidative phenotype.

    Ilse G M Slot

    Full Text Available Already in an early disease stage, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are confronted with impaired skeletal muscle function and physical performance due to a loss of oxidative type I muscle fibers and oxidative capacity (i.e. oxidative phenotype; Oxphen. Physical activity is a well-known stimulus of muscle Oxphen and crucial for its maintenance. We hypothesized that a blunted response of Oxphen genes to an acute bout of exercise could contribute to decreased Oxphen in COPD. For this, 28 patients with less advanced COPD (age 65 ± 7 yrs, FEV1 59 ± 16% predicted and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls performed an incremental cycle ergometry test. The Oxphen response to exercise was determined by the measurement of gene expression levels of Oxphen markers in pre and 4h-post exercise quadriceps biopsies. Because exercise-induced hypoxia and oxidative stress may interfere with Oxphen response, oxygen saturation and oxidative stress markers were assessed as well. Regardless of oxygen desaturation and absolute exercise intensities, the Oxphen regulatory response to exercise was comparable between COPD patients and controls with no evidence of increased oxidative stress. In conclusion, the muscle Oxphen regulatory response to acute exercise is not blunted in less advanced COPD, regardless of exercise-induced hypoxia. Hence, this study provides further rationale for incorporation of exercise training as integrated part of disease management to prevent or slow down loss of muscle Oxphen and related functional impairment in COPD.

  18. The regulatory role of immunosuppressants on immune abnormalities in acute pancreatitis

    DUAN, LIGENG; Ma, Yu; CHI, JUNLIN; Wang, Xu; Wesley, Alexander J; Chen, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    The uncontrolled progression of the inflammatory cascade is the main cause underlying the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in acute pancreatitis. In this study, we investigated the effects of several immunosuppressants on mitigating the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome (SIRS) and the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) associated with acute pancreatitis. A total of 93 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: group 1 was the sham ...

  19. Dexamethasone mediates protection against acute pancreatitis via upregulation of pancreatitis-associated proteins

    Kandil, Emad; Lin, Yin-yao; Bluth, Martin H; Zhang, Hong; Levi, Gabriel; Zenilman, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the influence of dexamethasone on pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) gene expression using both in vitro and in vivo models of acute pancreatitis and to study how PAP gene expression correlates with severity of pancreatitis.

  20. Acute supplementation of amino acids increases net protein accretion in IUGR fetal sheep

    Brown, Laura D.; Rozance, Paul J.; Thorn, Stephanie R.; FRIEDMAN, Jacob E.; Hay, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Placental insufficiency decreases fetal amino acid uptake from the placenta, plasma insulin concentrations, and protein accretion, thus compromising normal fetal growth trajectory. We tested whether acute supplementation of amino acids or insulin into the fetus with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) would increase net fetal protein accretion rates. Late-gestation IUGR and control (CON) fetal sheep received acute, 3-h infusions of amino acids (with euinsulinemia), insulin (with euglycemia...

  1. C-Reactive Protein and Complement Are Important Mediators of Tissue Damage in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Griselli, M; Herbert, J.; Hutchinson, W. L.; Taylor, K. M.; Sohail, M; Krausz, T.; Pepys, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial infarction in humans provokes an acute phase response, and C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute phase plasma protein, is deposited together with complement within the infarct. The peak plasma CRP value is strongly associated with postinfarct morbidity and mortality. Human CRP binds to damaged cells and activates complement, but rat CRP does not activate complement. Here we show that injection of human CRP into rats after ligation of the coronary artery reproducibly enhance...

  2. Acute phase proteins: a review of their function, behaviour and measurement in chickens

    O'Reilly, E.L.; Eckersall, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    This review brings together and consolidates the large amount of research on acute phase proteins (APPs) that has been undertaken in chickens. Acute phase proteins are secreted from the liver as a result of inflammation or infection that can be measured in plasma. They have been well-characterised in other farm animal species and have been measured in a wide variety of poultry research areas. The acceleration in chicken APP research is in response to increased interest in ways the immune resp...

  3. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, 1 Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; CHANNON, KEITH M

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression ...

  4. Iron Regulatory Proteins Control a Mucosal Block to Intestinal Iron Absorption

    Bruno Galy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated “mucosal block.” We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin “mucosal block” and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  5. Governing effect of regulatory proteins for Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger 2 activity.

    Jeong, Yon Soo; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-05-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (AE2) has a critical role in epithelial cells and is involved in the ionic homeostasis such as Cl(-) uptake and HCO3(-) secretion. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism of AE2. The main goal of the present study was to investigate potential regulators, such as spinophilin (SPL), inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT), STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) kinase, and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII). We found that SPL binds to AE2 and markedly increased the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. Especially SPL 1-480 domain is required for enhancing AE2 activity. For other regulatory components that affect the fidelity of fluid and HCO3(-) secretion, IRBIT and SPAK had no effect on the activity of AE2 and no protein-protein interaction with AE2. It has been proposed that CA activity is closely associated with AE activity. In this study, we provide evidence that the basolateral membrane-associated CA isoform CA XII significantly increased the activity of AE2 and co-localized with AE2 to the plasma membrane. Collectively, SPL and CA XII enhanced the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. The modulating action of these regulatory proteins could serve as potential therapeutic targets for secretory diseases mediated by AE2. PMID:26716707

  6. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less...

  7. Systematic measurement of transcription factor-DNA interactions by targeted mass spectrometry identifies candidate gene regulatory proteins

    Mirzaei, Hamid; Knijnenburg, Theo A.; Kim, Bong; Robinson, Max; Picotti, Paola; Carter, Gregory W.; Li, Song; Dilworth, David J.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Aitchison, John D.; Shmulevich, Ilya; Galitski, Timothy; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ranish, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves the orchestrated interaction of a large number of proteins with transcriptional regulatory elements in the context of chromatin. Our understanding of gene regulation is limited by the lack of a protein measurement technology that can systematically detect and quantify the ensemble of proteins associated with the transcriptional regulatory elements of specific genes. Here, we introduce a set of selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assays for the systematic ...

  8. [The effect of extremely low doses of the novel regulatory plant proteins ].

    Krasnov, M S; Margasiuk, D V; Iamskov, I A; Iamskova, V P

    2003-01-01

    Searching and study on regulatory proteins, which can keep under control the scope of important processes as like as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis, is an actual aim of the current biochemistry. Recently we have identified S-100 proteins in plants of following species: plantain (Plantago major L.), aloe (Aloe arborescens L.), and bilberry (Vaccinum myrtillus L.). Extraction and purification of S-100 proteins gotten from these plants were performed by the method we developed earlier for adhesion proteins of animal tissues. Homogeneity of the studied plant proteins was evaluated and confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. Both, plant and animal proteins have appeared to be biologically active at extremely low doses. The tests were performed by adhesiometrical method in short-term tissue culture of mouse's liver in vitro. As a result it was established that the plant proteins insert a membranotropic effect being added in extremely low doses, corresponding to 10(-10)-10(-13) mg/ml. Keeping in mind that the plantain is well known remedy for wound protection and healing, in several experiments we studied the biological effect of plant S-100 proteins on animal cells. It was found that S-100 proteins obtained from plantain influences proliferation of human fibroblasts in vitro. It was found that after the treatment with this protein in low doses the cell growth rate increases essentially. PMID:12881977

  9. DNA-protein interaction at erythroid important regulatory elements of MEL cells by in vivo footprinting

    2000-01-01

    Using ligation-mediated PCR method to study the status of DNA-protein interaction at hypersensitive site 2 of locus control Region and β maj promoter of MEL cell line before and after induction, MEL cell has been cultured and induced to differentiation by Hemin and DMSO, then the live cells have been treated with dimethyl sulfate. Ligation mediated PCR has been carried out following the chemical cleavage. The results demonstrate that before and after induction, the status of DNA-protein interaction at both hypersensitive site 2 and β maj promoter change significantly, indicating that distal regulatory elements (locus control region, hypersensitive sites) as well as proximal regulatory elements (promoter, enhancer) of β -globin gene cluster participate in the regulation of developmental specificity.

  10. Measurement of acute phase proteins for assessing severity of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Gillespie, S H; C. DOW; Raynes, J G; Behrens, R. H.; Chiodini, P L; McAdam, K P

    1991-01-01

    Seventeen adult patients with acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria, admitted to the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, were studied. Serial measurements of the serum concentration of C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A protein, and percentage parasitaemia were determined, together with initial measurement of serum electrolytes, liver function, haemoglobin, white cell and platelet counts. Initial C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A concentrations were increased (C-reactive protein mean 49.0 mg/...

  11. Diminished Expression of Complement Regulatory Proteins on Peripheral Blood Cells from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    Ricardo Machado Xavier; João Carlos Tavares Brenol; Priscila Schmidt Lora; Odirlei Andre Monticielo; Amanda Kirchner Piccoli; Laiana Schneider; Ana Paula Alegretti

    2012-01-01

    CD55, CD59, CD46, and CD35 are proteins with complement regulatory (Creg) properties that ensure cell and tissue integrity when this system is activated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Creg expression on peripheral blood cells from SLE patients and its association with cytopenia and disease activity. Flow cytometric analyses were performed on blood cells from 100 SLE patients and 61 healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, we observed in SLE patients with lymphopenia and n...

  12. Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins and AMPA receptor function in the cerebellum.

    Coombs, I. D.; Cull-Candy, S. G.

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity among AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subtypes is thought to be one of the key postsynaptic factors giving rise to diversity in excitatory synaptic signaling in the CNS. Recently, compelling evidence has emerged that ancillary AMPAR subunits—the so-called transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs)—also play a vital role in influencing the variety of postsynaptic signaling. This TARP family of molecules controls both trafficking and functional properties of AMPARs at most, if ...

  13. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    H Fujita; Ishiwata, S

    1998-01-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). ...

  14. Coordination of secondary metabolism and development in fungi: the velvet family of regulatory proteins

    Bayram, Ozgur; Braus, Gerhard H

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi produce a number of small bioactive molecules as part of their secondary metabolism ranging from benign antibiotics such as penicillin to threatening mycotoxins such as aflatoxin. Secondary metabolism can be linked to fungal developmental programs in response to various abiotic or biotic external triggers. The velvet family of regulatory proteins plays a key role in coordinating secondary metabolism and differentiation processes such as asexual or sexual sporulation and scle...

  15. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to β-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each i...

  16. Acute phase protein and protein electrophoresis values for captive Grant's zebra (Equus burchelli).

    Cray, Carolyn; Hammond, Elizabeth; Haefele, Holly

    2013-12-01

    Grant's zebra (Equus burchelli) are commonly kept in zoos and are subject to routine health monitoring and research studies. Recently, assays for acute phase proteins (APP) have been described in many wildlife species, and specific assays for serum amyloid A (SAA) have been well validated and studied in horses (Equus ferus caballus), in which it serves as a major APP. In the present study, serum samples from 26 Grant's zebra were subject to analysis by using assays for SAA, haptoglobin (HP), and protein electrophoresis. Reference intervals were calculated by using the robust method: SAA 1.8-31.4 mg/L and HP 0.37-1.58 mg/ml. Significant differences in SAA and HP were observed in clinically abnormal zebra; in some cases, these differences were marked and were noted in the absence of abnormal values for protein electrophoretic fractions. These data indicate that APP may be a valuable and sensitive tool in monitoring inflammation in this species. PMID:24450080

  17. Ferric Citrate Transport of Escherichia coli: Functional Regions of the FecR Transmembrane Regulatory Protein

    Welz, Dietrich; Braun, Volkmar

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the ferric citrate transport genes of Escherichia coli is induced by ferric citrate bound to the outer membrane receptor FecA. Additional ferric citrate-specific regulatory proteins are FecR in the cytoplasmic membrane and the FecI sigma factor in the cytoplasm. To further understand the assumed FecR-mediated signal transduction across the cytoplasmic membrane, the transmembrane topology of FecR (317 amino acids) was determined with hybrid proteins containing portions of FecR...

  18. Effects of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP in chickens

    Alipour Fahimeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sterol regulatory element binding protein- 1 and -2 (SREBP-1 and -2 are key transcription factors involved in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids. The SREBP have mostly been studied in rodents in which lipogenesis is regulated in both liver and adipose tissue. There is, though, a paucity of information on birds, in which lipogenesis occurs essentially in the liver as in humans. Since a prelude to the investigation of the role of SREBP in lipid metabolism regulation in chicken, we review Size and Tissue expression Pattern of SREBP and role of this protein in chickens.

  19. Autoregulation and multiple DNA interactions by a transcriptional regulatory protein in E. coli pili biogenesis.

    Forsman, K; M. Göransson; Uhlin, B E

    1989-01-01

    An operon mediating biogenesis of digalactoside-binding pilus-adhesin of serotype F13 in uropathogenic Escherichia coli includes the regulatory gene papB. The papB gene product was found to act as transcriptional activator of an operon which includes the papB gene and several pap cistrons encoding the proteins of the pilus polymer. Studies of how pap gene expression was affected by increasing amounts of PapB protein in the cells showed that high levels did not stimulate transcription but caus...

  20. Effector and regulatory T cells in patients with acute optic neuritis

    Tsakiri, Anna; Kjærsgaard, Erik; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Svane, Inge Marie; Frederiksen, Jette L

    2012-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is an autoimmune acute demyelinating disease of the optic nerve and may occur in patients with confirmed multiple sclerosis (MS) or as a clinically isolated syndrome. T lymphocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of MS. The phenotype of different T cell subsets is...

  1. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis

    Jones, Danielle M.; Murray, Christian M.; Ketelaar, KassaDee J.; Thomas, Joseph J.; Villalobos, Jose A.; Wallace, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  2. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel; Li, Shengting; Fryland, Tue; Børglum, Anders; Bolund, Lars; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression at...... involved in pathways at the RNA regulatory level with potential to mediate normal and disease-associated functions of the FUS and EWS proteins....

  3. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    Jones, Danielle M; Murray, Christian M; Ketelaar, KassaDee J; Thomas, Joseph J; Villalobos, Jose A; Wallace, Ian S

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  4. Acute differential effects of dietary protein quality on postprandial lipemia in obese non-diabetic subjects

    Holmer-Jensen, Jens; Mortensen, Lene S; Astrup, Arne;

    2013-01-01

    Non-fasting triglyceridemia is much closer associated to cardiovascular risk compared to fasting triglyceridemia. We hypothesized that there would be acute differential effects of four common dietary proteins (cod protein, whey isolate, gluten, and casein) on postprandial lipemia in obese non......-diabetic subjects. To test the hypothesis we conducted a randomized, acute clinical intervention study with crossover design. We supplemented a fat rich mixed meal with one of four dietary proteins i.e. cod protein, whey protein, gluten or casein. Eleven obese non-diabetic subjects (age: 40-68, body mass index: 30.......3-42.0 kg/m(2)) participated and blood samples were drawn in the 8-h postprandial period. Supplementation of a fat rich mixed meal with whey protein caused lower postprandial lipemia (P = .048) compared to supplementation with cod protein and gluten. This was primarily due to lower triglyceride...

  5. Procalcitonin behaves as a fast responding acute phase protein in vivo and in vitro

    Nijsten, MWN; Olinga, P; The, TH; de Vries, EGE; Groothuis, GMM; Limburg, PC; ten Duis, HJ; Moshage, H; Hoekstra, HJ; Bijzet, J; Zwaveling, JH; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: Procalcitonin (PCT) is a 13 kD protein of which plasma concentrations are strongly increased in inflammatory states, PCT concentrations are claimed to have a more powerful discriminatory value for bacterial infection than the acute phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA) or C-reactive prote

  6. Improving enzyme regulatory protein classification by means of SVM-RFE feature selection.

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Fernández-Blanco, Enrique; Dave, Kirtan; Pedreira, Nieves; Gestal, Marcos; Dorado, Julián; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2014-05-01

    Enzyme regulation proteins are very important due to their involvement in many biological processes that sustain life. The complexity of these proteins, the impossibility of identifying direct quantification molecular properties associated with the regulation of enzymatic activities, and their structural diversity creates the necessity for new theoretical methods that can predict the enzyme regulatory function of new proteins. The current work presents the first classification model that predicts protein enzyme regulators using the Markov mean properties. These protein descriptors encode the topological information of the amino acid into contact networks based on amino acid distances and physicochemical properties. MInD-Prot software calculated these molecular descriptors for 2415 protein chains (350 enzyme regulators) using five atom physicochemical properties (Mulliken electronegativity, Kang-Jhon polarizability, vdW area, atom contribution to P) and the protein 3D regions. The best classification models to predict enzyme regulators have been obtained with machine learning algorithms from Weka using 18 features. K* has been demonstrated to be the most accurate algorithm for this protein function classification. Wrapper Subset Evaluator and SVM-RFE approaches were used to perform a feature subset selection with the best results obtained from SVM-RFE. Classification performance employing all the available features can be reached using only the 8 most relevant features selected by SVM-RFE. Thus, the current work has demonstrated the possibility of predicting new molecular targets involved in enzyme regulation using fast theoretical algorithms. PMID:24556806

  7. Role of STAT3 in regulatory T lymphocyte plasticity during acute graft-vs.-host-disease

    Fujino, Masayuki; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are important mediators of the allogeneic immune response, although the mechanisms by which they are controlled are not fully understood. Studies conducted in mice, including a recent article in Immunity by Laurence et al., have shown that STAT3 is an important factor involved in the instability of natural Treg (nTreg) lymphocytes and the generation of induced Treg (iTreg) lymphocytes. The authors used T lymphocytes obtained from Foxp3-GFP reporter mice, which ...

  8. S-100AND#946; protein as a biomarker in acute hemorrhagic stroke

    Omkar Prasad Baidya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic stroke, a subtype of acute stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability throughout the world. At present, the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic stroke is mainly based on Computer Tomography (CT or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI but till now no biomarkers are routinely used in acute hemorrhagic stroke management. This article is a critical and descriptive review on the role of S100β protein as a biomarker in acute hemorrhagic stroke. Plasma S-100β level increases significantly in acute hemorrhagic stroke patients when compared to the normal subjects. Beside, the plasma S-100β can be correlated to the volume of hemorrhage in brain measured by plane CT scan. Plasma S-100β is an useful biomarker in acute hemorrhagic stroke and can be used for estimation of volume of hemorrhage in brain in acute hemorrhagic stroke patients. Thus, S-100β can be useful as an alternative to CT scan/MRI in diagnosis and in taking therapeutic decision in acute hemorrhagic stroke management. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 13-15

  9. C-Reactive protein predicts acute myocardial infarction during high-risk noncardiac and vascular surgery

    Oscar M. Martins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts cardiovascular events in a wide range of clinical contexts. However, the role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a predictive marker for perioperative acute myocardial infarction during noncardiac surgery is not yet clear. The present study investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels as predictors of acute myocardial infarction risk in patients undergoing high-risk noncardiac surgery. METHODS: This concurrent cohort study included patients aged >50 years referred for high-risk noncardiac surgery according to American Heart Association/ACC 2002 criteria. Patients with infections were excluded. Electrocardiograms were performed, and biomarkers (Troponin I or T and/or total creatine phosphokinase and the MB fraction (CPK-T/MB were evaluated on the first and fourth days after surgery. Patients were followed until discharge. Baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were compared between patients with and without acute myocardial infarction. RESULTS: A total of 101 patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, including 33 vascular procedures (17 aortic and 16 peripheral artery revascularizations, were studied. Sixty of the patients were men, and their mean age was 66 years. Baseline levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were higher in the group with perioperative acute myocardial infarction than in the group with non-acute myocardial infarction patients (mean 48.02 vs. 4.50, p = 0.005. All five acute myocardial infarction cases occurred in vascular surgery patients with high CRP levels. CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing high-risk noncardiac surgery, especially vascular surgery, and presenting elevated baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels are at increased risk for perioperative acute myocardial infarction.

  10. Ca2+-regulatory proteins in cardiomyocytes from the right ventricle in children with congenital heart disease

    Wu Yihe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia and hypertrophy are the most frequent pathophysiological consequence of congenital heart disease (CHD which can induce the alteration of Ca2+-regulatory proteins and inhibit cardiac contractility. Few studies have been performed to examine Ca2+-regulatory proteins in human cardiomyocytes from the hypertrophic right ventricle with or without hypoxia. Methods Right ventricle tissues were collected from children with tetralogy of Fallot [n = 25, hypoxia and hypertrophy group (HH group], pulmonary stenosis [n = 25, hypertrophy group (H group], or small isolated ventricular septal defect [n = 25, control group (C group] during open-heart surgery. Paraffin sections of tissues were stained with 3,3′-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate to measure cardiomyocyte size. Expression levels of Ca2+-regulatory proteins [sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a, ryanodine receptor (RyR2, sodiumcalcium exchanger (NCX, sarcolipin (SLN and phospholamban (PLN] were analysed by means of real-time PCR, western blot, or immunofluorescence. Additionally, phosphorylation level of RyR and PLN and activity of protein phosphatase (PP1 were evaluated using western blot. Results Mild cardiomyocyte hypertrophy of the right ventricle in H and HH groups was confirmed by comparing cardiomyocyte size. A significant reduction of SERCA2a in mRNA (P16-phosphorylated PLN was down-regulated (PP Conclusions The decreased SERCA2a mRNA may be a biomarker of the pathological process in the early stage of cyanotic CHD with the hypertrophic right ventricle. A combination of hypoxia and hypertrophy can induce the adverse effect of PLN-Ser16 dephosphorylation. Increased PP1 could result in the decreased PLN-Ser16 and inhibition of PP1 is a potential therapeutic target for heart dysfunction in pediatrics.

  11. Ethanol utilization regulatory protein: profile alignments give no evidence of origin through aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase gene fusion.

    Nicholas, H B; Persson, B; Jörnvall, H; Hempel, J.

    1995-01-01

    The suggestion that the ethanol regulatory protein from Aspergillus has its evolutionary origin in a gene fusion between aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase genes (Hawkins AR, Lamb HK, Radford A, Moore JD, 1994, Gene 146:145-158) has been tested by profile analysis with aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase family profiles. We show that the degree and kind of similarity observed between these profiles and the ethanol regulatory protein sequence is that expected from random sequences of the same c...

  12. Induction of transcription by a viral regulatory protein depends on the relative strengths of functional TATA boxes.

    Cook, W.J.; Gu, B; DeLuca, N A; Moynihan, E B; Coen, D M

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms by which viral regulatory proteins activate the cellular transcription apparatus without binding to specific DNA elements are not fully understood. Several lines of evidence suggest that activation by one such regulatory protein, herpes simplex virus ICP4, could be mediated, at least in part, by TFIID. To test this model, we replaced the TATA box of the ICP4-responsive viral thymidine kinase gene with functional TATA boxes that displayed different apparent affinities for TATA-b...

  13. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Ping-Chang Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Psychological stress is one of the factors associated with many human diseases; the mechanisms need to be further understood. Methods : Rats were subjected to chronic water avoid stress. Intestinal epithelial heat shock protein (HSP 70 was evaluated. The intestinal epithelial permeability was examined with Ussing chamber technique. Results : HSP70 was detected in normal intestinal epithelial cells. Psychological stress decreased HSP70 in the intestinal epithelial cells that correlated with the stress-induced intestinal epithelial hyperpermeability. Pretreatment with HSP70 abrogated stress-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Conclusions : Chronic stress inhibits HSP70 activity in rat intestinal epithelial layer that is associated with intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, which can be prevented by pretreatment with HSP70 protein. (Yang PC, Tu YH, Perdue MH, Oluwole C, Struiksma S. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  14. The role of the acute phase protein PTX3 in the ventilator-induced lung injury

    JM Real; MM. Marques; GMGT Spilborghs; EM Negri; MM Matzuk; RP Moura; AA Camargo; Deheinzelin, D; AAM Dias

    2008-01-01

    The pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is an acute phase proinflammatory protein produced by fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 is a key modulator of inflammation. Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life saving therapeutic approach for patients with acute lung injury that, nevertheless could lead to an inflammatory response and tissue injury (ventilator-induced lung injury: VILI), representing a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive units. Our obje...

  15. C - REACTIVE PROTEIN LEVELS IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ITS PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE

    Mohan; Aditya A.; Avantee; Priyadarshini; Minakshi,; Mansha B.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRA CT: AIM: To measure C - reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients of acute pancreatitis and evaluate if CRP levels predict the severity of pancreatitis by correlating these levels with - 1. C T Severity Index (CTSI). 2. Presence of complications. 3. Time take n for recovery. METHOD: Between the years 2007 and 2009 fifty patients diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Their CRP levels were sent on second day of admission ...

  16. Acute phase protein response in an experimental model of ovine caseous lymphadenitis

    Lang Tamara L; Waterston Mary M; Bence Laura; Lawson Fraser P; Eckersall Peter D; Donachie William; Fontaine Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is a disease of small ruminants caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The pathogenesis of CLA is a slow process, and produces a chronic rather than an acute disease state. Acute phase proteins (APP) such as haptoglobin (Hp) serum amyloid A (SAA) and α1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) are produced by the liver and released into the circulation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. The concentration of Hp in serum increases in experimental CL...

  17. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunits perform distinct functional roles in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides.

    Shin, Joon-Hee; Kim, Jung-Eun; Malapi-Wight, Martha; Choi, Yoon-E; Shaw, Brian D; Shim, Won-Bo

    2013-06-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize causing ear rot and stalk rot. The fungus also produces fumonisins, a group of mycotoxins linked to disorders in animals and humans. A cluster of genes, designated FUM genes, plays a key role in the synthesis of fumonisins. However, our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of fumonisin biosynthesis is still incomplete. We have demonstrated previously that Cpp1, a protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit, negatively regulates fumonisin production and is involved in cell shape maintenance. In general, three PP2A subunits, structural A, regulatory B and catalytic C, make up a heterotrimer complex to perform regulatory functions. Significantly, we identified two PP2A regulatory subunits in the F. verticillioides genome, Ppr1 and Ppr2, which are homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc55 and Rts1, respectively. In this study, we hypothesized that Ppr1 and Ppr2 are involved in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and/or cell development in F. verticillioides, and generated a series of mutants to determine the functional role of Ppr1 and Ppr2. The PPR1 deletion strain (Δppr1) resulted in drastic growth defects, but increased microconidia production. The PPR2 deletion mutant strain (Δppr2) showed elevated fumonisin production, similar to the Δcpp1 strain. Germinating Δppr1 conidia formed abnormally swollen cells with a central septation site, whereas Δppr2 showed early hyphal branching during conidia germination. A kernel rot assay showed that the mutants were slow to colonize kernels, but this is probably a result of growth defects rather than a virulence defect. Results from this study suggest that two PP2A regulatory subunits in F. verticillioides carry out distinct roles in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and fungal development. PMID:23452277

  18. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Petra Procházková; František Škanta; Radka Roubalová; Marcela Šilerová; Jiří Dvořák; Martin Bilej

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely f...

  19. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Palomero, Teresa; Odom, Duncan T.; O'Neil, Jennifer; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Margolin, Adam; Neuberg, Donna S.; Winter, Stuart S.; Larson, Richard S.; Li, Wei; Liu, X. Shirley; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant expression of 1 or more transcription factor oncogenes is a critical component of the molecular pathogenesis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional programs downstream of T-ALL oncogenes are mostly unknown. TAL1/SCL is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor oncogene aberrantly expressed in 60% of human T-ALLs. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip to identify 71 direct transcriptional targets of TAL1/SCL. ...

  20. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens.

    Smith, L Cody; Clark, Jessica C; Bisesi, Joseph H; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-09-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (precruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in both human and aquatic species. PMID:27156127

  1. Expanding the nitrogen regulatory protein superfamily: Homology detection at below random sequence identity.

    Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2002-07-01

    Nitrogen regulatory (PII) proteins are signal transduction molecules involved in controlling nitrogen metabolism in prokaryots. PII proteins integrate the signals of intracellular nitrogen and carbon status into the control of enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation. Using elaborate sequence similarity detection schemes, we show that five clusters of orthologs (COGs) and several small divergent protein groups belong to the PII superfamily and predict their structure to be a (betaalphabeta)(2) ferredoxin-like fold. Proteins from the newly emerged PII superfamily are present in all major phylogenetic lineages. The PII homologs are quite diverse, with below random (as low as 1%) pairwise sequence identities between some members of distant groups. Despite this sequence diversity, evidence suggests that the different subfamilies retain the PII trimeric structure important for ligand-binding site formation and maintain a conservation of conservations at residue positions important for PII function. Because most of the orthologous groups within the PII superfamily are composed entirely of hypothetical proteins, our remote homology-based structure prediction provides the only information about them. Analogous to structural genomics efforts, such prediction gives clues to the biological roles of these proteins and allows us to hypothesize about locations of functional sites on model structures or rationalize about available experimental information. For instance, conserved residues in one of the families map in close proximity to each other on PII structure, allowing for a possible metal-binding site in the proteins coded by the locus known to affect sensitivity to divalent metal ions. Presented analysis pushes the limits of sequence similarity searches and exemplifies one of the extreme cases of reliable sequence-based structure prediction. In conjunction with structural genomics efforts to shed light on protein function, our strategies make it possible to detect

  2. Analysis of the Phosphorylation Sites of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Regulatory Protein ICP27

    Zhi, Yan; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    1999-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) regulatory protein ICP27 is a 63-kDa phosphoprotein required for viral replication. ICP27 has been shown to contain both stable phosphate groups and phosphate groups that cycle on and off during infection (K. W. Wilcox, A. Kohn, E. Sklyanskaya, and B. Roizman, J. Virol. 33:167–182, 1980). Despite extensive genetic analysis of the ICP27 gene, there is no information available about the sites of the ICP27 molecule that are phosphorylated during viral infe...

  3. Possible regulatory function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 retrotransposon core protein.

    Roth, J F; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Martin-Rendon, E

    2000-07-01

    The yeast Ty1 retrotransposon encodes proteins and RNA that assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) as part of the life cycle of the retro-element. The Tya protein, which is equivalent to the retroviral Gag, is the major structural component of these particles. In this work, we demonstrate that Tya proteins fulfil other functions apart from their structural role. We show that Tya interacts in vitro with the Ty1 RNA domain required for RNA packaging, suggesting that this RNA-protein interaction may direct the packaging process. Furthermore, the overexpression of both Tya proteins, i.e. p1, the primary translation product, and p2, the mature form, increases endogenous Ty1 RNA levels in trans without increasing translation significantly. These observations suggest that Tya may exert a regulatory function during transposition. Interestingly, however, only p2, the mature form of Tya, trans-activates transposition of a marked genomic Ty element. This confirms that processing is required for transposition. PMID:10870103

  4. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    Matsushita, Y., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Murakawa, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Shimamura, K., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Oishi, M., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Ohyama, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Kurita, N., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  5. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA

  6. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-01

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state. PMID:11818540

  7. Schiff Base Metal Derivatives Enhance the Expression of HSP70 and Suppress BAX Proteins in Prevention of Acute Gastric Lesion

    Shahram Golbabapour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schiff base complexes have appeared to be promising in the treatment of different diseases and disorders and have drawn a lot of attention to their biological activities. This study was conducted to evaluate the regulatory effect of Schiff base metal derivatives on the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP 70 and BAX in protection against acute haemorrhagic gastric ulcer in rats. Rats were assigned to 6 groups of 6 rats: the normal control (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg, the positive control (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg, and four Schiff base derivative groups named Schiff_1, Schiff_2, Schiff_3, and Schiff_4 (25 mg/kg. After 1 h, all of the groups received ethanol 95% (5 mL/kg but the normal control received Tween 20 (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg. The animals were euthanized after 60 min and the stomachs were dissected for histology (H&E, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis against HSP70 and BAX proteins. The results showed that the Schiff base metal derivatives enhanced the expression of HSP70 and suppressed the expression of BAX proteins during their gastroprotection against ethanol-induced gastric lesion in rats.

  8. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins

    Li Junlin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd, which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX, Williams syndrome (WS, Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  9. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins.

    Li, Junlin; Zhao, Guifang; Gao, Xiaocai

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs) in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd), which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX), Williams syndrome (WS), Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23425632

  10. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  11. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells.

    Barati, Michelle T; Gould, James C; Salyer, Sarah A; Isaacs, Susan; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG) growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG(⁎)) conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1) proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2) proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB), supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase), suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis. PMID:26839892

  12. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells

    Michelle T. Barati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG⁎ conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1 proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2 proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB, supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase, suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis.

  13. Acute phase proteins in bovine milk in an experimental model of Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    Eckersall, P D; Young, F J; Nolan, A M;

    2006-01-01

    The objectives were to establish the origin of 2 acute phase proteins in milk during subclinical bovine mastitis and to characterize the relationship between those proteins in milk and blood. Haptoglobin (Hp) and mammary-associated serum amyloid A (M-SAA3) appear in milk during mastitis, whereas Hp...... and serum amyloid A increase in serum during mastitis. The concentrations of these proteins were determined in an experimental model using a field strain of Staphylococcus aureus to induce subclinical mastitis in dairy cows. The expression of mRNA coding for these proteins was assessed and the...

  14. ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS AS A MARKER OF RESPIRATORY INFLAMMATION IN PRZEWALSKI'S HORSE (EQUUS FERUS PRZEWALSKII).

    Sander, Samantha J; Joyner, Priscilla H; Cray, Carolyn; Rotstein, David S; Aitken-Palmer, Copper

    2016-06-01

    Acute phase proteins are sensitive markers of inflammation, which are highly conserved across taxa. Although the utility of these proteins are becoming well defined in human and domestic animal medical fields, their role in nondomestic species remains unclear. In this communication, a 20-yr-old Przewalski's horse was presented for unresolving aspiration pneumonia, which cultured a unique Actinomyces-like bacteria. Despite waxing and waning clinical signs and minimal changes on baseline hematologic analysis, protein electrophoresis, serum amyloid A, and surfactant protein D serum concentrations showed changes that more accurately reflected the clinical severity of this case. PMID:27468045

  15. Role of acute-phase proteins in interleukin-1-induced nonspecific resistance to bacterial infections in mice.

    Vogels, M.T.E.; L. Cantoni; Carelli, M.; Sironi, M; Ghezzi, P; van der Meer, J. W M

    1993-01-01

    Treatment with a single low dose (80 to 800 ng) of interleukin-1 (IL-1) 24 h before a lethal bacterial challenge of granulocytopenic and normal mice enhances nonspecific resistance. Since IL-1 induces secretion of acute-phase proteins, liver proteins which possess several detoxifying effects, we investigated the role of these proteins in the IL-1-induced protection. Inhibition of liver protein synthesis with D-galactosamine (GALN) completely inhibited the IL-1-induced synthesis of acute-phase...

  16. Acute and chronic ethanol consumption differentially impact pathways limiting hepatic protein synthesis

    Karinch, Anne M.; Martin, Jonathan H.; Vary, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    This review identifies the various pathways responsible for modulating hepatic protein synthesis following acute and chronic alcohol intoxication and describes the mechanism(s) responsible for these changes. Alcohol intoxication induces a defect in global protein synthetic rates that is localized to impaired translation of mRNA at the level of peptide-chain initiation. Translation initiation is regulated at two steps: formation of the 43S preinitiation complex [controlled by eukaryotic initia...

  17. Ethionine-dependent inhibition of acute-phase plasma protein synthesis in the rat.

    Kasperczyk, H.; Koj, A

    1983-01-01

    Ethionine administered intraperitoneally to rats suffering from turpentine-induced inflammation preferentially reduced incorporation of 14C-leucine into fibrinogen, haptoglobin and other acute-phase proteins. The inhibitory effect was observed both in vivo and in liver slices obtained from ethionine-treated donors, while addition of ethionine to liver slices in vitro led to general reduction of synthesis of all liver and plasma proteins, including albumin. For comparison, the effects of galac...

  18. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette; Poulsen, Karin T.; Campbell, Fiona M; Eckersall, P. David; Heegaard, Peter M.H.

    2009-01-01

    International audience The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we st...

  19. Identification of Acute Phase Proteins and Assays Applicable in Nondomesticated Mammals

    Bertelsen, M. F.; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M.; Grøndahl, C.;

    2009-01-01

    The serum concentration of acute phase proteins (APPs) increases dramatically in response to inflammation and tissue injury. APPs are clinically useful in a range of domesticated mammals; however, knowledge is limited in nondomesticated mammals. The detective ability of two assays for each of thr...

  20. Optimal combinations of acute phase proteins for detecting infectious disease in pigs

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Stockmarr, Anders; Piñeiro, Matilde;

    2011-01-01

    The acute phase protein (APP) response is an early systemic sign of disease, detected as substantial changes in APP serum concentrations and most disease states involving inflammatory reactions give rise to APP responses. To obtain a detailed picture of the general utility of porcine APPs to dete...

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel type of regulatory protein (GDI) for smg p25A, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein.

    Matsui, Y.; Kikuchi, A; Araki, S; Hata, Y; Kondo, J; Teranishi, Y; Takai, Y.

    1990-01-01

    We recently purified to near homogeneity a novel type of regulatory protein for smg p25A, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein, from bovine brain cytosol. This regulatory protein, named smg p25A GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI), regulates the GDP-GTP exchange reaction of smg p25A by inhibiting dissociation of GDP from and subsequent binding of GTP to it. In the present studies, we isolated and sequenced the cDNA of smg p25A GDI from a bovine brain cDNA library by using an oligonucleotide probe ...

  2. Crystallographic characterization of a multidomain histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component regulatory system

    The multidomain cytoplasmic portion of the histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component signal transduction system has been crystallized and X-ray data have been collected to 2.8 Å resolution. YycGF is a highly conserved two-component signal transduction system that is specific to low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria, including many important human pathogens. It has been recognized as a crucial regulatory system for cell-wall metabolism. YycG, the histidine protein kinase of this system, is a multidomain transmembrane protein. The truncated cytoplasmic portion of YycG from Bacillus subtilis encompassing the PAS domain, the dimerization domain and the catalytic domain was expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution with a completeness of 98.2% and an overall Rmerge of 5.6%. The crystals belonged to space group P61 or P65, with unit-cell parameters a = 135.0, c = 133.0 Å. The selenomethionine-substituted version of the protein was crystallized and X-ray data were collected to 3.6 Å resolution for subsequent MAD phasing

  3. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  4. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  5. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression

    Sullivan, B.E.; Carroll, C.C.; Jemiolo, B.; Trappe, S.W.; Magnusson, S.P.; Dossing, S.; Kjaer, M.; Trappe, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    -2, MMP-9, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 at rest and after RE. Patellar tendon biopsy samples were taken from six individuals (3 men and 3 women) before and 4 h after a bout of RE and from a another six individuals (3 men and 3 women) before and 24 h after RE. Resting mRNA expression was used for sex comparisons...... (6 men and 6 women). Collagen type I, collagen type III, and MMP-2 were downregulated (P < 0.05) 4 h after RE but were unchanged (P > 0.05) 24 h after RE. All other genes remained unchanged (P > 0.05) after RE. Women had higher resting mRNA expression (P < 0.05) of collagen type III and a trend (P...... = 0.08) toward lower resting expression of MMP-3 than men. All other genes were not influenced (P > 0.05) by sex. Acute RE appears to stimulate a change in collagen type I, collagen type III, and MMP-2 gene regulation in the human patellar tendon. Sex influences the structural and regulatory m...

  6. Mutations in complement regulatory proteins predispose to preeclampsia: a genetic analysis of the PROMISSE cohort.

    Jane E Salmon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or antiphospholipid antibodies (APL Ab--autoimmune conditions characterized by complement-mediated injury--is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia and miscarriage. Our previous studies in mice indicate that complement activation targeted to the placenta drives angiogenic imbalance and placental insufficiency. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We use PROMISSE, a prospective study of 250 pregnant patients with SLE and/or APL Ab, to test the hypothesis in humans that impaired capacity to limit complement activation predisposes to preeclampsia. We sequenced genes encoding three complement regulatory proteins--membrane cofactor protein (MCP, complement factor I (CFI, and complement factor H (CFH--in 40 patients who had preeclampsia and found heterozygous mutations in seven (18%. Five of these patients had risk variants in MCP or CFI that were previously identified in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease characterized by endothelial damage. One had a novel mutation in MCP that impairs regulation of C4b. These findings constitute, to our knowledge, the first genetic defects associated with preeclampsia in SLE and/or APL Ab. We confirmed the association of hypomorphic variants of MCP and CFI in a cohort of non-autoimmune preeclampsia patients in which five of 59 were heterozygous for mutations. CONCLUSION: The presence of risk variants in complement regulatory proteins in patients with SLE and/or APL Ab who develop preeclampsia, as well as in preeclampsia patients lacking autoimmune disease, links complement activation to disease pathogenesis and suggests new targets for treatment of this important public health problem. STUDY REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00198068.

  7. A Pyrococcus homolog of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein, LrpA, inhibits transcription by abrogating RNA polymerase recruitment

    Dahlke, Isabell; Thomm, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The genomes of Archaea harbor homologs of the global bacterial regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp). Archaeal Lrp homologs are helix–turn–helix DNA-binding proteins that specifically repress the transcription of their own genes in vitro. Here, we analyze the interaction of Pyrococcus LrpA with components of the archaeal transcriptional machinery at the lrpA promoter. DNA–protein complexes can be isolated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays that contain both LrpA and the ...

  8. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of urinary protein in acute kidney injury.

    Suhail, Sufi M; Woo, K T; Tan, H K; Wong, K S

    2011-07-01

    Recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the importance of urinary proteomics in acute kidney injury (AKI). We analyzed the protein in urine of patients with clinical AKI using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) for its diagnostic value, and followed them up for 40 months to evaluate prognosis. Urine from 31 consecutive cases of AKI was analyzed with SDS-PAGE to determine the low, middle and high molecular weight proteins. Fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) was estimated from serum and urine creatinine and sodium (Na). The cases were followed-up for 40 months from the end of the recruitment of study cases. Glomerular protein was higher in the hematuria group when compared with the non-hematuria group (P <0.04) and in the AKI group than in the acute on chronic renal failure (AKI-on-CRF) group (P <0.002). Tubular protein was higher in the AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.003) than in the AKI group. Tubular protein correlated with FENa in groups with diabetes mellitus (DM), AKI-on-CRF, and without hematuria (P <0.03, P <0.02 and P <0.004, respectively). Pattern of protein did not differ between groups with and without DM and clinical acute tubular necrosis (ATN). At the end of 40 months follow-up, category with predominantly glomerular protein progressed to chronic renal failure (CRF) or end-stage renal failure in higher proportion (P <0.05). In clinical AKI, we observed that glomerular protein dominated in cases with glomerular insult, as indicated by hematuria. Tubular protein was common in the study cases with CRF, DM and cases without hematuria. This indicates tubulo-interstitial injury for AKI in these cases. Patients with predominantly glomerular protein had an adverse outcome. PMID:21743220

  9. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE of urinary protein in acute kidney injury

    Sufi M Suhail

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the importance of urinary proteomics in acute kidney injury (AKI. We analyzed the protein in urine of patients with clinical AKI using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE for its diagnostic value, and followed them up for 40 months to evaluate prognosis. Urine from 31 consecutive cases of AKI was analyzed with SDS-PAGE to determine the low, middle and high molecular weight proteins. Fractional excretion of sodium (FENa was estimated from serum and urine creatinine and sodium (Na. The cases were followed-up for 40 months from the end of the recruitment of study cases. Glomerular protein was higher in the hematuria group when compared with the non-hematuria group (P <0.04 and in the AKI group than in the acute on chronic renal failure (AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.002. Tubular protein was higher in the AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.003 than in the AKI group. Tubular protein correlated with FENa in groups with diabetes mellitus (DM, AKI-on-CRF, and without hematuria (P <0.03, P <0.02 and P <0.004, respectively. Pattern of protein did not differ between groups with and without DM and clinical acute tubular necrosis (ATN. At the end of 40 months follow-up, category with predominantly glomerular protein progressed to chronic renal failure (CRF or end-stage renal failure in higher proportion (P <0.05. In clinical AKI, we observed that glomerular protein dominated in cases with glomerular insult, as indicated by hematuria. Tubular protein was common in the study cases with CRF, DM and cases without hematuria. This indicates tubulo-interstitial injury for AKI in these cases. Patients with predominantly glomerular protein had an adverse outcome.

  10. [New regulatory protein isolated from the bovine eye lens and its action on the cataract development in rat in vitro].

    Krasnov, M S; Gurmizov, E P; Iamskova, V P; Gundorova, R A; Iamskov, I A

    2005-01-01

    The regulatory protein was isolated from the eye lens extract by using an early designed scheme including by means of salting-out of proteins by ammonium sulphate, isoelectrofocusing in pH gradient and electrophoresis in PAAG. A high-purity fraction of the regulatory protein was obtained. The localization of the regulatory protein in the rat-eye lens was investigated by means of primary rabbit antibodies obtained within the case study and by FITS-marked secondary antibodies. Cataractogenesis was induced, in vitro, in Wistar rat lenses through adding, to the cultivation medium, hydrogen peroxide (0.5 mM) or calcium chloride (15 mM). The regulatory protein isolated from the bovine eye lens was added alongside with damaging antibodies to the nutrition medium, concentration 10(-12) mg/ml. The lenses were cultivated for as long as 8 days at 37 degrees C. The degree of opacification of lenses was evaluated visually with the help of a lined substrate as well as by spectrophotometry. The studied protein was shown immunohistochemically to be localized in the intercellular space of the lens epithelium in the region of the basic membrane. The cataractogenesis-related research of the regulatory protein was made on rabbit eye lenses, which were cultivated as a whole for as long as 8 days in vitro. Their transparency and morphology were preserved in them in full since they were cultivated in a serum-free nutrition without admixture of any destructive agents. Opacification of lenses was induced in vitro by changing the concentration of calcium ions in the cultivation medium or through adding hydrogen peroxide to the medium. The valuations of the lens opacity degree as observed in different research series and made by visual observation well correlate with the results of spectrophotometry of lenses made after their cultivation. It can be stated that the studied regulatory protein, when added to the cultivation medium, enhances about two-fold the lens transparency versus the lenses

  11. Identification of a novel regulatory protein (CsrD) that targets the global regulatory RNAs CsrB and CsrC for degradation by RNase E

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Babitzke, Paul; Kushner, Sidney R.; Romeo, Tony

    2006-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the global regulatory protein CsrA (carbon store regulator A) binds to leader segments of target mRNAs, affecting their translation and stability. CsrA activity is regulated by two noncoding RNAs, CsrB and CsrC, which act by sequestering multiple CsrA dimers. Here, we describe a protein (CsrD) that controls the degradation of CsrB/C RNAs. The dramatic stabilization of CsrB/C RNAs in a csrD mutant altered the expression of CsrA-controlled genes in a manner predicted from t...

  12. The Experimental and Clinical Study on the Effect of Curcumin on Cell Cycle Proteins and Regulating Proteins of Apoptosis in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    陈燕; 吴裕丹; 何静; 陈文娟

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To investigate whether the Bcl-2 gene family is involved in modulating mechanism ofapoptosis and change of cell cycle protein induced by curcumin in acute myeloid leukemia HL-60cell line and primary acute myelogenous leukemic cells, the Bcl-2 family member Mcl-l, Bax andBak and cell cycle proteins including P27kipl, P21wafl, cyclin D3 and pRbp- were selected and their ex-pression detected by SABC immuno-histochemical stain method. The attitude of sub-G1 peak inDNA histogram was determined by FCM. The TUNEL positive cell percentage was identified byterminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase ( TdT )-mediated Biotin dUNP end labeling technique. Itwas found that when HL-60 cells were treated with 25 μmol/L curcumin for 24 h, the expressionlevel of Mcl-1 was down-regulated, but that of Bax and Bak up-regulated time-dependently. Therewas significant difference in the expression level of Mcl-1, Bax and Bak between the curcumin-treated groups and control group (P<0. 05-0. 01). At the same time, curcumin had no effect onprogress of cell cycle in primaty acute myelogenous leukemia at newly diagnosis, but could in-crease the peak of Sub-G1 (P<0. 05), and down-regulate the expression of Mcl-1 and up-regulatethe expression of Bax and Bak with the difference being statistically significant. The expression ofP27kipl, P21wafl and pRbp- were elevated and that of cyclin D3 decreased in the presence of curcumin.These findings suggested that the Bcl-2 gene family indeed participated in the regulatory process ofapoptosisinduced by curcumin in HL-60 cells and AML cells. Curcumin can induce apoptosis ofprimary acute myelogenous leukemic cells and disturb cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells. Themechanism appeared to be mediated by perturbing Go/G1 phases checkpoints which associated withup-regulation of P27kipl, P21wafl and pRbp- expression, and down-regulation of cyclin D3.

  13. Isotope Coded Protein Labeling analysis of plasma specimens from acute severe dengue fever patients

    Fragnoud Romain

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever is the most important arthropod born viral disease of public health significance. Although most patients suffer only from flu-like symptoms, a small group of patient experiences more severe forms of the disease. To contribute to a better understanding of its pathogenesis this study aims to identify proteins differentially expressed in a pool of five viremic plasma from severe dengue patients relative to a pool of five non-severe dengue patients. Results The use of Isotope Coded Protein Labeling (ICPLTM to analyze plasma depleted of twenty high-abundance proteins allowed for the identification of 51 differentially expressed proteins, which were characterized by mass spectrometry. Using quantitative ELISA, three of these proteins (Leucine-rich glycoprotein 1, Vitamin D binding-protein and Ferritin were confirmed as having an increased expression in a panel of severe dengue plasma. The proteins identified as overexpressed by ICPLTM in severe dengue plasma involve in clear up action after cell injury, tissue coherence and immune defense. Conclusion This ICPLTM study evaluating differences between acute severe dengue plasmas and acute non-severe dengue plasmas suggests that the three proteins identified are overexpressed early in the course of the disease. Their possible use as biomarkers for the prognostic of disease severity is discussed.

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in the acute diabetic myocardium

    Strnisková, M.; Barančík, M.; Neckář, Jan; Ravingerová, T.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 249, 1-2 (2003), s. 59-65. ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A069 Grant ostatní: VEGA(SK) 2/2063/22 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : experimental diabetes * ischemia * mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.763, year: 2003

  15. Circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins as markers of pathogenesis in lymphatic filarial disease.

    R Anuradha

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Dysregulated host inflammatory responses leading to systemic immune activation are thought to play a central role in filarial disease pathogenesis. We measured the plasma levels of microbial translocation markers, acute phase proteins, and inflammatory cytokines in individuals with chronic filarial pathology with (CP Ag+ or without (CP Ag- active infection; with clinically asymptomatic infections (INF; and in those without infection (endemic normal [EN]. Comparisons between the two actively infected groups (CP Ag+ compared to INF and those without active infection (CP Ag- compared to EN were used preliminarily to identify markers of pathogenesis. Thereafter, we tested for group effects among all the four groups using linear models on the log transformed responses of the markers. Our data suggest that circulating levels of microbial translocation products (lipopolysaccharide and LPS-binding protein, acute phase proteins (haptoglobin and serum amyloid protein-A, and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-12, and TNF-α are associated with pathogenesis of disease in lymphatic filarial infection and implicate an important role for circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins.

  16. Acute phencyclidine treatment induces extensive and distinct protein phosphorylation in rat frontal cortex.

    Palmowski, Pawel; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Williamson, James; Beck, Hans C; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H; Jensen, Ole N

    2014-03-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP), a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, induces psychotomimetic effects in humans and animals. Administration of PCP to rodents is used as a preclinical model for schizophrenia; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying the symptoms remain largely unknown. Acute PCP treatment rapidly induces behavioral and cognitive deficits; therefore, post-translational regulation of protein activity is expected to play a role at early time points. We performed mass-spectrometry-driven quantitative analysis of rat frontal cortex 15, 30, or 240 min after the administration of PCP (10 mg/kg). We identified and quantified 23,548 peptides, including 4749 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 2604 proteins. A total of 352 proteins exhibited altered phosphorylation levels, indicating that protein phosphorylation is involved in the acute response to PCP. Computational assessment of the regulated proteins biological function revealed that PCP perturbs key processes in the frontal cortex including calcium homeostasis, organization of cytoskeleton, endo/exocytosis, and energy metabolism. This study on acute PCP treatment provides the largest proteomics and phosphoproteomics data sets to date of a preclinical model of schizophrenia. Our findings contribute to the understanding of alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia and provide a foundation for discovery of novel targets for pharmacological intervention. PMID:24564430

  17. The selective phosphorylation of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    Carlson, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor-activated signal transduction pathways regulate the responsiveness of cells to external stimuli. These transduction pathways themselves are subject to regulation, most commonly by phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G Proteins), as requisite signal transducing elements for many plasma membrane receptors, are considered likely targets for regulation by phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to phosphorylate the {alpha} subunit of G{sub i} and other G proteins in solution. However, the occurrence of the phosphorylation of G{sub 1} within intact cells in response to activation of PKC has not been rigorously demonstrated. In this thesis, the extent to which the {alpha} subunits of G{sub i} undergo phosphorylation within human platelets in response to activation of PKC was examined by means of radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation. Incubation of platelets with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of PKC, promoted the phosphorylation of several proteins within saponin-permeabilized and intact platelets incubated with ({gamma}{sup 32}P)ATP and ({sup 32}P)H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, respectively. None of the phosphoproteins, however, were precipitated by either of two antisera containing antibodies differing in specificities for epitopes within G{sub i{alpha}}-despite precipitation of a substantial fraction of the subunit itself. In contrast, other antisera, containing antibodies specific for the recently describe G{sub z{alpha}}, or antibodies for both G{sub z{alpha}} and G{sub i{alpha}}, precipitated a 40-kDa phosphoprotein.

  18. PreImplantation factor (PIF*) regulates systemic immunity and targets protective regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins.

    Barnea, Eytan R; Hayrabedyan, Soren; Todorova, Krassimira; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Or, Reuven; Guingab, Joy; McElhinney, James; Fernandez, Nelson; Barder, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Secreted by viable embryos, PIF is expressed by the placenta and found in maternal circulation. It promotes implantation and trophoblast invasion, achieving systemic immune homeostasis. Synthetic PIF successfully transposes endogenous PIF features to non-pregnant immune and transplant models. PIF affects innate and activated PBMC cytokines and genes expression. We report that PIF targets similar proteins in CD14+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells instigating integrated immune regulation. PIF-affinity chromatography followed by mass-spectrometry, pathway and heatmap analysis reveals that SET-apoptosis inhibitor, vimentin, myosin-9 and calmodulin are pivotal for immune regulation. PIF acts on macrophages down-stream of LPS (lipopolysaccharide-bacterial antigen) CD14/TLR4/MD2 complex, targeting myosin-9, thymosin-α1 and 14-3-3eta. PIF mainly targets platelet aggregation in CD4+, and skeletal proteins in CD8+ cells. Pathway analysis demonstrates that PIF targets and regulates SET, tubulin, actin-b, and S100 genes expression. PIF targets systemic immunity and has a short circulating half-life. Collectively, PIF targets identified; protective, immune regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins reveal mechanisms involved in the observed efficacy against immune disorders. PMID:26944449

  19. Regulation of the endogenous VEGF-A gene by exogenous designed regulatory proteins

    Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Schröder, Oliver; Frey, Gerhard; Briggs, Steven P.; Sera, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    We describe a facile method to activate or repress transcription of endogenous genes in a quantitative and specific manner by treatment with designed regulatory proteins (DRPs), in which artificial transcription factors (ATFs) are fused to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). Penetration of DRPs into cells is mediated by an N-terminal CPP fused to a nuclear localization signal; a DNA-binding domain and a transactivation domain follow. The DNA-binding domain was targeted to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene. An agonist DRP was rapidly taken up by cells and transported to the nucleus; soon after, the cells began transcribing the gene and secreting VEGF-A protein in a dose-dependent manner. Multiple copies of a short oligopeptide derived from a minimal transactivation domain of human β-catenin was stronger than VP-16. The SRDX domain from the plant transcription factor, SUPERMAN, changed the DRP to a hypoxia-induced antagonist of VEGF-A. DRPs combine many of the potential benefits of transgenes with those of recombinant proteins. PMID:15475575

  20. Serum acute phase proteins in cows with SARA (Subacute Ruminal Acidosis) suspect

    C. Cannizzo; Gianesella, M.; Giudice, E.; Messina, V; G. Piccione; M. Morgante

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variations of Acute Phase Proteins (APPs) and other blood constituents during the onset of the sub-acute ruminal acidosis (SARA) pathological status. A total of 108 cows from 12 dairy herds were randomly selected and divided into three Groups of 36 animals each. All animals were subjected to a rumenocentesis. Group A was composed by subjects with a rumen pH>5.8, Group B was composed by subjects with a rumen pH ≤5.5≤5.8 and Group C was composed by subj...

  1. Acute heat stress and thermal acclimation induce CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta in the goby Gillichthys mirabilis.

    Buckley, Bradley A

    2011-08-01

    Members of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors have regulatory control over numerous processes related to cell fate determination, including differentiation, proliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In mammals, abnormalities in the expression of some isoforms of C/EBPs are pathogenic and are implicated as being involved in myeloid leukemia and breast cancers. Next to nothing is known about their regulation, function or stress-responsiveness in poikilotherms. Here, both acute heat stress and thermal acclimation were demonstrated to induce the expression of one isoform, C/EBP-δ, in the liver, white muscle and gill of the eurythermal estuarine goby, Gillichthys mirabilis. The established role of C/EBP-δ in causing cell cycle arrest and/or promoting apoptosis in other vertebrates suggests that the heat-inducibility of this protein in poikilotherms may be part of the conserved cellular stress response with the hypothesized role of causing temporary cessation of cell growth and/or programmed cell death during bouts of environmental stress. The observed regulation of c/ebp-δ during hyperthermia represents a novel, heat-inducible signaling pathway in fishes. PMID:21442321

  2. Protein SUMOylation Is Required for Regulatory T Cell Expansion and Function.

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Aibo; Ma, Xiaopeng; Demarque, Maud; Jin, Wei; Xin, Huawei; Dejean, Anne; Dong, Chen

    2016-07-26

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for immune tolerance; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Treg cell expansion and function are still not well understood. SUMOylation is a protein post-translational modification characterized by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to lysines. UBC9 is the only E2 conjugating enzyme involved in this process, and loss of UBC9 completely abolishes the SUMOylation pathway. Here, we report that selective deletion of Ubc9 within the Treg lineage results in fatal early-onset autoimmunity similar to Foxp3 mutant mice. Ubc9-deficient Treg cells exhibit severe defects in TCR-driven homeostatic proliferation, accompanied by impaired activation and compromised suppressor function. Importantly, TCR ligation enhanced SUMOylation of IRF4, a critical regulator of Treg cell function downstream of TCR signals, which regulates its stability in Treg cells. Our data thus have demonstrated an essential role of SUMOylation in the expansion and function of Treg cells. PMID:27425617

  3. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase α subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

  4. Protein metabolism in malnourished children with acute lower respiratory infection

    We studied 19 subjects and 15 controls from November 1994 to February 1995. HIV infection is common among this population and HIV testing was done by ELISA of most subjects and controls in the course of their routine clinical care. To determine how HIV infection effects protein metabolism all HIV infected subjects and controls were grouped into a third category and compared to the subjects and controls. After the HIV subgrouping we were left with 13 subjects, 13 controls, and 8 HIV positive patients. KIC enrichments were used to calculate protein synthesis and breakdown, as KIC is believed to reflect intracellular leucine concentrations. Of note in Table 2 is the KIC/Leucine ratio is consistently greater than 1, averaging 1.3 over 16 samples. This is an unexpected finding as the KIC/Leucine ratio has been shown to be constant with a value of about 0.75 over a wide range of conditions. Samples for these eight patients have been evaluated under six different GCMS conditions to verify this unexpected observation. This ratio > 1.0 has been consistently found under all of these conditions. We are not certain what biological phenomenon can explain this, but it calls into question the validity of the four compartment model upon which these calculations are based. It is not unreasonable to expect that children with kwashiorkor metabolize ketoacids differently, and this difference could account for the increased KIC/Leucine ratio. 19 refs, 4 tabs

  5. Time elapsed after transplantation influences the relationship between the number of regulatory T cells in lung allograft biopsies and subsequent acute rejection episodes

    Krustrup, Dorrit; Iversen, Martin; Martinussen, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) play an important role in acute rejection after lung transplantation. However, the importance of the time elapsed after transplantation on the Treg response requires further investigation.We aim to evaluate the change over time in the frequency of Tregs...... in lung allograft biopsies and to assess how Tregs relate to simultaneous and subsequent acute cellular rejection. Materials and methods: A total of 258 biopsy samples obtained 0.5, 1, 3, 12 and 24. months after transplantation from 58 consecutive lung transplant patients were included. The biopsies...... were scored for acute rejection according to the ISHLT criteria (A0-A4) and immunohistochemically stained with antibodies against FoxP3. Results: There was a tendency for a decrease in the number of Tregs/mm2 with time. However, the previous levels of Tregs/mm2 did not have any significant effect on...

  6. Acute phase proteins as diagnostic markers in horses with colic

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Scheepers, Elrien; Sanz, Macarena;

    and fibrinogen to differentiate between horses with infectious non-surgical colic and surgical colic. Materials & Methods:The performance of the APPs was evaluated individually and in combination with clinical examination, as wells as traditional biomarkers in blood (WCC, PCV, TPP, lactate) and peritoneal fluid...... (PF) (haemolysis, WCC, total protein).Admission data collected prospectively from 148 horses with severe colic in one hospital was used to construct multivariate logistic models to predict if a horse had an infectious non-surgical colic. The models were based on 1) clinical evaluation, 2) clinical...... and blood evaluation and 3) clinical, blood and PF evaluation. Each model was independently validated against admission data from 78 horses in another hospital.Results and Discussion:The variables included in the final ‘clinical model’ were: Lethargy, temperature increase from 38◦C, gastric reflux 5-10L...

  7. Serum amyloid A: An acute-phase protein involved in tumour pathogenesis

    Sodin-Semrl, S.; Kovacevic, A.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA) is largely regulated by inflammation-associated cytokines and a high concentration of circulating SAA may represent an ideal marker for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, SAA is also synthesized in extrahepatic tissues, e.g. human carcinoma metastases and cancer cell lines. An increasing body of in vitro data supports the concept of involvement of SAA in carcinogenesis and neoplastic diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that SAA might be included in a group of biomarkers to detect a pattern of physiological events that reflect the growth of malignancy and host response. This review is meant to provide a broad overview of the many ways that SAA could contribute to tumour development, and accelerate tumour progression and metastasis, and to gain a better understanding of this acute-phase reactant as a possible link between chronic inflammation and neoplasia. PMID:18726069

  8. Changes of CD4+CD25+Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome and the Effects of Atorvastatin

    HU Zhenping; LI Dazhu; HU Yingfeng; YANG Keping

    2007-01-01

    The function of CD4+CD25+regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the effects of atorvastatin were investigated. Forty-eight patients with ACS were randomly divided into two groups: group C receiving conventional therapy (n=24), and group C+A receiving conventional therapy+atorvastatin (10 mg/day, n=24). T lymphocytes from ACS patients (before and 2 weeks after the treatment) or 18 healthy subjects were separated and the flow cytometry was used to measure the percentage of Treg. The inhibitory ability of Treg on effector T cells was determined by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). ELISA was used to measure the serum levels of cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β1 and IFN-γ) before and after treatment. The results showed that as compared with normal control group, Treg percentage was decreased significantly (P<0.01), the in- hibitory ability of Treg on the T lymphocytes proliferation was reduced (P<0.01), IFN-γ, levels were increased and IL-10 and TGF-β1 levels were lowered in ACS patients. After treatment with atorvas- tatin, Treg percentage and the inhibitory ability of Treg on T lymphocytes proliferation were signifi- cantly increased in ACS patients. Serum IFN-γ, was decreased significantly, while IL-10 and TGF-β1 were elevated significantly as compared with the non-atorvastatin group. The number of Treg was positively correlated with serum TGF-β1, but negatively with serum IFN-γ and CRP. It was concluded that ACS was associated with decreased number and defected function of Treg, which may play an important role in initiating immune-inflammatory response in ACS. The inhibitory ef- fects of atorvastatin on inflammation in ACS may be due to its beneficial effects on Treg and restora- tion of immune homeostasis.

  9. C-reactive protein and the acute phase reaction in geriatric patients.

    Bertsch, Thomas; Triebel, Jakob; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Christ, Michael; Sieber, Cornel; Fassbender, Klaus; Heppner, Hans Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The C-reactive protein (CRP), first described as a serum component capable of precipitating the C-polysaccharide of pneumococci, is one of the most important proteins because the serum concentration rises in the acute phase reaction. The acute phase reaction is the nonspecific reaction of the body to noxious stimuli of the most varied kinds, such as infections, burns, neoplasms and tissue trauma. The CRP is synthesized in liver parenchymal cells by cytokines which are derived from stimulated leucocytes and released into the circulation. Because of its molecular structure and in synergy with the complement system, it is able to precipitate and/or lyse microorganisms, thereby rendering them harmless. Measurement of the serum CRP concentration can provide important information with respect to the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Due to immunosenescence in geriatric patients the synthesis of CRP appears to be limited to inflammatory stimuli; however, this phenomenon does not appear to be of major clinical relevance. Despite the introduction of new parameters of the acute phase reaction, sometimes with better performance, such as interleukin-6, procalcitonin and the soluble endotoxin receptor sCD14, measurement of CRP for diagnosis and treatment monitoring is still justified even in geriatric patients as testing is rapid, economic and nearly ubiquitously available round the clock. Biochemical markers of the acute phase reaction should always be interpreted together with the clinical picture and their specific limitations. PMID:26334841

  10. Comparison of two different stochastic models for extracting protein regulatory pathways using Bayesian networks.

    Grzegorczyk, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Toxicoproteomics integrates traditional toxicology and systems biology and seeks to infer the architecture of biochemical pathways in biological systems that are affected by and respond to chemical and environmental exposures. Different reverse engineering methods for extracting biochemical regulatory networks from data have been proposed and it is important to understand their relative strengths and weaknesses. To shed some light onto this problem, Werhli et al. (2006) cross-compared three widely used methodologies, relevance networks, graphical Gaussian models, and Bayesian networks (BN), on real cytometric and synthetic expression data. This study continues with the evaluation and compares the learning performances of two different stochastic models (BGe and BDe) for BN. Cytometric protein expression data from the RAF-signaling pathway were used for the cross-method comparison. Understanding this pathway is an important task, as it is known that RAF is a critical signaling protein whose deregulation leads to carcinogenesis. When the more flexible BDe model is employed, a data discretization, which usually incurs an inevitable information loss, is needed. However, the results of the study reveal that the BDe model is preferable to the BGe model when a sufficiently large number of observations from the pathway are available. PMID:18569581

  11. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  12. Serum acute phase proteins in cows with SARA (Subacute Ruminal Acidosis suspect

    C. Cannizzo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the variations of Acute Phase Proteins (APPs and other blood constituents during the onset of the sub-acute ruminal acidosis (SARA pathological status. A total of 108 cows from 12 dairy herds were randomly selected and divided into three Groups of 36 animals each. All animals were subjected to a rumenocentesis. Group A was composed by subjects with a rumen pH>5.8, Group B was composed by subjects with a rumen pH ≤5.5≤5.8 and Group C was composed by subjects with a rumen pH<5.5. Blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture and Haptoglobin (Hp, Serum Amyloid A (SAA, Total Proteins, Albumin and White Blood Cells (WBC were determined. One-way ANOVA showed a statistical significance on Rumen pH, Hp, SAA. SARA seems not stimulate the APPs production from liver.

  13. Correlation of serum C-reactive protein, white blood count and neutrophil percentage with histopathology findings in acute appendicitis

    Xharra Shefki; Gashi-Luci Lumturije; Xharra Kumrije; Veselaj Fahredin; Bicaj Besnik; Sada Fatos; Krasniqi Avdyl

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical emergencies. Accurate diagnosis of acute appendicitis is based on careful history, physical examination, laboratory and imaging investigation. The aim of the study is to analyze the role of C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood count (WBC) and Neutrophil percentage (NP) in improving the accuracy of diagnosis of acute appendicitis and to compare it with the intraoperative assessment and histopathology findings. Materials...

  14. Serum heat shock protein 47 levels are elevated in acute interstitial pneumonia

    Kakugawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Nakashima, Shota; Hara, Shintaro; Sakamoto, Noriho; Kubota, Hiroshi; Mine, Mariko; Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Mukae, Hiroshi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein (HSP) 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, is involved in the processing and/or secretion of procollagen. We hypothesized that HSP47 could be a useful marker for fibrotic lung disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum levels of HSP47 in patients with various idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs). Methods Subjects comprised 9 patients with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), 12 with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), 16 with nonspecific...

  15. Association between Periodontal Disease and Elevated C-reactive Protein in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients

    G. Radafshar; B. Shad; M. Mirfeizi

    2006-01-01

    Statement of problem: Periodontal disease (PD) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events by unknown mechanisms. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular disease, with reported elevated serum levels during PD.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between PD and higher CRP levels in the serum of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, periodontal examinations and CRP serum l...

  16. Serum heat shock protein 47 levels are elevated in acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Kakugawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Nakashima, Shota; Hara, Shintaro; Sakamoto, Noriho; Kubota, Hiroshi; Mine, Mariko; Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Mukae, Hiroshi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of acute exacerbation (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47), a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, is essential for biosynthesis and secretion of collagen molecules. Previous studies in experimental animal fibrosis models have shown that downregulation of HSP47 expression reduces collagen production and diminishes fibrosis progression. In this study, serum HSP47 levels were evaluated to elucidate pathogenic diff...

  17. ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS, LIPID PROFILE AND PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES IN HEALTHY AND BRONCHOPNEUMONIC WATER BUFFALO CALVES

    El-Bahr, Sabry M.; Wael M. EL-Deeb

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of Acute Phase Proteins (APP), lipid profiles and proinflammatory cytokines in healthy and bronchopneumonic water buffalo calves. Therefore, sixty water buffalo calves (9±1 month old, 175±15 kg) were divided into two equal groups, the first group represented healthy, control, calves whereas calves of the second group were affected with bronchopneumonia. Total leukocytic and differential counts were determined. Serum total pr...

  18. Pancreatic Exocrine Enzymes and Intrapancreatic Protein Synthesis in Acute Oedematous Pancreatitis

    Yoshio Kinami; Ichiro Kita; Yasuhiko Kojima; Shigeki Takashima

    1994-01-01

    Changes in serum and intrapancreatic enzyme content and protein synthesis in pancreas were studied in acute oedematous pancreatitis (AOP). Male Wistar rats (n = 111) were divided into 2 groups, controls with a sham operation and those with AOP. Serum amylase levels rose immediately after the procedure causing AOP and then fell gradually, while serum lipase and ribonuclease levels remained higher than control values over 48h. (p < 0.05, 0.01). Serum deoxyribonuclease (DNase) II levels were unc...

  19. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein predicts adverse outcomes in acute kidney injury

    Ferguson, Michael A.; Vaidya, Vishal S.; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Collings, Fitz B.; Sunderland, Kelsey E.; Gioules, Costas J.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition with significant associated morbidity and mortality. The insensitivity and non-specificity of traditional markers of renal dysfunction prevent timely diagnosis, estimation of the severity of renal injury, and the administration of possible therapeutic agents. Here, we determine the prognostic ability of urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), and further characterize its sensitivity and specificity as a biomarker of AKI. Initial ...

  20. Relation between raised concentrations of fucose, sialic acid, and acute phase proteins in serum from patients with cancer: choosing suitable serum glycoprotein markers.

    Turner, G A; Skillen, A W; Buamah, P; Guthrie, D.; Welsh, J; Harrison, J; Kowalski, A.

    1985-01-01

    Serum concentrations of fucose, sialic acid, and eight acute phase proteins were measured in single specimens from patients with cancer in order to determine whether the raised concentrations of protein bound sugars commonly found in cancer correlate with increased concentrations of the acute phase proteins. Strong positive correlations were found only with alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, alpha 1-antitrypsin, and haptoglobins. Changes in protein bound sugars and acute phase proteins were also exam...

  1. Effect of acute maternal starvation on tyrosine metabolism and protein synthesis in fetal sheep

    To determine the effects of acute maternal starvation on intrauterine growth, tyrosine concentration and specific activity values in plasma, intracellular free and protein bound pools were determined in catheterized ovine fetuses following an 8 h continuous infusion of L-[2,3,5,6 3H] or L-[U-14C] tyrosine into the ewe and fetus respectively at 115-125 days of gestation. From the kinetic data the rates of whole body and tissue fractional protein synthesis were calculated. Although placental protein synthesis was not significantly changed as a result of acute maternal starvation, fetal whole body protein synthesis was reduced from 63 g/d/kg in the fed to 25 g/d/kg in the starved condition. There was also a 10 fold reduction in the net placental transfer of tyrosine to the fetus in the starved ewes. In addition, a three fold increase was observed in the quantity of tyrosine used for oxidation by the fetuses of starved ewes, changing from 5.2% of tyrosine net utilization in the fed to 13.7% in the starved condition. Significant reductions in tissue fractional protein synthesis rates were also seen in the liver, brain, lung kidney and GIT tissues from 78, 37, 65, 45 and 71%/d respectively in the fed to 12, 10, 23, 22 and 35%/d in the fetuses of starved ewes. The data indicate that during acute maternal starvation the sheep fetus utilizes more tyrosine for oxidation and less for anabolic purposes which is reflected in a decrease both in whole body and tissue fractional rates of protein synthesis

  2. STAT5 proteins are involved in down-regulation of iron regulatory protein 1 gene expression by nitric oxide.

    Starzynski, Rafal Radoslaw; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia; Muzeau, Françoise; Tyrolczyk, Zofia; Smuda, Ewa; Drapier, Jean-Claude; Beaumont, Carole; Lipinski, Pawel

    2006-12-01

    RNA-binding activity of IRP1 (iron regulatory protein 1) is regulated by the insertion/extrusion of a [4Fe-4S] cluster into/from the IRP1 molecule. NO (nitic oxide), whose ability to activate IRP1 by removing its [4Fe-4S] cluster is well known, has also been shown to down-regulate expression of the IRP1 gene. In the present study, we examine whether this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level. Analysis of the mouse IRP1 promoter sequence revealed two conserved putative binding sites for transcription factor(s) regulated by NO and/or changes in intracellular iron level: Sp1 (promoter-selective transcription factor 1) and MTF1 (metal transcription factor 1), plus GAS (interferon-gamma-activated sequence), a binding site for STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins. In order to define the functional activity of these sequences, reporter constructs were generated through the insertion of overlapping fragments of the mouse IRP1 promoter upstream of the luciferase gene. Transient expression assays following transfection of HuH7 cells with these plasmids revealed that while both the Sp1 and GAS sequences are involved in basal transcriptional activity of the IRP1 promoter, the role of the latter is predominant. Analysis of protein binding to these sequences in EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) using nuclear extracts from mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated to synthesize NO showed a significant decrease in the formation of Sp1-DNA and STAT-DNA complexes, compared with controls. We have also demonstrated that the GAS sequence is involved in NO-dependent down-regulation of IRP1 transcription. Further analysis revealed that levels of STAT5a and STAT5b in the nucleus and cytosol of NO-producing macrophages are substantially lower than in control cells. These findings provide evidence that STAT5 proteins play a role in NO-mediated down-regulation of IRP1 gene expression. PMID:16886906

  3. Extracellular superoxide dismutase regulates the expression of small gtpase regulatory proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI.

    Mikko O Laukkanen

    Full Text Available Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3, which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3-induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1, GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4, and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2 in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3-driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme.

  4. Extracellular superoxide dismutase regulates the expression of small gtpase regulatory proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI.

    Laukkanen, Mikko O; Cammarota, Francesca; Esposito, Tiziana; Salvatore, Marco; Castellone, Maria D

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3), which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3-induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1), GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4), and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2) in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3-driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:25751262

  5. Predictive value of c-reactive protein for thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction

    The serum levels of C-reactive protein on admission may predict the efficacy of reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Objectives: This study was conducted to know the predictive value of CRP for success of thrombolysis and to know the prognostic value of C-reactive protein in patients having acute myocardial infarction. Study Design: It was single center, open labeled cross sectional study. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients of acute myocardial infarction diagnosed on clinical and ECG criteria, who received thrombolytic therapy with strepto- kinase, were included in the study. The diagnosis of acute rnyocardial infarction was made on clinical para meters and ECG criteria. The ECG changes were noted before starting thrombolysis. The baseline sample for C-reactive protein (CRP,) was taken before starting thrombolysis. The time duration between onset of symptoms and start of thrombolysis was also noted. The thrombolysis was done with streptokinase infusion, 1.5 million units diluted in 100ml normal saline, intravenously over one hour. The ECG was repeated after six hours of completion of thrombolysis and, changes were noted and compared with ECG changes before thrombolysis. Now second sample for C-reactive protein (CRP2) was taken after six hours of completion of thrombolysis. CRP was measured by a high sensitivity assay which can accurately measure basal levels of CRP throughout the currently accepted cardiovascular risk assessment range (0.20 - 10.0 mg/L). According to ECG findings after thrombolysis, all patients were divided into two groups. Group A was considered as successful group to thrombolysis, in whom ECG changes were settled. Group B was considered as unsuccessful group to thrombolysis, in whom ECG changes remained same as before thrombolysis. Both values of C-reactive protein, CRP, and CRP2 were compared in both groups group A and group B. Results: Plasma CRP values before and after thrombolysis had strong predictive value for

  6. Age- and Sex-Associated Effects on Acute-Phase Proteins in Göttingen Minipigs

    Christoffersen, Berit Ø; Jensen, Søren J.; Ludvigsen, Trine P; Nilsson, Sara K; Grossi, Anette B; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Göttingen minipigs and to investigate the effects of age, sex, and various stimuli on these ranges. Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, pig major acute-phase protein (PMAP), albumin, and porcine α-1 acid glycoprotein (PAGP) were evaluated in 4 age groups (6...... in obese pigs without diabetes. In conclusion, reference values for CRP, PMAP, haptoglobin, SAA, PAGP and albumin were established for male and female Göttingen minipigs of different ages. These APP were influenced by age and sex, underlining the importance of considering these factors when designing...

  7. Age- and sex-associated effects on acute-phase proteins in Göttingen minipigs

    Christoffersen, Berit Ø.; Jensen, Søren Juel; Ludvigsen, Trine P.; Nilsson, Sara Kristina; Grossi, Anette B.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Göttingen minipigs and to investigate the effects of age, sex, and various stimuli on these ranges. Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, pig major acute-phase protein (PMAP), albumin, and porcine α-1 acid glycoprotein (PAGP) were evaluated in 4 age groups (6...... in obese pigs without diabetes. In conclusion, reference values for CRP, PMAP, haptoglobin, SAA, PAGP and albumin were established for male and female Göttingen minipigs of different ages. These APP were influenced by age and sex, underlining the importance of considering these factors when designing...

  8. Both short intense and prolonged moderate in vitro stimulation reduce the mRNA expression of calcium-regulatory proteins in rat skeletal muscle

    Mänttäri, Satu; Ørtenblad, Niels; Madsen, Klavs;

    2013-01-01

    ) muscles at 4 h of recovery following in vitro stimulations (either short intensive (SHO) 60 Hz, 5 min, or prolonged moderate (PRO) 20 Hz, 40 min). Stimulation induced acute regulation of the mRNA level of Ca(2+)-regulating proteins in a manner that does not follow typical fibre-type-specific transitions....... In general, stimulation decreased mRNA content of all proteins studied. Most prominent down-regulation was observed for Cacna1 (26 and 32 % after SHO and PRO, respectively, in SOL; 19 % after SHO in EDL). SERCA1, SERCA2, CASQ1, CASQ2, and RyR1 mRNA content also decreased significantly in both muscles...... relative to resting control. Of notice is that hexokinase II mRNA content was increased in EDL and unchanged in SOL underlining the specificity of the down-regulation of mRNA of Ca(2+) regulatory proteins. The results demonstrate contraction-induced down-regulation of mRNAs for the main components of Ca(2...

  9. Acute differential effects of milk-derived dietary proteins on postprandial lipaemia in obese non-diabetic subjects

    Holmer-Jensen, J; Hartvigsen, M L; Mortensen, L S; Astrup, A; de Vrese, M; Holst, J J; Thomsen, C; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Postprandial lipaemia is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis. To investigate the acute effect of four milk-derived dietary proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, whey isolate, caseinoglycomacropeptide and whey hydrolysate) on postprandial lipaemia, we have conducted a randomized, acute, single-b...

  10. Tight junction proteins in gallbladder epithelium: different expression in acute acalculous and calculous cholecystitis.

    Laurila, Jouko J; Karttunen, Tuomo; Koivukangas, Vesa; Laurila, Päivi A; Syrjälä, Hannu; Saarnio, Juha; Soini, Ylermi; Ala-Kokko, Tero I

    2007-06-01

    There is a paucity of information of tight junction (TJ) proteins in gallbladder epithelium, and disturbances in the structure of these proteins may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) and acute calculous cholecystitis (ACC). Using immunohistochemistry, we investigated the expression of TJ proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, and -4, occludin, zonula occludens (ZO-1), and E-cadherin in 9 normal gallbladders, 30 gallbladders with AAC, and 21 gallbladders with ACC. The number of positive epithelial and endothelial cells and the intensity of the immunoreaction were determined. Membrane-bound and cytoplasmic immunoreactivities were separately assessed. We found that TJ proteins were uniformly expressed in normal gallbladder epithelium, with the exception of claudin-2, which was present in less than half of the cells. In AAC, expression of cytoplasmic occludin and claudin-1 were decreased, as compared with normal gallbladder. In ACC, expression of claudin-2 was increased, and expression of claudin-1, -3, and -4, occludin, and ZO-1 were decreased, as compared with normal gallbladder or AAC. We conclude that there are significant differences in expression of TJ proteins in AAC and ACC, supporting the idea that AAC represents a manifestation of systemic inflammatory disease, whereas ACC is a local inflammatory and often infectious disease. PMID:17283368

  11. A Common Missense Variant in the Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Gene (GCKR) Is Associated with Increased Plasma Triglyceride and C-Reactive Protein but Lower Fasting Glucose Concentrations

    OBJECTIVE-Using the genome-wide-association approach, we recently identified the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR, rs780094) region as a novel quantitative trait locus for plasma triglyceride concentration in Europeans. Here, we sought to study the association of GCKR variants with metaboli...

  12. Prognostic Significance of Multidrug Resistance Gene 1 (MDR1), Multidrug Resistance-related Protein (MRP) and Lung Resistance Protein (LRP) mRNA Expression in Acute Leukemia

    Huh, Hee Jin; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Jang, Seongsoo; Seo, Eul-Ju; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Seo, Jong Jin; Moon, Hyung Nam; Ghim, Thad

    2006-01-01

    The prognostic significance of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression is controversial. We investigated whether multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) mRNA expression are associated with outcomes in acute leukemia patients. At diagnosis we examined MDR1, MRP and LRP mRNA expression in bone marrow samples from 71 acute leukemia patients (39 myeloid, 32 lymphoblastic) using nested RT-PCR. The expression of each of the...

  13. Identification of Functional Regulatory Residues of the β-Lactam Inducible Penicillin Binding Protein in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Andreas N. Mbah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to methicillin by Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent clinical problem worldwide. A mechanism for resistance has been proposed in which methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates acquired a new protein called β-lactam inducible penicillin binding protein (PBP-2′. The PBP-2′ functions by substituting other penicillin binding proteins which have been inhibited by β-lactam antibiotics. Presently, there is no structural and regulatory information on PBP-2′ protein. We conducted a complete structural and functional regulatory analysis of PBP-2′ protein. Our analysis revealed that the PBP-2′ is very stable with more hydrophilic amino acids expressing antigenic sites. PBP-2′ has three striking regulatory points constituted by first penicillin binding site at Ser25, second penicillin binding site at Ser405, and finally a single metallic ligand binding site at Glu657 which binds to Zn2+ ions. This report highlights structural features of PBP-2′ that can serve as targets for developing new chemotherapeutic agents and conducting site direct mutagenesis experiments.

  14. Purification and cloning of the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    Milstien, S; Jaffe, H; Kowlessur, D; Bonner, T I

    1996-08-16

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I, the initial enzyme of the de novo pathway for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for aromatic amino acid hydroxylations and nitric oxide synthesis, is sensitive to end-product feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. This inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin is mediated by the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein GFRP, previously named p35 (Harada, T., Kagamiyama, H., and Hatakeyama, K. (1993) Science 260, 1507-1510), and -phenylalanine specifically reverses the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibition. As a first step in the investigation of the physiological role of this unique mechanism of regulation, a convenient procedure has been developed to co-purify to homogeneity both GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP from rat liver. GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP exist in a complex which can be bound to a GTP-affinity column from which GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP are separately and selectively eluted. GFRP is dissociated from the GTP agarose-bound complex with 0.2 NaCl, a concentration of salt which also effectively blocks the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibitory activity of GFRP. GTP cyclohydrolase I is then eluted from the GTP-agarose column with GTP. Both GFRP and GTP cyclohydrolase I were then purified separately to near homogeneity by sequential high performance anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. GFRP was found to have a native molecular mass of 20 kDa and consist of a homodimer of 9.5-kDa subunits. Based on peptide sequences obtained from purified GFRP, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used to clone a cDNA from a rat liver cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction-based methods. The cDNA contained an open reading frame that encoded a novel protein of 84 amino acids (calculated molecular mass 9665 daltons). This protein when expressed in Escherichia coli as a thioredoxin fusion protein had tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibitory activity. Northern

  15. The human enhancer-binding protein Gata3 binds to several T-cell receptor regulatory elements.

    Marine, J; Winoto, A

    1991-01-01

    The tissue-specific developmental regulation of the alpha, beta, gamma and delta T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) genes is controlled by the corresponding distinct enhancers and their enhancer-binding proteins. To find a common TCR regulatory element, we have studied the ability of the newly described enhancer-binding protein Gata3 to bind to the sequence motif (A/T)GATA(G/A) shared between enhancer elements of all four TCR genes. Gata3 was shown in the chicken to be an enhancer-binding protein ...

  16. The physiological functions of iron regulatory proteins in iron homeostasis - an update

    De-LiangZhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs regulate the expression of genes involved in iron metabolism by binding to RNA stem-loop structures known as iron responsive elements (IREs in target mRNAs. IRP binding inhibits the translation of mRNAs that contain an IRE in the 5’untranslated region of the transcripts, and increases the stability of mRNAs that contain IREs in the 3'untranslated region of transcripts. By these mechanisms, IRPs increase cellular iron absorption and decrease storage and export of iron to maintain an optimal intracellular iron balance. There are two members of the mammalian IRP protein family, IRP1 and IRP2, and they have redundant functions as evidenced by the embryonic lethality of the mice that completely lack IRP expression (Irp1-/-/Irp2-/- mice, which contrasts with the fact that Irp1-/- and Irp2-/- mice are viable. In addition, Irp2-/- mice also display neurodegenerative symptoms and microcytic hypochromic anemia, suggesting that IRP2 function predominates in the nervous system and erythropoietic homeostasis. Though the physiological significance of IRP1 had been unclear since Irp1-/- animals were first assessed in the early 1990’s, recent studies indicate that IRP1 plays an essential function in orchestrating the balance between erythropoiesis and bodily iron homeostasis. Additionally, Irp1-/- mice develop pulmonary hypertension, and they experience sudden death when maintained on an iron-deficient diet, indicating that IRP1 has a critical role in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in understanding the physiological roles of IRP1 and IRP2, and further discusses the implications for clinical research on patients with idiopathic polycythemia, pulmonary hypertension and neurodegeneration.

  17. Human Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a Contributes Significantly to Hepatic Lipogenic Gene Expression

    Andreas Bitter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP 1, the master regulator of lipogenesis, was shown to be associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is attributed to its major isoform SREBP1c. Based on studies in mice, the minor isoform SREBP1a is regarded as negligible for hepatic lipogenesis. This study aims to elucidate the expression and functional role of SREBP1a in human liver. Methods: mRNA expression of both isoforms was quantified in cohorts of human livers and primary human hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with PF-429242 to inhibit the proteolytic activation of SREBP precursor protein. SREBP1a-specifc and pan-SREBP1 knock-down were performed by transfection of respective siRNAs. Lipogenic SREBP-target gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Results: In human liver, SREBP1a accounts for up to half of the total SREBP1 pool. Treatment with PF-429242 indicated SREBP-dependent auto-regulation of SREBP1a, which however was much weaker than of SREBP1c. SREBP1a-specifc knock-down also reduced significantly the expression of SREBP1c and of SREBP-target genes. Regarding most SREBP-target genes, simultaneous knock-down of both isoforms resulted in effects of only similar extent as SREBP1a-specific knock-down. Conclusion: We here showed that SREBP1a is significantly contributing to the human hepatic SREBP1 pool and has a share in human hepatic lipogenic gene expression.

  18. Serotonin transporter protein overexpression and association to Th17 and T regulatory cells in lupoid leishmaniasis.

    Mashayekhi Goyonlo, Vahid; Elnour, Husameldin; Nordlind, Klas

    2014-03-01

    The immunopathogenesis of chronic non-healing Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis is challenging. There is a bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems, serotonin being an important mediator in this respect. Our aim was to study the role of the serotonin transporter protein (SERT) and its relation to T cell-related immune responses in lupoid leishmaniasis. Paraffin-embedded skin biopsies of 12 cases of lupoid and 12 cases of usual types of cutaneous leishmaniasis were investigated using immunohistochemistry regarding expression of SERT, Th1, Th2, Th17 and T regulatory cell (Treg) markers. SERT as well as Tregs and interleukin (IL)-17 positive cells were more prevalent while IL-5 (Th2) and interferon (IFN)-γ (Th1) expressing cells were less numerous in the lupoid tissue compared to those from the usual type of leishmaniasis. The majority of the SERT(+) cells were also tryptase(+) (mast cells). There was a positive correlation between a higher number of SERT(+) and IL-17(+) cells in the lupoid type, while lower numbers of SERT(+) cells were significantly related to lower percentages of CD25(+) cells in the usual type of leishmaniasis. These results might indicate a role for SERT, Th17 and Tregs in the pathogenesis of lupoid leishmaniasis. PMID:23989888

  19. Enzymatic changes in myosin regulatory proteins may explain vasoplegia in terminally ill patients with sepsis

    Zheng, Wentao; Kou, Yong; Gao, Feng-lan; Ouyang, Xiu-he

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted with the hypothesis that failure of maintenance of the vascular tone may be central to failure of the peripheral circulation and spiralling down of blood pressure in sepsis. Namely, we examined the balance between expression of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase and kinase, enzymes that regulate MLCs dephosphorylation and phosphorylation with a direct effect on pharmacomechanical coupling for smooth muscle relaxation and contraction respectively. Mechanical recordings and enzyme immunoassays of vascular smooth muscle lysates were used as the major methods to examine arterial biopsy samples from terminally ill sepsis patients. The results of the present study provide evidence that genomic alteration of expression of key regulatory proteins in vascular smooth muscles may be responsible for the relentless downhill course in sepsis. Down-regulation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and up-regulation of MLCK may explain the loss of tone and failure to mount contractile response in vivo during circulation. The mechanical studies demonstrated the inability of the arteries to develop tone when stimulated by phenylephrine in vitro. The results of our study provide indirect hint that control of inflammation is a major therapeutic approach in sepsis, and may facilitate to ameliorate the progressive cardiovascular collapse. PMID:26772992

  20. Characterization of the regulatory subunit from brain cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase II

    Tryptic peptides derived from the regulatory subunits of brain and heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase II were mapped by reverse phase HPLC. At 280 nm, 15 unique peptides were found only in the heart RII digest, while 5 other peptides were obtained only from brain RII. At 210 nm, 13 brain-RII specific and 15 heart-RII specific tryptic peptides were identified and resolved. Two-dimensional mapping analyses revealed that several 37P-labeled tryptic fragments derived from the autophosphorylation and the photoaffinity labeled cAMP-binding sites of brain RII were separate and distinct from the 32P-peptides isolated from similarly treated heart RII. The tryptic phosphopeptide containing the autophosphorylation site in brain RII was purified. The sequence and phosphorylation site is: Arg-Ala-Ser(P)-Val-Cys-Ala-Glu-Ala-Tyr-Asn-Pro-Asp-Glu-Glu-Glu-Asp-Asp-Ala-Glu. Astrocytes and neurons exhibit high levels of the brain RII enzyme, while oligodendrocytes contain the heart RII enzyme. Monoclonal antibodies to bovine cerebral cortex RII were made and characterized. The antibodies elucidated a subtle difference between membrane-associated and cytosolic RII from cerebral cortex

  1. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  2. Early downregulation of acute phase proteins after doxorubicin exposition in patients with breast cancer.

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Bufalo, Aedra Carla; Herrera, Ana Cristina; Victorino, Vanessa Jacob; Cecchini, Rubens; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy remains the first-choice option for adjuvant therapy in breast cancer. Here, we investigated the impact of the first chemotherapic cycle of doxorubicin on the plasmatic-proteomic profiling of women diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 87). Blood samples were obtained from the same patient before and after doxorubicin infusion (1 h, 60 mg/m(2)) and processed for label-free LC-MS proteomic screening. A total of 80 proteins were downregulated after chemotherapy. In silico analysis revealed that the main biological process enrolled was inflammation and canonical pathways involving acute phase proteins. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, TGF-β1, clusterin, and gelsolin were chosen as relevant for further validation. All selected targets presented reduced plasmatic levels after treatment. Our results indicate that doxorubicin downregulated acute phase proteins immediately after its infusion. Since such proteins are cancer promoting, its downregulation could support the effectiveness of doxorubicin along treatment. PMID:26472721

  3. Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing Shows Selection on Leptospira Regulatory Proteins During in vitro Culture Attenuation.

    Lehmann, Jason S; Corey, Victoria C; Ricaldi, Jessica N; Vinetz, Joseph M; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Matthias, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Leptospirosis is the most common zoonotic disease worldwide with an estimated 500,000 severe cases reported annually, and case fatality rates of 12-25%, due primarily to acute kidney and lung injuries. Despite its prevalence, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptospirosis pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify virulence-related genes in Leptospira interrogans, we delineated cumulative genome changes that occurred during serial in vitro passage of a highly virulent strain of L. interrogans serovar Lai into a nearly avirulent isogenic derivative. Comparison of protein coding and computationally predicted noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes between these two polyclonal strains identified 15 nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant (nsSNV) alleles that increased in frequency and 19 that decreased, whereas no changes in allelic frequency were observed among the ncRNA genes. Some of the nsSNV alleles were in six genes shown previously to be transcriptionally upregulated during exposure to in vivo-like conditions. Five of these nsSNVs were in evolutionarily conserved positions in genes related to signal transduction and metabolism. Frequency changes of minor nsSNV alleles identified in this study likely contributed to the loss of virulence during serial in vitro culture. The identification of new virulence-associated genes should spur additional experimental inquiry into their potential role in Leptospira pathogenesis. PMID:26711524

  4. Identification of Arsenic Direct-Binding Proteins in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia Cells

    Tao Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of arsenic direct-binding proteins is essential for determining the mechanism by which arsenic trioxide achieves its chemotherapeutic effects. At least two cysteines close together in the amino acid sequence are crucial to the binding of arsenic and essential to the identification of arsenic-binding proteins. In the present study, arsenic binding proteins were pulled down with streptavidin and identified using a liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS. More than 40 arsenic-binding proteins were separated, and redox-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1, heat shock 70 kDa protein 9 (HSPA9 and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, were further studied using binding assays in vitro. Notably, PKM2 has a high affinity for arsenic. In contrast to PKM2, GSTP1and HSPA9 did not combine with arsenic directly in vitro. These observations suggest that arsenic-mediated acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL suppressive effects involve PKM2. In summary, we identified several arsenic binding proteins in APL cells and investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of arsenic trioxide for APL. Further investigation into specific signal pathways by which PKM2 mediates APL developments may lead to a better understanding of arsenic effects on APL.

  5. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    Dasom Shin; Gihyun Lee; Sung-Hwa Sohn; Soojin Park; Kyung-Hwa Jung; Ji Min Lee; Jieun Yang; Jaeho Cho; Hyunsu Bae

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focall...

  6. Efficient preparation and metal specificity of the regulatory protein TroR from the human pathogen Treponema pallidum.

    Liu, Yi; Li, Wei; Wei, Yaozhu; Jiang, Yindi; Tan, Xiangshi

    2013-10-01

    TroR is a putative metal-dependent regulatory protein that has been linked to the virulence of the human pathogen Treponema pallidum. It shares high homology with the well-known iron-dependent regulatory protein DtxR from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, as well as the manganese-dependent MntR from Bacillus subtilis. However, it has been uncertain whether manganese or zinc is the natural cofactor of TroR to date. Herein, we established an efficient method named "double-fusion tagging" to obtain soluble TroR for the first time. A series of studies, including ICP, CD, fluorescence, ITC, and electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), were performed to resolve the discrepancies in its metal-binding specificity. In addition, bioinformatic analysis as well as mutation studies were carried out to find the genetic relationships of TroR with its homology proteins. In conclusion, our findings indicate that TroR is a manganese-dependent rather than a zinc-dependent regulatory protein. PMID:23945957

  7. Immunodepletion of high-abundant proteins from acute and chronic wound fluids to elucidate low-abundant regulators in wound healing

    Chojnacki Caroline

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of wound healing consists of several well distinguishable and finely tuned phases. For most of these phases specific proteins have been characterized, although the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not yet fully understood. It is an open question as to whether deficits in wound healing can be traced back to chronic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus. Previous research efforts in this field focus largely on a restricted set of marker proteins due to the limitations detection by antibodies imposes. For mechanistic purposes the elucidation of differences in acute and chronic wounds can be addressed by a less restricted proteome study. Mass spectrometric (MS methods, e.g. multi dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT, are well suitable for this complex theme of interest. The human wound fluid proteome is extremely complex, as is human plasma. Therefore, high-abundant proteins often mask the mass spectrometric detection of lower-abundant ones, which makes a depletion step of such predominant proteins inevitable. Findings In this study a commercially available immunodepletion kit was evaluated for the detection of low-abundant proteins from wound fluids. The dynamic range of the entire workflow was significantly increased to 5-6 orders of magnitude, which makes low-abundant regulatory proteins involved in wound healing accessible for MS detection. Conclusion The depletion of abundant proteins is absolutely necessary in order to analyze highly complex protein mixtures such as wound fluids using mass spectrometry. For this the used immunodepletion kit is a first but important step in order to represent the entire dynamic range of highly complex protein mixtures in the future.

  8. Lung Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Response and Regulation During Acute and Chronic Lung Injury

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F.;

    2013-01-01

    lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized......BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in...... three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. METHODS: Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. RESULTS: In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in...

  9. Total leucocyte count, C-reactive protein and neutrophil count: Diagnostic Aid in acute appendicitis

    Shafi Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Acute appendicitis is one of the most common acute intraabdominal affections seen in surgical departments, which can be treated easily if an accurate diagnosis is made in time. Otherwise, delay in diagnosis and treatment can lead to diffuse peritonitis. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted on 110 patients who were operated for acute appendicitis to determine the role and predictive value of the total leucocyte count (TLC, C-reactive protein (CRP and percentage of neutrophil count in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Preoperative TLC, CRP and percentage of neutrophil count were determined and were compared with the results of the histopathology of the removed appendix. Results: Of all the patients studied, 92 had histopathologically positive appendicitis. The TLC was found to be significantly high in 90 patients who proved to have acute appendicitis, whereas CRP was high in only 88 patients and neutrophil percentage was raised in 91; four had a normal CRP level. Thus, TLC had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 97.82%, 55.55% and 91.8%, respectively. CRP had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 95.6%, 77.77% and 95.6% respectively. Percentage of neutrophil count had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 98.9%, 38.88% and 89.21%, respectively. When used in combination, there was a marked improvement in the specificity and the positive predictive value to 88.04% and 98.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The inflammatory markers, i.e., TLC, CRP and neutrophil count can be helpful in the diagnosis when measured together as this increases their specificity and positive predictive value.

  10. Interleukin 6 and lipopolysaccharide binding protein - markers of inflammation in acute appendicitis.

    Brănescu, C; Serban, D; Dascălu, A M; Oprescu, S M; Savlovschi, C

    2013-01-01

    The rate of incidence of acute appendicitis is 12% in the case of male patients and 25% in case of women, which represents about 7% of the world population. The appendectomy rate has remained constant (i.e. 10 out of 10,000 patients per year). Appendicitis most often occurs in patients aged between 11-40 years, on the threshold between the third and fourth decades, the average age being 31.3 years. Since the first appendectomy performed by Claudius Amyand (1681/6 -1740), on December, 6th, 1735 to our days, i.e., 270 years later, time has confirmed the efficiency of both the therapy method and the surgical solution. The surgical cure in case of acute appendicitis has proved to be acceptable within the most widely practised techniques in general surgery. The variety of clinical forms has reached all age ranges, which in its turn has resulted in a large number of semiotic signs. In the case of acute appendicitis, interdisciplinarity has allowed the transfer of concept and methodology transfer among many areas of expertise, aimed at a better, minute understanding of the inflammatory event itself. Acute appendicitis illustrates inflammation development at digestive level and provides for a diagnostic and paraclinical exploration which continually upgrades. The recent inclusion in the studies of the Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)- type inflammation markers has laid the foundation of the latter's documented presence in the case of acute appendicitis-related inflammation. Proof of the correlation between the histopathological, clinical and evolutive forms can be found by identifying and quantifying these inflammation markers. The importance of studying inflammation markers allows us to conduct studies going beyond the prognosis of the various stages in which these markers were identified. The present article shows the results of a 1-year monitoring of the inflammation markers' values for Interleukin-6 and Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)-types, both pre

  11. Comparison of pathways from the geometric targeting method and targeted molecular dynamics in nitrogen regulatory protein C

    Geometric targeting (GT) is a recently introduced method for rapidly generating all-atom pathways from one protein state to another, based on geometric rather than energetic considerations. To generate pathways, a bias is applied that gradually moves atoms toward a target structure, while a set of geometric constraints between atoms is enforced to keep the structure stereochemically acceptable. In this work, we compare conformational pathways generated from GT to pathways from the much more computationally intensive and commonly used targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) technique, for a complicated conformational change in the signaling protein nitrogen regulatory protein C. We show that the all-atom pathways from GT are similar to previously reported TMD pathways for this protein, by comparing motion along six progress variables that describe the various structural changes. The results suggest that for nitrogen regulatory protein C, finding an all-atom pathway is primarily a problem of geometry, and that a detailed force field in this case constitutes an unnecessary extra layer of detail. We also show that the pathway snapshots from GT have good structure quality, by measuring various structure quality metrics. Transient hydrogen bonds detected by the two methods show some similarities but also some differences. The results justify the usage of GT as a rapid, approximate alternative to TMD for generating stereochemically acceptable all-atom pathways in highly constrained protein systems

  12. Glutathione depletion and acute exercise increase O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle.

    Peternelj, Tina Tinkara; Marsh, Susan A; Strobel, Natalie A; Matsumoto, Aya; Briskey, David; Dalbo, Vincent J; Tucker, Patrick S; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Post-translational modification of intracellular proteins with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) profoundly affects protein structure, function, and metabolism. Although many skeletal muscle proteins are O-GlcNAcylated, the modification has not been extensively studied in this tissue, especially in the context of exercise. This study investigated the effects of glutathione depletion and acute exercise on O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle. Diethyl maleate (DEM) was used to deplete intracellular glutathione and rats were subjected to a treadmill run. White gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed for glutathione status, O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) protein levels, and mRNA expression of OGT, O-GlcNAcase and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase. DEM and exercise both reduced intracellular glutathione and increased O-GlcNAc. DEM upregulated OGT protein expression. The effects of the interventions were significant 4 h after exercise (P exercise. PMID:25416863

  13. Pancreatic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Deficiency Exacerbates Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Koike, Shinichiro; Chahed, Samah; Bachaalany, Santana; Griffey, Stephen; Sastre, Juan; Haj, Fawaz G

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating gastrointestinal disorder that causes significant morbidity. The disease starts as local inflammation in the pancreas that may progress to systemic inflammation and complications. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in inflammatory signaling, but its significance in AP remains unclear. To investigate whether PTP1B may have a role in AP, we used pancreas PTP1B knockout (panc-PTP1B KO) mice and determined the effects of pancreatic PTP1B deficiency on cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. We report that PTP1B protein expression was increased in the early phase of AP in mice and rats. In addition, histological analyses of pancreas samples revealed enhanced features of AP in cerulein-treated panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Moreover, cerulein- and arginine-induced serum amylase and lipase were significantly higher in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Similarly, pancreatic mRNA and serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were increased in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Furthermore, panc-PTP1B KO mice exhibited enhanced cerulein- and arginine-induced NF-κB inflammatory response accompanied with increased mitogen-activated protein kinases activation and elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress. Notably, these effects were recapitulated in acinar cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of PTP1B. These findings reveal a novel role for pancreatic PTP1B in cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:27461362

  14. Serum protein concentrations, including acute phase proteins, in calves experimentally infected with Salmonella Dublin

    Daniela Gomes da Silva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate serum protein concentrations in calves experimentally inoculated with Salmonella Dublin. Twelve healthy 10 to 15-day-old Holstein calves were randomly allotted into two groups, control and infected with 10(8 CFU of Salmonella Dublin orally. The calves were subjected to physical evaluation and blood samples were collected shortly before administration of the bacteria and also 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 and 168 hours post-infection. The concentration of serum proteins was determined through sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Thirty serum proteins ranging from molecular weight of 24,000 Da to molecular weight of 236,000 Da were detected. Serum concentrations of ceruloplasmin (125,000 Da, haptoglobin (45,000 Da, acid glycoprotein (40,000 Da and a 34,000 Da protein were significantly increased in the experimentally infected calves, when compared with their concentrations in the control animals. Therefore, this study showed that S. Dublin infection could lead to the increase of certain serum proteins in calves.

  15. D-histidine utilization in Salmonella typhimurium is controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp).

    Hecht, K; Zhang, S.; Klopotowski, T; Ames, G F

    1996-01-01

    A new class of D-histidine-utilizing mutants which carry mutations in the gene encoding the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been identified in Salmonella typhimurium. The lrp mutations arise as suppressors of mutations in the genes encoding the histidine permease which drastically decrease the level of histidine transport activity. However, the suppressor effect is not exerted by elevating the level of the permease. Rather, the properties of the suppressor mutants are consiste...

  16. Regulation of the germinal center gene program by interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 8/IFN consensus sequence-binding protein

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Melchers, Mark; Wang, Hongsheng; Torrey, Ted A.; Slota, Rebecca; Qi, Chen-Feng; Kim, Ji Young; Lugar, Patricia; Kong, Hee Jeong; Farrington, Lila; van der Zouwen, Boris; ZHOU, JEFF X.; Lougaris, Vassilios; Lipsky, Peter E.; Grammer, Amrie C.

    2006-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) consensus sequence-binding protein/IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is a transcription factor that regulates the differentiation and function of macrophages, granulocytes, and dendritic cells through activation or repression of target genes. Although IRF8 is also expressed in lymphocytes, its roles in B cell and T cell maturation or function are ill defined, and few transcriptional targets are known. Gene expression profiling of human tonsillar B cells and mouse B cell lymphoma...

  17. Ligand binding to the inhibitory and stimulatory GTP cyclohydrolase I/GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein complexes

    Yoneyama, Toshie; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki

    2001-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by 6R-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), which is an essential cofactor for key enzymes producing catecholamines, serotonin, and nitric oxide as well as phenylalanine hydroxylase. GFRP also mediates feed-forward stimulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by phenylalanine at subsaturating GTP levels. These ligands, BH4 and phenylalanine, induce complex formation bet...

  18. The role of heparin-binding protein in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    刘杨

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the role of heparin-binding protein(HBP)in sepsis-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS),and to evaluate the prognostic value of HBP in ARDS.Methods Sixty seven sepsis patients were enrolled in the prospective study.According to whether present ARDS,patients were divided into two groups:ARDS group and non-ARDS group.Blood samples were obtained within 2 hours after patients were diagnosed with sepsis.We measured the level of interleukin-6,interleukin-8 and HBP by ELISA,counted the

  19. Protein source and quality in therapeutic foods affect the immune response and outcome in severe acute malnutrition

    Protein is a vital component of therapeutic foods designed to treat severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children; however there are still unknowns about the quality and quantity of the proteins to use in these foods. This review examines two recent studies investigating several different qualities an...

  20. Hepatic acute-phase proteins control innate immune responses during infection by promoting myeloid-derived suppressor cell function

    Sander, L.E.; Sackett, S.D.; Dierssen, U.; Beraza, N.; Linke, R.; Müller, M.R.; Blander, J.M.; Tacke, F.; Trautwein, C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute-phase proteins (APPs) are an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins produced mainly in the liver in response to infection and inflammation. Despite vast pro- and antiinflammatory properties ascribed to individual APPs, their collective function during infections remains poorly defined. Us

  1. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  2. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  3. The role of ion-regulatory membrane proteins of excitation-contraction coupling and relaxation in inherited muscle diseases.

    Froemming, G R; Ohlendieck, K

    2001-01-01

    The excitation-contraction-relaxation cycle of skeletal muscle fibres depends on the finely tuned interplay between the voltage-sensing dihydropyridine receptor, the junctional ryanodine receptor Ca2+-release channel and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. Inherited diseases of excitation-contraction coupling and muscle relaxation such as malignant hyperthermia, central core disease, hypokalemic periodic paralysis or Brody disease are caused by mutations in these Ca2+-regulatory elements. Over twenty different mutations in the Ca2+-release channel are associated with susceptibility to the pharmacogenetic disorder malignant hyperthermia. Other mutations in the ryanodine receptor trigger central core disease. Primary abnormalities in the alpha-1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor underlie the molecular pathogenesis of both hypokalemic periodic paralysis and certain forms of malignant hyperthermia. Some cases of the muscle relaxation disorder named Brody disease were demonstrated to be based on primary abnormalities in the Ca2+-ATPase. Since a variety of other sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins modulate the activity of the voltage sensor, Ca2+-release channel and ion-binding proteins, mutations in these Ca2+-regulatory muscle components might be the underlying cause for novel, not yet fully characterized, genetic muscle disorders. The cell biological analysis of knock-out mice has been helpful in evaluating the biomedical consequences of defects in ion-regulatory muscle proteins. PMID:11145921

  4. Unusual Heme Binding in the Bacterial Iron Response Regulator Protein (Irr): Spectral Characterization of Heme Binding to Heme Regulatory Motif

    Ishikawa, Haruto; Nakagaki, Megumi; Bamba, Ai; Uchida, Takeshi; Hori, Hiroshi; O'Brian, Mark R.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    We characterized heme binding in the bacterial iron response regulator (Irr) protein, which is a simple heme-regulated protein having a single “heme-regulatory motif”, HRM, and plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of a nitrogen fixing bacterium. The heme titration to wild-type and mutant Irr clearly showed that Irr has two heme binding sites: one of the heme binding sites is in the HRM, where 29Cys is the axial ligand, and the other one, the secondary heme binding site, is located outside...

  5. Identification of electrostatic interaction sites between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Gibson, R.M.; Ji-Buechler, Y.; Taylor, S S

    1997-01-01

    Two classes of molecules inhibit the catalytic subunit (C) of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK), the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) and the regulatory (R) subunits. Basic sites on C, previously identified as important for R/C interaction in yeast TPK1 and corresponding to Lys213, Lys217, and Lys189 in murine C alpha, were replaced with either Ala or Thr and characterized for their kinetic properties and ability to interact with RI and PKI. rC(K213A) and rC(K217A) we...

  6. Lentivirus-Mediated Short-Hairpin RNA Targeting Protein Phosphatase 4 Regulatory Subunit 1 Inhibits Growth in Breast Cancer

    Qi, Yuying; Hu, Tinghui; Li, Kai; Ye, Renqing; Ye, Zuodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Protein phosphatase 4 regulatory subunit 1 (PP4R1), as an interaction partner of the catalytic serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit has been shown to involve in cellular processes and nuclear factor κB signaling. However, the functions of PP4R1 in human breast cancers remain unclear. This study is designed to explore the effect of PP4R1 knockdown on the biological characteristics of breast cancer cells. Methods A lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was de...

  7. CTL Responses to Regulatory Proteins Tat and Rev in HIV-1 B'/C Virus-Infected Individuals

    MING-MING JIA; KUN-XUE HONG; JIAN-PING CHEN; HONG-WEI LIU; SHA LIU; XIAO-QING ZHANG; HONG-JING ZHAO; YI-MING SHAO

    2008-01-01

    To characterize HIV-1 specific CTL responses to regulatory proteins Tat and Rev in HIV-B'/C vires-infected ART-naive individuals. Methods HIV-1-specific CTL responses were analyzed by IFN-γ ELISPOT assay using overlapping peptides spanning the consensus sequences of HIV-1 clade C Tat and Rev proteins. Statistical analysis and graphical presentation were performed using SIGMAPLOT 10.0 and SIGMASTAT 3.5. For samples with a positive response, the magnitude of CTL responses was compared between HIV-1 C proteins by Wilcoxon rank sum test, and the significance threshold was P<0.05. Results Tat and Rev were frequently recognized, with 23% and 52% of the tested individuals having detectable responses to these proteins, respectively. Several immunodominant regions were detected in Rev. No significant correlation was observed between the magnitude and breadth of CTL responses to regulatory proteins and the control of virus replication in this study. Conclusion Tat and Rev can serve as targets for HIV-1-specific CTL, and several immunodominant regions are detectable in Rev. Further characterization of epitopes and their role in virus control may shed light on pathogenesis of HIV-1 natural infection and also be useful for the design and testing of candidate vaccines.

  8. C - REACTIVE PROTEIN LEVELS IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ITS PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE

    Mohan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRA CT: AIM: To measure C - reactive protein (CRP levels in patients of acute pancreatitis and evaluate if CRP levels predict the severity of pancreatitis by correlating these levels with - 1. C T Severity Index (CTSI. 2. Presence of complications. 3. Time take n for recovery. METHOD: Between the years 2007 and 2009 fifty patients diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Their CRP levels were sent on second day of admission and CT scan done after 72 hours of admission. RESULTS: CRP levels of 63mg/dl and above are significantly associated with increased time to recovery (R>7D, (p - 0.004. A significant association was seen between the presence of complications and a CTSI >7, (p - 0.0002. There was no significant correlation or association be tween the CRP levels and CTSI as indicated by a value of 0.040528 (test of correlation and p - <0.05. CONCLUSION: High serum CRP levels have predicted prognosis as well as mortality in this study. CTSI can be a very accurate predictor of development of comp lications in a case of acute pancreatitis

  9. Acute Phase Proteins in Response to Dictyocaulus viviparus Infection in Calves

    Waller K Persson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments were carried out to examine the acute phase response, as measured by the acute phase proteins (APP haptoglobin, serum amyloid A (SAA and fibrinogen, in calves infected with lungworm, Dictyocaulus vivparus. In addition, eosinophil counts were analysed. Three different dose models were used in 3 separate experiments: I 250 D. viviparus infective third stage larvae (L3 once daily for 2 consecutive days, II 100 D. viviparus L3 once daily for 5 consecutive days, and III 2000 L3 once. All 3 dose regimes induced elevated levels of haptoglobin, SAA and fibrinogen, although there was considerable variation both between and within experiments. A significant increase was observed in all 3 APP at one or several time points in experiment I and III, whereas in experiment II, the only significant elevation was observed for fibrinogen at one occasion. The eosinophil numbers were significantly elevated in all 3 experiments. The results show that lungworm infection can induce an acute phase response, which can be monitored by the selected APP. Elevated APP levels in combination with high numbers of eosinophils in an animal with respiratory disease may be used as an indicator of lung worm infection, and help the clinician to decide on treatment. However, high numbers of eosinophils and low levels of APP do not exclude a diagnosis of lungworm. Thus, lungworm infection may not be detected if measurements of APP are used to assess calf health in herds or individual animals.

  10. Acute phase protein response in an experimental model of ovine caseous lymphadenitis

    Lang Tamara L

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA is a disease of small ruminants caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The pathogenesis of CLA is a slow process, and produces a chronic rather than an acute disease state. Acute phase proteins (APP such as haptoglobin (Hp serum amyloid A (SAA and α1 acid glycoprotein (AGP are produced by the liver and released into the circulation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. The concentration of Hp in serum increases in experimental CLA but it is not known if SAA and AGP respond in parallel or have differing response profiles. Results The concentration in serum of Hp, SAA and AGP in 6 sheep challenged with 2 × 105 cells of C. pseudotuberculosis showed significant increases (P C. pseudotuberculosis became detectable at 11 days p.i. and continued to rise throughout the experiment. Conclusion The serum concentrations of Hp, SAA and AGP were raised in sheep in an experimental model of CLA. An extended response was found for AGP which occurred at a point when the infection was likely to have been transforming from an acute to a chronic phase. The results suggest that AGP could have a role as a marker for chronic conditions in sheep.