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Sample records for acute radiation effects

  1. Effects of Ozonated Olive Oil on Acute Radiation Proctitis in Rats

    Gültekin, Fatma Ayça; BAKKAL, Bekir Hakan; Sümer, Demet; Köktürk, Füruzan; Bektaş, Sibel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute radiation proctitis is a common complication of pelvic radiation and management of acute radiation proctitis is under evaluation. The beneficial effects of ozonated olive oil (OzOO) have already been shown in the treatment of chronic wounds. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of topical OzOO on acute radiation proctitis. Aims: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of topical OzOO on acute radiation proctitis. Study Design: An...

  2. Protective effects of gelsolin on acute radiation symptom

    This paper is to study the protective effect of gelsolin on acute radiation symptoms after total body irradiation. The concentration of plasma gelsolin was determined by a commercial ELISA Kit before and post-irradiation at different times by 137Cs γ rays with 4 Gy and 8 Gy. Levels of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and fibrinogen (FIB) were detected by an STAGO blood coagulation instrument at different times post-irradiation with 6 Gy γ ray. Otherwise the contents of the plasma malonaldehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and whole blood glutathione (GSH) were examined at 2 d and 7 a respectively after radiation. We found that the plasma levels of gelsolin were rising at 24 h post-radiation and a persistent degression tendency of gelsolin concentration was found from 24 h to 72 h post-irradiation with 4 Gy and 8 Gy. This decreasing degree had a positive correlation with the exposure dose. On the day from 4 d to 7 d after radiation treatment, the gelsolin treatment group had significantly higher PT and APTT, but low FIB than those of irradiated control group. Within 14 d to 18 d post-radiation, APTT, PT and FIB in gelsolin treatment group were lower than those in irradiated control group, but only APTT and PT differences were prominent. Levels of GSH and SOD in gelsolin treatment group were conspicuously higher than those in irradiated control group; whereas MDA levels were significantly lower than the irradiated control group. Gelsolin may have some certain protective effects on acute radiation disease in improving radiation hemorrhagic injury and eliminating free radicals. (authors)

  3. Acute radiation syndrome and delayed effects of radiation exposure

    The results of the overall irradiation of the body with large doses are described. Effects of irradiation are presented separately for central nervous, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Damages of cellular level and late effects in the whole body scale are shown. 7 refs, 2 figs

  4. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  5. Clinical effect of rhEGF on acute radiation stomatitis

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on acute radiation stomatitis (ARS). Methods: A total of 90 patients with head and neck malignant tumor going to receive radiotherapy were randomized into 3 groups: prophylactic application group (group A); therapeutic application group (group B) and the control group(group C). The irradiated mucous membrane was sprayed with rhEGF at the beginning of radiotherapy in group A and sprayed after grade I radiation stomatitis had appeared in group B. Comparison was made with control patients (group C) who received routine oral care with Dobell's solution. The rate of ARS and the clinical effect of rhEGF were evaluated. Results: The ARS appeared in 73% (22/30) of the patients after irradiated at a dose more than 10 Gy in group A, and appeared in 83% (25/30) of the patients irradiated at a dose less than 10 Gy in group C. In groups A and B, the rates of grades III and IV ARS were obviously lower than those in group C. The average curative time of the rhEGF treatment groups (group A or B) was less than 7 days whereas, that of the control group (group C) was more than 10 days. The total effective rate of the rhEGF treatment groups was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Prophylactic application of rhEGF can postpone the development of ARS. rhEGF can reduce the incidence of grades III and IV of ARS and shorten the curative time of ARS by either prophylactic or therapeutic application. Therefore, it should be highly recommended and popularized. (authors)

  6. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  7. The effects of acute radiation exposure on the serum components

    The blood samples were collected from the experimental animals 24 hrs after irradiation of gamma doses upto 80 Gy. Native PAGE showed a decreasing trend in gamma globulin fraction of serum from the irradiated group compared to control, while SDS PAGE indicated an enhanced tendency in protein of molecular weight 30,000 to 40,000. Serum albumin slightly decreased with radiation doses as a result of decrease in total protein amount. Radiation exposure had little or no effects on such lipid related components as phospholipid, triglyceride, and cholesterol, respectively. Among others, glutamic pyryvic transaminase (GPT) showed a drastic decrease in its amount 24 hrs after radiation exposure, which can be applied to the health care program for radiation workers. (Author)

  8. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  9. Side effect of cranial radiation in childhood acute leukemia, 1

    We examined the somnolence syndrome, which is one of the side effects of cranial irradiation. Out of 53 patients in acute leukemia who had received cranial irradiation, nine patients (17%) developed the somnolence syndrome. Patients with the somnolence syndrome showed slow waves on EEG. Some patients had ventricular dilatation and widening of sulci before cranial irradiation on CT findings, but these findings improved after cranial irradiation. Out of nine cases with the somnolence syndrome, 6 patients survived and did not experience difficulties in school. But one patient showed calcification on CT brain scan. It is considered that the cause of the somnolence syndrome is a trasient inhibition of myelin synthesis and most patients improved without serious sequelae. It is necessary to follow up many cases of somnolence syndrome. (author)

  10. Modelling the effects of ionizing radiation on survival of animal population: acute versus chronic exposure.

    Kryshev, A I; Sazykina, T G

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present paper was application of a model, which was originally developed to simulate chronic ionizing radiation effects in a generic isolated population, to the case of acute exposure, and comparison of the dynamic features of radiation effects on the population survival in cases of acute and chronic exposure. Two modes of exposure were considered: acute exposure (2-35 Gy) and chronic lifetime exposure with the same integrated dose. Calculations were made for a generic mice population; however, the model can be applied for other animals with proper selection of parameter values. In case of acute exposure, in the range 2-11 Gy, the population response was in two phases. During a first phase, there was a depletion in population survival; the second phase was a recovery period due to reparation of damage and biosynthesis of new biomass. Model predictions indicate that a generic mice population, living in ideal conditions, has the potential for recovery (within a mouse lifetime period) from acute exposure with dose up to 10-11 Gy, i.e., the population may recover from doses above an LD50 (6.2 Gy). Following acute doses above 14 Gy, however, the mice population went to extinction without recovery. In contrast, under chronic lifetime exposures (500 days), radiation had little effect on population survival up to integrated doses of 14-15 Gy, so the survival of a population subjected to chronic exposure was much better compared with that after an acute exposure with the same dose. Due to the effect of "wasted radiation", the integrated dose of chronic exposure could be about two times higher than acute dose, producing the same effect on survival. It is concluded that the developed generic population model including the repair of radiation damage can be applied both to acute and chronic modes of exposure; results of calculations for generic mice population are in qualitative agreement with published data on radiation effects in mice. PMID

  11. Acute radiation disease

    Features of clinical trends in acute period of radiation disease at personnel who suffered from Chernobyl accident are considered. The main attention is paid to the results of 10 year observation of organs, systems and metabolic processes in patients. Used therapeutic, rehabilitation and preventive actions in stationary, ambulatory and sanatorium - health resort stages are described

  12. Protective effects of parmelia tinctorum preparations on acute radiation-injured mice

    Objective: To investigate the radiation protection effect of Parmelia tinctorum preparations in dosage, drug administration time, administration methods and different preparation methods on acute radiation-injured mice, and find out the best therapeutic project. Methods: Kunming mice were injected (ip) with 10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg, 80 mg/kg of Parmelia tinctorum preparations before irradiation respectively, then irradiated by 9 Gy 60Co γ-ray. The 30-day survival rates and the protection factors were observed. By the same method, another group of mice were injected (ip) with Parmelia tinctorum preparations at 15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h before irradiation respectively, the 30-day survival rates and the protection factors were observed. The protective effect of Parmelia tinctorum preparations from intramuscular and oral routes were compared with the same method. The protective effect of Parmelia tinctorum water extract preparations and alcohol extract preparations were compared. Results: A certain dosage (20-80 mg/kg) of Parmelia tinctorum preparations could greatly improve the 30-day survival rates and the protection factors of radiation-injured mice. Parmelia tinctorum preparations had significant therapeutic effect on 60Co γ-ray radiation-injured mice at 15 min-1 h before irradiation. Administration of Parmelia tinctorum preparations by intramuscular injection showed a little lower efficacy than by intraperitoneal injection, but administration the same dose orally had no significant radiation protective effect. Parmelia tinctorum preparations extracted by water injected (ip) before irradiation had the same radiation protective effect with those extracted by 50% alcohol. Conclusion: Parmelia tinctorum preparations have a certain protective effect on acute radiation-injured mice. The best therapeutic project is injected (ip) with 40 mg/kg of Parmelia tinctorum preparations at 30 min before irradiation. (authors)

  13. Effect Of Oligomeric Enteral Nutrition On Symptoms Of Acute Radiation Enteritis

    Radiotherapy of abdominal and pelvic tumours is frequently associated with acute radiation enteritis. Predominant symptoms include diarrhea, watery stools, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. There are very few effective interventions available for this condition. Enteral oligomeric nutrition has been used in bowel diseases with functional failure similar to radiation enteritis. The aim of presented work was to observe occurrence of symptoms of radiation enteritis in patients undergoing abdominal or pelvic radiotherapy. Apart from diet and pharmacological therapy, oral oligomeric enteral nutrition (Peptisorb Powder Nutricia) at the dose of 1000 - 2000 ml per day was administered for minimum of 4 days. Planned period of administration was 14 days and longer. Symptoms of radiation enteritis were evaluated at the beginning and in the end of administration. Prevalence of all evaluated symptoms of radiation enteritis was decreased and difference was statistically significant for diarrhea, watery stools, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The use of evaluated oligomeric nutritional support might, in conjunction with pharmacotherapy and diet, alleviate symptoms of acute radiation enteritis and maintain nutritional status of patients. (author)

  14. Chemical toxicity of uranium hexafluoride compared to acute effects of radiation

    The chemical effects from acute exposures to uranium hexafluoride are compared to the nonstochastic effects from acute radiation doses of 25 rems to the whole body and 300 rems to the thyroid. The analysis concludes that an intake of about 10 mg of uranium in soluble form is roughly comparable, in terms of early effects, to an acute whole body dose of 25 rems because both are just below the threshold for significant nonstochastic effects. Similarly, an exposure to hydrogen fluoride at a concentration of 25 mg/m3 for 30 minutes is roughly comparable because there would be no significant nonstochastic effects. For times t other than 30 minutes, the concentration C of hydrogen fluoride considered to have the same effect can be calculated using a quadratic equation: C = 25 mg/m3 (30 min/t). The purpose of these analyses is to provide information for developing design and siting guideline based on chemical toxicity for enrichment plants using uranium hexafluoride. These guidelines are to be similar, in terms of stochastic health effects, to criteria in NRC regulations of nuclear power plants, which are based on radiation doses. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  15. Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) and its harmful effects on human health

    After radiation exposure a series of many clinical syndromes appear that is called as Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS). ARS also known as radiation toxicology or radiation sickness. Both low and higher doses radiation exposure on human body cause different types of radiation syndromes. These radiations may be ionizing radiations. X-rays and gamma rays etc. some times neutrons or radionuclides may also be deposited in human body and their effective doses cause major injuries or abnormalities even sometimes death also. ARS consist of a sequence of phased symptoms. These symptoms appear after the radiation exposure for several days to several months or sometimes for a long period or years. ARS depends on the quantity of absorbed radiation dose (rad0). ARS is characterized by an initial prodromal stage of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Critical effects of ARS are Hematologic, that results infections to low white blood cells (WBC), bleeding due to low platelets and anemia due to low red blood cells (RBC), Gastrointestinal results nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite and abdominal pain (exposure doses of 600-1000 rad) and Neurovascular depending on the exposure dose. Neurovascular syndrome typically occurs at exposure doses greater than 1000 rad. It presents with neurological symptoms such as dizziness, headache, or decreased level of consciousness with an absence of vomiting. The clinical course of radiation sickness following a single intensive exposure to whole body radiation is characterized by three successive phases; a prodromal phase, which develops within minutes or hours after exposure, an ensuring latent period, which is relatively asymptomatic; and the main phase of the illness. Complete Blood Count (CBC) are helpful for the diagnosis for ARS. ARS may cause skin damage or loss of epidermis. Person suffering from nausea, vomiting, diarrhea should be admitted to well equipped hospitals or clinics. High exposured persons should be analysed CBC. Their

  16. Clinical study on the effect of Yangyinjiandu decoction on acute radiation esophagitis

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Yangyinjiandu decoction for acute radiation esophagitis. Methods: Lung cancer and mediastinal tumor treated by radiotherapy(portals including oesophagus to a radical tumoricidal dose≥40 Gy, with≥10 cm oesophagus include in radiotherapy). Patients were randomly divided according to the time of acceptance into the treatment group and the control group. All parameters of the two groups were basically similar and comparable. The treatment group was given Yangyinjiandu decoction (one dose daily, water decoction, 200 ml, twice a day) taken in the morning and in the evening before the end of radiotherapy. The control group was given oral vitamin C tablet 100 mg once a day before the end of radiotherapy. Five days after radio-therapy, the control group took oral prednisone 5 mg three times a day and amoxicillin 5g three times a day. All the above medicines were continued for 7 days. Results: The commencement of complication was 14.86 ± 0.34 days in the treatment group and 13.55 ± 0.26 days in the control group (P<0.01). The degree of complication was significant]y less mild in the treated group than the control group. Complication of acute group II and III radiation esophagitis rates were 5 and 0 in the treatment group and 16 and 6 in the control group (P<0.05). The overall effective rate were 95.2% and marked effective rate 12.0% of the treated group but were statistically higher than those of the control group. Conclusions: Yangyinjiandu decoction is effective and better reliable in treating acute radiation esophagitis. (authors)

  17. Cytogenetic effects of acute gamma radiation on leaf and apical meristem of scotch pine

    Tikhomirov, F.A.; Fedotov, I.S.; Prister, B.S.; Remezova, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of acute ..gamma..-radiation on incidence of chromosomal aberrations in apical and leaf meristem of the pine in the first and second postradiation vegetation periods. It was found that the radiosensitivity of these tissues is the same. In the second postradiation vegetation period, after exposure to a dosage of 1500-2500 rad, there is normalization of the parameters studied. Restitution of tissues can occur both as a result of recovery of involved meristem cells and by means of differentiation of subapical meristem cells.

  18. Protective effect of vitamin A on acute radiation injury in the small intestine

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of vitamin A on the development of early radiation-induced reactions in the rat small intestine. The early effects of intraoperative gamma-radiation on the small bowel utilizing the terminal ileum of Sprague-Dawley rats and the protective effect of supplemental vitamin A on acute radiation injury were investigated. Three groups were included in the study: group I (10 rats) was the surgical control group; group II (13 rats) underwent only intraoperative irradiation; and group III (10 rats) was the vitamin A plus irradiation group. Exteriorized terminal ileal segments of groups II and III were exposed to a single fraction of 20 Gy of intraoperative gamma-irradiation. On the seventh postoperative day, terminal ileal segments of all rats were resected and histopathologically evaluated for ulceration, enteritis cystica profunda, atypical epithelial regeneration, fibrosis, vascular sclerosis, and inflammatory process. Although none of the above findings were present in the surgical control group, group III rats experienced less severe effects than group II rats. The results suggest the early side effects of radiation may be prevented by vitamin A supplementation. (author)

  19. Evidence Report: Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Simonsen, Lisa; Huff, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Possible acute and late risks to the central nervous system (CNS) from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are concerns for human exploration of space. Acute CNS risks may include: altered cognitive function, reduced motor function, and behavioral changes, all of which may affect performance and human health. Late CNS risks may include neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia and premature aging. Although detrimental CNS changes are observed in humans treated with high-dose radiation (e.g., gamma rays and 9 protons) for cancer and are supported by experimental evidence showing neurocognitive and behavioral effects in animal models, the significance of these results on the morbidity to astronauts has not been elucidated. There is a lack of human epidemiology data on which to base CNS risk estimates; therefore, risk projection based on scaling to human data, as done for cancer risk, is not possible for CNS risks. Research specific to the spaceflight environment using animal and cell models must be compiled to quantify the magnitude of CNS changes in order to estimate this risk and to establish validity of the current permissible exposure limits (PELs). In addition, the impact of radiation exposure in combination with individual sensitivity or other space flight factors, as well as assessment of the need for biological/pharmaceutical countermeasures, will be considered after further definition of CNS risk occurs.

  20. Assessment of acute and late effects to high-LET radiation

    We have begun to reassess late tissue effects available from the Charged Particle Cancer Radiotherapy program at Berkeley. Our quantitative approach is limited in the analysis of these Phase I/II studies by not having equivalent patient numbers for each of the particle beams studied, by not having completely comparable follow-up times, by variations in the sizes of the fields compared, by variations in the skin scoring photographic documentation available from the patient charts, and by variations in the fractionation sizes, numbers and schedules. Despite these limitations, preliminary evidence demonstrates acute skin reactions with a shift to increasing lower dose per fraction per field for the maximum skin reactions of helium, carbon and neon ions compared to electrons. Comparisons with skin reactions from low-energy neutrons indicate that Bragg peak carbon ions (initial energy 308 MeV/nucleon) are slightly less effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak neon ions (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) corrected for differences in reference radiation are slightly more effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak silicon (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) result in an enhanced acute skin reaction, and a premature appearance of late effects that may indicate a significantly different mechanism of damage and/or repair

  1. Therapeutic effect of TPO and G-CSF on acute radiation sickness of monkeys

    Objective: The author describes the therapeutic effects of recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on acute radiation sickness in monkeys. Methods: rhTPO(10μg·kg-1·d-1, sc, on days 1-21 after TBI) or/and rhG-CSF (5μg·kg-1·d-1, sc, on days 1-21 after TBI) were administered to rhesus monkeys with 5.0 Gy X-irradiation. Results: rhTPO promoted platelet and reticulocyte recovery, resulting in less profound nadirs and a rapid recovery to normal levels. Platelet transfusion were not required in contrast to controls, while hemoglobin levels stabilized rapidly. TPO treatment did not influence neutrophil counts, rhG-CSF stimulated neutrophil regeneration and had no effect on platelet levels. Simultaneous administration of rhTPO and rhG-GSF were as effective as rhTPO alone in preventing thrombopenia, although the platelet level did not rise to the supranormal level seen with TPO alone. The neutrophils were greatly augmented in number, compared to G-CSF treatment alone, resulting in a less profound nadir and much earlier recovery, which was similarly observed for monocytes, CD11b+, CD16+ and CD56+ cell reconstitution. Conclusion: These data show that rhTPO and rhG-GSF are potent stimulators of hematopoiesis in monkeys with radiation sickness

  2. Studies of the ionizing radiation effects on the effluents acute toxicity due to anionic surfactants

    Several studies have shown the negative effects of surfactants, as detergents active substance, when discharged on biological sewage wastewater treatment plants. High toxicity may represent a lower efficiency for biological treatment. When surfactants are in aquatic environment they may induce a loss of grease revetment on birds (feather). Depending on the surfactant concentration, several damages to all biotic systems can happen. Looking for an alternative technology for wastewater treatment, efficient for surfactant removal, the present work applied ionizing radiation as an advanced oxidation process for affluents and effluents from Suzano Treatment Station. Such wastewater samples were submitted to radiation using an electron beam from a Dynamic Electron Beam Accelerator from Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. In order to assess this proposed treatment efficacy, it was performed acute toxicity evaluation with two test-organisms, the crustacean Daphnia similis and the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The studied effluents were: one from a chemical industry (IND), three from sewage plant (affluents - GG, GM and Guaio) and the last biologically treated secondary effluent (EfF), discharged at Tiete river. The applied radiation doses varied from 3 kGy to 50 kGy, being 50 kGy enough for surfactant degradation contained at industrial effluent. For GG, GM and Guaio samples, doses of 6 kGy and 10 kGy were efficient for surfactant and toxicity reduction, representing an average removal that varied from 71.80% to 82.76% and toxicity from 30% to 91% for most the effluents. The final effluent was less toxic than the others and the radiation induced an average 11% removal for anionic surfactant. The industrial effluents were also submitted to an aeration process in order to quantify the contribution of surfactant to the whole sample toxicity, once it was partially removed as foam and several fractions were evaluated for toxicity. (author)

  3. Exposed persons at the Chernobyl Atomic Power Station accident: acute radiation effects

    Observation made over 115 patients with acute radiation sickness due to exposure external γ- and β-rays confirmed high efficiency of the earlier proposed principles of prognostication of the degree of severity by clinical manifestations of the primary disease response and those of separate syndromes, using the methods of hematological and cytogenetic analyses. Out of 115 victims, 56 persons had radiation burns (RB), 17 intestinal syndrome (IS), 80 - oropharengeal syndrome (ORS), 7 - interstitial radiation pneumonitis (IRP). In thanatogenesis, of prime importance were: RB (more than 40% of the body surface) - 19 persons and IRP - 7 persons. A severe course of intestinal and oropharengeal syndromes was combined with other fatal manifestations of radiation injury. Early isolation of patients (2-4 stages), selective decontamination of the intestine, prescription of a wide spectrum antibiotics, antimycotic and antiviral drugs, as well as γ-globulin could practically remove the risk of the development of fatal infectious complications during a medullary andtransitory forms of radiation sickness

  4. Radiobiology of the acute radiation syndrome

    Acute radiation syndrome or acute radiation sickness is classically subdivided into three sub syndromes: the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal and neurovascular syndrome but many other tissues can be damaged. The time course and severity of clinical signs and symptoms are a function of the overall body volume irradiated, the inhomogeneity of dose exposure, the particle type, the absorbed dose and the dose rate. Classical pathophysiology explain the failure of each of these organs and the timing of appearance of their signs and symptoms due to radiation-induced cytocidal effects of a great number of parenchymal cells of hierarchically organized tissues. Contemporaneously, many other radiation-induced effects has been described and all of them may lead to tissue injury with their corresponding signs and symptoms that can be expressed after short or long period of time. Radiation-induced multi-organ involvement is thought to be due to radiation-induced systemic inflammatory response mediated by released pro-inflammatory cytokines. (authors)

  5. Acute radiation syndrome in human

    The combination of the different types of irradiation dramatically changes the clinical course of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in the case of short term exposure. The recent experience has been compared mostly with the data on the atomic bomb victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The comparison of the injuries from different radiation exposures resulted in the possibility to receive summarized data and the actual basis of the observed difference. The situation with total relatively uniform irradiation is observed when human position is at long distance from powerful radiation sources or when he changes his position, as seen in atomic bomb survivors, the results of nuclear weapon tests and the patients in the Chernobyl accident. This is connected with the ARS of bone, marrow and intestine. The situation characterized by the clinical signs of the large area of skin and mucosa injuries was observed in nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident. In the case of the more localized and less severe beta injuries of skin and mucosa, the long term effects may be important. The majority of accidents in peaceful period are related to the uneven exposure from near sources, and the situation of the combination of external and internal irradiation is related to uneven irradiation and the predominance of internal exposure. (K.I.)

  6. The acute radiation syndrome

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.)

  7. 2013 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel Status Review for: The Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure, The Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events (SPEs), The Risk Of Degenerative Tissue Or Other Health Effects From Radiation Exposure, and The Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis

    2014-01-01

    The Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) was impressed with the strong research program presented by the scientists and staff associated with NASA's Space Radiation Program Element and National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). The presentations given on-site and the reports of ongoing research that were provided in advance indicated the potential Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure (CNS) and were extensively discussed by the SRP. This new data leads the SRP to recommend that a higher priority should be placed on research designed to identify and understand these risks at the mechanistic level. To support this effort the SRP feels that a shift of emphasis from Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) and carcinogenesis to CNS-related endpoints is justified at this point. However, these research efforts need to focus on mechanisms, should follow pace with advances in the field of CNS in general and should consider the specific comments and suggestions made by the SRP as outlined below. The SRP further recommends that the Space Radiation Program Element continue with its efforts to fill the vacant positions (Element Scientist, CNS Risk Discipline Lead) as soon as possible. The SRP also strongly recommends that NASA should continue the NASA Space Radiation Summer School. In addition to these broad recommendations, there are specific comments/recommendations noted for each risk, described in detail below.

  8. Evaluation and management of acute radiation dermatitis

    Acute radiation dermatitis remains one of the most commonly observed side effect during radiation therapy leading to complication such as superinfection or treatment disruption. Its management is characterized by a great heterogeneity. Few strategies have demonstrated a benefit in preventing radiation dermatitis, which relies mostly on decreasing dose delivered to the skin and skin care practices. Simple emollients and use of topical steroids can be useful in early stages. The singularity of the skin toxicity seen with cetuximab and radiotherapy warrants a specific grading system and distinctive clinical treatment with use of antibiotics. (authors)

  9. Radiation-induced acute brain injury and the protective effect of traditional Chinese medicine-salvia miltiorrhiza

    Objective: To understand the expression of acute brain injury induced by radiation and the protective effect of traditional Chinese Medicine in BALB/C mouse. Methods: The whole brain of BALB/C mouse was irradiated to a dose of 25 Gy using a 6 MV X linear accelerator. Ten hours later, the brain tissue and blood sample were taken. Thiobarbituric acid reaction was used to detect the malonaldehyde substitute for the lipid peroxide. Immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of ICAM-1 on D1, 2, 3, and 10 after having received radiation. One-Way ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences in the values of LPO in the brain tissue and plasma between the groups. The difference of expression of ICAM-1 between the groups was compared by χ2 method. Results: Two hundred and twelve female BALB/C mice were divided into five groups: Control group, Radiation alone group (R), R + dexamethasone group, R + 654-2 group and R + Salvia Miltiorrhiza group. The contents of LPO in the mouse brain tissue 10 hours after 25 Gy of whole brain irradiation were as follows (mean ± standard error): Control group (1975.5±94.2) nmol/g, Radiation alone group (R) (3417.3±109.7) nmol/g, R + dexamethasone group (3113.6±178.1) nmol/g, R + 654-2 group (3406.4±159.1) nmol/g, R + Salvia Miltiorrhiza group (2981.5±140.1) nmol/g. Salvia Miltiorrhiza significantly reduced the LPO increase induced by irradiation (P<0.05). There were no significant differences between the other groups in the change of LPO in the plasma 10 hours after whole brain irradiation. The expression of ICAM-1 after whole brain irradiation was time-dependent . There was an increase of expression of ICAM-1 24 hours after irradiation, reaching the peak at 48 hours. Salvia Miltiorrhiza and dexamethasone strongly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 when compared with radiation only, with the difference significant (P<0.01). Conclusions: The change of LPO content in the BALB/C mouse brain tissue and the increase in

  10. Biological effects of radiation

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  11. Chromosomal radiosensitivity and acute radiation side effects after radiotherapy in tumour patients - a follow-up study

    Radiotherapists are highly interested in optimizing doses especially for patients who tend to suffer from side effects of radiotherapy (RT). It seems to be helpful to identify radiosensitive individuals before RT. Thus we examined aberrations in FISH painted chromosomes in in vitro irradiated blood samples of a group of patients suffering from breast cancer. In parallel, a follow-up of side effects in these patients was registered and compared to detected chromosome aberrations. Blood samples (taken before radiotherapy) were irradiated in vitro with 3 Gy X-rays and analysed by FISH-painting to obtain aberration frequencies of first cycle metaphases for each patient. Aberration frequencies were analysed statistically to identify individuals with an elevated or reduced radiation response. Clinical data of patients have been recorded in parallel to gain knowledge on acute side effects of radiotherapy. Eight patients with a significantly elevated or reduced aberration yield were identified by use of a t-test criterion. A comparison with clinical side effects revealed that among patients with elevated aberration yields one exhibited a higher degree of acute toxicity and two patients a premature onset of skin reaction already after a cumulative dose of only 10 Gy. A significant relationship existed between translocations in vitro and the time dependent occurrence of side effects of the skin during the therapy period. The results suggest that translocations can be used as a test to identify individuals with a potentially elevated radiosensitivity

  12. Effects of acute gamma radiation on the reproductive ability of the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Earthworms are the most suitable biological indicators of radioactive pollution because they are the parts of nutritional webs, and are present in relatively high numbers. Four months old Eisenia fetida were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation, namely 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 Gy to study the effects of radiation on different reproductive parameters. The number of cocoons laid and the hatchlings emerged were recorded for all the selected doses. There was no reduction in cocoon production, however; decreasing size and weight of the cocoons was observed from the samples exposed to 20 Gy and above doses. Significant reductions in the hatchlings were recorded in earthworms exposed to 10 Gy and above doses. The dose response curves for a percentage reduction in hatchlings were constructed. Exposure to radiation dose of 1 and 2 Gy did not show any reduction, however, there was ≈10%, ≈50% and ≈90% decrease in the hatchlings in samples exposed to 3, 15 and 45, 50, 55 and 60 Gy doses respectively. Delayed hatchability was also reported at al exposure level. Histology of irradiated earthworms revealed that the structural damage in the seminal vesicles was prominent at the exposed dose of 3 Gy onwards with complete degeneration on exposure to 60 Gy of gamma radiation. - Highlights: • Eisenia fetida exposed to several doses of gamma-radiation to study the impact on reproduction. • There was no reduction in the cocoon production however. • There was reduction in size, weight and change in shape of the cocoons observed. • Reduction in number of hatchlings and degradation of seminal vesicles was pragmatic

  13. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    Katsura, Kouji; Masuko, Noriko; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Tsuchida, Emiko; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Acute and Chronic Cutaneous Reactions to Ionizing Radiation Therapy

    Bray, Fleta N.; Simmons, Brian J.; Aaron H. Wolfson; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an important treatment modality for a variety of malignant conditions. However, development of radiation-induced skin changes is a significant adverse effect of radiation therapy (RT). Cutaneous repercussions of RT vary considerably in severity, course, and prognosis. When they do occur, cutaneous changes to RT are commonly graded as acute, consequential-late, or chronic. Acute reactions can have severe sequelae that impact quality of life as well as cancer treatment. Th...

  16. Acute adverse effects of radiation therapy on HIV-positive patients in Japan. Study of 31 cases at Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital

    Recently, the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients has increased in Japan. HIV-positive patients are at a higher risk of cancer than the general population. This paper retrospectively reports the acute adverse effects of radiation therapy on HIV-positive patients who were treated at Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious diseases Center Komagome Hospital (TMCICK). Thirty-one cases involving 24 HIV-positive cancer patients who were treated at TMCICK from January 1997 to March 2009 were included in this study. All acute adverse effects of radiation therapy were examined during, and one month after, the last radiation therapy session. Acute adverse effects were classified according to the site of radiation therapy treatment and analyzed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0. Grade 3 acute adverse effects were seen in 17% of cases, and Grade 2 toxicities were found in 23% of patients. Damage to the skin and mucosa, including stomatitis or diarrhea, tended to occur after low-dose radiation therapy; however, no severe acute adverse effects were seen in other organs, such as the brain, lung, and bone. Acute adverse effects tended to occur earlier in HIV-positive patients and became severe more frequently than in the general population. In particular, disorders of the mucosa, such as those of the oral cavity, pharynx, and intestine, tended to occur rapidly. It was shown that radiation therapy is safe when treatment is performed carefully and that it is a very useful treatment for cancer in HIV-positive patients. (author)

  17. Involvement of Toll-like receptors in acute radiation syndrome and radiation therapy for cancer

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are one of pattern recognition receptors that are indispensable for antibacterial and antiviral immunity. After TLRs sense pathogen-derived components, they activate intracellular signaling pathways, which results in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Although it is well known that radiation therapy is one of effective cancer therapies, radiation affects immune system. Recent evidences show the involvement of TLR in acute radiation syndrome and radiation therapy for cancer. I summarize to date knowledge on the involvement of Toll-like receptors in acute radiation syndromes and radiation therapy for cancer, and discuss the effects of ionizing radiation on TLR of innate immune cells. (author)

  18. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs.

    Li, Chang Jiang; Wang, Sheng Zi; Wang, Shu Yi; Zhang, Yan Ping

    2014-09-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotton pieces that had been soaked with 0.5 ml amifostine solution or saline were applied gently on the buccal mucosa of each guinea pig for 30 min. The animals in Groups A, B and C were irradiated individually with a single dose of 30 Gy to the bilateral buccal mucosa. Eight days after irradiation, the animals were scored macroscopically; they were then euthanized, and the buccal mucosal tissues were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and ICAM-1 immunohistochemical analysis. In Groups A and B, the mean macroscopic scores were 2.9 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 1.1, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, when they were separately compared with Group C (4.4 ± 0.7), a noticeable difference was obtained (P amifostine-treated groups were better than in Group C. The results demonstrated that topical administration of amifostine to the oral mucosa is effective treatment of acute radiation-induced mucositis. PMID:24706999

  19. Electronical recording and evaluation of acute radiation morbidity

    Background: Relatively uniform documentation systems are used for recording of acute side effects in oncology. Object of this work is to illustrate the applicability of electronic data bases for registration and evaluation of acute side effects in radiation therapy. Methods: Based on topographic documentation sheets, an electronic data base was developed for each major topographic site. Besides general patient related parameters (TNM, previous chemotherapy, surgical interventions, intercurrent diseases and more), the kind and the degree of acute radiation related side effects are documented for each week of radiation and for day 90 (RTOG) as the joint day between acute and subacute tissue reactions. Results: The temporal expenditure for the recording of the general patient related parameters of a patient is less than a minute. The weekly documentation can be performed during the daily routine work and needs approximately 5 minutes per week. The structure of the data base enables later analyses of acute radiation related morbidity. Conclusions: Electronic data bases enable a fast and systematic recording and evaluation of acute radiation related side effects. The development of particular registration entities for recording of acute side effects may be a possible application and demonstrates the needs of professional developments. (orig.)

  20. Effect of acute nutritional deprivation on immune function in mice. II. Response to sublethal radiation

    Previous studies from this laboratory indicated that mice starved for 48 or 72 hr were resistant to the intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. In the present experiments, we investigated the possibility that rapidly proliferating monocytes were responsible for the early protective effect observed in these mice. Confirming previous studies, the numbers of L. monocytogenes in livers and spleens of starved mice were 2-3 logs lower than those of fed mice 72 hr after inoculation of bacteria. The early protective effect of starvation could be eliminated completely by nonlethal doses of radiation (200-900 rads). Organ bacterial counts in starved-irradiated mice were similar to those of fed mice. Correlative histopathologic studies were carried out on all three groups of mice. Seventy-two hours after challenge with L. monocytogenes, the livers of fed mice had multiple microabscesses with cental necrosis and a poor mononuclear response. In contrast, livers of starved mice had fewer infectious foci, less necrosis, and a more prominent monocyte/macrophage inflammatory response. Similar to fed mice, the livers of starved-irradiated mice had marked necrosis and few monocytes/macrophages. In addition, the number of peripheral blood monocytes in starved mice was increased 72 hr after inoculation compared to fed and starved-irradiated mice. The data from these experiments suggest that a proliferating population of monocytes is responsible for resistance of starved mice against L. monocytogenes

  1. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    Sarapultseva, Elena I; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2016-10-01

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F0 and F1Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F0Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F2 total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F2 progeny of irradiated F0Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays. PMID:27288911

  2. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  3. Biological radiation effects

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed

  4. Radiation proctitis. Clinical and pathological manifestations, therapy and prophylaxis of acute and late injurious effects of radiation on the rectal mucosa

    Zimmermann, F.B.; Feldmann, H.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: Often the rectum is the dose-limiting organ in curative radiation therapy of pelvic malignancies. It reacts with serous, mucoid, or more rarely bloody diarrhea. Methods: A research for reports on prophylactic and supportive therapies of radiation-induced proctitis was performed (Medline, Cancerlit, and others). Results: No proven effective prophylactic local or systemic therapies of radiation proctitis exist. Also, no reasonable causal medication is known. In the treatment of late radiation sequelae no clincally tested certain effective therapy exists, too. Antiinflammatory, steroidal or non-steroidal therapeutics as well as sucralfate can be used as topical measures. They will be successful in some patients. Side effects are rare and the therapy is cost-effective. Treatment failures can be treated by hyperbaric oxygen. This will achieve good clinical results in about 50% of the cases. Single or few mucosal telangiectasias with rectal bleeding can be treated sufficienctly by endoscopic cautherization. Conclusion: Besides clinical studies acute proctitis should be treated just symptomatically. Radical surgery should be performed only when all conventional treatments have been uneffective, although no certain effective therapies of radiation-induced late proctitis exist. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Oft ist der Enddarm das dosislimitierende Organ bei der kurativen Radiotherapie boesartiger Tumoren des Beckens. Er reagiert mit seroesen, mukoesen oder sehr selten blutig tingierten Durchfaellen. Methode: Es wurde eine Literaturrecherche nach prophylaktischen und supportiven Therapien der radiogenen Proktitis durchgefuehrt (Medline, Cancerlit und andere). Ergebnisse: Es existieren keine gesicherten effektiven prophylaktischen Therapie der radiogen Proktitis, weder lokal noch systemisch. Es sind auch keine sinnvollen kausalen Behandlungen bekannt. Auch in der Behandlung spaeter Strahlenfolgen existieren keine klinisch getesteten, sicher wirksamen

  5. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotton pieces that had been soaked with 0.5 ml amifostine solution or saline were applied gently on the buccal mucosa of each guinea pig for 30 min. The animals in Groups A, B and C were irradiated individually with a single dose of 30 Gy to the bilateral buccal mucosa. Eight days after irradiation, the animals were scored macroscopically; they were then euthanized, and the buccal mucosal tissues were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and ICAM-1 immunohistochemical analysis. In Groups A and B, the mean macroscopic scores were 2.9 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 1.1, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, when they were separately compared with Group C (4.4 ± 0.7), a noticeable difference was obtained (P < 0.05). No mucositis was observed in Group D. Comparisons of the expression of ICAM-1 were in agreement with the macroscopic data. Histologically, superficial erosion, exudate and ulcer formation were all observed in the RT groups; only the severity and extent were different. The microscopic observations in the amifostine-treated groups were better than in Group C. The results demonstrated that topical administration of amifostine to the oral mucosa is effective treatment of acute radiation-induced mucositis. (author)

  6. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Dörr Harald; Meineke Viktor

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the ab...

  7. Study on the therapeutic effect of cytokine on acute radiation syndrome induced by 60Co γ ray exposure

    Objective: To examine the therapeutic effect of combined administration of rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on acute radiation syndrome induced by 60Coγ ray exposure in beagles. Methods: Sixteen beagles were randomly divided into the control (n=5), symptomatic treatment group (n=5) and cytokine treatment group (n=6). All the beagles in the three groups were exposed to the whole-body irradiation of 60Co γ ray at a dose of 4.5 Gy. The animals in the second group accepted active symptomatic treatment. The animals in the cytokine treatment group were sub-cutaneously administered rhIL -11 and rhG -CSF besides active symptomatic treatment. Hemogram of peripheral blood, pristine apoptosis and necrosis ratio of nucleated cells, the content of IL-2 and IFN-γ in plasma and formation of bone marrow were used to evaluate the therapeutic effect. Results: In the cytokine treatment group, the animal' survival rate 45 days after exposure was increased and hemogram of peripheral blood was improved significantly. The rate of pristine apoptosis and necrosis of nucleated cell declined obviously. Early, the content of both IL-2 and IFN-γ in plasma was up significantly, then the content of IL-2 rapidly descended, but that of IFN-γ was relatively stable. Conclusion: The combined administration of rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF significantly improved the recovery of hematopoietic and immunological function. (authors)

  8. Acute radiation effects on cutaneous microvasculature: evaluation with a laser Doppler perfusion monitor

    Laser Doppler perfusion monitoring is a noninvasive technique for measuring blood flow in epidermal microvasculature that makes use of the frequency shift of light reflected from red blood cells. Measurements in patients undergoing radiation therapy show increases in blood flow of ten to 25 times baseline at doses above 50 Gy, and increases are observed with doses as low as 2 Gy. Follow-up measurements show rapid decreases in flow levels after completion of therapy, but levels remain elevated even at 1 year

  9. Acute radiation effects on cutaneous microvasculature: evaluation with a laser Doppler perfusion monitor

    Amols, H.I.; Goffman, T.E.; Komaki, R.; Cox, J.D.

    1988-11-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion monitoring is a noninvasive technique for measuring blood flow in epidermal microvasculature that makes use of the frequency shift of light reflected from red blood cells. Measurements in patients undergoing radiation therapy show increases in blood flow of ten to 25 times baseline at doses above 50 Gy, and increases are observed with doses as low as 2 Gy. Follow-up measurements show rapid decreases in flow levels after completion of therapy, but levels remain elevated even at 1 year.

  10. Effect of Pseudomonas contamination or antibiotic decontamination of the GI tract on acute radiation lethality after neutron or gamma irradiation

    The influence of antibiotic decontamination of Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract prior to whole-body neutron or gamma irradiation was studied. It was observed that for fission neutron doses greater than 5.5 Gy, cyclotron-produced neutron doses greater than 6.7 Gy, and 137Cs gamma-ray doses greater than 14.4 Gy, the median survival time of untreated rats was relatively constant at 4.2 to 4.5 days, indicating death was due to intestinal injury. Within the dose range of 3.5 to 5.5 Gy of fission neutrons, 4.9 to 6.7 Gy of cyclotron-produced neutrons, and 9.6 to 14.4 Gy of gamma rays, median survival time of these animals was inversely related to dose and varied from 12 to 4.6 days. This change in survival time with dose reflects a transition in the mechanisms of acute radiation death from pure hematopoietic, to a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic, to pure intestinal death. Decontamination of the GI tract with antibiotics prior to irradiation increased median survival time 1 to 5 days in this transitional dose range. Contamination of the intestinal flora with Pseudomonas aeruginosa prior to irradiation reduced median survival time 1 to 5 days in the same radiation dose range. Pseudomonas-contaminated animals irradiated within this transitional dose range had maximum concentrations of total bacteria and Pseudomonas in their livers at the time of death. However, liver bacteria concentration was usually higher in gamma-irradiated animals, due to a smaller contribution of hematopoietic injury in neutron-irradiated animals. The effects of both decontamination of the GI tract and Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract were negligible in the range of doses in which median survival time was dose independent, i.e., in the pure intestinal death dose range

  11. The effects of acute joint exposure to radiation and certain pesticides on the peripheric blood in rats

    The effect of joint external γ-radiation and some pesticides on the peripheric blood is studied. Lindane, trichlorfon and tetramethylthiuram disulfide are used as toxic chemicals. It is shown that the combined effect has caused, like radiation, stable leukopenia, but less expressed than the effect of gamma radiation. It is especially obvious in the case of combining ionizing radiation and TMTD when the number of leukocytes averaged by 25% more than in the case of injury by radiation alone. Lymphocytes are most sensitive blood cell elements earily responsing to radiation and chemical organism injuries, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The results of analyzing the dynamics of the most qualitative and quantitative paramaters of leukocytes permit to state the summation of mutual effects of factors of radiation and chemical nature

  12. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p <.05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. (orig.)

  13. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke

    Othman, Ahmed E. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, University Hospital Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Center for Medical-IT Convergence Technology Research, Advanced Institute of Convergence Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p <.05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. (orig.)

  14. Genetic effects of radiation

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates

  15. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Dörr Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  16. Psychophysiological adaptation of the patient with the remote effect of the III degree acute radiation syndrome

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2013-12-01

    putation of both shins at level in top / 3, late beam buttock, right hip ulcers, a beam cataract of the III degree of both eyes, stabilized. The assessment of the efficiency of psychophysiological adaptation in dynamics with 2009 indicates emergence of prevalence of hypochondriac tendencies over a demonstration with accession of high uneasiness and autistic lines at preservation of the leading role of an hypochondriac somatization of alarm with considerable decrease in an emotionality, an integration, a freedom of behavior. The changes revealed in dynamics correspond to the specific increase weight of violations of mental adaptation, characteristic for the period of adaptation exhaustion. The high intelligence, good figurative and logical thinking, well-mannered forms of behavior, high control over the emotional sphere, restraint of emotions, independence, self-sufficiency, organization, behavior taking into account environment requirements provided the patient M. firmness before a heavy illness, promoted good adaptation to an environment with confidence in myself, high social adaptability, opportunity successfully to carry out duties, hold the work account (worked 39 years after accident. Comparative assessment of operator ability of the patient M. showed good average time of common and difficult sensorimotor reactions with 2 mistakes, high time of reaction for moving object, however decrease in accuracy of reaction from 10-13% to 2% testifies to manifestation in dynamics of insufficiency of real functional reserves of nervous system. Conclusions. Efficiency of psychophysiological adaptation depends not only on a dose of radiation and weight of the transferred disease, but, mostly, on premorbid properties of the identity of the victim and his social and labor installation.

  17. Effects of Pseudomonas contamination or antibiotic decontamination of the GI tract on acute radiation lethality

    The influence of antibiotic decontamination or Psuedomonas contamination of the GI tract prior to whole-body neutron or gamma irradiation was studied. For neutron doses greater than 6.7 Gy and gamma ray doses greater than 14.4 Gy, the median survival time of SPF rats was relatively constant at 4.4 days, indicating death was due to intestinal injury. Within the dose range of 4.9 to 6.7 Gy of neutrons or 9.6 to 14.4 Gy of photons, median survival time was inversely related to dose and varied from 12 to 4.6 days. Decontamination or Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract increased or decreased, respectively, median survival time 1 to 5 days in this survival dose dependent range. The effects of these treatments, however, were negligible in the range of doses in which median survival time was dose independent. These treatments had little effect on the ultimate survival after irradiation as measured by either the LD50/5 day or LD50/30 day endpoints

  18. Acute radiation effects on saliva composition in rats with different vitamin a levels in serum

    Irradiation of the head and neck often causes loss of salivary gland function which may lead to severe oral discomfort. The effects of a single dose of 25 Gy given to rats with different serum levels of vitamin A were studied. The salivary secretion rate as well as concentrations of protein, hexosamine, amylase and electrolytes, and the activities of two antibacterial glycoproteins were measured. At an adequates of two antibacterial glycoproteins were measured. At an adequate level of vitamin A in the diet, irradiation significantly reduced whole saliva secretion rate, and decreased the concentration of salivary sodium, calcium and hexosamine as well as the activity of a glycoprotein agglutinating a serotype c strain of S. mutans. Peroxidase, amylase and potassium were not significantly affected. The reductions seen at an adequate level of vitamin A were not reduced by supplementation of excess dietary retinol. The damage caused by irradiation was enhanced by vitamin A deficiency as seen in the reduced protein and hexosamine concentrations. (orig.)

  19. Pharmacological management of acute radiation morbidity

    Zimmermann, J.S.; Kimmig, B. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie), Christian-Albrecht-Universitaet Kiel (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: The acute radiation morbidity may be a serious problem for the patient and may be decreased by pharmacological approaches. Material and methods: A database research (Medline, Cancerlit, DIMDI, etc.) was performed in order to obtain pharmacological approaches to decrease the acute radiation morbidity. The evaluation was focused on therapeutic principles but not on special drugs. Results: Different approaches may be chosen to protect healthy tissues from the effects of ionizing radiation: 1. Administration of cyto- or radioprotective agents prior to irradiation, 2. administration of agents to avoid additional secondary toxicity by inflammation or superinfection during the treatment cycle (supportive care) and 3. administration of rescue agents, such as bone marrow CSFs or hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), after therapy. For radioprotection, there are reports on cellular protection by vitamine E, vitamine C, beta carotene, ribose-cysteine, glutamine, Mgcl2/adenosine triphosphate and WR-2721 (amifostine). In general, preclinical studies show that the combination of pretreatment with amifostine, irradiation, and G-CSF after radiation enhances hematologic recovery. Assessment of these combined effects, including local supportive therapies, merits further clinical investigation. There are data from prospective studies as well as from empirical clinical experience, that radioprotection and clinical supportive care may reduce the treatment related morbidity by 10 to 30% either. Conclusions: A further improvement of the therapeutic ratio is to be expected by systemically combined application of radioprotectors, supportive care and rescue agents. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Die strahlentherapeutische Fruehmorbiditaet kann auf das Ergebnis einer Strahlenbehandlung Einfluss nehmen und kann durch medikamentoese Verfahren gelindert werden. Material und Methoden: Eine Datenbankrecherche (Medline, Cancerlit, DIMDI u.a.) wurde durchgefuehrt, um einen Ueberblick ueber

  20. Clinico-morphological characteristics of reparation of acute radiation ulcer

    The mechanism of reparative processes under the effect of various drugs was studied in experimental acute radiation ulcer of rats. It was established that at the stage of marked exudative-necrotic processes the use of antiinflammatory and antiexudative substances (bariz, dimethylsulfoxyde) led to normalization of the microcirculation that reduced the time of radiation ulcer healing. The use of anabolic steroids (retabolil) intensified metabolism that also produced a favourable effect on the reparative processes

  1. Effect of MgSO4 on NMDA receptor in brain tissue and serum NSE in rats with radiation-induced acute brain injury

    Objective: To explore the protection of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) on radiation-induced acute brain injury. Methods Thirty six mature Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: the blank control group, experimental control group and experimental therapy group. The whole brain of SD rats in the experimental control group and experimental therapy group were irradiated with a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electron beam. Magnesium sulfate was injected intraperitoneally into the rats in the experimental therapy group before and after irradiation for seven times. The blood and the brain tissue were taken on the 1st, 3rd and 14th day after irradiation. ELISA was used to measure the level of serum NSE. Western blot technique was used to detect the expression of NR1 and NR2B subunit protein in brain tissue. Results: Compared with the blank control group, the level of serum NSE in the experimental control group increased significantly (P4 used in early stage can inhibit the level of serum NSE and the expression of NR1 and NR2B after radiation-induced acute brain injury. It shows a protective effect on radiation-induced acute brain injury. (authors)

  2. Acute and Chronic Cutaneous Reactions to Ionizing Radiation Therapy.

    Bray, Fleta N; Simmons, Brian J; Wolfson, Aaron H; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is an important treatment modality for a variety of malignant conditions. However, development of radiation-induced skin changes is a significant adverse effect of radiation therapy (RT). Cutaneous repercussions of RT vary considerably in severity, course, and prognosis. When they do occur, cutaneous changes to RT are commonly graded as acute, consequential-late, or chronic. Acute reactions can have severe sequelae that impact quality of life as well as cancer treatment. Thus, dermatologists should be informed about these adverse reactions, know how to assess their severity and be able to determine course of management. The majority of measures currently available to prevent these acute reactions are proper skin hygiene and topical steroids, which limit the severity and decrease symptoms. Once acute cutaneous reactions develop, they are treated according to their severity. Treatments are similar to those used in prevention, but incorporate wound care management that maintains a moist environment to hasten recovery. Chronic changes are a unique subset of adverse reactions to RT that may develop months to years following treatment. Chronic radiation dermatitis is often permanent, progressive, and potentially irreversible with substantial impact on quality of life. Here, we also review the etiology, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, prevention, and management of late-stage cutaneous reactions to radiotherapy, including chronic radiation dermatitis and radiation-induced fibrosis. PMID:27250839

  3. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs

    Li, Chang Jiang; Wang, Sheng Zi; Wang, Shu Yi; Zhang, Yan Ping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotto...

  4. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key words: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (Cv ARS), Radiation Neurotoxins (RNT), Neurotransmitters, Radiation Countermeasures, Antiradiation Vaccine (ArV), Antiradiation Blocking Antibodies, Antiradiation Antidote. Psychoneuroimmunology, Neurotoxicity. ABSTRACT: To review the role of Radiation Neurotoxins in triggering, developing of radiation induced central nervous system injury. Radiation Neurotoxins - rapidly acting blood toxic lethal agent, which activated after irradiation and concentrated, circulated in interstitial fluid, lymph, blood with interactions with cell membranes, receptors and cell compartments. Radiation Neurotoxins - biological molecules with high enzymatic activity and/or specific lipids and activated or modified after irradiation. The Radiation Neurotoxins induce increased permeability of blood vessels, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and developing severe disorder of blood macro- and micro-circulation. Principles of Radiation Psychoneuro-immunology and Psychoneuro-allergology were applied for determination of pathological processes developed after irradiation or selective administration of Radiation Neurotoxins to radiation naïve mammals. Effects of radiation and exposure to radiation can develop severe irreversible abnormalities of Central Nervous System, brain structures and functions. Antiradiation Vaccine - most effective, advanced methods of protection, prevention, mitigation and treatment and was used for of Acute Radiation Syndromes and elaboration of new technology for immune-prophylaxis and immune-protection against ϒ, Heavy Ion, Neutron irradiation. Results of experiments suggested that blocking, antitoxic, antiradiation antibodies can significantly reduce toxicity of Radiation Toxins. New advanced technology include active immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation therapy that included specific blocking antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins

  5. Diagnosis of moderate acute radiation sickness

    Forty patients with malignant lymphoma were given 60Co TLI. 21 cases received 6 Gy and 19 received 8 Gy. It was estimated that a single TLI of 6 and 8 Gy would correspond to TBI of 3.55 Gy and 4.25 Gy (average values) by analysing peripheral blood cell chromosome aberrations and 1.85-2.37 Gy by measuring red bone marrow stem cells clinically. Moderate acute radiation sickness with digestive tract reaction and hemopoietic and immunologic depression was observed. WBC and platelets decreased rapidly. Lymphocytes showed quantitative and qualitative changes even at early stage. All these indexes are significant for diagnosis. Besides, the degree of labial stimulation response, levels of C-reactive protein, corticoid, and urinal nucleoside and alkaloid base presented great changes both pre-and post-irradiation. Early diagnosis of moderate acute radiation sickness could be made in cancer patients subjected to 6-8 Gy TLI

  6. Inhibitory effect of indomethacin combined with radiation on proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells

    Objective: To investigate the inhibitory effect of indomethacin combined with radiation on proliferation of HL-60 cells and to provide basis for study on antitumor therapy. Methods: The HL-60 cells were exposed to indomethacin at 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 μmol·L-1 together with 3 Gy X-rays radiation and cultivated for 24 h. MTT and Trypan blue exclusion experiments were used to detect the inhibitory rate of cell proliferation and viability respectively. Real-time PCR was used to detect the changes of cell proliferation and apoptosis-related gene PCNA and Caspase-3 mRNA expressions. Results: Compared with control group, the inhibitory rates of proliferation of HL-60 cells in different doses of indomethacin groups were increased significantly (P<0.01), especially in 80 μmol·L-1 indomethacin group. Compared with control, indomethacin (80 μmol·L'-1) and 3 Gy X-rays radiation group, the inhibitory rate of cell viability of HL-60 cells in 80 μmol·L-1 indomethacin combined with radiation group was increased significantly (P<0.01). Compared with control, indomethacin (80 μmol·L-1) and 3 Gy X-rays radiation groups, the expression of PCNA mRNA in 80 μmol·L-1 indomethacin combined with radiation group was decreased and the expression of Caspase-3 mRNA was increased significantly (P<0.01). Conclusion: Indomethacin can enhance the inhibitory effect of radiation on proliferation of HL-60 cells. (authors)

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation

    A sound evaluation of the consequences of releases of radioactivity into the environment, especially of those large amounts, and of the effectiveness of different protective measures, requires thorough concern of the various aspects of the radiological effects. The effects of ionizing radiation were reviewed according to the following characterization: Affected subject (somatic, genetic and psychological effects); Duration of irradiation (acute and chronic irradiation); Latent period (early and late effects); Dose-effect relationship (stochastic and non-stochastic effects); Population affected (e.g. children, pregnant women). In addition to the lethal effects which are generally considered extensively in all the evaluations of the consequences of radioactivity releases, such effects as early symptoms and morbidity are emphasized in this review. The dependence of the effects on dose rates, repair mechanism and medical treatment is discussed, and the uncertainties involved with their evaluation is highlighted. The differences between QF (quality factor) and RBE (relative biological effectiveness) of different radiation sources are interpreted. Synergystic effects and the effectiveness of various means of medication are discussed. It is suggested that all radiological effects, including those resulting from relatively low radiation doses, e.g. foetus deformations, fertility impairment, prodomal - leading to psychological effects, should be considered within the evaluation of the consequences of radioactivity releases and of the effectiveness of protective measures. Limits of the repair factors to be considered within the evaluation of the effects of chronic exposures are proposed

  8. Acute radiation syndrome, c.aused by single whole-body external irradiation

    The general characteristic of conceptions of the material substrate of various forms and types of radiation injuries from the moment of a wide use of radiation energy and radioactive substances up to the present time, the dependence of structural changes on the type of ionizing radiation, dose and forms of its effect, are presented. The pathological anatomy of particular manifestations of acute radiation disease in various systems of the organism is described. The attention is paid to the variant of radiation disease taking place during non-uniform general irradiation. Local and general morphological changes which develop in skin, hyperdermic fat and skeleton muscles simultaneously in the zone of massive local effect against the background of the general radiation injury, are described for the first time. Delayed alterations in blood vessels and interstitial tissue after the acute radiation disease are described as well as the pathomorphology and histochemistry of trophic disorders in the acute and delayed periods of acute radiation disease

  9. Effects of acute sublethal gamma radiation exposure on aggressive behavior in male mice: A dose-response study

    The resident-intruder paradigm was used to assess the effects of gamma radiation (0, 3, 5, 7 Gray [Gy] cobalt-60) on aggressive offensive behavior in resident male mice over a 3-month period. The defensive behavior of nonirradiated intruder mice was also monitored. A dose of 3 Gy had no effect on either the residents' offensive behavior or the defensive behavior of the intruders paired with them. Doses of 5 and 7 Gy produced decreases in offensive behavior of irradiated residents during the second week postirradiation. The nonirradiated intruders paired with these animals displayed decreases in defensive behavior during this time period, indicating a sensitivity to changes in the residents' behavior. After the third week postirradiation, offensive and defensive behavior did not differ significantly between irradiated mice and sham-irradiated controls. This study suggests that sublethal doses of radiation can temporarily suppress aggressive behavior but have no apparent permanent effect on that behavior

  10. The role of radiation therapy in childhood acute leukemia. A review from the viewpoint of basic and clinical radiation oncology

    Radiation therapy has been playing important roles in the treatment of childhood acute leukemia since the 1970s. The first is the preventive cranial irradiation for central nervous system therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The second is the total body irradiation as conditioning before bone marrow transplantation for children with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission and with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second remission. Although some late effects have been reported, a part of them could be overcome by technical improvement in radiation and salvage therapy. Radiation therapy for children might have a successful outcome on a delicate balance between efficiencies and potential late toxicities. The role of radiation therapy for childhood acute leukemia was reviewed from the standpoint of basic and clinical radiation oncology in this paper. (author)

  11. Stimulation effects of recombinant human interleukin-11 on haematopoiesis and the application in the treatment of acute radiation injury

    In the present experiment, recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) significantly improved the proliferation activity of hematopoietic cells in the human bone marrow cell culture and increased the number of colonies of multilineage progenitor cells. Meylosuppressed mice or rhesus monkeys by chemo-or radiotherapy had higher platelet counts than those of controls after rhIL-11 treatment. rhIL-11 is safe and effective in reducing chemo-and/or radiotherapy associated thrombocytopenia and the need for platelet transfusions in patients who undergo intensive chemotherapy. rhIL-11 is likely to become an effective agent in correcting meylosuppression induced by radiation or chemotherapy

  12. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  13. Acute Radiation Syndrome. Consequences and outcomes

    Okladnikova, N.D.; Pesternikova, V.S.; Sumina, M.V.; Azizova, T.V.; Yurkov, N.N. [Branch No 1 State Research Center of Russia, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biophysics

    2000-05-01

    The consequences and outcomes of an Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), induced by external gamma radiation for 59 persons (49 men and 10 women) have been estimated. All incidents have taken place more than 40 years ago in the yearly years of adjustment of an atomic industry (1950-1953-38 persons, 1954-1958-21 persons). According to the degree of severity ARS 5 groups are selected: the severest degree - 7 individuals (average dose in group 43.8{+-}12.8 Sv), severe - 4 individuals (9.3{+-}1.5 Sv), medium - 14 individuals (2.2{+-}0.8 Sv), a light degree - 15 individuals (0.93{+-}0.13 Sv), ''erased'' from - 19 individuals (0.85{+-}0.07 Sv). In all cases, except for lethal (the severest degree), the characteristics of morphological composition of the peripheral blood were restored in the first year after ARS and now correspond to physiological standard. In 2 cases the moderate hypoplasia of granulocytopoiesis was diagnosed. A marker of the acute exposure was the chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of the peripheral blood. The frequency of chromosome aberrations correlates with severity degree of ARS (from 3-7 up to 35-50 stable aberrations per 100 cells). In cases of ARS with severe degree the early development of a cerebral atherosclerosis is detected. The radiation cataract was diagnosed in 5 patients (an exposure doses 4.0-9.8 Sv, a period of development 2-5 years). During the first years after ARS in 80% of cases the complete labour rehabilitation is reached. Of 53 patients with known vital status by 45 year of monitoring 19 persons (35.8%) have died, of these in 2 cases the causes of death are not determined. In remaining cases the causes of death were ARS of severest degree (7 persons), Ischemic Heart Disease (5 persons), malignant tumors (4 persons), accidents and traumas (2 persons). (author)

  14. Acute Radiation Syndrome. Consequences and outcomes

    The consequences and outcomes of an Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), induced by external gamma radiation for 59 persons (49 men and 10 women) have been estimated. All incidents have taken place more than 40 years ago in the yearly years of adjustment of an atomic industry (1950-1953-38 persons, 1954-1958-21 persons). According to the degree of severity ARS 5 groups are selected: the severest degree - 7 individuals (average dose in group 43.8±12.8 Sv), severe - 4 individuals (9.3±1.5 Sv), medium - 14 individuals (2.2±0.8 Sv), a light degree - 15 individuals (0.93±0.13 Sv), ''erased'' from - 19 individuals (0.85±0.07 Sv). In all cases, except for lethal (the severest degree), the characteristics of morphological composition of the peripheral blood were restored in the first year after ARS and now correspond to physiological standard. In 2 cases the moderate hypoplasia of granulocytopoiesis was diagnosed. A marker of the acute exposure was the chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of the peripheral blood. The frequency of chromosome aberrations correlates with severity degree of ARS (from 3-7 up to 35-50 stable aberrations per 100 cells). In cases of ARS with severe degree the early development of a cerebral atherosclerosis is detected. The radiation cataract was diagnosed in 5 patients (an exposure doses 4.0-9.8 Sv, a period of development 2-5 years). During the first years after ARS in 80% of cases the complete labour rehabilitation is reached. Of 53 patients with known vital status by 45 year of monitoring 19 persons (35.8%) have died, of these in 2 cases the causes of death are not determined. In remaining cases the causes of death were ARS of severest degree (7 persons), Ischemic Heart Disease (5 persons), malignant tumors (4 persons), accidents and traumas (2 persons). (author)

  15. Lung pathology in case of acute radiation injury

    Results of pathomorphological studies of 27 patients exposed to total external γ- and β-radiation resulted from the Chernobyl accident and lost due to the acute radiation disease in the first weeks following radiation exposure are discussed. Dose range is 3.7-13.7 Gy. Two groups of pathological changes in lungs are revealed, those are: infection (bacterial, viral and fungous) ones caused by acute radiation disease and signs of respiratory distress-syndrome in adults

  16. Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome : Radiation Neurotoxins, Mechanisms of Toxicity, Neuroimmune Interactions.

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (CvARS) is an extremely severe in-jury of Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). CvARS can be induced by the high doses of neutron, heavy ions, or gamma radiation. The Syndrome clinical picture depends on a type, timing, and the doses of radiation. Four grades of the CvARS were defined: mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. Also, four stages of CvARS were developed: prodromal, latent, manifest, outcome -death. Duration of stages depends on the types, doses, and time of radiation. The CvARS clinical symptoms are: respiratory distress, hypotension, cerebral edema, severe disorder of cerebral blood microcirculation, and acute motor weakness. The radiation toxins, Cerebro-Vascular Radiation Neurotoxins (SvARSn), determine development of the acute radiation syndrome. Mechanism of action of the toxins: Though pathogenesis of radiation injury of CNS remains unknown, our concept describes the Cv ARS as a result of Neurotoxicity and Excitotoxicity, cell death through apoptotic necrosis. Neurotoxicity occurs after the high doses radiation exposure, formation of radiation neuro-toxins, possible bioradicals, or group of specific enzymes. Intracerebral hemorrhage can be a consequence of the damage of endothelial cells caused by radiation and the radiation tox-ins. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB)and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCFB)is possibly the most significant effect of microcirculation disorder and metabolic insufficiency. NMDA-receptors excitotoxic injury mediated by cerebral ischemia and cerebral hypoxia. Dam-age of the pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5 and Purkinje cell layer the cerebral cortex , damage of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus occur as a result of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral bleeding. Methods: Radiation Toxins of CV ARS are defined as glycoproteins with the molec-ular weight of RT toxins ranges from 200-250 kDa and with high enzymatic activity

  17. Acute Radiation Disease : Cutaneous Syndrome and Toxic properties of Radiomimetics -Radiation Neurotoxins and Hematotoxins.

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Cutaneous injury is an important complication of a general or local acute irradiation. A type of a skin and tissues lesions depends on a type, intensity, and period of irradiation. Also, the clinical picture, signs, and manifestations of the cutaneous syndrome depend on a type of the radiation toxins circulated in lymph and blood of irradiated mammals. Radiation Toxins were isolated from lymph of the mammals that were irradiated and developed different forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) -Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, and Hematopoietic. Radiation Toxins can be divided into the two important types of toxins (Neu-rotoxins and Hematotoxins) or four groups. The effects of Radiation Neurotoxins include severe damages and cell death of brain, heart, gastrointestinal tissues and endothelial cells of blood and lymphatic vessels. The hematotoxicity of Hematotoxic Radiation Toxins includes lym-phopenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia in the blood circulation and transitory lymphocytosis and leukocytosis in the Central Lymphatic System. In all cases, administration of the Radiomimetics (Radiation Toxins) intramuscularly or intravenously to healthy, radiation naive mammals had induced and developed the typical clinical manifestations of the ARS. In all cases, administration of Radiomimetics by subtoxic doses had demonstrated development of typical clinical signs of the cutaneous syndrome such as hair loss, erythema, swelling, desqua-mation, blistering and skin necrosis. In animal-toxic models, we have activated development of the local skin and tissue injury after injection of Radiation Toxins with cytoxic properties.

  18. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome

    Weber-Donat, G.; Potet, J.; Baccialone, J.; Teriitehau, C. [Military Hospital Percy, Radiology Department, Clamart (France); Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P. [Military Hospital Percy, Army Institute of Radioprotection, Clamart (France); Lahutte-Auboin, M. [Military Hospital Val-de-Grace, Radiology Department, Paris (France); Bey, E. [Military Hospital Percy, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department, Clamart (France)

    2012-12-15

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. (orig.)

  19. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. (orig.)

  20. Hematological parameters after acute radiation injury

    According to clinical experiences of radiation accidents during the past two decades, utilization of measured hematologic changes as a direcrt indicator of the severity of radiation injury provides important information for diagnosis and prognostic evaluation in individual cases. Hematologic changes can be described in terms of prognostic categories based on the possible outcome of the acute radiation syndrome. The five categories suggested by Wald according to the grade of severity. By the actual application of this category to our experience of the 1971 Chiba accident of exposure to irridium 192, it was proved that the estimated dose was well correlated to the value by cytogenetic analysis and physical estimation used of thermo-luminescence phenomena. In hematological parameters, a decrease of lymphocytes occurs whithin 24 hours after the exposure. The level of this early lymphopenia is regarded as one of the best indicators of severity of radiation injury. For the decision of therapeutic procedures, however, the total granulocyte count and platelet count are more valuable to exclude severe infection and bleeding symptoms occurred one month after the exposure. The limitation of the approach by hematologic data must exist in the case exposed in a non-uniform fashion. To overwhelm this difficulty, the application of rapid marrow scanning by short-lived RI such as 52Fe is expected and the bone marrow imaging by magnetic resonance studies is more exciting. For more sensitive and technically easy-drived methods detecting hematologic injury, our new method of detecting micro-nucleus in polychromatic erythroblasts from cultured erythroid colonies from peripheral blood is now developing. Preliminary data have shown the sensitivity of this method is comparable to the cytogenetic study of pheripheral lymphocytes. (author)

  1. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  3. Macrophage expression in acute radiation colitis in rats

    Although radiation therapy is important in the treatment of tumors in pelvic and abdominal region, it may cause radiation injury as a side effect. But there is no effective way of preventing or curing the damages. The mechanism of acute radiation colitis has not been elucidated yet. Our previous reports have revealed that X-ray irradiation induce apoptosis of epithelial stem cells in colon. Then a hypothesis of the radiation colitis can be put forward, DNA damage by irradiation, apoptosis of mucosal epithelial stem cells and degeneration of epithelial gland structure, macrophages phagocyte the debris, being activated and secreting various inflammatory cytokines, infiltration of inflammatory cells. Several recent reports show that macrophages may play an important role in the process of inflammatory bowel diseases such ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. We studied radiation colitis using rat animal models. Male Wister rats were irradiated by a single fraction dose of 22.5 Gy X-ray at laparotomy, shielding except for an approximately 2.5 cm length of rectum. Histological changes and macrophage accumulation in the rectum mucosa were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot method with the specimens which were taken on the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and 14th day after irradiation. Severe macrophage accumulation in the lamina propria of the rectum was observed on the 5th day. At the same time, severe destruction of mucosal structure and inflammatory cells infiltration were also observed. Based on the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine producing effects of macrophage in rat and the increased expression in inflammatory bowel disease patients, speculate that intervention in the macrophage-cytokine network could form a future target for the treatment of acute radiation colitis. (author)

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on the hematopoietic niche and treatment of acute radiation syndrome by gene therapy in highly-irradiated monkeys

    The hematopoietic stem cell niche represents a complex radiosensitive compartment whose protection is required for recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression. We initially studied RI effects on endothelial and mesenchymal progenitors by an evaluating radiosensitivity and cell death. Then, we have proposed a new gene therapy strategy based on local and short term secretion of Sonic hedgehog morphogen to favour vascular niche repair and to stimulate residual hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We investigated the hematopoietic response of 8-Gy gamma irradiated monkeys to a single intra-osseous injection of xenogeneic multipotent mesenchymal stem cells transduced with a Shh pIRES2 plasmid. Thrombocytopenia and neutropenia duration were significantly reduced in grafted animals and clonogenics normalized from day 42. Areas under the curve of PLTs and ANCs between day 0 and day 30 were significantly higher in treated animals than in controls. Grafting MatrigelTM colonized or not with ASC in immunocompromised mice demonstrated a notable pro-angiogenic activity for Shh-ASC. Long term follow up (180-300 days) confirmed a durable recovery in the four grafted monkeys. Globally this study suggests that grafting Shh-multipotent stem cells may represent a new strategy to cure radiation-induced niche damage. (author)

  5. Acute radiation nephritis. Its evolution on sequential bone imaging

    Acute radiation nephritis typically affects the kidneys 3-12 months after radiation exposure and may occur with doses as low as 2500 rads. After an initial latent period, the affected portions of the kidneys become swollen and edematous, and develop multiple petechiae. Necrotizing vasculitis and interstitial hemorrhage occur, and the end stage is that of scarring. Two patients are presented in whom localized acute radiation nephritis developed, and whose kidneys demonstrated the characteristic sequential changes of this entity on serial bone imaging

  6. The influence of the combined effects of acute gamma-radiation, sodium bromate and sodium nitrate on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedling root growth

    Pryakhin, E.; Osipov, D. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine - URCRM (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Among special industrial reservoirs used for the storage of liquid radioactive waste of Mayak PA, Russia, one of the most radioactively contaminated is the R-17 reservoir, so-called 'Staroye Boloto' (the total β-activity of water ranged in the observation period from 0.4 MBq/l to 4.5 MBq/l, the total a-activity ranged from 43 to 420 Bq/l). Also this reservoir is characterized by high level of chemical contamination, in particular, the concentration of nitrates in water is 2.5-4,4 g/l, sodium bromate - up to 35 mg/l. One of the interesting questions is interaction of radiation and chemical contamination in their effect on living organisms in this reservoir. In laboratory experiments seeds of Lactuca sativa were used; the effect of the studied factor on the length of the sprout's root was estimated. To assess the effect of chemical toxicants the solutions of each salt in 7 different concentrations were used, distilled water was used as a control. For evaluation of acute effects of external gamma irradiation the seeds after exposure for 24 hours in distilled water, were irradiated at 7 different doses using gamma-unit on the basis of Cs-137 with the dose rate of 0.62 Gy/min. To assess the combined effects of acute external gamma irradiation, of nitrates and bromates, seeds after 24 hour exposure at each test concentration of the salts solutions were irradiated using gamma-unit. To calculate the effective concentrations or doses was used drc package for R software. To calculate the dose rate to aquatic organisms in the R-17 was used ERICA Assessment Tool 2012. It was found out that the EC50 of sodium nitrate for lettuce was 2.69 g/l, which is comparable to the concentration of nitrates in the 'Staroye Boloto'. This indicates that nitrate can have significant toxic effect on aquatic higher plants of the reservoir. The EC50 of sodium bromate was 14.6 mg/l. This is less than the maximum concentration of the substance in the R-17, which suggests

  7. The influence of the combined effects of acute gamma-radiation, sodium bromate and sodium nitrate on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedling root growth

    Among special industrial reservoirs used for the storage of liquid radioactive waste of Mayak PA, Russia, one of the most radioactively contaminated is the R-17 reservoir, so-called 'Staroye Boloto' (the total β-activity of water ranged in the observation period from 0.4 MBq/l to 4.5 MBq/l, the total a-activity ranged from 43 to 420 Bq/l). Also this reservoir is characterized by high level of chemical contamination, in particular, the concentration of nitrates in water is 2.5-4,4 g/l, sodium bromate - up to 35 mg/l. One of the interesting questions is interaction of radiation and chemical contamination in their effect on living organisms in this reservoir. In laboratory experiments seeds of Lactuca sativa were used; the effect of the studied factor on the length of the sprout's root was estimated. To assess the effect of chemical toxicants the solutions of each salt in 7 different concentrations were used, distilled water was used as a control. For evaluation of acute effects of external gamma irradiation the seeds after exposure for 24 hours in distilled water, were irradiated at 7 different doses using gamma-unit on the basis of Cs-137 with the dose rate of 0.62 Gy/min. To assess the combined effects of acute external gamma irradiation, of nitrates and bromates, seeds after 24 hour exposure at each test concentration of the salts solutions were irradiated using gamma-unit. To calculate the effective concentrations or doses was used drc package for R software. To calculate the dose rate to aquatic organisms in the R-17 was used ERICA Assessment Tool 2012. It was found out that the EC50 of sodium nitrate for lettuce was 2.69 g/l, which is comparable to the concentration of nitrates in the 'Staroye Boloto'. This indicates that nitrate can have significant toxic effect on aquatic higher plants of the reservoir. The EC50 of sodium bromate was 14.6 mg/l. This is less than the maximum concentration of the substance in the R-17, which suggests that sodium bromate has a

  8. Explanation of nurse standard of external exposure acute radiation sickness

    National occupational health standard-Nurse Standard of External Exposure Acute Radiation Sickness has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. Based on the extensive research of literature, collection of the previous nuclear and radiation accidents excessive exposed personnel data and specific situations in China, this standard was enacted according to the current national laws, regulations, and the opinions of peer experts. It is mainly used for care of patients with acute radiation sickness, and also has directive significance for care of patients with iatrogenic acute radiation sickness which due to the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation pretreatment. To correctly carry out this standard and to reasonably implement nursing measures for patients with acute radiation sickness, the contents of this standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  9. Psychological Aspects of Acute Radiation Accidents

    This paper generally describes personality structure and needs and then relates these to the psychological aspects of radiation injury. Three levels in the personality structure are defined as child, adult, and parent. This is followed by a description of two major need systems the first of which, if not met, results in the death of the individual and the second, if not met, results in significant emotional disruption of the individual. This is followed by a discussion of coping phases and stress patterns of radiation injury, including the effects of the illusion of immunity characterized by the feeling that ''things can happen to others, but not to me'', and the ''nuclear mystique'' which is characterized by a magical quality attached to radiation due partly to the lack of sense organ response to radiation exposure. Following impact, treatment in the reactive.phase, which includes moderate and severe emotional reactions, involves a series of compensating emotions. These include the illusion of centrality, the feeling of abandonment, altruism, and amorality. The ''aftermath'' reaction is treated from the standpoint of the ''tormenting memory'', the ''amnesiac reaction'', the ''fear of recurrence'' and the individual’s need to cope with both his medical condition and reactions of others to his condition. The recovery phase is treated from the standpoint of unacceptable and acceptable disability. Finally, a recommended psychological treatment for the physician to use in radiation accident cases is made involving the individual's psychological needs, as well as the physician's psychological role which includes: authoritative support, acceptance, optimism, and avoidance of the appearance of an overly scientific approach. Effective organizing, planning or training for the care of radiation accident cases must consider the psychological factors developed. Recommendations for mental health programs which include employee screening and counselling programs are made

  10. Methods for assessing the extent of acute radiation injury

    Previous radiation accidents have shown that the medical management of exposed persons cannot be performed without the use of 'biological indicators' of effect and of repair. For the clinical management of a patient with the acute radiation syndrome, it is essential to obtain information on the subjective symptomatology as well as on laboratory parameters, especially during the first 3 to 6 days after exposure. The medical doctor responsible for the clinical care of patients has to rely on the use of what has been described as 'sequential diagnosis'. This approach consists essentially of the determination of a limited number of parameters as a function of time. From the analysis of the pattern of the determined and evaluated signs and symptoms in the first hours and days, one is able to characterize patients according to type and severity of symptomatology. This has been clearly demonstrated in the Moscow - Ulm Radiation Accident Database (MURAD) developed in a collaborative project between the Institute of Biophysics in Moscow and the Department of Clinical Physiology and Occupational Medicine of the University of Ulm. On the basis of the radiation accident clinical response pattern observed early after irradiation, one is able to develop a first approach for therapeutic strategies. It is the purpose of this contribution to outline the diagnostic and prognostic significance of blood cell changes and to discuss the following problem areas: significance and elements of a sequential diagnosis; significance of blood lymphocytes for radiation accident diagnosis; significance of blood granulocyte changes for the prognosis of the acute radiation syndrome; analysis of granulocyte changes by means of regulated system models; utilization of indicators of response and repair for planning therapeutic options

  11. Changes in blood sugar content of dogs exposed to chronic gamma radiation for 6 years. [Combined effects of physical stress, heat stress, and acute radiation stress

    Akhunov, A.A.

    1978-10-26

    There have not been many studies of blood sugar concentration in animals exposed to chronic gamma radiation, and the results thereof are contradictory. Therefore, data on blood sugar levels in dogs during a 6-year exposure to gamma radiation and after discontinuation thereof are reported.

  12. Influence of acute hypoxia and radiation quality on cell survival

    Tinganelli, Walter; Ma, Ning-Yi; von Neubeck, Cläre; Maier, Andreas; Schicker, Corinna; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Durante, Marco

    2013-01-01

    To measure the effect of acute oxygen depletion on cell survival for different types of radiation, experiments have been performed using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and RAT-1 rat prostate cancer cells. A special chamber has been developed to perform irradiations under different levels of oxygenation. The oxygen concentrations used were normoxia (air), hypoxia (94.5% N2, 5% CO2, 0.5% O2) and anoxia (95% N2, 5% CO2). Cells were exposed to X-rays and to C-, N- or O-ions with linear energy ...

  13. Sequence analysis of the ATM gene in 20 patients with RTOG grade 3 or 4 acute and/or late tissue radiation side effects

    Purpose: Patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) show greatly increased radiation sensitivity and cancer predisposition. Family studies imply that the otherwise clinically silent heterozygotes of this autosomal recessive disease run a 3.5 to 3.8 higher risk of developing cancer. In vitro studies suggest moderately increased cellular radiation sensitivity of A-T carriers. They may also show elevated clinical radiosensitivity. We retrospectively examined patients who presented with severe adverse reactions during or after standard radiation treatment for mutations in the gene responsible for A-T, ATM, considering a potential means of future identification of radiosensitive individuals prospectively to adjust dosage schedules. Material and Methods: We selected 20 cancer patients (breast, 11; rectum, 2; ENT, 2; bladder, 1; prostate, 1; anus, 1; astrocytoma, 1; Hodgkins lymphoma, 1) with Grade 3 to 4 (RTOG) acute and/or late tissue radiation side effects by reaction severity. DNA from the peripheral blood of patients was isolated. All 66 exons and adjacent intron regions of the ATM gene were PCR-amplified and examined for mutations by a combination of agarose gel electrophoresis, single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and exon-scanning direct sequencing. Results: Only 2 of the patients revealed altogether four heteroallelic sequence variants. The latter included two single-base deletions in different introns, a single-base change causing an amino acid substitution in an exon, and a large insertion in another intron. Both the single-base deletions and the single-base change represent known polymorphisms. The large insertion was an Alu repeat, shown not to give rise to altered gene product. Conclusions: Despite high technical efforts, no unequivocal ATM mutation was detected. Nevertheless, extension of similar studies to larger and differently composed cohorts of patients suffering severe adverse effects of radiotherapy, and application of new

  14. Quantitative assessment of acute radiation injury of the lens

    An attempt is made to unify various approaches to the assessment of acute radiation injury of the organ of vision. The development of cataracts was studied on mice subjected to local irradiation of the head at doses: 7, 10, 12, 15, 20 and 25 Gy. A clinical picture of radiation injury of the eye at different X-ray doses at different stages was established during ophthalmological examination using a manual electroophthalmoscope (X5). A method of the quantitative assessment of radiation injury of the mouse eye at different radiation doses was proposed using the light transmission factor tau; its experimental value was obtained, values for different clinical stages of cataracts were established. The time course of the development of radiation cataracts in mice subjected to X-ray irradiation in a wide spectrum of doses, was observed; clinical features of the process were revealed. Dose fractionation under the above conditions did not make aprotective effect on the lens. Dependence of a degree of lens injury on irradiation dose obtained owing to the use of the light transmission factor tau, was described with the following equation: N=Nsub(0)esup(-D/Dsup(0))

  15. Radiation protection and health effects

    The use of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine carries with it a responsibility to both patient and personnel to maximize the diagnostic and therapeutic benefit while minimizing the potential for any adverse health effects. Shortly after the discovery of the x-ray in 1895 the potential for acute health hazards of ionizing radiation became apparent. However, the risks of ionizing radiation were poorly understood and many early users did not believe that anyone could be hurt by something that could not be detected by any of the human senses. Many experiments on the biologic effects of ionizing radiation began in the early 1900s, and the first radiation protection standards were proposed by the British Roentgen Society in 1915. We now realize that these pioneers had a very limited knowledge of the potential hazards and radiation protection principles. Today more scientific data are available on the health effects of, detection of, and protection from ionizing radiation than any other physical agent or chemical known. In addition, use of many forms of ionizing radiation is heavily regulated at both national and state levels. This paper discusses how maternal contamination with radionuclides may cause irradiation of the fetus even if the radionuclide is not transferred across the placenta. This is mostly true for radionuclides that decay yielding relatively penetrating radiations

  16. Acute radiation proctitis. A clinical, histopathological and histochemical study

    The aim of the study is: 1) A sequential description of the clinical course of acute radiation proctitis during pelvic RT. 2) A sequential description of the rectal mucosal histopathology during pelvic RT as a possible substrate for clinical toxicity. 3) To assess the mucosal protease activity during RT as a possible explanation of the observed tissue changes. 4) To assess the efficacy of prophylactic sucralfate in acute radiation proctitis a randomised study was initiated and carried out together with a meta-analysis of previously available data. 5) Most studies on clinical acute toxicity in pelvic RT use either the RTOG/EORTC score system or focus on diarrhoea/stool frequency. A more differentiated and sensitive recording was developed and tested to pick up symptoms escaping the commonly used scores. 6) Study the relation between histopathological findings and the clinical picture. 4 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) Acute radiation proctitis: a sequential clinicopathologic study during pelvic radiotherapy. 2) Clinical significance of increased gelatinolytic activity in the rectal mucosa during external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer. 3) Profiles and time course of acute radiation toxicity symptoms during conformal radiotherapy for cancer of the prostate. 4) Sucralfate does not ameliorate acute radiation proctitis. Some future prospects are discussed

  17. Acute radiation proctitis. A clinical, histopathological and histochemical study

    Hovdenak, Nils

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the study is: 1) A sequential description of the clinical course of acute radiation proctitis during pelvic RT. 2) A sequential description of the rectal mucosal histopathology during pelvic RT as a possible substrate for clinical toxicity. 3) To assess the mucosal protease activity during RT as a possible explanation of the observed tissue changes. 4) To assess the efficacy of prophylactic sucralfate in acute radiation proctitis a randomised study was initiated and carried out together with a meta-analysis of previously available data. 5) Most studies on clinical acute toxicity in pelvic RT use either the RTOG/EORTC score system or focus on diarrhoea/stool frequency. A more differentiated and sensitive recording was developed and tested to pick up symptoms escaping the commonly used scores. 6) Study the relation between histopathological findings and the clinical picture. 4 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) Acute radiation proctitis: a sequential clinicopathologic study during pelvic radiotherapy. 2) Clinical significance of increased gelatinolytic activity in the rectal mucosa during external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer. 3) Profiles and time course of acute radiation toxicity symptoms during conformal radiotherapy for cancer of the prostate. 4) Sucralfate does not ameliorate acute radiation proctitis. Some future prospects are discussed.

  18. Radiation effects and radiation risks

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./MG) With 8 maps in appendix

  19. Characteristics of long-term consequences of acute radiation sickness

    In persons who suffered from acute radiation sickness (ARS) as a result of the Chernobyl accident in course of time there are revealed the stochastic and non-stochastic effects of irradiation both in 'critical' and 'non-critical' organism systems. It is connected with maintenance of somatic mutation high level and steady changes in membranes subcellular structures, biomolecules as well as metabolic disturbances. Stable changes of hemopoietic and immune system indexes have to be considered as pre-pathological status with high hazard of stochastic effects development. Frequency rate of typical radiation cataracts (posterior subcapsular) is correlated with ARS severity degree; fundus oculi vessel pathology have essential weight in total eye pathology. Chronic radiation dermatitis is an important clinical problem being a long-term consequence of irradiation. It demands a constant attention in order to prevent trophic secondary skin lesions. Radiation damage of eye and skin as well as high frequency of chronic somatic diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders conditioned the high level of disablement in ARS-patients

  20. Thymus endocrine function in acute radiation sickness resulted from Chernobyl accident

    Data are presented on the role of inhibition of endocrine function of the thymus in the pathogenesis of acute radiation sickness resulted from the direct and indirect (via the increased glucocorticoid production) effects of ionizing radiation. The complex treatment, including nonspecific active immunotherapy, permitted to normalize the thymic hormone level and certain parameters of the immune system

  1. Psychological consequences of nuclear and radiological accidents: Delayed neuropsychiatric effects of the acute radiation sickness following Chernobyl. Chapter 2

    The neuropsychiatric consequences of accidental irradiation to ARS patients have been monitored to the present on the basis of one in-patient medical examination per year. All ARS patients are hospitalized in the Radiation Pathology Department of the Institute for Clinical Radiology, RCRM, Kiev. The data on the neuropsychiatric aftermath of ARS presented hereafter were based on two research designs: 1) prospective follow-up study (1987-2001), and 2) cross-sectional study with parallel groups (1996-1998). The principles of the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders include complexity, stability and succession between stages (clinical, ambulatory-polyclinic, ambulatory and sanatorium treatment). Basic treatment includes pharmacotherapy and psychological therapy. Neuropharmacology includes vasoactive and nootropic drugs, neuroprotectors, antidepressants (predominantly, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors - SSRIs) and atypical antipsychotic (if necessary). The correction of mental disorders is carried out at syndromological level. It is worth mentioning the importance of out-patient methods of treatment and rehabilitation [Nyagu A.I. et al., 1998, Nyagu A.I. et al., 1999

  2. Biological radiation effects

    This work examines ionizing radiations: what they are, where they come from, their actions and consequences, finally the norms and preventive measures necessary to avoid serious contamination, whether the individual or the population in general is involved. Man has always been exposed to natural irradiation, but owing to the growing use of ionizing radiations both in medicine and in industry, not to mention nuclear tests and their use as an argument of dissuasion, the irradiation of human beings is increasing daily. Radioactive contamination does remain latent, apart from acute cases, but this is where the danger lies since the consequences may not appear until long after the irradiation. Of all biological effects due to the action of radioelements the genetic risk is one of the most important, affecting the entire population and especially the generations to come. The risk of cancer and leukemia induction plays a substantial part also since a large number of people may be concerned, depending on the mode of contamination involved. All these long-term dangers do not of course exclude the various general or local effects to which the individual alone may be exposed and which sometimes constitute a threat to life. As a result the use of ionizing radiations must be limited and should only be involved if no other process can serve instead. The regulations governing radioelements must be stringent and their application strictly supervised for the better protection of man. This protection must be not only individual but also collective since pollution exists in air, water and land passes to plants and animals and finally reaches the last link in the food chain, man

  3. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Mehrdad Mirouliaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy among children for whom radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used for treatment. When hypothalamus-pituitary axis is exposed to radiotherapy, children′s hormone level and quality of life are influenced. The aim of this study is to determine late effects of radiotherapy on hormonal level in these patients. Materials and Methods: In this study 27 children with ALL, who have been referred to Shahid Ramezanzadeh Radiation Oncology Center in Yazd-Iran and received 18-24 Gy whole brain radiation with Cobalt 60 or 9 MV linear accelerator, were assessed. These patient′s basic weight, height and hormonal levels were measured before radiotherapy and also after different periods of time. Results: GHD (growth hormone deficiency after clonidine stimulation test was observed in 44% ( n=12 and that in 50% of them ( n=6, less than 1 year, had been passed from their radiation therapy. None of these patients demonstrated hormone deficiency in other axes. Conclusions: This study showed that even application of a 18-24 Gy radiation dose might influence growth hormone levels; therefore, we recommend reduction of radiotherapy dose in such patients whenever possible.

  4. Effect of a prostaglandin - given rectally for prevention of radiation-induced acute proctitis - on late rectal toxicity. Results of phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study

    Kertesz, Tereza; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F.; Hille, Andrea [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Zapf, Antonia [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Pradier, Olivier [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Brest (France); Schmidberger, Heinz [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Background and purpose: to assess the late effect of a prostaglandin, given rectally during irradiation, on late rectal toxicity. In the acute treatment setting no significant differences in reducing the incidence of acute proctitis symptoms in patients receiving misoprostol, however, significantly more rectal bleeding had been reported. Patients and methods: a total of 100 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer had been entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. The toxicity was evaluated yearly after cessation of irradiation by the RTOG/LENT-SOMA scale. Results: the median follow-up was 50 months. 20 patients suffered from grade 1, four patients from grade 2 as well, and three patients only from grade 2 toxicity. Frequency, bleeding and urgency were the most commonly reported symptoms. In keeping with other studies and clinical experience, the symptoms peaked within the first 2 years with a median for grade 1 of 13 months and for grade 2 of 15 months. The presence of acute toxicity grade 2 showed a correlation with the development of any late toxicity (p = 0.03). Any acute rectal bleeding was significant correlated with any late rectal bleeding (p = 0.017). Conclusion: misoprostol given as once-daily suppository for prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis does neither influence the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute nor late rectal toxicity. Misoprostol has no negative impact on the incidence and severity of late rectal bleeding, in contrast to acute rectal bleeding. The routine clinical use of misoprostol suppositories cannot be recommended. (orig.)

  5. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  6. Role of toll-like receptors in acute gastrointestinal radiation syndrome

    Ionizing radiation induces various disorders according to the radiation sensitivity of each organ. Acute gastrointestinal radiation syndrome is a serious illness that is caused by exposure of gastrointestinal tract to high amounts of ionizing radiation in radiation accidents or radiation therapy in cancer treatment. Although the pathological mechanism have been well studied in human and animals, no effective treatments have been developed to date. The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family is one of the best-characterized families of innate immune receptors, which induce innate immune response against pathogen infection. However, contrary to their protective function, recent studies have suggested that immune responses triggered by TLRs play deleterious roles by aggravating tissue inflammation in some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. This review describes recent advancement of our understanding of acute gastrointestinal radiation syndrome and the contributions of TLR to its pathological mechanisms. (author)

  7. Effects of radiation on erythropoiesis

    Since the pioneer work of Heineke (1903; 1905) many workers have studied the effect of radiation on haemopoiesis. Their work has been reviewed by Bloom (1948), by Jacobson (1954) and more recently by Bond et al. (1965). The subject continues to stimulate much interest but is now more concerned with the effects of radiation on the multipotential stem cell pool than on radiation damage to the erythropoietic cells themselves. Death from haemopoietic failure following an LD50/30 dose of radiation is probably not attributable to failure of erythropoiesis; while damage to the erythropoietic system certainly plays a part in the syndrome, it is not a major factor contributing to the death of the animal. Although the severity and time course of the response vary with the species studied, the general effects of radiation on erythropoiesis are similar in all mammalian bone marrow studied to date. Likewise, though the severity of the reaction varies somewhat with the energy of the radiation and has been used to compare the relative biological effectiveness of different types of radiation (Sinclair et al., 1962; Sztanyik, 1967), the response is different only in degree and not in its fundamental pattern. The initial syndrome of depression and recovery will therefore be described largely by reference to work performed on the response of the rat to single acute exposures of either whole-body or partial-body irradiation with conventional X-rays

  8. Effect of Massive Blood Transfusion on the Therapeutic Efficiency of Homogenic Bone Marrow in Acute Radiation Illness

    Simultaneously with bone-marrow transplantation, the authors replaced the blood of the lethally irradiated recipient animals with blood from the bone-marrow donor. From experiments on dogs and rabbits it became clear that replacing 86% of the recipient's blood with blood from the bone-marrow donor considerably reduces the therapeutic effect of bone-marrow transplantation. The authors consider that the main cause of the animals' early death in experiments combining bone-marrow transplantation and massive donor blood transfusions is a secondary syndrome resulting from the graft-versus-host reaction. This does not exclude the inverse possibility - that the development of a host-versus-graft reaction is due to the presence of a massive number of antigens of the donor blood in the blood of the recipient. (author)

  9. Antiradiation Antitoxin IgG : Immunological neutralization of Radiation Toxins at Acute Radiation Syndromes.

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: High doses of radiation induce apoptotic necrosis of radio-sensitive cells. Mild doses of radiation induce apoptosis or controlled programmed death of radio-sensitive cells with-out development of inflammation and formation of Radiation Toxins. Cell apoptotic necrosis initiates Radiation Toxins (RT)formation. Radiation Toxins play an important role as a trig-ger mechanism for inflammation development and cell lysis. If an immunotherapy approach to treatment of the acute radiation syndromes (ARS) were to be developed, a consideration could be given to neutralization of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants-SRD) by specific antiradiation antibodies. Therapeutic neutralization effects of the blocking anti-radiation antibodies on the circulated RT had been studied. Radiation Toxins were isolated from the central lymph of irradiated animals with Cerebrovascular(Cv ARS),Cardiovascular (Cr ARS),Gastrointestinal(Gi ARS) and Haemopoietic (Hp ARS) forms of ARS. To accomplish this objective, irradiated animals were injected with a preparation of anti-radiation immunoglobulin G (IgG) obtained from hyperimmune donors. Radiation-induced toxins that we call Specific Radiation Determinants (SRD) possess toxic (neurotoxic, haemotoxic) characteristics as well as specific antigenic properties. Depending on direct physiochemical radiation damage, they can induce development of many of the pathological processes associated with ARS. We have tested several specific hyperimmune IgG preparations against these radiation toxins and ob-served that their toxic properties were neutralized by the specific antiradiation IgGs. Material and Methods: A scheme of experiments was following: 1.Isolation of radiation toxins (RT) from the central lymph of irradiated animals with different form of ARS. 2.Transformation of a toxic form of the RT to a toxoid form of the RT. 3.Immunization of radiation naive animals. Four groups of rabbits were inoculated with a toxoid form of SRD

  10. Low level radiation: biological effects

    It is imperative that physicians and scientists using radiations in health care delivery continue to assess the benefits derived, vs. potential risk, to patients and radiation workers being exposed to radiation in its various forms as part of our health delivery system. Insofar as possible we should assure our patients and ourselves that the benefits outweigh the potential hazards involved. Inferences as to the possible biological effects of low level radiation are generally based on extrapolations from those effects observed and measured following acute exposures to considerably higher doses of radiation. Thus, in order to shed light on the question of the possible biological effects of low level radiation, a wide variety of studies have been carried out using cells in culture and various species of plant and animal life. This manuscript makes reference to some of those studies with indications as to how and why the studies were done and the conclusions that might be drawn there from. In addition reference is made to the handling of this information by scientists, by environmentalists, and by the news media. Unfortunately, in many instances the public has been misled by what has been said and/or written. It is hoped that this presentation will provide an understandable and reasonable perspective on the various appropriate uses of radiation in our lives and how such uses do provide significant improvement in our health and in our quality of life

  11. Molecular effects of radiation

    The basis of radiobiology based on the effects of radiation in cells and tissues. Though the primary constituents of tissues are DNA and chromosomes, thus we need to know the effects of radiation in its molecular level before going for its effect in tissue level. The most abundant molecule inside the body is water molecule, and any type of radiation effect to water molecule might affect the whole body functionality. Brief knowledge about the effect of radiation in molecular level on the basis of hydrolysis of water; and radiation damage to DNA and chromosome will be helpful to understand the basics of radiobiology. (author)

  12. Effects of radiation

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  13. Estimation of a contribution of internal exposure to early effects of acute radiation syndrome in victims of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    Materials on internal irradiation of people with accute radiation syndrome, caused by the ChNPP accident are presented. It is shown, that internal exposure is more than important as related to clynical direct accute effects under investigation. Thyroid, lungs and whole body radiation doses are presented. Severity of broncholung and hypophysical-thyroidal system damage was evaluated

  14. Space radiation effects

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  15. Radiation effects in space

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented

  16. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  17. The modes of death in mammals exposed to whole body radiation (acute radiation syndromes)

    When an animal is exposed to a sufficient amount of radiation, there will be changes in many organs of the body, and as a result of either the effects in one particular organ or the interaction of effects in several organs, the animal as a whole will show characteristic syndromes. Some syndromes result inevitably in death. Others may or may not be lethal, depending on the extent of the tissue damage. The time of appearance of the syndromes, their duration, and the survival of the organism depend on many factors. Whole body acute doses of radiation produce the same spectrum of Central Nervous System (CNS), Gastrointestinal (GI) and Bone Marrow (BM) injury in man as was described for animals. Damage to the skin, ovary and testis are an integral and important part of the symptoms. (author)

  18. Salivary biochemical markers as potential acute toxicity parameters for acute radiation injury: A study on small experimental animals.

    Soni, S; Agrawal, P; Kumar, N; Mittal, G; Nishad, D K; Chaudhury, N K; Bhatnagar, A; Basu, M; Chhillar, N

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have been evaluating several biodosimetric/screening approaches to assess acute radiation injury, related to mass causality. Keeping in mind this background, we hypothesized that effect of whole-body irradiation in single fraction in graded doses can affect the secretion of various salivary components that could be used as acute radiation injury/toxicity marker, which can be used in screening of large population at the time of nuclear accidents/disaster. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats treated with whole-body cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of dose 1-5 Gy (dose rate: 0.95 Gy/min) were included in this study. Whole mixed saliva was collected from all animals before and after radiation up to 72 h postradiation. Saliva was analyzed for electrolytes, total protein, urea, and amylase. Intragroup comparison of salivary parameters at different radiation doses showed significant differences. Potassium was significantly increased as the dose increased from 1 Gy to 5 Gy (p 0.5). Sodium was significantly altered after 3-5 Gy (p 0.5), except 1 and 2 Gy, whereas changes in sodium level were nonsignificant (p > 0.5). Urea, total protein, and amylase levels were also significantly increased as the radiation dose increased (p 0.5). This study suggests that salivary parameters were sensitive toward radiation even at low radiation dose which can be used as a predictor of radiation injury. PMID:25813962

  19. RADIATION AND EFFECTS ON HUMAN HEALTH

    Hakan YAREN

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In modern world, living without radiation is impossible. Radiation is defined as ?energy transmitted through space as waves or particles? and also determined as ?particles or waves emitted from the nucleus of unstable radioactive atoms to become stable? Mainly two types of radiation are exist; ionising radiation and non-ionising radiation. Ionising radiation is consist of alpha, beta particules, neutrons, x rays and gamma rays. Ionising radiation which can be measured by ion chambers, geiger-Mueller detectors, Scintillation Counters, fluorescent counters etc. Has harmfull effects on human health in levels of molecular, cellular, tissue, organs and organ systems. These harmfull effects can also be named somatic and genetic. One of the most encountered problem is ?Acute Radiation Syndrom? which has three sub syndroms called haematopoetic syndrom, gastrointestinal syndrom and neurovascular syndrom. Exposure time, distance and armorisation are the key elements of protection from radiation. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(4.000: 199-208

  20. Future radiation effects

    A review is given of the units used in radiation protection. The radiation hazards incurred by human populations can be divided into early and late somatic radiation effects and genetic radiation effects. Examples and motivations of risk analysis estimates are given. For genetic radiation effects, the siginificance dose and the doubling dose are defined. The minimum permissible dose for different human populations are compared with the doses received from natural radioactivity with medical applications. The risk caused by nuclear reactors and fall-out and its consequences are given for the year 1972 and estimated for the year 2000

  1. Stem cell-based therapies for acute radiation syndrome

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in the event of accidental or intentional incident such as nuclear/radiological terrorism can lead to debilitating injuries to multiple organs resulting in death within days depending on the amount of radiation dose and the quality of radiation. Unfortunately, there is not a single FDA-licensed drug approved against acute radiation injury. The RadStem Center for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (RadStem CMGR) program at Einstein is developing stem cell-based therapies to treat acute radiation syndrome (ARS). We have demonstrated that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells, consisting of a mixture of mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid progenitors can mitigate mice exposed to whole body irradiation of 12 Gy or whole abdominal irradiation of up to 20 Gy. We identified a variety of growth and differentiation factors that individually is unable to improve survival of animals exposed to lethal irradiation, but when administered sequentially mitigates radiation injury and improves survival. We termed this phenomenon as synthetic survival and describe a new paradigm whereby the 'synthetic survival' of irradiated tissues can be promoted by systemic administration of growth factors to amplify residual stem cell clonogens post-radiation exposure, followed by a differentiation factor that favors tissue stem cell differentiation. Synthetic survival can be applied to mitigate lethal radiation injury in multiple organs following radiation-induced hematopoeitic, gastrointestinal and pulmonary syndromes. (author)

  2. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  3. Cytogenetic effects in children born to participants in the cleanup of the Chernobyl accident consequences - Acute radiation syndrome survivors and children evacuated from Pripyat

    The cytogenetic study of 87 children was held. Age of involved kids ranged from 5 to 14 years old. The I-st study group was presented with 17 kids born in 1987-1988 from the Chernobyl accident consequences cleaning up participants (CACCP) who survived the Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) of I-II severity degree in 1986. The II-nd study group was consisted from the 45 children born in 1983-1985 resident in town Pripyat with thyroid exposure doses from 65 to 616 sZv and total irradiation doses from 0.2 to 13.2 sZv. The 25 children born in 1983-1988 and resident in radiation situation - favourable region of Ukraine constituted the Control (III-rd) group. The aberrant cells number and chromosomal aberrations amount mainly due to chromatide type ones confidential increase compared to that in control was revealed among the children born from CACCP - ARS survivors. In children exposed to ionizing radiation during infant and early childhood age the aberrant cells number and chromosomal aberrations quantity was elevated also but due to both chromosomal (dicentrics and rings) and chromatide types. (author)

  4. Anti-radiation vaccine: Immunologically-based Prophylaxis of Acute Toxic Radiation Syndromes Associated with Long-term Space Flight

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    Protecting crew from ionizing radiation is a key life sciences problem for long-duration space missions. The three major sources/types of radiation are found in space: galactic cosmic rays, trapped Van Allen belt radiation, and solar particle events. All present varying degrees of hazard to crews; however, exposure to high doses of any of these types of radiation ultimately induce both acute and long-term biological effects. High doses of space radiation can lead to the development of toxicity associated with the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) which could have significant mission impact, and even render the crew incapable of performing flight duties. The creation of efficient radiation protection technologies is considered an important target in space radiobiology, immunology, biochemistry and pharmacology. Two major mechanisms of cellular, organelle, and molecular destruction as a result of radiation exposure have been identified: 1) damage induced directly by incident radiation on the macromolecules they encounter and 2) radiolysis of water and generation of secondary free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which induce chemical bond breakage, molecular substitutions, and damage to biological molecules and membranes. Free-radical scavengers and antioxidants, which neutralize the damaging activities of ROS, are effective in reducing the impact of small to moderate doses of radiation. In the case of high doses of radiation, antioxidants alone may be inadequate as a radioprotective therapy. However, it remains a valuable component of a more holistic strategy of prophylaxis and therapy. High doses of radiation directly damage biological molecules and modify chemical bond, resulting in the main pathological processes that drive the development of acute radiation syndromes (ARS). Which of two types of radiation-induced cellular lethality that ultimately develops, apoptosis or necrosis, depends on the spectrum of incident radiation, dose, dose rate, and

  5. Bile loss in the acute intestinal radiation syndrome in rats

    The effects of bile duct ligation (BDL), choledochostomy, bile acid sequestering within the intestinal lumen by cholestyramine, and fluid and electrolyte replacement on survival time and development of diarrhea after whole-body exposure to doses of ionizing radiation that result in death from acute intestinal injury were studied. BDL significantly prolonged survival and delayed the onset of diarrhea after exposure to 137Cs gamma rays, fission neutrons, or cyclotron-produced neutrons in the range of doses that produce intestinal death or death from a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic injuries. Cannulation of the bile duct with exteriorized bile flow (choledochostomy) to protect the irradiated intestine from the mucolytic action of bile salts did not duplicate the effect of BDL in increasing survival time. Choledochostomy without fluid replacement eliminated the occurrence of diarrhea in 15.4 Gy irradiated rats. Diarrhea did occur in irradiated animals with choledochostomy if they received duodenal injections of fluid and electrolytes to replace the fluid lost as a result of bile drainage. Duodenal injection of fluid and electrolytes had no significant effect on survival time in irradiated rats. Injection of fluid and electrolytes into the peritoneal cavity of irradiated rats resulted in an increase in survival time that was comparable to that observed after BDL. Addition of antibiotics to the peritoneally injected fluid and electrolytes further increased survival time (up to 9 days). This survival time approached that seen in animals receiving the same radiation dose but which had the intestine exteriorized and shielded to minimize radiation injury to the intestine. Postmortem histological examinations of the irradiated small intestine showed mucosal regeneration in these long-term survivors receiving fluid and antibiotic therapy

  6. Acute radiation syndrones and their management

    Radiation syndromes produced by large doses of ionizing radiation are divided into three general groups depending on dose of radiation and time after exposure. The CNS syndrome requires many thousands of rad, appears in minutes to hours, and kills within hours to days. The GIS appears after doses of a few hundred to 2000 rad. It is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and disturbances of water and electrolyte metabolism. It has a high mortality in the first week after exposure. Survivors will then experience the HS as a result of marrow aplasia. Depending on dose, survival is possible with antibiotic and transfusion therapy. The relationship of granulocyte depression to mortality in dogs and human beings is illustrated. The role of depth dose pattern of mortality of radiation exposure is described and used as an indication of why air exposure doses may be misleading. The therapy of radiation injury is described based on antibiotics, transfusion therapy, and use of molecular regulators. The limited role of matched allogenic bone marrow transplants is discussed. 52 refs., 13 figs

  7. Acute radiation syndrones and their management

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation syndromes produced by large doses of ionizing radiation are divided into three general groups depending on dose of radiation and time after exposure. The CNS syndrome requires many thousands of rad, appears in minutes to hours, and kills within hours to days. The GIS appears after doses of a few hundred to 2000 rad. It is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and disturbances of water and electrolyte metabolism. It has a high mortality in the first week after exposure. Survivors will then experience the HS as a result of marrow aplasia. Depending on dose, survival is possible with antibiotic and transfusion therapy. The relationship of granulocyte depression to mortality in dogs and human beings is illustrated. The role of depth dose pattern of mortality of radiation exposure is described and used as an indication of why air exposure doses may be misleading. The therapy of radiation injury is described based on antibiotics, transfusion therapy, and use of molecular regulators. The limited role of matched allogenic bone marrow transplants is discussed. 52 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Factors Influencing the Efficacy of Radiation Protection of the Thyroid Gland in Chernobyl Patients with Acute Radiation Disease

    Full text: Just after the Chernobyl accident there were three groups of factors which could influence on the incorporation of radioactive iodine into the victims at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. The first group was related with the amount of radioactive iodine in the air, the second with radiation protection measures and the third with clinical condition of the victims. The purpose of this investigation was to study relationships among them. The subject of the research was 108 case histories of the victims after short-term external gamma-exposure from 0.5 to 12.7 Gy. 92 of them fell ill with acute radiation disease. Their thyroid glands were exposed to radiation iodine within 0.01-12 Gy. A multifactor analysis was used for studying the relationships among the radioactive iodine intake, development of prodromal radiation syndrome and taking in 0.125 g of potassium iodine to protect the thyroid gland. The investigation shows that the highest level of iodine incorporation was determined in the men stayed at the nuclear power plant for the first hour after the beginning of the accident. A protective effect of potassium iodine depended on the time of taking in. The vomiting was a reason for decreasing the effect due to the loss of some potassium iodine with vomiting materials during the prodromal period of acute radiation disease. The level of the radionuclide incorporation had no influence on the development of the acute radiation syndrome. (author)

  9. Developing diagnostic guidelines for the acute radiation syndrome

    Diagnostic guidelines seem to be promising for improving medical care. One aspect of a diagnostic guideline for the acute radiation syndrome has been tested against an extensive case history database. Subsequently, the guideline has been optimized for a small set of case histories. The improved performance has been proven by a test against the rest of the case history database

  10. Radiation effects in space

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  11. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  12. Opiate antinociception is altered by immunemodification: the effect of interferon, cyclosporine and radiation-induced immune suppression upon acute and long-term morphine activity

    It has recently been demonstrated that various forms of immune modification result in a profound attenuation of the opiate withdrawal syndrome. Herein we investigate the extent to which some of the immune modifiers active in withdrawal attenuation affect other opiate related behaviors, namely antinociception and the development of tolerance to this effect. The observations demonstrate that immune modification by cyclosporine and irradiation exposure result in an alteration of the acute antinociceptive effect of morphine; while none of these treatments modify the development of tolerance to this property of morphine. (Auth.)

  13. Subacute radiation dermatitis: a histologic imitator of acute cutaneous graft-versus-host disease

    The histopathologic changes of radiation dermatitis have been classified either as early effects (necrotic keratinocytes, fibrin thrombi, and hemorrhage) or as late effects (vacuolar changes at the dermal-epidermal junction, atypical radiation fibroblasts, and fibrosis). Two patients, one exposed to radiation therapeutically and one accidentally, are described. Skin biopsy specimens showed an interface dermatitis characterized by numerous dyskeratotic epidermal cells with lymphocytes in close apposition (satellite cell necrosis); that is, the epidermal changes were similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease. Because recipients of bone marrow transplants frequently receive total body irradiation as part of their preparatory regimen, the ability of radiation to cause persistent epidermal changes similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease could complicate the interpretation of posttransplant skin biopsy specimens

  14. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  15. Radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia in mice

    Ample epidemiological studies of human populations implicate ionizing radiation as a carcinogen and these quantitative studies provide the foundation for the core estimates of radiation cancer risk. The majority of the epidemiological data originate from situations of radiation exposure at high dose and high dose rate. The relevance of risk estimates based on such exposures to the more commonly encountered low dose and dose rate situation has been questioned frequently. Thus, there is a need to investigate and quantitate low dose and dose rate effects. A number of approaches may be considered, for example, very large scale epidemiology, very large scale animal experimentation; however, both of these present problems of a practical and/or ethical nature. A further possible approach is that of mechanistic modelling. This requires a fairly detailed understanding of neoplastic disease and how it develops post-irradiation. Many factors and variables have to be taken into consideration in mechanistic modelling approaches. Testing of mechanistic modelling schemes is best carried out using animal model systems. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a radiogenic cancer of significance in man and several good mouse models of the disease are available. Here, recent studies conducted at NRPB with the aim of elucidating the post-irradiation development of AML will be discussed. In particular three areas critical for developing a sound mechanistic model will be covered, definition of the initiating event; study of disease progression, this addresses the question of the frequency of conversion of initiated cells into the neoplastic state and the influence of genetic background on leukaemogenesis. (author)

  16. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on

  18. Effects of radiation; Effets des radiations

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  19. Biophysical radiation effects

    The biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation is based upon the absorption of energy in molecular structures of a cell. Because of the quantum nature of radiation large fluctuations of energy concentration in subcellulare regions has to be considered. In addition both the spatial distribution of a sensitive molecular target and cellulare repair processes has to be taken into consideration for an assessment of radiation action. In radiation protection the difference between the quality factor and the Relative Biological Effectiveness has a fundamental meaning and will be discussed in more detail. The present report includes a short review on some relevant models on radiation action and a short discussion on effects of low dose irradiation. (orig.)

  20. Effects of ionizing radiations

    After recalling radiation-matter interaction, influence on radiation effects of chemical composition, structure, irradiation atmosphere, dose rate, temperature of organic materials and evolution of electrical, mechanical and physical properties are reviewed. Then behaviour under irradiation of main organic materials: elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, oils and paints are examined. 68 refs

  1. Effect of acute gamma radiation and protective action of different concentration of extracts of safora japonica and hypericum perforatum on the life of aboriginal earthworms of Absheron

    Full text : As atomic power is increasingly recognized as a potential energy source to sustain future human development, radiological protection of the environment will become an even more important environmental safety concern. Thus, an understanding of the effects of ionizing radiation on non-human biota is required by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the radiological protection of the environment. Soil processes are vital to sustainable terrestrial ecosystems, and soil invertebrates play an important role in nutrient cycling by feeding on microbiota. Because of their ecological importance, soil invertebrates are used for ecological impact assessments of terrestrial ecosystem pollutants. For chemical substances, single-species laboratory tests are used to understand toxicity. Standard tests using earthworms and spring tails have been developed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Laboratory toxicity tests are also applicable in field contamination monitoring to determine if test organisms have been exposed to field-corrected soils. In such assays, gene expression as a biomarker has been receiving increased attention as it may produce fast, sensitive and diagnostic assays. A similar use of laboratory tests can be applied to assess the environmental impact of ionizing radiation. An understanding of the dose-effect relations of ionising radiation for non-human biota establishes important baselines for radiobiological protection of ecosystems. We used standard laboratory tests to examine dose-effect relationships of gamma radiation on the survival, biomass changing, feeding activity, coprolite excretion of aboriginal earthworms

  2. Influence of acute hypoxia and radiation quality on cell survival

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of acute oxygen depletion on cell survival for different types of radiation, experiments have been performed using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and R-3327-AT1 (RAT-1) rat prostate cancer cells. A special chamber has been developed to perform irradiations under different levels of oxygenation. The oxygen concentrations used were normoxia (air), hypoxia (94.5% N2, 5% CO2, 0.5% O2) and anoxia (95% N2, 5% CO2). Cells were exposed to X-rays and to C-, N- or O-ions with linear energy transfer (LET) values ranging from 100-160 keV/μm. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values have been calculated from the measured clonogenic survival curves. For both cell lines, the X-ray OER depended on the survival level. For particle irradiation, OER was not dependent on the survival level but decreased with increasing LET. The RBE of CHO cells under oxic conditions reached a plateau for LET values above 100 keV/μm, while it was still increasing under anoxia. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that our chamber could be used to measure radiosensitivity under intermediate hypoxia. Measurements suggest that ions heavier than carbon could be of additional advantage in the irradiation, especially of radioresistant hypoxic tumor regions. (author)

  3. Diagnosis of acute radiation disease by Enzyme Immune-Assay (EIA)

    Diagnosis of the acute radiation disease by the method of immune enzyme assay is a simple and efficient tool of evaluating and biological dosimetry and forecasting of development of the acute radiation defeats as at group of population so at individuals locating in the zone polluted by the radiation. We use as biological markers the group of essential radiotoxins - high molecular mass glycoprotein ( molecular mass - 200 - 250 kDa ) - radiation antigens (S.D.R. - specific radiation determinant ) accumulated in the lymphoid system, with epitopes specific to each form of radiation syndrome, after animals have been irradiated in doses inducing the development of the cerebral (1), toxic ( 2), gastrointestinal ( 3 ) and typical ( 4 ) forms of acute radiation sickness. These two phenomena allowed us to develop a technologies for diagnosis, prophylaxis and therapy of radiation disease - enzyme immune assay ( EIA ), anti radiation vaccine, anti radiation serum, method of immune - lymph - plasma-sorption. The important first step in effectiveness of therapy is an accurate assessment of severity of disease in early period after irradiation. The ideal markers for early and accurate assessment is high weight glycoprotein with specifics radiation induced features (S.D.R.) mentioned above. This biology active substance isolated from lymph can induct the symptoms of radiation syndrome without previously radiation when it is administrated intra-muscularly or intravenously to healthy animals. Enzyme immune assay (EIA) allowed researchers to indicate the significant levels of different forms of S.D.R. in peripheral blood of animals in first 24 hours after radiation. Indication of high level of S.D.R. -1 allowed to forecast a fast development of cerebral form of acute radiation disease. Determination of high levels of S.D.R.-2, S.D.R.-3 and S.D.R.-4 in peripheral blood allowed to recognize early periods of toxic, gastrointestinal and typical forms of acute radiation sickness

  4. Radiation therapy treatment of acute refractory renal allograft rejection

    radiation treatment (median 4, range 1-22), number of transplants (one transplant in 77 %), and concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Independent factors by the Cox regression model were: Sex (P=0.005), Creatinine levels (P=0.000), HLA-DR (P=0.05), PRA-Max > 70% (P=0.014). Each factor was scored using the integral coefficients to generate four different groups. The overall actuarial graft survival from the initiation of RT was 83% at 1 month, 60% at 1 year and 36% at 5 years. The Kaplan-Meier survival analyzed by groups seems to produce an interpretable separation of the risk factors for graft loss. The number of rejections of pre-RT range from 1-6 (median 2) and post-RT range from 0-3 (median 0). Conclusions: Our experience indicates that radiation therapy provides effective treatment for acute refractory renal allograft rejection. The response to radiation therapy in patients treated with acute refractory renal graft rejection can be predicted by a new scoring system

  5. Radiation therapy in prostate cancer: evaluation of acute toxicity

    Goals: The present work documents the increasing demand of curative intent radiation therapy (CIRT) for localized prostate cancer and assesses acute reactions caused by ionizing radiation to intrapelvic organs. Patients and methods: From January 1995 to December 2001, 166 patients with prostatic cancer received radiation therapy, 70% of them (n=116) with curative intent. Treatment was completed as planned in 108 patients: 55 with pelvic irradiation and prostatic boost (PRT), 42 with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 10 with a permanent 125 I implant (IPI) and 1 with combined radiotherapy. Patients were classified as at high- or low-risk according to tumor volume, Gleason score, regional lymph node status and pretreatment specific prostatic antigen level. High-risk patients were assigned to PRT and low-risk patients to local treatment only (either 3DCRT or IPI). Mean doses were 46 Gy for pelvis and 73 Gy for prostate with PRT; 75 Gy with 3DCRT and 127 Gy with IPI and combined radiation therapy. Acute rectal toxicity (ART) and acute urinary toxicity (AUT) were assessed according to the RTOG scale. Statistical analysis was performed with Fischer's exact test. Results: The proportion of patients receiving CIRT increased from 46% (n=28) in 1995-1998 to 84% (n=88) in 1999-2001; p < 0.0001. No patient developed ART or AUT beyond degree 2. ART was lower with 3DCRT (71% degree 0 or 1) than with PRT (45% degree 0 or 1); p= 0.0134. No significant difference was found in AUT. Conclusions: In recent years the demand for CIRT has almost doubled, with a concomitant decrease in palliative radiotherapy. In high-risk patients, pelvic irradiation increased mild and moderate ART, without compromising their life quality. None of the techniques employed was associated with severe acute toxicity. (author)

  6. Vascularization of bone regeneration products in acute radiation sickness

    In 119 rabbits with acute radiation sickness the vascularization process in bone regeneration products was studied by microangiography. The formation of arteries and of bone structures was retarded in irradiated animals. The deficient formation of veins and capillaries did not cause conditions for venous blood circulation and resulted in a slow resorption of newly formed bone structures and gristle. That is one of the reasons for an extended healing process of fractures and for formation of false articulations in irradiated animals. (author)

  7. Supplemental vitamin A prevents the acute radiation-induced defect in wound healing

    Acute radiation injury leads to thymic involution, adrenal enlargement, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, gastrointestinal ulceration, and impaired wound healing. The authors hypothesized that supplemental vitamin A would mitigate these adverse effects in rats exposed to acute whole-body radiation. To test their hypothesis, dorsal skin incisions and subcutaneous implantation of polyvinyl alcohol sponges were performed in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats at varying times following sham radiation or varying doses of whole-body radiation (175-850 rad). In each experiment, the control diet [which contains about 18,000 IU vit. A/kg chow (3 X the NRC RDA for normal rats)] was supplemented with 150,000 IU vit. A/kg diet beginning at, before, or after sham radiation and wounding or radiation and wounding. The supplemental vitamin A prevented the impaired wound healing and lessened the weight loss, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, thymic involution, adrenal enlargement, decrease in splenic weight, and gastric ulceration of the radiated (750-850 rad) wounded rats. This was true whether the supplemental vitamin A was begun before (2 or 4 days) or after (1-2 hours to 4 days) radiation and wounding; the supplemental vitamin A was more effective when started before or up to 2 days after radiation and wounding. The authors believe that prevention of the impaired wound healing following radiation by supplemental vitamin A is due to its enhancing the early inflammatory reaction to wounding, including increasing the number of monocytes and macrophages at the wound site; possible effect on modulating collagenase activity; effect on epithelial cell (and possible mesenchymal cell) differentiation; stimulation of immune responsiveness; and lessening of the adverse effects of radiation

  8. Effects of radiation on testicular function in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A report from the Children Cancer Study Group

    Testicular function was evaluated in 60 long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). All the patients were treated on two consecutive Children Cancer Study Group protocols and received identical chemotherapy and either 18 or 24 Gy radiation therapy (RT) to one of the following fields: craniospinal plus 12 Gy abdominal RT including the gonads (group 1); craniospinal (group 2); or cranial (group 3). The median age at the time of their last evaluation was 14.5 years (range, 10.5 to 25.7), which took place a median of 5.0 years (range, 1 to 10.3) after discontinuing therapy. The incidence of primary germ cell dysfunction as judged by raised levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and/or reduced testicular volume was significantly associated with field of RT; 55% of group 1, 17% of group 2, and 0% of group 3 were abnormal (P = .002). Leydig cell function, as assessed by plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone, and pubertal development, was unaffected in the majority of subjects regardless of RT field. These data indicate that in boys undergoing therapy for ALL, germ cell dysfunction is common following testicular irradiation and can occur following exposure to scattered irradiation from craniospinal RT. In contrast, Leydig cell function appears resistant to direct irradiation with doses as high as 12 Gy

  9. Management of two patients with intestinal form of acute radiation sickness and extremely severe bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness complicated with disseminated fungous infection

    Objective: To present two patients diagnosed as intestinal form of acute radiation sickness (patient A) and extremely severe bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness(patient B) complicated with disseminated fungous infection in China. Methods: On October 21st, 2004, a nuclear accident occurred in Jining, Shandong Province, China. Two individuals were accidentally irradiated by a 60Co source. They were transferred to our hospital, and performed allogeneic stem cell transplantation and soon acquired hematopoiesis recovery; however, refractory disseminated fungous infection occurred in two patients. Results: High dosage of amphotericin B combined with itraconazole and concidas were used to kill fungi. The infection was once controlled, but the radiation injury and infection were still becoming worse even after many kinds of treatment. The patients finally died of multiple organ failure on day 33 and day 75, respectively after the accident. Conclusions: The combination of Ampghotec (amphotericin B) with Caspofungin (concidas) and Itraconazole in the treatment of disseminated fungous infection was effective and with no related toxicity. But during the continuous injury of radiation, we couldn't eradicate the fungous infection. The patients were finally died of multiple organs failure related with radiation and infection. (authors)

  10. Multifocal atherosclerosis in patient after acute first degree radiation sickness.

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: assessment the heavy psychosomatic and all-somatic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathology of patient, transferred an acute I degree radiation sickness, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation. Conclusions. The subdepressive and disturbing-depressive syndrome of patient, transferred an acute radiation sickness (ARS of I degree, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation, was independent risk factor of development of multifocal atherosclerosis; Features of development of all-somatic and psychosomatic pathology of patient are based on a combination of genetic prerequisites, environment influences (the stress caused by accident on the ChNPP and social factors, influencing on him during a course of life, especially during early socialization. Thus at development of psychosomatic frustration the combination of feature of the mental reaction connected with the personal characteristic and special relationship between mental (stress and physiological (somatic by aspects of reaction which led to metabolism violation, to aging, decrease in adaptation opportunities of an organism and development age — dependent pathology took place.

  11. Potential health effects of space radiation

    Yang, Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.

    1993-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be exposed to radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, and possibly solar particle events. The potential health hazards due to these space radiations must be considered carefully to ensure the success of space exploration. Because there is no human radioepidemiological data for acute and late effects of high-LET (Linear-Energy-Transfer) radiation, the biological risks of energetic charged particles have to be estimated from experimental results on animals and cultured cells. Experimental data obtained to date indicate that charged particle radiation can be much more effective than photons in causing chromosome aberrations, cell killing, mutation, and tumor induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) varies with biological endpoints and depends on the LET of heavy ions. Most lesions induced by low-LET radiation can be repaired in mammalian cells. Energetic heavy ions, however, can produce large complex DNA damages, which may lead to large deletions and are irreparable. For high-LET radiation, therefore, there are less or no dose rate effects. Physical shielding may not be effective in minimizing the biological effects on energetic heavy ions, since fragments of the primary particles can be effective in causing biological effects. At present the uncertainty of biological effects of heavy particles is still very large. With further understanding of the biological effects of space radiation, the career doses can be kept at acceptable levels so that the space radiation environment need not be a barrier to the exploitation of the promise of space.

  12. Biological radiation effects

    The book covers all aspects of biological radiation effects and provides the fundamental basis for understanding the necessity of radiation protection as well as applications in radiotherapy. The physical basis is dealt with in some detail, and the effects at the subcellular and the cellular level are thoroughly discussed, taking into account modern developments and techniques. The effects on the human organism are reviewed, both from the point of view of applications in medicine as well as with regard to radiation hazards (teratogenic, gonadal and carcinogenic effects). It can be used by graduate students as an introduction and as a source book for all who want to become acquainted with this important field. It is an extended version of the original German book containing updated information and new material. (orig.) With 273 figs

  13. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child

  14. Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Combined With Recombinant CD19-Ligand × Soluble TRAIL Fusion Protein is Highly Effective Against Radiation-resistant B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice

    Fatih M. Uckun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In high-risk remission B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL patients, relapse rates have remained high post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT even after the use of very intensive total body irradiation (TBI-based conditioning regimens, especially in patients with a high “minimal residual disease” (MRD burden. New agents capable of killing radiation-resistant BPL cells and selectively augmenting their radiation sensitivity are therefore urgently needed. We report preclinical proof-of-principle that the potency of radiation therapy against BPL can be augmented by combining radiation with recombinant human CD19-Ligand × soluble TRAIL (“CD19L–sTRAIL” fusion protein. CD19L–sTRAIL consistently killed radiation-resistant primary leukemia cells from BPL patients as well as BPL xenograft cells and their leukemia-initiating in vivo clonogenic fraction. Low dose total body irradiation (TBI combined with CD19L–sTRAIL was highly effective against (1 xenografted CD19+ radiochemotherapy-resistant human BPL in NOD/SCID (NS mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients as well as (2 radiation-resistant advanced stage CD19+ murine BPL with lymphomatous features in CD22ΔE12xBCR-ABL double transgenic mice. We hypothesize that the incorporation of CD19L–sTRAIL into the pre-transplant TBI regimens of patients with very high-risk BPL will improve their survival outcome after HSCT.

  15. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  16. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  17. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  18. Acute neurocognitive impairment during cranial radiation therapy in patients with intracranial tumors

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the acute effects of cranial radiation therapy (CNS-RT) using different radiation doses (0, 1.8, 2, 3, ≤ 20 Gy) on cognitive function with special emphasis on memory. We assessed patients with and without intracranial tumors to distinguish between direct and indirect radiation effects on brain tissue. Eighty-two patients were evaluated with neuropsychological testing before and acutely after radiotherapy (RT). Sixty-four patients received RT to the brain (55 with, 9 without intracranial tumor). Eighteen patients treated with RT to the breast served as controls. Patients with intracranial tumor demonstrated attention (19-38th percentile) and verbal memory scores (34-46th percentile) below the population average at baseline. The average Verbal Memory score was significantly different between patients with intracranial tumor and controls both at baseline (38th vs. 58th percentile) and after irradiation (27th vs. 52th percentile). Patients with preexisting peritumoral edema performed worse than patients without edema and controls. Radiation dose-related deficits were seen for working memory performance in patients with intracranial tumor. Our data indicate no measurable impairment of cognitive functioning acutely after prophylactic cranial irradiation. Patients with intracranial tumor show a deterioration of almost all memory functions with a dose-dependent impairment in working memory. Patients with preexisting peritumoral brain edema show the strongest deterioration. (orig.)

  19. Acute neurocognitive impairment during cranial radiation therapy in patients with intracranial tumors

    Welzel, Grit; Mai, Sabine K.; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Wenz, Frederik [University Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Fleckenstein, Katharina [University Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology]|[Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2008-12-15

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the acute effects of cranial radiation therapy (CNS-RT) using different radiation doses (0, 1.8, 2, 3, {<=} 20 Gy) on cognitive function with special emphasis on memory. We assessed patients with and without intracranial tumors to distinguish between direct and indirect radiation effects on brain tissue. Eighty-two patients were evaluated with neuropsychological testing before and acutely after radiotherapy (RT). Sixty-four patients received RT to the brain (55 with, 9 without intracranial tumor). Eighteen patients treated with RT to the breast served as controls. Patients with intracranial tumor demonstrated attention (19-38th percentile) and verbal memory scores (34-46th percentile) below the population average at baseline. The average Verbal Memory score was significantly different between patients with intracranial tumor and controls both at baseline (38th vs. 58th percentile) and after irradiation (27th vs. 52th percentile). Patients with preexisting peritumoral edema performed worse than patients without edema and controls. Radiation dose-related deficits were seen for working memory performance in patients with intracranial tumor. Our data indicate no measurable impairment of cognitive functioning acutely after prophylactic cranial irradiation. Patients with intracranial tumor show a deterioration of almost all memory functions with a dose-dependent impairment in working memory. Patients with preexisting peritumoral brain edema show the strongest deterioration. (orig.)

  20. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness

    Rodgerson, Denis O.; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hir...

  1. Radiation damage effects

    The summarized data suggest that both glass and crystalline waste forms may sustain substantial doses of α-decay damage and still retain their durability. Radiation effects in glasses are less pronounced and less complicated than that in single or poly-phase ceramics; thus, the latter category requires careful research and consideration. Perhaps the most important conclusion is that short-term actinide doping experiments in crystalline phases provide a realistic simulation of long-term effects based on the comparison of observed radiation effects in Pu-doped zircon and naturally damaged zircon (there is a 107 difference in dose rate). Deviations from the similarity in effect (e.g., saturation dose) may be attributed to low-temperature, long-term annealing effects

  2. Therapy and prophylaxis of acute and late radiation-induced sequelae of the esophagus

    Background: Radiation-induced esophagitis is a frequent acute side effect in curative and palliative radiotherapy of thoracal and cervical tumors. Late reactions are rare but might be severe. Methods: A resarch for reports on prophylactic and supportive therapies of radiation-induced esophagitis was performed (Medline, Cancerlit, and others). Results: Nutrition must be ensured and symptomatic relief of sequelae is important, especially in the case of dysphagia. The latter can be improved by topic or systemic analgetics. If esophageal spasm occurs, calcium antagonists might help. In case of gastro-esophageal reflux proton pump inhibitors should be used. There is no effective prophylactic measure for radiation esophagitis. Late side effects with clinical relevance are rare in conventional radiotherapy. Chronic ulcera, fistula or stenosis may develop. Before any treatment, a tumor infiltration of the esophagus should be excluded by biopsy. This can lead more often to late complications than radiation therapy itself. Nutrition should be ensured by endoscopic dilation, stent-implantation, or endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy. Local injection of steroids might be used to avoid an early restenosis. Conclusions: An intensive symptomatic therapy of acute esophagitis is reasonable. Effective prophylaxis do not exist. Late radiation induced sequelae is rare. Therefore, a tumor recurrence should be excluded in cases of dysphagia. Securing nutrition by PEG, stent, or port is well in the fore. (orig.)

  3. Radiation effects on living systems

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  4. Radiation treatment of testicular relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ten patients with testicular relapse among 128 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are reported. At the time of the initial diagnosis of leukemia all patients with later testicular relapse showed one or more risk factors as predictive for leukemic infiltration of the testicles. All patients except one, who underwent orchiectomy and died 11 weeks after surgical intervention, received radiation therapy with doses ranging from 12 to 20 Gy and chemotherapy. The local control was excellent. Average survival time from testicular relapse to death was 68 weeks in 8 of 9 patients treated by irradiation and chemotherapy. One patient is still alive without signs of disease after 6 years. (orig.)

  5. Dissimilar genome response to acute and chronic low-dose radiation in male and female mice

    The long-term genetic consequences of chronic exposure to low-dose irradiation constitutes a major concern to the general public and research community, especially as chronic radiation has recently been proven to be much more mutagenic and carcinogenic than previously thought. Here we report the results of the first ever comparison of the effects of acute and chronic whole body low-dose radiation exposure on global gene expression. We found a substantial difference between males and females in the expression of genes involved in signaling, growth control, transcription and other pathways upon acute and chronic radiation exposure. Specifically, we found sex differences in the expression of genes coding for G protein-coupled receptors and nuclear receptors. We also found different induction of PKCδ, PKCβ and PKCμ, members of PKC signaling pathway as well as in TGF and WNT signaling in males and females. Very pronounced difference, that was confirmed on the level of protein, was observed in the expression of WNT5A that plays an important role in carcinogenesis and muscle regeneration. WNT5A expression was significantly elevated only in chronically exposed females. We also provide the first evidence of the effect of ionizing radiation on the estrogen receptor in females. Repetitive irradiation of muscle tissue has been linked to development of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), which, enigmatically, occurs more frequently in males. Our data may be used to study possible mechanisms of RMS development upon chronic radiation exposure. They may provide some clues about the molecular background of the sex differences of RMS occurrence and may in the future lead to the discovery of new biomarkers for RMS predisposition in the irradiated tissue. Overall, differences in male and female responses to acute and chronic low-dose radiation obtained by this study were more drastic than we could have predicted. If confirmed in other experimental systems, these findings could potentially lead

  6. Pathobiochemical, hematological and immunological findings in pigs with an acute radiation syndrome showing only a few clinical symptoms. 1

    The acute radiation syndrome showing only a few clinical symptoms was examined using biochemical tests. Store pigs received a whole-body irradiation of 2 Gy (200 rad). 11 biochemical tests were used for plasma and the whole blood. Activity changes were observed in the enzymes ALD, LDH, GOT and CPK after irradiation. The results show that despite of only a few clinical symptoms of the radiation syndrome considerable enzyme changes reveal individually differing radiation effects. (author)

  7. Effect of single lithium doses on haemopoiesis regeneration after radiation exposure in mice

    The reported experiment failed to demonstrate any effect of single doses of lithium carbonate on haemopoiesis regeneration in experimental haematological syndrome of acute radiation sickness. The effects of gamma radiation on blood formation are shown. 3 figs., 6 refs. (author)

  8. Anti-infection treatment of iatrogenic acute radiation sickness

    Objective: To occumulatle experience of anti-infection treatment in acute radiation sickness (ARS) induced by medical treatment in order to provide beneficial help for victims of accidental of acute radiation sickness. Methods: The changes of peripheral blood indices, body temperature and clinical symptoms of 17 cases who were clinically irradiated with 6.0-7.2 Gy X-rays were observed both before peripheral blood stem cell transplantation(PBSCT) and after anti-infection treatment. Results: WBC count began to decrease to below 1 x 109/L from the 8th to 10th days after irradiation and maintained at row level for 4 days or for 13.3 days if the patients had not received rhG-CSF treatment. In 29.4% of patients the body temperature was higher than 38.5 degree C. After comprehensive enviromental protection and anti-infection treatment, all patients could successfully tide over the period of bone marrow depression without appearance of the typical critical phase of ARS. Conclusion: PBSCT and rhG-CSF treatment can reduce the time span for reconstruction of bone marrow. Comprehensive enviromental protection and combined anti-infection treatment are key points fm successful treatment. (authors)

  9. Assessment of recovery of the intestine after acute radiation injury

    Baer, A.R.; Cheeseman, C.I.; Thomson, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Several aspects of intestinal function and morphology are affected by acute radiation damage, including changes in the activity of proliferative cells in the crypts, immune cell populations, and the transport of various substrates. This study was designed to compare the time course of the recovery of intestinal proliferation, transport, and leukocyte population following radiation injury. Rats received a single dose of 6 Gy to the abdomen from a /sup 137/Cs source and were studied 3, 7, and 14 days later. No changes in the passive uptake of L-glucose or D-leucine were observed in the jejunum. Active transport of D-glucose and maximal water uptake were reduced at 3 days but had returned to normal by 7 days, whereas L-leucine uptake required more than 7 days to return to control levels. Mucosal permeability, assessed by an in vivo potential difference technique, remained increased 7 days after irradiation. Ornithine decarboxylase, an indicator of DNA synthetic activity, was elevated following radiation treatment and remained so even after 14 days. By comparison, myeloperoxidase activity, used as a quantitative monitor of granulocyte numbers, was still reduced after 7 days. These data indicate that while certain parameters of gut function may return to normal soon after radiation injury, the recovery of other factors is more prolonged. Thus the return of transport function to normal values post irradiation may be viewed as an adaptive change rather than simply the recovery of the tissue.

  10. Diminution of acute radiation reaction of mouse skin with low-intensity infrared laser/red diodes-emitted light

    Efficiency of the application of different regimes of laser treatment of radiation-induced skin reactions in mice feet is compared. Posterior limb feet of mice were exposed to acute X radiation at 30-36 Gy dose or fractionated radiation at 45 Gy dose. In the day of primary irradiation or different time later the feet were treated using magnetic infrared laser therapeutic MILTA-01 apparatus. Magnetic and light components of the MILTA-01 apparatus reduce the effect of radiation on mice skin corresponding two time decrease in X-radiation dose

  11. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected

  12. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    Hindley, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.hindley@lthtr.nhs.uk [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom); Zain, Zakiyah [College of Arts and Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, Kedah (Malaysia); Wood, Lisa [Department of Social Sciences, Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Whitehead, Anne [Medical and Pharmaceutical Statistics Research Unit, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Sanneh, Alison; Barber, David; Hornsby, Ruth [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected.

  13. Expression of several growth factors and their receptors during the formation and development of acute radiation-induced skin ulcers and their effects on ulcer healing: an experimental study

    Objective: To study the expression of several growth factors and their receptors during the formation and development of acute radiation-induced skin ulcers, and their effects on ulcer healing. Methods: Female Wistar rats were used, and a model of simple skin wounds was made. Another rat model which was locally irradiated with 60Co γ-rays was used, and the pathological changes were observed for 55 days. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and image analysis were performed to examine EGF, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF-B, TGF-β1 and their receptors in the tissue of radiation skin ulcers. Results: Skin ulcers were found on day 14 after irradiation, and they enlarged and deepened gradually during the observation period. In the irradiated skin, especially in the epidermal cells, fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells of the ulcer beds, the expression of EGF, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF-B, TGF-β1 and their receptors was higher than that in normal skin, but their expression was suppressed in the ulcer beds as compared with that in the surgical wound beds. The expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-βR1 was elevated in the irradiated skin and was not inhibited in the cells of radiation ulcer beds as compared with that in the simple wound beds. Conclusion: After irradiation, the decreased expression of some growth factors and their receptors in the local skin tissue may play an important role in the formation, development and non-healing mechanism of radiation skin ulcers

  14. Studies of the ionizing radiation effects on the effluents acute toxicity due to anionic surfactants; Estudos dos efeitos da radiacao ionizante na toxicidade de efluentes que apresentam surfactantes anionicos

    Moraes, Maria Cristina Franco de

    2004-07-01

    Several studies have shown the negative effects of surfactants, as detergents active substance, when discharged on biological sewage wastewater treatment plants. High toxicity may represent a lower efficiency for biological treatment. When surfactants are in aquatic environment they may induce a loss of grease revetment on birds (feather). Depending on the surfactant concentration, several damages to all biotic systems can happen. Looking for an alternative technology for wastewater treatment, efficient for surfactant removal, the present work applied ionizing radiation as an advanced oxidation process for affluents and effluents from Suzano Treatment Station. Such wastewater samples were submitted to radiation using an electron beam from a Dynamic Electron Beam Accelerator from Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. In order to assess this proposed treatment efficacy, it was performed acute toxicity evaluation with two test-organisms, the crustacean Daphnia similis and the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The studied effluents were: one from a chemical industry (IND), three from sewage plant (affluents - GG, GM and Guaio) and the last biologically treated secondary effluent (EfF), discharged at Tiete river. The applied radiation doses varied from 3 kGy to 50 kGy, being 50 kGy enough for surfactant degradation contained at industrial effluent. For GG, GM and Guaio samples, doses of 6 kGy and 10 kGy were efficient for surfactant and toxicity reduction, representing an average removal that varied from 71.80% to 82.76% and toxicity from 30% to 91% for most the effluents. The final effluent was less toxic than the others and the radiation induced an average 11% removal for anionic surfactant. The industrial effluents were also submitted to an aeration process in order to quantify the contribution of surfactant to the whole sample toxicity, once it was partially removed as foam and several fractions were evaluated for toxicity. (author)

  15. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  16. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  17. Radiation effects in metals

    The current understanding of radiation damage in metals is reviewed, simplifying the actual complexity of the effects by considering some aspects separately. The production of point defects in metals, the primary damage state are first studied. The second part of the lecture is devoted to the evolution of this primary damage state as a function of temperature and dose: the steady state concentration of point defects, the nucleation of secondary defects and their growth are successively considered

  18. Relative biological effectiveness of carbon ions for tumor control, acute skin damage and late radiation-induced fibrosis in a mouse model

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Horsman, Michael Robert; Alsner, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    right hind limb were irradiated with single fractions of either photons, or 12 C ions using a 30-mm spread-out Bragg peak. The endpoint of the study was local control (no tumor recurrence within 90 days). For the acute skin reaction, non-tumor bearing CDF1 mice were irradiated with a comparable...

  19. Topical Calendula and Betamethasone Valerate in the prevention of acute radiation dermatitis: a randomized prospective trial

    Fotouhi M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute radiation dermatitis is a very common side effect of radiation therapy for many cancers, including breast cancer. Despite the high prevalence of acute radiation dermatitis as well as wet desquamation, only a few trials studying the prophylaxis of this complication using topical treatment have been conducted. In spite of these studies, some controversy still exists about regarding treatments for acute radiation dermatitis, as does some concern about their long-term complications. For this reason, we conducted a clinical trial for a new treatment with the same effectiveness as corticosteroids, but fewer complications. Methods: This trial included 60 patients with pathologic diagnoses of breast cancer for whom radiotherapy had been planned. Patients were 30-73 years old. Patients with radical mastectomy received 5000 cGy over five weeks, and those with conservative surgery received 6000 cGy over six weeks divided in 200 cGy fractions. Patients were divided randomly into two groups: one group received a moderately-potent glucocorticoid steroid, 0.1% betamethasone ointment (30, and the other received the new treatment, 0.1% calendula ointment (30. All patients applied their respective drugs twice daily within the tangential field from the first day of radiation treatment until one month after treatment was completed. Starting one week after radiation therapy commenced, patients were monitored weekly for symptoms of dermatitis and the degree of severity as well as possible adverse drug effects, in addition to such monitoring on the days of their appointments. Four weeks after termination of therapy, patients were again examined, at which time they completed a questionnaire about dermatologic complications. Results: The mean time to develop dermatitis was 3.7 weeks for the betamethasone group and 3.87 weeks for the calendula group. Maximal dermatitis intensity during treatment in the betamethasone group was: 0, 6.7%; I, 73.3%; II, 16

  20. Potent corticosteroid cream (mometasone furoate) significantly reduces acute radiation dermatitis: results from a double-blind, randomized study

    Purpose: Radiation-induced dermatitis is a very common side effect of radiation therapy, and may necessitate interruption of the therapy. There is a substantial lack of evidence-based treatments for this condition. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mometasone furoate cream (MMF) on radiation dermatitis in a prospective, double-blind, randomized study. Material and methods: The study comprised 49 patients with node-negative breast cancer. They were operated on with sector resection and scheduled for postoperative radiotherapy using photons with identical radiation qualities and dosage to the breast parenchyma. The patients were randomized to receive either MMF or emollient cream. The cream was applied on the irradiated skin twice a week from the start of radiotherapy until the 12th fraction (24 Gy) and thereafter once daily until 3 weeks after completion of radiation. Both groups additionally received non-blinded emollient cream daily. The intensity of the acute radiation dermatitis was evaluated on a weekly basis regarding erythema and pigmentation, using a reflectance spectrophotometer together with visual scoring of the skin reactions. Results: MMF in combination with emollient cream treatment significantly decreased acute radiation dermatitis (P=0.0033) compared with emollient cream alone. There was no significant difference in pigmentation between the two groups. Conclusions: Adding MMF, a potent topical corticosteroid, to an emollient cream is statistically significantly more effective than emollient cream alone in reducing acute radiation dermatitis

  1. Stimulating effects of low doses of radiation

    Different ionizing radiations cause biochemical and biophysical changes in the cells of the genotypes according to the application of the doses applied to different organs of the plants, and the manner of their application (acute, chronic, or acute and chronic). The sensitivity of different genotypes, and their tissues, depends on the stage at which their tissues were irradiated as well as on the environmental conditions under which the irradiation was made. Relatively strong doses usually cause some genetic changes in the somatic and generative cells. Small doses can, in some genotypes, stimulate the growth of some tissues to some extent. The stimulating effect on the growth of seedlings of the M2 generation, developed from acute seed irradiation of some genotypes of wheat, barley, and inbred lines of maize and their hybrids is described here. 3 refs, 5 tabs

  2. Evidence Report: Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events

    Carnell, Lisa; Blattnig, Steve; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice; Kim, Myung-Hee; Norman, Ryan; Patel, Zarana; Simonsen, Lisa; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Crew health and performance may be impacted by a major solar particle event (SPE), multiple SPEs, or the cumulative effect of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and SPEs. Beyond low-Earth orbit, the protection of the Earth's magnetosphere is no longer available, such that increased shielding and protective mechanisms are necessary in order to prevent acute radiation sickness and impacts to mission success or crew survival. While operational monitoring and shielding are expected to minimize radiation exposures, there are EVA scenarios outside of low-Earth orbit where the risk of prodromal effects, including nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and fatigue, as well as skin injury and depletion of the blood-forming organs (BFO), may occur. There is a reasonable concern that a compromised immune system due to high skin doses from a SPE or due to synergistic space flight factors (e.g., microgravity) may lead to increased risk to the BFO. The primary data available at present are derived from analyses of medical patients and persons accidentally exposed to acute, high doses of low-linear energy transfer (LET) (or terrestrial) radiation. Data more specific to the space flight environment must be compiled to quantify the magnitude of increase of this risk and to develop appropriate protection strategies. In particular, information addressing the distinct differences between solar proton exposures and terrestrial exposure scenarios, including radiation quality, dose-rate effects, and non-uniform dose distributions, is required for accurate risk estimation.

  3. Chromosomal mechanisms in murine radiation acute myeloid leukemogenesis

    Chromosome 2 abnormalities, particularly interstitial deletions, characterize murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs). Here, G-band analyses in CBA/H mice of early (1-6 month) post 3 Gy X-radiation events in bone marrow cells in vivo and karyotype evolution in one unusual AML are presented. The early event analysis showed that all irradiated animals carry chromosome 2 abnormalities, that chromosome 2 abnormalities are more frequent than expected and that interstitial deletions are more common in chromosome 2 than in the remainder of the genome. On presentation AML case N122 carried a t(2; 11) terminal translocation which, with passaging, evolved into a del2(C3F3). Therefore two pathways in leukaemogenesis might exist, one deletion-driven, the other terminal tranlocation-driven involving interstitial genes and terminal genes respectively of chromosome 2. As all irradiated individuals carried chromosome 2 abnormalities, the formation of these aberrations does not determine individual leukaemogenic sensitivity as only 20-25% of animals would be expected to develop AML. Similar lines of argument suggest that chromosome 2 abnormalities are necessary but not sufficient for radiation leukaemogenesis in CBA/H nor are they rate limiting in leukaemogenesis. (Author)

  4. Chromosomal mechanisms in murine radiation acute myeloid leukemogenesis

    Bouffler, S.D.; Breckon, G.; Cox, R. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    Chromosome 2 abnormalities, particularly interstitial deletions, characterize murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs). Here, G-band analyses in CBA/H mice of early (1-6 month) post 3 Gy X-radiation events in bone marrow cells in vivo and karyotype evolution in one unusual AML are presented. The early event analysis showed that all irradiated animals carry chromosome 2 abnormalities, that chromosome 2 abnormalities are more frequent than expected and that interstitial deletions are more common in chromosome 2 than in the remainder of the genome. On presentation AML case N122 carried a t(2; 11) terminal translocation which, with passaging, evolved into a del2(C3F3). Therefore two pathways in leukaemogenesis might exist, one deletion-driven, the other terminal tranlocation-driven involving interstitial genes and terminal genes respectively of chromosome 2. As all irradiated individuals carried chromosome 2 abnormalities, the formation of these aberrations does not determine individual leukaemogenic sensitivity as only 20-25% of animals would be expected to develop AML. Similar lines of argument suggest that chromosome 2 abnormalities are necessary but not sufficient for radiation leukaemogenesis in CBA/H nor are they rate limiting in leukaemogenesis. (Author).

  5. Cumulative radiation effect

    In five previous papers, the concept of Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) has been presented as a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Simple nomographic and tabular methods for the solution of practical problems in radiotherapy are now described. An essential feature of solving a CRE problem is firstly to present it in a concise and readily appreciated form, and, to do this, nomenclature has been introduced to describe schedules and regimes as compactly as possible. Simple algebraic equations have been derived to describe the CRE achieved by multi-schedule regimes. In these equations, the equivalence conditions existing at the junctions between schedules are not explicit and the equations are based on the CREs of the constituent schedules assessed individually without reference to their context in the regime as a whole. This independent evaluation of CREs for each schedule has resulted in a considerable simplification in the calculation of complex problems. The calculations are further simplified by the use of suitable tables and nomograms, so that the mathematics involved is reduced to simple arithmetical operations which require at the most the use of a slide rule but can be done by hand. The order of procedure in the presentation and calculation of CRE problems can be summarised in an evaluation procedure sheet. The resulting simple methods for solving practical problems of any complexity on the CRE-system are demonstrated by a number of examples. (author)

  6. Psychoneurological character of persons who had acute radiation syndrome

    Survivors of the Chernobyl accident who had an acute radiation syndrome (ARS,110 persons) were observed for 8 years after Chernobyl accident. It has been found that the cerebrovascular pathology and vertebral osteochondrosis rate increase as well as abnormal psychoorganic changes in personality and endogenic-like psychoorganic process, their rate being in proportion to the ARS heaviness. The EEG and evoked potentials have confirmed the dyscirculatory and toxic-metabolic organic disorders of the central nervous system as a result of irradiation in the remote period of the ARS consequences. It is necessary for early and differential diagnostic of the psychoneurological disorders after ARS to carry out the neuro- and psychophysiological examination as well as computer tomography, nucleic magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography of the brain

  7. New scoring system identifies kidney outcome with radiation therapy in acute renal allograft rejection

    concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Independent factors examined by Cox regression modeling were: gender (p 0.005), creatinine levels (p = 0.000), HLA-DR (p = 0.05), PRA-Maximum >70% (p = 0.014). Each factor was scored using integral coefficients to generate four different groups. The Kaplan-Meier survival analyzed by group produces an interpretable separation of the risk factors for graft loss. Conclusions: The outcome in patients treated with radiation therapy for acute renal graft rejection can be predicted by a novel scoring system. Patients with scores of three or less are able to achieve 100% renal graft salvage, while patients who have scores of 12 or higher are not able to be salvaged with the current radiation therapy regimen. Future studies should be directed toward identifying more effective treatment for patients who have a high score based on our criteria. The scoring system should be utilized to identify patients at risk who could benefit from radiation therapy. Further study with a randomized trial utilizing this scoring system is needed to confirm the validity of the scoring system in predicting graft survival and the efficacy of radiation in patients who receive radiation therapy for acute graft rejection

  8. Alleviation of acute radiation damages by post-irradiation treatments

    Radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages in mice were tried to alleviate experimentally by post-treatment. Combined treatment of OK-432 and aztreonam clearly prevented the radiation induced sepsis and elevated the survival rate in mice; the survival was 80% in the OK-432 plus aztreonam group while it was 55% in the group treated with OK-432 alone and 0% with saline. Irsogladine maleate, an anti-ulcer drug, increased the survival rate of jejunal crypt stem cells with a clear dose-related trend. The D0 for irsogladine maleate was 2.8 Gy although it was 2.3 Gy for saline, These findings suggest that some conventional drugs are effective for radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages and the possibility that they can be applied for people exposed to radiation accidentally. (author)

  9. The acute radiation syndrome in the miniature pig Troll

    8 animals at an average age of 230 days and an average body weight of 24.9 kg were whole-body gamma-irradiated from a cobalt-60 source with 3.0 Gy midline dose. 4 of the 8 pigs survived, the others died within day 14 and 17 after irradiation, mainly due to thrombopenia dependent hemorrhage. Hematologic examinations showed as well that the platelets decreased to a minimum on day 14 p.r. The granulocyte values and yet remarkable the lymphocyte values decreased at an earlier time. The absolute lymphocyte counts reached their lowest mark already on the first day after irradiation. The reticulocytes, which also decreased markedly on day 1 p.r., sank further on the following days, till after two weeks when they started to increase again. Furthermore 25 biochemical serum parameters have been investigated. The major pathological findings of the acute radiation sickness were the mostly heavy hemorrhages. Histological studies indicated primarily aplasia of bone marrow, intestinal mucosa damages and atrophy of lymphatic tissues. Signs for septicemia were rarely found. The investigations in Troll-pigs showed, their reactions to an irradiation of middle-lethal doses are similar to those of other pigs. Only the Vietnamese pot-bellied swine reacts differently: Profuse diarrheas already after low radiation-doses are reported. (orig./MG)

  10. A two-mutation model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia using historical mouse data.

    Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Bouffler, Simon; Ellender, Michele; Huiskamp, René; Kowalczuk, Christine; Meijne, Emmy; Sutmuller, Marjolein

    2011-03-01

    From studies of the atomic bomb survivors, it is well known that ionizing radiation causes several forms of leukemia. However, since the specific mechanism behind this process remains largely unknown, it is difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic effects at acute high-dose exposures to risk estimates for the chronic low-dose exposures that are important for radiation protection purposes. Recently, it has become clear that the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in CBA/H mice takes place through two key steps, both involving the Sfpi1 gene. A similar mechanism may play a role in human radiation-induced AML. In the present paper, a two-mutation carcinogenesis model is applied to model AML in several data sets of X-ray- and neutron-exposed CBA/H mice. The models obtained provide good fits to the data. A comparison between the predictions for neutron-induced and X-ray-induced AML yields an RBE for neutrons of approximately 3. The model used is considered to be a first step toward a model for human radiation-induced AML, which could be used to estimate risks of exposure to low doses. PMID:20842369

  11. Radiation effects and radiation risks. 2. ed.

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig.) With 10 maps in appendix

  12. Genomic alterations in radiation-induced murine acute myeloid leukemias

    High-dose radiation induces acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in C3H mice, most of which have a high frequent hemizygous deletion around the D2Mit15 marker on the interstitially deleted region of chromosome 2. This region involves PU.1 (Sfpi-1), which is a critical candidate gene for initiation of mouse leukemogenesis. To identify other genes contributing to leukemogenesis with PU.1, we analyzed chromosomal aberrations and changes of expression in 18 AML-related genes in 39 AMLs. Array CGH analysis revealed that 35 out of 39 AMLs had hemizygous deletions of chromosome 2, and recurrent aberrations on chromosomes 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 15, and 18. Expressions of 18 AML-related genes, within the altered chromosome regions detected by array CGH were analyzed by using RT-PCR and/or real-time PCR. Although Wnt5b, Wnt16, G-CSFR, M-CSFR, SCL/Tal-1 and GATA1 genes were down-regulated, the c-myc gene was, on the contrary, up-regulated. Expression levels of two genes, Rasgrp1 and Wt1, within the deleted region of chromosome 2 correlated with the loss of one of two alleles, although the expression of PU.1 showed an inverse correlation. In addition, the expression level of PU.1 appeared to be higher with a coincidental missense point mutation in DNA-binding domain of PU.1 in the remaining allele, suggesting a feedback transcription control on PU.1. Such an autoregulation might be relevant to the fact that PU.1 haploinsufficiency per se triggers radiation-induced AML. Together with the detection of chromosomal aberrations, these findings provide useful clues to identify cooperative genes that are responsible for molecular pathogenesis of AMLs induced by low-dose-rate radiation exposure. (author)

  13. Topical betamethasone for the prevention of acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients

    Background: Acute radiation dermatitis is a very common side effect of radiation therapy in large numbers of cancers including breast cancer. Despite high prevalence rate of acute radiation dermatitis and also wet desquamation, a few trials on prophylaxis of this complication using topical treatment have been conducted. Despite effectiveness of topical corticosteroids in treatment of acute radiation dermatitis which are focused in the literature, yet there are some controversy about their usage in this regard. For this reason we attempted to investigate this subject via conducting a clinical trial. Materials and Methods: This trial included 76 patients with pathologic diagnosis of breast cancer for whom radiotherapy has been planned. Patients were 27-70 years old. Patients with radical mastectomy received 5000 cGy within 5 weeks, and those with conservative surgery received 6000 cGy within 6 weeks devided in 200 centigray fractions. Patients were divided randomly into two groups, betamethasone and placebo, 38 patients in each group. In placebo group, 3 patients did not attend for weekly assessment. Additional one patient did not refer during follow-up period. Thus, they were excluded from the study. One group was given betamethasone o.1% and other group was administered base of ointment as placebo. All patient consumed drug or placebo from the 1st day of treatment until one week after treatment completion as twice daily within tangential field. Patients were monitored for assessing dermatitis severity and its symptoms and also possible drug adverse effects one week after the therapy commenced and afterwards by one-week intervals as well as in an appointed day. Three weeks after termination of therapy, patients were also visited, and each examination provided information about dermatologic complications which were registered in the questionnaire. Results: Mean times development of dermatitis in both betamethasone and placebo groups were 3.2500 and 2.2571 (weeks

  14. Association of Acute Radiation Syndrome and Rain after the Bombings in Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    Ozasa, K; Sakata, R; Cullings, H M; Grant, E J

    2016-06-01

    Acute radiation-induced symptoms reported in survivors after the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been suspected to be associated with rain that fell after the explosions, but this association has not been evaluated in an epidemiological study that considers the effects of the direct dose from the atomic bombs and other factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate this association using information from a fixed cohort, comprised of 93,741 members of the Life Span Study who were in the city at the time of the bombing. Information on acute symptoms and exposure to rain was collected in surveys conducted by interviewers, primarily in the 1950s. The proportion of survivors developing severe epilation was around 60% at levels of direct radiation doses of 3 Gy or higher and less than 0.2% at levels <0.005 Gy regardless of reported rain exposure status. The low prevalence of acute symptoms at low direct doses indicates that the reported fallout rain was not homogeneously radioactive at a level sufficient to cause a substantial probability of acute symptoms. We observed that the proportion of reported acute symptoms was slightly higher among those who reported rain exposure in some subgroups, however, suggestions that rain was the cause of these reported symptoms are not supported by analyses specific to the known areas of radioactive fallout. Misclassification of exposure and outcome, including symptoms due to other causes and recall bias, appears to be a more plausible explanation. However, the insufficient and retrospective nature of the available data limited our ability to quantify the attribution to those possible causes. PMID:27223827

  15. Radiation effects on blood coagulation

    Haemorrhage is an important and ominous sign in acute radiation disease. While it is overwhelmingly evident that thrombocytopenia is the major cause of the haemorrhagic diathesis, detailed observations of all of the changes in the coagulation mechanism, fibrinolytic elements and platelet function are lacking. The current knowledge is reviewed in this chapter. In general, changes should be considered in relation to the course of the disease, that is early or late, and whether the observations were made in man or animals

  16. Radiation effects in wild terrestrial vertebrates - the EPIC collection

    The paper presents data on radiation effects in populations of wild vertebrate animals inhabiting contaminated terrestrial ecosystems. The data were extracted from the database 'Radiation effects on biota', compiled within the framework of the EC Project EPIC (2000-2003). The data collection, based on publications in Russian, demonstrates radiation effects in the areas characterized with high levels of radionuclides (Kyshtym radioactive trace; 'spots' of enhanced natural radioactivity in the Komi region of Russia; territories contaminated from the Chernobyl fallout). The data covers a wide range of exposures from acute accidental irradiation to lifetime exposures at relatively low dose rates. Radiation effects include mortality, changes in reproduction, decrease of health, ecological effects, cytogenetic effects, adaptation to radiation, and others. Peculiarities of radiation effects caused by different radionuclides are described, also the severity of effects as they appear in different organisms (e.g. mice, frogs, birds, etc.)

  17. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    A summary is given of studies on radiation effects in light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, detectors, optical isolators and optical fibers. It is shown that the study of radiation damage in these devices can provide valuable information concerning the nature of the devices themselves, as well as methods of hardening these devices for applications in radiation environments

  18. Radiation effects on living systems

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. It is intended that the bibliography will be updated regularly

  19. The role of MRI in the diagnosis of acute radiation reaction in breast cancer patient

    Startseva, Zh A.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Usova, AV; Frolova, I. G.; Simonov, K. A.; Velikaya, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A clinical case with acute radiation reaction of the left breast after organ-preserving surgery with 10 Gy IORT (24.8 Gy) conventional radiation therapy has been presented. Comprehensive MRI examination showed signs of radiation- induced damage to skin, soft tissues and vessels of the residual breast.

  20. Poloxamer 188 and antioxidants prevent acute radiation necrosis of adult skeletal muscle cells

    Full text: To date there are no effective therapeutic agents widely available for acute radiation sickness. Acute cellular necrosis occurring minutes to hours after exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation (IR) results from rapid membrane lipid peroxidation, blebbing and membrane breakdown. Not only can repairing the membrane prevent acute necrosis, but it can also provide a critical time period to address other mechanisms of cell death, such as apoptosis or mitotic arrest, which manifest over a longer time frame. We have previously shown that certain polymer surfactants can restore structural integrity and transport barrier function of cell membranes following high-dose IR. We now present data showing that the amphiphillic surfactant Poloxamer 188 (P188), a tri-block copolymer composed of two hydrocephalic blocks separated by a hydrophobic central block, has efficacy in preventing acute necrosis of adult rat skeletal muscle cells after high-dose IR and that at doses in which P188 is effective, adding the antioxidant ascorbate or n-acetyl cysteine further increases cell survival. Explanted rat flexor digitoum brevis muscle cells received 10, 40 or 40 Gy IR from Co 60 in a 21% oxygen atmosphere and their viability was determined using fluorometric probes (Calcein-AM and Ethidium homodimer) at 4 and 18 hours after IR. Compared to unirradiated cells, 10 Gy did not cause acute necrosis. Significant acute necrosis was observed after 40 and 80 Gy in a dose-dependent manner. Post-IR treatment with P188 significantly enhanced the cells' viability. By comparison, treating with 10 kDa neutral Dextran, a purely hydrophilic polymer, was not found to be effective. Despite progressive cell death over 18 h after high-dose IR, cells treated with P188 showed greater survival than cells grown only in media or Dextran-treated cells. Cells treated with 40 Gy survived better than those treated with 80 Gy, indicating some limits to the efficacy of treatment with P188. Cells

  1. Reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine (Prozac) submitted to ionizing radiation to Vibrio fischeri

    Santos, Dymes R.A.; Garcia, Vanessa S.G.; Vilarrubia, Anna C.S.; Borrely, Sueli I., E-mail: vanessagarcia@usp.br, E-mail: sborrely@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The constant use of pharmaceutical drugs by great part of the population and its continuous input into the environment creates a growing need of investigating its presence, behavior and the effects on aquatic biota, as well as new ways to treat wastewater containing such substances. The fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH) present in the drug Prozac is an active ingredient used in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Generally, these compounds enter the aquatic environment by sewage collectors systems after undergoing prior treatment in sewage treatment plants (STPs) or without any treatment. This study focused on evaluating the reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical FH, under its manipulated formula, for the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It was also evaluated the acute toxicity of the aqueous solution containing the FH after its exposition to ionizing radiation from industrial electron accelerator. It was performed acute toxicity tests lasting 15 minutes, where the average EC (50) of the non-irradiated CF water solution was approximately 0.68 mg L-1. While the CF water solution irradiated with 1 kGy, 2.5 kGy, 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy, presented an average EC(50) 1.63 mg.L{sup -1}, 2.34 mg.L{sup -1}, 2.35 mg.L{sup -1} and 1.80 mg.L{sup -1}, respectively, showing a notable reduction of the acute toxicity for this organism. (author)

  2. Reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine (Prozac) submitted to ionizing radiation to Vibrio fischeri

    The constant use of pharmaceutical drugs by great part of the population and its continuous input into the environment creates a growing need of investigating its presence, behavior and the effects on aquatic biota, as well as new ways to treat wastewater containing such substances. The fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH) present in the drug Prozac is an active ingredient used in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Generally, these compounds enter the aquatic environment by sewage collectors systems after undergoing prior treatment in sewage treatment plants (STPs) or without any treatment. This study focused on evaluating the reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical FH, under its manipulated formula, for the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It was also evaluated the acute toxicity of the aqueous solution containing the FH after its exposition to ionizing radiation from industrial electron accelerator. It was performed acute toxicity tests lasting 15 minutes, where the average EC (50) of the non-irradiated CF water solution was approximately 0.68 mg L-1. While the CF water solution irradiated with 1 kGy, 2.5 kGy, 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy, presented an average EC(50) 1.63 mg.L-1, 2.34 mg.L-1, 2.35 mg.L-1 and 1.80 mg.L-1, respectively, showing a notable reduction of the acute toxicity for this organism. (author)

  3. Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus

    Thiede, M.E.

    1988-05-25

    Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Comparison of Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants radioprotection potency.

    Maliev, Slava; Popov, Dmitri; Lisenkov, Nikolai

    Introduction: This experimental study of biological effects of the Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants which were used for prophylaxis and treatment of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by high doses of the low-LET radiation. An important role of Reactive Oxyden Species (Singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions and bio-radicals)in development of the Acute Radiation Syndromes could be defined as a "central dogma" of radiobiology. Oxida-tion and damages of lipids, proteins, DNA, and RNA are playing active role in development of postradiation apoptosis. However, the therapeutic role of antioxidants in modification of a postradiation injury caused by high doses of radiation remains controversial.Previous stud-ies had revealed that antioxidants did not increase a survival rate of mammals with severe forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by High Doses of the low-LET radiation. The Antiradiation Vaccine(ARV) contains toxoid forms of the Radiation Toxins(RT) from the Specific Radiation Determinants Group (SRD). The RT SRD has toxic and antigenic prop-erties at the same time and stimulates a specific antibody elaboration and humoral response form activated acquired immune system. The blocking antiradiation antibodies induce an im-munologically specific effect and have inhibiting effects on radiation induced neuro-toxicity, vascular-toxicity, gastrointestinal toxcity, hematopoietic toxicity, and radiation induced cytol-ysis of selected groups of cells that are sensitive to radiation. Methods and materials: Scheme of experiments: 1. Irradiated animals with development of Cerebrovascular ARS (Cv-ARS), Cardiovascular ARS (Cr-ARS) Gastrointestinal ARS(GI-ARS), Hematopoietic ARS (H-ARS) -control -were treated with placebo administration. 2. Irradiated animals were treated with antioxidants prophylaxisis and treatment of Cv-ARS, Cr-SRS, GI-ARS, Hp-ARS forms of the ARS. 3. irradiated animals were treated with radioprotection by Antiradiation Vaccine

  5. Treatment for infections complications of experimental acute radiation sickness with sulacillin, a combined antibiotic

    The therapeutic efficiency of sulacillin (combination of ampicillin antibiotic with beta-lactamase sulbactam inhibitor) used for prevention and treatment of infections complications of the acute radiation disease (ARD) is considered. It is shown that sulacillin antiinfections effect essentially exceeds the activity of ampicillin by treatment of irradiated mice infected with a beta-lactamase-producing strain of Kl pneumoniae. Inclusion of the sulacillin as a principal antibiotic into the ARD therapeutic scheme provides for the 66.6 % survival of dogs at LD90/45

  6. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures

  7. Chanqes of osseous tissue following radiation therapy and in acute radiation trauma

    The studies on ionizing radiation effect with harmful doses on man skeleton are analyzed. Pathomorphological and rentgenological changes in bones of patients, who underwent radiotherapy course are studied; the pointed out changes were observed as radiation complications. It is noted that pathological process in the bone develops comparatively slowly following therapeutic fractionated irradiation

  8. Chemical effects of radiation

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  9. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    Ionizing radiation is energy that travels through space as electromagnetic waves or a stream of fast moving particles. In the workplace, the sources of ionizing radiation are radioactive substances, nuclear power plants, x-ray machines and nuclear devices used in medicine, research and industry. Commonly encountered types of radiation are alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Alpha particles have very little penetrating power and pose a risk only when the radioactive substance is deposited inside the body. Beta particles are more penetrating than alpha particles and can penetrate the outer body tissues causing damage to the skin and the eyes. Gamma rays are highly penetrating and can cause radiation damage to the whole body. The probability of radiation-induced disease depends on the accumulated amount of radiation dose. The main health effects of ionizing radiation are cancers in exposed persons and genetic disorders in the children, grandchildren and subsequent generations of the exposed parents. The fetus is highly sensitive to radiation-induced abnormalities. At high doses, radiation can cause cataracts in the eyes. There is no firm evidence that ionizing radiation causes premature aging. Radiation-induced sterility is highly unlikely for occupational doses. The data on the combined effect of ionizing radiation and other cancer-causing physical and chemical agents are inconclusive

  10. The analysis of prognostic factors affecting post-radiation acute reaction after conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    Spych, Michał; Gottwald, Leszek; Klonowicz, Małgorzata; Biegała, Michał; Bibik, Robert; Fijuth, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to evaluate the risk of acute side effects in the lung after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An attempt was made to single out clinical factors and factors related to treatment technique which may induce acute post-radiation pneumonitis. Material and methods The analysis concerned 34 consecutive patients who underwent radical radiation therapy for NSCLC. Intensity of early toxicity was evaluated...

  11. The acute radiation syndrome in the 137Cs Brazilian accident, 1987

    Eight patients with the most severe degreed of bone marrow impairment are studied. Case descriptions are limited to manifestations and complications related to the 'Acute Radiation Syndrome' (ARS). Medical facilities, exams and therapeutic management are discussed. (MAC)

  12. Protective Effect of Melatonin on Acute Pancreatitis

    Jolanta Jaworek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, a product of the pineal gland, is released from the gut mucosa in response to food ingestion. Specific receptors for melatonin have been detected in many gastrointestinal tissues including the pancreas. Melatonin as well as its precursor, L-tryptophan, attenuates the severity of acute pancreatitis and protects the pancreatic tissue from the damage caused by acute inflammation. The beneficial effect of melatonin on acute pancreatitis, which has been reported in many experimental studies and supported by clinical observations, is related to: (1 enhancement of antioxidant defense of the pancreatic tissue, through direct scavenging of toxic radical oxygen (ROS and nitrogen (RNS species, (2 preservation of the activity of antioxidant enzymes; such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, or glutathione peroxidase (GPx, (3 the decline of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis α (TNFα production, accompanied by stimulation of an anti-inflammatory IL-10, (4 improvement of pancreatic blood flow and decrease of neutrophil infiltration, (5 reduction of apoptosis and necrosis in the inflamed pancreatic tissue, (6 increased production of chaperon protein (HSP60, and (7 promotion of regenerative process in the pancreas. Conclusion. Endogenous melatonin produced from L-tryptophan could be one of the native mechanisms protecting the pancreas from acute damage and accelerating regeneration of this gland. The beneficial effects of melatonin shown in experimental studies suggest that melatonin ought to be employed in the clinical trials as a supportive therapy in acute pancreatitis and could be used in people at high risk for acute pancreatitis to prevent the development of pancreatic inflammation.

  13. Effect of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle precursor cells

    Marš, Tomaž; Čemažar, Maja; Jurdana, Mihaela; Pegan, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Background. Long term effects of different doses of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle myoblast proliferation, cytokine signalling and stress response capacity were studied in primary cell cultures.Materials and methods. Human skeletal muscle myoblasts obtained from muscle biopsies were cultured and irradiated with a Darpac 2000 X-ray unit at doses of 4, 6 and 8 Gy. Acute effects of radiation were studied by interleukin - 6 (IL-6) release and stress response detected by the heat shoc...

  14. Autologous bone marrow stromal cell transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis induced by a moderate dose of radiation in dogs.

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Xu; Li, Hongyu; Qi, Xingshun; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-05-01

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most common complications of cancer radiotherapy, and the development of new and effective measures for its prevention and treatment is of great importance. Adult bone marrow stromal stem cells (ABMSCs) are capable of self-renewal and exhibit low immunogenicity. In this study, we investigated ABMSC transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis. We developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis using abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a single X-ray dose of 14 Gy. ABMSCs were cultured in vitro, identified via immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, and double labeled with CM-Dil and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) before transplantation, which took place 48 hours after abdominal irradiation in a single fraction. The dog model of acute radiation enteritis was transplanted with cultured ABMSCs labeled with CM-Dil and SPIO into the mesenteric artery through the femoral artery. Compared with untreated control groups, dogs treated with ABMSCs exhibited substantially longer survival time and improved relief of clinical symptoms. ABMSC transplantation induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and the recovery of intestinal function. Furthermore, ABMSC transplantation resulted in elevated serum levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-11 (IL10) and intestinal radioprotective factors, such as keratinocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor-2, and platelet-derived growth factor-B while reducing the serum level of the inflammatory cytokine IL17. ABMSCs induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and regulated the secretion of serum cytokines and the expression of radioprotective proteins and thus could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective mitigators of and protectors against acute radiation enteritis. PMID:26763584

  15. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given

  16. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  17. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    Eduardo Ekman Schenberg

    Full Text Available Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT, harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered.

  18. Computed tomographic findings of radiation-induced acute adrenal injury with associated radiation nephropathy: a case report

    Radiation nephropathy was first recognized in 1906. The kidney is a radiosensitive organ with a tolerance dose (5% complications in 5 years) of 20 Gray. The imaging findings of acute and chronic radiation induced renal injury are previously described. Radiation-induced adrenal injury, to our knowledge, has not been described in the literature. Unlike the kidneys and other upper abdominal organs, the adrenal glands are traditionally thought to be radio-resistant, protected from radiation-induced injury by proximity to adjacent organs and by the adrenal medulla which reportedly has increased radio-resistance. We present the computed tomographic imaging findings of a patient with acute radiation induced adrenal injury which resulted in adrenal insufficiency following radiotherapy of an adjacent thecal metastasis

  19. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation.

    Fabrikant, J. I.

    1981-01-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer inducti...

  20. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  1. Phase II study assessing the effectiveness of Biafine cream as a prophylactic agent for radiation-induced acute skin toxicity to the breast in women undergoing radiotherapy with concomitant CMF chemotherapy

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of Biafine cream in preventing Grade 2 acute radiation dermatitis, according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada skin radiation toxicity criteria in patients undergoing concomitant adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the breast. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients participated in this study. Patients were treated with a lumpectomy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the breast. Biafine cream was applied daily, starting on the first day and ending 2 weeks post-radiotherapy. Patients underwent weekly skin assessments throughout radiotherapy and at 2 and 4 weeks after treatment. Outcome measures were assessed using a Skin Assessment Questionnaire that was scored according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada skin radiation toxicity criteria and a self-administered questionnaire that evaluated skin symptoms. Results: The maximum skin toxicity observed during the course of treatment was as follows: less than Grade 2 toxicity, 15% (9 patients); Grade 2, 83% (50 patients); Grade 3, 2% (1 patient); Grade 4, 0% (0 patients). The majority of the radiation dermatitis was observed after 3 weeks of radiotherapy. Conclusion: The majority of patients who underwent concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy for breast cancer developed Grade 2 radiation dermatitis with the use of Biafine cream. However, no treatment delays or interruptions were observed because of skin toxicity

  2. Gamma radiation effects on nestling Tree Swallows

    The sensitivity of Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to the stress of ionizing radiation was investigated with growth analysis. Freshly hatched nestlings were temporarily removed from nests, taken to the laboratory and acutely exposed to 0.9, 2.7, or 4.5 Gy gamma radiation. Some of the unirradiated control nestlings were also taken to the laboratory whereas others were left in the nests. Growth of all the nestlings was measured daily and analyzed by fitting growth models. There was no detectable radiation-induced mortality up to fledgling, approx. = 20 d after irradiation. Radiation exposure did not affect the basic growth pattern; the logistic growth model was most suitable for body mass and foot length, and the von Bertalanffy model for primary-feather length, irrespective of treatment. Parameter values from these models indicated pronounced growth depression in the 2.7-Gy and 4.5-Gy groups, particularly for body mass. Radiation also affected the timing of development. The growth depression of the 2.7-Gy group was similar to that caused by hatching asynchrony in unirradiated nestlings. The 4.5-Cy nestlings grew as well as unexposed nestlings that died from natural causes. Chronic irradiation at approx. = 1.0 Cy/d caused more severe growth effects than acute exposure to 4.5 Gy and may have caused permanent stunting. Growth analysis is a potent tool for assessing man-made environmental stresses. Observed body-mass statistics and model parameters seem to be most sensitive to environmental stresses, but coefficients of variation are not necessarily correlated with sensitivity. 34 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  3. Genetic effects of radiation

    In this chapter, the BEIR Committee has reviewed and reevaluated the data that are pertinent to the estimation of genetic risks to humans from low levels of ionizing radiation. The present report summarizes the methods and conclusions of previous committees. In deriving new risk figures, it places rather more emphasis on the results of the studies of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors than have previous BEIR reports. However, the committee has also made use of the extensive radiation studies carried out with mice, which are briefly reviewed. 174 ref

  4. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  5. Diagnostic criterions of the postradiation encephalopathy in remote period of the acute radiation syndrome

    Development of post-radiation encephalopathy diagnostic criteria on the base of neuro psychic, neuro- and psychofisiological research in patients who suffered with acute radiation disease after Chernobyl catastrophe was the aim of this work. 110 persons of 20-75 years age were investigated. 55 refs., 6 tab., 6 figs

  6. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2014), s. 4770-4778. ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : granulocyte colony-stimulating factor * radiation accidents * acute radiation syndrome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2014

  7. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy

  8. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-08-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy.

  9. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS – treatment of the reduced host defense

    Heslet L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lars Heslet1, Christiane Bay2, Steen Nepper-Christensen31Serendex ApS, Gentofte; 2University of Copenhagen, Medical Faculty, Copenhagen; 3Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Otorhinolaryngology, Køge University Hospital, Køge, DenmarkBackground: The current radiation threat from the Fukushima power plant accident has prompted rethinking of the contingency plan for prophylaxis and treatment of the acute radiation syndrome (ARS. The well-documented effect of the growth factors (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF] and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF] in acute radiation injury has become standard treatment for ARS in the United States, based on the fact that growth factors increase number and functions of both macrophages and granulocytes.Methods: Review of the current literature.Results: The lungs have their own host defense system, based on alveolar macrophages. After radiation exposure to the lungs, resting macrophages can no longer be transformed, not even during systemic administration of growth factors because G-CSF/GM-CSF does not penetrate the alveoli. Under normal circumstances, locally-produced GM-CSF receptors transform resting macrophages into fully immunocompetent dendritic cells in the sealed-off pulmonary compartment. However, GM-CSF is not expressed in radiation injured tissue due to defervescence of the macrophages. In order to maintain the macrophage’s important role in host defense after radiation exposure, it is hypothesized that it is necessary to administer the drug exogenously in order to uphold the barrier against exogenous and endogenous infections and possibly prevent the potentially lethal systemic infection, which is the main cause of death in ARS.Recommendation: Preemptive treatment should be initiated after suspected exposure of a radiation dose of at least ~2 Gy by prompt dosing of 250–400 µg GM-CSF/m2 or 5 µg/kg G-CSF administered systemically and concomitant inhalation of

  10. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of δ- and β- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both θ- and α-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author)

  11. Radiation effects on structural materials

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support

  12. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

    Purpose: To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and lymphotoxin-β) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) during the same acute and chronic phases. Methods and Materials: Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Results: Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and lymphotoxin-β) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-β, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Conclusion: Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy

  13. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Comparison of Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants radioprotection potency.

    Maliev, Slava; Popov, Dmitri; Lisenkov, Nikolai

    Introduction: This experimental study of biological effects of the Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants which were used for prophylaxis and treatment of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by high doses of the low-LET radiation. An important role of Reactive Oxyden Species (Singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions and bio-radicals)in development of the Acute Radiation Syndromes could be defined as a "central dogma" of radiobiology. Oxida-tion and damages of lipids, proteins, DNA, and RNA are playing active role in development of postradiation apoptosis. However, the therapeutic role of antioxidants in modification of a postradiation injury caused by high doses of radiation remains controversial.Previous stud-ies had revealed that antioxidants did not increase a survival rate of mammals with severe forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by High Doses of the low-LET radiation. The Antiradiation Vaccine(ARV) contains toxoid forms of the Radiation Toxins(RT) from the Specific Radiation Determinants Group (SRD). The RT SRD has toxic and antigenic prop-erties at the same time and stimulates a specific antibody elaboration and humoral response form activated acquired immune system. The blocking antiradiation antibodies induce an im-munologically specific effect and have inhibiting effects on radiation induced neuro-toxicity, vascular-toxicity, gastrointestinal toxcity, hematopoietic toxicity, and radiation induced cytol-ysis of selected groups of cells that are sensitive to radiation. Methods and materials: Scheme of experiments: 1. Irradiated animals with development of Cerebrovascular ARS (Cv-ARS), Cardiovascular ARS (Cr-ARS) Gastrointestinal ARS(GI-ARS), Hematopoietic ARS (H-ARS) -control -were treated with placebo administration. 2. Irradiated animals were treated with antioxidants prophylaxisis and treatment of Cv-ARS, Cr-SRS, GI-ARS, Hp-ARS forms of the ARS. 3. irradiated animals were treated with radioprotection by Antiradiation Vaccine

  14. Countermeasure development : Specific Immunoprophylaxis and Immunotherapy of Combined Acute Radiation Syndromes.

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Combined Acute Radiation Syndromes (CARS) are extremely severe injuries. Combination of Radiation and Thermal factors induce development of the acute pathologi-cal processes in irradiated mammals: systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMOD), toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). Also, high doses of Radiation and Thermal injury induce for-mation of following Toxin groups: A. Specific Radiation Toxins; B. Specific Thermal Toxins; C. Nonspecific Histiogenic Pro-inflammatory and Inflammatory Toxins (NHIT). Specific Radi-ation Toxins (SRT) include four major group of Toxins: Cerebrovascular Radiation Toxins (Cv RT), Cardiovascular Radiation Toxins (Cr RT), Gastrointestinal Radiation Toxins (Gi RT), and Hematopoietic Radiation Toxins (Hp RT). CvRT, Cr RT, Gi RT groups of toxins are defined as Neurotoxins and Hp RT group is defined as Hematotoxins. Specific Thermal Toxins (STT) were isolated from the burned skin (Voul S., Colker I. 1972). The group of Nonspecific Histio-genic Inflammatory Toxins (NHIT) includes high amount of tissue toxins which are peptides with medium molecular weight. This group of polypeptides can be a significant factor as a part of developing of the general inflammation reaction. However, NHIT toxins can't induce many reactions and changes which are specific for radiation. Specific Radiation Toxins (SRT) can induce specific processes and reactions such as clonogenic cell death -programmed apoptotic necrosis. Although besides high doses of radiation, other forms of cell death such as Pyroptosis or Oncosis should be considered. We postulate that NHIT toxins are similar for high doses of radiation and thermal injury. Specific Radiation Toxins (SRT) are induced by high doses of radiation. Specific Thermal Toxins (STT) toxins which formation is induced by a Thermal Factor are different from SRT. Administration of STT toxins or NHIT toxins (IV or IM) to

  15. Comparison of conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques for treatment of pelvic tumors. Analysis of acute toxicity

    This retrospective analysis reports on the comparative outcome of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities between conformal radiation therapy (CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in the treatment of patients with pelvic tumors. From January 2002 to December 2008, 69 patients with pelvic tumors underwent whole pelvic CRT and 65 underwent whole pelvic IMRT to treat pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor regions. Total dose to the whole pelvis ranged from 50 to 50.4 Gy in 25 to 28 daily fractions. Chemotherapy (CT) regimen, when employed, was based upon primary tumor. Acute GI and GU toxicities were graded by RTOG/EORTC acute radiation morbidity criteria. Absence of GI symptoms during radiotherapy (grade 0) was more frequently observed in the IMRT group (43.1% versus 8.7; p < 0.001) and medication for diarrhea (Grade 2) was more frequently used in the CRT group (65.2% versus 38.5%; p = 0.002). Acute GI grade 1 and 3 side effects incidence was similar in both groups (18.5% versus 18.8%; p = 0.95 and 0% versus 7.2%; p = 0.058, respectively). Incidence of GU toxicity was similar in both groups (grade 0: 61.5% versus 66.6%, p = 0.54; grade 1: 20% versus 8.7%, p = 0.06; grade 2: 18.5% versus 23.5%, p = 0.50 and grade 3: 0% versus 1.5%, p > 0.99). This comparative case series shows less grade 2 acute GI toxicity in patients treated with whole pelvic IMRT in comparison with those treated with CRT. Incidence of acute GU toxicity was similar in both groups

  16. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06–2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52–0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22–2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25–2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41–11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12–1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical

  17. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help

  18. γ-Tocotrienol as a Promising Countermeasure for Acute Radiation Syndrome: Current Status.

    Singh, Vijay K; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The hazard of ionizing radiation exposure due to nuclear accidents or terrorist attacks is ever increasing. Despite decades of research, still, there is a shortage of non-toxic, safe and effective medical countermeasures for radiological and nuclear emergency. To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) has approved only two growth factors, Neupogen (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), filgrastim) and Neulasta (PEGylated G-CSF, pegfilgrastim) for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS) following the Animal Efficacy Rule. Promising radioprotective efficacy results of γ-tocotrienol (GT3; a member of the vitamin E family) in the mouse model encouraged its further evaluation in the nonhuman primate (NHP) model. These studies demonstrated that GT3 significantly aided the recovery of radiation-induced neutropenia and thrombocytopenia compared to the vehicle controls; these results particularly significant after exposure to 5.8 or 6.5 Gray (Gy) whole body γ-irradiation. The stimulatory effect of GT3 on neutrophils and thrombocytes (platelets) was directly and positively correlated with dose; a 75 mg/kg dose was more effective compared to 37.5 mg/kg. GT3 was also effective against 6.5 Gy whole body γ-irradiation for improving neutrophils and thrombocytes. Moreover, a single administration of GT3 without any supportive care was equivalent, in terms of improving hematopoietic recovery, to multiple doses of Neupogen and two doses of Neulasta with full supportive care (including blood products) in the NHP model. GT3 may serve as an ultimate radioprotector for use in humans, particularly for military personnel and first responders. In brief, GT3 is a promising radiation countermeasure that ought to be further developed for U.S. FDA approval for the ARS indication. PMID:27153057

  19. γ-Tocotrienol as a Promising Countermeasure for Acute Radiation Syndrome: Current Status

    Vijay K. Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The hazard of ionizing radiation exposure due to nuclear accidents or terrorist attacks is ever increasing. Despite decades of research, still, there is a shortage of non-toxic, safe and effective medical countermeasures for radiological and nuclear emergency. To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA has approved only two growth factors, Neupogen (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, filgrastim and Neulasta (PEGylated G-CSF, pegfilgrastim for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS following the Animal Efficacy Rule. Promising radioprotective efficacy results of γ-tocotrienol (GT3; a member of the vitamin E family in the mouse model encouraged its further evaluation in the nonhuman primate (NHP model. These studies demonstrated that GT3 significantly aided the recovery of radiation-induced neutropenia and thrombocytopenia compared to the vehicle controls; these results particularly significant after exposure to 5.8 or 6.5 Gray (Gy whole body γ-irradiation. The stimulatory effect of GT3 on neutrophils and thrombocytes (platelets was directly and positively correlated with dose; a 75 mg/kg dose was more effective compared to 37.5 mg/kg. GT3 was also effective against 6.5 Gy whole body γ-irradiation for improving neutrophils and thrombocytes. Moreover, a single administration of GT3 without any supportive care was equivalent, in terms of improving hematopoietic recovery, to multiple doses of Neupogen and two doses of Neulasta with full supportive care (including blood products in the NHP model. GT3 may serve as an ultimate radioprotector for use in humans, particularly for military personnel and first responders. In brief, GT3 is a promising radiation countermeasure that ought to be further developed for U.S. FDA approval for the ARS indication.

  20. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed

  1. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  2. The acute radiation syndrome: A study of ten cases and a review of the problem

    Hempelmann, L.H.; Lisco, H.

    1950-03-17

    In this report ten cases of acute radiation syndrome are described resulting from two accidents occurring at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of unique nature involving fissionable material. These cases are described in considerable detail. The report comprises ten sections. This volume, part II of the report, is comprised of sections entitled: (1) the Biological Basis for the Clinical Response seen in the Acute radiation Syndrome, (2) Clinical Signs and Symptoms, (3) Discussion of Hematological Findings, (4) Chemistry of the Blood and Urine, (5) Discussion of Pathological Findings, and (6) Reconsiderations of the Calculated Radiation Doses in Terms of the Observed Biological Response of the Patients. This report was prepared primarily for the clinician who is interested in radiation injuries and therefore emphasis has been placed on the correlation of clinical and pathological changes with the type of cytogenetic change known to be produced by ionizing radiation.

  3. Hypoxyradiotherapy of uterine cervix cancer to decrease of acute side-effects and treatment complications

    The authors have reported on preliminary results of hypoxyradiotherapy in the course of external irradiation in patients with uterine cervix cancer from a view-point of the occurrence of acute reactions and treatment complications. A mixture of nitrogen and oxygen containing 8.0 to 8.5% of O2 was used to provoke acute hypoxia during irradiation. The applied dosis of external irradiation was simultaneously increased by 40%. On the basis of a randomized study with 120 patients, acute hypoxia was found to protect healthy tissues against post-radiation damage. When the dosis of 96 Gy in the paracervical space and that of 75 Gy in the pelvic wall were applied, acute side-effects decreases significantly if compared with a conventional radiotherapeutic procedure (p<0.01). Radiological preconditions for using acute hypoxia in radiotherapy are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Cory D. Cress

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  5. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Cory D. Cress; McMorrow, Julian J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Landi, Brian J.; Seth M. Hubbard; Messenger, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  6. Overcoming tumour radiation resistance resulting from acute hypoxia

    Radioresistant hypoxic cells in tumours are believed to compromise the success of clinical radiotherapy. This brief article discusses three methods of overcoming acute hypoxia in tumours, all of which are applicable in clinical radiotherapy. Of these nicotinamide probably has the greatest clinical potential. (UK)

  7. Studies on the application of tryptophan metabolites as indicators of acute radiation damage and their modification

    It has been the aim of the investigations to continue earlier studies on the amplication of tryptophan metabolites as biochemical indicators after irradiation. These metabolites are of interest as they apparently indicate radiation effects in contrast to other metabolites like taurine and deoxycytidine in a dose range which leads to acute radiation sickness with the consequence of death. This assumption has been confirmed by the results of these studies. Measurements in the urine of rats demonstrate that the excretion of kynurenic acid and of xanthurenic acid as well as especially the ratio of kynurenic acid/anthranilic acid increases considerably in those animals which die some days later. The excretion of the surviving anilic acid increases considerably in those animals which die some days later. The excretion of the surviving animals is characteristical different. This abnormal excretion is induced by changes of specific, hepatic enzyme activities. The investigations have shown that the effects on the enzyme activities apppear not only after X-rays irradiation but also after neutrons. The studies, which have been performed with human material on the NAD-metabolism, demonstrate that with respect to the enzyme activities in the spleen as well as to the urinary excretion the same or similar effects, which have been found with animal experiments, can be expected. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 CKA

  8. The inflammatory response plays a major role in the acute radiation syndrome induced by fission radiation

    Agay, D.; Chancerelle, Y.; Hirodin, F.; Mathieu, J.; Multon, E.; Van Uye, A.; Mestries, J.C. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees Emile Parde, Departement de Radiologie, 38 - La Tronche (France)

    1997-03-01

    At high dose rates, both gamma and neutron irradiation induce an acute inflammatory syndrome with huge intercellular communication disorders. This inflammatory syndrome evolves in two phases, separated by a latency phase. During the prodromal phase, the molecular and cellular lesions induced by free radicals trigger an initial response which associates cellular repair and multicellular interactions involving both humoral and nervous communications. A large part of perturbations constitute a non specific inflammatory syndrome and clinically silent coagulation disorders which are linked by common intercellular mediators. All these perturbations are rapidly reversible and there is no correlation between the radiation dose and the severity of the response. During the manifest-illness phase, both inflammatory and coagulation disorders resume, slightly preceding the clinical symptoms. Biochemical symptoms are moderate in the animals which will survive, but they escape regulatory mechanisms in those which will die, giving rise to a vicious circle. These biochemical disorders are largely responsible for the death. With lower dose rates, it cannot be excluded that great cellular communication disorders take place at the tissue level, with limited blood modifications. This aspect should be taken into account for the optimization of cytokine therapies. (authors)

  9. Radon, radiation effects and radiation protection

    Epidemiological studies among Rn-exposed miners revealed a significant increase in lung tumour occurrence with increased exposure to radon daughters. Radiation exposure of the lungs also is given through inhalation of Rn-decay products released from the building material of residential houses. The resulting lung cancer risk is one of the major issues of radiation protection of the population. Extensive data collections are available on Rn-concentrations in room air. Building planning and design should make better use of these data, particularly for selection of materials and design of the basement and foundation of buildings, as radon daughters are the major source of radiation exposure of the population. (DG)

  10. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    The efficient dose of ionizing radiation (I.R.), expressed in sievert is a weighting of the deposited energy (absorbed dose in grays) by factors that take into account the radiation hazard and tissues radiosensitivity. it is useful in radiation protection because it allows to add exposures to ionizing radiation of different nature. for low doses, it has no probabilistic value. The determinist effects of ionizing radiation are observed from thresholds of several hundred of milli sievert. The seriousness grows with the dose. The whole-body doses exceeding 8 Sv are always lethal. The radio-induced cancers are observed only for doses exceeding 100 to 200 mSv for adults, delivered at a self important dose rate. Their seriousness does not depend on the dose. Their appear fortuity (stochastic effect) with a various individual susceptibility, genetically determined. The number of eventual radio-induced cancers coming from the exposure of a high number of persons to low dose of ionizing radiation (<100 mSv) cannot be evaluated with a linear without threshold model. these models, however usually used, do not take into account the biological reality of cell defense mechanisms, tissues or whole body defense mechanisms, these one being different against low or high doses of ionizing radiation. Against low doses, the preponderant mechanism is the elimination of potentially dangerous damaged cells. Against high doses, the repair of damaged cells is imperative to preserve the tissue functions. It can lead to DNA repair errors (radio-induced mutations) and canceration. The radio-induced congenital malformations are effects with threshold. The radio-induced carcinogenesis in utero is a stochastic effect. The radio-induced hereditary congenital malformations have never been highlighted for man. (N.C.)

  11. Ornithogalum virens as a plant assay for beta and gamma radiation effects

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the monocotyledonous angiosperm, Ornithogalum virens (Quintanilha and Cabral, 1947), could be used in such a biological assay system. After exposing O. virens plants to acute (60Co) and chronic (137Cs) gamma radiation and internal beta radiation (32P), lethality (LD50, LD100), growth inhibition, and chromosome aberrations were investigated. The LD50 and LD100 for acute gamma radiation were estimated to be between 0.91 to 1.8 krad and less than 3.6 krad, respectively. Though growth inhibition and abnormal growth were observed in the acute and chronic gamma radiation studies, the changes in the growth of the plants were so variable that these parameters were found to be unreliable measures of radiation effects. Chromosome aberrations were a more reliable measure of radiation damage because linear relationships between total aberrations and dose were found for both gamma and beta radiation

  12. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses, yet few of these studies meet the required standard. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high. Since no adequate experimental studies have been performed nothing is known about the mechanisms of these therapeutic radiation

  13. Genetic radiation effects

    Three types of genetic damage arising from irradiation are identified; (1) gene or point mutations at the level of the DNA molecule, which contains the genetic code. (2) chromosome breakage which may lead to translocations (3) uncontrolled distribution of the chromosomes into the daughter cells. Tabular information is drawn mainly from the UNSCEAR report, 1977, on the risk factors of genetic damage from various irradiation levels. Some detailed effects on genetic structure are described for recessive mutations, dominant mutations and trans-locations. Experimental work has in some cases been guided by X-ray irradiation with single and double dose effects, including tests on mice, for which subsequent herdity may be examined. (G.C.)

  14. Implications of radiation-induced bystander effects and other non-targeted radiation effects for multi pollutant environmental exposures

    Environmentally relevant low doses of ionizing radiation are now accepted to induce a variety of biological effects at levels where it is difficult to implicate direct (targeted) DNA damage. These effects include bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive responses and low dose hypersensitivity. The importance of these effects is that all are induced at very low doses. Typically one track of high LET radiation or less than 5 mGy of low LET radiation can trigger these effects. Once induced the level of effect does not increase with increasing dose and is persistent. The mechanisms underlying these effects are not known but it is accepted that genetic background is crucial in determining what the consequences of the exposure will be. This presentation will show 1. That chemical pollutants (heavy metals and micro-organics) can also induce these low dose responses, 2. That these effects can be induced in vivo as well as in vitro using mouse models exposed to whole body doses, 3. That the mechanism involves persistent elevation of ROS and that the effect can persist over many cell generations, 4. That chronic low dose exposures may actually be more effective than acute doses at inducing certain types of response, 5. That combinations of these inducers (whether radiation or chemical) and classical mutagens, can enhance the frequency of mutations due to the mutagen. There are implications for radiation and environmental protection which at present treat radiation as a 'stand alone' agent and assume a linear correlation between radiation dose and effect. (author)

  15. Influence of plasma GSH level on acute radiation mucositis of the oral cavity

    The purpose of the study was to see how pretreatment plasma GSH level influences the severity of acute radiation mucositis of the oral cavity during therapeutic irradiation in patients with oral cancer. Thirteen patients with squamous cell circinoma of the oral cavity form the subject material. Radical radiotherapy (60 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks) was given using telecobalt. Pretreatment plasma GSH level was measured by Beutler's method. The normal tissue reaction during radiotherapy was monitored and graded. The GSH levels ranged from 10.6-90.5 μM/L (mean 30.6 μM/L). Those who had higher GSH levels developed less severe mucositis. The mean GSH levels in the groups with different severity of reactions were: Grade 2 (four patients) = 50.7 μM/L; Grade 3 (five patients) = 26.1 μM/L; Grade 4 (two patients) = 20.4 μM/L and Grade 5 (two patients) = 26.1 μM/L; Grade 4 (two patients) = 20.4 μM/L and Grade 5 (two patients) = 13.6 μM/L. Plasma GSH estimation has the potential to predict individual sensitivity to acute radiation mucositis and may particularly be useful in hyperfractionated regimes. The study also affirms the radioprotective role of GSH and suggests that this effect is either due to protection against membrane lipid perodixation (since GSH does not enter the cell freely) or DNA damage (fractionated radiotherapy may permit freer entry of GSH into cell). 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. The effects and control of radiation

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; ionising radiation (alpha and beta particles, gamma- and X-radiation, neutrons, half-life, sources of radiation); biological effects; risk estimates (somatic) (early effects, delayed effects); risk estimates (hereditary); control of radiation; risk estimates (accidents). (U.K.)

  17. Clinical analysis of patients with acute radiation syndrome due to total body irradiation or total lymphatic irradiation

    Objective: To study the severity of iatrogenic acute radiation syndrome, treatment, hematopoietic recovery and related complications in patients subjected to total body irradiation (TBI) or total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods: 100 tumor patients (91 with leukemia and 9 with other tumors), after receiving 500∼1000 cGy (in an average of 738.6 cGy) of TBI or TLI with super high dose chemotherapy as conditioning regimen during the process of hemopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed severe or even extremely severe, mainly bone marrow form acute radiation syndrome. Results: The patients' white blood cell count once dropped to (0∼0.15) x 109/L, platelet count fell to (1∼17) x 109/L, bone marrow was depleted with only a few non-hemopoietic cells and rare hemopoietic cells, and a high risk of complicating with infection and hemorrhage was observed. Treated with a variety of measures including protective isolation, supportive care, administration of growth factors such as GM-CSF or G-CSF, blood component transfusion and effective antibiotics, 92 cases restored their normal hemopoiesis, while 8 cases died of infection or hemorrhage. The clinical course of these patients indicated that a majority of the patients with severe and extremely severe, iatrogenic acute radiation syndrome involving bone marrow could restore their normal hemopoiesis, and hemopoietic stem cell transplantation played an important role in the treatment. Conclusion: Hemopoietic stem cell transplantation and administration of growth factors are very useful for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome

  18. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Dong, Lihua [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Cui, Jingkun [Department of Internal Medicine, Nanling School District Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Tang, Fengjiao; Cong, Xiaofeng [Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Han, Fujun, E-mail: fujun_han@aliyun.com [Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  19. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  20. Effects of ionizing radiations on insects

    The most traditional effects caused by irradiation are development and morphogenesis disorders since on the whole the sensitivity of the developing organism to ionizing radiations is all the greater as the growth rate is faster. During the development of higher insects two categories of cell divide: larval cells on the one hand, which differentiate immediately after segmentation and give rise to larval organisms, and embryonic cells on the other which divide actively to form various islets or imaginal discs destined, each to its own extent, to provide the organs of the adult. Two cell categories thus coexist in the larva, one undergoing differentiation and the other multiplication, the radiosensitivity of which will be quite different for this very reason and will account at least partly, where the lethal effect of ionizing radiations is concerned, for the results observed. Three chapters deal in turn with effects on longevity, on regeneration and restoration and on morphogenesis and development. Strong doses give rise beyond a certain threshold to the appearance of acute radiodermatitis; their clinical signs and different degrees of seriousness liken them to burns of a special type

  1. Biopositive Effects of Ionizing Radiation?

    This paper was written for a talk given by E. Broda in Vienna for an event organised by the chemical physical society, the Austrian biochemical society and the Austrian biophysical society in December 1972. In this paper Broda analyses the question of biopositive effects of ionizing radiation. (nowak)

  2. Radiation Effects on Polymer Properties

    Bouquet, F. L.; Winslow, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Report compiles data on effects of radiation on physical properties of synthetic organic materials. Emphasis on materials of interest to nuclear-equipment and nuclear-reactor designers. Data covers five categories of polymeric materials: Insulators, elastomeric seals and gaskets, lubricants, adhesives, and coatings. More than 250 materials represented.

  3. Principles of medical rehabilitation of survivors of acute radiation sickness induced by gamma and beta and gumma and neutron radiation

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the principles of medical rehabilitation different degree acute radiation syndrome (ARS) survivors, who exposed γβ- and γη-irradiation in different radiation accidents. The main reasons of working disability in the late consequences of ARS period are consequences of local radiation injures (LRI) and joining somatic diseases. Its revealing and treatment considerably improves quality of life of the patients. The heaviest consequence of LRI of a skin at γβ- radiation exposure is the development of late radiation ulcers and radiation fibrosis, which require repeated plastic surgery. LRI at γη-radiation exposure differ by the greater depth of destruction of a underlying tissues and similar defects require the early amputations. Last 10 years microsurgery methods of plastic surgery allow to save more large segments of extremities and to decrease expression of the late consequences (radiation fibrosis and late radiation ulcers) LRI severe and extremely severe degrees. Medical rehabilitation of radiation cataract (development at doses more than 2.0 Gy) includes its extraction and artificial lens implantation, if acuity of vision is considerably decreased. Changes of peripheral blood, observed at the period of the long consequences, as a rule, different, moderate, transient and not requiring treatment. Only one ARS survivor dead from chronic myeloid leukemia. Thyroid nodes, not requiring operative intervention, are found out in Chernobyl survivors. Within the time course the concurrent somatic disease become the major importance for patients disability growth, which concurrent diseases seem to be unrelated to radiation dose and their structure does not differ from that found in general public of Russia. The rehabilitation of the persons who have transferred ARS as a result of radiating failure, should be directed on restoration of functions critical for ionizing of radiation of bodies and systems causing reduction of a level of

  4. Principles of medical rehabilitation of survivors of acute radiation sickness induced by gamma and beta and gumma and neutron radiation

    Nedejina, N.M.; Galstian, I.A.; Savitsky, A.A.; Sachkov, A.V.; Rtisheva, J.N.; Uvatcheva, I.V.; Filin, S.V. [State Research Center of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biophysics

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the principles of medical rehabilitation different degree acute radiation syndrome (ARS) survivors, who exposed {gamma}{beta}- and {gamma}{eta}-irradiation in different radiation accidents. The main reasons of working disability in the late consequences of ARS period are consequences of local radiation injures (LRI) and joining somatic diseases. Its revealing and treatment considerably improves quality of life of the patients. The heaviest consequence of LRI of a skin at {gamma}{beta}- radiation exposure is the development of late radiation ulcers and radiation fibrosis, which require repeated plastic surgery. LRI at {gamma}{eta}-radiation exposure differ by the greater depth of destruction of a underlying tissues and similar defects require the early amputations. Last 10 years microsurgery methods of plastic surgery allow to save more large segments of extremities and to decrease expression of the late consequences (radiation fibrosis and late radiation ulcers) LRI severe and extremely severe degrees. Medical rehabilitation of radiation cataract (development at doses more than 2.0 Gy) includes its extraction and artificial lens implantation, if acuity of vision is considerably decreased. Changes of peripheral blood, observed at the period of the long consequences, as a rule, different, moderate, transient and not requiring treatment. Only one ARS survivor dead from chronic myeloid leukemia. Thyroid nodes, not requiring operative intervention, are found out in Chernobyl survivors. Within the time course the concurrent somatic disease become the major importance for patients disability growth, which concurrent diseases seem to be unrelated to radiation dose and their structure does not differ from that found in general public of Russia. The rehabilitation of the persons who have transferred ARS as a result of radiating failure, should be directed on restoration of functions critical for ionizing of radiation of bodies and

  5. Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Reduces Time Spent With Acute Dermatitis for Women of All Breast Sizes During Radiation

    Purpose: To study the time spent with radiation-induced dermatitis during a course of radiation therapy for breast cancer in women treated with conventional or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 804 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation from 2001 to 2006. All patients were treated with whole-breast radiation followed by a boost to the tumor bed. Whole-breast radiation consisted of conventional wedged photon tangents (n = 405) earlier in the study period and mostly of photon IMRT (n = 399) in later years. All patients had acute dermatitis graded each week of treatment. Results: The breakdown of the cases of maximum acute dermatitis by grade was as follows: 3%, Grade 0; 34%, Grade 1; 61%, Grade 2; and 2%, Grade 3. The breakdown of cases of maximum toxicity by technique was as follows: 48%, Grade 0/1, and 52%, Grade 2/3, for IMRT; and 25%, Grade 0/1, and 75%, Grade 2/3, for conventional radiation therapy (p < 0.0001). The IMRT patients spent 82% of weeks during treatment with Grade 0/1 dermatitis and 18% with Grade 2/3 dermatitis, compared with 29% and 71% of patients, respectively, treated with conventional radiation (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the time spent with Grade 2/3 toxicity was decreased in IMRT patients with small (p = 0.0015), medium (p < 0.0001), and large (p < 0.0001) breasts. Conclusions: Breast IMRT is associated with a significant decrease both in the time spent during treatment with Grade 2/3 dermatitis and in the maximum severity of dermatitis compared with that associated with conventional radiation, regardless of breast size.

  6. Biological radiation effects

    Everyone is exposed to a complex mix of electromagnetic fields (EMF) of different frequencies that permeate our environment. Exposures to these EMF are increasing significantly as technology advances unabated and new applications are found. Technological progress in the broadest sense of the word has always been associated with various hazards and risks, both perceived and real. The industrial, commercial and household application on EMF is no exception. Throughout the world, the general public is concerned that exposure to EMF from such sources as high voltage power lines, broadcasting networks, mobile telephones and their base stations could lead to adverse health consequences, especially in children. As a result, the construction of new power lines and broadcasting and mobile telephone network has met with considerable opposition in many countries. Public exposure to EMF is regulated by a variety of voluntary and legal limits, together with various national safety standards. Guidelines are designed to avoid all identified hazards, from short and long term exposure, recommended limits. The aim of this paper is to report the summary of the actual scientific knowledge about the potential health effects and hazards due to man made EMF and the new tendencies of the social and political choices

  7. Preliminary early evaluation of radiation acute syndrome severity in an animal model

    To improve the knowledge of Radiation Acute Syndrome radiopathological picture, whole body x-rays irradiation at 2Gy of a primate (Cebus apella paraguayanus) used as model has been performed. Early evaluations of clinical symptoms and dose and damage biological indicators have shown that this primate has given out similar responses to those of man. (author)

  8. Pathmorphological investigation of pulmonary infections complications in persons dying from acute radiation sickness after Chernobyl accident

    Lungs of 27 persons who participated in liquidation of Chernobyl accident and died from acute radiation sickness were studied histologically. Pulmonary infections were found, including invasion of viral, bacterial and fungal agents. Being depended on hematopoietic function the inflammatory reactions were areactive during postirradiation aplasia and became typical within the recovery beginning

  9. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Michal Hofer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  10. Environmental Radiation Effects on Mammals A Dynamical Modeling Approach

    Smirnova, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    This text is devoted to the theoretical studies of radiation effects on mammals. It uses the framework of developed deterministic mathematical models to investigate the effects of both acute and chronic irradiation in a wide range of doses and dose rates on vital body systems including hematopoiesis, small intestine and humoral immunity, as well as on the development of autoimmune diseases. Thus, these models can contribute to the development of the system and quantitative approaches in radiation biology and ecology. This text is also of practical use. Its modeling studies of the dynamics of granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in humans testify to the efficiency of employment of the developed models in the investigation and prediction of radiation effects on these hematopoietic lines. These models, as well as the properly identified models of other vital body systems, could provide a better understanding of the radiation risks to health. The modeling predictions will enable the implementation of more ef...

  11. Space radiation effects and microgravity

    Humans in space are exposed both to space radiation and microgravity. The question whether radiation effects are modified by microgravity is an important aspect in risk estimation. No interaction is expected at the molecular level since the influence of gravity is much smaller than that of thermal motion. Influences might be expected, however, at the cellular and organ level. For example, changes in immune competence could modify the development of radiogenic cancers. There are no data so far in this area. The problem of whether intracellular repair of radiation-induced DNA lesions is changed under microgravity conditions was recently addressed in a number of space experiments. The results are reviewed; they show that repair processes are not modified by microgravity

  12. Protracted Oxidative Alterations in the Mechanism of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome

    Nikolai V. Gorbunov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of high-dose total body ionizing irradiation [(thereafter, irradiation (IR] are attributed to primary oxidative breakage of biomolecule targets, mitotic, apoptotic and necrotic cell death in the dose-limiting tissues, clastogenic and epigenetic effects, and cascades of functional and reactive responses leading to radiation sickness defined as the acute radiation syndrome (ARS. The range of remaining and protracted injuries at any given radiation dose as well as the dynamics of post-IR alterations is tissue-specific. Therefore, functional integrity of the homeostatic tissue barriers may decline gradually within weeks in the post-IR period culminating with sepsis and failure of organs and systems. Multiple organ failure (MOF leading to moribundity is a common sequela of the hemotapoietic form of ARS (hARS. Onset of MOF in hARS can be presented as “two-hit phenomenon” where the “first hit” is the underlying consequences of the IR-induced radiolysis in cells and biofluids, non-septic inflammation, metabolic up-regulation of pro-oxidative metabolic reactions, suppression of the radiosensitive hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues and the damage to gut mucosa and vascular endothelium. While the “second hit” derives from bacterial translocation and spread of the bacterial pathogens and inflammagens through the vascular system leading to septic inflammatory, metabolic responses and a cascade of redox pro-oxidative and adaptive reactions. This sequence of events can create a ground for development of prolonged metabolic, inflammatory, oxidative, nitrative, and carbonyl, electrophilic stress in crucial tissues and thus exacerbate the hARS outcomes. With this perspective, the redox mechanisms, which can mediate the IR-induced protracted oxidative post-translational modification of proteins, oxidation of lipids and carbohydrates and their countermeasures in hARS are subjects of the current review. Potential role of ubiquitous

  13. Histopathological comparison of topical therapy modalities for acute radiation proctitis in an experimental rat model

    Cagatay Korkut; Oktar Asoglu; Murat Aksoy; Yersu Kapran; Hatice Bilge; Nese Kiremit-Korkut; Mesut Parlak

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalent topical therapeutic modalities available for the treatment of acute radiation proctitis compared to formalin. METHODS: A total of 120 rats were used. Four groups (n = 30) were analyzed with one group for each of the following applied therapy modalities: control, mesalazine, formalin, betamethasone, and misoprostol. A single fraction of 17.5 Gy was delivered to each rat. The rats in control group rats were given saline, and the rats in the other three groups received appropriate enemas twice a day beginning on the first day after the irradiation until the day of euthanasia. On d 5, 10, and 15, ten rats from each group were euthanized and a pathologist who was unaware of treatment assignment examined the rectums using a scoring system. RESULTS: The histopathologic scores for surface epithelium, glands (crypts) and lamina propria stroma of the rectums reached their maximum level on d 10. The control and formalin groups had the highest and mesalazine had the lowest, respectively on d 10. On the 15th d, mesalazine, betamethasone, and misoprostol had the lowest scores of betamethasone. CONCLUSION: Mesalazine, betamethasone, and misoprostol are the best topical agents for radiation proctitis and formalin has an inflammatory effect and should not be used.

  14. Amifostine ameliorates recognition memory defect in acute radiation syndrome caused by relatively low-dose of gamma radiation

    Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Joong-Sun; Song, Myoung-Sub; Seo, Heung-Sik; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Jong Choon; Jo, Sung-Kee; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether amifostine (WR-2721) could attenuate memory impairment and suppress hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice with the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). These were assessed using object recognition memory test, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis [Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX)]. Amifostine treatment (214 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to irradiation significan...

  15. Radiation monitoring by radiation effect of aerosol

    The high energy and high intensity accelerator facilities need the radiation monitoring with temporal and spatial resolutions. Numerical estimations are made for the radiation monitoring using the sampling method of aerosol Alanine. The aerosol Alanine put into the monitoring area through the duct. The intensity of radicals in the collected throughput Alanine of about 50 mg after passing through the monitoring area is measured by the ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) method. Key parameters in the system are the aerosol particle diameter and its intensity, the duct diameter and length, and the aerosol flow rate inside the duct. The maximum dose rate more than 108 Gy/h is possible to measure assuming the duct of 100 cm2 in area and 10 m in length, and the aerosol flow rate of 1000 L/min. The temporal resolution of the order of minutes is obtainable when the aerosol particle size is 0.1 μm. As a result of numerical estimation based on empirical simulations, it is to be promising to apply a proposed scheme to the radiation monitoring for accelerator fields. (Y. Tanaka)

  16. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation

  17. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-10-21

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation.

  18. Radiation Induced Acute Changes During Early Organogenesis of Mammalian

    Several experiments were performed to study the acute changes induced during early embryonic organogenesis after gamma irradiation to doses 0.5,1,2,and 3 Gy on the ninth day of gestation. The changes observed at full term included number of viable fetuses, fetal size, fetal weight and incidence of embryonic absorption sites. Other parameters observed were related to dimensions of lateral fetal length, tail length and antro-posterior and lateral measurements of skull. Results indicated that embryonic absorption sites showed a significant incidence at higher doses of two and three Gy, which reflected on the number of fetuses reaching full term. The occurrence of these and the other changes observed are related to dose magnitude and the mechanisms underlying them are considered due to the high radiosensitivity of embryonic tissue during early organogenesis. The data obtained has a serious implications related to exposures of pregnant women

  19. Acute skin lesions due to localized ''hot particle'' radiation exposures

    Purpose of the studies was to determine incidence and severity of lesions resulting from localized deposition of dose to the skin from small (2 at 70μm depth) from isotopes having max beta particle energies from about 0.3-3 MeV. Incidence of erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored routinely for up to 71 days post-irradiation. Responses followed normal probability distributions, and thus, no true threshold could be defined. Ten and 50% incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. Lowest dose producing 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for exposures to Yb-175 (0.5 MeV max energy) beta particles. Severity of lesions was estimated using diameters and persistence. From preliminary considerations of probability of induction, size, and persistence of acute lesions, a special limit for hot particle exposures in the range of 5-50 Gy may be reasonable, with an action level between about 1 Gy and the limit

  20. Health consequences in the Chernobyl emergency workers surviving after confirmed acute radiation sickness. Chapter 1

    On April 26, 1986 the accident at the Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) took place during the planned test of one of the safety systems. According to the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES of the IAEA) the Chernobyl accident is classified as the only event by today at the 7th (most severe) level. The accident caused the deaths within a few days or weeks of 30 ChNPP employees and firemen (including 28 deaths that were due to radiation exposure), brought about the evacuation of about 116,000 people from areas surrounding the reactor during 1986, and the relocation, after 1986, of about 220 000 people from Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine. The highest doses were received by the approximately 600 emergency workers who were on the site of the Chernobyl power plant during the night of the accident. The most important exposures were due to external irradiation, as the intake of radionuclides through inhalation was relatively small in most cases. Acute radiation sickness (ARS) was confirmed for 134 of those emergency workers. Forty-one of these patients received whole-body doses from external irradiation of less than 2.1 Gy. Ninety-three patients received higher doses and had more severe ARS: 50 persons with doses between 2.2 and 4.1 Gy, 22 between 4.2 and 6.4 Gy, and 21 between 6.5 and 16 Gy. In 1986-1987 237 emergency workers were diagnosed with ARS. Later, this disease was confirmed in 134 patients, of which 108 were treated in Russia and 26 in Ukraine. Of these confirmed 134 patients, 28 died in the acute period (first 3 months) after the accident due to extremely severe radiation induced bone marrow and skin damages. Between 1987 and 2001, a further 14 ARS patients and 7 NOARS patients died. The main causes of their death were sudden coronary death (7 cases), oncohaematological pathology (3 cases), liver cirrhosis (2 cases) and infectious lung diseases (2 cases). In Ukraine stochastic health effects (malignant neoplasms) have been

  1. Research on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA

    Researches on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA have been carried out in different sections. In recent years, the organizations were rearranged to attain better research circumstances, and new research programs started. At present, radiation effect studies focus on radiation effect mechanisms at atomic, molecular and cellular levels including simulation studies, and protection studies focus on dosimetry for conditions difficult to cover with currently used methods and data as well as the related basic studies. The outlines of the whole studies and also some descriptions on selected subjects will be given in this paper. (author)

  2. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and myoglobinuric acute renal failure following radiation therapy in a patient with polymyositis and cervical cancer

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted to receive radiation treatment for uterine cervical cancer, however a complex series of events ensued, leading to death. She developed an acute exacerbation of polymyositis complicated by thrombocytopenic purpura, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Radiation therapy may have produced an immune disturbance leading to the acute exacerbation of polymyositis. Auto-immune-mediated endothelial damage might have triggered a series of events leading to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Rhabdomyolysis seemed to be the main cause of acute renal failure. (author)

  3. EGF and EGFR expression during the formation and development of acute radiation-induced skin ulcers and their effects on ulcer healing: a comparative study with normal wound healing

    To study EGF and EGFR expression during the formation and development of radiation-induced skin ulcers and their effects on ulcer healing, a rat model which was locally irradiated with 60Co γ-rays was used, and another rat model of simple skin wounds was made as a control. Pathological changes were observed for 55d. Immuno-histochemistry in situ hybridization and image analysis were performed to detect EGF and EGFR expression in the tissue of radiation skin ulcers. Results: Skin ulcers were found on 14d after irradiation, and they were enlarged and deepened gradually during the observation period. In the irradiated skin, especially in the epidermal cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in the ulcer beds, the expression of EGF and EGFR was higher than that in normal skin. But their expression was obviously decreased in the radiation ulcer beds compared to that in the surgical wound beds. After irradiation, the decreased expression of EGF and EGFR may play an important role in the formation, development and nonhealing mechanism of radiation skin ulcers

  4. Expression of PDGF-B and PDGFR-β during the formation and development of acute radiation-induced skin ulcers and their effects on ulcer healing: a comparative study with normal wound healing

    Objective: To study the expression of PDGF-B and PDGFR-β during the formation and development of radiation-induced skin ulcers and their effects on ulcer healing. Methods: A rat model which was locally irradiated with 60Co γ-rays was used, and another rat model of surgical skin wounds was made. Pathological changes were observed for 55 days. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and image analysis were performed to detect PDGF-B and PDGFR-β expression in the tissue of radiation skin ulcers and surgical wounds. Results: Skin ulcers were found on day 14 after irradiation, and they were enlarged and deepened gradually during the observation period. In the irradiated skin, especially in the epidermal cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells of the ulcer beds, the expressions of PDGF-B and PDGFR-β were higher than those in normal skin. But their expression were obviously decreased in the radiation ulcer beds compared to those in the surgical wound beds. Conclusion: After irradiation, the decreased expressions of PDGF-B and PDGFR-β may play an important role in the formation, development and nonhealing mechanism of radiation skin ulcers

  5. New developments in the treatment of the acute radiation syndrome

    Radiation accidents associated with the use of nuclear power, radiation devices and industrial applications have resulted in a number of individuals with significant partial or total body exposures, in a limited number with lethal outcome. Such exposures generally result in life-threatening suppression of bone marrow and immune functions and may be accompanied by high doses to the skin and underlying tissues. In recent years, new methods of diagnosis and treatment of such patients have entered development, while experience with relatively large-scale accidents, such as the Chernobyl cases, have clearly demonstrated the limitations of previous approaches. In particular bone marrow transplantation has met with limited success, mostly due to the inhomogeneous nature of accidental exposures as well as the frequent occurrence of other injuries other man bone marrow damage. Present day technology allows for direct estimates of the number of residual bone marrow stem cells to enable a rapid decision on the type of treatment indicated, while some twenty-five recombinant hemopoietic growth factors are under investigation to accelerate the recovery of white blood cells and platelets, as well as immune functions. If applied appropriately, such growth factor treatment will successfully replace bone marrow transplantation in the majority of accident cases. Advances in hemopoietic stem cell biology, both in terms of source of stem cells as well as their isolation, will on the other hand make stem cell infusion a much less risky operation than bone marrow transplantation has been in the past

  6. AML1 gene rearrangements and mutations in radiation-associated acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes

    Several studies suggested a causal link between AML1 gene rearrangements and both radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Fifty-three AML samples were analyzed for the presence of AML1 abnormalities using fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of these patients, 24 had experienced radiation exposure due to the Chernobyl accident, and 29 were non-irradiated spontaneous AML cases and served as controls. AML1/ETO translocations were found in 9 of 29 spontaneous AML but only in 1 of 24 radiation-associated AML cases. This difference between translocation frequencies is statistically significant in the age-unstratified cohorts (p=0.015). Following age stratification, the difference becomes less pronounced but remains on borderline significance (p=0.053). AML1 mutation status was assessed in 5 clean-up workers at Chemobyl NPP with MDS, or AML following MDS, by direct sequencing of genomic DNA from the coding region (exon 3 through 8). In one patient who developed MDS following an acute radiation syndrome, a hexanucleotide duplication of CGGCAT in exon 8 was found, inserted after base position 1502. Our results suggest that AML1 gene translocations are infrequent in radiation-induced leukemogenesis but are consistent with the idea that radiation may contribute to the development of MDS through AML1 gene mutation. (author)

  7. Prophylaxis and treatment of acute radiation ulcers in rats with low-power infrared laser radiation

    Kursova, Larisa V.; Kaplan, Michael A.; Nikitina, Rosa G.; Maligina, Antonina I.

    1999-12-01

    Exposure of radiation ulcers in rats to low-power infrared laser radiation (LPLR) (wavelength--890 nm, pulse power--6 W, frequency--150 and 300 Hz, irradiation time--10 min) noticeably accelerates their healing, reduces exudative processes, increases number of specialized cells in wound. Application of LPLR prior to radiation damage decreases ulcer dimensions.

  8. Some hazardous effects of radiations on human body

    The radiation hazards and its dangers has been increasing by leaps and bounds. Certain elements and particles are capable of degrading by themselves and releasing energy in the form of radiations. Such types of radiations can not be seen by naked eyes, but are capable of penetrating our body and can produce serious ill effects. Acute radiation syndrome can be divided into three main categories: (1) Hematopoietic:- In this type of syndrome there is fall in blood cells, causes infections, bleeding and anemia (2) Gastrointestinal:- It occurs at the exposures of 600-1000 rad. Nausea, loss of appetite, vomiting and abdominal pain are main symptoms. (3) Neurovascular:- When exposure greater than 1000 rad occurs it effects nervous system which results in dizziness, headache or decreased level of consciousness. The various organs or parts of body are affected by exposure to radiations such as the losing of hair and clumping of hairs with radiation exposure above 200 rems or higher, same way the thyroid gland is susceptible to radioactive iodine, in sufficient amount iodine can destroy some parts or fully the thyroid. When a person is exposed to radiations around 100 rems the blood lymphocyte cell count will be reduced, leaving the victim more susceptible to infection. If the exposure is between 1000-5000 rems blood vessels got damage resulting into heart failure, in short, we can say that in order to prevent body from radiation the only way to keep away from them. (author)

  9. The Effects of Acute Stress on Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    KUBİLAY, Ayşegül

    2002-01-01

    The physiological effects of acute stressors (transport, handling, netting and confinement) on rainbow trout in an aquaculture system were investigated. Serum cortisol level, serum glucose and lysozyme activity were determined in rainbow trout stressed by acute stressors, and compared with those of unstressed (control) fish. Serum cortisol, glucose levels and lysozyme activity were significantly higher(P

  10. Effects of acute and chronic gamma irradiation on the shoot apex and general morphology of Lupinus albus L

    Lupinus albus L. plants were grown from seeds and irradiated at various stages of development with acute or chronic gamma rays. All plants were greenhouse grown (pre- and post-irradiation) and allowed to proceed through their normal growth cycle. The purpose of these experiments was to establish a Plactochron Index for Lupinus albus L. and to determine the effects of acute and chronic irradiation on development at the macro and microscopic levels. A Plastochron Index was calculated and used as an indirect time scale to evaluate the effects of gamma rays from a common base line. Acute radiation treatment lasted for a period of a few days, whereas chronic treatment was initiated at the seedling stage and lasted for the entire growth season. Vegetative plants were used to study the effects of acute radiation exposure on apical meristem morphology, Plastochron Index, phyllatoxis and gross morphology

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems

    A panel of experts in November 1971 specifically considered the effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems and formulated detailed suggestions for research in the area. A further panel meeting took place in April 1974. The results of the work are presented in this report which is divided into 3 chapters in the first chapter the concentrations of natural and artificial radionuclides in aquatic environments and the radiation dose rates received by aquatic organisms are discussed. In particular, simple dosimetry models for phytoplankton, zooplankton, mollusca, crustacea and fish are presented which permit the estimation of the dose rates from incorporated radionuclides and from radionuclides in the external environment. In the second chapter the somatic and genetic effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms are reviewed. Somatic effects are discussed separately as effects due to short-term (acute) exposure to near-lethal doses of radiation. Great attention is paid to the effects due to long-term (chronic) exposure at lower doses rates. Consideration is given to behaviour, repair mechanisms and metabolic stimulation after exposure, and also the influence of environmental factors on radiation effects. In the third chapter the potential effects of low-level irradiation on aquatic populations are considered. First, the possible consequences of somatic effects on egg and larval mortality, stock-recruitment, fecundity and ecosystem stability are discussed. Subsequently, the assessment of genetic effects as they relate to population genetics and increased mutation rates are considered

  12. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space and a Rindler space with the surface gravity for acceleration.

  13. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space...

  14. Immuno-therapy of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Extracorporeal Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption.

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Methods Results Summary and conclusions Introduction: Existing Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include methods of specific immunotherapy and active detoxication. Though the Acute Radiation Syndromes were defined as an acute toxic poisonous with development of pathological processes: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Toxic Multiple Organ Injury (TMOI), Toxic Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome(TMODS), Toxic Multiple Organ Failure (TMOF). Radiation Toxins of SRD Group play an important role as the trigger mechanisms in development of the ARS clinical symptoms. Methods: Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption is a type of Immuno-therapy which includes prin-ciples of immunochromato-graphy, plasmopheresis, and hemodialysis. Specific Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies are the active pharmacological agents of immunotherapy . Antiradia-tion Antitoxic Antibodies bind selectively to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins, Hematotox-ins and neutralize their toxic activity. We have developed the highly sensitive method and system for extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption with antigen-specific IgG which is clinically important for treatment of the toxic and immunologic phases of the ARS. The method of extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption includes Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies (AAA) immobilized on microporous polymeric membranes with a pore size that is capable to provide diffusion of blood-lymph plasma. Plasma of blood or lymph of irradiated mammals contains Radiation Toxins (RT) that have toxic and antigenic properties. Radiation Toxins are Antigen-specific to Antitoxic blocking antibodies (Immunoglobulin G). Plasma diffuses through membranes with immobilized AAA and AA-antibodies bind to the polysaccharide chain of tox-ins molecules and complexes of AAA-RT that are captured on membrane surfaces. RT were removed from plasma. Re-transfusion of plasma of blood and lymph had been provided. We show a statistical significant

  15. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  16. Medical management of severe local radiation injury after acute X-ray exposure

    Medical management during acute period in a case of severe local radiation injury after acute X-ray exposure includes 3 stages. During the fist stage patient got conservative treatment according to the common pathogenetic mechanisms of LRI (dis aggregating therapy, stimulation of regeneration, dis intoxication therapy, antibiotic therapy, pain relief therapy, Local anti-burn therapy-specific non-adhesive bandage with antiseptic and anti-burn medicaments); estimation of severity, deepness and area of injury by clinical picture and dates of instrumental methods of examining; defining necessity and volume of surgical treatment; preparing arrangements for surgical treatment. This stage ends with forming of demarcation line of a very hard severity of a Local Radiation Injure. The second stage includes necrectomy of the area of a very hard severity with microsurgical plastic by re vascularized flap and auto dermoplastic. The third stage - adaptation of re vascularized flap and total epithelization of injured area. (author)

  17. Radiation effects on pharmaceuticals and related materials

    Radiation sterilization is the method of choice for many medical supplies and devices. However, because of the ionizing nature of gamma radiation, one must consider the effect of such radiation on the physical and chemical properties and on the biological behaviour of pharmaceutical and related materials before the feasibility of radiation sterilization for such products is established. The results of such feasibility studies can lead to an appropriate decision on the suitability of radiation sterilization for a particular pharmaceutical. (author)

  18. Sodium butyrate enemas in the treatment of acute radiation-induced proctitis in patients with prostate cancer and the impact on late proctitis. A prospective evaluation

    Hille, Andrea; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Kertesz, Tereza; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F. [University Hospital, Goettingen (Germany). Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Pradier, Olivier [University Hospital, Brest (France). Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Schmidberger, Heinz [University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate prospectively the effect of sodium butyrate enemas on the treatment of acute and the potential influence on late radiation-induced proctitis. 31 patients had been treated with sodium butyrate enemas for radiation-induced acute grade II proctitis which had developed after 40 Gy in median. During irradiation the toxicity was evaluated weekly by the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and subsequently yearly by the RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) and LENT-SOMA scale. 23 of 31 patients (74%) experienced a decrease of CTC grade within 8 days on median. A statistical significant difference between the incidence and the severity of proctitis before start of treatment with sodium butyrate enemas compared to 14 days later and compared to the end of irradiation treatment course, respectively, was found. The median follow-up was 50 months. Twenty patients were recorded as suffering from no late proctitis symptom. Eleven patients suffered from grade I and 2 of these patients from grade II toxicity, too. No correlation was seen between the efficacy of butyrate enemas on acute proctitis and prevention or development of late toxicity, respectively. Sodium butyrate enemas are effective in the treatment of acute radiation-induced proctitis in patients with prostate cancer but have no impact on the incidence and severity of late proctitis. (orig.)

  19. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1949-11-16

    This paper discusses procedures for research on biological effects of radiation, using mouse tissue: activation trace analysis including methods and proceedures for handling samples before during and after irradiation; methods and procedures for ion exchange study; method of separation and recovery of copper, iron, zinc, cobalt, pubidium and cesium. Also included are studies of trace elements with radioactive isotopes: the distribution of cobalt 60, zinc 65, and copper 64 in the cytoplasm and nuclei of normal mice and those with tumors. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H-, H/sup o/, and H+ beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 μs to 500 μs length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 σ) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs

  1. Radiation effects on superconducting materials

    Superconducting magnets will be used in plasma confinement of future fusion reactors. They will be subjected to neutron irradiation at low temperatures, so information is required on the effects of irradiation at low temperatures upon superconducting properties (critical current density, superconducting transition temperature, etc.) of the superconducting materials, electrical resistivity of the stabilizing materials such as Cu, multifilamentary composite materials of the magnets, and mechanical and electrical properties of the electrical insulating materials. A review is made of the existing data of radiation effects on the superconducting magnets. The superconducting transition temperature of the elements, alloys and compounds decreases with neutron irradiation, more in the compounds than in the alloys. The critical current density J sub(c) of the alloys decreases with fast neutron irradiation at low temperatures. In Nb3Sn, J sub(c) increases by low temperature fast neutron irradiation below the fluence of about 1018n/cm2, and the degradation of J sub(c) appears at over 1018n/cm2. Fast neutron irradiation causes resitivity increase of Cu and Al. Radiation damage in the materials may have large influence on stability characteristics of the composite wires. Extensive studies are necessary to clarify the problems, especially the irradiation effect at low temperatures. (auth.)

  2. Strategy and tactics for stimulation of haemopoiesis in patients developing the acute radiation syndrome. Chapter 8

    This paper is essentially based on the outcome of a concerted research action of the European Communities entitled 'Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims as a Basis for a Computerized Guidance System' (METREPOL) which was conducted as a joint effort between research establishments in Paris, Oxford, Rotterdam, Munich and Ulm. The results of this concerted action have been published by the British Institute of Radiology in 2001 with the following title: 'Medical Management of Radiation Accidents: Manual on the Acute Radiation Syndrome'. In this manual, experience was used from more than 800 case histories of persons that were subjected to whole body radiation exposure during radiation accidents. A total of 70 accidents in 14 countries provided the material for the manual including data on medical management and follow-up of the Chernobyl and Tokaimura accidents presented in detail in this Technical Document. These case histories form the core of an international database system entitled SEARCH (System for Evaluation and Archiving of Radiation Accidents based on Case Histories). The haematopoietic cell renewal systems are of paramount importance in the clinical management of the acute radiation syndrome for two reasons. First of all, the haematopoietic tissue is distributed throughout the skeleton characterized by an enormous haematopoietic cell turnover as well as by a high radiation sensitivity. Furthermore, it is regulated to act as one organ by humoral factors and by a continuous monitoring of stem cell content in the bone marrow units by a migration stream of circulating haematopoietic stem cells. Therefore, the haematopoietic blood cell response patterns after total body exposure to ionizing radiation reflect in a very precise way the extent of damage to the entire organism and are able to predict the probable clinical course of the patient and allows preparation for the different treatment options. Thus, it is obvious that the

  3. Preliminary clinical findings on NEUMUNE as a potential treatment for acute radiation syndrome

    5-androstenediol (5-AED) has been advanced as a possible countermeasure for treating the haematological component of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). It has been used in animal models to stimulate both innate and adaptive immunity and treat infection and radiation-induced immune suppression. We here report on the safety, tolerability and haematologic activity of 5-AED in four double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled studies on healthy adults including elderly subjects. A 5-AED injectable suspension formulation (NEUMUNE) or placebo was administered intramuscularly as either a single injection, or once daily for five consecutive days at doses of 50, 100, 200 or 400 mg. Subjects (n = 129) were randomized to receive NEUMUNE (n = 95) or the placebo (n = 34). NEUMUNE was generally well-tolerated; the most frequent adverse events were local injection site reactions (n = 104, 81%) that were transient, dose-volume dependent, mild to moderate in severity, and that resolved over the course of the study. Blood chemistries revealed a transient increase (up to 28%) in creatine phosphokinase and C-reactive protein levels consistent with intramuscular injection and injection site irritation. The blood concentration profile of 5-AED is consistent with a depot formulation that increases in disproportionate increments following each dose. NEUMUNE significantly increased circulating neutrophils (p < 0.001) and platelets (p < 0.001) in the peripheral blood of adult and elderly subjects. A dose-response relationship was identified. Findings suggest that parenteral administration of 5-AED in aqueous suspension may be a safe and effective means to stimulate innate immunity and alleviate neutropenia and thrombocytopenia associated with ARS.

  4. Preliminary clinical findings on NEUMUNE as a potential treatment for acute radiation syndrome

    Stickney, Dwight R; Groothuis, Jessie R; Ahlem, Clarence; Kennedy, Mike; Miller, Barry S; Onizuka-Handa, Nanette; Schlangen, Karen M; Destiche, Daniel; Reading, Chris; Garsd, Armando; Frincke, James M [Harbor Biosciences, 9171 Towne Centre Drive, Suite 180, San Diego, CA 92122 (United States)

    2010-12-01

    5-androstenediol (5-AED) has been advanced as a possible countermeasure for treating the haematological component of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). It has been used in animal models to stimulate both innate and adaptive immunity and treat infection and radiation-induced immune suppression. We here report on the safety, tolerability and haematologic activity of 5-AED in four double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled studies on healthy adults including elderly subjects. A 5-AED injectable suspension formulation (NEUMUNE) or placebo was administered intramuscularly as either a single injection, or once daily for five consecutive days at doses of 50, 100, 200 or 400 mg. Subjects (n = 129) were randomized to receive NEUMUNE (n = 95) or the placebo (n = 34). NEUMUNE was generally well-tolerated; the most frequent adverse events were local injection site reactions (n = 104, 81%) that were transient, dose-volume dependent, mild to moderate in severity, and that resolved over the course of the study. Blood chemistries revealed a transient increase (up to 28%) in creatine phosphokinase and C-reactive protein levels consistent with intramuscular injection and injection site irritation. The blood concentration profile of 5-AED is consistent with a depot formulation that increases in disproportionate increments following each dose. NEUMUNE significantly increased circulating neutrophils (p < 0.001) and platelets (p < 0.001) in the peripheral blood of adult and elderly subjects. A dose-response relationship was identified. Findings suggest that parenteral administration of 5-AED in aqueous suspension may be a safe and effective means to stimulate innate immunity and alleviate neutropenia and thrombocytopenia associated with ARS.

  5. Effects of Radiation on MEMS

    Shea, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of MEMS devices to radiation is reviewed, with an emphasis on radiation levels representative of space missions. While silicon and metals generally do not show mechanical degradation at the radiation levels encountered in most missions, MEMS devices have been reported to fail at doses of as few krad, corresponding to less than one year in most orbits. Radiation sensitivity is linked primarily to the impact on device operation of radiation-induced trapped charge in dielectrics...

  6. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    Basic values and their symbols as well as units of physical dosimetry are given. The most important information about biological radiation effects is presented. Polish radiation protection standards are cited. (A.S.)

  7. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    ... yourself during radiation therapy Radiation therapy can damage healthy body tissues in or near the area being treated, which can cause side effects. Many people worry about this part of their cancer treatment. Before ...

  8. Interpretation of spin effects in Cherenkov radiation

    The Cherenkov radiation effect depends on correlation between electron polarization and photon spirality. This correlation in the given case is interpreted as interference of the charge radiation amplitudes and electron magnetic moment

  9. Stochastic and non-stochastic radiation effects

    Both the carcinogenic and the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation are thought to be induced by 'stochastic' mechanisms of action. It is generally accepted that the number of carcinogenic injury is proportional to the radiation dose applied, and that there is no direct relationship between radiation dose and severity of induced injury, so that no threshold dose can be defined. However, the severity of mutagenic effects, resulting for example from cell death or leading to functional disorders or malformations, has been observed to be a function of the radiation dose, so that in principle threshold doses can be defined. These latter effects are called non-stochastic radiation effects. (orig./DG)

  10. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  11. Cosmic Radiation Effects on Avionics

    The earth is bombarded by a nearly isotropic flux of energetic charged particles called cosmic rays which interact with air nuclei to generate a cascade of secondary particles building up to a maximum intensity at 60,000 feet. At normal cruising altitudes the radiation is still several hundred times the ground level intensity. These particles are sufficiently energetic and ionising that they can deposit enough charge in a small volume of semiconductor to change the state of a memory cell, while certain devices can be triggered into a state of high current drain, leading to burn-out and hardware failure. These deleterious interactions of individual particles are referred to as single event effects. The authors have flown Cosmic Radiation Effects detectors in a variety of spacecraft and aircraft and illustrative results are presented together with a review of published instances of such phenomena in flight systems. In the future there is likely to be increased susceptibility due to growing reliance on high performance computers using smaller devices operated at lower voltages and flying at higher altitudes. The influence of cosmic rays will have to be properly considered in the assessment of reliability. (author)

  12. Radiation and man - evaluation of biological and environmental low level radiation effects

    The harmful effects of acute radiation cannot be resolved by statistical means and require clearer knowledge of mechanisms of action and much wider collection of human experience before any definite sound stand can be taken. Much information has accumulated from animal experiments, and still the interpretations are not always clearcut, but for human experience it is only the occasional accident which can give a direct answer. Some of the phenomena attributed to low dose radiation are summarized. There are regions of radiation exposure about which we have only limited positive knowledge, an all low-dose risk estimates have been based on effects observed at relatively high doses. Much information has been gathered which does not support the severity of former basic principles, especially our knowledge of mechanisms of repair existing in most cells as natural defence against the damages caused by radiation as well as by many chemicals which act as mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. Understanding these mechanism, their scope of action and their availability to a damaged cell and organism will lead towards modification of the acceptable permissible exposures, in some cases towards severity, but in most cases towards leniency and higher values. For the evaluation of the effects of low level low dose-rate radiations, whether external, or from internal deposition of isotopes, only late somatic and genetic effects should be considered. (B.G.)

  13. Evaluation of delayed effects of ionizing radiation: an historical perspective.

    Stewart, A M

    1991-01-01

    It is widely assumed that after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki there were no lasting effects of the acute injuries (which included extensive damage to blood forming tissues by the radiation) or the massively high death rate (which was caused by environmental effects of the blast as well as personal injuries). However, close inspection of the dose response curves for non-cancer deaths has shown that this could be a false impression caused by one effect of marrow aplasia being confused with leukemia (defective erythropoiesis) and a second effect being confused with early selection in favor of general fitness (defective immune responses). Possible consequences of such confusion (for cancer risk coefficients) are discussed in relation to what is known about late effects of prenatal x-rays and occupational exposures to radiation. PMID:1805618

  14. Radiation effects in the environment

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  15. Acute stress modulates genotype effects on amygdala processing in humans

    Cousijn, Helena; Rijpkema, Mark; Qin, Shaozheng; van Marle, Hein J. F.; Franke, Barbara; Hermans, Erno J.; van Wingen, Guido; Fernández, Guillén

    2010-01-01

    Probing gene–environment interactions that affect neural processing is crucial for understanding individual differences in behavior and disease vulnerability. Here, we tested whether the current environmental context, which affects the acute brain state, modulates genotype effects on brain function in humans. We manipulated the context by inducing acute psychological stress, which increases noradrenergic activity, and probed its effect on tonic activity and phasic responses in the amygdala us...

  16. The Effects of Radiation and Dose-Fractionation on Cancer and Non-Tumor Disease Development

    Woloschak, Gayle E.; Tatjana Paunesku; David J Grdina; Kwasny, Mary J; Jian-Jian Li; Haley, Benjamin M.; William Liu

    2012-01-01

    The Janus series of radiation experiments, conducted from 1970 to 1992, explored the effects of gamma and neutron radiation on animal lifespan and disease development. Data from these experiments presents an opportunity to conduct a large scale analysis of both tumor and non-tumor disease development. This work was focused on a subset of animals from the Janus series of experiments, comparing acute or fractionated exposures of gamma or neutron radiation on the hazards associated with the deve...

  17. The radiation effects of nuclear weapons explosions

    The energy resulting from nuclear weapons explosions consists of thermal energy (heat radiation), shock waves, initial radiation (nuclear ray flash, gamma and neutron flash), and nuclear radiation of the fission products (fallout). The contribution of the different energy components depends on the energy amounts produced by fission or fusion reactions (A-weapon, H-weapon), on the components used for conversion to helium-4 (deuterium, tritium, lithium), the weapon design (radiation absorption and induced activity in auxiliaries), and on the type of employment (atmospheric, ground, or underground explosion). The damaging effects vary accordingly, consisting of thermal damage, blast effects, and radiation injuries. The effects are explained and compared. (orig.)

  18. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  19. Therapeutic effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 on experimental radiation enteritis in rat

    Radiation enteritis in patients treated by abdominal and pelvic radiotherapy is characterized by acute mucosal disruption and chronic intestinal fibrosis. Using a model of localized intestinal irradiation in the rat, we showed remote intestinal dysfunction outside the irradiation field along the whole gut, probably associated with perturbations in the systems regulating intestinal functions. Based on the hypothesis of consequential late effects, acute administration of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2, a growth factor with specific trophic effect on the intestinal mucosa, limited the apparition of both acute and chronic radiation enteritis. This suggests that therapeutic strategies targeting the severity of acute tissue damage may also limit chronic sequelae. The study of GLP-2 effects on epithelial cells in co-culture with either subepithelial myo-fibroblasts or enteric nervous system emphasized the problem of the modelization of complex systems in vitro, and suggested a synergic action from these different actors in vivo. (author)

  20. Molecular and cellular effects of radiations

    This program is concerned with the basic nature of the biological effects of mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental radiations, including those solar ultraviolet and visible radiations responsible for the most common form of human cancer: cancer of the skin. Concentrating on the damages to DNA caused by these radiations, the program attempts to delineate the basic mechanisms whereby such damage may occur. 14 refs

  1. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5, and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells.

  2. Serum-mucoid fraction content in development of skin acute radiation necrosis in rats

    Serum-mucoid fraction composition (in polyacrilamide gel) in rats during the different stages of local acute radiation injury of skin (6000 rad irradiation) has been studied. For this injury type during all the periods no appearance of new, unusual for the norm, fractions of serum-mucoids is noted. 2 stages of changes in serum-mucoid fractions have been revealed: the simultaneous increase in the content of all the serum-mucoid components is observed during acute period (bullous dermatitis); during a necrotic period of development of acute skin radiation injury the level of the third fraction increases, the number of the first fraction decreases, the content of the second and forth fractions changes slightly. The level of total serum-mucoids is predominantly determined by the changes of the third fraction, growth of which during the ulcer-necrotic period depends clearly on an injury degree. The determination of the third fraction containing, likely, low molecular haptoglobin in these cases can be of prognostic and diagnostic values

  3. Overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase reduces acute radiation induced lung toxicity

    Golson Maria L

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute RT-induced damage to the lung is characterized by inflammatory changes, which proceed to the development of fibrotic lesions in the late phase of injury. Ultimately, complete structural ablation will ensue, if the source of inflammatory / fibrogenic mediators and oxidative stress is not removed or attenuated. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD in mice ameliorates acute radiation induced injury by inhibiting activation of TGFβ1 and downregulating the Smad 3 arm of its signal transduction pathway. Methods Whole thorax radiation (single dose, 15 Gy was delivered to EC-SOD overexpressing transgenic (XRT-TG and wild-type (XRT-WT animals. Mice were sacrificed at 1 day, 1 week, 3, 6, 10 and 14 weeks. Breathing rates, right lung weights, total/differential leukocyte count, activated TGFβ1 and components of its signal transduction pathway (Smad 3 and p-Smad 2/3 were assessed to determine lung injury. Results Irradiated wild-type (XRT-WT animals exhibited time dependent increase in breathing rates and right lung weights, whereas these parameters were significantly less increased (p vs. XRT-WT. Conclusion This study shows that overexpression of EC-SOD confers protection against RT-induced acute lung injury. EC-SOD appears to work, in part, via an attenuation of the macrophage response and also decreases TGFβ1 activation with a subsequent downregulation of the profibrotic TGFβ pathway.

  4. Applying radiation health effects data to radiation protection policies

    Data from the peer-reviewed scientific literature establish a sound basis to define a low-dose, low-dose-rate, dose-response. These data include human health dose-response studies; immunologically 'whole' animal studies; and cellular and molecular biological studies of complete biological systems for the relevant immunological and physiological responses. Initiatives are required to constructively apply these data to both radiation research and radiation protection policies. First, current low level radiation health effects research must apply existing data to define research projects to integrate and confirm existing dose-response data, with specific emphasis on the biological bases that exist in definitive and reproducible cellular and biological dose-response. Second, dose-response assessment must identify and incorporate all existing substantial and confirmed data, including natural radiation sources, to establish the bases for radiation protection policy for interventions to protect public health and safety. A preliminary assessment of these data is applied to: 1) Specify research that can be constructively applied to describe radiation health effects dose-response. 2) Apply health effects dose-response to radiation and radioactivity applications policies to maximize radiation health effects interventions for occupational applications, medical applications, and other radiation and radioactive materials applications controls to cost-effectively assure public health and safety. An assessment of the proposed revisions to ICRP radiation protection policies is provided that associates the basis for administrative limits with the previous proposal of the US NRC for a 'Below Regulatory Concern' (BRC) policy. This proposal ignores the context of the fact that very low levels of radiation exposure are far within the variations of natural radiation exposures, and therefore can have no gross net consequences. The equivalent failure of the BRC proposal resulted in quick

  5. Effects of Therapeutic Radiation on Polymeric Scaffolds

    Cooke, Shelley Lynn

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ionizing radiation are known to cause degradation and/or cross-linking in polymers. Lower levels of ionizing radiation, such as x-rays, are commonly used in the treatment of cancers. Material characterization has not been fully explored for polymeric materials exposed to therapeutic radiation levels. This study investigated the effects of therapeutic radiation on three porous scaffolds: polycaprolactone (PCL), polyurethane (PU) and gelatin. Porous scaffolds were fabricate...

  6. Delayed effects of radiation on enzymes in erythrocytes

    Objective: To study the delayed effects of radiation on the enzymes in erythrocytes. Methods: The activity of 8 enzymes, related glycolysis, hexose monophosphate shunt, nucleotide metabolism, redox reaction and esterase in erythrocytes of five patients with bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were assayed at 1,2,3 and 6 years after exposure to 60Co radiation. Results: The decreased activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), pyruvate kinase (PK), NADH-methemoglobin reductase (MR) during the stage of crisis and of acetylcholinesterase (ACE) during the stage of convalescence were recovered to varying extent, whereas the lowered activities of the first three enzymes in some cases remained unchanged. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and the radiation dose as well as the age of the patients. Conclusion: It is demonstrated that the delayed effects of radiation damage to erythrocyte enzymes are most significant in PK of glycolysis, G6PD of hexose monophosphate shunt and MR of redox reaction. It is suggested that the genes related to the synthesis of erythrocyte enzymes may be damaged by radiation

  7. Radiation effect on ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) can be used at a substitute of the bone of human body skeleton. Before being set in to human body, it needs to be sterilized with high energy radiation. Therefore, it is of considerable significance to study the effect of radiation on UHMWPE. Because of ultrahigh molecular weight of this material, there would be a lot of entanglements at molecular chain, its radiation effect would be quite different from that of polyethylene with normal molecular weight. The radiation effect on UHMWPE was studied by means of density and DSC analysis. It has been shown that the density increases with the increase of radiation dose up to 1.13 MGy monotonically. The heat of fusion per unit weight of sample and melting point of UHMWPE increase with dose too, especially at the lower dose of radiation. It could be concluded that during the period of radiation, there would be additional crystallization or crystal perfection taken place

  8. Radiation-induced acute necrosis of the pancreatic islet and the diabetic syndrome in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus)

    Tsubouchi, S.; Suzuki, H.; Ariyoshi, H. (Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan)); Matsuzawa, T. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis and Cancer)

    1981-07-01

    Exposure of golden hamsters to 35 000 rad of X-rays induced acute and specific necrosis of the cells of the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas within 4 hours, whereas no other tissue revealed any drastic changes which would lead to a critical illness until 36 hours. Animals began to show the characteristic signs of diabetes, that is, hyperglycaemia, hyperkalaemia, ketonemia, and acidosis at 12 hours and these continued until death, 56+-8 hours later. These were accompanied by the disappearance of ..beta..-cell granules and a decrease of plasma insulin. Treatment of irradiated animals with injections of insulin resulted in a reduction in high blood glucose and the prolongation of survival time up to 5 days, which is comparable to the survival time when the cause of death is gastrointestinal. It is concluded that this radiation-induced diabetic syndrome resulted from acute necrosis of the cells of the islets of Langerhans, a previously unreported lethal effect of radiation in golden hamsters.

  9. Radiation-induced acute necrosis of the pancreatic islet and the diabetic syndrome in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus)

    Exposure of golden hamsters to 35 000 rad of X-rays induced acute and specific necrosis of the cells of the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas within 4 hours, whereas no other tissue revealed any drastic changes which would lead to a critical illness until 36 hours. Animals began to show the characteristic signs of diabetes, that is, hyperglycaemia, hyperkalaemia, ketonemia, and acidosis at 12 hours and these continued until death, 56+-8 hours later. These were accompanied by the disappearance of β-cell granules and a decrease of plasma insulin. Treatment of irradiated animals with injections of insulin resulted in a reduction in high blood glucose and the prolongation of survival time up to 5 days, which is comparable to the survival time when the cause of death is gastrointestinal. It is concluded that this radiation-induced diabetic syndrome resulted from acute necrosis of the cells of the islets of Langerhans, a previously unreported lethal effect of radiation in golden hamsters. (author)

  10. The effects of acute nicotine on contextual safety discrimination

    Kutlu, Munir G.; Oliver, Chicora; Gould, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be related to an inability to distinguish safe versus threatening environments and to extinguish fear memories. Given the high rate of cigarette smoking in patients with PTSD, as well as the recent finding that an acute dose of nicotine impairs extinction of contextual fear memory, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effect of acute nicotine in an animal model of contextual safety discrimination. Followi...

  11. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation

    This paper approaches the long-term effects of ionizing radiation considering the common thought that killing of cells is the basis for deterministic effects and that the subtle changes in genetic information are important in the development of radiation-induced cancer, or genetic effects if these changes are induced in germ cells

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Significantly Improves Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Pancreatic and Ampullary Cancers

    Purpose: Among patients with upper abdominal malignancies, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can improve dose distributions to critical dose-limiting structures near the target. Whether these improved dose distributions are associated with decreased toxicity when compared with conventional three-dimensional treatment remains a subject of investigation. Methods and Materials: 46 patients with pancreatic/ampullary cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) using inverse-planned IMRT. All patients received CRT based on 5-fluorouracil in a schema similar to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 97-04. Rates of acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for this series of IMRT-treated patients were compared with those from RTOG 97-04, where all patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if there was a statistically different incidence in acute GI toxicity between these two groups of patients. Results: The overall incidence of Grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity was low in patients receiving IMRT-based CRT. When compared with patients who had three-dimensional treatment planning (RTOG 97-04), IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting (0% vs. 11%, p = 0.024) and diarrhea (3% vs. 18%, p = 0.017). There was no significant difference in the incidence of Grade 3-4 weight loss between the two groups of patients. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with a statistically significant decrease in acute upper and lower GI toxicity among patients treated with CRT for pancreatic/ampullary cancers. Future clinical trials plan to incorporate the use of IMRT, given that it remains a subject of active investigation.

  13. Radiation hazards and their effects

    Radiation can be classified into ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation, based on whether it is capable of ionizing atoms and breaking chemical bonds. Ultraviolet and higher frequency such as X-rays, gamma rays are ionizing. These pose their own special hazards. Non ionizing radiation is associated with two major potential hazards. i.e. electrical and biological. Additionally includes electric current caused by radiation can generate sparks and create a fire or explosive hazards. Strong radiation can induce current capable of delivering an electric shock. Extremely high power electromagnetic radiation can cause electric currents strong enough to create sparks when an induced voltage exceeds the breakdown voltage of surrounding mediums. A 2009 study at the University of Basal in Switzerland found that intermitted exposure of human cells to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field at a flux density of 10 Gy induced a slight but significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the comet assay. Mobile phones radiation and health concerns have been raised, especially following the enormous increase in the use of wireless mobile telephony throughout the world. Mobile phones use electromagnetic radiation in the microwaves range and some believes this may be harmful to human health. (author)

  14. Curative effects of Tiron on dogs with acute uranium intoxication

    It was reported that the tiron had good therapeutic effects on small animals with acute uranium intoxication. The tiron's therapeutic effects as a first aid on large animals (38 dogs) with acute uranium poisoning are reported in this paper. Indices reflecting its effect were as follows: excretion rate of uranium from the dogs, several appropriate biochemical tests, clinical manifestations, histo-pathological changes of kidney and liver, and also the mortality of dogs. The results showed that the tiron or a combination of tiron and NaHCO3 has a good therapeutic effect as a first aid on the dogs receiving lethal dose of uranyl nitrate

  15. Combined exposure to simulated microgravity and acute or chronic radiation reduces neuronal network integrity and cell survival

    Benotmane, Rafi

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. This study aimed at assessing the effect of these combined conditions on neuronal network density, cell morphology and survival, using well-connected mouse cortical neuron cultures. To this end, neurons were exposed to acute low and high doses of low LET (X-rays) radiation or to chronic low dose-rate of high LET neutron irradiation (Californium-252), under the simulated microgravity generated by the Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch space). High content image analysis of cortical neurons positive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin unveiled a reduced neuronal network integrity and connectivity, and an altered cell morphology after exposure to acute/chronic radiation or to simulated microgravity. Additionally, in both conditions, a defect in DNA-repair efficiency was revealed by an increased number of γH2AX-positive foci, as well as an increased number of Annexin V-positive apoptotic neurons. Of interest, when combining both simulated space conditions, we noted a synergistic effect on neuronal network density, neuronal morphology, cell survival and DNA repair. Furthermore, these observations are in agreement with preliminary gene expression data, revealing modulations in cytoskeletal and apoptosis-related genes after exposure to simulated microgravity. In conclusion, the observed in vitro changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by space simulated conditions provide us with mechanistic understanding to evaluate health risks and the development of countermeasures to prevent neurological disorders in astronauts over long-term space travels. Acknowledgements: This work is supported partly by the EU-FP7 projects CEREBRAD (n° 295552)

  16. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); EMR3738, Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie [Pole Information Médicale Evaluation Recherche, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); EA SIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon (France); Faix, Antoine [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Ruffion, Alain [Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Department of Urology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  17. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity

  18. Mucosa-adhesive water-soluble polymer film for treatment of acute radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Purpose: To examine the usefulness and safety of a mucosa-adhesive water-soluble polymer film (AD film) containing anesthetics and antibiotics for the treatment of acute radiation-induced oral mucositis. Materials and Methods: To prepare AD films, 600 mg of hydroxy-propyl-cellulose was dissolved in ethyl alcohol, and mixed with a solution containing tetracaine, ofloxacine, miconazole, guaiazulene, and triacetin. The gel obtained was dried to form 30 translucent round sheets (20 mg per sheet) of 7.5 cm in diameter and 0.2 mm in thickness. The AD film showed excellent adhesive and coating properties when placed on wet oral mucosa. From 1993 to 1994, we used the AD film in 25 patients with acute radiation-induced oral mucositis, in an attempt to alleviate their pain and prevent secondary oral infection. All patients had received definitive radiotherapy for oral carcinoma. Intensity and duration of oral pain from mucositis, relief rates at rest and while eating, and presence of bacterial and/or fungal infection were compared with those of 27 patients treated with topical anesthetics (viscous lidocaine, XylocaineTM) and/or general systemic analgesics from 1990 to 1992 (NonAD Group). Results: The intensity of oral pain was the same in the two groups. The mean duration of pain of the AD film Group (10 days) was significantly shortened compared with the NonAD Group (15 days). The rates of complete pain relief at rest and while eating of the AD film Group were statistically higher than those of the NonAD Group: 82% vs. 44%, and 68% vs. 22%, respectively. No secondary bacterial or fungal infections were observed in the AD film Group, whereas 4 cases of documented infections were found in the NonAD Group. No acute or chronic adverse effects of AD film were observed during the 3-year follow-up period. The rates for local control of oral carcinoma and overall survival, at the end of the follow-up period, were 96% and 87% for the AD film Group vs. 92% and 85% for the NonAD Group

  19. Plants experiencing chronic internal exposure to ionizing radiation exhibit higher frequency of homologous recombination than acutely irradiated plants

    Kovalchuk, O.; Kovalchuk, I.; Hohn, B. [Friedrich Miescher Institute, P.O. Box 2543, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Arkhipov, A. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center of International Research, Shkolnaya Str. 6, 255620 Chernobyl (Ukraine); Barylyak, I.; Karachov, I. [Ukrainian Scientific Genetics Center, Popudrenko Str. 50, 253660 Kiev (Ukraine); Titov, V. [Ivano-Frankivsk State Medical Academy, Galitska Str.2, 284000 Ivano-Frankivsk (Ukraine)

    2000-04-03

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known mutagen responsible for causing DNA strand breaks in all living organisms. Strand breaks thus created can be repaired by different mechanisms, including homologous recombination (HR), one of the key mechanisms maintaining genome stability [A. Britt, DNA damage and repair in plants, Annu. Rev. Plant. Phys. Plant Mol. Biol., 45 (1996) 75-100; H. Puchta, B. Hohn, From centiMorgans to basepairs: homologous recombination in plants, Trends Plant Sci., 1 (1996) 340-348.]. Acute or chronic exposure to IR may have different influences on the genome integrity. Although in a radioactively contaminated environment plants are mostly exposed to chronic pollution, evaluation of both kinds of influences is important. Estimation of the frequency of HR in the exposed plants may serve as an indication of genome stability. We used previously generated Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum plants, transgenic for non-active versions of the {beta}-glucoronidase gene (uidA) [P. Swoboda, S. Gal, B. Hohn, H. Puchta, Intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants, EMBO J., 13 (1994) 484-489; H. Puchta, P. Swoboda, B. Hohn, Induction of homologous DNA recombination in whole plants, Plant, 7 (1995) 203-210.] serving as a recombination substrate, to study the influence of acute and chronic exposure to IR on the level of HR as example of genome stability in plants. Exposure of seeds and seedlings to 0.1 to 10.0 Gy 60Co resulted in increased HR frequency, although the effect was more pronounced in seedlings. For the study of the influence of chronic exposure to IR, plants were grown on two chemically different types of soils, each artificially contaminated with equal amounts of 137Cs. We observed a strong and significant correlation between the frequency of HR in plants, the radioactivity of the soil samples and the doses of radiation absorbed by plants (in all cases r0.9, n=6, P<0.05). In addition, we noted that plants grown in soils with

  20. Plants experiencing chronic internal exposure to ionizing radiation exhibit higher frequency of homologous recombination than acutely irradiated plants

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known mutagen responsible for causing DNA strand breaks in all living organisms. Strand breaks thus created can be repaired by different mechanisms, including homologous recombination (HR), one of the key mechanisms maintaining genome stability [A. Britt, DNA damage and repair in plants, Annu. Rev. Plant. Phys. Plant Mol. Biol., 45 (1996) 75-100; H. Puchta, B. Hohn, From centiMorgans to basepairs: homologous recombination in plants, Trends Plant Sci., 1 (1996) 340-348.]. Acute or chronic exposure to IR may have different influences on the genome integrity. Although in a radioactively contaminated environment plants are mostly exposed to chronic pollution, evaluation of both kinds of influences is important. Estimation of the frequency of HR in the exposed plants may serve as an indication of genome stability. We used previously generated Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum plants, transgenic for non-active versions of the β-glucoronidase gene (uidA) [P. Swoboda, S. Gal, B. Hohn, H. Puchta, Intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants, EMBO J., 13 (1994) 484-489; H. Puchta, P. Swoboda, B. Hohn, Induction of homologous DNA recombination in whole plants, Plant, 7 (1995) 203-210.] serving as a recombination substrate, to study the influence of acute and chronic exposure to IR on the level of HR as example of genome stability in plants. Exposure of seeds and seedlings to 0.1 to 10.0 Gy 60Co resulted in increased HR frequency, although the effect was more pronounced in seedlings. For the study of the influence of chronic exposure to IR, plants were grown on two chemically different types of soils, each artificially contaminated with equal amounts of 137Cs. We observed a strong and significant correlation between the frequency of HR in plants, the radioactivity of the soil samples and the doses of radiation absorbed by plants (in all cases r0.9, n=6, P<0.05). In addition, we noted that plants grown in soils with different

  1. Radiation effects on CCD image sensors

    In the past decade, the micro process technology has advanced and some elaborate semiconductor devices with many microscopic elements in a cell of about 10 μm x 10 μm can be successfully used as radiation detectors and related parts in the field of nuclear physics and engineering. A CCD image sensor, for example, effectively measures details of particle-beam profiles in accelerator applications. This paper describes radiation effects on CCD image sensors. Some CCD samples were irradiated with 60Co gamma-rays and DD and DT neutrons for the examination of the reliability of CCDs used in radiation environments. This paper shows experimental data on radiation effects on CCDs and then discusses the difference in the radiation effects between gamma-rays and neutrons. The following two radiation effects on CCDs are described. One is the transient effect, which is induced by the ionisation process of radiations and is not permanent but recoverable. A CCD responds to radiations as well as light and outputs pseudo signals induced by radiation reactions in the normal video signals during irradiation. The other is the permanent effect, which is caused by the generation of the defects. A CCD image sensor is easily influenced by the trapped holes produced by ionisation in the gate oxide. The defects cause the generation of the leakage current within the depletion region, the trapping of signal charge within the channel of the charge shift register, and the flat band voltage shift which affects the CCD operating bias. (author)

  2. Transient cell function disruption by low dose acute exposure of ionizing radiation

    Incubation of BMG-1 cells with thallium chloride (201Tl) in the range of diagnostic dose did not show a smooth uptake curve and appeared to have an unsuspected deviation in initial phase. In the present study this unexpected phenomenon was explored, using commonly used radionuclides (viz., 201Tl and 131I). Comparison was made with technetium-99m pertechnetate (99mTcO4) and technetium-99m labeled methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) that are known to show conventional 2 phase graph representing inflow and outflow segments. Serial in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo gamma scintigraphy as well as NMR spectroscopy experiments were conducted to corroborate the results. BMG-1 cells demonstrated a four-phase uptake pattern with 201Tl as compared to a conventional biphasic pattern with 99mTc-MIBI. Flow cytometry data however did not reveal any 201Tl induced cell injury. Further, mice tissue extracts injected with 201Tl also showed a transient depression in its uptake. Scintigraphy experiments in rabbits administered with diagnostic dose of 201Tl and 131I confirmed the in vitro and ex vivo findings. Further, proton NMR spectroscopy showed decrease in the level of choline at 3 h and 24 h in 201Tl treated animals as compared to control. Phosphoethanolamine peak firstly decreased at 3 h but reached normal level at 24 h time point. No significant change was observed in the level of betaine. This transient reduction in internalization of 201Tl and 131I may represent a hitherto unknown acute effect of low dose radiation, i.e., transient depression in Na+-K+ ATPase pump activity without any apparent evidence of cell damage, representing a transient cell membrane dysfunction. The phenomenon may present a mechanistical explanation of 'thyroid stunning' at cellular level and suggest that it may be more universal in nature than suspected till now. (author)

  3. Late sequelae of preventive radiation and chemotherapy of the cerebral cranium in children with acute leukemia

    In 15 children, combined treatment of the cerebral crane (irradiation + cytostatics) was done for acute leukemia, using Pinkel's or Riehm's method. In order to judge of late sequelae on the brain tissue. the cerebral crane was explored by means of computed tomography, generally more than a year later. Of 15 children 1o revealed slight or important parenchymal alterations being imputable to the former therapy. A possible augmentation of the sensitivity to radiation due to combined chemotherapy is discussed, and a revisal of therapeutic schedules, therefore, is recommended. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MKO

  4. Involvement of histamine released from mast cells in acute radiation dermatitis in mice

    A possible involvement of histamine in acute radiation dermatitis in mice was investigated. The dose of 40 Gy of gamma irradiation induced erythema and edema in C57BL/6 mice treated with vehicle. However, in C57BL/6 mice treated with chlorpheniramine and WBB6F1-W/WV mice, erythema and edema were not observed. In all of these mice, epilation and dry desquamation were induced, but bepotastine significantly reduced the extent of these areas. These results suggest that gamma irradiation-induced erythema and edema were caused by histamine released from mast cells via histamine H1 receptor, and epilation was induced by other inflammatory mediators. (author)

  5. Natural aerosol direct and indirect radiative effects

    Rap, Alexandru; Scott, Catherine E.; Spracklen, Dominick V; Bellouin, Nicolas; Forster, Piers M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Schmidt, Anja; Mann, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Natural aerosol plays a significant role in the Earth's system due to its ability to alter the radiative balance of the Earth. Here we use a global aerosol microphysics model together with a radiative transfer model to estimate radiative effects for five natural aerosol sources in the present-day atmosphere: dimethyl sulfide (DMS), sea-salt, volcanoes, monoterpenes, and wildfires. We calculate large annual global mean aerosol direct and cloud albedo effects especially for DMS-derived sulfate ...

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampus

    The present situation in studying effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampus of brain was reviewed in these topics, such as the kinetics of hippocampus, influences of ionizing radiation, on neutrons, biochemistry, enzymes, transmitters and synapses in hippocampus and on its electrophysiology, and the neuro-behavior after irradiation of hippocampus of brain, in order to provide information for clarifying the mechanism is radiation effect on hippocampus and for protection of human

  7. Radiation health effects. Experience from Chernobyl to Fukushima

    The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986 led to a high level of radioactive contamination over wide area in Europe. High radiation-dose exposure to 134 power plant staff and emergency personnel resulted in acute radiation syndrome. The internal radiation exposure by radioactive iodine-131 caused operated thyroid cancer among more than 6000 children at the time of the accident until 2010. The low dose irradiation by radioactive cesium-137 continues even today, and evacuation and relocation proved a deeply traumatic experience to many people. Since the Chernobyl accident, WHO and IAEA have established a global assistance system to strengthen the activities related to radiation emergency medical preparedness and response network. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011 has also caused many people to evacuate, and great suffering, hardship, and anxiety to the residents of Fukushima Prefecture. Therefore the Fukushima Prefectural Government is now conducting the 'The Fukushima Health Management Survey' to alleviate residents' concerns about radiation and to facilitate suitable healthcare in the future. It is necessary to continue scientific research around Chernobyl and provide accurate information on radiation health effects not only to the Fukushima residents but also toward all over the world. (author)

  8. Positive effects of small doses of ionising radiation on plants and animals

    Although part of the favourable results is likely to be due to wrong methods there is still a big part which must be taken seriously. Positive effects occurred after irradiation with X-, β, and γ rays and fast electrons. In plants, positive effects occurred after acute irradiation of the seed in the range of 1 R-10000 R, after acute irradiation of the growing plants with 50 R-1000, and after chronic irradiation of growing plants in the range of 0.02 R/day-230 R/day. For insects, the radiation doses with stimulating effects were, for acute irradiation, between 50 R and 180.00O R, for chronic irradiation between 9.5 R/day-75.9 R/hour. For mammals, positive effects of acute irradiation were found in the range of 40 R-400 R, after chronic irradiation of 0.11 R/day-5 R/day. The lower limits of these dose ranges are mainly due to the fact that smaller doses have not been dealt with at all. Positive effects of ionising radiation were seen especially when the experimental animals or plants were kept under unfavourable conditions. The exact mechanism of the radiation stimulation has not been explained yet. The assumption is favoured that the radiation causes a stimulation of repair mechanisms, - similar to the enzyme induction, may be - which enables the organisms to face further damage better due to their improved repair capacity. The generation of heterocygotes or of polyploidy by radiation seems also a plausible explanation of the positive radiation effects. In some experiments which revealed an increased radiation resistance after pre-radiation the synchronisation of the cell cycle caused by a radiation-induced delay of unitosis is likely to play a role. (orig./MG)

  9. Effect of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle precursor cells

    Long term effects of different doses of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle myoblast proliferation, cytokine signalling and stress response capacity were studied in primary cell cultures. Human skeletal muscle myoblasts obtained from muscle biopsies were cultured and irradiated with a Darpac 2000 X-ray unit at doses of 4, 6 and 8 Gy. Acute effects of radiation were studied by interleukin – 6 (IL-6) release and stress response detected by the heat shock protein (HSP) level, while long term effects were followed by proliferation capacity and cell death. Compared with non-irradiated control and cells treated with inhibitor of cell proliferation Ara C, myoblast proliferation decreased 72 h post-irradiation, this effect was more pronounced with increasing doses. Post-irradiation myoblast survival determined by measurement of released LDH enzyme activity revealed increased activity after exposure to irradiation. The acute response of myoblasts to lower doses of irradiation (4 and 6 Gy) was decreased secretion of constitutive IL-6. Higher doses of irradiation triggered a stress response in myoblasts, determined by increased levels of stress markers (HSPs 27 and 70). Our results show that myoblasts are sensitive to irradiation in terms of their proliferation capacity and capacity to secret IL-6. Since myoblast proliferation and differentiation are a key stage in muscle regeneration, this effect of irradiation needs to be taken in account, particularly in certain clinical conditions

  10. Some characteristics and effects of natural radiation

    Since life first appeared on the Earth, it has, in all its subsequent evolved forms including human, been exposed to natural radiation in the environment both from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources. Being an environmental mutagen, ionising natural radiation may have played a role of some significance in the evolution of early life forms on Earth. It has been estimated by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation that at the present time, exposure to natural radiation globally results in an annual average individual effective dose of about 2.4 mSv. This represents about 80 % of the total dose from all sources. The three most important components of natural radiation exposure are cosmic radiation, terrestrial radioactivity and indoor radon. Each of these components exhibits both geographical and temporal variabilities with indoor radon exposure being the most variable and also the largest contributor to dose for most people. In this account, an overview is given of the characteristics of the main components of the natural radiation environment and some of their effects on humans. In the case of cosmic radiation, these range from radiation doses to aircrew and astronauts to the controversial topic of its possible effect on climate change. In the case of terrestrial natural radiation, accounts are given of a number of human exposure scenarios. (author)

  11. Acute and long-term psychiatric side effects of mefloquine

    Ringqvist, Asa; Bech, Per; Glenthøj, Birte;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to explore the profile of acute and long-term psychiatric side effects associated with mefloquine. METHODS: Subjects (n = 73) reported to a Danish national register during five consecutive years for mefloquine associated side effects were included. Acute...... psychiatric side effects were retrospectively assessed using the SCL-90-R and questions based on Present State Examination (PSE). Subjects reporting suspected psychotic states were contacted for a personal PSE interview. Electronic records of psychiatric hospitalizations and diagnoses were cross-checked. Long......-term effects were evaluated with SF-36. SCL-90-R and SF-36 data were compared to age- and gender matched controls. RESULTS: In the SCL-90-R, clinically significant scores for anxiety, phobic anxiety and depression were found in 55%, 51%, and 44% of the mefloquine group. Substantial acute phase psychotic...

  12. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    Suetsugu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  13. Clinical symptoms of the acute radiation syndrome in cattle. Comparison between dairy cow and calf

    In 4 experiments 39 cows aged between 3.5 and 11.5 years and in 5 experiments 38 calves, aged between 2.5 and 4 months, were exposed to bilateral ionizing whole-body irradiation using roentgen or gamma rays. In both complexes an acute radiation sickness was produced ranging from LD0/30 to LD100/30. The course of the radiation disease and the overall clinical picture were basically similar in the comparable lethality range. But in the main reaction phase, 3 complexes were more severe in calves: infectious processes of the respiratory organs, diarrhea, and heamorrhagic diathesis. The causes are supposed in the different influence of the germ setting. (author)

  14. Dynamics of ceruloplasmin amd of some blood parameters in piglets suffering from acute radiation disease

    Changes in oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin (CP) were followed up after treatment with gamma rays of 60Co with a dose of 4 Ey (dose power 0.68 Ey/min) in the blood serum of male piglets of an average life weight of 18+-3 kg. CP level from 217 E/l raised to 376 E/l on the 16th hour after radiation and on the 16th day decreased to 296 e/l. Moreover, serum copper increased from 25 μmol/l to 42.3 μmol/l on the 16th hour following irradiation but on the 14th day its level dropped to 32.5 μmol/l. Erythrocyte and leucocyte count decreased from 5.83x1012/l and 19.94x1012/l to 2.47x1012/l and 2.0x109/l, respectively. Besides, serum albumin decreased, but α-and β-globulins increased. Examination of ailing piglets showed a paraclinical pattern of an inflammatory process by acute radiation disease. CP as an antioxidant participates in reactions with toxic radiacals on radiation. By the rising of its level on radiation it again was characterized as an acute-phase protein. Serum CP was determined according to the method of Ravin using as substrate P-phenylendiamine dihydrochloride; serum copper - by the test of Boehringer Mannheim; serum proteins were studied electrophoretically on agarose gels using veronal buffer, pH 8.6

  15. Managing the adverse effects of radiation therapy.

    Berkey, Franklin J

    2010-08-15

    Nearly two thirds of patients with cancer will undergo radiation therapy as part of their treatment plan. Given the increased use of radiation therapy and the growing number of cancer survivors, family physicians will increasingly care for patients experiencing adverse effects of radiation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to significantly improve symptoms of depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy, although they have little effect on cancer-related fatigue. Radiation dermatitis is treated with topical steroids and emollient creams. Skin washing with a mild, unscented soap is acceptable. Cardiovascular disease is a well-established adverse effect in patients receiving radiation therapy, although there are no consensus recommendations for cardiovascular screening in this population. Radiation pneumonitis is treated with oral prednisone and pentoxifylline. Radiation esophagitis is treated with dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, and viscous lidocaine. Radiation-induced emesis is ameliorated with 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and steroids. Symptomatic treatments for chronic radiation cystitis include anticholinergic agents and phenazopyridine. Sexual dysfunction from radiation therapy includes erectile dysfunction and vaginal stenosis, which are treated with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and vaginal dilators, respectively. PMID:20704169

  16. Effect of transplants of preserved bone marrow on the course of combined radiation injury of the nerve

    The carried out investigations showed that whole-body irradiation with the dose of 0.15 C/kg in combination with mechanical trauma of sciatic nerve produces acute radiation sickness mostly of mean gravity in rabbits. Autotransplantation of preserved bone resulted in more pronounced therapeutic effect on the course of acute radiation sickness and on the course of of de- and regeneration processes in the traumatized nerve in comparison with transplantation of blood formation tissue in 48 hours

  17. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 100C, at 0-50C, and at 30 +/- 100C. Irradiation at -300C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D10 value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D10 values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures

  18. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  19. Acute and delayed radiation injuries in the small intestine and colon

    The group of patients with severe actinic intestinal injuries consists of 67 patients, 46 female and 21 male. The main indication of irradiation were gynaecologic tumours with 67%. The irradiation was carried out with a telekobalt unit combined with radium. From the pathogenetic point of view, acute inflammation and necrobiotic processes in the intestinal mucosa and a restriction of the ability to regenerate are the main radiation-induced acute injuries; delayed injuries are mainly the narrowing and rarefaction of the vessels with lacking capillary budding. The cause of the completely different intervals of up to 26 years until the manifestation of the delayed injury remained unclear. The majority of the delayed symptoms were unspecific; therefore, the danger of misinterpretation was pointed out. A resection with primary anastomosis of the ends of the intestines is the goal to be reached operation-technically. The postoperative complication rate was 45.0%. The most frequent complications were the recurrence of a fistula and the formation of a new fistula, respectively, followed by anastomotic and wound insufficiency, and gastrointestinal bleedings. The postoperative lethality was 18.3%. The causes of death were, according to their frequency, peritonitis, acute failure of the coronary circulation, pneumonia, and massive bleedings. (orig./MG)

  20. Radiation Effects on Polymers - XI

    Ghanem, N. A.; El-Awady, N. I.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius;

    1979-01-01

    With the aim of improving properties of cellulose acetate membranes for reverse osmosis desalination, grafting was performed using high energy electrons. In this paper, the grafting parameters (radiation dose and method, monomer concentration, solvents, chain transfer agent and redox system...

  1. Radiation effects in polycarbonate capacitors

    Vujisić Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the influence of neutron and gamma irradiation on the dissipation factor and capacitance of capacitors with polycarbonate dielectrics. The operation of capacitors subject to extreme conditions, such as the presence of ionizing radiation fields, is of special concern in military industry and space technology. Results obtained show that the exposure to a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field causes a decrease of capacitance, while the loss tangent remains unchanged.

  2. Radiation friction vs ponderomotive effect

    Fedotov, A M; Gelfer, E G; Narozhny, N B; Ruhl, H

    2014-01-01

    The concept of ponderomotive potential is upgraded to a regime in which radiation friction becomes dominant. The radiation friction manifests itself in novel features of long-term capturing of the particles released at the focus and impenetrability of the focus from the exterior. We apply time scales separation to the Landau-Lifshitz equation splitting the particle motion into quivering and slow drift of a guiding center. The drift equation is deduced by averaging over fast motion.

  3. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  4. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  5. Effects of Mdy Ointment on the Expression of Ku70 mRAN and Ku80 mRNA in Acute Radiation Dermatitis Rats%Mdy对放射性皮炎Ku70、Ku80mRNA表达的影响

    倪晨; 王倩; 赵爱国; 熊艺花; 赖小平

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Mdy ointment on acute radiation dermatitis induced by radiotherapy.Eighty female SD rats were randomly divided into four groups.The acute radiation dermatitis rat model was established through β- ray radiation.Drugs were administrated for 30 days in each group.And the appearance and healing time of wound were observed.Changes of tissue during wound healing were observed by means of light and electron microscopy.And the expression of Ku70 mRNA and Ku80 mRNA during wound healing was detected by PCR.The results showed that symptoms of radiation dermatitis were mild in the treatment group with Mdy ointment and the wound healed fast.The fibroblasts and collagen fiber were hyperplasia through the observation of light microscope.The connective tissue and collagen fiber of dermis layer were hyperplasia through the observation of electron microscope.The expression of Ku70 mRNA and Ku80 mRNA in the treatment group were higher than that in the model group (P < 0.05).It is concluded that for acute radiation dermatitis induced by rays, Mdy ointment can promote collagen synthesis and collagen fiber proliferation.Mdy ointment upregulates the expression of Ku70 mRNA and Ku80 mRNA, which improves wound healing.%目的:研究本单位自制Mdv软膏对放疗所致急性放射性皮炎的作用.方法:雌性SD大鼠80只,随机分为4组,采用β射线照射大鼠,造成急性放射性皮炎,各组给药30d,观察创面情况;光镜和电镜观察创面愈合过程中组织学改变;实时荧光定量PCR法检测创面愈合过程中Ku70、Ku80mRNA表达.结果:Mdy组产生放射性皮炎的症状较轻,且愈合较模型组快;病理学检查发现Mdv组上皮细胞、纤维母细胞增值,真皮层结缔组织及胶原纤维增生,达到愈合;Mdv组对Ku70、Ku80mRNA的表达均高于模型组(P<0.05).结论:Mdy对β射线所致急性放射性皮炎,有促进胶原蛋白合成修复创面等作用,同时上调Ku70、Ku80

  6. Hypersensitivity of LEC strain rats in radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death

    LEC strain rats, which have been known to develop hereditarily spontaneous fulminant hepatitis 4 to 5 months after birth, were highly sensitive to whole-body X ray-irradiation as compared to WKAH strain rats. Radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death occurred at doses higher than 2.0 Gy in LEC rats, and at doses higher than 7.4 Gy in WKAH rats. By probit analysis of survival data, it was shown that the LD50/30 value for LEC rats was 3.0 Gy which was significantly lower than that (7.8 Gy) of WKAH rats. Histopathological examinations of the bone marrows from both strains after irradiation at a dose of 4.0 Gy revealed that a number of hemopoietic cells were recovered in WKAH rats on day 8 after irradiation, but not in LEC rats. These results suggested the hypersensitivity of LEC rats to ionizing radiation in connection with acute bone-marrow death. (author)

  7. Hypersensitivity of LEC strain rats in radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death

    Hayashi, Masanobu; Endoh, Daiji; Kon, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Tadashi; Sato, Fumiaki; Kasai, Noriyuki; Namioka, Shigeo (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Veterinary Medicine)

    1993-02-01

    LEC strain rats, which have been known to develop hereditarily spontaneous fulminant hepatitis 4 to 5 months after birth, were highly sensitive to whole-body X ray-irradiation as compared to WKAH strain rats. Radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death occurred at doses higher than 2.0 Gy in LEC rats, and at doses higher than 7.4 Gy in WKAH rats. By probit analysis of survival data, it was shown that the LD[sub 50/30] value for LEC rats was 3.0 Gy which was significantly lower than that (7.8 Gy) of WKAH rats. Histopathological examinations of the bone marrows from both strains after irradiation at a dose of 4.0 Gy revealed that a number of hemopoietic cells were recovered in WKAH rats on day 8 after irradiation, but not in LEC rats. These results suggested the hypersensitivity of LEC rats to ionizing radiation in connection with acute bone-marrow death. (author).

  8. Activation of platelet aggregation and arachidonate metabolism in early stage of acute radiation injury

    The paper describes the changes of platelet aggregation and arachidonate metabolism in platelets and endothelial cells after 8.0-8.5 Gy γ-ray whole-body irradiation in rats. It was found that with 8.0 Gy exposure platelet aggregation rate and speed, and plasma TxB2 level were increased at 4h and on the 1st day post irradiation, and that 6-keto-PGF1α level was enhanced at 4h, then reduced to the control level on the 1st day post irradiation. The result of biological assay showed the ability for rat platelets to convert exogenous arachidonate into TxA2 was significantly raised at 4h and on the 1st day after 8.5 Gy γ-ray irradiation. It is suggested that the activation of platelet arachidonate metabolism may be one of the important causes of acute radiation injury is suggested that the activation of platelet arachidonate metabolism may be one of the important causes of acute radiation injury

  9. Hypersensitivity of LEC strain rats in radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death

    LEC strain rats, which have been known to develop hereditarily spontaneous fulminant hepatitis 4 to 5 months after birth, were highly sensitive to whole-body X ray-irradiation as compared to WKAH strain rats. Radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death occurred at doses higher than 2.0 Gy in LEC rats, and at doses higher than 7.4 Gy in WKAH rats, respectively. By probit analysis of survival data, it was shown that the LD50/30 value for LEC rats was 3.0 Gy which was significantly lower than that (7.8 Gy) of WKAH rats. Histopathological examinations of the bone marrows from both strains after irradiation at a dose of 4.0 Gy revealed that a number of hemopoietic cells were recovered in WKAH rats on day 8 after irradiation, but not in LEC rats. These results suggested the hypersensitivity of LEC rats to ionizing radiation in connection with acute bone-marrow death

  10. Total aerosol effect: radiative forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    U. Lohmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of precipitation formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical properties, a quantification of the aerosol forcings in the traditional way is difficult to define properly. Here we argue that fast feedbacks should be included because they act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP, that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Based on our results, we recommend RFP as a valid option to compare different forcing agents, and to compare the effects of particular forcing agents in different models.

  11. Total aerosol effect: radiative forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    D. Koch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical properties, a quantification of the aerosol forcings in the traditional way is difficult to properly define. Here we argue that fast feedbacks should be included because they act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP, that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Based on our results, we recommend RFP as a valid option to compare different forcing agents, and to compare the effects of particular forcing agents in different models.

  12. Follow-up observation of five cases of severe or moderate degree bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness in 60Co radiation accident in Shanghai

    Objective: A 60Co radiation accident occurred in Shanghai on June 25, 1990. All the five victims including two suffering from severe degree and three from moderate degree of bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness, were clinically cured after the critical stage. They were followed-up for 18 months to observe the late effect of radiation. Methods: After discharge on Dec. 3, 1990, they were subjected to periodical systematic examination and related treatment. Results: The results of the early 18 months systematic periodical survey after the accident were as follows: (1) the values of blood and bone marrow picture, number of hemopoietic progenitors were all decreased; (2) the erythrocyto-plasmic enzymes and protein composition of erythrocytic membrane were abnormal; (3) the immunologic function, especially the cellular immunity, wa defective; (4) the crystalline lensed appeared slightly opaque and retina vessels dilated; (5) on chromosome karyotype analysis most of remaining aberrations were of stable types and offered the major evidence of dose-response relationship while the yields of dicentrics plus rings of instable type declined strikingly; (6) the microcirculation of nail fold and bulbar conjunctiva showed distal-contractile dysfunction, while the levels of serum AT-1 and AT-2 did not return to normal; (7) the number of spermatozoa was decreased in the semen, with a dose-dependently decreased survival rate and mobility; and (8) some endocrinologic functions did not return to normal. Conclusion: Based on the above results, it is indicated that although these patients were clinically cured from the critical stage, they should be followed up for long-term observation at molecular, cellular and whole body levels by multiple disciplines. The authors suggest a preliminary plan for long-term follow-up survey to evaluate biological effects of radiation

  13. The effects of acute irradiation on a forest biogeocenosis: Experimental data, model and practical applications for accidental cases

    The effects of acute irradiations of a mixed pine and birch forest in spring and autumn with a high power point-type gamma radiation source (1180 TBq 137Cs) have been described. Radiation dose relationships for numerous response reactions of woody and herbaceous plants (growth and development of organs of woody plants, cytogenetical, physiological and biochemical changes in trees, reproductive potential of plants, damage and dying off of the forest as a biogeocenosis on the whole) have been calculated. Post-radiation recovery of the forest was investigated. Changes involving the secondary reactions related to radiation damage and death of the trees are presented. A model for radiation damage of forests has been designed. Examples are given on the usage of this model in the description of radiation effects in forests in the event of accidental releases of radionuclides into environment

  14. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG uptake by spleen in acute radiation disease

    Shao-jie WU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate whether 18F-FDG uptake can be applied in dosimetry to facilitate a rapid and accurate evaluation of individual radiation dosage after a nuclear accident. Methods Forty-eight Tibetan minipigs were randomly assigned into 6 groups, i.e., 0, 1, 2, 5, 8 and 11Gy groups. Animals in all except 0Gy group received total body irradiation (TBI with a 8MV X centrifugal linear accelerator, and 18F-FDG combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT were carried out before TBI, and also at 6, 24 and 72h after receiving TBI in different doses ranging from 1 to 11Gy. Spleen tissues and blood samples were collected for histological examination, apoptosis, and routine blood analysis. Results Mean standardized uptake values (SUVs of the spleen showed significant differences between experimental groups and control group. The spleen SUVs at 6h post-irradiation showed significant correlation with radiation dose; Spearman's correlation coefficient was 0.95(P<0.01. Histopathological observations showed that the degree of splenic damage was proportional to the radiation dose. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed that apoptosis was one of the major forms of splenic lymphocyte death. Conclusion In the Tibetan minipig model, it was shown that radiation doses bear a close relationship with the 18F-FDG uptake of spleen. This finding suggests that 18F-FDG PET/CT may be useful for the rapid detection of individual radiation dosage after acute radiation disease (ARD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.08

  15. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  16. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma r...

  17. Thyroid disorders in acute period after radiation therapy on neck region

    E I Bobrova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of our study was to analyze thyroid status in adult patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in acute period after radiotherapy on neck region. Material and methods. Thyroid function (TSH, free T 4, anti-TPO and thyroid ultrasound were evaluated in 22 adults (10 women, 12 men, mean age 30.2 yrs with a history of Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL before radiotherapy on neck region, 7-14 days, 6 month, 1 year after treatment. Results. Incidence of subclinical hyperthyroidism was 13.6% in acute period (7-14 days after radiotherapy on neck region. There was correlation between dose of radiation and incidence of acute thyroiditis ( r = 0.67, p = 0.03. TSH level fall directly after treatment (1.08 vs 1.88 mkMEd/l р = 0.03, but 6 month after this difference disappeared. T 4 free level decreased 1 yr after treatment (1.18 vs 0.99 ng/ml in compare with measurement before treatment ( p = 0,01. Thyroid volume decreased (9.8 ml vs 5.7 ml 6 month after radiotherapy in compare with measurement before treatment ( p = 0.03, and keep on decreasing 1 yr after treatment (5.35 vs 9.7 ml p = 0.003. Conclusions. These data indicate that some patients with HL receiving high dose of radiotherapy on neck region can develop acute thyroiditis, but this abnormalities are transitory and do not reviewed treatment.

  18. Bystander effects and biota: implications of radiation-induced bystander effects for protection of the environment from ionising radiation

    Bystander effects are now known to be induced by both high and low LET in a variety of cells in culture. They have been proven to occur in vivo in mice following 0.5Gy total body irradiation and in blood from humans being treated for cancer by radiotherapy. Effects have also been detected in fish, crustacea and molluscs. The important questions now are not whether bystander effects occur but why and what implications they have, if any, for radiation protection. Different species and different genetic backgrounds within a species produce different types of bystander effect, different organs also produce different effects. This paper will review the data in this field and will discuss likely implications for protection of man and non-human biota. In particular it will look at the potential long-term outcomes for different organisational levels, from cell to ecosystem, of bystander mechanisms. In view of new concerns about the effects of low level radiation on non-human biota, emphasis will be placed on considering how bystander effects might operate at chronic low doses versus acute accidental low doses. Problems of radiation interaction with chemicals, whether chemicals can also induce 'bystander effects' , and how regulators might handle these situations which occur all the time in real environments, will be presented for discussion. Finally the paper will discuss likely implications of these mechanisms for evolutionary biology

  19. Protective Effect of HSP25 on Radiation Induced Tissue Damage

    Control of cancer by irradiation therapy alone or in conjunction with combination chemotherapy is often limited by organ specific toxicity. Ionizing irradiation toxicity is initiated by damage to normal tissue near the tumor target and within the transit volume of radiotherapy beams. Irradiation-induced cellular, tissue, and organ damage is mediated by acute effects, which can be dose limiting. A latent period follows recovery from the acute reaction, then chronic irradiation fibrosis (late effects) pose a second cause of organ failure. HSP25/27 has been suggested to protect cells against apoptotic cell death triggered by hyperthermia, ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, Fas ligand, and cytotoxic drugs. And several mechanisms have been proposed to account for HSP27-mediated apoptotic protection. However radioprotective effect of HSP25/27 in vivo system has not yet been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of exogenous HSP25 expression, as delivered by adenoviral vectors, to protect animal from radiation induced tissue damage

  20. Radiative effects in gauge theories

    Borisov, A. V.; Zhukovskii, V. Ch.

    1987-10-01

    The definitions of the vacuum state and the analysis of the radiative processes reffer to fundamental problems of non-abelian gayge theories. On the basis of the functional integration in the proper time representation a model of vacuum is examined of the quantum chromodynamics, proposed by Savvidy and Matinyan (Nuclear Physics B, Volume 134, Issue 3, p. 539-545). The supersimmetry of the Dirac equation for fermions in an external constant homogeneous magnetic field is examined. The radiative shift is calculated for the Dirac neutrino mass in an arbitrary external constant electromagnetic field in the framework of the Weinberg-Salam theory. An interpretation of the sign of the neutrino's anomalous magnetic moment is given. The power of the electromagnetic radiation of the moment and characteristic time of the neutrino spirality flipp in an external magnetic field is calculated. Bibliography: 24; Ill. 2

  1. Acute and late morbidity of radiation therapy in women with large pendulous breasts treated with a breast positioning ring

    Purpose: A breast positioning ring to facilitate the treatment of large/flaccid breasts has been previously described (Bentel, IJROBP 29: 879, 1994). This ring aids in the radiation treatment of patients with large pendulous breasts by positioning the breast in a more desirable location/shape on the chestwall. In general, the ring reduces skin folds and the volume of lung included in the tangential fields. We herein report the acute and late morbidity of radiation therapy in women treated with this ring. Materials and Methods: Between 9/91 and 2/97, fifty-two patients with large and/or pendulous breasts were treated using a breast positioning ring consisting of a hollow plastic tube wrapped around the base of the breast and supported by a strap. Patients generally received 46 Gy to the whole breast in 23 fractions using opposed tangential 6 MV photon fields, followed by a tumor bed boost of 16 Gy with an en face electron field. Acute and late (≥ 1 year FU) morbidity was assessed by reviewing the patients' records. Patients experiencing acute moist desquamation and these requiring a treatment break were noted. Late morbidity included pain, induration, changes in breast size or color. Cosmetic results were scored by both physicians and patients. The incidence of morbidity was correlated with patient weight and breast 'size' (estimated by the cross-sectional 'area' of the breast included in the transverse contour at the central axis of the tangential fields). Forty-eight patients are available for evaluation of acute and forty for late morbidity. Median follow up was 33.3 months, (range 12 - 65). The patients' age ranged from 31 to 83 years (mean = 59). Comparisons were made to the morbidity observed in 26 patients with large but not pendulous breasts that were similarly treated but without the ring (control group). Results: Moist desquamation occurred in 69% ((33(48))) of patients treated with the positioning ring. The incidence of moist desquamation was correlated

  2. Nuclear radiation and its effect on man

    A brief presentation is made of the biological effects on man of nuclear radiation. The sources of such radiation, natural and artificial, are summarised. The philosophy on which the maximum permissible doses to various groups and to the population are based is briefly described. Tables are given illustrating the various aspects discussed. (JIW)

  3. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  4. Radiation effects after exposure during prenetal development

    The embryo and fetus are very radiosensitive during the total prenatal development period. The quality and extent of radiation effects depend strongly on the developmental stage at which the exposure occurs. During the preimplantation period radiation exposure can cause death of the embryo after radiation doses of 0.2 Gy and higher. Malformations are only observed in very rare cases when genetic predispositions exist. Macroscopic-anatomical malformations are induced only after irradiation during the major organogenesis. On the basis of experimental data with mammals it is assumed that a radiation dose of about 0.2 Gy doubles the malformation risk. Studies in humans give rise to the assumption that the human embryo is more radioresistant than the embryos of mice and rats. Radiation exposure during the major organogenesis and the early fetal period lead to disturbances in the growth and developmental processes. During early fetogenesis (week 8-15 post coruption) high radiosensitity exists for the development of the central nervous system. Radiation doses of 1 Gy cause severe mental retardation in about 50% of exposed fetuses. Analysis of the dose-effect curves shows that there is probably a dose-effect curve with a threshold for this effect. It must be taken into account that radiation exposure during the fetal period also induces cancer. The studies, however, do not allow quantitative estimate of this radiation risk at present. It is therefore generally assumed that the risk is about the same level as for children. (orig.)

  5. Chernobyl health effects: radiation or stress?

    Consideration is given to results of wide-scale examination of human population, subjected to the effect of radiation in result of Chernobyl accident. The examined contingents consisted of liquidators, evacuated from 30-km zone, people still living in contamination territories, children of irradiated parents and children, who received large radiation doses. High levels of respiratory system diseases, digestive system diseases, cardiovascular diseases and nervous system diseases were revealed for these people. It was revealed that stress, socio-economic and chemical factors played sufficient role in disease incidence. It is shown that fair of radiation may damage more, than radiation itself

  6. The histopathological comparison of L-carnitine with amifostine for protective efficacy on radiation-induced acute small intestinal toxicity

    Murat Caloglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to compare the protective efficacy of l-carnitine (LC to amifostine on radiation-induced acute small intestine damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty, 4-week-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to four groups - Group 1: control (CONT, n = 6, Group 2: irradiation alone (RT, n = 8, Group 3: amifostine plus irradiation (AMI+RT, n = 8, and Group 4: l-Carnitine plus irradiation (LC+RT, n = 8. The rats in all groups were irradiated individually with a single dose of 20 Gy to the total abdomen, except those in CONT. LC (300 mg/kg or amifostine (200 mg/kg was used 30 min before irradiation. Histopathological analysis of small intestine was carried out after euthanasia. Results: Pretreatment with amifostine reduced the radiation-induced acute degenerative damage (P = 0.009 compared to the RT group. Pretreatment with LC did not obtain any significant difference compared to the RT group. The vascular damage significantly reduced in both of the AMI+RT (P = 0.003 and LC+RT group (P = 0.029 compared to the RT group. The overall damage score was significantly lower in the AMI+RT group than the RT group (P = 0.009. There was not any significant difference between the LC+RT and RT group. Conclusions: Amifostine has a marked radioprotective effect against all histopathological changes on small intestinal tissue while LC has limited effects which are mainly on vascular structure.

  7. Physics of radiation effects in crystals

    Johnson, RA

    1986-01-01

    ``Physics of Radiation Effects in Crystals'' is presented in two parts. The first part covers the general background and theory of radiation effects in crystals, including the theory describing the generation of crystal lattice defects by radiation, the kinetic approach to the study of the disposition of these defects and the effects of the diffusion of these defects on alloy compositions and phases. Specific problems of current interest are treated in the second part and include anisotropic dimensional changes in x-uranium, zirconium and graphite, acceleration of thermal creep in reactor ma

  8. Feasibility and Acute Toxicity of Hypofractionated Radiation in Large-breasted Patients

    Dorn, Paige L., E-mail: pdorn@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL (United States); Corbin, Kimberly S.; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of and acute toxicity associated with hypofractionated whole breast radiation (HypoRT) after breast-conserving surgery in patients excluded from or underrepresented in randomized trials comparing HypoRT with conventional fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: A review was conducted of all patients consecutively treated with HypoRT at University of Chicago. All patients were treated to 42.56 Gy in 2.66 Gy daily fractions in either the prone or supine position. Planning was performed in most cases using wedges and large segments or a 'field-in-field' technique. Breast volume was estimated using volumetric measurements of the planning target volume (PTV). Dosimetric parameters of heterogeneity (V105, V107, V110, and maximum dose) were recorded for each treatment plan. Acute toxicity was scored for each treated breast. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 78 patients were treated to 80 breasts using HypoRT. Most women were overweight or obese (78.7%), with a median body mass index of 29.2 kg/m{sup 2}. Median breast volume was 1,351 mL. Of the 80 treated breasts, the maximum acute skin toxicity was mild erythema or hyperpigmentation in 70.0% (56/80), dry desquamation in 21.25% (17/80), and focal moist desquamation in 8.75% (7/80). Maximum acute toxicity occurred after the completion of radiation in 31.9% of patients. Separation >25 cm was not associated with increased toxicity. Breast volume was the only patient factor significantly associated with moist desquamation on multivariable analysis (p = 0.01). Patients with breast volume >2,500 mL experienced focal moist desquamation in 27.2% of cases compared with 6.34% in patients with breast volume <2,500 mL (p = 0.03). Conclusions: HypoRT is feasible and safe in patients with separation >25 cm and in patients with large breast volume when employing modern planning and positioning techniques. We recommend counseling regarding expected increases in skin toxicity in women

  9. Feasibility and Acute Toxicity of Hypofractionated Radiation in Large-breasted Patients

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of and acute toxicity associated with hypofractionated whole breast radiation (HypoRT) after breast-conserving surgery in patients excluded from or underrepresented in randomized trials comparing HypoRT with conventional fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: A review was conducted of all patients consecutively treated with HypoRT at University of Chicago. All patients were treated to 42.56 Gy in 2.66 Gy daily fractions in either the prone or supine position. Planning was performed in most cases using wedges and large segments or a “field-in-field” technique. Breast volume was estimated using volumetric measurements of the planning target volume (PTV). Dosimetric parameters of heterogeneity (V105, V107, V110, and maximum dose) were recorded for each treatment plan. Acute toxicity was scored for each treated breast. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 78 patients were treated to 80 breasts using HypoRT. Most women were overweight or obese (78.7%), with a median body mass index of 29.2 kg/m2. Median breast volume was 1,351 mL. Of the 80 treated breasts, the maximum acute skin toxicity was mild erythema or hyperpigmentation in 70.0% (56/80), dry desquamation in 21.25% (17/80), and focal moist desquamation in 8.75% (7/80). Maximum acute toxicity occurred after the completion of radiation in 31.9% of patients. Separation >25 cm was not associated with increased toxicity. Breast volume was the only patient factor significantly associated with moist desquamation on multivariable analysis (p = 0.01). Patients with breast volume >2,500 mL experienced focal moist desquamation in 27.2% of cases compared with 6.34% in patients with breast volume 25 cm and in patients with large breast volume when employing modern planning and positioning techniques. We recommend counseling regarding expected increases in skin toxicity in women with a PTV volume >2,500 mL.

  10. DTI based detection of radiation induced early acute changes in hippocampus in mice at 7T

    In last decade, it has been understood that ionizing radiation exposure influences central nervous system (CNS) functions and behaviour. Our recent studies have observed metabolic and microstructural changes in brain within 10 days post irradiation. Changes in CNS are speculated due to systemic inflammatory response which can be observed within few hours of radiation exposure. To look for the influence of systemic inflammatory response on brain, present study was carried out to identify the changes occurring in brain with special reference to hippocampus within 24 hours of radiation exposure. A total of 16 mice (n = 8 in each group) were exposed to whole body radiation dose of 5 Gy through a Tele 60Co irradiation facility. DTI study was conducted on sham radiated control mice (n = 8) and at 3 hrs and 24 hrs post irradiation of irradiated mice at 7T animal MRI system. The mice were sacrificed following imaging and immunohistochemistry, mRNA expression of pro inflammatory and anti inflammatory (TGFâ1) marker response were performed on brain tissue. The results showed marginal decrease in mean diffusivity at 3 hours but significantly decreased at 24 hours post irradiation. No significant change in FA values was observed at any time point. Marked changes in radial diffusivity was further detected compared to axial diffusivity. Altered diffusivity depicts change in diffusion characteristics of the intracellular and extra cellular water compartments including restricted water diffusion. The restricted water diffusion could be due to infiltration of inflammatory markers in the brain across the blood brain barrier. The neuroinflammatory response is further supported by increased mRNA expression of cytokines in hippocampus. Further, immunohistochemistry showed noticeable reactive astrogliosis in irradiated group compared to control that might be another reason for restricted diffusion. The study shows that systemic inflammatory response influences the brain even during

  11. Acute effects of winter air pollution on respiratory health

    Zee, van der S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, acute respiratory health effects of exposure to winter air pollution are investigated in panels of children (7-11 yr) and adults (50-70 yr) with and without chronic respiratory symptoms, living in urban and non-urban areas in the Netherlands. The study was performed during three cons

  12. Treatment of radiation-induced acute oral mucositis in a rat model

    The stem cells of the epithelial lining of the oral mucosa are non-specifically affected by many anti-cancer agents including radiation. Radiation-induced mucositis of upper aerodigestive tract is a major dose-limiting factor in the treatment of head and neck tumours. A new non-toxic drug (Compound A) consisting of Curcumin, -tocopherol and sun flower oil (SFO) was developed and its efficacy was tested in the treatment of radiation-induced normal tissue lesions. Mature (12 weeks old; 200-225g) female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in compliance with the Animal (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. While under anaesthesia the animals tongue was slightly extended outside and a region of the underside of the tongue was irradiated in-situ with single doses of 2.27 MeV -rays from a 5mm diameter 90Sr/90Y plaque. The dose-rate of the source was ∼10Gy/min at the surface of the mucus membrane. Irradiations and subsequent assessment of the lesion were carried out under general anesthesia maintained by a 1.5% Halothane, oxygen mixture. Four groups of 36 animals were irradiated with single doses of either 13.5, 15, 16.5 or 18 Gy. Following irradiation the animals in each dose group were subdivided into four treatment subgroups of 9 rats to receive 0.5 ml per day of either Compound A, SFO, -tocopherol or water by oral gavage until the end of experiments. Nine animals were used at each dose point in each treatment group. Mucosal ulceration (erosion of mucosal epithelium) was considered as an end-point and this is referred by radiation-induced mucositis in the context of present experiments. From the day after irradiation until any acute radiation-induced oral mucosal lesion had healed the animals tongue were assessed daily for the presence of radiation-induced mucositis (mucosal ulceration). Quantal data for the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis were analysed using logit analysis and dose modification factor (DMF) was obtained. There was a modest increase in the ED50 values

  13. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    Fried, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels.

  14. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels

  15. Nursing-led management of side effects of radiation: evidence-based recommendations for practice

    Poirier P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patricia PoirierUniversity of Maine School of Nursing, Orono, ME, USAAbstract: It has been estimated that 50%–60% of patients diagnosed with cancer will receive radiation therapy at some point in their treatment. Although radiation therapy can play a significant role in the cure or control of cancer, and the palliation of symptoms, it also has side effects. Side effects of radiation therapy can interfere with patient quality of life and daily functioning. Severe side effects can lead to delays in treatment, potentially affecting the outcome of treatment. All patients receiving radiation therapy are at risk of fatigue and skin reactions in the area of the body being treated. Other side effects of radiation therapy are specific to the part of the body being treated. Radiation therapy to the head and neck area may cause oral mucositis, dryness, and nutritional deficiencies. Radiation therapy to the chest or lung area may lead to difficulty in swallowing and eating. Radiation therapy to the pelvis frequently causes diarrhea. There are many nursing interventions available to manage the side effects of treatment based on best available evidence and expert opinion. Nurses in all settings are essential in helping patients manage the side effects of treatment and maintain their quality of life. The purpose of this review is to provide nurses with evidence-based recommendations and suggestions for managing common acute side effects of radiation therapy.Keywords: evidence-based practice, radiation therapy, side effects, nursing management

  16. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    Wiendl, Toni A.; Wiendl, Fritz W.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Franco, Jose G.; Althur, Valter, E-mail: tawiendl@hotmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  17. Biological effects of proton radiation: an update

    Proton radiation provides significant dosimetric advantages when compared with gamma radiation due to its superior energy deposition characteristics. Although the physical aspects of proton radiobiology are well understood, biological and clinical endpoints are understudied. The current practice to assume the relative biological effectiveness of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons to be a generic value of about 1.1 relative to photons likely obscures important unrecognised differentials in biological response between these radiation qualities. A deeper understanding of the biological properties induced by proton radiation would have both radiobiological and clinical impact. This article briefly points to some of the literature pertinent to the effects of protons on tissue-level processes that modify disease progression, such as angiogenesis, cell invasion and cancer metastasis. Recent findings hint that proton radiation may, in addition to offering improved radio-therapeutic targeting, be a means to provide a new dimension for increasing therapeutic benefits for patients by manipulating these tissue-level processes. (authors)

  18. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour. - Highlights: • Effect of radiation processing on tenderness of three meat systems was evaluated. • Dose dependant reduction in shear force seen in buffalo meat. • Collagen solubility increased with irradiation

  19. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  20. Acute phase response before treatment predicts radiation esophagitis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Background and purpose: Radiation esophagitis (RE) represents an inflammatory reaction to radiation therapy (RT). We hypothesized that aspects of the physiologic acute phase response (APR) predicts RE. Material and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 285 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation. The primary analysis was the association of pretreatment lab values reflective of the APR with symptomatic (grade ⩾2) RE. Univariate and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to test associations of clinical and pretreatment lab values with RE. Optimal cutpoints and multivariable risk stratification groupings were determined via recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Pretreatment platelet counts were higher and hemoglobin levels lower in patients who developed RE (P < 0.05). Based on these two pre-treatment risk factors, an APR score was defined as 0 (no risk factors), 1 (either risk factor), or 2 (both risk factors). APR score was significantly associated with RE in both univariate (OR = 2.3 for each point, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–3.4, P = 0.001) and multivariate (OR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.3–3.4, P = 0.002) analyses. Conclusions: The APR score may represent a novel metric to predict RE. However, pending validation in an independent dataset, caution is advised when interpreting these results given their retrospective and thus exploratory nature

  1. Effects of low-level exposure to ionizing radiation: current concepts and concerns for veterinary workers

    The issue of biological effects caused by low-level exposure to ionizing radiation (0.1Sv/yr or 10 rem) is a concern of veterinary radiologists, clinicians and radiotherapists. Cellular damage from ionizing radiation is mediated by injury to DNA, some of which can be repaired. The most important harmful effects attributed to low-level exposure are carcinogenesis and mutation. Ionizing radiation may also cause embryonic and fetal damage, life span shortening and cataractogenesis. The estimated excess risk of mortality for all human cancers is 0.8% (800 deaths per 100,000) per 0.10 Sv of acute exposure; at low dose-rates, risk is presumed to be less. Ionizing radiation increases the frequency of spontaneous genic and chromosomal mutations in man and animals. Studies of atomic bomb survivors imply that at least 1 Sv would be needed to double the spontaneous mutation rate for acute exposure to low-LET radiation. However, the doubling dose for chronic, low-level exposure may be 4 Sv or more. The human embryo and fetus are sensitive to excessive doses of ionizing radiation, with mental retardation the main concern in the low dose range. Paradoxically, there is scientific evidence that in some instances, chronic low-level exposure to ionizing radiation causes a beneficial or hormonic effect. For veterinary workers, occupational exposures appear to be well below the maximum permissible dose limit and the risk or probability of harmful effects is low if stringent radiation safety practices are maintained

  2. Sterilizing radiation effects on selected polymers

    The mechanism of radiation effects and their industrial applications are discussed for the following classes of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers, films and fibers, and adhesives/coatings/potting compounds. 35 references, 3 tables

  3. Effects of solar radiation on glass

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Kinser, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation of selected glasses are reported. Optical property degradation is studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Strength changes are measured using a concentric ring bend test. Direct fracture toughness measurements using an indentation test are planned.

  4. Radiation effects blamed on Chernobyl

    Strictly speaking, the nature of an epidemiological study would not permit the same causal links to be established as an experimental study does. Instead, it merely provides circumstantial evidence, from which some conclusions can be drawn as to the causative factors in the occurrences recorded. To summarize it may be stated that as fas as the Germans are concerned no scientific evidence has so far been provided to prove health impairments attributable to an added radiation load from the Chernobyl fallout. On the other hand, it can not be denied that there are indications of health damage in a few individuals unreasonably changing their eating habits for fear of radiation injuries. The question as to whether the event instilled a permanent feeling of unease in some population groups still remains largely obscure. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    Bahareh Amin; Alireza Nakhsaz; Hossein Hosseinzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) were evaluated using forced swim test (FST). In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals), antidepressant-like effe...

  6. Predicted solar cell edge radiation effects

    The Advanced Solar Cell Orbital Test (ASCOT) will test six types of solar cells in a high energy proton environment. During the design of the experiment a question was raised about the effects of proton radiation incident on the edge of the solar cells and whether edge radiation shielding was required. Historical geosynchronous data indicated that edge radiation damage is not detectable over the normal end of life solar cell degradation; however because the ASCOT radiation environment has a much higher and more energetic fluence of protons, considerably more edge damage is expected. A computer analysis of the problem was made by modeling the expected radiation damage at the cell edge and using a network model of small interconnected solar cells to predict degradation in the cell's electrical output. The model indicated that the deepest penetration of edge radiation was at the top of the cell near the junction where the protons have access to the cell through the low density cell/cover adhesive layer. The network model indicated that the cells could tolerate high fluences at their edge as long as there was high electrical resistance between the edge radiated region and the contact system on top of the cell. The predicted edge radiation related loss was less than 2% of maximum power for GaAs/Ge solar cells. As a result, no edge radiation protection was used for ASCOT

  7. Fast Neutron Radiation Effects on Bacillus Subtili

    CHEN Xiaoming; REN Zhenglong; ZHANG Jianguo; ZHENG Chun; TAN Bisheng; YANG Chengde; CHU Shijin

    2009-01-01

    To examine the sterilizing effect and mechanism of neutron radiation, Bacillus sub-tilis vat. niger, strain (ATCC 9372) spores were irradiated with the fast neutron from the Chinese fast burst reactor Ⅱ(CFBR-Ⅱ). The plate-count results indicated that the D10 value was 384.6 Gy with a neutron radiation dose rate of 7.4 Gy/min. The rudimental catalase activity of the spores declined obviously with the increase in the radiation dose. Meanwhile, under the scanning electron microscope, no visible influence of the neutron radiation on the spore configuration was detected even if the dose was increased to 4 kGy. The content and distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by neutron radiation at different doses were measured and quantified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Further analysis of the DNA release percentage (PR), the DNA breakage level (L), and the average molecular weight, indicated that DNA fragments were obvi-ously distributed around the 5 kb regions at different radiation doses, which suggests that some points in the DNA molecule were sensitive to neutron radiation. Both PR and L varied regularly to some extent with the increase in radiation dose. Thus neutron radiation has a high sterilization power, and can induce falling enzyme activity and DNA breakage in Bacillus subtilis spores

  8. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We update previously published Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 data set. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux data sets. Our results clearly show that the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave, and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles, to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance data sets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  9. Moderate toxic effects following acute zonisamide overdose

    Hofer, K E; Trachsel, C; Rauber-Lüthy, C; Kupferschmidt, H; Kullak-Ublick, G A; Ceschi, A

    2011-01-01

    Zonisamide is an antiepileptic drug that acts on voltage-sensitive sodium and calcium channels, with a modulatory effect on GABA-mediated neuronal inhibition and an inhibitory effect on carbonic anhydrase. It is used mainly for the treatment of partial seizures, and is generally well tolerated at therapeutic doses. The most common reported adverse effects are somnolence, anorexia, dizziness, and headache. There are limited data on zonisamide overdose in the literature, and no case of zonisami...

  10. Radiation effects on biodegradable polyesters

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] and its copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] are microbial biodegradable polyesters produced by many types of bacteria. Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(E-caprolactone) (PCL) are also biodegradable synthetic polyesters which have been commercialized. These thermoplastics are expected for wide usage in environmental protection and blocompatible applications. Radiation grafting of hydrophilic monomers onto many polymers, e.g., polyethylene and polypropylene has been studied mainly for biomedical applications. In the present study, radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl monomers onto PHB and P(3HB-co-3HV) was carried out and improvement of their properties was studied. Changes in the properties and biodegradability were compared with the degree of grafting. Radiation-induced crosslinking of PBS and PCL which relatively show thermal and irradiation stability was also carried out to improve their thermal stability or processability. Irradiation to PBS and PCL mainly resulted in crosslinking and characterization of these crosslinked polyesters was investigated

  11. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  12. Treatment of extremely severe acute hemopoietic radiation sickness beagles with RhG-CSF and RhIL-11

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of treatment combined recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) and recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) on severe acute hemopoietic radiation sickness (ARS) beagles. Methods: Beagles were irradiated with 4.5 Gy 60Co γ-ray to establish ARS models, and animals were divided into the irradiated control group and the supportive care and combined cytokines treatment cohort. After irradiation the irradiated control beagles was given no treatment, the supportive care beagles received purely symptomatic treatment including blood transfusion and anti-infection while the combined cytokines treatment beagles received rhG-CSF and rhIL-11 subcutaneously for three weeks besides symptomatic treatment.Results After irradiation, all kinds of cells' population declined sharply, but rebounded to normal basically in the combined cytokines treatment rate in the cohort. The mean blood transfusion volume of cytokines in the cohort and the period of blood transfusion all were less than those in the supportive care cohort (P<0.01). The period of administrated antibiotic of cytokines in the cohort was shorter than that in the supportive care cohort (P<0.05). In the observe period of 45 d, survival rate in the irradiated controls cohort was 0%, in the supportive care cohort was 80%, and in the combined cytokines treatment cohort was 100%(P<0.01). Conclusion: Administration of rhG-CSF and rhIL-11 early after irradiation and continued daily, in combined with supportive care in severe acute hemopoietic radiation sickness beagles can improve hematopoietic function restoration, stimulate blood cells to restore to the normal level quickly, significantly decrease the reguired volume of blood transfusion, shorten the period of anti-infection and increase survival of irradiated canines. (authors)

  13. Effects of radiations on ornamental fish

    Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. There are two distinct types of radiations: ionizing and non-ionizing. Ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays are some examples of radiation. 'Ornamental fish' is designed for aquatic hobbyists and the aquatic industry for several purposes. UV light has two primary uses in fish culture: Controlling green water and disinfecting the water supply. Many proponents of UV disinfection sometimes overlook the additional benefits relating to ornamental fish; those being that cleaner water reduces the stress on the fish by not having to fight off diseases, thus enhancing its immune system and leading to faster growth and more brilliant colors. Ultraviolet sterilizers are often used in aquaria to help control unwanted microorganisms in the water. UV radiation also ensures that exposed pathogens cannot reproduce, thus decreasing the likelihood of a disease outbreak in an aquarium. Despite of these benefits, the ill-effects of radiations cannot be ruled out. Ultraviolet Radiation-induced DNA Damage is seen in the skin of the Platyfish Xiphophorus. Higher radiation doses may cause the gastrointestinal syndrome that leads to defects of the intestinal mucosa barrier with successive contamination of musculature. Exposure to UV radiation can kill the fish and induce sublethal effects in embryos, larvae and adults. The change in skin includes irregularity of skin surface, epidermal oedema, necrosis etc. Irradiation may badly influence the textural attributes of fish muscle. (author)

  14. Cardiovascular Effects of Acute Organophosphate Poisoning

    Shankar Laudari

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion:Cardiac effects of OP poisoning can be life-threatening. Prompt diagnosis, early supportive and definitive therapies with atropine and oximes along with vigilant monitoring of the patients for prominent cardiac effects such as QT prolongation, VT or VF during hospital stay can definitely save lives of the victims.

  15. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    Dasom Shin; Gihyun Lee; Sung-Hwa Sohn; Soojin Park; Kyung-Hwa Jung; Ji Min Lee; Jieun Yang; Jaeho Cho; Hyunsu Bae

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focall...

  16. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects and genomic instability. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm would cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (orig.)

  17. Radiation effects on mouse incisor teeth following whole-body doses of up to 16 Gray

    Experiments were performed to determine the threshold dose of radiation above which macroscopic tooth damage in C57BL mice occurs, the sequence of appearance of this damage, and the extent and rate of recovery in relation to radiation dose. Protection from the acute effects of radiation doses well in excess of the LD90 was obtained by the administration of non-absorbable antibiotics and bone marrow reconstitution, without the use of radioprotective drugs. However, gross effects on the incisors were observed at doses in excess of 10 gy. Body weight changes were to some extent linked with the incidence of tooth damage. (author)

  18. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  19. Radiosensitivity and clinical symptoms of the acute radiation syndrome in calves and young cattle

    38 calves, aged 2.5 to 4 months were exposed to bilateral whole-body X-ray treatment. Incident doses were between 1.80 Gy and 2.80 Gy. An incident dose in excess of 3.0 Gy has to be considered as Ldsub(100/30) for calves in the above age group, while incident doses between 2.2 Gy and 2.5 Gy are LDsub(50/30) and 1.8 Gy being LDsub(0/30). The clinical symptoms of the acute radiation syndrome were clearly phased in response to doses between 2.0 Gy and 4.0 Gy (primary, latency, main reaction, and recovery periods). Following the above doses, the death of the animals, occurred between the middle of the third and end of the fourth week after irradiation. The clinical symptoms are described in detail. Only the symptoms in the main reaction phase depend unambiguously on dosage. There were more frequent febrile rectal temperatures, higher incidence of bronchopneumonia, and disturbances of movement. The acute clinical symptoms gradually faded away in the phase of transition to recovery towards the end of the fourth week after irradiation. (author)

  20. Ornithogalum virens as a plant assay for beta and gamma radiation effects

    Herron, V J

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the monocotyledonous angiosperm, Ornithogalum virens (Quintanilha and Cabral, 1947), could be used in such a biological assay system. After exposing O. virens plants to acute (/sup 60/Co) and chronic (/sup 137/Cs) gamma radiation and internal beta radiation (/sup 32/P), lethality (LD/sub 50/, LD/sub 100/), growth inhibition, and chromosome aberrations were investigated. The LD/sub 50/ and LD/sub 100/ for acute gamma radiation were estimated to be between 0.91 to 1.8 krad and less than 3.6 krad, respectively. Though growth inhibition and abnormal growth were observed in the acute and chronic gamma radiation studies, the changes in the growth of the plants were so variable that these parameters were found to be unreliable measures of radiation effects. Chromosome aberrations were a more reliable measure of radiation damage because linear relationships between total aberrations and dose were found for both gamma and beta radiation.

  1. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  2. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A₂ in Mice.

    Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Park, Soojin; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Min; Yang, Jieun; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A₂ (bvPLA₂) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA₂ in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA₂ six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA₂ treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA₂ treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes' mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA₂ on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA₂ in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA₂ are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA₂ in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments. PMID:27144583

  3. Effect Analysis on the Radiation Dose Rate of Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivors by Atmospheric Condition

    The Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) had been established to evaluate the radiation doses for the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The radiation effects of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from the atomic bombs detonated at both cities were analyzed, and two types of radiation transport codes (i.e., MCNP4C and DORT) were employed in their studies. It was specifically investigated for contribution of each type of radiations to total dose. However, it is insufficient to examine the effects by various environmental factors such as weather conditions, because their calculations were only performed under certain condition at the times of the bombings. In addition, the scope of them does not include acute radiation injury of the atomic bomb survivors in spite of important information for investigating hazard of unexpected radiation accident. Therefore, this study analyzed the contribution of primary and secondary effects (i.e., skyshine and groundshine) of neutrons emitted from the Nagasaki atomic bomb. These analyses were performed through a series of radiation transport calculations by using MCNPX 2.6.0 code with variations of atmospheric density. The acute radiation injury by prompt neutrons was also evaluated as a function of distance from the hypocenter, where hypocenter is the point on the ground directly beneath the epicenter which is the burst point of the bomb in air

  4. Radiation abuse and its effects

    This paper delves into overuse practiced in diagnostic radiography. The conventional attitudes to low-dose irradiation are critically examined, as is the MPD related to individual radiosensitivity. Concern is expressed that a sizeable proportion of radiologists ignore important aspects of the Code of Practice and this attitude is readily emulated in the hospital setting. The author advocates education within the medical profession and the community on the risks involved in radiation abuse and the benefits derived from justified exposures to x rays. (author)

  5. Biological effects and hazards of radiation exposure

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risk to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. This risk effects can be at least qualitatively understood by considering the effects of radiation on cell DNA. Whilst exposure to high levels of radiation results in a number of identifiable effects, exposure to low levels of radiation may result in effects which only manifest themselves after many years. Risk estimates for low levels of radiation have been derived on the basis of a number of assumptions. In the case of uranium mine workers a major hazard arises from the inhalation of radon daughters. Whilst the correlation between radon daughter exposure and lung cancer incidence is well established, the numerical value of the risk factor is the subject of controversy. ICRP 50 gives a value of 10 cases per 106 person-years at risk per WLM (range 5-15 x 10-6 PYR-1 WLM-1). The effect of smoking on lung cancer incidence rates amongst miners is also controversial. Nevertheless, smoking by miners should be discouraged

  6. Radiation-induced stress effects following low dose exposure

    Complete text of publication follows. Recent advances in our understanding of effects of radiation on living cells suggest that fundamentally different mechanisms are operating at low doses compared with high doses. Also, acute low doses appear to involve different response mechanisms compared with chronic low doses. Both genomic instability and so called 'bystander effects' show many similarities with well known cellular responses to oxidative stress. These predominate following low dose exposures and are maximally expressed at doses as low as 5mGy. At the biological level this is not surprising. Chemical toxicity has been known for many years to show these patterns of dose response. Cell signaling and coordinated stress mechanisms appear to dominate acute low dose exposure to chemicals. Adaptation to chemical exposures is also well documented although mechanisms of adaptive responses are less clear. In the radiation field adaptive responses also become important when low doses are protracted or fractionated. Recent data from our group concerning bystander effects following multiple low dose exposures suggest that adaptive responses can be induced in cells which only receive signals from irradiated neighbours. We have data showing delayed and bystander effects in humans, rodents 3 fish species and in prawns following in vitro and/or in vivo irradiation of haematopoietic tissues and, from the aquatic groups, gill and skin/fin tissue. Bystander signals induced by radiation can be communicated from fish to fish in vivo and are detectable as early as the eyed egg stage, i.e. as soon as tissue starts to develop. Using proteomic approaches we have determined that the bystander and the direct irradiation proteomes are different. The former show significant upregulation of 5 proteins with anti-oxidant, regenerative and restorative functions while the direct radiation proteome has 2 upregulated proteins both involved in proliferation. These data have implications for

  7. Radiation-induced intracranial osteosarcoma after radiation for acute lymphocytic leukemia associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    A 28-year-old man presented with osteosarcoma of the occipital bone 16 years after 24 Gy of craniospinal irradiation for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The tumor had both intra- and extra-cranial components. However, the affected skull appeared to be normal on imaging because of permeative infiltration by the tumor. Subtotal resection was achieved and the tumor was verified histologically as an osteosarcoma. The residual tumor soon showed remarkable enlargement and disseminated to the spinal cord. Both of the enlarged and disseminated tumor masses were treated by surgical intervention and chemotherapy. However, the patient deteriorated due to the tumor regrowth and died 11 months after the initial diagnosis. This patient had previously developed a leukemia, a colon cancer, a rectal cancer and a hepatocellular carcinoma. His brother also died of leukemia. The patient had a heterozygous TP53 germ-line mutation of codon 248 in the exon 7. In conclusion, we consider the present tumor to be a rare example of radiation-induced skull osteosarcoma in a member of the cancer-prone family with TP53 germ-line mutation which is associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. (author)

  8. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  9. Radiation effects on fiber-reinforced plastics

    The advances in the research on the latent deterioration caused by radiation, not leading to any change in static mechanical features for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) were reviewed aiming to assess a static mechanical characteristics of the epoxide resin, FRP. The deterioration of FRP due to radiation is known to be related to the radiation resistancy of its matrix. The bending strength of CFRP laminated with epoxide was determined as a function of radiation dose and tetraglycidyl-diaminodiphenyl methan (TGDDM) was found to be more resistant to radiation than diglycidyl ether of bisphenol (DGEBA). The bending strength was decreased by heat treatment at a higher temperature following the radiation in both CFRP. So, heat treatment was thought to be useful to detect the latent deterioration which fails to appear in any changes in static characteristics at room temperature. In addition, it is necessary to noninvasively observe the material with regard to the conditions to generate damages due to the fatigue. The results of three-point bending experiment show that when 3 different stressing; compression pressure, and shearing and stretching forces were loaded simultaneously, cracks develop easily. Further, electron radiation caused to increase water absorption of GFRP, suggesting that some damages developed on the interface of GFRP treated with silane coupling reagent might cause occurrence of crack. The latent deterioration due to radiation is detectable in part by estimation of water absorbance and heat treatment effects on FRP. (M.N.)

  10. Sunscreens: topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against harmful effects of solar radiation

    This review deals with topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against the harmful effects of solar radiation. Two concerns about the deleterious effects of sun exposure involve: (1) acute effects (e.g., sunburn and drug-induced phototoxicity) and (2) potential long-term risks of repeated sun exposures leading to development of solar elastosis, keratoses, induction of both nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer, and alteration of immune responses and functions. Action spectra of normal and abnormal reactions of human skin to acute and chronic effects of solar radiation are presented with a view to helping the physician prescribe the appropriate sunscreens. Factors that influence acute effects of sunburn are reviewed. Various artificial methods effective in minimizing or preventing harmful effects of solar radiation, both in normal individuals and in patients with photosensitivity-related problems, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the commercially available chemical sunscreens and their properties. Sun protection factor (SPF) values of several brand-name formulations determined with a solar simulator under indoor conditions (laboratory) and with solar radiation under natural, field conditions are presented. Factors responsible for variations of SPF values observed under indoor and outdoor conditions are reviewed. Systemic photoprotective agents and their limitations are outlined. The photobiology of melanin pigmentation (the tanning reaction) is briefly discussed, with emphasis on the dangers of using quick-tanning lotions for stimulation of the tanning reaction

  11. Acute adaptive immune response correlates with late radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    The lung response to radiation exposure can involve an immediate or early reaction to the radiation challenge, including cell death and an initial immune reaction, and can be followed by a tissue injury response, of pneumonitis or fibrosis, to this acute reaction. Herein, we aimed to determine whether markers of the initial immune response, measured within days of radiation exposure, are correlated with the lung tissue injury responses occurring weeks later. Inbred strains of mice known to be susceptible (KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ) or resistant (C3H/HeJ, A/J, AKR/J) to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and to vary in time to onset of respiratory distress post thoracic irradiation (from 10–23 weeks) were studied. Mice were untreated (controls) or received 18 Gy whole thorax irradiation and were euthanized at 6 h, 1d or 7 d after radiation treatment. Pulmonary CD4+ lymphocytes, bronchoalveolar cell profile & cytokine level, and serum cytokine levels were assayed. Thoracic irradiation and inbred strain background significantly affected the numbers of CD4+ cells in the lungs and the bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential of exposed mice. At the 7 day timepoint greater numbers of pulmonary Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes and reduced lavage interleukin17 and interferonγ levels were significant predictors of late stage fibrosis. Lavage levels of interleukin-10, measured at the 7 day timepoint, were inversely correlated with fibrosis score (R = −0.80, p = 0.05), while serum levels of interleukin-17 in control mice significantly correlated with post irradiation survival time (R = 0.81, p = 0.04). Lavage macrophage, lymphocyte or neutrophil counts were not significantly correlated with either of fibrosis score or time to respiratory distress in the six mouse strains. Specific cytokine and lymphocyte levels, but not strain dependent lavage cell profiles, were predictive of later radiation-induced lung injury in this panel of inbred strains. The online version of this

  12. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: a brief history.

    Miller, R W

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen's discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts (1949), leukemia (1952) and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intrauterine exposure (1952). No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements (1956), the F1 mortality (1981), cytogenetic studies (1987) or biochemical genetic studies (1988). Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes (1968), and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes (1992). Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia (1995), a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. Also, obligate heterozygote female relatives can be studied for increased susceptibility to radiation-induced breast cancer, as suggested by clinical studies. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others (1994). The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased

  13. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references

  14. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  15. Modeling the acute health effects of astronauts from exposure to large solar particle events.

    Hu, Shaowen; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; McClellan, Gene E; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-04-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events (SPE) presents a significant health concern for astronauts for exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field, which could impair their performance and result in the possibility of failure of the mission. Assessing the potential for early radiation effects under such adverse conditions is of prime importance. Here we apply a biologically based mathematical model that describes the dose- and time-dependent early human responses that constitute the prodromal syndromes to consider acute risks from SPEs. We examine the possible early effects on crews from exposure to some historically large solar events on lunar and/or Mars missions. The doses and dose rates of specific organs were calculated using the Baryon radiation transport (BRYNTRN) code and a computerized anatomical man model, while the hazard of the early radiation effects and performance reduction were calculated using the Radiation-Induced Performance Decrement (RIPD) code. Based on model assumptions we show that exposure to these historical events would cause moderate early health effects to crew members inside a typical spacecraft or during extra-vehicular activities, if effective shielding and medical countermeasure tactics were not provided. We also calculate possible even worse cases (double intensity, multiple occurrences in a short period of time, etc.) to estimate the severity, onset and duration of various types of early illness. Uncertainties in the calculation due to limited data on relative biological effectiveness and dose-rate modifying factors for protons and secondary radiation, and the identification of sensitive sites in critical organs are discussed. PMID:19276707

  16. Radiation effects on DNA methylation in mice

    Effects of ionizing radiation on DNA methylation in liver, brain and spleen were examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total methylated cytosine level in the genome was reduced within 8 hours after 3.8 Gy of irradiation in liver of adult mice. But no appreciable effect was observed in brain and spleen. When mice were irradiated at newborn, liver DNA revealed no change in methylated cytosine level. Even though slight effects of radiation were detected in he methylation of the c-myc and c-fos genes, they were only temporary and no long-term effects were observed. These data suggest that the effect of radiation on DNA methylation in vivo is not prevailing a DNA damage, but rather influenced much through biological parameters. (author)

  17. Acute effects of aflatoxins on guinea pig isolated ileum.

    Luzi, A; Cometa, M F; Palmery, M

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies on the aflatoxins have focused mainly on their chronic toxic effects. In this study we investigated the acute gastrointestinal effects of four common aflatoxins on isolated guinea pig ileum. AFB(1) (EC(50) 4.6+/-0.4 microM) and AFB(2) (EC(50)17+/-4.4 microM) contracted isolated guinea pig ileum in a dose-dependent manner, whereas AFG(1) and AFG(2) evoked no contractions. Atropine (5.9 nM 11.8 and 23.6 nM) antagonized AFB(1)-induced contractions in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with the nicotinic ganglionic blocker, hexamethonium (up to 55 microM), left AFB(1)-induced contractions unchanged. In contrast, tetrodotoxin (0.3 microM), blocked AFB(1) contractile activity. The two inhibitors of ACh release, morphine (0.3 microM) and clonidine (0.4 microM), antagonized EC(50) AFB(1)-induced contractions, and apamin, a drug that increases neuronal excitability, facilitated the EC(50) AFB(1)-induced contractile effect. The choline uptake blocker, hemicholinium (17.4 microM) markedly reduced AFB(1)-induced contractions. These results suggest that aflatoxins induce their contractile effect indirectly through the cholinergic system by stimulating acetylcholine release from the postganglionic parasympathetic nerve endings. The acute actions of aflatoxins on isolated guinea pig ileum could explain their acute gastrointestinal effects in humans and animals. PMID:12206819

  18. Long-term therapy related side effect on endocrine system among survivor with paediatric brain tumour and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Chan, Shu-wing, Sophia; 陳舒穎

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and brain tumours are frequently seen in childhood malignancies. With the improved effectiveness of treatments, approximately 70–80% patients can be cured of their primary illness. However, therapy-related long-term sequelae among survivors are becoming a major concern. Traditional treatments include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, and these have been shown to have prolonged side effects on the endocrine system, and symptoms may develop mon...

  19. Exposure to low dose radiation and its effect

    The title subjects are easily explained. As an introduction, the concept of the ICRP Recommendation (2007) is explained briefly on its use of radiation protection and management. Natural radiation dose to ordinary Japanese is said to be the average 1.5 mSv/y in contrast to the whole world people, 2.4. Medical radiation dose to Japanese is estimated to amount to 2.3 mSv/y, to American, 3.0, and to people of medically advanced nations, 1.92. There are areas always exposed to the natural high dose radiation like Ramsar 10.2 mSv/y (Iran). The effect of such natural low dose has been shown to be all insignificant on cancer mortality in Yangjian area (3.3 mSv/y) in China, on lung cancer risk due to radon in Japan Misasa spa area (>10 mSv/y), and on cancer mortality among 176 thousands nuclear industry workers in Japan (average accumulated dose 12 mSv), etc. There have been such reports as increased bladder cancer in Chernobyl, increased leukemic relative risk of infants whose fathers worked in Sellafield nuclear facility, and acute death/health-injury of residents in the past Lou-Lan area where Chinese nuclear bombs were tested. Fallout data from 1955 to 2011 shows the process of radioactive materials fallen and peaks were due to nuclear tests and Chernobyl/Fukushima Accidents. Basic studies on low dose effect involve those of the radioadoptive response, radiation hormesis, bystander effect and cluster injury of DNA. In low dose-carcinogenesis relationship, presented are models of linear non-threhold (LNT), those estimating lower risk than LNT like linear quadratic (LQ) model, and higher risk like supra-linear model. Risks leading to cancer formation include the occupation and others like medical doctors, tobacco smoking and various anxieties/stresses. (T.T.)

  20. The acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation of mouse skin and the factors affecting the response

    Several problems regarding acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation were investigated in order to clarify protection problems of localised doses to the skin. A study into the acute biological effects of different energy beta emitters and the effects of energy and area on the response showed direct relationships between these criteria for a range of different acute responses with different time courses. Three different types of acute response were found and these are described as 'moist desquamation', 'acute ulceration' and 'acute epidermal necrosis'. An unexpected finding was that the lower energy beta emitter 170Tm was as efficient at inducing scab formation as the higher energy 90Sr sources for the same area of exposure. Experiments using 2x4 cm2 exposures to 224Cm alpha particles showed that the response to this poorly penetrating radiation was minimal after doses as high as 180 Gy measured at 10 μm into the skin. In comparison, large area exposure to 170Tm produced areas of prolonged scabbing after doses up to 100 Gy. However, the intensity of the reaction varied between strains. (author)

  1. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning

    Renza Perini; Marta Bortoletto; Michela Capogrosso; Anna Fertonani; Carlo Miniussi

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cor...

  2. Measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers

    We propose a new method for measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers on a nanosecond timescale. The method, which incorporates a streak camera, allows more precise time resolution than other methods and has the advantage of measuring the radiation-induced attenuation as a function of wavelength and time simultaneously. By choosing different light sources and sweep speeds, radiation-induced attenuation may be measured under a variety of experimental configurations. Examples of the type of output obtained with our method are given

  3. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    Lambert, J.D.; Maxcy, R.B.

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 10/sup 0/C, at 0-5/sup 0/C, and at 30 +/- 10/sup 0/C. Irradiation at -30/sup 0/C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D/sub 10/ value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D/sub 10/ values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures.

  4. Radiation effects on the integrity of paper

    Books and documents attacked by fungi and insects have already been treated by radiation for disinfestations purposes. However, there is still need to investigate the influence of radiation on the cellulose paper structure. The aim of this research was to study the effects of radiation on paper properties, especially those related to strength and appearance. Paper sheets for this study were prepared in the laboratory, using bleached eucalyptus pulp as raw material. No additives were used to concentrate the attention only on the effects of irradiation on the pure cellulose matrix. The samples were irradiated at IPEN's 60Co Gammacell irradiator with six radiation doses, from 3 to 15 kGy at the dose rate 0.817 Gy/s. The properties of paper sheets were tested after irradiation and compared with unirradiated samples according to ISO methods. No significant changes were detected in paper samples irradiated up to 15 kGy.

  5. Emergency preparedness of Research Center for Radiation medicine and its hospital to admit and treat the patients with signs of acute radiation sickness

    After the Chernobyl accident, the Research Center for Radiation Medicine (RCRM) was established in Kiev (Ukraine). Its main task was to maintain a high level of emergency preparedness and be ready to examine and treat patients who suffer as a result of hypothetical radiation accident. Based on the previous experience, this institution's specialists worked out new diagnostic criteria and drug treatment schemata for acute radiation sickness, created a database on 75 patients with this diagnosis and improved educational programmes for medical students and physicians working in the field of radiation medicine. RCRM collaborates fruitfully with western partners through the joint research projects and connects with the World Health Organisation's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network centre. Collaboration with Kiev Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation allows RCRM to use aseptic wards having highly filtered air for the treatment of most severely irradiated patients. (authors)

  6. Additive effects of ultraviolet radiation

    A xenon-mercury high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce ultraviolet (uv) radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated and evaluated by slitlamp biomicroscopy. Corneal threshold (Hc) was 0.05 J.cm-2 and lens threshold (hL) was 0.75 J.cm-2. Other eyes were irradiated with 2 Hc and evaluated from 4 to 24 h at 4 h intervals. Corneal damage was only greater than that expected from a single Hc exposure if the separation between the two Hc exposures did not exceed 8 h. The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of uv was the development of corneal epithelial granules

  7. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454678

  8. Higher sensitivity of LEC strain rat in radiation-induced acute intestinal death

    LEC strain rats (LEC rats), which have been known to develop hereditarily spontaneous fulminant hepatitis 4-5 months after birth, were highly sensitive to whole-body X-irradiation as compared to WKAH strain rats (WKAH rats). Radiation-induced acute intestinal death occurred at doses higher than 6.5 Gy in LEC rats, and at doses higher than 12.8 Gy in WKAH rats, respectively. By the probit analysis of survival data, it was shown that the LD50/7 value of LEC rats was estimated to be 7.03 Gy which was significantly lower than that (12.99 Gy) of WKAH rats. Histopathological examinations of small intestines from LEC rats 2 days after irradiation at the dose of 8.5 Gy showed severe epithelial death together with edema, whereas little or no significant changes were noted in intestinal epithelium of 8.5 Gy-irradiated WKAH rats. These results suggest that the radiosensitivity of LEC rats to ionizing radiation appears to be higher than that of other strains of rats

  9. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis.

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation - charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis. PMID:24160185

  10. A-bomb radiation and evidence of late effects other than cancer.

    Stewart, A M; Kneale, G W

    1990-06-01

    Cancer risk coefficients for ionizing radiation are currently based on the assumption that, after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there were no late effects of early selection (survival of the fittest) or acute marrow damage. These negative findings were the result of applying a linear model of relative risk to the deaths of 5-y survivors. By applying a linear-quadratic model to these deaths (i.e., a model with more than one degree of freedom), we have obtained evidence of longstanding competition between selection effects of the early deaths and other radiation effects, and also evidence that late effects of radiation include marrow damage as well as cancer. Consequently, the present method of risk estimation--by linear extrapolation of high dose effects--should no longer be used for estimating the cancer effects of occupational exposures or background radiation. PMID:2345104

  11. The radiation effects on the living cell

    This publication is a presentation of particular points discussed during the colloquium of the 15-18 june 1999, for which scientific researches are performed at the CEA/CNRS. They deal with the radiobiology, for the radiation effects on living matter; with the DNA, for the knowledge and repair mechanisms on cells submitted to ionizing radiations; with the exposition to UV in correlation with neoplasms; with the P53 gene which is a tumour suppressor. (A.L.B.)

  12. Effects of melatonin in experimental stroke models in acute, sub-acute, and chronic stages

    Hsiao-Wen Lin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Wen Lin, E-Jian LeeNeurophysiology Laboratory, Neurosurgical Service, Department of Surgery, National Cheng Kung University Medical Center and Medical School, Tainan, TaiwanAbstract: Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine, a naturally occurring indole produced mainly by the pineal gland, is a well known antioxidant. Stroke (cerebral ischemia is the second leading cause of death worldwide. To date, however, effective and safe treatment for stroke remains unavailable. Melatonin is both lipid- and water-soluble and readily crosses the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Increasing evidence has shown that, in animal stroke models, administering melatonin significantly reduces infarct volume, edema, and oxidative damage and improves electrophysiological and behavioral performance. Here, we reviewed studies that assess effects of melatonin on cerebral ischemia in acute, sub-acute, and chronic stages. In addition to its potent antioxidant properties, melatonin exerts antiapoptotic, antiexcitotoxic, anti-inflammatory effects and promotes mitochondrial functions in animals with cerebral ischemia. Given that melatonin shows almost no toxicity to humans and possesses multifaceted protective capacity against cerebral ischemia, it is valuable to consider using melatonin in clinical trials on patients suffering from stroke.Keywords: cerebral ischemia, melatonin, stroke, neuroprotection

  13. Evidence for beneficial low level radiation effects and radiation hormesis

    Low doses in the mGy range cause a dual effect on cellular DNA. One effect concerns a relatively low probability of DNA damage per energy deposition event and it increases proportional with dose, with possible bystander effects operating. This damage at background radiation exposure is orders of magnitudes lower than that from endogenous sources, such as ROS. The other effect at comparable doses brings an easily obeservable adaptive protection against DNA damage from any, mainly endogenous sources, depending on cell type, species, and metabolism. Protective responses express adaptive responses to metabolic perturbations and also mimic oxygen stress responses. Adaptive protection operates in terms of DNA damage prevention and repair, and of immune stimulation. It develops with a delay of hours, may last for days to months, and increasingly disappears at doses beyond about 100 to 200 mGy. Radiation-induced apoptosis and terminal cell differentiation occurs also at higher doses and adds to protection by reducing genomic instability and the number of mutated cells in tissues. At low doses, damage reduction by adaptive protection against damage from endogenous sources predictably outweighs radiogenic damage induction. The analysis of the consequences of the particular low-dose scenario shows that the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis for cancer risk is scientifically unfounded and appears to be invalid in favor of a threshold or hormesis. This is consistent with data both from animal studies and human epidemiological observations on low-dose induced cancer. The LNT hypothesis should be abandoned and be replaced by a hypothesis that is scientifically justified. The appropriate model should include terms for both linear and non-linear response probabilities. Maintaining the LNT-hypothesis as basis for radiation protection causes unressonable fear and expenses. (author)

  14. Whole acute toxicity removal from industrial and domestic effluents treated by electron beam radiation: emphasis on anionic surfactants

    Electron beam radiation has been applied to improve real industrial and domestic effluents received by Suzano wastewater treatment plant. Radiation efficacy has been evaluated as toxicity reduction, using two biological assays. Three sites were sampled and submitted for toxicity assays, anionic surfactant determination and electron beam irradiation. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity for both test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. The raw toxic effluents exibitted from 0.6 ppm up to 11.67 ppm for anionic surfactant before being treated by the electron beam. Radiation processing resulted in reduction of the acute toxicity as well as surfactant removal. The final biological effluent was in general less toxic than other sites but the presence of anionic surfactants was evidenced

  15. Whole acute toxicity removal from industrial and domestic effluents treated by electron beam radiation: emphasis on anionic surfactants

    Moraes, M.C.F. E-mail: mariacristinafm@uol.com.br; Romanelli, M.F; Sena, H.C.; Pasqualini da Silva, G.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Borrely, S.I

    2004-10-01

    Electron beam radiation has been applied to improve real industrial and domestic effluents received by Suzano wastewater treatment plant. Radiation efficacy has been evaluated as toxicity reduction, using two biological assays. Three sites were sampled and submitted for toxicity assays, anionic surfactant determination and electron beam irradiation. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity for both test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. The raw toxic effluents exibitted from 0.6 ppm up to 11.67 ppm for anionic surfactant before being treated by the electron beam. Radiation processing resulted in reduction of the acute toxicity as well as surfactant removal. The final biological effluent was in general less toxic than other sites but the presence of anionic surfactants was evidenced.

  16. Whole acute toxicity removal from industrial and domestic effluents treated by electron beam radiation: emphasis on anionic surfactants

    Moraes, M. C. F.; Romanelli, M. F.; Sena, H. C.; Pasqualini da Silva, G.; Sampa, M. H. O.; Borrely, S. I.

    2004-09-01

    Electron beam radiation has been applied to improve real industrial and domestic effluents received by Suzano wastewater treatment plant. Radiation efficacy has been evaluated as toxicity reduction, using two biological assays. Three sites were sampled and submitted for toxicity assays, anionic surfactant determination and electron beam irradiation. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity for both test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. The raw toxic effluents exibitted from 0.6 ppm up to 11.67 ppm for anionic surfactant before being treated by the electron beam. Radiation processing resulted in reduction of the acute toxicity as well as surfactant removal. The final biological effluent was in general less toxic than other sites but the presence of anionic surfactants was evidenced.

  17. Biological effect of radiation on human

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved

  18. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  19. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  20. Medical exposure and the effects of radiation

    Radiation gives cracks to genes. The influence is divided into deterministic effect with a threshold value, and the stochastic effect (tumor and genetic effect) which increases according to the exposure amount. Although we are put to various non-artificial radiations, which we cannot be avoided, on the earth, the contamination by artificial radiation can be defended. Artificial radioactive exposure includes medical exposure and non-medical exposure for example by nuclear power plant. As to medical examinations using radiation, the inquiry about the radiation exposure is increasing after the occurrence of the first nuclear power plant disaster of Fukushima. While concern about non-medical radioactive exposure increases, the uneasiness to medical irradiation is also increasing. The dose limit by artificial radioactive exposure other than medical exposure is set up in order to prevent the influence on the health. While the dose limit of the public exposure is set to the lower value than the total dose of non-artificial exposure concerning of a safety margin for all people, the dose limit of medical exposure is not defined, since it is thought that medical irradiation has a benefit for those who receive irradiation. Making an effort to decrease the radiation dose in performing the best medical treatment is the responsibility with which we are burdened. (author)

  1. Non-psychotic mental disorders in persons who had acute radiation sickness as a result of the Chernobyl disaster (10 years after catastrophe)

    The description of non-psychotic mental disorders in the persons who had in 1986 acute radiation sickness of 1-3 severity degree as a result of the Chernobyl disaster was given on the basis of follow up study. Three principal syndromes were distinguished as following: cerebrasthenic, psychopathic-like ('characteropathia') and psycho organic. Principals of therapy of non-psychotic mental disorders in the persons who had been exposed to ionization radiation and suffered from acute radiation sickness are considered

  2. Effects of radiation on aquatic organisms

    With the onset of nuclear age, nuclear fuel cycle products, nuclear medicine techniques, disposal of radio active wastes on land or in water, fall out of testing nuclear weapons has contributed large amount of radio nuclides to the water bodies. Radio nuclides can imbalance aquatic ecosystem resulting in danger to natural life. The biological effects of radiation on aquatic life are mortality, pathophysiological, reproductive, developmental and genetic changes. A broad review of the results obtained about the aquatic organisms related to different phyla indicates that the lower or less developed or more primitive organisms are more resistant than the higher or more advanced, developed and complex organisms to ionizing radiation. The algae, protozoa are more resistant than the insects, crustaceans, molluscs and fishes. The changes in sensitivity between different stages of development have also been noted. A review of the results of exposing salmonoid gametes, eggs, fingerlings and adults to X-rays supports the concepts that radio sensitivity decreases with age. This paper presents a selective review on effects of radiation and radio nuclides on the aquatic life. It include uses and sources of radiation, effective quantity of radiation, lethal and sub lethal effect, effects on survival, growth, reproduction, behaviour, metabolism, carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. (author)

  3. Clinical report of an extremely severe bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness

    Objective: To sum up the experiences from the diagnosis and treatment of patient B subjected to an accidental 60Co exposure on October 21st, 2004, in Jining, Shandong Province, China. Methods: Radiation dose of B was assessed by analysis of chromosome aberration and microneucleus assay, simulation test of the accident site, autopsy and electron spin resonance (ESR). The ultimate clinical diagnosis was based on analysis of irradiation dose, clinical manifestations and laboratory results. In therapeutical aspects, total environmental protection, HLA-identical allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), anti- infection and protection managements of organs were given. Results: Patient B was diagnosed as extremely severe bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness (ARS). HLA-identical allogeneic PBSCT was performed on the patient from his brother on the 7th day after the accident. The hematopoietic recovery began on the 9th day after transplantation. The patient acquired permanent full donor' engraftment without graft versus host disease (GVHD), But the radiation injury was continuing and the patient complicated with polyinfection in lung, and cardiac insufficiency. On the 45th day after the accident, patient B was performed with tracheotomy and maintained ventilation with respirator. On the 75th day after the accident, patient B died of multiple organ failure. Conclusions: Early triage diagnosis and total environmental protection should be performed as soon as possible for extremely severe bone marrow form of ARS. It is very important to perform a successful HLA-identical allogeneic PBSCT, in order to extend the life time of the patient. Multiple organ injuries and infections of bacteria and fungi usually occurred on this kind of patients, so intense measures of anti-infection and protection of multiple organs should be taken. The important and difficult point in the treatment of this kind ARS might be for help the immune-reconstruction and tissue

  4. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  5. In vivo proliferation of bone marrow stem cells of mice after combined long-term exposure to gamma radiation and acute exposure to X rays

    The aim of this paper was to ascertain whether a long-term exposure to gamma radiation at low dose rates, comparable to the professional permissible dose, can modify the response of bone marrow stem cells to single acute irradiation. The study was carried out by the method of exogenous spleen colonization. Continuous exposure to Co60 gamma rays was applied at dose rates of 0,223 mGy x h-1 and 1,25 mGy x h-1. The duration of exposure was 30-105 days, accumulated doses within this time were 0.16-0,56 Gy respectively. After the exposure was completed the mice were subjected to acute X-rays irradiation at the doses of 0,5-4,0 Gy. It was found the bone marrow stem cells, capable to form clones in the spleens, respond to the dose effect as well as at very low its values. The effect estimated by changed responsiveness to acute irradiation depends to accumulated dose only. The higher is the accumulated dose during long-term irradiation the greater is diminishing of repopulating ability of bone marrow cells after following acute irradiation. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  6. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive changes in sensorimotor function during spaceflight are reflected by spatial disorientation, motion sickness, gaze destabilization and decrements in balance, locomotion and eye-hand coordination that occur during and following transitions between different gravitational states. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-synthesis of data from spaceflight analogs to evaluate their effectiveness in simulating adaptive changes in sensorimotor function. METHODS. The analogs under review were categorized as either acute analogs used to simulate performance decrements accompanied with transient changes, or adaptive analogs used to drive sensorimotor learning to altered sensory feedback. The effectiveness of each analog was evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, magnitude and time course of observed deficits compared to spaceflight data, and the effects of amplitude and exposure duration. RESULTS. Parabolic flight has been used extensively to examine effects of acute variation in gravitational loads, ranging from hypergravity to microgravity. More recently, galvanic vestibular stimulation has been used to elicit acute postural, locomotor and gaze dysfunction by disrupting vestibular afferents. Patient populations, e.g., with bilateral vestibular loss or cerebellar dysfunction, have been proposed to model acute sensorimotor dysfunction. Early research sponsored by NASA involved living onboard rotating rooms, which appeared to approximate the time course of adaptation and post-exposure recovery observed in astronauts following spaceflight. Exposure to different bed-rest paradigms (6 deg head down, dry immersion) result in similar motor deficits to that observed following spaceflight. Shorter adaptive analogs have incorporated virtual reality environments, visual distortion paradigms, exposure to conflicting tilt-translation cues, and exposure to 3Gx centrifugation. As with spaceflight, there is considerable variability in responses to most of the analogs

  7. Acute psychological effects of one high intensity exercise

    Kleppe, Kim Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if there are positive acute mood effects of one high intensity exercise. Method: self-completion questionnaires were used to measure the state mood of the participants. 20 persons with a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder (group one), 22 persons with a psychiatric diagnosis of a non-psychotic disorder (group two) and 20 persons with no psychiatric disorder (group three) performed one high intensity exercise while completing the same questionnaire before and...

  8. Effect of carbon dioxide in acute mountain sickness

    Harvey, T C; Raichle, M E; Winterborn, M H;

    1988-01-01

    The effect of adding CO2 to inhaled air in six subjects with acute mountain sickness was investigated during a medical expedition to 5400 m.3% CO2 in ambient air increased ventilation and resulted in a rise in PaO2 of between 24% and 40%. There was a 9-28% increase in PaCO2 and a reduction of the...

  9. Acute Effects of Marijuana Smoking on Negative and Positive Affect

    Metrik, Jane; Kahler, Christopher W.; McGeary, John E.; Monti, Peter M.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2011-01-01

    Human studies and animal experiments present a complex and often contradictory picture of the acute impact of marijuana on emotions. The few human studies specifically examining changes in negative affect find either increases or reductions following delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration. In a 2 × 2, instructional set (told THC vs. told no THC) by drug administration (smoked marijuana with 2.8% THC vs. placebo) between-subjects design, we examined the pharmacologic effect of marij...

  10. Toxic effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation present in sunlight is an environmental human carcinogen. The toxic effects of UV from natural sunlight and therapeutic artificial lamps are a major concern for human health. The major acute effects of UV irradiation on normal human skin comprise sunburn inflammation (erythema), tanning, and local or systemic immunosuppression. At the molecular level, UV irradiation causes DNA damage such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts, which are usually repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Chronic exposure to UV irradiation leads to photoaging, immunosuppression, and ultimately photocarcinogenesis. Photocarcinogenesis involves the accumulation of genetic changes, as well as immune system modulation, and ultimately leads to the development of skin cancers. In the clinic, artificial lamps emitting UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) radiation in combination with chemical drugs are used in the therapy of many skin diseases including psoriasis and vitiligo. Although such therapy is beneficial, it is accompanied with undesirable side effects. Thus, UV radiation is like two sides of the same coin--on one side, it has detrimental effects, and on the other side, it has beneficial effects

  11. Health effects of low level radiation

    In 1982, Prof. Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri Univ. asserted 'Radiation Hormesis' on the Journal of Health Physics and he published two books. CRIEPI initiated the research program on Radiation Hormesis following his assertion to confirm 'is it true or not?' After nearly ten year research activities on data surveys and animal tests with many Universities, we are realizing scientific truth of bio-positive effects by low level radiation exposures. The interesting bio-positive effects we found could be categorized in following five groups. 1) Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 2) Moderation of psychological stress through response of key enzymes, 3) Suppression and therapy of adult-diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, 4) Suppression of cancer through enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes, 5) Suppression of cancer and ratio-adaptive response by activation of DNA repair and apoptosis. In the responses of many specialists to our initiation of radiation hormesis research program following T.D. Luckey's claim about low level radiation, I have to pick up for the first, the great success of Prof. Sakamoto. Prof. Sakamoto had been already applying whole body low dose irradiation for ten years before our radiation hormesis research started on the therapy to suppress the cancer reappearing after treatment. He reported about his successful trial to real patients and showed an enhancement of immune system. (author)

  12. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    Kanatt, Sweetie R.; Chawla, S. P.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour.

  13. Acute toxicity in comprehensive head and neck radiation for nasopharynx and paranasal sinus cancers: cohort comparison of 3D conformal proton therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy

    To evaluate acute toxicity endpoints in a cohort of patients receiving head and neck radiation with proton therapy or intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Forty patients received comprehensive head and neck radiation including bilateral cervical nodal radiation, given with or without chemotherapy, for tumors of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses, any T stage, N0-2. Fourteen received comprehensive treatment with proton therapy, and 26 were treated with IMRT, either comprehensively or matched to proton therapy delivered to the primary tumor site. Toxicity endpoints assessed included g-tube dependence at the completion of radiation and at 3 months after radiation, opioid pain medication requirement compared to pretreatment normalized as equivalent morphine dose (EMD) at completion of treatment, and at 1 and 3 months after radiation. In a multivariable model including confounding variables of concurrent chemotherapy and involved nodal disease, comprehensive head and neck radiation therapy using proton therapy was associated with a lower opioid pain requirement at the completion of radiation and a lower rate of gastrostomy tube dependence by the completion of radiation therapy and at 3 months after radiation compared to IMRT. Proton therapy was associated with statistically significant lower mean doses to the oral cavity, esophagus, larynx, and parotid glands. In subgroup analysis of 32 patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy, there was a statistically significant correlation with a greater opioid pain medication requirement at the completion of radiation and both increasing mean dose to the oral cavity and to the esophagus. Proton therapy was associated with significantly reduced radiation dose to assessed non-target normal tissues and a reduced rate of gastrostomy tube dependence and opioid pain medication requirements. This warrants further evaluation in larger studies, ideally with patient-reported toxicity outcomes and quality of life

  14. Response to and recovery from acute sublethal gamma radiation in the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa

    Woodhead, A.D.; Setlow, R.B.

    1979-05-01

    Acute irradiation of the Amazon molly with a sublethal dose of 1,000 rad caused some damage to the intestinal tract and to the haematopoietic system. Histologically, the intestine appeared to have regenerated by the end of a week; damage to the haematopoietic tissue appeared more slowly, but repair was almost complete some two months later. Nevertheless, recovery to the intestine cannot have been entirely completed in seven days, since the fish did not feed well for the following two weeks. After this, there were no obvious deleterious effects upon the survival and viability of the fish, although irradiated fish weighed less at the termination of the experiment.

  15. The late biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Full text: The principal objective of the symposium was to review the current status of understanding of the late biological effects of ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. A second objective was to critically evaluate information obtained from epidemiological studies of human population groups as well as from animal experimentation in order to provide a solid scientific basis upon which problems of current concern, such as radiation protection standards and risk-benefit analysis, could be deliberated. Eighty-one papers were presented in 10 sessions which covered epidemiological studies of late effects in human populations exposed to internal and/or external ionizing radiation; quantitative and qualitative data from animal experimentation of late effects; methodological problems and modern approaches; factors influencing susceptibility or expression of late radiation injury; comparative evaluation of late effects induced by radiation and other environmental pollutants, and problems of risk assessment. In addition, there were two evening sessions for free discussion of problems of interpreting animal data, and of the epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations. Reports on atomic bomb survivors showed that these epidemiological studies are providing dependable data, such as dose-related excess infant mortality. The reports also revealed the need for consensus in the method employed in the interpretation of data. That was also the case with studies on occupationally exposed populations at Hanford plant, where disparate results were presented on radiation-induced neoplasia among radiation workers. These data are, however, considered not so significant in relative terms when compared to risks involved in other industries. It was recommended that national registry systems for the dosimetry and medical records of radiation workers be established and co-ordinated internationally in order to facilitate reliable epidemiological

  16. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  17. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios; biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (orig./HP)

  18. Radiation Effect Mechanisms in Electronic Devices

    The development of the electronics industry worldwide achieved great advances from the 70s, with studies on oxidation process in field effect silicon transistors. Thus, there was a need for knowledge of the mechanisms that are present in oxides and interfaces between silicon and silicon oxides, as well as other compound semiconductors due to critical differences between the properties of silicon. Against this background, many studies have been performed to understand reliability and ionization radiation effects on electronic devices. Reliability problems and effects of ionizing radiation on electronic devices are critical, depending on the environment in which the devices are exposed. This is the case of space, avionics, particle accelerators, nuclear reactors. This research area is strategic for space and defense areas. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to conduct tests to qualify electronic devices submitted to irradiation, based on Total Ionizing Dose (Tid), Single Event Effects (SEE) and Displacement Damage (D D). This work shows tests using X-ray and ion beams to test commercial MOS(Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor). The integrated circuits, CD4007, were exposed to 60 MeV 35Cl ion beams using the Sao Paulo 8UD Pelletron Accelerator and 10 keV X-ray radiation using a Shimadzu XRD-7000. The total dose effects due to ionizing radiation in MOSFET devices can lead to trapping of charges in the oxide and at the interface Si/SiO2, which increases or decreases the transistors off-current and leakage currents, and shifts the threshold voltage. Characteristic curves of current as a function of gate voltage, in different irradiation conditions, for p and n-MOSFET transistors, which compose the commercial device, were studied. In Figure it is possible to note different behaviors of the devices as a function of radiation dose due to X-ray radiation and the incidence a 60 MeV 35Cl ion beam

  19. Parenteral nutrition in experimental acute radiation injury of the abdominal cavity organs

    The peculiarities of metabolism in rats after partial body irradiation of the abdomen in a high dose and the effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) with various compositions of diagrams on metabolic indexes with the aim of explaining diagram under conditions of intensive radiation injury of gastrointestinal tract, are investigated. Experiments have been carried out on male rats of the Vistar line, subjected to partial-body X-ray irradiation of the abdomen with the dose of 1400 R. It is shown that under conditions of radiation effect with predominnt unjury of the abdomen, considerable suppression of oxidation processes limits metabolism of nutritious substances. A decrease of glucose and amino acid content in PN produces a pronounced therapeutic effect under these conditions. The increase of lipid component in the PN composition and retabolile introduction increases PN therapeutic effect

  20. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Helene Rundqvist

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum and after completed exercise (exercise serum. The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  1. Radiation damage effects in zircon

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin; Salje, Ekhard

    2002-03-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO_4, is important for geology and geochronology, and has been proposed as a host material to immobilize highly radioactive materials from dismantled weapons and nuclear waste from power stations [1]. In these applications zircon is exposed to alpha-irradiation. Computer simulations have started to be employed to simulate radiation damage in zircon [2], but the origin and microscopic mechanisms of the most important structural changes in zircon - unit cell expansion and large macroscopic swelling at higher doses, strong shear deformation of the crystalline lattice, and polymerization of SiOn units [3], remain unknown. Here, we perform the molecular dynamics simulation of highly energetic recoils in zircon. Basing on the simulation results, we propose the simple picture of the density change in the damaged region that consists of the depleted and densified matter. We find that the experimentally observed structural changes originate from the interaction of the damaged region with the surrounding crystalline lattice: the shear of the lattice around the damaged region causes shear deformation and expansion of the unit cells. The polymers of connected SiOn polyhedra are most commonly present in the densified shell at the periphery of the damaged region. [1] R C Ewing et al, J. Mater. Res. 10, 243 (1995); W J Weber et al, B E Burakov et al, in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XIX, 25-32 and 33-40 (Plenum, New York, 1996); R C Ewing, et al in Crystalline Ceramics: Waste Forms for the Disposal of Weapons Plutonium, NATO Workshop Proceedings 65 (Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1996). [2] B Park et al, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 174108 (1-16) (2001); J P Crocombette and D Ghaleb, J. Nucl. Mater., 295, 167 (2001); K Trachenko et al, J. Appl. Phys., 87, 7702 (2000); K Trachenko et al, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt., 13, 1947 (2001). [3] T Murakami et al, Am. Min., 76, 1510 (1991); H D Holland and D Gottfried, Acta Cryst. 8, 291 (1955).; W J Weber, J. Am

  2. Radiation effects on custom MOS devices

    This Thesis consists of four chapters: The first is primarily for background information on the effects of radiation on MOS devices and the theory of wafer bonding; the second gives a full discussion of all practical work carried out for manufacture of Field Effect test Capacitors, the third discusses manufacture of vacuum insulator Field Effect Transistors (FET's) and the fourth discusses the testing of these devices. Using a thermally bonded field effect capacitor structure, a vacuum dielectric was studied for use in high radiation environments with a view to manufacturing a CMOS compatible, micro machined transistor. Results are given in the form of high frequency C-V curves before and after a 120 kGy(Si), 12 MRad(Si), dose from a Co60 source showing a 1 Volt shift. The work is then extended to the design and manufacture of a micro machined, under-etch technique, Field Effect Transistor for use in high radiation areas. Results are shown for Threshold, Subthreshold and Transfer characteristics before and after irradiation up to a total dose of 100kGy or 10MRad. The conclusion from this work is that it should be possible to commercially manufacture practical vacuum dielectric field effect transistors which are radiation hard to at least 120 kGy(Si). (author)

  3. Effect of copaiba oil on acute pancreatitis in mice

    Daniel L. Medeiros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The anti-inflammatory activity of copaiba oil was evaluated using a cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis model in mice. Methods: Mice were pretreated with Copaiba sp oleoresin before induction of pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection (five injections at hourly intervals of cerulein solution and, 6 h later, pancreatic and lung damage were analyzed macroscopically for the severity of necrosis, and by protein plasma extravasation and plasma amylase activity (a biomarker of acute pancreatic damage; myeloperoxidase activity (MPO; a neutrophil marker and thiobarbituric reactive species (TBARS; a lipid peroxidation index were determined in the pancreas and lung. Results: A significant reduction in protein plasma extravasation of damaged pancreatic tissue was observed in mice that received copaiba oil. This effect was confirmed biochemically by reduction of protein plasma extravasation, and associated with reduced plasma amylase and MPO activity. Conclusion: These findings indicate the anti-inflammatory effect of copaiba oil on experimental acute pancreatitis induced by cerulein in mice. [J Exp Integr Med 2014; 4(2.000: 107-114

  4. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally. Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years. The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05 increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes.

  5. Effects of {gamma}-radiation on white tea volatiles

    Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Silveira, Ana Paula M.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: gbfanaro@ipen.br; Purgatto, Eduardo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Nutricao Experimental

    2009-07-01

    Tea is the second most widely consumed beverages in the world and is processed from two and a bud of Camellia sinensis (L.). Depending on the processing may give rise to four mainly teas (green, black, oolong and white tea). The white tea is the one that has recently awakened interest in scientific community due the fact that this tea has more antioxidant property and activity than green tea. A further industrialization and commercialization of these plants become a problem of public health. The presence of potentially toxigenic fungi can be found in these products, indicating a great potential for the presence of mycotoxins that can cause acute and chronic effects in different organs and systems of the human body. Ionizing radiation is one of the most effective means disinfecting dry food ingredients. This treatment can inhibit cellular life division, like microorganisms, promoting a molecular structural modification. The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of radiation on volatile formation in white tea. Samples were irradiated in room temperature at {sup 60}Co source Gammacell 220 (A.E.C. Ltda) at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20-kGy. The volatiles organic compound was extracted by hydrodistillation and the extract was separated and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The results show that the quantities of volatiles formations are directly proportional to the increase of radiation dose. About 37.86% of the compounds were stable at all radiation doses and 47.53% of new compounds were identified after irradiation. (author)

  6. Effects of γ-radiation on white tea volatiles

    Tea is the second most widely consumed beverages in the world and is processed from two and a bud of Camellia sinensis (L.). Depending on the processing may give rise to four mainly teas (green, black, oolong and white tea). The white tea is the one that has recently awakened interest in scientific community due the fact that this tea has more antioxidant property and activity than green tea. A further industrialization and commercialization of these plants become a problem of public health. The presence of potentially toxigenic fungi can be found in these products, indicating a great potential for the presence of mycotoxins that can cause acute and chronic effects in different organs and systems of the human body. Ionizing radiation is one of the most effective means disinfecting dry food ingredients. This treatment can inhibit cellular life division, like microorganisms, promoting a molecular structural modification. The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of radiation on volatile formation in white tea. Samples were irradiated in room temperature at 60Co source Gammacell 220 (A.E.C. Ltda) at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20-kGy. The volatiles organic compound was extracted by hydrodistillation and the extract was separated and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The results show that the quantities of volatiles formations are directly proportional to the increase of radiation dose. About 37.86% of the compounds were stable at all radiation doses and 47.53% of new compounds were identified after irradiation. (author)

  7. Biological effect of low dose radiation

    This document describes the recent findings in studies of low dose radiation effect with those by authors' group. The low dose radiation must be considered in assessment of radiation effects because it induces the biological influence unexpected hitherto; i.e., the bystander effect and genetic instability. The former is a non-targeted effect that non-irradiated cells undergo the influence of directly irradiated cells nearby, which involves cell death, chromosome aberration, micronucleus formation, mutation and carcinogenesis through cellular gap junction and/or by signal factors released. Authors' group has found the radical(s) possessing as long life time as >20 hr released from the targeted cells, a possible mediator of the effect; the generation of aneuploid cells as an early carcinogenetic change; and at dose level <10 Gy, activation of MAPK signal pathway leading to relaxation of chromatin structure. The genetic instability means the loss of stability where replication and conservation of genome are normally maintained, and is also a cause of the late radiation effect. The group has revealed that active oxygen molecules can affect the late effect like delayed cell death, giant cell formation and chromosome aberration, all of which lead to the instability, and is investigating the hypothesis that the telomere instability resulted from the abnormal post-exposure interaction with its nuclear membrane or between chromatin and nuclear matrix, is enhanced by structural distortion of nuclear genes. As well, shown is the possible suppression of carcinogenesis by p53. The group, to elucidate the mechanism underlying the low dose radiation effect, is conducting their studies in consideration of the sequential bases of physical, chemical and biological processes. (R.T.)

  8. Effects of acute oligohydramnios on respiratory system of fetal sheep.

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Padbury, J F; Kitterman, J A

    1992-08-01

    Prolonged oligohydramnios, or a lack of amniotic fluid, is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and subsequent perinatal morbidity, but it is unclear whether short-term or acute oligohydramnios has any effect on the fetal respiratory system. To investigate the acute effects of removal of amniotic fluid, we studied nine chronically catheterized fetal sheep at 122-127 days gestation. During a control period, we measured the volume of fluid in the fetal potential airways and air spaces (VL), production rate of that fluid, incidence and amplitude of fetal breathing movements, tracheal pressures, and fetal plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. We then drained the amniotic fluid for a short period of time [24-48 h, 30.0 +/- 4.0 (SE) h] and repeated the above measurements. The volume of fluid drained for the initial studies was 1,004 +/- 236 ml. Acute oligohydramnios decreased VL from 35.4 +/- 2.9 ml/kg during control to 22.0 +/- 1.6 after oligohydramnios (P less than 0.004). Acute oligohydramnios did not affect the fetal lung fluid production rate, fetal breathing movements, or any of the other measured variables. Seven repeat studies were performed in six of the fetuses after reaccumulation of the amniotic fluid at 130-138 days, and in four of these studies the lung volume also decreased, although the overall mean for the repeat studies was not significantly different (27.0 +/- 5.2 ml/kg for control vs. 25.5 +/- 5.5 ml/kg for oligohydramnios). Again, none of the other measured variables were altered by oligohydramnios in the repeat studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1399988

  9. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: A brief history

    Within months of Roentgen's discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts, leukemia and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intra-uterine exposure. No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements, the F1 mortality, cytogenetic studies or biochemical genetic studies. Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes, and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes. Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia, a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others. The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased frequencies of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid cancers and certain causes of death other than cancer. 88 refs., 1 fig

  10. Genetics and ionizing radiations. 2. The genetic effects of ionizing radiations

    Ionizing radiations are the best known mutagenic agents. Their relative importance as compared to other mutagens cannot be determined. Experiments show that male germinal cells are more sensitive than female germinal cells. This sensitivity is determined by the cell phase at the time of agression. Acute X-exposure results in a mutation rate of about 1.7x10-7 rad-1 per gamete and per gene in the male. This rate is lower in case of chronic exposure. Pathological effects will appear in the first (dominant genes, and unbalanced chromosomal anomalies) or n-th generation (recessive genes and balanced chromosomal rearrangements). Direct studies on humans have brought contradictory results. Only X or γ-emitters induce a true genetic risk, the other radiations being too little penetrating to reach the gonads. The doubling dose of the mutation rate is estimated at over 100 rad in males and over 1,000 rad in females. However, one cannot conclude that low doses are not harmless because their effects are difficult to demonstrate. The individual risk, that remains low, must be distinguished from the collective risk for which the safeguard of the quality of the genetic material of our species must remain our prime purpose

  11. Genetic Effects of Pile Radiations in Rice

    In attempts to utilize radiation-induced mutations for rice breeding, it is of primary interest to obtain the fundamental data of the biological effects of pile radiations. Although considerable variation of radiosensitivity was found among rice varieties, Japanese rice was comparatively more susceptible to pile radiations than foreign varieties, and tetraploids were less susceptible as compared with the diploid varieties after irradiation. From die observation of the radiation injury of F1, hybrids it was concluded that, in addition to the contribution of a gene or a gene system, the cytoplasm was related to the intervarietal difference of radiosensitivity. Sterility was more easily induced by pile radiations than X-irradiation. In the X-ray series, chlorophyll mutations on the X1-ear basis reached a maximum frequency at middle doses and decreased at higher doses. In the pile radiation series the frequency increased with increasing doses. The cause of differences of these two series seemed to be a difference of the mean size of mutated sectors between both the radiations. The increment of induced variation on quantitative characters occurred in plus and minus direction with similar frequencies after the treatment of pile radiations. However, the heritable variations did not increase in accordance with neutron flux. The amount of induced variation was more in the progenies of partially sterile X1 ear and less in those which segregated chlorophyll mutants in X2 generation. It was calculated that 1 r of X- and gamma-rays was equivalent to 1-2 x 109 thermal neutrons per cm2 for induction of chlorophyll mutations and of variation on quantitative characters. (author)

  12. Effects of gabapentin in acute inflammatory pain in humans

    Werner, M U; Perkins, F M; Holte, Kathrine; Pedersen, J L; Kehlet, H

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine the analgesic effects of the anticonvulsant, gabapentin, in a validated model of acute inflammatory pain. METHODS: Twenty-two volunteers were investigated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Gabapentin 1...... stimuli (visual analog scale [VAS]), assessments of thermal and mechanical detection thresholds, and areas of secondary hyperalgesia. Side effects drowsiness and postural instability were assessed by subjective ratings (VAS). RESULTS: The burn injury induced significant primary and secondary hyperalgesia...... inflammation following a thermal injury. These observations suggest a clinical potential of gabapentin in the treatment of postoperative pain....

  13. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  14. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression...... other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit....... lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute...... therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11...

  15. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    Bahareh Amin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p. were evaluated using forced swim test (FST. In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals, antidepressant-like effects of oral administration of drugs were examined using FST and tail suspension test (TST. Locomotor activity and motor coordination were studied using open field and rotarod tests, respectively. Results: Acute treatment with crocin (40 mg/kg and crocetin (20 and 40 mg/kg produced antidepressant-like effect in FST without affecting the baseline locomotion in mice. Sub-acute oral administration of crocin significantly decreased immobility time only at the highest dose (100 mg/kg. Crocetin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg was able to decrease immobility time in FST and TST. Locomotor activity and coordination of mice were not affected by crocin or crocetin. Conclusion: Since higher doses of crocin was required to show antidepressant effects, more efficacy of crocetin may be concluded. This observation provides further support for metabolism of crocin to crocetin following oral administration.

  16. Radiation-induced bystander effects: Are they good bad or both?

    The different contributions are as follow: the current events on the cellular responses to irradiation ( part one and two); From physico-chemistry to radiobiology: new knowledge (part one and two); Radiation-induced bystander effects: are they good bad or both; recognition of the multi visceral failure in the acute irradiation syndrome; integrated approach of the tissue carcinogenesis: differential effect sane tissue-tumoral tissue; differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers by the transcriptoma analysis. (N.C.)

  17. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    Rubin, P.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Siemann, D.W.; Shapiro, D.L.; Van Houtte, P.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve.

  18. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)

  19. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve

  20. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    Franco, Camilo F. de Oliveira, E-mail: camilo.urucum@hotmail.com [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA/EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Harder, Marcia N.C., E-mail: marcia.harder@fatec.sp.gov.br [Centro Paula Souza, Curso Superior de Tecnologia em Bicombustiveis (FATEC), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Filho, Jose C.; Neto, Miguel B., E-mail: jorgecazefilho@yahoo.com.br [Empresa Estadual de Pesquisa Agropecuaria da Paraiba (EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)