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Sample records for acute paralysis virus

  1. Single Assay Detection of Acute Bee Paralysis Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per

    2012-01-01

    A new RT-PCR primer pair designed to identify Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV), Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV) or Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (IAPV) of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a single assay is described. These primers are used to screen samples for ABPV, KBV, or IAPV in a single RT...

  2. Acute paralysis viruses of the honey bee

    Chunsheng; Hou; Nor; Chejanovsky

    2014-01-01

    <正>The alarming decline of honey bee(Apis mellifera)colonies in the last decade drove the attention and research to several pathogens of the honey bee including viruses.Viruses challenge the development of healthy and robust colonies since they manage to prevail in an asymptomatic mode and reemerge in acute infections following external stresses,as well as they are able to infect new healthy colonies(de Miranda J R,et al.,2010a;de Miranda J R,et al.,2010b;Di Prisco G,et al.,2013;Nazzi F,et al.,2012;Yang X L,et al.,2005).

  3. Assembly of recombinant Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus capsids.

    Junyuan Ren

    Full Text Available The dicistrovirus Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV has been implicated in the worldwide decline of honey bees. Studies of IAPV and many other bee viruses in pure culture are restricted by available isolates and permissive cell culture. Here we show that coupling the IAPV major structural precursor protein ORF2 to its cognate 3C-like processing enzyme results in processing of the precursor to the individual structural proteins in a number of insect cell lines following expression by a recombinant baculovirus. The efficiency of expression is influenced by the level of IAPV 3C protein and moderation of its activity is required for optimal expression. The mature IAPV structural proteins assembled into empty capsids that migrated as particles on sucrose velocity gradients and showed typical dicistrovirus like morphology when examined by electron microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies raised to recombinant capsids were configured into a diagnostic test specific for the presence of IAPV. Recombinant capsids for each of the many bee viruses within the picornavirus family may provide virus specific reagents for the on-going investigation of the causes of honeybee loss.

  4. A potentially novel overlapping gene in the genomes of Israeli acute paralysis virus and its relatives

    Price Nicholas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV is a honeybee-infecting virus that was found to be associated with colony collapse disorder. The IAPV genome contains two genes encoding a structural and a nonstructural polyprotein. We applied a recently developed method for the estimation of selection in overlapping genes to detect purifying selection and, hence, functionality. We provide evolutionary evidence for the existence of a functional overlapping gene, which is translated in the +1 reading frame of the structural polyprotein gene. Conserved orthologs of this putative gene, which we provisionally call pog (predicted overlapping gene, were also found in the genomes of a monophyletic clade of dicistroviruses that includes IAPV, acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, and Solenopsis invicta (red imported fire ant virus 1.

  5. Effect of oral infection with Kashmir bee virus and Israeli acute paralysis virus on bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) reproductive success.

    Meeus, Ivan; de Miranda, Joachim R; de Graaf, Dirk C; Wäckers, Felix; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) together with Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and Kashmir bee virus (KBV) constitute a complex of closely related dicistroviruses. They are infamous for their high mortality after injection in honeybees. These viruses have also been reported in non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators such as bumblebees, which got infected with IAPV when placed in the same greenhouse with IAPV infected honeybee hives. Here we orally infected Bombus terrestris workers with different doses of either IAPV or KBV viral particles. The success of the infection was established by analysis of the bumblebees after the impact studies: 50days after infection. Doses of 0.5×10(7) and 1×10(7) virus particles per bee were infectious over this period, for IAPV and KBV respectively, while a dose of 0.5×10(6) IAPV particles per bee was not infectious. The impact of virus infection was studied in micro-colonies consisting of 5 bumblebees, one of which becomes a pseudo-queen which proceeds to lay unfertilized (drone) eggs. The impact parameters studied were: the establishment of a laying pseudo-queen, the timing of egg-laying, the number of drones produced, the weight of these drones and worker mortality. In this setup KBV infection resulted in a significant slower colony startup and offspring production, while only the latter can be reported for IAPV. Neither virus increased worker mortality, at the oral doses used. We recommend further studies on how these viruses transmit between different pollinator species. It is also vital to understand how viral prevalence can affect wild bee populations because disturbance of the natural host-virus association may deteriorate the already critically endangered status of many bumblebee species. PMID:25004171

  6. Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Implications for Honey Bee Health

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P. Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W. Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C.; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L.; Teixeira, Erica W.; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV–host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide. PMID:25079600

  7. Acute flaccid paralysis due to West nile virus infection in adults: A paradigm shift entity

    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP with preceding fever are described. One patient had a quadriparesis with a florid meningoencephalitic picture and the other two had asymmetric flaccid paralysis with fasciculations at the onset of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging in two cases showed prominent hyperintensitities in the spinal cord and brainstem with prominent involvement of the grey horn (polio-myelitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF polymerase chain reaction was positive for West Nile virus (WNV in the index patient. All three cases had a positive WNV immunoglobulin M antibody in serum/CSF and significantly high titer of WNV neutralizing antibody in serum, clearly distinguishing the infection from other Flaviviridae such as Japanese encephalitis. WNV has been recognized in India for many decades; however, AFP has not been adequately described. WNV is a flavivirus that is spread by Culex mosquitoes while they take blood meals from humans and lineage 1 is capable of causing a devastating neuro-invasive disease with fatal consequences or severe morbidity. We describe the first three laboratory confirmed cases of WNV induced AFP from Kerala and briefly enumerate the salient features of this emerging threat.

  8. Metagenomic detection of viral pathogens in Spanish honeybees: co-infection by Aphid Lethal Paralysis, Israel Acute Paralysis and Lake Sinai Viruses.

    Fredrik Granberg

    Full Text Available The situation in Europe concerning honeybees has in recent years become increasingly aggravated with steady decline in populations and/or catastrophic winter losses. This has largely been attributed to the occurrence of a variety of known and "unknown", emerging novel diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that colonies often can harbour more than one pathogen, making identification of etiological agents with classical methods difficult. By employing an unbiased metagenomic approach, which allows the detection of both unexpected and previously unknown infectious agents, the detection of three viruses, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus (ALPV, Israel Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV, and Lake Sinai Virus (LSV, in honeybees from Spain is reported in this article. The existence of a subgroup of ALPV with the ability to infect bees was only recently reported and this is the first identification of such a strain in Europe. Similarly, LSV appear to be a still unclassified group of viruses with unclear impact on colony health and these viruses have not previously been identified outside of the United States. Furthermore, our study also reveals that these bees carried a plant virus, Turnip Ringspot Virus (TuRSV, potentially serving as important vector organisms. Taken together, these results demonstrate the new possibilities opened up by high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis to study emerging new diseases in domestic and wild animal populations, including honeybees.

  9. Importance of brood maintenance terms in simple models of the honeybee - Varroa destructor - acute bee paralysis virus complex

    Hermann J. Eberl

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple mathematical model of the infestation of a honeybee colony by the Acute Paralysis Virus, which is carried by parasitic varroa mites (Varroa destructor. This is a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the dependent variables: number of mites that carry the virus, number of healthy bees and number of sick bees. We study this model with a mix of analytical and computational techniques. Our results indicate that, depending on model parameters and initial data, bee colonies in which the virus is present can, over years, function seemingly like healthy colonies before they decline and disappear rapidly (e.g. Colony Collapse Disorder, wintering losses. This is a consequence of the fact that a certain number of worker bees is required in a colony to maintain and care for the brood, in order to ensure continued production of new bees.

  10. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus Disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera; Apidae)

    We present the first successful use of RNAi under a large-scale real-world application for disease control. Israeli acute paralysis virus, IAPV, has been linked as a contributing factor in coolly collapse, CCD, of honey bees. IAPV specific homologous dsRNA were designed to reduce impacts from IAPV i...

  11. In vitro infection of pupae with Israeli acute paralysis virus suggests disturbance of transcriptional homeostasis in honey bees (Apis mellifera.

    Humberto F Boncristiani

    Full Text Available The ongoing decline of honey bee health worldwide is a serious economic and ecological concern. One major contributor to the decline are pathogens, including several honey bee viruses. However, information is limited on the biology of bee viruses and molecular interactions with their hosts. An experimental protocol to test these systems was developed, using injections of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV into honey bee pupae reared ex-situ under laboratory conditions. The infected pupae developed pronounced but variable patterns of disease. Symptoms varied from complete cessation of development with no visual evidence of disease to rapid darkening of a part or the entire body. Considerable differences in IAPV titer dynamics were observed, suggesting significant variation in resistance to IAPV among and possibly within honey bee colonies. Thus, selective breeding for virus resistance should be possible. Gene expression analyses of three separate experiments suggest IAPV disruption of transcriptional homeostasis of several fundamental cellular functions, including an up-regulation of the ribosomal biogenesis pathway. These results provide first insights into the mechanisms of IAPV pathogenicity. They mirror a transcriptional survey of honey bees afflicted with Colony Collapse Disorder and thus support the hypothesis that viruses play a critical role in declining honey bee health.

  12. Dynamics of the Presence of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus in Honey Bee Colonies with Colony Collapse Disorder

    Chunsheng Hou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The determinants of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, a particular case of collapse of honey bee colonies, are still unresolved. Viruses including the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV were associated with CCD. We found an apiary with colonies showing typical CCD characteristics that bore high loads of IAPV, recovered some colonies from collapse and tested the hypothesis if IAPV was actively replicating in them and infectious to healthy bees. We found that IAPV was the dominant pathogen and it replicated actively in the colonies: viral titers decreased from April to September and increased from September to December. IAPV extracted from infected bees was highly infectious to healthy pupae: they showed several-fold amplification of the viral genome and synthesis of the virion protein VP3. The health of recovered colonies was seriously compromised. Interestingly, a rise of IAPV genomic copies in two colonies coincided with their subsequent collapse. Our results do not imply IAPV as the cause of CCD but indicate that once acquired and induced to replication it acts as an infectious factor that affects the health of the colonies and may determine their survival. This is the first follow up outside the US of CCD-colonies bearing IAPV under natural conditions.

  13. Acute Flaccid Paralysis Associated with Novel Enterovirus C105

    Horner, Liana M.; Poulter, Melinda D.; Brenton, J. Nicholas; Turner, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of acute flaccid paralysis among children in the United States during summer 2014 was tentatively associated with enterovirus D68 infection. This syndrome in a child in fall 2014 was associated with enterovirus C105 infection. The presence of this virus strain in North America may pose a diagnostic challenge.

  14. Acute Flaccid paralysis in adults: Our experience

    Rupesh Kaushik; Parampreet S Kharbanda; Ashish Bhalla; Roopa Rajan; Sudesh Prabhakar

    2014-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a complex clinical syndrome with a broad array of potential etiologies that vary with age. We present our experience of acute onset lower motor neuron paralysis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty-three consecutive adult patients presenting with weakness of duration less than four weeks over 12 months period were enrolled. Detailed history, clinical examination, and relevant investigations according to a pre-defined diagnostic algorithm were carried...

  15. Acute Flaccid paralysis in adults: Our experience

    Rupesh Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP is a complex clinical syndrome with a broad array of potential etiologies that vary with age. We present our experience of acute onset lower motor neuron paralysis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty-three consecutive adult patients presenting with weakness of duration less than four weeks over 12 months period were enrolled. Detailed history, clinical examination, and relevant investigations according to a pre-defined diagnostic algorithm were carried out. The patients were followed through their hospital stay till discharge or death. Results: The mean age was 33.27 (range 13-89 years with male preponderance (67.7%. The most common etiology was neuroparalytic snake envenomation (51.9%, followed by Guillain Barre syndrome (33.1%, constituting 85% of all patients. Hypokalemic paralysis (7.5% and acute intermittent porphyria (4.5% were the other important conditions. We did not encounter any case of acute polio mylitis in adults. In-hospital mortality due to respiratory paralysis was 9%. Conclusion: Neuroparalytic snakebite and Guillain Barre syndrome were the most common causes of acute flaccid paralysis in adults in our study.

  16. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli acute paralysis virus disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera: Apidae.

    Wayne Hunter

    Full Text Available The importance of honey bees to the world economy far surpasses their contribution in terms of honey production; they are responsible for up to 30% of the world's food production through pollination of crops. Since fall 2006, honey bees in the U.S. have faced a serious population decline, due in part to a phenomenon called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, which is a disease syndrome that is likely caused by several factors. Data from an initial study in which investigators compared pathogens in honey bees affected by CCD suggested a putative role for Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus, IAPV. This is a single stranded RNA virus with no DNA stage placed taxonomically within the family Dicistroviridae. Although subsequent studies have failed to find IAPV in all CCD diagnosed colonies, IAPV has been shown to cause honey bee mortality. RNA interference technology (RNAi has been used successfully to silence endogenous insect (including honey bee genes both by injection and feeding. Moreover, RNAi was shown to prevent bees from succumbing to infection from IAPV under laboratory conditions. In the current study IAPV specific homologous dsRNA was used in the field, under natural beekeeping conditions in order to prevent mortality and improve the overall health of bees infected with IAPV. This controlled study included a total of 160 honey bee hives in two discrete climates, seasons and geographical locations (Florida and Pennsylvania. To our knowledge, this is the first successful large-scale real world use of RNAi for disease control.

  17. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Honeybee Queens

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina; Büchler, Ralph;

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is known as a disease of worker honey bees. To investigate pathogenesis of the CBPV on the queen, the sole reproductive individual in a colony, we conducted experiments regarding the susceptibility of queens to CBPV. Results from susceptibility experiment showed a...... similar disease progress in the queens compared to worker bees after infection. Infected queens exhibit symptoms by Day 6 post infection and virus levels reach 1011 copies per head. In a transmission experiment we showed that social interactions may affect the disease progression. Queens with forced...... contact to symptomatic worker bees acquired an overt infection with up to 1011 virus copies per head in six days. In contrast, queens in contact with symptomatic worker bees, but with a chance to receive food from healthy bees outside the cage appeared healthy. The virus loads did not exceed 107 in the...

  18. A Mathematical Model of the Honeybee-Varroa destructor-Acute Bee Paralysis Virus System with Seasonal Effects.

    Ratti, Vardayani; Kevan, Peter G; Eberl, Hermann J

    2015-08-01

    A mathematical model for the honeybee-varroa mite-ABPV system is proposed in terms of four differential equations for the: infected and uninfected bees in the colony, number of mites overall, and of mites carrying the virus. To account for seasonal variability, all parameters are time periodic. We obtain linearized stability conditions for the disease-free periodic solutions. Numerically, we illustrate that, for appropriate parameters, mites can establish themselves in colonies that are not treated with varroacides, leading to colonies with slightly reduced number of bees. If some of these mites carry the virus, however, the colony might fail suddenly after several years without a noticeable sign of stress leading up to the failure. The immediate cause of failure is that at the end of fall, colonies are not strong enough to survive the winter in viable numbers. We investigate the effect of the initial disease infestation on collapse time, and how varroacide treatment affects long-term behavior. We find that to control the virus epidemic, the mites as disease vector should be controlled. PMID:26382876

  19. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses

    Cokyaman Turgay; Tekin Emine; Koken Ozlem; S Paksu Muhammet; A Tasdemir Haydar

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian–Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common ...

  20. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance: A 6 years study, Isfahan, Iran

    Alireza Emami Naeini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poliomyelitis is still an endemic disease in many areas of the world including Africa and South Asia. Iran is polio free since 2001. However, due to endemicity of polio in neighboring countries of Iran, the risk of polio importation and re-emergence of wild polio virus is high. Case definition through surveillance system is a well-defined method for maintenance of polio eradication in polio free countries. Methods: In a cross-sectional survey from 2007 to 2013, we reviewed all the records of under 15 years old patients reported to Acute Flaccid Paralysis Committee (AFPC in Isfahan province, Iran. All cases were visited by members of the AFPC. Three stool samples were collected from each reported case within 2 weeks of onset of paralysis and sent to National Polio Laboratory in Tehran, Iran, for poliovirus isolation. Data were analyzed by SSPS software (version 22. Student′s t-test and Chi-square was used to compare variables. Statistical significance level was set at P 94%, with six doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV. Accurate surveillance for poliomyelitis is essential for continuing eradication.

  1. Rabies virus neuritic paralysis: immunopathogenesis of nonfatal paralytic rabies.

    Weiland, F; Cox, J. H.; Meyer, S.; Dahme, E; Reddehase, M J

    1992-01-01

    Two pathogenetically distinct disease manifestations are distinguished in a murine model of primary rabies virus infection with the Evelyn-Rokitnicky-Abelseth strain, rabies virus neuritic paralysis (RVNP) and fatal encephalopathogenic rabies. RVNP develops with high incidence in immunocompetent mice after intraplantar infection as a flaccid paralysis restricted to the infected limb. The histopathologic correlate of this monoplegia is a degeneration of the myelinated motor neurons of the peri...

  2. Epidemiology and clinical findings associated with enteroviral acute flaccid paralysis in Pakistan

    Angez Mehar; Shaukat Shahzad; Sharif Salmaan; Masroor Muhammad; Naeem Asif; Zaidi Sohail Z; Saeed Mohsan; Khan Anis

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Enteroviruses are among the most common viruses infecting humans worldwide and they are associated with diverse clinical syndromes. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a clinical manifestation of enteroviral neuropathy, transverse myelitis, Guillian-Barre Syndrome, Traumatic neuritis and many other nervous system disorders. The objective of this study was to understand the role of Non-Polio Enteroviruses (NPEV) towards this crippling disorder. Methods Stool specimens of 1775 ...

  3. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis

    2016-01-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  4. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  5. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses

    Cokyaman Turgay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian-Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time.

  6. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses.

    Turgay, Cokyaman; Emine, Tekin; Ozlem, Koken; Muhammet, S Paksu; Haydar, A Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian-Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time. PMID:26557177

  7. In-vitro infection of pupae with Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus suggests variation for susceptibility and disturbance of transcriptional homeostasis in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    The ongoing decline of honey bee health worldwide is a serious economic and ecological concern. One major contributor to the decline are pathogens, including several honey bee viruses. However, information is limited on the biology of bee viruses and molecular interactions with their hosts. An exper...

  8. Paediatric surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis in the Netherlands in 1995 and 1996

    Conyn-van Spaendonck MAE; Geubbels ELPE; Suijkerbuijk AWM; CIE; NSCK

    1998-01-01

    In Nederland wordt de surveillance van acute slappe verlamming (AFP acute flaccid paralysis) sinds oktober 1992 uitgevoerd via het Nederlands Signalerings-Centrum Kindergeneeskunde. Het betreft een vorm van actieve surveillance waarbij klinisch werkzame kinderartsen maandelijks een aantal zeldzame

  9. Epidemiology and clinical findings associated with enteroviral acute flaccid paralysis in Pakistan

    Angez Mehar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteroviruses are among the most common viruses infecting humans worldwide and they are associated with diverse clinical syndromes. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP is a clinical manifestation of enteroviral neuropathy, transverse myelitis, Guillian-Barre Syndrome, Traumatic neuritis and many other nervous system disorders. The objective of this study was to understand the role of Non-Polio Enteroviruses (NPEV towards this crippling disorder. Methods Stool specimens of 1775 children, aged less than 15 years, suffering from acute flaccid paralysis were collected after informed consent within 14 days of onset of symptoms during January 2003 to September 2003. The specimens were inoculated on RD and L20B cells using conventional tube cell culture while micro-neutralization test was used to identify the non-polio enterovirus (NPEV serotypes. Detailed clinical information and 60-days follow-up reports were analyzed for NPEV-associated AFP cases. Results NPEV were isolated from 474 samples. The male to female ratio was 1.4:1. The isolation of NPEV decreased significantly with the increase in age. Cases associated with fever at the onset of NPEV-associated AFP were found to be 62%. The paralysis was found asymmetrical in 67% cases, the progression of paralysis to peak within 4 days was found in 72% cases and residual paralysis after 60 days of paralysis onset was observed in 39% cases associated with NPEV. A clinical diagnosis of Guillian-Barre syndrome was made in 32% cases. On Microneutralization assay, echo-6 (13% and coxsackievirus B (13% were the most commonly isolated serotypes of NPEV along with E-7, E-13, E-11, E-4 and E-30. The isolates (n = 181 found untypable by the antiserum pools were confirmed as NPEV by PCR using Pan-Enterovirus primers. Conclusion The present study suggests that NPEV are a dominant cause of AFP and different serotypes of NPEV are randomly distributed in Pakistan. The untypable isolates need further

  10. Molecular Identification of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus Infection in Apis mellifera Colonies in Japan

    Tomomi Morimoto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV infection causes chronic paralysis and loss of workers in honey bee colonies around the world. Although CBPV shows a worldwide distribution, it had not been molecularly detected in Japan. Our investigation of Apis mellifera and Apis cerana japonica colonies with RT-PCR has revealed CBPV infection in A. mellifera but not A. c. japonica colonies in Japan. The prevalence of CBPV is low compared with that of other viruses: deformed wing virus (DWV, black queen cell virus (BQCV, Israel acute paralysis virus (IAPV, and sac brood virus (SBV, previously reported in Japan. Because of its low prevalence (5.6% in A. mellifera colonies, the incidence of colony losses by CBPV infection must be sporadic in Japan. The presence of the (− strand RNA in dying workers suggests that CBPV infection and replication may contribute to their symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates a geographic separation of Japanese isolates from European, Uruguayan, and mainland US isolates. The lack of major exchange of honey bees between Europe/mainland US and Japan for the recent 26 years (1985–2010 may have resulted in the geographic separation of Japanese CBPV isolates.

  11. Detection of chronic honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) paralysis virus infection: application to a field survey

    Ribière, Magali; Faucon, Jean-Paul; Pépin, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Détection des infections par le virus de la paralysie chronique de l'abeille domestique (Apis mellifera L.) : application lors d'une enquête de terrain. Le virus de la paralysie chronique (CPV) a été l'un des premiers virus isolés chez l'abeille domestique [3]. Le CPV est responsable d'une maladie infectieuse et contagieuse des abeilles adultes, la paralysie chronique de l'abeille connue par les apiculteurs français sous le nom de "Maladie noire "[16]. à l'origine de mortalités, cette patholo...

  12. Isolation of paralysis-inducing murine leukemia viruses from Friend virus passaged in rats.

    Kai, K; Furuta, T

    1984-01-01

    Four clones of murine leukemia viruses (PVC-111, PVC-211, PVC-321, and PVC-441) were isolated from a paralyzed Fischer rat which had been infected with rat-passaged Friend leukemia virus. PVC-211 and PVC-321 viruses induced hind leg paralysis in rats and killed them within 1 month, and PVC-441 did so within 2 months after infection, whereas PVC-111 did not within 4 months. PVC-321 and PVC-441 but not PVC-111 virus grew well in brain and spinal cord media. The viral antigens were found often i...

  13. Occurrence of Deformed wing virus, Chronic bee paralysis virus and mtDNA variants in haplotype K of Varroa destructor mites in Syrian apiaries.

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Daher-Hjaij, Nouraldin; Ismaeil, Faiz; Mando, Jamal; Khaled, Bassem Solaiman; Kubaa, Raied Abou

    2016-05-01

    A small-scale survey was conducted on 64 beehives located in four governorates of Syria in order to assess for the first time the presence of honeybee-infecting viruses and of Varroa destructor mites in the country. RT-PCR assays conducted on 192 honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) using virus-specific primers showed that Deformed wing virus (DWV) was present in 49 (25.5%) of the tested samples and Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) in 2 (1.04%), whereas Acute bee paralysis virus, Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus were absent. Nucleotide sequences of PCR amplicons obtained from DWV and CBPV genomes shared 95-97 and 100% identity with isolates reported in the GenBank, respectively. The phylogenetic tree grouped the Syrian DWV isolates in one cluster, distinct from all those of different origins reported in the database. Furthermore, 19 adult V. destructor females were genetically analyzed by amplifying and sequencing four fragments in cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), ATP synthase 6 (atp6), cox3 and cytochrome b (cytb) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. Sequences of concatenated V. destructor mtDNA genes (2696 bp) from Syria were similar to the Korean (K) haplotype and were found recurrently in all governorates. In addition, two genetic lineages of haplotype K with slight variations (0.2-0.3%) were present only in Tartous and Al-Qunaitra governorates. PMID:26914360

  14. Characterization of a novel enterovirus serotype and an enterovirus EV-B93 isolated from acute flaccid paralysis patients.

    Shahzad Shaukat

    Full Text Available Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs are among the most common viruses infecting humans worldwide. Most of these infections are asymptomatic but few can lead to systemic and neurological disorders like Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP. Acute Flaccid Paralysis is a clinical syndrome and NPEVs have been isolated frequently from the patients suffering from AFP but little is known about their causal relationship. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize the NPEV serotypes recovered from 184 stool samples collected from AFP patients in Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA in north-west of Pakistan. Overall, 44 (95.6 % isolates were successfully typed through microneutralization assay as a member of enterovirus B species including echovirus (E-2, E-3, E-4, E-6, E-7, E-11, E-13, E-14, E-21 and E-29 while two isolates (PAK NIH SP6545B and PAK NIH SP1202B remained untypeable. The VP1 and capsid regions analysis characterized these viruses as EV-B93 and EV-B106. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that PAK NIH isolates had high genetic diversity and represent distinct genotypes circulating in the country. Our findings highlight the role of NPEVs in AFP cases to be thoroughly investigated especially in high disease risk areas, with limited surveillance activities and health resources.

  15. Surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis in the Netherlands, 1992-94

    Oostvogel, P.M.; Conyn-Spaendonck, M.A.E. van; Hirasing, R.A.; Loon, A.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Detection and investigation of call cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in children below 15 years of age are among the criteria for poliomyelitis-free certification. In the absence of poliomyelitis the incidence of AFP is around 1 per 100 000 children aged < 15 years. In the Netherlands, surveil

  16. Lower motor neuron paralysis with extensive cord atrophy in parainfectious acute transverse myelitis

    Sunil Pradhan; Ajit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We describe a young patient of acute transverse myelitis (ATM) who developed true lower motor neuron (LMN) type flaccid paraplegia as a result of anterior horn cell damage in the region of cord inflammation that extended from conus upwards up to the D4 transverse level. We infer that flaccidity in acute phase of ATM is not always due to spinal shock and may represent true LMN paralysis particularly if the long segment myelits is severe and extending up to last spinal segment.

  17. A Case of Associated Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus without Eruption

    Keishi Fujiwara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with significant weakness of the left soft palate, paralysis of the left vocal cord, and left facial nerve palsy. Although the patient showed no herpetic eruption in the pharyngolaryngeal mucosa and auricle skin, reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV was confirmed by serological examination. She was diagnosed with zoster sine herpete. After treatment with antiviral drugs and corticosteroids, her neurological disorder improved completely. When we encounter a patient with associated laryngeal paralysis, we should consider the possibility of reactivation of VZV even when no typical herpetic eruption is observed.

  18. Zika Virus Tied to Rare Disorder That Can Cause Paralysis

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157521.html Zika Virus Tied to Rare Disorder That Can Cause ... 2016 MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus may cause Guillain-Barre syndrome, a disorder ...

  19. Role of immunity in age-related resistance to paralysis after murine leukemia virus infection.

    Hoffman, P M; Robbins, D S; Morse, H C

    1984-01-01

    Resistance to the paralytic effects of a wild mouse (Cas-Br-M) murine leukemia virus infection develops with age and is complete by 10 days of age in susceptible NFS mice. The possibility that cell-mediated immunity plays a significant role in this resistance was suggested by the observation that treatment of 10-day-old mice with antithymocyte serum rendered them susceptible to paralysis. By comparison, mice rendered incapable of generating a humoral immune response by treatment from birth to...

  20. Lower motor neuron paralysis with extensive cord atrophy in parainfectious acute transverse myelitis

    Sunil Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a young patient of acute transverse myelitis (ATM who developed true lower motor neuron (LMN type flaccid paraplegia as a result of anterior horn cell damage in the region of cord inflammation that extended from conus upwards up to the D4 transverse level. We infer that flaccidity in acute phase of ATM is not always due to spinal shock and may represent true LMN paralysis particularly if the long segment myelits is severe and extending up to last spinal segment.

  1. First molecular detection of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV in Iran

    Modirrousta, H.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the viruses infecting honey bees, chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is known to induce significant losses in honey bee colonies. CBPV is an unclassified polymorphic single stranded RNA virus. Using RT-PCR, the virus infections in honey bees can be detected in a rapid and accurate manner. Bee samples were collected from 23 provinces of Iran, between July-September 2011 and 2012. A total of 160 apiaries were sampled and submitted for virus screening. RNA extraction and RT-PCR were performed with QIAGEN kits. The primers lead to a fragment of 315 bp. The PCR products were electrophoresed in a 1.2 % agarose gel. Following the RT-PCR reaction with the specific primers, out of the 160 apiaries examined, 12 (7.5 % were infected with CBPV. This is the first study of CBPV detection in Iranian apiaries. We identified CBPV in the collected samples from different geographic regions of Iran.

  2. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance: A 6 years study, Isfahan, Iran

    Alireza Emami Naeini; Mohamadreza Ghazavi; Sharareh Moghim; Amirhosein Sabaghi; Reza Fadaei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poliomyelitis is still an endemic disease in many areas of the world including Africa and South Asia. Iran is polio free since 2001. However, due to endemicity of polio in neighboring countries of Iran, the risk of polio importation and re-emergence of wild polio virus is high. Case definition through surveillance system is a well-defined method for maintenance of polio eradication in polio free countries. Methods: In a cross-sectional survey from 2007 to 2013, we reviewed all...

  3. [Investigation of adenovirus isolation frequency from the stool samples of patients suspected with acute flaccid paralysis].

    Bayrakdar, Fatma; Coşgun, Yasemin; Salman Atak, Tunca; Karademir, Hülya; Korukluoğlu, Gülay

    2016-04-01

    Although adenoviruses (AdVs) generally cause upper respiratory tract infections, conjunctivitis/epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, gastroenteritis and pneumonia, they can lead to the involvement of central nervous system. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a type of seizure, characterized by rapid and sudden onset of extreme weakness in hands and feet, including (less frequently) weakness of respiratory and swallowing, representing with decreased muscle tone, especially in children below 15-year-old. The major viral cause of AFP is polioviruses, however non-polio enteroviruses, mumps virus, rabies virus and flaviviruses can also be responsible for AFP. The data of some recent studies have pointed out the probable aetiological role of AdVs in AFP. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of AdVs from stool samples of AFP-suspected patients and their contacts. A total of 6130 stool samples from patients (age range: 0-15 years) prediagnosed as AFP (n= 3185) and their contacts (n= 2945), which were sent to our laboratory from the health care centers located at different regions of Turkey for the monitorization of poliomyelitis as part of national AFP surveillance programme, between 2000-2014, have been retrospectively evaluated in terms of adenovirus isolation frequency. Samples were analyzed according to the algorithm recommended by World Health Organization and inoculated in Hep-2, RD, and L20B cell lines for cultivation. Apart from enteroviruses, in case of the presence of characteristic cytopathic effects for AdVs observed in L20B cells were confirmed by a commercial Adeno agglutination kit (Diarlex Adeno; Orion Diagnostica, Finland). It was noted that AdVs have been isolated from 1.6% (97/6130) of the samples, and out of positive samples 76.3% (74/97) were from AFP-suspected cases, while 23.7% (23/97) were from their contacts. Accordingly the frequencies of AdVs from AFP-suspected cases and their contacts were found as 2.3% (74/3185) and 0.8% (23

  4. Multiple Virus Infections and the Characteristics of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Diseased Honey Bees (Apis Mellifera L. in China

    Wu Yan Y.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available China has the largest number of managed honey bee colonies globally, but there is currently no data on viral infection in diseased A. mellifera L. colonies in China. In particular, there is a lack of data on chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV in Chinese honey bee colonies. Consequently, the present study investigated the occurrence and frequency of several widespread honey bee viruses in diseased Chinese apiaries, and we used the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay. Described was the relationship between the presence of CBPV and diseased colonies (with at least one of the following symptoms: depopulation, paralysis, dark body colorings and hairless, or a mass of dead bees on the ground surrounding the beehives. Phylogenetic analyses of CBPV were employed. The prevalence of multiple infections of honey bee viruses in diseased Chinese apiaries was 100%, and the prevalence of infections with even five and six viruses were higher than expected. The incidence of CBPV in diseased colonies was significantly higher than that in apparently healthy colonies in Chinese A. mellifera aparies, and CBPV isolates from China can be separated into Chinese-Japanese clade 1 and 2. The results indicate that beekeeping in China may be threatened by colony decline due to the high prevalence of multiple viruses with CBPV.

  5. Characterisation of Structural Proteins from Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV Using Mass Spectrometry

    Aurore Chevin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is the etiological agent of chronic paralysis, an infectious and contagious disease in adult honeybees. CBPV is a positive single-stranded RNA virus which contains two major viral RNA fragments. RNA 1 (3674 nt and RNA 2 (2305 nt encode three and four putative open reading frames (ORFs, respectively. RNA 1 is thought to encode the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp since the amino acid sequence derived from ORF 3 shares similarities with the RdRP of families Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae. The genomic organization of CBPV and in silico analyses have suggested that RNA 1 encodes non-structural proteins, while RNA 2 encodes structural proteins, which are probably encoded by ORFs 2 and 3. In this study, purified CBPV particles were used to characterize virion proteins by mass spectrometry. Several polypeptides corresponding to proteins encoded by ORF 2 and 3 on RNA 2 were detected. Their role in the formation of the viral capsid is discussed.

  6. Epidemiology of acute flaccid paralysis in Kermanshah province, 2004-2009

    Keyghobad Ghadiri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine epidemiologic features of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP during 2004-2009 in Kermanshah province. This cross-sectional descriptive study was done based on data records from Kermanshah health care center. In total 89 patients, 0-14 years old were enrolled study, which 36 of them were male and 53 were female. 50.6% of subjects were diagnosed as Guillain-barre, 6.7% transverse synovitis and 5.6% as arthritis. No any cases of poliomyelitis were diagnosed. The prevalence of reported of AFP during 2004-2009 in Kermanshah province was more than expected rate of 1 per 100000 according to WHO.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of a Highly Mutated Chinese Isolate of Enterovirus B84 from a Patient with Acute Flaccid Paralysis

    Zheng, Huanying; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Leng; Lu, Jing; Guo, Xue; Li, Hui; Zeng, Hanri; Fang, Ling; Xu, Wenbo; Ke, Changwen

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus B84 (EV-B84) is a newly identified serotype within the species Enterovirus B (EV-B). To date, only ten nucleotide sequences of EV-B84 are published and only one full-length genome sequence (the prototype strain) is available in the GenBank database. Here, a highly mutated EV-B84 (strain AFP452/GD/CHN/2004) was recovered from a patient with acute flaccid paralysis in the Guangdong province of China in 2004 making this the first report of EV-B84 in China. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic dendrogram analysis revealed high variation from the global EV-B84 strains (African and Indian strains) and frequent intertypic recombination in the non-structural protein region, suggesting high genetic diversity in EV-B84. The Chinese EV-B84 strain, apparently evolving independently of the other ten strains, strongly suggests that the EV-B84 strain has been circulating for many years. However, the extremely low isolation rate suggests that it is not a prevalent EV serotype in China or worldwide. This study provides valuable information about the molecular epidemiology of EV-B84 in China, and will be helpful in future studies to understand the association of EV-B84 with neurological disorders; it also helps expand the number of whole virus genome sequences of EV-B84 in the GenBank database. PMID:27499334

  8. [Genetic Characteristics of Coxsackievirus Group A Type 4 Isolated from Patients with Acute Flaccid Paralysis in Shaanxi, China].

    Wang, Dongyan; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Shuangli; Si, Yuan; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Qian; Ji, Tianjiao; Xu, Wenbo

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the genetic characteristics of coxsackievirus A4 (CV-A4) based on the entire VP1 coding region. Samples were isolated from patients with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Shaanxi, China from 2006 to 2010. We wished to ascertain the predominant genotype and the relationship between CV-A4 infection and AFP. Sixty-eight non-polio enteroviruses were inoculated onto RD cells (to increase the virus titer) and molecular typing was undertaken. The entire VP1 coding region was amplified. Percentage of CV-A4 was 10.3% (7/68). Analyses of genetic identify and creation of phylogenetic trees revealed that CV-A4 could be classified into A, B and C genotypes. Seven CV-A4 strains from Shaanxi and other CV-A4 strains from China formed an independent evolution lineage located in group 4 and belonged to the C2 sub-genotype. These data suggested that CV-A4 strains of sub-genotype C2 were the predominant genotypes in China. These strains co-evolved and co-circulated with those from other provinces in China, so continued monitoring of CV-A4 (by clinical and genetic surveillance) should be enhanced. PMID:27396156

  9. Chronic bee paralysis virus and Nosema ceranae experimental co-infection of winter honey bee workers (Apis mellifera L.)

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is an important viral disease of adult bees which induces significant losses in honey bee colonies. In this study winter worker bees were experimentally infected using three different experiments. Bees were inoculated orally or topically with CBPV to evaluate the l...

  10. First Complete Genome Sequence of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus Isolated from Honey Bees (Apis mellifera) in China.

    Li, Beibei; Hou, Chunsheng; Deng, Shuai; Zhang, Xuefeng; Chu, Yanna; Yuan, Chunying; Diao, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is a serious viral disease affecting adult bees. We report here the complete genome sequence of CBPV, which was isolated from a honey bee colony with the symptom of severe crawling. The genome of CBPV consists of two segments, RNA 1 and RNA 2, containing respective overlapping fragments. PMID:27491983

  11. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Honeybee Queens: Evaluating Susceptibility and Infection Routes

    Esmaeil Amiri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is known as a disease of worker honey bees. To investigate pathogenesis of the CBPV on the queen, the sole reproductive individual in a colony, we conducted experiments regarding the susceptibility of queens to CBPV. Results from susceptibility experiment showed a similar disease progress in the queens compared to worker bees after infection. Infected queens exhibit symptoms by Day 6 post infection and virus levels reach 1011 copies per head. In a transmission experiment we showed that social interactions may affect the disease progression. Queens with forced contact to symptomatic worker bees acquired an overt infection with up to 1011 virus copies per head in six days. In contrast, queens in contact with symptomatic worker bees, but with a chance to receive food from healthy bees outside the cage appeared healthy. The virus loads did not exceed 107 in the majority of these queens after nine days. Symptomatic worker bees may transmit sufficient active CBPV particles to the queen through trophallaxis, to cause an overt infection.

  12. Genetic characterization of slow bee paralysis virus of the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.).

    de Miranda, Joachim R; Dainat, Benjamin; Locke, Barbara; Cordoni, Guido; Berthoud, Helène; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter; Budge, Giles E; Ball, Brenda V; Stoltz, Don B

    2010-10-01

    Complete genome sequences were determined for two distinct strains of slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV) of honeybees (Apis mellifera). The SBPV genome is approximately 9.5 kb long and contains a single ORF flanked by 5'- and 3'-UTRs and a naturally polyadenylated 3' tail, with a genome organization typical of members of the family Iflaviridae. The two strains, labelled 'Rothamsted' and 'Harpenden', are 83% identical at the nucleotide level (94% identical at the amino acid level), although this variation is distributed unevenly over the genome. The two strains were found to co-exist at different proportions in two independently propagated SBPV preparations. The natural prevalence of SBPV for 847 colonies in 162 apiaries across five European countries was <2%, with positive samples found only in England and Switzerland, in colonies with variable degrees of Varroa infestation. PMID:20519455

  13. MRI findings of spine: acute flaccid paralysis associated with enterovirus 71 infected hand-foot-mouth disease

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of spinal MR images in acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) associated with enterovirus 71 infected hand-foot-mouth disease. Methods: The spinal MR images of eight infants with AFP and positive EV71 cultures were analyzed during an outbreak of hand-foot-mouth disease in China in 2008. Results: Acute paralysis was observed in one lower limb in 4 of the 8 patients, in four limbs in 2 patients, in one upper limb and both lower limbs in 1 patient, 2 of the 8 patients also had brain stem encephalitis. Lesions were identified in anterior horn regions of spinal cord with hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and hypointensity on T1-weighted images. Location of the lesions included C3 to C7 (1 case), T10 extending to conus medullaris (5 cases) and a combination of the above (2 cases). Five of the 8 patients presented with unilateral paralysis. Two of the 5 cases showed unilateral hyperintense lesions in anterior horn regions and the remaining 3 cases showed bilateral hyperintense lesions in anterior horn regions with a unilateral predominance. One of the 3 patients with bilateral lesions showed slight enhancement of anterior horn with prominent enhancement of ventral roots after intravenous injections of contrast medium. Three of the 8 patients with bilateral paralysis showed bilateral hyperintensity in both anterior horn regions. Conclusion: MR is the imaging modality of choice for the detection of radiculomyelitis of AFP associated with EV71 infection. (authors)

  14. Analysis of new aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) isolates suggests evolution of two ALPV species.

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-12-01

    Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV; family Dicistroviridae) was first isolated from the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi. ALPV-like virus sequences have been reported from many insects and insect predators. We identified a new isolate of ALPV (ALPV-AP) from the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and a new isolate (ALPV-DvV) from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. ALPV-AP has an ssRNA genome of 9940 nt. Based on phylogenetic analysis, ALPV-AP was closely related to ALPV-AM, an ALPV isolate from honeybees, Apis mellifera, in Spain and Brookings, SD, USA. The distinct evolutionary branches suggested the existence of two lineages of the ALPV virus. One consisted of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM, whilst all other isolates of ALPV grouped into the other lineage. The similarity of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was up to 88 % at the RNA level, compared with 78-79 % between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. The sequence identity of proteins between ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was 98-99 % for both ORF1 and ORF2, whilst only 85-87 % for ORF1 and 91-92 % for ORF2 between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. Sequencing of RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) products and cDNA clones of the virus genome revealed sequence variation in the 5' UTRs and in ORF1, indicating that ALPV may be under strong selection pressure, which could have important biological implications for ALPV host range and infectivity. Our results indicated that ALPV-like viruses infect insects in the order Coleoptera, in addition to the orders Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, and we propose that ALPV isolates be classified as two separate viral species. PMID:25170050

  15. Microglia retard dengue virus-induced acute viral encephalitis.

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chang, Chih-Peng; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Jhan, Ming-Kai; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dengue virus (DENV) infection may also present acute viral encephalitis through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that encephalitic DENV-infected mice exhibited progressive hunchback posture, limbic seizures, limbic weakness, paralysis, and lethality 7 days post-infection. These symptoms were accompanied by CNS inflammation, neurotoxicity, and blood-brain barrier destruction. Microglial cells surrounding the blood vessels and injured hippocampus regions were activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically depleting microglia unexpectedly increased viral replication, neuropathy, and mortality in DENV-infected mice. In microglia-depleted mice, the DENV infection-mediated expression of antiviral cytokines and the infiltration of CD8-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was abolished. DENV infection prompted the antigen-presenting cell-like differentiation of microglia, which in turn stimulated CTL proliferation and activation. These results suggest that microglial cells play a key role in facilitating antiviral immune responses against DENV infection and acute viral encephalitis. PMID:27279150

  16. PENGKAJIAN DATA RUMAH SAKIT (HOSPITAL RECORD REVIEW KASUS ACUTE FLACCID PARALYSIS (AFP TAHUN 1999-2000 DI JAWA TIMUR

    Cholis Bachroen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This survey was the evaluation of the program on Polio Eradication through Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP Surveillance especially Hospital Based Surveillance. The evaluation was done by reviewing the Hospitals' Record (Hospital Based Survey. The objective of the survey was to estimate the under reported of routine reporting system, which the data of the survey used as a gold standard. The results showed that due to incomplete of the records in several hospitals, some of AFP cases might be could not be covered. However the under reported of the routine surveillance system was more than 50%. It seems that the strengthening of supervision was still needed to increase coverage of the routine surveillance system.   Keywords: hospitals; medical record; acute flocid paralysis

  17. Temporal Regulation of Distinct Internal Ribosome Entry Sites of the Dicistroviridae Cricket Paralysis Virus.

    Khong, Anthony; Bonderoff, Jennifer M; Spriggs, Ruth V; Tammpere, Erik; Kerr, Craig H; Jackson, Thomas J; Willis, Anne E; Jan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry is a key mechanism for viral protein synthesis in a subset of RNA viruses. Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), a member of Dicistroviridae, has a positive-sense single strand RNA genome that contains two internal ribosome entry sites (IRES), a 5'untranslated region (5'UTR) and intergenic region (IGR) IRES, that direct translation of open reading frames (ORF) encoding the viral non-structural and structural proteins, respectively. The regulation of and the significance of the CrPV IRESs during infection are not fully understood. In this study, using a series of biochemical assays including radioactive-pulse labelling, reporter RNA assays and ribosome profiling, we demonstrate that while 5'UTR IRES translational activity is constant throughout infection, IGR IRES translation is delayed and then stimulated two to three hours post infection. The delay in IGR IRES translation is not affected by inhibiting global translation prematurely via treatment with Pateamine A. Using a CrPV replicon that uncouples viral translation and replication, we show that the increase in IGR IRES translation is dependent on expression of non-structural proteins and is greatly stimulated when replication is active. Temporal regulation by distinct IRESs within the CrPV genome is an effective viral strategy to ensure optimal timing and expression of viral proteins to facilitate infection. PMID:26797630

  18. Clinical and neuroimaging features of enterovirus71 related acute flaccid paralysis in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease

    Feng Chen; Jian-Jun Li; Tao Liu; Guo-Qiang Wen; Wei Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical and neuroimaging features of enterovirus71 (EV71) related acute flaccid paralysis in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease. Methods: Nine patients with acute flaccid paralysis met the criterion of EV71 induced hand-foot-mouth disease underwent spinal and brain MR imaging from May 2008 to Sep 2012. Results: One extremity flaccid was found in four cases (3 with lower limb, 1 with upper limb), two limbs flaccid in three cases (2 with lower limbs, 1 with upper limbs), and four limbs flaccid in two cases. Spinal MRI studies showed lesion with high signal in T2-weighted images (T2WI) and low signal T1-weighted images (T1WI) in the spinal cord of all nine cases, and the lesions were mainly in bilateral and unilateral anterior horn of cervical spinal cord and spinal cord below thoracic 9 (T9) level. In addition, the midbrain, pons, and medulla, which were involved in 3 cases with brainstem encephalitis, demonstrated abnormal signal. Moreover, spinal cord contrast MRI studies showed mild enhancement in corresponding anterior horn of the involved side, and strong enhancement in its ventral root. Conclusions:EV71 related acute flaccid paralysis in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease mainly affected the anterior horn regions and ventral root of cervical spinal cord and spinal cord below T9 level. MR imaging could efficiently show the characteristic pattern and extent of the lesions which correlated well with the clinical features.

  19. Study of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance system in Kerman (Iran for one decade

    Hossein Ali Ebrahimi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background — During the past decade, polio eradication has stalled globally. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP surveillance is a key strategy for monitoring the progress of polio eradication. All AFP patients who referred to expert committee were evaluated about the causes. Methods — This case series study is the result of activities for one decade of expert AFP committee of Kerman University of Medical Sciences from 2002-2011, with coverage of more than 2,650,000 populations and 730,677 child with age of ≤15 years old. All patients have gone under diagnostic and therapeutic managements. Results — The total cases referred to Kerman expert committee of AFP for ten years were 147 cases. In our study the incidence of AFP was 2.016 per 100000 populations for one year.The most common causes of AFP were Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. Other causes of AFP were; stroke, synovitis, myelitis, seizures, cerebral palsy, viral infections, tumors, cerebellitis and non-polio AFP. The rate of GBS in our study was 0.96 per 100000 in children 15 years old or smaller, and more in male. In this study the incidence rate in cities with low mean temperature was higher than in cities with high mean temperature. Conclusion — We had no polio case in this period. The most common cause of AFPs was Guillain–Barre syndrome. The incidence of GBS was higher in areas with low mean temperature.

  20. Tick Paralysis

    ... Physician’s Resources Contact About The Foundation Select Page Tick Paralysis Menu What is Tick Paralysis? Where is ... How to Remove a Tick Deer Tick Ecology Tick-Borne Diseases Anaplasmosis Babesiosis Borrelia myamotoi Infections Colorado ...

  1. Viral Aetiology of Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance Cases, before and after Vaccine Policy Change from Oral Polio Vaccine to Inactivated Polio Vaccine

    T. S. Saraswathy Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1992, surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP cases was introduced in Malaysia along with the establishment of the National Poliovirus Laboratory at the Institute for Medical Research. In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, approved a vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV. Eight states started using IPV in the Expanded Immunization Programme, followed by the remaining states in January 2010. The objective of this study was to determine the viral aetiology of AFP cases below 15 years of age, before and after vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine. One hundred and seventy-nine enteroviruses were isolated from the 3394 stool specimens investigated between 1992 and December 2012. Fifty-six out of 107 virus isolates were polioviruses and the remaining were non-polio enteroviruses. Since 2009 after the sequential introduction of IPV in the childhood immunization programme, no Sabin polioviruses were isolated from AFP cases. In 2012, the laboratory AFP surveillance was supplemented with environmental surveillance with sewage sampling. Thirteen Sabin polioviruses were also isolated from sewage in the same year, but no vaccine-derived poliovirus was detected during this period.

  2. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    A 31/2-year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  3. Vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis cases from children presenting with acute flaccid paralysis in Uganda.

    Nanteza, Mary B; Kisakye, Annet; Ota, Martin O; Gumede, Nicksy; Bwogi, Josephine

    2015-12-01

    A retrospective study to identify VAPP cases from the entire Uganda was conducted between January 2003 and December 2011. Eleven of the 106 AFP cases were VAPPs. The VAPP rate ranged from 0 to 3.39 cases per 1,000,000 birth cohorts and the peak was in 2009 when there was scaling up of OPV immunization activities following an importation of wild poliovirus in the country. All the subsequent polio suspect cases since then have been vaccine-associated polio cases. Our data support the strategy to withdraw OPV and introduce IPV progressively in order to mitigate against the paralysis arising from Sabin polioviruses. PMID:26058454

  4. Wild mouse ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection of inbred mice: dual-tropic virus expression precedes the onset of paralysis and lymphoma.

    Hoffman, P M; Davidson, W F; Ruscetti, S K; Chused, T M; Morse, H C

    1981-01-01

    NFS/N mice inoculated at birth with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus (Cas-Br-MuLV) obtained from wild mice developed hind limb paralysis beginning at 7 weeks of age and nonthymic lymphomas beginning at more than 20 weeks of age. Studies of 1- to 7-week-old Cas-Br-M MuLV-infected mice showed the following: (i) a marked increase in nonecotropic MuLV-related antigens on spleen cells but not thymocytes beginning at 2 weeks; (ii) the appearance of dual-tropic mink cell focus-forming (MCF) MuLV-r...

  5. Clinical and biochemical spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis in North: East India

    Ashok K Kayal; Munindra Goswami; Marami Das; Rahul Jain

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute hypokalemic paralysis, characterized by acute flaccid paralysis is primarily a calcium channelopathy, but secondary causes like renal tubular acidosis (RTA), thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP), primary hyperaldosteronism, Gitelman′s syndrome are also frequent. Objective: To study the etiology, varied presentations, and outcome after therapy of patients with hypokalemic paralysis. Materials And Methods: All patients who presented with acute flaccid paralysis with hypokalemia...

  6. Peripheral Facial Paralysis and Apoptosis Induced by Herpes Simplex Type I Virus: A Rat Study

    Kabakuş, Nimet; ALPAY, H. Cengiz; GÖDEKMERDAN, Ahmet; GÖK, Üzeyir; Akpolat, Nusret

    2005-01-01

    Different results have been reported concerning the impact of agents used in the treatment of idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (FNP) generated by HSV type I (HSV-I) on the apoptotic process. We aimed at investigating the effects of different agents (steroids, acyclovir and interferon) used in the treatment of idiopathic FNP on the apoptotic process in animals in whom experimental FNP has been produced by HSV-I. After cleaning the auricles of 113 animals, linear injuries were produced, and th...

  7. Gamma Interferon (IFN-γ) Receptor Restricts Systemic Dengue Virus Replication and Prevents Paralysis in IFN-α/β Receptor-Deficient Mice

    Prestwood, Tyler R.; Morar, Malika M.; Zellweger, Raphaël M.; Miller, Robyn; May, Monica M.; Yauch, Lauren E.; Lada, Steven M.; Shresta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that mice lacking alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptors (IFN-α/βR and -γR) uniformly exhibit paralysis following infection with the dengue virus (DENV) clinical isolate PL046, while only a subset of mice lacking the IFN-γR alone and virtually no mice lacking the IFN-α/βR alone develop paralysis. Here, using a mouse-passaged variant of PL046, strain S221, we show that in the absence of the IFN-α/βR, signaling through the IFN-γR confers approximately 140-fold greater ...

  8. Etiological spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis: A retrospective analysis of 29 patients

    Ravindra Kumar Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by episodes of acute muscle weakness associated with hypokalemia. In this study, we evaluated the possible etiological factors in patients of hypokalemic paralysis. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the records of 29 patients who were admitted with a diagnosis of hypokalemic paralysis. Modified Guillain-Barre΄ Syndrome disability scale was used to grade the disability. Results: In this study, 15 (51.7% patients had secondary causes of hypokalemic paralysis and 14 patients (42.3% had idiopathic hypokalemic paralysis. Thyrotoxicosis was present in six patients (20.6%, dengue infection in four patients (13.7%, distal renal tubular acidosis in three patients (10.3%, Gitelman syndrome in one patient (3.4%, and Conn′s syndrome in one patient (3.4%. Preceding history of fever and rapid recovery was seen in dengue infection-induced hypokalemic paralysis. Approximately 62% patients had elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase. All patients had recovered completely following potassium supplementation. Patients with secondary causes were older in age, had significantly more disability, lower serum potassium levels, and took longer time to recover. Conclusion: In conclusion, more than half of patients had secondary causes responsible for hypokalemic paralysis. Dengue virus infection was the second leading cause of hypokalemic paralysis, after thyrotoxicosis. Presence of severe disability, severe hypokalemia, and a late disease onset suggested secondary hypokalemic paralysis.

  9. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus and Nosema ceranae Experimental Co-Infection of Winter Honey Bee Workers (Apis mellifera L.

    Aleš Gregorc

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is an important viral disease of adult bees which induces significant losses in honey bee colonies. Despite comprehensive research, only limited data is available from experimental infection for this virus. In the present study winter worker bees were experimentally infected in three different experiments. Bees were first inoculated per os (p/o or per cuticle (p/c with CBPV field strain M92/2010 in order to evaluate the virus replication in individual bees. In addition, potential synergistic effects of co-infection with CBPV and Nosema ceranae (N. ceranae on bees were investigated. In total 558 individual bees were inoculated in small cages and data were analyzed using quantitative real time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR. Our results revealed successful replication of CBPV after p/o inoculation, while it was less effective when bees were inoculated p/c. Dead bees harbored about 1,000 times higher copy numbers of the virus than live bees. Co-infection of workers with CBPV and N. ceranae using either method of virus inoculation (p/c or p/o showed increased replication ability for CBPV. In the third experiment the effect of inoculation on bee mortality was evaluated. The highest level of bee mortality was observed in a group of bees inoculated with CBPV p/o, followed by a group of workers simultaneously inoculated with CBPV and N. ceranae p/o, followed by the group inoculated with CBPV p/c and the group with only N. ceranae p/o. The experimental infection with CBPV showed important differences after p/o or p/c inoculation in winter bees, while simultaneous infection with CBPV and N. ceranae suggesting a synergistic effect after inoculation.

  10. Surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Lombardy, Northern Italy, from 1997 to 2011 in the context of the national AFP surveillance system

    Pellegrinelli, Laura; Primache, Valeria; Fiore, Lucia; Amato, Concetta; Fiore, Stefano; Bubba, Laura; Pariani, Elena; Amendola, Antonella; Barbi, Maria; Binda, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    An Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) surveillance system was set up in Lombardy (Northern Italy) in 1997 in the framework of the national AFP surveillance system, as part of the polio eradication initiative by the World Health Organization (WHO). This surveillance system can now be used to detect Poliovirus (PV) reintroductions from endemic countries. This study aimed at describing the results of the AFP surveillance in Lombardy, from 1997 to 2011.

  11. Bilateral optic neuritis in acute human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Larsen, M; Toft, P.B.; Bernhard, P;

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report a case of acute viral disease accompanied by bilateral optic neuritis with substantial paraclinical evidence that human immunodeficiency virus was the causative agent. METHODS: Clinical and paraclinical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Virus and antibody titers...... as well as reverse lymphocytosis were consistent with acute infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-1. CONCLUSIONS: Human immunodeficiency virus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute optic neuritis...

  12. Surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis in the Netherlands 1992-1994

    Oostvogel PM; Conyn-van Spaendonck MAE; Hirasing RA; van Loon AM; LIO; CIE; Nederlands Signalerings Centrum Kindergeneeskunde (NSCK); TNO

    1996-01-01

    Surveillance van acute slappe verlamming (ASV) bij kinderen in Nederland vindt plaats in het kader van het mondiale uitroeiingsinitiatief van poliomyelitis van de Wereld Gezondheidsorganisatie. Ervaring elders leert dat de incidentie van ASV, in afwezigheid van poliomyelitis, ongeveer 1 op de 100.0

  13. Hepatitis-A Virus Induced Acute Myocarditis

    Özen, Metahan; KOÇAK, Gülendam; Özgen, Ünsal

    2006-01-01

    The viral myocarditis is the most common cause of heart failure in previously healthy children. We herewith present an adolescent girl admitted with acute myocarditis findings, heart failure and arrhythmia. Cardiological studies verified the diagnosis and patient received intravenous immuneglobuline solution in addition to supportive therapy. Her clinical picture was finally attributed to unicteric hepatitis A virus infection. Keywords: Viral myocarditis, Hepatitis A, Intravenous immuneg...

  14. Paralysis: Rehabilitation

    ... Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Rehabilitation Rehabilitation Rehabilitation and exercise are key to enhancing your health and quality of life. Find a rehabilitation center near you and become familiar with different ...

  15. MRI findings in acute Hendra virus meningoencephalitis

    Aim: To describe serial changes in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute human infection from two outbreaks of Hendra virus (HeV), relate these changes to disease prognosis, and compare HeV encephalitis to reported cases of Nipah virus encephalitis. Materials and methods: The MRI images of three human cases (two of which were fatal) of acute HeV meningoencephalitis were reviewed. Results: Cortical selectivity early in the disease is evident in all three patients, while deep white matter involvement appears to be a late and possibly premorbid finding. This apparent early grey matter selectivity may be related to viral biology or ribavirin pharmacokinetics. Neuronal loss is evident at MRI, and the rate of progression of MRI abnormalities can predict the outcome of the infection. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in the MRI picture mirrored the clinical course. Conclusion: This is the first comprehensive report of serial MRI findings in acute human cerebral HeV infection from two outbreaks. The cortical selectivity appears to be an early finding while deep white matter involvement a late, and possibly premorbid, finding. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in MRI mirrored the clinical course.

  16. MRI findings in acute Hendra virus meningoencephalitis

    Nakka, P.; Amos, G.J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia); Saad, N., E-mail: nivena100@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia); Jeavons, S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia)

    2012-05-15

    Aim: To describe serial changes in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute human infection from two outbreaks of Hendra virus (HeV), relate these changes to disease prognosis, and compare HeV encephalitis to reported cases of Nipah virus encephalitis. Materials and methods: The MRI images of three human cases (two of which were fatal) of acute HeV meningoencephalitis were reviewed. Results: Cortical selectivity early in the disease is evident in all three patients, while deep white matter involvement appears to be a late and possibly premorbid finding. This apparent early grey matter selectivity may be related to viral biology or ribavirin pharmacokinetics. Neuronal loss is evident at MRI, and the rate of progression of MRI abnormalities can predict the outcome of the infection. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in the MRI picture mirrored the clinical course. Conclusion: This is the first comprehensive report of serial MRI findings in acute human cerebral HeV infection from two outbreaks. The cortical selectivity appears to be an early finding while deep white matter involvement a late, and possibly premorbid, finding. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in MRI mirrored the clinical course.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and a predicted structural protein (pSP) of the Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) isolated from various geographic regions.

    Blanchard, Philippe; Schurr, Frank; Olivier, Violaine; Celle, Olivier; Antùnez, Karina; Bakonyi, Tamàs; Berthoud, Hélène; Haubruge, Eric; Higes, Mariano; Kasprzak, Sylwia; Koeglberger, Hemma; Kryger, Per; Thiéry, Richard; Ribière, Magali

    2009-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is responsible for chronic paralysis, an infectious and contagious disease of adult honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). The full-length nucleotide sequences of the two major RNAs of CBPV have previously been characterized. The Orf3 of RNA1 has shown significant similarities to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of positive single-stranded RNA viruses, whereas the Orf3 of RNA2 encodes a putative structural protein (pSP). In the present study, honey bees orig...

  18. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    Osterhaus, Ab; Vries, Petra

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated whole virus or viral subunits, depends largely on the matching of vaccine strain and circulating virus. Measles vaccines, which are based on attenuated live virus, have been quite effective in control...

  19. Surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Lombardy, Northern Italy, from 1997 to 2011 in the context of the national AFP surveillance system.

    Pellegrinelli, Laura; Primache, Valeria; Fiore, Lucia; Amato, Concetta; Fiore, Stefano; Bubba, Laura; Pariani, Elena; Amendola, Antonella; Barbi, Maria; Binda, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    An Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) surveillance system was set up in Lombardy (Northern Italy) in 1997 in the framework of the national AFP surveillance system, as part of the polio eradication initiative by the World Health Organization (WHO). This surveillance system can now be used to detect Poliovirus (PV) reintroductions from endemic countries. This study aimed at describing the results of the AFP surveillance in Lombardy, from 1997 to 2011.   Overall, 131 AFP cases in Lombardy were reported with a mean annual incidence rate of 0.7/100 000 children <15 years of age (range: 0.3/100 000-1.1/100 000). The sensitivity of the surveillance system was optimal from 2001-2003. The monthly distribution of AFP cases was typical with peaks in November, in January, and in March. The major clinical diagnoses associated with AFP were Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS, 40%) and encephalomyelitis/myelitis (13%). According to the virological results, no poliomyelitis cases were caused by wild PV infections, but two Vaccine-Associated Paralytic Paralysis (VAPP) cases were reported in 1997 when the Sabin oral polio vaccine (OPV) was still being administered in Italy. Since a surveillance system is deemed sensitive if at least one case of AFP per 100,000 children <15 years of age is detected each year, our surveillance system needs some improvement and must be maintained until global poliovirus eradication will be declared. PMID:25483546

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Human Enterovirus 85 (HEV85) Recombinant with an Unknown New Serotype HEV-B Donor Sequence Isolated from a Child with Acute Flaccid Paralysis

    Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Hui; Zhu, Shuangli; Zhu, Zhen; Huang, Guohong; Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Bo; Yan, Dongmei; An, Hongqiu; Xu, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    A Chinese human enterovirus 85 (HEV85) isolate, HTYT-ARL-AFP02F/XJ/CHN/2011, was isolated from a stool specimen of a child with acute flaccid paralysis in Xinjiang, China, in 2011. The complete genome sequence revealed that a natural intertypic recombination event had occurred between HEV85 and a previously undescribed serotype of HEV-B.

  1. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) receptor restricts systemic dengue virus replication and prevents paralysis in IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice.

    Prestwood, Tyler R; Morar, Malika M; Zellweger, Raphaël M; Miller, Robyn; May, Monica M; Yauch, Lauren E; Lada, Steven M; Shresta, Sujan

    2012-12-01

    We previously reported that mice lacking alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptors (IFN-α/βR and -γR) uniformly exhibit paralysis following infection with the dengue virus (DENV) clinical isolate PL046, while only a subset of mice lacking the IFN-γR alone and virtually no mice lacking the IFN-α/βR alone develop paralysis. Here, using a mouse-passaged variant of PL046, strain S221, we show that in the absence of the IFN-α/βR, signaling through the IFN-γR confers approximately 140-fold greater resistance against systemic vascular leakage-associated dengue disease and virtually complete protection from dengue-induced paralysis. Viral replication in the spleen was assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, which revealed a reduction in the number of infected cells due to IFN-γR signaling by 2 days after infection, coincident with elevated levels of IFN-γ in the spleen and serum. By 4 days after infection, IFN-γR signaling was found to restrict DENV replication systemically. Clearance of DENV, on the other hand, occurred in the absence of IFN-γR, except in the central nervous system (CNS) (brain and spinal cord), where clearance relied on IFN-γ from CD8(+) T cells. These results demonstrate the roles of IFN-γR signaling in protection from initial systemic and subsequent CNS disease following DENV infection and demonstrate the importance of CD8(+) T cells in preventing DENV-induced CNS disease. PMID:22973027

  2. An Acute Hemorrhagic Infectious Disease: Ebola Virus Disease

    Lei JIAO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease (EVD is an acute hemorrhagic infectious disease caused by ebola virus, with high infectivity and fatality rate. At present, it mainly occurs in areas of Central Africa and West Africa and no effective vaccine and antiviral drugs are available for the clinical treatment.

  3. Frequency of isolation of polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses from patients with acute flaccid paralysis, enterovirus infection and children from groups at risk

    N. I. Romanenkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the frequency of isolation of polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses from different categories of the investigated children. The percentage of detection of polioviruses from the patients with acute flaccid paralysis was lower than that from the children from groups at risk. Among the patients with the enterovirus infection the polioviruses were rarely revealed. The frequency of isolation of non polio enteroviruses from these patients was significantly higher than that from the other categories of investigated persons. The improvement of poliomyelitis surveillance and the reinforcement of virological surveillance of children from groups at risk and those with enterovirus infection will provide the important data for Global Polio Eradication Initiative and the maintenance of polio free status of the Russian Federation.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis Complicating Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection: A Case Report and Review

    Hemanta Kumar Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis complicating fulminant viral hepatitis has been well recognized; however, acute pancreatitis occurring in nonfulminant hepatitis is very rare. The case presented describes moderate pancreatitis in a young male, manifesting during the course of nonfulminant acute hepatitis E infection. The diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis E was confirmed by serology and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to demonstrate Hepatitis E virus (HEV RNA in both stool and serum. Patients with acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain should have a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis suspected and appropriate investigations including serum amylase, lipase, biliary ultrasonography and/or contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen should be undertaken. The identification of this unusual complication of Hepatitis E is important; however, the prognosis for patients with Acute Pancreatitis Complicating Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection is good, and uncomplicated recovery with conservative treatment is expected.

  5. Respiratory virus infections and aeroallergens in acute bronchial asthma.

    Carlsen, K H; Orstavik, I; Leegaard, J; Høeg, H

    1984-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty six attacks of acute bronchial asthma occurring in 169 children aged over 2 years were studied during a two year period. More attacks occurred during spring and autumn than at other times of the year. In 73 patients (29%) a respiratory virus infection was diagnosed, with the same seasonal variation as the asthmatic attacks. Most of the virus infections were caused by rhinovirus (45%) and respiratory syncytial virus (19%). There was no significant correlation between asth...

  6. Acute Pancreatitis Complicating Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection: A Case Report and Review

    Hemanta Kumar Nayak; Nitish L Kamble; Nishant Raizada; Sandeep Garg,; Mradul Kumar Daga

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicating fulminant viral hepatitis has been well recognized; however, acute pancreatitis occurring in nonfulminant hepatitis is very rare. The case presented describes moderate pancreatitis in a young male, manifesting during the course of nonfulminant acute hepatitis E infection. The diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis E was confirmed by serology and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to demonstrate Hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA in both stool and ser...

  7. Support for children identified with acute flaccid paralysis under the global polio eradication programme in Uttar Pradesh, India: a qualitative study

    Yotsu Rie R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cases of polio in India declined after the implementation of the polio eradication programme especially in these recent years. The programme includes surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP to detect and diagnose cases of polio at early stage. Under this surveillance, over 40,000 cases of AFP are reported annually since 2007 regardless of the number of actual polio cases. Yet, not much is known about these children. We conducted a qualitative research to explore care and support for children with AFP after their diagnosis. Methods The research was conducted in a district of western Uttar Pradesh classified as high-risk area for polio. In-depth interviews with parents of children with polio (17, with non-polio AFP (9, healthcare providers (40, and key informants from community including international and government officers, religious leaders, community leaders, journalists, and academics (21 were performed. Results Minimal medicine and attention were provided at government hospitals. Therefore, most parents preferred private-practice doctors for their children with AFP. Many were visited at homes to have stool samples collected by authorities. Some were visited repetitively following the sample collection, but had difficulty in understanding the reasons for these visits that pertained no treatment. Financial burden was a common concern among all families. Many parents expressed resentment for their children's disease, notably have been affected despite receiving multiple doses of polio vaccine. Both parents and healthcare providers lacked information and knowledge, furthermore poverty minimised the access to available healthcare services. Medicines, education, and transportation means were identified as foremost needs for children with AFP and residual paralysis. Conclusions Despite the high number of children diagnosed with AFP as part of the global polio eradication programme, we found they were not provided with

  8. Clinical curative effect observation of acupuncture treatment on acute peripheral facial paralysis%针灸治疗急性期周围性面瘫的临床疗效观察

    黄沐春; 张杨; 唐诗; 陈冬梅

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨针灸治疗急性期周围性面瘫的临床疗效。方法对急性期周围性面瘫患者使用针灸治疗,采用House-Brack-mann分级量表进行疗效观察与评价。结果针灸治疗可以明显改善周围性面瘫患者的临床症状。结论治疗周围性面瘫介入越早越好,留下后遗症的几率越小。%ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment on peripheral facial paralysis in acute stage.Methods the patients in acute stage of peripheral facial paralysis were treated with acupuncture.The House-Brack-mann grading scale was used to evaluate the treatment effect.Results The acupuncture therapy can significantly improve the clinical symptoms of patients with peripheral facial paralysis. Conclusion the treatment of peripheral facial paralysis was the sooner,the better.

  9. Analysis on virological surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis in Chongqing (2008-2011)%重庆市2008-2011年急性驰缓性麻痹病例监测结果

    赵春芳; 赵华; 陈应琼; 彭靖尧; 凌华; 张敏

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价重庆市2008-2011年急性驰缓性麻痹(AFP)病例监测运转情况.方法 按照《脊灰病毒检验手册》操作规程进行病毒分离与鉴定,由国家脊灰实验室用PCR-RFLP法和ELISA法对分离到的脊灰病毒株进行型内鉴定.结果 从307例AFP病例粪便标本中分离到脊灰病毒(PV)10株,分离率为3.26%,其中脊灰Ⅱ型5株,Ⅲ型3株,PV混合2株,Ⅱ型为我市的主要型别占50.00%,其次是Ⅲ型、PV混合型分别占30.00%、20.00%.所有PV经国家脊灰实验室进行型内鉴定,有9株为疫苗相关株,另外有1株Ⅱ型有6个核苷酸序列变异,鉴定为疫苗高变异株.分离非脊灰肠道病毒(NPEV) 26株,分离率为8.47%.结论重庆市2008-2011年急性驰缓性麻痹病例中未发现脊灰野病毒,维持了无脊灰状态.在实现无脊灰目标后,仍应加强AFP病例的病毒学监测工作,以确保最终实现全球消灭脊灰的目标.%Objective To evaluate the surveillance system of the acute flaccid paralysis( AFP) cases in Chongqing from 2008 to 2011. Methods Viruses were isolated and identified according to the Polio Laboratory Manual,and the results were conducted intratypic differentiation at the National Poliomyelitis Laboratory by PCR-RFLP and ELJSA methods. Results 10 strains of poliomyelitis virus( PV) were isolated from human fecal samples of 307 AFP cases,The isolating rate was 3. 26% , which included 5 strains of the type Ⅱ poliovirus ,3 strains of the type Ⅲ poliovirus and 2 strains of the mixed poliovirus. The principle prevalent type was Ⅱ, accounted for 50. 00% , followed by type Ⅲ and PV hybrid, accounted for 30. 00% and 20. 00% respectively. All the PVs were sent to the National Poliomyelitis Laboratory for further intratypic differentiation and identification. The results indicated that 9 strains were vaccine-related. Meanwhile, 6 nucleotide sequence variations were found in 1 strain of the type Ⅱ poliovirus, which was confirmed as the

  10. [Primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Presentation of 18 cases].

    Ariza-Andraca, C R; Frati-Munari, A C; Ceron, E; Chavez de los Rios, J M; Martinez-Mata, J

    1993-01-01

    The clinical features of 16 males and 2 females with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) are presented. Five patients had familial HPP, 4 thyrotoxic HPP and 9 sporadic disease. The age of onset ranged from 6 to 42 years. Clinical pictures varied from paraparesis to severe quadriplegia. The disease onset was earlier in familial HPP (p paralysis (p paralysis. Glucose-insulin provocation test was positive in 5/5 patients. Oral potassium chloride and amiloride were useful to prevent paralysis. Contrasting with reports from USA and Europe, in México, HPP is not exceptional, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute paralysis. PMID:7926395

  11. 综合康复治疗贝尔面瘫瘫32例%Treatment of Bell facial paralysis by comprehensive rehabilitation therapy

    徐纪香

    2002-01-01

    Background:Bell facial paralysis is characterized by acutely peripheral facial paralysis.Simple approaches can aggravate symptoms and induce permanent facial paralysis.Optimal therapy time may be missed.Comprehensive therapy is effective in treating the condition.

  12. Virus elimination in acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Correlation with virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity rather than cytotoxicity

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Volkert, M; Bro-Jørgensen, K

    1983-01-01

    The immunological effector mechanism responsible for the elimination of virus in murine acute non-fatal extracranial lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection was studied. In this infection virus clearance is generally regarded as the result of a direct action of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells...... (Tc cells) on virus-producing target cells in the infected mouse. However, by manipulating the antiviral immune response by pretreatment with various doses of cyclophosphamide, we found lack of correlation between Tc-cell activity and the clearance of virus. In contrast, we observed a conspicuous...... correlation between the host's ability to mount a virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and its capacity to combat virus. Moreover, pretreatment with silica and carrageenan prolonged viraemia without impairment of the peak Tc-cell response. These findings indicate that Tc cells have...

  13. Acute hepatitis with nontyphoidal salmonella and hepatitis E virus coinfection

    Yu-Ting Kuo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old Taiwanese man presented with dark urine for 5 days before admission to hospital and with fever on the 2nd day of admission to hospital. Laboratory studies showed acute hepatitis with hyperbilirubinemia. Acute hepatitis with nontyphoidal salmonella and hepatitis E virus coinfection was diagnosed. The fever subsided after treatment with ceftriaxone and cefepime. His serum bilirubin reached its peak value on the 3rd week after admission to hospital and then gradually returned to the normal range. To the best of our knowledge, acute hepatitis E coinfection with nontyphoidal salmonella has not been reported previously.

  14. Clinical Analysis of Acute Flaccid Paralysis in Infants and Young Children with Hand-foot-mouth Disease%手足口病致急性迟缓性麻痹的临床特点研究

    于春梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical features of acute flaccid paralysis ( AFP ) in infants and young children with hand - foot - mouth disease ( HFMD ). Methods Twenty - eight HFMD cases with AFP were enrolled. The etiology, ce-rebrospinal fluid ( CSF ), myocardial enzymes, spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) findings were collected. Patients were treated with immunoglobulin, dexamethasone, mecobalamin, and rat nerve growth factor. They were followed up for two months. Results AFP due to HFMD was confirmed in 22 patients. Typical skin rash was observed in the pre - paralysis phase in all patients. Twenty patients were accompanied with viral encephalitis. In addition, 20 patients experienced abnormal CSF or routine examination findings. Throat swab and sero - immunological examinations showed positive enteric virus -71 ( EV71 ) in 9 patients. The muscle strength began to be improved in a week, and basically recovered two weeks after acute phase in 21 patients. The muscle strength was basically recovered in 25 patients during the 2 - month follow - up. Conclusion HFMD patients have a high incidence of central nervous system involvement. EV71 is a major virus that can causes AFP by damaging anterior horn cells. The prognosis usually is good in infants and young children after active treatment.%目的 探讨手足口病致急性迟缓性麻痹的临床特点.方法 对28例手足口病伴急性迟缓性麻痹患儿进行临床观察,行病原学检查、颅脑和脊髓磁共振检查及脑脊液检查,行心肌酶、神经-肌电图检查.给予免疫球蛋白、地塞米松、鼠神经生长因子、弥可保等治疗.随访2个月观察预后.结果 手足口病所致急性迟缓性麻痹多见于2岁以下儿童(22/28);麻痹前期均有典型手足口病的皮疹.81.5%(20/28)的患儿合并病毒性脑炎.81.5%(20/28)的患儿脑脊液压力或常规异常.咽拭子EVPCR和血清免疫学检查均显示有9例患儿肠道病毒71型(EV71)

  15. Clinical Profile in Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis Cases

    Agrawal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The present article was aimed to study demographic and clinical pattern, periodicity and precipitating events for hypokalemic paralysis and to assess the response to treatment both during acute attacks and as prophylaxis in comparison with available literature. Forty patients with hypokalemic paralysis were admitted in Narayana Medical College and Hospital during the last two years, in all the medical units and neurology wards. Patients were assessed clinically, with symptomatology and precip...

  16. Episodic paralysis in a young male

    de Lloyd, Anna Claire; Davies, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    A 19-year-old Caucasian male presented acutely describing several episodes of profound paralysis. At the time of admission he had recovered completely and his neurological examination and routine biochemistry were normal. A diagnosis of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis was made after the thyroid function tests returned confirming hyperthyroidism. He was given β blockers and received a block and replacement regime before proceeding on to radioactive iodine therapy. He suffered a relapse of hypert...

  17. Ticks and tick paralysis: imaging findings on cranial MR

    Tick paralysis is an acute, progressive, and potentially fatal muscle paralysis secondary to a toxin secreted by a pregnant tick during a bite. Although tick bites can occur anywhere on the body, ticks are frequently overlooked on the scalp because of overlying hair. Children with acute neurologic symptoms frequently undergo MR scanning that may incidentally reveal the offending tick. Timely identification and removal of the tick leads to rapid recovery from tick paralysis. We report the MRI findings at 1.5 T of tick paralysis with an attached tick. (orig.)

  18. Ticks and tick paralysis: imaging findings on cranial MR

    Burke, Michael S.; Fordham, Lynn Ansley [University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, UNC School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, NC (United States); Hamrick, Harvey J. [University of North Carolina Hospitals, Department of Pediatrics, Chapel Hill (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Tick paralysis is an acute, progressive, and potentially fatal muscle paralysis secondary to a toxin secreted by a pregnant tick during a bite. Although tick bites can occur anywhere on the body, ticks are frequently overlooked on the scalp because of overlying hair. Children with acute neurologic symptoms frequently undergo MR scanning that may incidentally reveal the offending tick. Timely identification and removal of the tick leads to rapid recovery from tick paralysis. We report the MRI findings at 1.5 T of tick paralysis with an attached tick. (orig.)

  19. Virus infections of honeybees Apis Mellifera

    Giuseppina Tantillo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The health and vigour of honeybee colonies are threatened by numerous parasites (such as Varroa destructor and Nosema spp. and pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa. Among honeybee pathogens, viruses are one of the major threats to the health and wellbeing of honeybees and cause serious concern for researchers and beekeepers. To tone down the threats posed by these invasive organisms, a better understanding of bee viral infections will be of crucial importance in developing effective and environmentally benign disease control strategies. Here we summarize recent progress in the understanding of the morphology, genome organization, transmission, epidemiology and pathogenesis of eight honeybee viruses: Deformed wing virus (DWV and Kakugo virus (KV; Sacbrood virus (SBV; Black Queen cell virus (BQCV; Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV; Kashmir bee virus (KBV; Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV; Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV. The review has been designed to provide researchers in the field with updated information about honeybee viruses and to serve as a starting point for future research.

  20. Periodic paralysis complicating malaria.

    Senanayake, N; Wimalawansa, S J

    1981-01-01

    Episodic muscular weakness, commonly associated with alterations of serum potassium, is the cardinal feature of periodic paralysis. The combination of transient hyperkalaemia and rigors occurring during febrile episodes of malaria is suggested as the underlying cause which precipitated the muscular paralysis. Three patients with malaria who developed a similar paralysis during the paroxysms of fever are described to illustrate this.

  1. A Case of Hypokalemic Paralysis in a Patient With Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Nguyen, Frederic N.; Kar, Jitesh K.; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after dev...

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection with Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Cholestatic Hepatitis

    Kang, Seok-Jin; Yoon, Ka-Hyun; Hwang, Jin-Bok

    2013-01-01

    Infection-induced acute hepatitis complicated with acute pancreatitis is associated with hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus or hepatitis E virus. Although rare, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection should be considered also in the differential diagnosis if the patient has acute hepatitis combined with pancreatitis. We report a case of EBV infection with cholestatic hepatitis and pancreatitis with review of literature. An 11-year-old female was admitted due to 1-day history of abdominal pain a...

  3. A case report of acute flaccid paralysis following the pre-inoculation with oral poliomyelitis attenuated live vaccine%提前接种脊髓灰质炎减毒活疫苗发生急性弛缓性麻痹1例报道

    马敬仓; 杨传欣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the occurrence of acute flaccid paralysis was caused by the vaccination of oral poliomyelitis Attenuated Live Vaccine. Methods The investigation of the case,collecting case, s medical records,presenting the diagnostic opinion after summary and analysis. Results The case,with vaccination history of oral poliomyelitis vaccine 16 days later, had main symptoms of fever,limb weakness,etc.The case had inpatient treatment successively in a municipal hospital and a provincial hospital,and was diagnosed of acute flaccid paralysis and poliomyelitis.Polio virus and other enteroviruses were not detected in the case's specimens. The opinions of the municipal diagnosis experts group on adverse events following immunization for the diagnosis was that the patient did not meet the diagnostic conditions of vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis,but clinical polio compatible. Conclusion There was relationship between acute flaccid paralysis and the vaccinations of oral poliomyelitis attenuated live vaccine.%目的:调查某急性弛缓性麻痹病例是否因为口服脊髓灰质炎减毒活疫苗所引发。方法对患者开展个案调查,收集患者的病历资料,汇总分析后提出诊断意见。结果该患者有口服脊髓灰质炎减毒活疫苗的记录。在接种口服脊髓灰质炎减毒活疫苗后约16d开始发病,主要症状有发热、四肢无力等,先后在市级医院和省级医院住院治疗,主要诊断为急性弛缓性麻痹、脊髓灰质炎等;所采集的该患者大便标本判定为不合格标本,未检出脊髓灰质炎病毒、其他肠道病毒;市级预防接种异常反应调查诊断专家组意见为不符合确诊脊髓灰质炎疫苗相关患者的诊断条件,但临床表现符合脊髓灰质炎。结论该病例接种口服脊髓灰质炎减毒活疫苗与发生急性弛缓性麻痹有关。

  4. Immunologically Silent Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection in France

    Mansuy, Jean Michel; Peron, Jean Marie; Bureau, Christophe; Alric, Laurent; Vinel, Jean Pierre; Izopet, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis E is an acute and self-limiting hepatitis, and the causative agent, hepatitis E virus, is excreted in feces and orally transmitted. The disease is common in Asia and Africa, causing outbreaks or sporadic cases. In Europe, the infection is generally observed after a history of travel in an area of endemicity. We report on an autochthonous case in southwestern France in which the diagnosis was based on molecular tools rather than serological testing.

  5. 深圳市2001-2011年残留麻痹的急性弛缓性麻痹病例情况分析%Analysis on the situation of residual paralysis of acute flaccid paralysis cases from 2001 to 2011 in Shenzhen City

    卢紫燕; 杨卫红; 单芙香

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解深圳市2001-2011年残留麻痹的继续弛缓性麻痹(acute flaccid paralysis,AFP)病例流行病特征,提高AFP监测质量.方法 对深圳市2001-2011年残留麻痹AFP病例个案资料和病原学检测结果进行描述性流行病学分析.结果 深圳市2001-2011年共报告残留麻痹AFP病例60例,主要发生在小年龄组儿童,<3岁的儿童40例,占66.67%;发病高峰为4~8月,男女比例为1.61∶1;麻痹部位以双下肢麻痹较多,其次为四肢肢体麻痹;残留麻痹的AFP病例以疫苗相关病例(VAPP)和格林巴利综合征(GBS)为主,其次为横贯性脊髓炎、创伤性神经炎等.结论 VAPP的发生是接种脊髓灰质炎减毒活疫苗(OPV)难以克服的弱点,为减少VAPP病例及防止脊灰疫苗衍生病毒(VDPV)的发生,应在消灭脊灰后期科学、合理地调整消灭脊灰的免疫策略.%Objective To understand the epidemiological characteristics of the residual paralysis of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases and to raise quality of the AFP surveillance.Methods The data of AFP cases and the results of pathogenic detection were analyzed by description epidemiological method.Results A total of 60 residual paralysis of AFP cases were reported in Shenzhen from 2001 to 2011,which occurred mainly in children at low age.There were 40 cases of children less than 3 years old,accounting for 66.67%.The peak incidence of the residual paralysis cases concentrated from April to August and the ratio of male to female was 1.61:1.The residual paralysis was mainly on both lower limbs,secondly was on unilateral lower limbs.The cases of residual paralysis of AFP were mainly VAPP cased and Guillain-Barre Snydrome and followed by transverse myelitis,traumatic neuritis and so on.Conclusions The occurrence of VAPP was the serious weakness of OPV.In order to reduce the VAPP cases and prevent the occurrence of VDPV,we should scientifically and reasonably adjust the immunization policy in the later stage

  6. Three cases of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to painless thyroiditis

    Debmalya Sanyal; Moutusi Raychaudhuri; Shakya Bhattacharjee

    2013-01-01

    We present three cases of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) due to painless thyroiditis presenting as acute quadriparesis. All responded to potassium supplementation and propranolol. TPP may be due to thyrotoxicosis of any etiology, commonly Grave's disease. The absence of clinical signs of thyrotoxicosis can delay diagnosis and treatment. Thyroid function tests should be a routine evaluation in all cases of hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

  7. [Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis following adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection].

    de Suremain, A; Somrani, R; Bourdat-Michel, G; Pinel, N; Morel-Baccard, C; Payen, V

    2015-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is responsible for nearly 10% of acute renal failure (ARF) cases in children. It is mostly drug-induced, but in a few cases viruses are involved, probably by an indirect mechanism. An immune-competent 13-month-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe ARF with anuria in a context of fever, cough, and rhinorrhea lasting 1 week. The kidney biopsy performed early brought out tubulointerstitial damage with mild infiltrate of lymphocytes, without any signs of necrosis. There were no virus inclusion bodies, no interstitial hemorrhage, and no glomerular or vascular damage. Other causes of TIN were excluded: there was no biological argument for an immunological, immune, or drug-induced cause. Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were positive in respiratory multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in nasal aspirate but not in blood, urine, and renal tissue. The patient underwent dialysis for 10 days but the response to corticosteroid therapy was quickly observed within 48 h. The mechanism of TIN associated with virus infection is unknown. However, it may be immune-mediated to be able to link severe renal dysfunction and ADV and/or RSV invasion of the respiratory tract. PMID:25842199

  8. Isolated sleep paralysis

    Sawant, Neena S.; Shubhangi R Parkar; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months.

  9. Acute Cholestatic Hepatitis A Virus Infection Presenting with Hemolytic Anemia and Renal Failure: A Case Report

    Lapp, Robert T.; Fedja Rochling

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus is the most common acute viral hepatitis worldwide with approximately 1.5 million cases annually. Hepatitis A virus infection in general is self-limited. In rare cases, hepatitis A virus infection may cause renal failure, hemolytic anemia, and/or cholestasis. We report the first case of acute cholestatic hepatitis A virus infection complicated by hemolytic anemia, and renal failure in one patient. A 42-year-old Caucasian male presented with cholestasis, hemolytic anemia and ...

  10. DEFORMED WING VIRUS IN Apis mellifera L.: PREVALENCE, MORPHOLOGY, AND PATHOGENICITY (review)

    V.E. VOLYKHINA

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections are not considered the most dangerous honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) diseases though being rather harmful. Virus-caused honeybee pathologies are mainly symptomless (N.J. Dimmock et al., 1987; A.C.F. Hung et al., 1996), nevertheless, a rapid replication of the viruses can be triggered leading to clinical manifestation and even death of the insects (R. Singh et al., 2010). In honeybee families a simultaneous circulation of several viruses can occur. Acute bee paralysis virus (ABP...

  11. Evaluation of a real-time two-step RT-PCR assay for quantitation of Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) genome in experimentally-infected bee tissues and in life stages of a symptomatic colony.

    Blanchard, Philippe; Ribière, Magali; Celle, Olivier; Lallemand, Perrine; Schurr, Frank; Olivier, Violaine; Iscache, Anne Laure; Faucon, Jean Paul

    2007-01-01

    A two-step real-time RT-PCR assay, based on TaqMan technology using a fluorescent probe (FAM-TAMRA) was developed to quantify Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) genome in bee samples. Standard curves obtained from a CBPV control RNA and from a plasmid containing a partial sequence of CBPV showed that this assay provided linear detection over a 7-log range (R(2)>0.99) with a limit of detection of 100 copies, and reliable inter-assay and intra-assay reproducibility. Standardisation including RN...

  12. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis: a short clinical review

    Rashmi Aggarwal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis (TPP is a potentially lethal manifestation of hyperthyroidism which is characterized by hypokalemia and muscular weakness. It mainly affects Asian men in the age group of 20 to 40 years. Immediate supplementation with oral or intravenous potassium will help to not only abort the acute attack of paralysis but will also prevent serious and life threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Non selective beta blockers like propranolol can also be used to ameliorate and prevent subsequent paralytic attack. Acetazolamide has no role in the treatment of TPP. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 539-542

  13. Laboratory diagnostics acute respiratory virus infections under evolutionary variability influenza viruses

    V. F. Suhovetskaya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available As a result of laboratory investigation 1651 patients at the age from 0 months till 18 years, hospitalized with ARI from 2008 to 2011, in ¾ cases the virus etiology of disease was found. At the same time in 2009-2011 was marked significant prevalence of pandemic influenza virus infection A(Н1N1v in a kind mono- and mikst-infections (in 18,8 and 10,2 % of cases accordingly, and adenoviruses, espiratory sincitial viruses and parainfluenza were the most frequent concomitants (in 4,8, 3,2 and 2,4 % of cases. In a clinical picture of disease acute nasopharynx lesion (67,8 % was predominated, complicating by croup in 12,2 % of cases, by acute bronchitis in 12,1 % of cases, and more rare by pneumonia (in 8,2 % of cases. The analysis of results of immunofluorescence test in comparison with the cumulative data of other laboratory methods (polymerase chain reaction, immuneenzyme analysis, virus isolation, serological examination has shown possibility of discovery with its help the valuable information on etiology ARI, including influenza, at early stages of disease and in short terms.

  14. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis triggered by β2-adrenergic bronchodilators.

    Yeh, Fu-Chiang; Chiang, Wen-Fang; Wang, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is the most common form of periodic paralysis and is characterized by attacks of muscle paralysis associated with a low serum potassium (K+) level due to an acute intracellular shifting. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP), characterized by the triad of muscle paralysis, acute hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism, is one cause of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. The triggering of an attack of undiagnosed TPP by β2-adrenergic bronchodilators has, to our knowledge, not been reported previously. We describe two young men who presented to the emergency department with the sudden onset of muscle paralysis after administration of inhaled β2-adrenergic bronchodilators for asthma. In both cases, the physical examination revealed an enlarged thyroid gland and symmetrical flaccid paralysis with areflexia of lower extremities. Hypokalemia with low urine K+ excretion and normal blood acid-base status was found on laboratory testing, suggestive of an intracellular shift of K+, and the patients' muscle strength recovered at serum K+ concentrations of 3.0 and 3.3 mmol/L. One patient developed hyperkalemia after a total potassium chloride supplementation of 110 mmol. Thyroid function testing was diagnostic of primary hyperthyroidism due to Graves disease in both cases. These cases illustrate that β2-adrenergic bronchodilators should be considered a potential precipitant of TPP. PMID:24852589

  15. Isolated sleep paralysis

    ... from sleep. It is not associated with another sleep disorder. ... Sleep paralysis can be a symptom of narcolepsy . But if you do not have other symptoms of narcolepsy, there is usually no need to have sleep studies done.

  16. Tracking virus-specific CD4+ T cells during and after acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    Michaela Lucas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists.

  17. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    Abbas, Haider; Kothari, Nikhil; Bogra, Jaishri

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare genetic disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of skeletal muscle weakness with associated hypokalemia which is precipitated by stress, cold, carbohydrate load, infection, glucose infusion, hypothermia, metabolic alkalosis, anesthesia, and steroids. We encountered one such incidence of prolonged recovery after general anesthesia, which on further evaluation revealed a case of hypokalemic paralysis. The key to successful management of such a patien...

  18. Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis: An Underdiagnosed and Under-recognized Condition.

    Tella, Sri Harsha; Kommalapati, Anuhya

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a condition characterized by the triad of acute hypokalemia without total body potassium deficit, episodic muscle paralysis, and thyrotoxicosis. We describe two cases of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis who presented to our hospital with potassium values of 1.3 MeQ/l and 1.2 MeQ/l, respectively. Surprisingly, the two patients had no documented past medical history. Based on the clinical features of high heart rate, palpitations (seen in both the patients), and exophthalmos (seen in one patient), thyrotoxic periodic paralysis was suspected. A thorough laboratory workup confirmed the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. Beta blockers were initiated promptly, along with intravenous potassium chloride, and the patients eventually improved symptomatically. These patients were eventually diagnosed with Graves' disease and were placed on methimazole, which prevented further attacks. Thyroid periodic paralysis (TPP) is a rare clinical manifestation of hyperthyroidism. Patients present with sudden onset paralysis associated with severe hypokalemia. The presence of paralysis and hypokalemia in a patient who has a history of hyperthyroidism should prompt the physician about thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. A high index of suspicion, prompt diagnosis, and management of the condition can prevent severe complications, such as cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26623197

  19. Fatal Dysrhythmia Following Potassium Replacement for Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    Ahmed, Imdad; Chilimuri, Sridhar S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of fatal rebound hyperkalemia in a patient with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) treated with potassium supplementation. Although TPP is a rare hyperthyroidism-related endocrine disorder seen predominantly in men of Asian origin, the diagnosis should be considered in patients of non-Asian origins presenting with hypokalemia, muscle weakness or acute paralysis. The condition may present as a life threatening emergency and unfamiliarity with the disease could result in a fa...

  20. Three cases of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to painless thyroiditis

    Debmalya Sanyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present three cases of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP due to painless thyroiditis presenting as acute quadriparesis. All responded to potassium supplementation and propranolol. TPP may be due to thyrotoxicosis of any etiology, commonly Grave′s disease. The absence of clinical signs of thyrotoxicosis can delay diagnosis and treatment. Thyroid function tests should be a routine evaluation in all cases of hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

  1. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is reported in a Hispanic man with an unusual recurrence six weeks after radioactive iodine treatment. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis has now been well characterized in the literature: it occurs primarily in Orientals with an overwhelming male preponderance and a higher association of specific HLA antigens. Clinical manifestations include onset after high carbohydrate ingestion or heavy exertion, with progressive symmetric weakness leading to flaccid paralysis of the extremities and other muscle groups, lasting several hours. If hypokalemia is present, potassium administration may help abort the attack. Although propranolol can be efficacious in preventing further episodes, the only definitive treatment is establishing a euthyroid state. The pathophysiology is still controversial, but reflects altered potassium and calcium dynamics as well as certain morphologic characteristics within the muscle unit itself

  2. Identification and Functional Characterization of Kir2.6 Mutations Associated with Non-familial Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis*

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Lin, Shih-Hua; Lo, Yi-Fen; Yang, Sung-Sen; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Cannon, Stephen C.; Huang, Chou-Long

    2011-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) is characterized by episodic flaccid paralysis of muscle and acute hypokalemia during attacks. Familial forms of hypoKPP are predominantly caused by mutations of either voltage-gated Ca2+ or Na+ channels. The pathogenic gene mutation in non-familial hypoKPP, consisting mainly of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) and sporadic periodic paralysis (SPP), is largely unknown. Recently, mutations in KCNJ18, which encodes a skeletal muscle-specific inwardly ...

  3. Acute transverse myelitis caused by Coxsackie virus B4 infection: a case report.

    Ku, B; Lee, K.

    1998-01-01

    Acute transverse myelitis is a rare clinical manifestation of Coxsackie virus infection which cause acute and progressive debilitating illness associated with loss of spinal cord function in the affected patients. A 62 year-old female developed symptoms of rapidly progressive paraplegia with sensory loss. On spinal MRI, T2 sagittal image showed increased signal intensity with cord swelling at T11-L2 level and 8 folds or greater rise of Coxsackie virus B4 neutralizing antibody titers was obser...

  4. Detection of West Nile virus genome and specific antibodies in Iranian encephalitis patients

    Chinikar, S; Javadi, A; Ataei, B;

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus which circulates in birds, horses and humans. An estimated 80% of WNV infections are asymptomatic. Fewer than 1% of infected persons develop neuroinvasive disease, which typically presents as encephalitis, meningitis, or acute flaccid paralysis...

  5. Provocative poliomyelitis causing postpolio residual paralysis among select communities of two remote villages of North Karnataka in India: A community survey

    Amitesh Narayan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramuscular injections can provoke muscular paralysis especially, if the child has had exposure to polio virus. The purpose of the study was to determine the association with known risk factors for motor disabilities in two remote villages of North Karnataka (India, where an increased number of disabled people among select communities had been reported. A community based survey was conducted. The selection of study subjects was done through screening, history related with occurrence of musculoskeletal disability, screening and general examination of the affected joints and muscles. Data analysis was done by estimation of percentages. Among the physical disabilities identified, the most common was post-polio residual paralysis. 35.65% (n = 41 subjects had developed paralysis following the administration of an intramuscular injection when they had acute viremia in childhood, indicating that (probably muscle paralysis would have been provoked by intramuscular injections, resulting in provocative poliomyelitis. Unnecessary injection must be avoided in children during acute viremia state and use of oral polio vaccine should be encouraged.

  6. Prevalence of hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis D virus and hepatitis E virus as causes of acute viral hepatitis in North India: A hospital based study

    Jain, P; Prakash, S.; Gupta, S; Singh, K.P.; Shrivastava, S; Singh, D. D.; Singh, J; Jain, A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Acute viral hepatitis (AVH) is a major public health problem and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Aim: The aim of the present study is to determine the prevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) as causes of AVH in a tertiary care hospital of North India. Settings and Design: Blood samples and clinical information was collected from cases of AVH referred to the Grade I v...

  7. Acute hepatitis associated with autochthonous hepatitis E virus infection--San Antonio, Texas, 2009.

    Tohme, Rania A; Drobeniuc, Jan; Sanchez, Roger; Heseltine, Gary; Alsip, Bryan; Kamili, Saleem; Hu, Dale J; Guerra, Fernando; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2011-10-01

    Locally acquired hepatitis E infection is increasingly being observed in industrialized countries. We report 2 cases of autochthonous acute hepatitis E in the United States. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3a related to US-2 and swine hepatitis E virus strains was isolated from one of the patients, indicating potential food-borne or zoonotic transmission. PMID:21896699

  8. Chicken pox infection (varicella zoster virus) and acute monoarthritis: evidence against a direct viral mechanism.

    Fink, C G; Read, S J; Giddins, G.; Eglin, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A 9 year old boy developed acute monoarthritis of the left knee concurrent with the appearance of a varicella zoster virus (VZV) rash. Repeated VZV DNA hybridisation of the cells within the synovial fluid and synovial membrane failed to show any evidence of intracellular virus. Virus was isolated from synovial fluid 24 hours after the start of clinical infection but not later. These findings suggest that the mechanism of the arthritis is not due to viral replication inside the swollen joint.

  9. Etiology of Hypokalemic Paralysis in Korea: Data from a Single Center

    Wi, Jung-Kook; Lee, Hong Joo; Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Joo Hee; Chin, Sang Ouk; Rhee, Sang Youl; Moon, Ju-Young; Lee,Sang-Ho; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Lee, Tae-Won

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the underlying causes of hypokalemic paralysis seems to be essential for the appropriate management of affected patients and their prevention of recurrent attacks. There is, however, a paucity of documented reports on the etiology of hypokalemic paralysis in Korea. We retrospectively analyzed 34 patients with acute flaccid weakness due to hypokalaemia who were admitted during the 5-year study period in order to determine the spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis in Korea and to identi...

  10. Etiological spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis: A retrospective analysis of 29 patients

    Ravindra Kumar Garg; Hardeep Singh Malhotra; Rajesh Verma; Pawan Sharma; Maneesh Kumar Singh*,

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by episodes of acute muscle weakness associated with hypokalemia. In this study, we evaluated the possible etiological factors in patients of hypokalemic paralysis. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the records of 29 patients who were admitted with a diagnosis of hypokalemic paralysis. Modified Guillain-Barre΄ Syndrome disability scale was used to grade the disability. Results: In this study, 15 (51.7%) patients had secondary causes of hypok...

  11. Hypokalaemic Periodic Paralysis in a Patient with Subclinical Hyperthyroidism: A Rare Case

    Hegde, Swati; Shaikh, Mohammed Aslam; Gummadi, Thejaswi

    2016-01-01

    Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis (TPP) is an uncommon disorder. Though many cases of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis are reported in overt hyperthyroidism, hypokalaemic paralysis in subclinical hyperthyroidism is very rare. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is characterised by circulating TSH levels below reference range and normal thyroid hormone levels. We describe a case of 32-year-old Asian male who presented to the emergency department with acute onset weakness and hypokalaemia with no previous h...

  12. Chikungunya virus infection amongst the acute encephalitis syndrome cases in West Bengal, India

    D Taraphdar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection from the acute encephalitis syndrome cases is an uncommon form and has been observed in the year 2010-11 from West Bengal, India. The case-1 and case-2 had the acute encephalitis syndrome; case-3 was of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis whereas the case-4 had the symptoms of meningo-encephalopathy with bulbar involvement. We are reporting four cases with neurological complications involving central nervous system (CNS due to CHIKV infection from this state for the first time. The virus has spread almost every districts of this state rapidly. At this stage, these cases are public health threat.

  13. [Hypokalemic paralysis during pregnancy: a report of two cases].

    Hernández Pacheco, José Antonio; Estrada Altamirano, Ariel; Pérez Borbón, Guadalupe María; Torres Torres, Cutberto

    2009-12-01

    The hypokalemic paralysis is a disease characterized by the development of acute muscular weakness, associated to low levels of blood potassium (cuadriplegia associated to blood potassium level of 1.4 meq/L, diagnosed with distal tubular acidosis; she required mechanical ventilation for respiratory paralysis. The medical profile remits with potassium intravenous replacement and the pregnancy ends with a spontaneous abortion. The second case is a 15 years old woman with 26.5 weeks of pregnancy, who suffers a generalized paralysis with blood potassium of 2.7 meq/L, requiring also mechanical ventilation for respiratory paralysis; the final diagnosis was Barterr syndrome, and the medical profile remited after potassium supplement. Her pregnancy got complicated with a severe preeclampsia, enough reason for interrumpting the pregnancy at 29.1 weeks of gestation. In both cases Guilliain-Barre syndrome was ruled out. PMID:20077884

  14. Clinical and neurophysiological features of tick paralysis.

    Grattan-Smith, P J; Morris, J G; Johnston, H M; Yiannikas, C; Malik, R; Russell, R; Ouvrier, R A

    1997-11-01

    The clinical and neurophysiological findings in six Australian children with generalized tick paralysis are described. Paralysis is usually caused by the mature female of the species Ixodes holocyclus. It most frequently occurs in the spring and summer months but can be seen at any time of year. Children aged 1-5 years are most commonly affected. The tick is usually found in the scalp, often behind the ear. The typical presentation is a prodrome followed by the development of an unsteady gait, and then ascending, symmetrical, flaccid paralysis. Early cranial nerve involvement is a feature, particularly the presence of both internal and external ophthalmoplegia. In contrast to the experience with North American ticks, worsening of paralysis in the 24-48 h following tick removal is common and the child must be carefully observed over this period. Death from respiratory failure was relatively common in the first half of the century and tick paralysis remains a potentially fatal condition. Respiratory support may be required for > 1 week but full recovery occurs. This is slow with several weeks passing before the child can walk unaided. Anti-toxin has a role in the treatment of seriously ill children but there is a high incidence of acute allergy and serum sickness. Neurophysiological studies reveal low-amplitude compound muscle action potentials with normal motor conduction velocities, normal sensory studies and normal response to repetitive stimulation. The biochemical structure of the toxin of I. holocyclus has not been fully characterized but there are many clinical, neurophysiological and experimental similarities to botulinum toxin. PMID:9397015

  15. Nuevos virus asociados con gastroenteritis New viruses associated with acute diarrheal disease

    Carlos Aguirre

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se hace un resumen de las características comunes y específicas de los diversos virus asociados con enfermedad diarreica aguda, con énfasis en la importancia que tienen en la génesis de este síndrome y en el hecho de que la mayoría de los casos, aunque sean severos, pueden ser manejados adecuadamente mediante el reemplazo de líquidos y electrolitos.

    A synopsis of the common and specific features of the various viruses associated with acute diarrheal disease is presented; emphasis Is made on their importance as etiologic agents of this syndrome and on the fact that most cases, even If they are severe, can be appropriately treated by fluid and electrolyte replacement.

  16. Three atypical lethal cases associated with acute Zika virus infection in Suriname

    Rens Zonneveld

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Zika virus infection usually presents with a self-limiting triad of fever, rash and arthritis. There is limited information on severe or lethal cases. We report three cases of lethal acute Zika infection, confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, in adult patients with some co-morbidities. The patients showed rapid clinical deterioration with hemorrhagic and septic shock, and exaggerated acute and innate inflammatory responses with pronounced coagulopathy, and died soon after admission to the hospital. It remains unclear whether the fatal outcomes were due to acute Zika virus infection alone or to the combination with exacerbated underlying prior disease or co-infection. Nonetheless, the severity of these cases implies that increased awareness for atypical presentations of Zika virus infection, and careful clinical assessment of patients with symptoms of Zika, is warranted during current and future outbreaks.

  17. Sudden flaccid paralysis.

    Tariq, Mohammad; Peshin, Rohit; Ellis, Oliver; Grover, Karan

    2015-01-01

    Periodic thyrotoxic paralysis is a genetic condition, rare in the West and in Caucasians. Thyrotoxicosis, especially in western hospitals, is an easily overlooked cause of sudden-onset paralysis. We present a case of a 40-year-old man who awoke one morning unable to stand. He had bilateral lower limb flaccid weakness of 0/5 with reduced reflexes and equivocal plantars; upper limbs were 3/5 with reduced tone and reflexes. ECG sinus rhythm was at a rate of 88/min. PR interval was decreased and QT interval increased. Bloods showed potassium of 1.8 mEq/L (normal range 3.5-5), free T4 of 29.2 pmol/L (normal range 6.5-17) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of mEq/L (normal range 12.5-62.5). The patient was admitted initially to intensive therapy unit and given intravenous potassium. His symptoms resolved within 24 h. He was diagnosed with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. He was discharged on carbimazole and propanolol, and follow-up was arranged in the endocrinology clinic. PMID:25566931

  18. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in an African male: a case report.

    Belayneh, Dereje K; Kellerth, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis and is rarely reported in non-Asian populations. A 26-year-old Ethiopian male who presented with recurrent flaccid tetraparesis, hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism is reported here. Thyroid function should be routinely checked in patients with acute or recurrent hypokalemic paralysis. PMID:25767707

  19. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in an African male: a case report

    Belayneh, Dereje K; Kellerth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis and is rarely reported in non-Asian populations. A 26-year-old Ethiopian male who presented with recurrent flaccid tetraparesis, hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism is reported here. Thyroid function should be routinely checked in patients with acute or recurrent hypokalemic paralysis.

  20. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion presenting with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a case report

    Sloan Derek J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is associated with a range of neurological conditions. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare presentation; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is the commonest form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has occasionally been reported in acute Immunodeficiency Virus infection but little data exists on frequency, management and outcome. Case presentation We describe an episode of Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a 30-year-old man testing positive for Immunodeficiency Virus, probably during acute seroconversion. Clinical suspicion was confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis and nerve conduction studies. Rapid clinical deterioration prompted intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and early commencement of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. All symptoms resolved within nine weeks. Conclusion Unusual neurological presentations in previously fit patients are an appropriate indication for Immunodeficiency-Virus testing. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy with adequate penetration of the central nervous system should be considered as an early intervention, alongside conventional therapies such as intravenous immunoglobulin.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    ... paralysis Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Muscular Dystrophy Association Resource list from the University of Kansas Medical Center GeneReviews (1 link) Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis Genetic Testing Registry (3 links) Hypokalemic periodic paralysis Hypokalemic ...

  3. Neuropathogenicity of Two Saffold Virus Type 3 Isolates in Mouse Models

    Kotani, Osamu; Naeem, Asif; Suzuki, Tadaki; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Sato, Yuko; Nakajima, Noriko; Hosomi, Takushi; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Hasegawa, Hideki; Taguchi, Fumihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Saffold virus (SAFV), a picornavirus, is occasionally detected in children with acute flaccid paralysis, meningitis, and cerebellitis; however, the neuropathogenicity of SAFV remains undetermined. Methods The virulence of two clinical isolates of SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3) obtained from a patient with aseptic meningitis (AM strain) and acute upper respiratory inflammation (UR strain) was analyzed in neonatal and young mice utilizing virological, pathological, and immunological methods. Re...

  4. Mumps, Cervical Zoster, and Facial Paralysis: Coincidence or Association?

    Kenji Kondo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of mumps with peripheral facial paralysis has been suggested, but its pathogenesis remains unclear. An 8-year-old girl simultaneously developed left peripheral facial paralysis, ipsilateral cervical herpes zoster, and bilateral mumps sialadenitis. Elevated anti-mumps and anti-varicella zoster virus IgM antibodies in serological testing indicated recent infection of mumps and reactivation of VZV. Molecular studies have provided mounting evidence that the mumps virus dysregulates the host’s immune system and enables the virus to proliferate in the infected host cells. This dysregulation of the immune system by mumps virus may have occurred in our patient, enabling the latent VZV infection to reactivate.

  5. Hepatitis B virus replication in acute glomerulonephritis with chronic active hepatitis.

    Cadrobbi, P; Bortolotti, F; Zacchello, G.; Rinaldi, R; Armigliato, M; Realdi, G

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year old boy who had chronic active hepatitis type B with features of ongoing liver damage and active virus replication, developed acute membranous glomerulonephritis two years after the clinical onset of liver disease, when both hepatitis B e antigen and antibody were detectable in serum. After withdrawal of short term steroid treatment and resolution of hepatitis B virus replication, both glomerulonephritis and chronic hepatitis went into remission. Some months later hepatitis B surface...

  6. [Acute severe coxsackie virus B myocarditis of pseudonecrotic form. Apropos of 2 cases].

    Beard, T; Boudjemaa, B; Carrié, D; Chakra, G; Ferrières, J; Delay, M; Bernadet, P

    1993-05-01

    This study reports two cases of acute severe Coxsackie virus B4 myocarditis in which the immediate clinical signs suggested the acute phase of myocardial infarction, apparently antero-lateral in the first case in a context of cardiogenic shock and infero-lateral in the second case, in the context of acute pulmonary edema. Both cases were characterized by the severity of the initial signs. Numerous other cases of acute Coxsackie virus B myocarditis, simulating myocardial infarction, have been reported in the literature and these contexts deserve to be recognized earlier as they call for specific treatment. The immediate outcome was favorable in both cases but required massive cardiological intensive care in the first patient. Long term follow-up was excellent. PMID:8396381

  7. Borna disease virus induces acute fatal neurological disorders in neonatal gerbils without virus- and immune-mediated cell destructions

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a noncytolytic, neurotropic RNA virus that is known to cause neurological disturbances in various animal species. Our previous experiment demonstrated that neonate gerbils develop an acute fatal neurological disease following infection with BDV , Virology 282, 65-76). The study suggested that BDV directly causes functional damage of neuronal cells resulting in the lethal disorder in neonatal gerbils. To extend this finding, we examined whether BDV can induce neurological diseases in the absence of virus- and immune-mediated cell destruction, by using cyclosporine A (CsA)-treated neonatal gerbils. Although CsA completely suppressed specific antibody production and brain inflammation in the infected gerbil brains, the fatal neurological disorder was not inhibited by the treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CsA treatment significantly decreased brain levels of cytokines, except interleukin (IL)-1β, in the infected gerbils. These results suggested that BDV replication, as well as brain cytokines, at least IL-1β, rapidly induces fatal disturbances in gerbil brain. We demonstrate here that BDV exhibits a unique neuropathogenesis in neonatal gerbil that may be pathologically and immunologically different from those in two other established rodent models, rats and mice. With this novel rodent model of virus infection it should be possible not only to examine acute neurological disturbances without severe neuroanatomical and immunopathological alterations but also to analyze molecular and cellular damage by virus replication in the central nervous system

  8. Clinical study of 15 children with hand foot and month disease and acute flaccid paralysis%手足口病合并急性弛缓性瘫痪15例临床分析

    王玉光; 陈志海; 张璐; 卢联合; 冯亮; 王凌航; 徐艳利; 任娜; 庞琳; 李兴旺

    2009-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical characteristics and prognosis of 15 children with hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) who were admitted to Beijing Ditan Hospital during the outbreak of HFMD in 2008. Method The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF),magnetic resonance imaging and prognosis of 15 children with HFMD and AFP were retrospectively reviewed. The recovery of the patients' affected extremities were monitored for 4 weeks. Results The mean age of these patients was (22.47 ± 20.68) months (range: 5~72 months). Acute paralysis developed (3.47 ± 1.68) days after the onset of fever and progressed to maximum severity within (1~2) days. Poliomyelitis-like syndrome was observed in all cases. Of the 15 cases, 10 had monoplegia of lower limbs, two had paraplegia, one had monoplegia of upper limbs and two had quadriplegia. In these cases, the muscle power varied from level 0 to level 4, and six even showed no muscle power in their affected extremities. Thirteen cases developed neurologic complications (encephalitis, meningitis or ataxia) and three had transient urinary retention. Cerebrospinal MRI examination in eight cases showed hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images, predominantly in the impaired anterior horn regions of the spinal cord (C2~C7 for cases with upper extremity impairments and T12~L1 for cases with lower extremity impairments), and displayed long T1 signals and long T2 signals. In addition, the midbrain, brain-stem or medulla was also involved in four cases who also contracted encephalitis or meningitis. The muscle strength in 11 patients with single lower extremity impairment showed improvements in the distal limb muscles within 4~8 days, and the other cases showed recovery 2~3 weeks later. Conclusions HFMD in combination with AFP most commonly occurs in children aged less than 2 years old. Acute paralysis develops during the early stage of infection and progresses to a

  9. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis as the presenting symptom of silent thyroiditis

    Debmalya Sanyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silent thyroiditis is a rare cause of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. The objective was to present a case of silent thyroiditis presenting as periodic paralysis. A 23-year-old man presented with recurrent acute flaccid predominantly proximal weakness of all four limbs. He had a similar episode 3 weeks back. On examination he was found to have hypokalemia secondary to thyrotoxicosis. Clinically there were no features of thyrotoxicosis or thyroiditis. He was initially treated with intravenous and later oral potassium supplementation and propranolol. At 8 weeks of follow-up his thyroid profile became normal and his propranolol was stopped. He had no further recurrence of paralysis. He was diagnosed as a case silent thyroiditis presenting as thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. In cases of recurrent or acute flaccid muscle paralysis, it is important to suspect thyrotoxicosis, even if asymptomatic. Definitive treatment of thyrotoxicosis prevents recurrence.

  10. Chikungunya Virus Infection and Acute Elevation of Serum Prostate-Specific Antigen

    William Derval Aiken; Anzinger, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    A man with prostate cancer on a regime of active surveillance had a laboratory-confirmed acute Chikungunya virus infection. The patient experienced a sudden increase in serum Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) during the acute illness that caused him anxiety and confounded interpretation of the PSA test. Six weeks after the onset of Chikungunya Fever symptoms, the elevated serum PSA returned to baseline. The association of Chikungunya Fever and elevated serum PSA may result in misinterpretation ...

  11. Radiculoplexopathy with conduction block caused by acute Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Vucic, Steve; Palmer, William; Cros, Didier

    2005-02-01

    The authors report a case of cervicobrachial radiculoplexopathy with proximal conduction block (CB), associated with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The patient presented with pain, paresthesias, and monomelic weakness in the left C7-8, and T1 myotomes. The illness was monophasic with rapid recovery. Neurophysiologic studies demonstrated CB in the proximal left median and ulnar nerve segments. The authors conclude that this syndrome resulted from a postinfectious process following acute EBV infection. PMID:15699388

  12. Virus Status, Varroa Levels, and Survival of 20 Managed Honey Bee Colonies Monitored in Luxembourg Between the Summer of 2011 and the Spring of 2013

    Clermont Antoine

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty managed honey bee colonies, split between 5 apiaries with 4 hives each, were monitored between the summer of 2011 and spring of 2013. Living bees were sampled in July 2011, July 2012, and August 2012. Twenty-five, medium-aged bees, free of varroa mites, were pooled per colony and date, to form one sample. Unlike in France and Belgium, Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV has not been found in Luxembourg. Slow Bee Paralysis Virus (SBPV and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV levels were below detection limits. Traces of Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV were amplified. Black Queen Cell Virus (BQCV, Varroa destructor Virus-1 (VDV-1, and SacBrood Virus (SBV were detected in all samples and are reported from Luxembourg for the first time. Varroa destructor Macula- Like Virus (VdMLV, Deformed Wing Virus (DWV, and Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV were detected at all locations, and in most but not all samples. There was a significant increase in VDV-1 and DWV levels within the observation period. A principal component analysis was unable to separate the bees of colonies that survived the following winter from bees that died, based on their virus contents in summer. The number of dead varroa mites found below colonies was elevated in colonies that died in the following winter. Significant positive relationships were found between the log-transformed virus levels of the bees and the log-transformed number of mites found below the colonies per week, for VDV-1 and DWV. Sacbrood virus levels were independent of varroa levels, suggesting a neutral or competitive relationship between this virus and varroa.

  13. Some points of the X-ray pattern of acute viral primary pneumonia caused by acute respiratory disease viruses

    An analysis is made of the results of the X-ray studies as well as of the virological and serological tests in 225 out-patients consulted in the first days of their complaints. A predominance of the viral (70.2%) over the viral-bacterial primary pneumonia is established. The acute viral primary pneumonia are caused mostly by single influenza viruses and more rarely - by single respiratory viruses; in the cases of combined influenza viruses influenza-influenza viruses prevail over the influenza-respiratory ones. The morphological changes in pneumonia due to isolated single influenza viruses involve mostly the interstitium and are projected on X-ray as patchy and stripped densities. The inflamatory changes in pneumonia caused by combined influenza viruses affect both ihe interstitium and the broncho-alveolar substrate of the lungs; they are manifested in two roentgenologic forms: creeping (migrating) and fusing (confluent). In viral-bacterial pneumonia the changes affect mostly the lobe. The right lung and the lower parts of the both lungs are affected in most cases. 5 figs., 21 refs

  14. MARATHON DESPITE UNILATERAL VOCAL FOLD PARALYSIS

    Matthias Echternach

    2008-06-01

    vocal fold paralysis for the first time. Although a marathon race is an endurance exertion without maximum acute strain on the respiratory system (McArdle et al., 2001, the sport medical examinations also showed no restriction at maximum exertion, neither expiratory nor inspiratory. An unilateral vocal fold paralysis is apparently not such a serious obstacle to the respiratory tract that one would have to reckon with a clear-cut respiratory deficit. Exercise testing of larger samples of patients with vocal fold paralysis should be performed concerning their capacity to endure exertion.The question in the present case thus remains the causal connection between the paralysis and unspecific respiratory complaints. The laryngological examination speaks against an acute event. A possible cause of the vocal fold paralysis is the thoracotomy or the pleuritis in childhood; Due to the time lapse of over 40 years, this cannot be proven. The entire diagnostic spectrum excluded another organic cause for her respiratory complaints, so that we tend to assume a functional or psychosomatic nature. As the symptoms vanished spontaneously, no further proof of this can be offered

  15. Practical aspects in the management of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    Levitt Jacob O

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Management considerations in hypokalemic periodic paralysis include accurate diagnosis, potassium dosage for acute attacks, choice of diuretic for prophylaxis, identification of triggers, creating a safe physical environment, peri-operative measures, and issues in pregnancy. A positive genetic test in the context of symptoms is the gold standard for diagnosis. Potassium chloride is the favored potassium salt given at 0.5–1.0 mEq/kg for acute attacks. The oral route is favored, but if...

  16. Varicella-zoster virus reactivation during acute enterovirus infection is associated with CD8 lymphocytopenia

    Chia, John K; Chia, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    The trigger or triggers for reactivation of varicella-zoster virus have not been well defined in the medical literature. We investigated the role of enterovirus infections in triggering herpes zoster in five patients and correlated the reactivation with transient CD8 T lymphocyte depletion during the acute enterovirus infection.

  17. Risk factors and molecular characterization of acute sporadic symptomatic hepatitis E virus infection in Thailand

    Kittiyod Poovorawan; Salyavit Jitmitrapab; Sombat Treeprasertsuk; Thanunrat Thongmee; Apiradee Theamboonlers; Pisit Tangkijvanich; Piyawat Komolmit; Yong Poovorawan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To report clinical outcomes and viral genotypes of acute symptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection inThailand.Methods:Forty patients with acute symptomaticHEV infection were recruited during2009-2013.Clinical, demographic and laboratory data were collected.Diagnosis was accomplished by detection of anti-HEVIgM and/orHEVRNA in the serum or stool.HEV genotypes were classified by direct sequencing ofRT-PCRproducts and phylogenetic analysis. Results:The high risk group, comprising immune-compromised, liver cirrhosis and very elderly (>80 years) patients(17 cases), had higher levels of serum alkaline phosphatase at presentation compared with the low risk group.Two fatal cases resulted from acute hepatitisE in the high risk group.Initial clinical presentation did not show statistically significant differences.In six cases (6/40), the virus could be detected in serum or stool byRT-PCR and sequencing.Upon molecular characterization, the viruses were classified asHEV genotype3f and were in the same cluster as Thai swineHEV.Conclusions:Our data showed that acuteHEV infection has various clinical presentations and outcomes.Higher levels of serum alkaline phosphatase were observed in high risk patients.All isolated viruses were identified asHEV genotype3f possibly originating from swine.

  18. Acute hepatitis due to dengue virus in a chronic hepatitis patient

    L.J Souza

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of acute hepatitis caused by dengue virus, with a significant increase in aspartate transferase and alanine transferase levels in a chronic hepatitis patient attended at the Cane Sugar Planters Hospital of Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ.

  19. Knowledge of Acute Human Immnuodeficiency Virus Infection among Gay and Bisexual Male College Students

    Grin, Benjamin; Chan, Philip A.; Operario, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in at-risk college men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on knowledge about acute HIV infection (AHI). Participants and Methods: A one-time anonymous survey was administered to college students attending a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  20. Paralysis Analysis: Investigating Paralysis Visit Anomalies in New Jersey

    Hamby, Teresa; Tsai, Stella; Genese, Carol; Walsh, Andrew; Bradford, Lauren; Lifshitz, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the investigation of a statewide anomaly detected by a newly established state syndromic surveillance system and usage of that system. Introduction On July 11, 2012, New Jersey Department of Health (DOH) Communicable Disease Service (CDS) surveillance staff received email notification of a statewide anomaly in EpiCenter for Paralysis. Two additional anomalies followed within three hours. Since Paralysis Anomalies are uncommon, staff initiated an investigation to determin...

  1. MR features in patients with residual paralysis following aseptic meningitis

    Suh, Dae Chul; Park, Young Seo [College of Medicine, Asan Meidcal Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-01-15

    MR studies were performed in three patients with paralysis in the lower extremities. Poliomyelitis-like paralysis can be caused by neurovirulent strains of nonpolioenteroviruses. Entervirus 71 (EV 71) is documented as one of the potentially neurovirulent strains and a causative agent of some epidemics (1-7). The clinical manifestations associated with the EV 71 infection include aseptic meningitis, hand-food-mouth disease (HFMD), acute respiratory illness and gastrointestinal disease(6). Although rarely fatal, flaccidparalysis can be followed by EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis. Anterior horn cell necrosis was suggested on MR in two patients with residual paralysis (7). MR features, however, have not yet been described in detail. In this report we present three cases of patients with clinical evidence of EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis whose MR studies showed residual changes in spinal cord.

  2. MR features in patients with residual paralysis following aseptic meningitis

    MR studies were performed in three patients with paralysis in the lower extremities. Poliomyelitis-like paralysis can be caused by neurovirulent strains of nonpolioenteroviruses. Entervirus 71 (EV 71) is documented as one of the potentially neurovirulent strains and a causative agent of some epidemics (1-7). The clinical manifestations associated with the EV 71 infection include aseptic meningitis, hand-food-mouth disease (HFMD), acute respiratory illness and gastrointestinal disease(6). Although rarely fatal, flaccidparalysis can be followed by EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis. Anterior horn cell necrosis was suggested on MR in two patients with residual paralysis (7). MR features, however, have not yet been described in detail. In this report we present three cases of patients with clinical evidence of EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis whose MR studies showed residual changes in spinal cord

  3. 肠道病毒71型引起急性弛缓性瘫痪:二例报告并文献复习%Enterovirus 71- induced acute flaccid paralysis: two case reports with review of literatures

    晋兴楠; 邹映雪; 张艳芬; 吴波; 任立歆

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) complicated with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). Methods The clinical features, MRI, electroencephalogram (EEG), neurophysiological examination and prognosis of 2 cases of HFMD complicated with AFP were analyzed retrospectively. Functional recovery was followed up for 9 weeks. Related literatures were reviewed. Results Both of the two cases are infants. AFP occurred at the 7 th day, and advanced to severe degree at 1-2 d after onset. Paralysis affected one limb in one case and 3 limbs in another case. Muscle strength ranged from 0 to 3 degree. Cranial MRI indicated broadened extracerebral lacuna. Cervical MRI presented long T2 lesion in the spinal cord. EEG recorded symmetrical slow background waves. Neurophysiological examination showed minor or moderate spontaneous potential at the paralytic limb. The duration of motor unit potential was prolonged, but the amplitude declined. Motor nerve conduction velocity was normal. Terminal latent period was intact. The amplitude of muscle motor potential declined. Sensory nerve conduction velocity was normal. F wave disappeared. Both of the 2 patients began to recover 2-3 weeks later. Conclusion HFMD complicated with AFP usually affects infant. Paralysis usually occurs around 1 week during the course of HFMD and progresses rapidly to peak 1-2 days after onset. Unique or multi limbs can be affected and the paralysis can recover rapidly. MRI, EEG, and neurophysiological examination are valuable for diagnosis and predicting prognosis.%目的 探讨2例手足口病并发急性弛缓性瘫痪患儿的临床特征及预后.方法 对2例手足口病并发急性弛缓性瘫痪患儿的临床表现,以及MRI、脑电图、神经电生理学检查结果及预后进行回顾分析,并对其瘫痪肢体的功能恢复情况进行随访.结果 2例患儿均为婴儿,于病程第7天出现急性弛缓性瘫痪,发病1~2d即进展

  4. Thyrotoxic Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis: A Case Report

    Tuna, Mazhar Muslum; Aycicek Dogan, Bercem; Nasiroglu Imga, Narin; Karakilic, Ersen; Karadeniz, Mine; Tutuncu, Yasemin; Isik, Serhat; Berker, Dilek; Guler, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    AbstractHypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare disorder characterized by reversible attacks of muscle weakness accompanied by episodic hypokalemia. The most common causes of hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) are familial periodic paralysis, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) and sporadic periodic paralysis, respectively. There are generally some precipitating factors such as stress, vigorous exercise and high carbohydrate food consumption which all ease the occurrence of attacks. The du...

  5. A case of hypokalemic paralysis in a patient with neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Nguyen, Frederic N; Kar, Jitesh K; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after developing a dental abscess. He had a history of pituitary adenoma resection at the age of 13 with subsequent pan-hypopituitarism and was noncompliant with hormonal supplementation. On hospital day 3, he developed sudden onset of quadriplegia with motor strength of 0 of 5 in the upper extremities bilaterally and 1 of 5 in both lower extremities with absent deep tendon reflexes. His routine laboratory studies revealed severe hypokalemia of 1.6 mEq/dL. Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) revealed absent compound motor action potentials (CMAPs) with normal sensory potentials. Electromyography (EMG) did not reveal any abnormal insertional or spontaneous activity. He regained full strength within 36 hours following aggressive correction of the hypokalemia. Repeat NCS showed return of CMAPs in all nerves tested and EMG revealed normal motor units and normal recruitment without myotonic discharges. In patients with central DI with polyuria, hypokalemia can result in sudden paralysis. Hypokalemic paralysis remains an important differential in an acute case of paralysis and early recognition and appropriate management is key. PMID:24707338

  6. [Serological studies of the role of the respiratory syncytial virus in acute respiratory diseases in children].

    Vancea, D; Saşcă, C; Matinca, D; Ivanof, A

    1975-01-01

    The presence of the syncytial respiratory virus was determined by CF in 281 children admitted with acute respiratory diseases between 15 Sept. 1971 and 30 Dec. 1973, using the Long antigen prepared in the "St. Nicolau" Institute of Virology, Bucharest. In 38 children (13.5%) a serologic diagnosis of infection with the syncytial virus was established; in the other cases of respiratory infection of different etiology, antibodies to the syncytial virus were found in low but constant titers in both serum samples. The presence of these antibodies in a high proportion of the children points to the wide circulation of the syncytial virus in the infantile population, with all its clinico-epidemiologic implications. PMID:173009

  7. Potassium-Related Periodic Paralysis

    A Lesani; MH Moradi Nejad

    1995-01-01

    Potassium-related periodic paralysis may be associated with hypo, normo, or hyperkalemic disturbance of the Potassium level. Clinical features, laboratory findings and ECG as well as EMG changes are different in the 3 types of the disease. The treatment demands correction of the Potassium level of the blood serum. The disease is normally transferred as an autosomal dominant trait. In this article we present a 9-year old girl who suffered from hypokalemic paralysis since she was 4 years old.

  8. Successful rehabilitation in conversion paralysis.

    Delargy, M A; Peatfield, R C; Burt, A A

    1986-01-01

    A rehabilitation programme for patients with conversion paralysis has been introduced in which they are offered physical rehabilitation. During an eight month period between October 1984 and May 1985 six patients who had been diagnosed as dependent on wheelchairs owing to conversion paralysis for a mean of 3 years (range 1-6 years) were entered into the inpatient neurorehabilitation programme. All six patients were able to walk within a mean of 41 days (range 10-70 days), and then relinquishe...

  9. Causes of Paralysis

    ... progressive neurological disease. > Arteriovenous malformations Defects of the circulatory system that are believed to arise during fetal development. > ... skeletal muscles. > Neurofibromatosis Progressive disorder of the nervous ... Polio is caused by a virus that attacks the nerves which control motor function. > ...

  10. Viruses and bacteria in acute asthma exacerbations - A GA(2) LEN-DARE* systematic review

    Papadopoulos, N G; Christodoulou, I; Rohde, G;

    2011-01-01

    accurate and sensitive methodologies. This systematic review summarizes current knowledge and developments in infection epidemiology of acute asthma in children and adults, describing the known impact for each individual agent and highlighting knowledge gaps. Among infectious agents, human rhinoviruses are...... the most prevalent in regard to asthma exacerbations. The newly identified type-C rhinoviruses may prove to be particularly relevant. Respiratory syncytial virus and metapneumovirus are important in infants, while influenza viruses seem to induce severe exacerbations mostly in adults. Other agents are...

  11. Acute Mediastinitis as a Complication of Epstein-Barr Virus.

    Lloyd, Taryn; Tran, Vu Kiet

    2016-03-01

    Acute mediastinitis is a rare, potentially life-threatening condition that is most commonly seen as a complication of esophageal perforations or cardiac surgery. The term "descending necrotizing mediastinitis" (DNM) is used to describe oropharyngeal infections that spread to the mediastinum, most commonly following odontogenic infections, peritonsillar or retropharyngeal abscesses, cervical lymphadenitis, trauma, or endotracheal intubation. Infectious mononucleosis is another rare cause of DNM. The mortality of acute mediastinitis is high, while the mortality for DNM is even higher. Major determinants of mortality are delayed diagnosis and/or treatment. While DNM is seen infrequently, its severe nature makes it essential that emergency physicians consider the diagnosis in patients presenting with upper respiratory infections, chest pain, and systemic symptoms, and also in patients with a recent diagnosis of EBV, in order to mitigate a high rate of morbidity and mortality. PMID:26007626

  12. Changes in ovarian follicles following acute infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Grooms, D L; Brock, K V; Pate, J L; Day, M L

    1998-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with several reproductive problems in cattle, including poor fertility, early embryonic deaths, abortion and congenital anomalies. Little is known about the cause of poor fertility in cows acutely infected with BVDV. The purpose of this study was to identify changes in ovarian function following acute infection with noncytopathic BVDV. The ovaries of 5 BVDV sero-negative and virus-negative pubertal heifers were monitored daily for 4 consecutive estrous cycles. The position and diameter of all follicles (> 5 mm) and luteal structures were recorded. Daily plasma samples were collected to measure peripheral progesterone and estradiol levels. Each heifer was infected intranasally with noncytopathic BVDV following ovulation of the second estrous cycle. The maximum diameter and growth rate of dominant anovulatory and ovulatory follicles were significantly reduced following acute BVDV infection. Similarly, the number of subordinate follicles associated with both the anovulatory and ovulatory follicle was reduced following infection. There were no significant differences in other follicle or luteal dynamic parameters or in peripheral progesterone or estradiol levels. Ovarian follicular growth was different during the first 2 estrous cycles following acute infection with BVDV when compared with the 2 estrous cycles preceding infection. These differences may be important in explaining reduced fertility in herds with acute BVDV infection. PMID:10732038

  13. Clinical and biochemical spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis in North: East India

    Ashok K Kayal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute hypokalemic paralysis, characterized by acute flaccid paralysis is primarily a calcium channelopathy, but secondary causes like renal tubular acidosis (RTA, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP, primary hyperaldosteronism, Gitelman′s syndrome are also frequent. Objective: To study the etiology, varied presentations, and outcome after therapy of patients with hypokalemic paralysis. Materials And Methods: All patients who presented with acute flaccid paralysis with hypokalemia from October 2009 to September 2011 were included in the study. A detailed physical examination and laboratory tests including serum electrolytes, serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK, urine analysis, arterial blood gas analysis, thyroid hormones estimation, and electrocardiogram were carried out. Patients were further investigated for any secondary causes and treated with potassium supplementation. Result: The study included 56 patients aged 15-92 years (mean 36.76 ± 13.72, including 15 female patients. Twenty-four patients had hypokalemic paralysis due to secondary cause, which included 4 with distal RTA, 4 with Gitelman syndrome, 3 with TPP, 2 each with hypothyroidism, gastroenteritis, and Liddle′s syndrome, 1 primary hyperaldosteronism, 3 with alcoholism, and 1 with dengue fever. Two female patients were antinuclear antibody-positive. Eleven patient had atypical presentation (neck muscle weakness in 4, bladder involvement in 3, 1 each with finger drop and foot drop, tetany in 1, and calf hypertrophy in 1, and 2 patient had respiratory paralysis. Five patients had positive family history of similar illness. All patients improved dramatically with potassium supplementation. Conclusion: A high percentage (42.9% of secondary cause for hypokalemic paralysis warrants that the underlying cause must be adequately addressed to prevent the persistence or recurrence of paralysis.

  14. Lamivudine Inhibits the Replication of ALV-J Associated Acutely Transforming Virus and its Helper Virus and Tumor Growth In vitro and In vivo.

    Wang, Yixin; Xu, Shuzhen; Li, Sifei; Su, Hongqin; Chang, Shuang; Li, Yang; Sun, Xiaolong; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2015-01-01

    To study the antiviral effects of lamivudine on avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) and its inhibitory effect on the growth of fibrosarcomas caused by acute transforming avian leukosis virus, a series of experiments were performed in chicken embryo fibroblast cultures and 1-day-old chickens inoculated with an acutely transforming viral stock Fu-J (SDAU1005). This stock was prepared from an acutely fibrosarcoma of field cases in chicken farms and contained both the replication-defective virus Fu-J carrying v-fps oncogene and its helper virus ALV-J strain SDAU1005. The results from three different assays in cell cultures demonstrated the significant inhibitory effect of lamivudine on the replication of both SDAU1005 and Fu-J viruses. Furthermore, the effect was dose dependent in the concentration range of 1-4 μg/ml. In chicken experiments, lamivudine could decrease the viral loads of SDAU1005 and Fu-J in the plasma of inoculated chickens, delay the appearance of acute sarcomas, and decrease chicken mortality in the early stage. This model may be used to directly evaluate the inhibitory effects of lamivudine on such tumors and to understand the relationship between the replication-defective virus and its helper virus while also assessing tumor processes. PMID:26648914

  15. Physical mapping of the paralysis-inducing determinant of a wild mouse ecotropic neurotropic retrovirus.

    DesGroseillers, L; Barrette, M; Jolicoeur, P

    1984-01-01

    We have recently shown that a molecularly cloned ecotropic retrovirus, initially isolated from the brain of a paralyzed wild mouse, retained the ability to induce hind limb paralysis when inoculated into susceptible mice (Jolicoeur et al., J. Virol. 45:1159-1163, 1983). To map the viral DNA sequences encoding the determinant of paralysis, we constructed chimeric viral DNA genomes in vitro between parental cloned infectious viral DNA genomes from this neurotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) a...

  16. [Acute encephalitis. Neuropsychiatric manifestations as expression of influenza virus infection].

    Moreno-Flagge, Noris; Bayard, Vicente; Quirós, Evelia; Alonso, Tomás

    2009-01-01

    The aim is to review the encephalitis in infants and adolescents as well as its etiology, clinical manifestation, epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnostic methods and treatment, and the neuropsyquiatric signs appearing an influenza epidemy. Encephalitis is an inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS) which involves the brain. The clinical manifestations usually are: headache, fever and confusional stage. It could also be manifested as seizures, personality changes, or psiqyiatric symptoms. The clinical manifestations are related to the virus and the cell type affected in the brain. A meningitis or encephalopathy need to be ruled out. It could be present as an epidemic or isolated form, beeing this the most frequent form. It could be produced by a great variety of infections agents including virus, bacterias, fungal and parasitic. Viral causes are herpesvirus, arbovirus, rabies and enterovirus. Bacterias such as Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia and Mycoplasma neumoniae. Some fungal causes are: Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum. More than 100 agents are related to encephalitis. The diagnosis of encephalitis is a challenge for the clinician and its infectious etiology is clear in only 40 to 70% of all cases. The diagnosis of encephalitis can be established with absolute certainty only by the microscopic examination of brain tissue. Epidemiology is related to age of the patients, geographic area, season, weather or the host immune system. Early intervention can reduce the mortality rate and sequels. We describe four patients with encephalitis and neuropsychiatric symptoms during an influenza epidemic. PMID:19240010

  17. A homosexual japanese man with acute hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus genotype ae, concurrent with amebic colitis

    Sakaguchi,Kohsaku

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We report herein a case with acute hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus genotype Ae, concurrent with amebic colitis. A 39-year-old homosexual Japanese man was admitted to our hospital with jaundice. Laboratory tests showed an elevation of transaminase and positivity for hepatitis B surface antigen and IgM-type antibody to hepatitis B core antigen. The hepatitis B virus genotype was determined to be Ae. Furthermore, a mud-like stool with blood and mucous had sometimes been noted during the past 3 years, and amebic colitis was shown by colonofi berscopy during hospitalization. The patient was diagnosed with acute hepatitis B, concurrent with amebic colitis, and was successfully treated with lamivudine and metronidazole. In Japanese patients with acute hepatitis B virus genotype A infection, homosexual activity tends to be high. Furthermore, in Japanese homosexual men, amebiasis has been increasing. Thus, in Japanese patients with acute hepatitis B, a determination of genotype should be performed in order to investigate the route of transmission of hepatitis B virus, and a search for amebiasis should be performed in patients with acute hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus genotype A. Furthermore, education of homosexual men regarding hepatitis B virus, hepatitis B virus vaccination, and amebiasis is urgently required.

  18. Novel Approach for Detection of Enteric Viruses To Enable Syndrome Surveillance of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis ▿

    Svraka, Sanela; van der Veer, Bas; Duizer, Erwin; Dekkers, Jojanneke; Koopmans, Marion; Vennema, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases worldwide, with viruses, particularly noroviruses, being the leading cause in developed countries. In The Netherlands, systematic surveillance of gastroenteritis outbreaks of suspected viral etiology was established by the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in 1994. Since 2002, the total number of outbreaks reported has been increasing, and with that comes the need for sensitive assays that can be performed quickly...

  19. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    Milani, M

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinic...

  20. Acute viral hepatitis morbidity and mortality associated with hepatitis E virus infection: Uzbekistan surveillance data

    Margolis Harold S; Onischenko Gennady G; Yashina Tatiana L; Brown Matthew S; Favorov Michael O; Sharapov Makhmudkhan B; Chorba Terence L

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In Uzbekistan, routine serologic testing has not been available to differentiate etiologies of acute viral hepatitis (AVH). To determine the age groups most affected by hepatitis E virus (HEV) during documented AVH epidemics, trends in AVH-associated mortality rate (MR) per 100,000 over a 15-year period and reported incidence of AVH over a 35-year period were examined. Methods Reported AVH incidence data from 1971 to 2005 and AVH-associated mortality data from 1981 to 1995...

  1. Acute lymphocytic crisis following herpes simplex type 1 virus hepatitis in a nonimmunocompromised man: a case report

    Plastiras Sotiris

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction An increase in circulating lymphocytes can be seen following infections such as infectious mononucleosis and pertussis, or in lymphoproliferative disorders such as acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Acute lymphocytic crisis following herpes simplex virus hepatitis has not been described in the literature. Case presentation A 52-year-old man was admitted to our hospital reporting low-grade fever for the previous seven days, and fatigue. During the fifth day of hospitalization, the patient developed a lymphocytic crisis and, after further tests the patient was diagnosed as having herpes simplex virus hepatitis. Conclusion This case report shows that herpes simplex virus type 1 is a possible cause of an acute lymphocytic crisis similar to other well known infectious agents such as Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human immunodeficiency virus, human herpes virus type 6, adenovirus, toxoplasma and human T-cell lymphotropic virus. Furthermore, this case report expands the clinical spectrum of herpes simplex virus hepatitis, since it is reported in a nonimmunocompromised patient presenting with atypical acute lymphocytic syndrome.

  2. Abundant GFP expression and LTP in hippocampal acute slices by in vivo injection of sindbis virus.

    D'Apuzzo, M; Mandolesi, G; Reis, G; Schuman, E M

    2001-08-01

    Virus-mediated gene transfer into neurons is a powerful tool for the analysis of neuronal structure and function. Recombinant sindbis virus has been previously used to study protein function in hippocampal neuron cultures as well as in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. Nevertheless, some concern still exists about the physiological relevance of these cultured preparations. Acute hippocampal slices are a widely used preparation for the study of synaptic transmission, but currently recombinant gene delivery is usually achieved only through time-consuming transgenic techniques. In this study, we show that a subregion of the CA1 area in acute hippocampal slices can be specifically altered to express a gene of interest. A sindbis virus vector carrying an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter was injected in vivo into the hippocampus of adult rats. After 18 h, rats were killed, and acute hippocampal slices, infected in the CA1 field, were analyzed morphologically and electrophysiologically. Infected slices showed healthy and stable electrophysiological responses as well as long-term potentiation. In addition, infected pyramidal cells were readily recognized in living slices by two-photon imaging. Specifically, the introduction of an EGFP-Actin fusion protein greatly enhanced the detection of fine processes and dendritic spines. We propose this technique as an efficient tool for studying gene function in adult hippocampal neurons. PMID:11495971

  3. Identification of Viruses in Cases of Pediatric Acute Encephalitis and Encephalopathy Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Torii, Yuka; Okada, Ryo; Hayano, Satoshi; Ando, Shotaro; Kamiya, Yasuko; Kojima, Seiji; Ito, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Acute encephalitis/encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome that is occasionally associated with viral infection. Comprehensive virus detection assays are desirable because viral pathogens have not been identified in many cases. We evaluated the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for detecting viruses in clinical samples of encephalitis/encephalopathy patients. We first determined the sensitivity and quantitative performance of NGS by comparing the NGS-determined number of sequences of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) in clinical serum samples with the HHV-6 load measured using real-time PCR. HHV-6 was measured as it occasionally causes neurologic disorders in children. The sensitivity of NGS for detection of HHV-6 sequences was equivalent to that of real-time PCR, and the number of HHV-6 reads was significantly correlated with HHV-6 load. Next, we investigated the ability of NGS to detect viral sequences in 18 pediatric patients with acute encephalitis/encephalopathy of unknown etiology. A large number of Coxsackievirus A9 and mumps viral sequences were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of 2 and 1 patients, respectively. In addition, Torque teno virus and Pepper mild mottle viral sequences were detected in the sera of one patient each. These data indicate that NGS is useful for detection of causative viruses in patients with pediatric encephalitis/encephalopathy. PMID:27625312

  4. A 10-year analysis of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in 135 patients: focus on symptomatology and precipitants

    Chang, Chin-Chun; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Sung, Chih-Chien; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chau, Tom; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background A comprehensive analysis has not been performed on patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) characterized by acute hypokalemia and paralysis in the setting of thyrotoxicosis. Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze the detailed symptomatology of thyrotoxicosis and precipitating factors for the attack in a large cohort of TPP patients. Patients and methods A prospective observational study enrolled patients with TPP consecutively over 10 years at an academic medical ce...

  5. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis as the presenting symptom of silent thyroiditis

    Debmalya Sanyal; Shakya Bhattacharjee

    2013-01-01

    Silent thyroiditis is a rare cause of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. The objective was to present a case of silent thyroiditis presenting as periodic paralysis. A 23-year-old man presented with recurrent acute flaccid predominantly proximal weakness of all four limbs. He had a similar episode 3 weeks back. On examination he was found to have hypokalemia secondary to thyrotoxicosis. Clinically there were no features of thyrotoxicosis or thyroiditis. He was initially treated with intravenous an...

  6. Mutations in Potassium Channel Kir2.6 Cause Susceptibility to Thyrotoxic Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    Ryan, Devon P.; da Silva, Magnus R. Dias; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fontaine, Bertrand; Donaldson, Matt R.; Kung, Annie W.C.; Jongjaroenprasert, Wallaya; Liang, Mui Cheng; Khoo, Daphne H.C.; Cheah, Jin Seng; Ho, Su Chin; Bernstein, Harold S.; Macie, Rui M.B.; Brown, Robert H.; Ptáčcek, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (TPP) is characterized by acute attacks of weakness, hypokalemia, and thyrotoxicosis of various etiologies. These transient attacks resemble those of patients with familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) and resolve with treatment of the underlying hyperthyroidism. Because of the phenotypic similarity of these conditions, we hypothesized that TPP might also be a channelopathy. While sequencing candidate genes, we identified a previously unre...

  7. Rifampin-associated tubulointersititial nephritis and Fanconi syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis

    2013-01-01

    Background Rifampin is one of the most important drugs in first-line therapies for tuberculosis. The renal toxicity of rifampin has been reported sporadically and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) is a frequent histological finding. We describe for the first time a case of ATIN and Fanconi syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis, associated with the use of rifampin. Case presentation A 42-year-old man was admitted with sudden-onset lower extremity paralysis and mild renal insuffi...

  8. Lower virus infections in Varroa destructor-infested and uninfested brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera of a low mite population growth colony compared to a high mite population growth colony.

    Berna Emsen

    Full Text Available A comparison was made of the prevalence and relative quantification of deformed wing virus (DWV, Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV, black queen cell virus (BQCV, Kashmir bee virus (KBV, acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV and sac brood virus (SBV in brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera from colonies selected for high (HMP and low (LMP Varroa destructor mite population growth. Two viruses, ABPV and SBV, were never detected. For adults without mite infestation, DWV, IAPV, BQCV and KBV were detected in the HMP colony; however, only BQCV was detected in the LMP colony but at similar levels as in the HMP colony. With mite infestation, the four viruses were detected in adults of the HMP colony but all at higher amounts than in the LMP colony. For brood without mite infestation, DWV and IAPV were detected in the HMP colony, but no viruses were detected in the LMP colony. With mite infestation of brood, the four viruses were detected in the HMP colony, but only DWV and IAPV were detected and at lower amounts in the LMP colony. An epidemiological explanation for these results is that pre-experiment differences in virus presence and levels existed between the HMP and LMP colonies. It is also possible that low V. destructor population growth in the LMP colony resulted in the bees being less exposed to the mite and thus less likely to have virus infections. LMP and HMP bees may have also differed in susceptibility to virus infection.

  9. Lower virus infections in Varroa destructor-infested and uninfested brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) of a low mite population growth colony compared to a high mite population growth colony.

    Emsen, Berna; Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md; Goodwin, Paul H; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the prevalence and relative quantification of deformed wing virus (DWV), Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and sac brood virus (SBV) in brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) from colonies selected for high (HMP) and low (LMP) Varroa destructor mite population growth. Two viruses, ABPV and SBV, were never detected. For adults without mite infestation, DWV, IAPV, BQCV and KBV were detected in the HMP colony; however, only BQCV was detected in the LMP colony but at similar levels as in the HMP colony. With mite infestation, the four viruses were detected in adults of the HMP colony but all at higher amounts than in the LMP colony. For brood without mite infestation, DWV and IAPV were detected in the HMP colony, but no viruses were detected in the LMP colony. With mite infestation of brood, the four viruses were detected in the HMP colony, but only DWV and IAPV were detected and at lower amounts in the LMP colony. An epidemiological explanation for these results is that pre-experiment differences in virus presence and levels existed between the HMP and LMP colonies. It is also possible that low V. destructor population growth in the LMP colony resulted in the bees being less exposed to the mite and thus less likely to have virus infections. LMP and HMP bees may have also differed in susceptibility to virus infection. PMID:25723540

  10. Oral rehydration salts, zinc supplement and rota virus vaccine in the management of childhood acute diarrhea

    Abdulwahab MA Telmesani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute diarrhea remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Since the introduction of oral rehydration salts (ORS mortality has dropped to less than 50% worldwide. Low osmolarity ORS improved the outcome and reduced the hospitalization further. Zinc difficiency has been found to be associated with severe episodes of acute diarrhea. Zinc supplement in developing countries did reduce the incidence and prevalence of diarrhea. In addition, Zinc supplement significantly reduced the severity of diarrhea and duration of the episode. In the Americas and Europe, Rota virus vaccine was 90% effective in preventing severe episodes of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. This review concludes that low osmolarilty ORS, zinc supplementation and rotavirus vaccine are major factors in reducing the morbidity, mortality and hospitalization resulting from to acute gastroenteritis in childhood.

  11. Unilateral laryngeal paralysis

    Mitrović Slobodan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Phoniatric rehabilitation is mainly aimed at restoring satisfactory phonation. Voice quality depends on the capacity of intact vocal cords to compensate the deficiency involved, as well as on automatism of phonation. Material and methods The study included 50 patients. All subjects underwent history taking, reported symptoms that urged them to visit a phoniatrician; they were submitted to a clinical otorhinolaryngologic and phoniatric examinations, voice assessment by subjective acoustic analysis spectral analysis by digital sonography and laryngostroboscopy. All patients underwent Seeman's method of laryngeal compression. Results The examined group of 50 subjects included 17 males (34% and 33 females (66%. Vocal cord palsy was most often due to neck surgery (strumectomy in 19 patients (38% followed by an idiopathic palsy involved in 12 patients (24%. Disocclusion of 1-2 mm and 3-3 mm was registered in 54 % and 24% patients, respectively After treatment total occlusion was established in 20 % of patients, while disocclusion of up to 1mm, 1-2 mm or 2-3 mm persisted in 36 %, 20% and 2% of patients, respectively. T-test revealed a statistically significant difference in glottic incompetence prior to and after treatment (p<0.01. After treatment, using Seeman's method of digital compression of the larynx 48 % of patients regained satisfactory speech and voice clarity and 50% of them still presented mild dysphonia. Moderate dysphonia was registered in 2% but none of the patients had severe dysphonia. Discussion Central laryngeal palsies made 4% of our examined group, while according to the literature they make 1.2-8.7% of all laryngeal palsies. In majority of cases, paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was due to neck surgery (38%, but literature reports indicate that iatrogenic palsies are mostly due to operation of the thyroid. The well known fact that the left recurrent nerve is more frequently paralyzed, has been confirmed in

  12. An unusual case of acute wandering paralysis

    Federico Bianchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors reported on a 63-year-old diabetic male who developed a strange wandering hemiparesis affecting first left side and then right side, not consistent with a right parasagittal meningioma nor with ischemic stroke. The subsequent rapid worsening of clinical picture, with occurrence of paraparesis, urinary incontinence and midthoracic sensory level, together with the evidence of leucocytosis, led to the diagnosis of a T6-T7 spondylodiscitis with spinal cord compression. The authors underlied the difficulties in diagnosing this condition in the setting of general hospital practice and the importance of clinical and neurological examination.

  13. An unusual case of acute wandering paralysis

    Federico Bianchi; Quintino Giorgio D'Alessandris; Roberto Pallini; Eduardo Fernandez; Liverana Lauretti

    2016-01-01

    The authors reported on a 63-year-old diabetic male who developed a strange wandering hemiparesis affecting first left side and then right side, not consistent with a right para-sagittal meningioma nor with ischemic stroke. The subsequent rapid worsening of clinical picture, with occurrence of paraparesis, urinary incontinence and midthoracic sensory level, together with the evidence of leucocytosis, led to the diagnosis of a T6-T7 spon-dylodiscitis with spinal cord compression. The authors underlied the difficulties in diagnosing this condition in the setting of general hospital practice and the importance of clinical and neurological examination.

  14. Hypokalemic paralysis secondary to tenofovir induced fanconi syndrome

    Vishal V Ramteke; Deshpande, Rushi V.; Om Srivastava; Adinath Wagh

    2015-01-01

    Tenofovir induced fanconi syndrome (FS) presenting as hypokalemic paralysis is an extremely rare complication in patients on anti-retroviral therapy. We report a 50-year-old male with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome on tenofovir-based anti-retroviral therapy who presented with acute onset quadriparesis. On evaluation, he was found to have hypokalemia with hypophosphatemia, glucosuria and proteinuria suggesting FS. He regained normal power in limbs over next 12 h following correction of hyp...

  15. [Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis: report of one case].

    Frantchez, Victoria; Valiño, José; Carracelas, Analía; Dufrechou, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is characterized by attacks of generalized weakness associated to hypokalemia in patients with hyperthyroidism. We report a 25-year-old man with a history of spontaneously relapsing episodes of muscular weakness, who consulted for a rapidly evolving upper and lower limb paresis. Hypokalemia associated to a primary hyperthyroidism was detected. Treatment with antithyroid Drugs and potassium supplementation reverted symptoms and the episodes of acute muscular weakness did not reappear. PMID:21279257

  16. A rare case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis precipitated by hydrocortisone

    Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a rare, but serious condition characterized by acute paralytic attacks and hypokalemia in association with thyrotoxicosis. Although carbohydrate rich meals, strenuous exercise, alcohol, emotional stress are known precipitants of TPP, steroid treatment has rarely been reported to induce TPP. We report a case in which a patient with previously untreated Grave's disease developed TPP following administration of Intravenous hydrocortisone for control of seve...

  17. Recurrent Vocal Fold Paralysis and Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

    Marcus Vinicius Pinto; Lucia Joffily; Maurice Borges Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP) represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years befo...

  18. Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis: A Case Report

    Morović-Vergles, Jadranka; Ostrički, Branko; Galešić, Krešimir; Škoro, Mirko; Zelenika, Dijana

    2002-01-01

    A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in a 24-year-old male with hyperthyroidism is presented. Clinical manifestations included progressive symmetrical weakness that led to flaccid paralysis due to hypokalemia with concurrent thyrotoxicosis. Intravenous administration of potassium chloride resulted in complete regression of the symptoms of muscle weakness and paralysis. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an uncommon complication of thyrotoxicosis, which primarily occurs in Orientals, with a ...

  19. Hypokalemic paralysis and acid-base balance

    Ivo Casagranda; Riccardo Boverio; Andrea Defrancisci; Sara Ferrillo; Francesca Gargiulo

    2006-01-01

    Three cases of hypokalemic paralysis are reported, presenting to the Emergency Department. The first is a patient with a hypokalemic periodic paralysis with a normal acid-base status, the second is a case of hypokalemic flaccid paralysis of all extremities with a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, the last is a patient with a hypokalemic distal paralysis of right upper arm with metabolic alkalosis. Afterwards some pathophysiologic principles and the clinical aspects of hypokalemia are discu...

  20. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor induced hyperkalaemic paralysis

    Dutta., D; Fischler, M; McClung, A

    2001-01-01

    Secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is a rare condition often mimicking the Guillain-Barré syndrome. There have been a few case reports of hyperkalaemia caused by renal failure, trauma, and drugs where the presentation has been with muscle weakness. A case of hyperkalaemic paralysis caused by an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor is reported.


Keywords: hyperkalaemia; paralysis; ACE inhibitors

  1. HYPOKALEMIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS: AGE OF ONSET IN A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    M. H. Harirchian

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a familial channelopathy inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The first attack of paralysis may be evolved at any age, but has been reported to be most common in the second decade, so that some authorities believe that an episodic weakness beginning after age 25 is almost never due to primary periodic paralysis. In this retrospective study, we reviewed 50 patients admitted in two hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences during 1992-2001 with acute flaccid weakness and hypokalemia, twenty-three of whom fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two patients showed first attack below age 15, 8 in 15-20, 4 in 20-25, 3 in 25-35, 4 in 35-45, and 2 beyond age 45. In our study, in contrast to previous ones, the first attack was beyond age 20 in 13 patients (56.5% and beyond 25 in 9 (39 %. Age at first attack is more than other studies, which seems to be due to a difference between our epidemiological characteristics compared to that in the West. In other words, in our epidemiological condition, periodic weakness, although started beyond second decade of age, could be due to primary periodic paralysis if secondary hypokalemia had been ruled out.

  2. The Honey Bee Pathosphere of Mongolia: European Viruses in Central Asia.

    Tsevegmid, Khaliunaa; Neumann, Peter; Yañez, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Parasites and pathogens are apparent key factors for the detrimental health of managed European honey bee subspecies, Apis mellifera. Apicultural trade is arguably the main factor for the almost global distribution of most honey bee diseases, thereby increasing chances for multiple infestations/infections of regions, apiaries, colonies and even individual bees. This imposes difficulties to evaluate the effects of pathogens in isolation, thereby creating demand to survey remote areas. Here, we conducted the first comprehensive survey for 14 honey bee pathogens in Mongolia (N = 3 regions, N = 9 locations, N = 151 colonies), where honey bee colonies depend on humans to overwinter. In Mongolia, honey bees, Apis spp., are not native and colonies of European A. mellifera subspecies have been introduced ~60 years ago. Despite the high detection power and large sample size across Mongolian regions with beekeeping, the mite Acarapis woodi, the bacteria Melissococcus plutonius and Paenibacillus larvae, the microsporidian Nosema apis, Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus and Lake Sinai virus strain 2 were not detected, suggesting that they are either very rare or absent. The mite Varroa destructor, Nosema ceranae and four viruses (Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus, Deformed wing virus (DWV) and Chronic bee paralysis virus) were found with different prevalence. Despite the positive correlation between the prevalence of V. destructor mites and DWV, some areas had only mites, but not DWV, which is most likely due to the exceptional isolation of apiaries (up to 600 km). Phylogenetic analyses of the detected viruses reveal their clustering and European origin, thereby supporting the role of trade for pathogen spread and the isolation of Mongolia from South-Asian countries. In conclusion, this survey reveals the distinctive honey bee pathosphere of Mongolia, which offers opportunities for exciting future research. PMID:26959221

  3. The Honey Bee Pathosphere of Mongolia: European Viruses in Central Asia.

    Khaliunaa Tsevegmid

    Full Text Available Parasites and pathogens are apparent key factors for the detrimental health of managed European honey bee subspecies, Apis mellifera. Apicultural trade is arguably the main factor for the almost global distribution of most honey bee diseases, thereby increasing chances for multiple infestations/infections of regions, apiaries, colonies and even individual bees. This imposes difficulties to evaluate the effects of pathogens in isolation, thereby creating demand to survey remote areas. Here, we conducted the first comprehensive survey for 14 honey bee pathogens in Mongolia (N = 3 regions, N = 9 locations, N = 151 colonies, where honey bee colonies depend on humans to overwinter. In Mongolia, honey bees, Apis spp., are not native and colonies of European A. mellifera subspecies have been introduced ~60 years ago. Despite the high detection power and large sample size across Mongolian regions with beekeeping, the mite Acarapis woodi, the bacteria Melissococcus plutonius and Paenibacillus larvae, the microsporidian Nosema apis, Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus and Lake Sinai virus strain 2 were not detected, suggesting that they are either very rare or absent. The mite Varroa destructor, Nosema ceranae and four viruses (Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus, Deformed wing virus (DWV and Chronic bee paralysis virus were found with different prevalence. Despite the positive correlation between the prevalence of V. destructor mites and DWV, some areas had only mites, but not DWV, which is most likely due to the exceptional isolation of apiaries (up to 600 km. Phylogenetic analyses of the detected viruses reveal their clustering and European origin, thereby supporting the role of trade for pathogen spread and the isolation of Mongolia from South-Asian countries. In conclusion, this survey reveals the distinctive honey bee pathosphere of Mongolia, which offers opportunities for exciting future research.

  4. Virus profile in children with acute respiratory infections with various severities in Beijing, China

    Zhu Runan; Song Qinwei; Qian Yuan; Zhao Linqing; Deng Jie; Wang Fang; Sun Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is one of the most common infectious diseases in infants and young children globally.This study aimed to determine the virus profile in children with ARI presenting with different severities.Methods Clinical specimens collected from children with ARI in Beijing from September 2010 to March 2011 were investigated for 18 respiratory viruses using an xTAG Respiratory Viral Panel Fast (RVP Fast) assay.The Pearson chisquare analysis was used to identify statistical significance.Results Of 270 cases from three groups of ARI patients,including Out-patients,In-patients and patients in the intensive care unit (ICU),viruses were detected in 176 (65.2%) specimens with the RVP Fast assay.The viral detection rate from the Out-patients group (50.0%) was significantly lower than that from the In-patients (71.1%) and ICU-patients (74.4%) groups.The virus distribution was different between the Out-patients group and the other hospitalized groups,while the virus detection rate and distribution characteristics were similar between the In-patients and ICU-patients groups.The coinfection rates of the Out-patients group,the In-patients group,and the ICU-patients group were 15.6%,50.0% and 35.8%,respectively.In addition to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenovirus (ADV),human rhinovirus (HRV) was frequently detected from children with serious illnesses,followed by human metapneumovirus (hMPV),human bocavirus (HBoV) and coronaviruses.Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV3) was detected in children with lower respiratory illness,but rarely from those with serious illnesses in the ICU-patient group.Conclusion In addition to so-called common respiratory viruses,virus detection in children with ARI should include those thoucht to be uncommon respiratory viruses,especially when there are severe ARI-related clinical illnesses.

  5. [Hypokalemic periodic paralysis. A case report].

    Areta-Higuera, J D; Algaba-Montes, M; Oviedo-García, A Á

    2014-01-01

    Periodic paralysis is a rare disorder that causes episodes of severe muscle weakness that can be confused with other diseases, including epilepsy or myasthenia gravis. Hyperkalemic and hypokalemic paralysis are included within these diseases, the latter being divided into periodic paralysis (familial, thyrotoxic or sporadic) and non-periodic paralysis. In this regard, we present a case of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis in an eighteen year-old female who was diagnosed with epilepsy in childhood, as well as a subclinical hypothyroidism (for which she received replacement therapy) months ago. The diagnosis was made by the anamnesis and the confirmation of hypokalemia. PMID:24360869

  6. Hypokalemic paralysis and acid-base balance

    Ivo Casagranda

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of hypokalemic paralysis are reported, presenting to the Emergency Department. The first is a patient with a hypokalemic periodic paralysis with a normal acid-base status, the second is a case of hypokalemic flaccid paralysis of all extremities with a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, the last is a patient with a hypokalemic distal paralysis of right upper arm with metabolic alkalosis. Afterwards some pathophysiologic principles and the clinical aspects of hypokalemia are discussed and an appropriate approach to do in Emergency Department, to identify the hypokalemic paralysis etiologies in the Emergency Department, is presented, beginning from the evaluation of acid-base status.

  7. Prevalence of Hepatitis A virus (HAV and Hepatitis E virus (HEV in the patients presenting with acute viral hepatitis

    A Joon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis A virus (HAV and Hepatitis E virus (HEV are both enterically transmitted, resulting in acute viral hepatitis (AVH in developing countries. They pose major health problems in our country. This study was done to determine prevalence of HAV and HEV in patients presenting with AVH and the co-infection of HAV and HEV in these patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 2-years duration was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, KMC, Mangalore. A non-random sampling of 958 patients presenting with AVH was considered in the study. On the basis of history, serum samples were analysed for IgM anti-HAV and IgM anti-HEV for the detection of HAV and HEV, respectively using commercially available ELISA kits. Data collected was analysed by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 11.5. Results: The seroprevalence of HAV- and HEV-positive patients were 19.31% and 10.54%, respectively. The seroprevalence of both HAV and HEV in patients with acute viral hepatitis was 11.5%. The prevalence of HAV and HEV among males (68% and 31% was higher than in females (31% and 20% and was predominantly seen among young adults. These infections were predominantly seen during end of monsoons and beginning of winter. Conclusion: Though the prevalence of HAV is much higher than that of HEV, co-infection rate of 11.5% mandates the screening for HEV which will be of immense importance in pregnant women and improving levels of personal hygiene among higher socio-economic population. These data will be essential for planning of future vaccination strategies and for better sanitation programme in this part of the country.

  8. Acute gastroenteritis and enteric viruses in hospitalised children in southern Brazil: aetiology, seasonality and clinical outcomes

    Sonia Maria Raboni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral acute gastroenteritis (AG is a significant cause of hospitalisation in children younger than five years. Group A rotavirus (RVA is responsible for 30% of these cases. Following the introduction of RVA immunisation in Brazil in 2006, a decreased circulation of this virus has been observed. However, AG remains an important cause of hospitalisation of paediatric patients and only limited data are available regarding the role of other enteric viruses in these cases. We conducted a prospective study of paediatric patients hospitalised for AG. Stool samples were collected to investigate human adenovirus (HAdV, RVA, norovirus (NoV and astrovirus (AstV. NoV typing was performed by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. From the 225 samples tested, 60 (26% were positive for at least one viral agent. HAdV, NoV, RVA and AstV were detected in 16%, 8%, 6% and 0% of the samples, respectively. Mixed infections were found in nine patients: HAdV/RVA (5, HAdV/NoV (3 and HAdV/NoV/RVA (1. The frequency of fever and lymphocytosis was significantly higher in virus-infected patients. Phylogenetic analysis of NoV indicated that all of these viruses belonged to genotype GII.4. The significant frequency of these pathogens in patients with AG highlights the need to routinely implement laboratory investigations.

  9. "Proliferation of cytotoxic and activated T cells during acute Epstein-Barr virus induced Infectious Mononucleosis "

    Mansoori SD

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The immune responses that develop following Epstien-Barr Virus (EBV infection are complex and involve both humoral and to a greater extent cell-mediated immune mechanisms. To evaluate the immune response, flow cytometric analysis of the peripheral blood of six patients during the acute phase of EBV infection was performed. This analysis revealed a significant increase in the percentages and the absolute number of CD8+cytotoxic and activated (HLA-DR+ - T lymphocytes and in some cases with a concomitan decrease in the percentages of B (CD19+ lymphocytes and T helper (CD4+ lymphocytes. These patient invariably had inverted CD4/CD8 ratio. All changes reversed to normal level during the recovery phase of infection. It is therefore concluded that EBV specific cytotoxic and activated T lymphocytes are essential in controlling acute EBV infection presented by the infected B cells.

  10. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p < 0.001). Overall symptoms and clinical findings were similar among hMPV and RSV positive episodes, but more RSV-infected children required respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  11. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Nordmann Winther, Thilde; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Westh, Henrik Torkil; Lundgren, Bettina; Melbye, Mads; Høgh, Birthe

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection.......6%) ARTI episodes by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting the hMPV N gene and the RSV L gene. Two children were co-infected with hMPV and RSV. They were excluded from statistical analysis. Hospitalization for ARTI caused by hMPV was restricted to very young...

  12. Barr humbug: acute cerebellar ataxia due to Epstein-Barr virus.

    Davies, Benjamin; Machin, Nicholas; Lavin, Timothy; Ul Haq, Mian Ayaz

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with neurological sequellae, but rarely there is acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) in an adult. We present a novel case of a 26-year-old man, who presented with ACA. He had normal MRI and CSF analysis. Serum testing confirmed active EBV. A course of oral prednisolone 1 mg/kg for 4 weeks, with a subsequent taper was started. He made a full recovery within 3 weeks of presentation. PMID:27558189

  13. [Acute pancreatitis caused by varicella-zoster virus after liver transplantation].

    Coelho, J C; Wiederkehr, J C; Campos, A C; Zeni Neto, C; Oliva, V

    1994-02-01

    Twenty-six days after liver transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis, a 52 year-old patient was rehospitalized for viral infection. The clinical features were fatigue, anorexia and vomiting. On physical examination, vesicular skin lesions involving the left 8 th intercostal space were suggestive of herpes-zoster infection. The following day the patient was extremely tired and dyspnoeic. The abdomen was distended with moderate abdominal epigastric pain. The clinical picture worsened rapidly and the patient died a few hours later. Autopsy revealed acute haemorrhagic necrosis of the pancreas due to herpes-zoster virus. PMID:8207103

  14. The Dicistroviridae: An Emerging Family of Invertebrate Viruses

    Bryony C. Bonning

    2009-01-01

    Dicistroviruses comprise a newly characterized and rapidly expanding family of small RNA viruses of invertebrates. Several features of this virus group have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. In this review I provide an overview of the Dicistroviridae and describe progress made toward the understanding and practical application of dicistroviruses, including (i) construction of the first infectious clone of a dicistrovirus, (ii) use of the baculovirus expression system for production of an infectious dicistrovirus, (iii) the use of Drosophila C virus for analysis of host response to virus infection, and (iv) correlation of the presence of Israeli acute paralysis virus with honey bee colony collapse disorder. The potential use of dicistroviruses for insect pest management is also discussed. The structure, mechanism and practical use of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements has recently been reviewed elsewhere.

  15. 针刺配合情志护理综合干预对急性面瘫患者抑郁状态及睡眠质量的影响%Effect of Acupuncture Combined with Comprehensive Emotional Nursing Intervention on Acute Facial Paralysis Patients' Depresson and Sleep Quality

    翁子梅; 蔡南哨; 罗文舒

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨针刺配合情志护理综合干预对急性面瘫的抑郁状态和睡眠质量的影响。方法随机选取2011年8月至2013年8月在我院接受针刺治疗的周围性面瘫患者160例,随机分为常规针刺法治疗的对照组80例,以及针刺配合情志护理综合干预的观察组80例,对比两组患者的抑郁状态、睡眠质量以及临床疗效。结果治疗4周后,观察组的抑郁评分为(42.16±5.02)分,显著低于对照组(孕<0.05);观察组的睡眠质量指数为(10.51±1.74)分,显著低于对照组(孕<0.05)。结论急性面瘫采用针刺配合情志护理综合干预的临床效果确切,能显著改善抑郁状态和睡眠质量,提高患者生活质量。%Objective To investigate the effect of acupuncture combined with comprehensive emotional nursing intervention on acute facial paralysis patients' depresson and sleep quality. Methods 160 patients with acute facial paralysis in our hospital from Aug. 2011 to Aug. 2013 were randomly divided into control group (common accupuncture treatment, n = 80) and observation group (accupuncture combined with comprehensive emotional nursing intervention, n=80). The status of depression, sleep quality and clinical curative effect were compared. Results After 4 weeks' treatment, the depression score of the observation group was (42.16±5.02), significantly lower than that of the control group (P <0.05). The sleep quality index of the observation group was (10.51±1.74), significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions Acupuncture combined with comprehensive emotional nursing intervention has exact clinical effect on acute facial paralysis, which can treat depression, enhance sleep quality significantly, and improve patients' life quality.

  16. Targeted nursing care in the treatment of 60 patients with acute facial paralysis by oral administration of traditional Chinese drugs combined with acupoint sticking therapy%中药内服联合穴位贴敷治疗急性面瘫60例针对性护理

    贾庭英

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨中药内服联合穴位贴敷治疗急性面瘫患者的临床效果及针对性护理方法.方法:将120例急性面瘫患者随机分为观察组与对照组各60例.对照组给予常规治疗护理;观察组在此基础上给予牵正合剂内服联合穴位贴敷治疗,加强针对性护理.比较两组治疗效果、治愈时间及治疗费用.结果:观察组治疗总有效率高于对照组(P<0.05),医疗费用及治愈时间少于对照组(P<0.05).结论:中药内服联合穴位贴敷治疗急性面瘫患者的临床效果确切,针对性护理可提高治疗效率,缩短患者住院时间,减少医疗费用.%Objective:To study the efficacy of oral administration of traditional Chinese drugs combined with acupoint sticking therapy in the treatment of patients with acute facial paralysis and the targeted nursing methods.Methods:120 patients with acute facial paralysis were randomly divided into the observation group and the control group (60 cases in each group).The patients in the control group were given conventional treatment and nursing care and the patients in the observation group were treated with oral administration of Qianzheng mixture combined with acupoint sticking therapy and also given targeted nursing care based on the conventional one.The effect,time and cost of treatment were compared between the two groups.Results:The total effective rate was higher in the observation group than the control group (P < 0.05) ; the medical cost and time of cure was less and shorter in the observation group than the control group (P < 0.05).Conclusion:The clinical effect of oral administration of traditional Chinese drugs combined with acupoint sticking therapy is definite in the treatment of patients with acute facial paralysis,and targeted nursing care can improve the treatment efficiency,shorten and reduce hospitalization time and medical cost.

  17. Acute infection by hepatitis E virus with a slight immunoglobulin M antibody response.

    Inagaki, Yuki; Oshiro, Yukio; Imanishi, Mamiko; Ishige, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody response is generally regarded as a useful marker for diagnosing primary infection. However, in some cases, this antibody is not detected during the acute phase of infection. An 81-year-old man with stable membranous nephropathy who presented with asymptomatic acute liver dysfunction came to our hospital. HEV RNA of genotype 3 was detected in his serum, and he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis E. According to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, high-level positivity for anti-HEV IgG and IgA antibodies was observed, but the assay was negative for IgM antibody throughout the clinical course of infection. The patient was not immunosuppressed. We further investigated the presence of IgM antibody using two other polyclonal antibodies against human IgM as secondary antibodies and another recombinant ORF2 protein of genotype 3 as an immobilized antigen. IgM was weakly detected in the serum during the acute phase only by the test with the antigen of genotype 3. Multi-genotype antigens can detect a slight IgM antibody response; however, anti-HEV IgA is more useful in diagnosing primary HEV infection, particularly in cases with a low IgM antibody response. PMID:26215116

  18. Increases in Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infections - Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia, 2006-2013.

    Harris, Aaron M; Iqbal, Kashif; Schillie, Sarah; Britton, James; Kainer, Marion A; Tressler, Stacy; Vellozzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    As many as 2.2 million persons in the United States are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (1), and approximately 15%-25% of persons with chronic HBV infection will die prematurely from cirrhosis or liver cancer (2). Since 2006, the overall U.S. incidence of acute HBV infection has remained stable; the rate in 2013 was 1.0 case per 100,000 persons (3). Hepatitis B vaccination is highly effective in preventing HBV infection and is recommended for all infants (beginning at birth), all adolescents, and adults at risk for HBV infection (e.g., persons who inject drugs, men who have sexual contact with men, persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and others). Hepatitis B vaccination coverage is low among adults: 2013 National Health Interview Survey data indicated that coverage with ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine was 32.6% for adults aged 19-49 years (4). Injection drug use is a risk factor for both hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HBV. Among young adults in some rural U.S. communities, an increased incidence of HCV infection has been associated with a concurrent increase of injection drug use (5); and recent data indicate an increase of acute HCV infection in the Appalachian region associated with injection drug use (6). Using data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) during 2006-2013, CDC assessed the incidence of acute HBV infection in three of the four Appalachian states (Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia) included in the HCV infection study (6). Similar to the increase of HCV infections recently reported, an increase in incident cases of acute HBV infection in these three states has occurred among non-Hispanic whites (whites) aged 30-39 years who reported injection drug use as a common risk factor. Since 2009, cases of acute HBV infection have been reported from more non-urban than urban regions. Evidence-based services to prevent HBV infection are needed. PMID:26821369

  19. Recurrent Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis Unmasks Sjogren Syndrome without Sicca Symptoms.

    Hung, Yao-Min; Huang, Neng-Chyan; Wann, Shue-Ren; Chang, Yun-Te; Wang, Jyh-Seng

    2015-04-01

    Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis (HPP) may occur as a rare complication of Sjogren Syndrome (SS) and Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA). A 64-year male patient came with HPP, and was later diagnosed with distal RTA. The patient, who had no xerostomia and xerophthalmia, was diagnosed with primary SS from serologic and histologic findings of minor salivary gland biopsy. The patient recovered after potassium replacement therapy. Renal biopsy was also performed and revealed evidence of tubulointerstitial nephritis. Corticosteroids were administered and there was no recurrence of HPP during a 4-year follow-up period. The case highlights the significance of acute hypokalemia management in emergency department as it can unmask SS even if the SS is not associated with sicca symptoms. Hypokalemic paralysis associated with normal anion gap metabolic acidosis should prompt toward the diagnosis of SS. PMID:25933458

  20. Fatal Dysrhythmia Following Potassium Replacement for Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    Ahmed, Imdad

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of fatal rebound hyperkalemia in a patient with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP treated with potassium supplementation. Although TPP is a rare hyperthyroidism-related endocrine disorder seen predominantly in men of Asian origin, the diagnosis should be considered in patients of non-Asian origins presenting with hypokalemia, muscle weakness or acute paralysis. The condition may present as a life threatening emergency and unfamiliarity with the disease could result in a fatal outcome. Immediate therapy with potassium chloride supplementation may foster a rapid recovery of muscle strength and prevent cardiac arrhythmias secondary to hypokalemia, but with a risk of rebound hyperkalemia. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(1:57-59.

  1. A prospective evaluation of diagnostic methodologies for the acute diagnosis of dengue virus infection on the Thailand-Myanmar border

    Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Turner, Paul; Turner, Claudia L.; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Jarman, Richard G; Blacksell, Stuart D; Nosten, François H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Clinically useful diagnostic tests of dengue virus infection are lacking. We prospectively evaluated the performance of real-time reverse transcriptase (rRT)-PCR, NS-1 antigen and IgM antibody tests to confirm dengue virus infection in acute blood specimens from 162 patients presenting with undifferentiated febrile illness compatible with dengue infection. rRT-PCR was the most sensitive test (89%) and potentially could be used as a single test for confirmation of dengue infection. NS-...

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus Myocarditis Presenting as Acute Abdomen in a Child: a Case Report

    Roshni Chakraborty

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Epstein-Barr  virus  (EBV  infection  can  present  with  a  variety  of  manifestation. Case Report  Here  we  present  a  case  of  a  7  year- old  immunocompetent  girl  who  came  with  acute  abdominal  pain ,  had  echocardiographic  evidence  of  myocardial  dysfunction  and  finally  was  diagnosed  as  a  case  of  serologically  proven  acute  EBV  infection. Conclusion Isolated  gastrointestinal  symptoms  can  be  a  presentation  of  Epstein-Barr  virus  myocarditis.

  3. Acute Bronchitis

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  4. Identification of ALV-J associated acutely transforming virus Fu-J carrying complete v-fps oncogene.

    Wang, Yixin; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Fang, Lichun; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    Transduction of oncogenes by ALVs and generation of acute transforming viruses is common in natural viral infections. In order to understand the molecular basis for the rapid oncogenicity of Fu-J, an acutely transforming avian leukosis virus isolated from fibrosarcomas in crossbreed broilers infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in China, complete genomic structure of Fu-J virus was determined by PCR amplification and compared with those of Fu-J1, Fu-J2, Fu-J3, Fu-J4, and Fu-J5 reported previously. The results showed that the genome of Fu-J was defective, with parts of gag gene replaced by the complete v-fps oncogene and encoded a 137 kDa Gag-fps fusion protein. Sequence analysis revealed that Fu-J and Fu-J1 to Fu-J5 were related quasi-species variants carrying different lengths of v-fps oncogenes generated from recombination between helper virus and c-fps gene. Comparison of virus carrying v-fps oncogene also gave us a glimpse of the molecular characterization and evolution process of the acutely transforming ALV. PMID:27108997

  5. Immune profile and Epstein-Barr virus infection in acute interstitial nephritis: an immunohistochemical study in 78 patients.

    Mansur, Abdurrezagh

    2011-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a common cause of acute kidney injury and is characterised by a dense interstitial cellular infiltrate, which has not been well defined. Previous studies have demonstrated a correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and AIN. The purpose of our study was to define the nature of the interstitial immune infiltrate and to investigate the possibility of renal infection with EBV.

  6. Acute kidney injury in critical ill patients affected by influenza A (H1N1) virus infection

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Papiol, Elisabeth; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Diaz, Emili; Zaragoza, Rafael; Granada, Rosa María; Socias, Lorenzo; Bonastre, Juan; Valverdú, Montserrat; Pozo, Juan Carlos; Luque, Pilar; Juliá-Narvaéz, Jose Antonio; Cordero, Lourdes; Albaya, Antonio; Serón, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Little information exists about the impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients with the pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational, multicenter study in 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs). Patients with chronic renal failure were excluded. AKI was defined according to Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria. Results A total of 661 patients were analyzed. One hundred eighteen (17.7%) patients dev...

  7. Acute Hendra virus infection: Analysis of the pathogenesis and passive antibody protection in the hamster model

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are recently-emerged, closely related and highly pathogenic paramyxoviruses. We have analysed here the pathogenesis of the acute HeV infection using the new animal model, golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), which is highly susceptible to HeV infection. HeV-specific RNA and viral antigens were found in multiple organs and virus was isolated from different tissues. Dual pathogenic mechanism was observed: parenchymal infection in various organs, including the brain, with vasculitis and multinucleated syncytia in many blood vessels. Furthermore, monoclonal antibodies specific for the NiV fusion protein neutralized HeV in vitro and efficiently protected hamsters from HeV if given before infection. These results reveal the similarities between HeV and NiV pathogenesis, particularly in affecting both respiratory and neuronal system. They demonstrate that hamster presents a convenient novel animal model to study HeV infection, opening new perspectives to evaluate vaccine and therapeutic approaches against this emergent infectious disease.

  8. Molecular Evolution and Phylodynamics of Acute Hepatitis B Virus in Japan

    Lin, Serena Y. C.; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is prevalent worldwide and causes liver diseases, including acute and chronic hepatitis. Ten HBV genotypes (A–J) with distinct geographic distributions have been reported. Cases of acute HBV infection with genotype A have increased in Japan nationwide since the 1990s, mainly through sexual transmission. To investigate the molecular evolution and phylodynamics of HBV genotypes, we collected acute HBV isolates acquired in Japan from 1992–2002. Full genomes were obtained for comprehensive phylogenetic and phylodynamic analysis, with other Japanese HBV sequences from GenBank that were isolated during 1991–2010. HBV genotypes were classified using the maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods. The GMRF Bayesian Skyride was used to estimate the evolution and population dynamics of HBV. Four HBV genotypes (A, B, C, and H) were identified, of which C was the major genotype. The phylodynamic results indicated an exponential growth between the 1960s and early 1990s; this was followed by a population bottleneck after 1995, possibly linked with successful implementation of a nationwide vaccination program. However, HBV/A increased from 1990 to 2003–2004, and then started to decrease. The prevalence of genotype A has increased over the past 10 years. Phylodynamic inference clearly demonstrates a steady population growth compatible with an ongoing subepidemic; this might be due to the loss of immunity to HBV in adolescents and people being born before the vaccination program. This is the first phylodynamic study of HBV infection in Japan and will facilitate understanding the molecular epidemiology and long-term evolutionary dynamics of this virus in Japan. PMID:27280441

  9. Hamstring transfer for quadriceps paralysis in post polio residual paralysis

    Jagadish J Patwa

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: H to Q transfer in the presence of quadriceps paralysis with good power in hamstring is a better alternative than supracondylar osteotomy because it is a dynamic correction and it produces some degree of recurvatum with increasing stability of knee in extension while walking. While inserting hamstring over patella the periosteum is not cut in an I-shaped fashion to create a flap which gives additional strength to new insertion and also patella act as a fulcrum during the extension of knee by producing the bowstring effect.

  10. Prevention of human poliovirus-induced paralysis and death in mice by the novel antiviral agent arildone.

    McKinlay, M A; Miralles, J V; Brisson, C J; Pancic, F

    1982-01-01

    Arildone, a novel antiviral agent which blocks virion uncoating, was assessed for its ability to prevent paralysis and death in mice infected intracerebrally with a lethal dose of human poliovirus type-2 (strain MEF). Intraperitoneal administration of arildone suspended in gum tragacanth prevented paralysis and death in a dose-dependent manner (minimal inhibitory dose = 32 mg/kg, twice daily) and protected animals from virus challenges in excess of 20 50% lethal doses. Oral medication with ar...

  11. Comparative studies on virus detection in acute respiratory diseases in humans by means of RIA and cultivation

    In winter 1981, 146 patients with an acute respiratory infection were examined. Nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained by intranasal catheter. Comparative investigations were performed by cultivation in tissue culture and by a four-layer radioimmunoassay. In the radioimmunoassay, polystyrene beads were used as the solid phase, ginea pig antivirus immunoglobulins as the captive antibodies, rabbit anti-virus immunoglobulins as the secondary antibodies and 125I-labelled sheep anti-rabbit immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The radioimmunoassay was developed for the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B virus and parainfluenza type 1, type 2 and type 3 virus. Tissue culture seems to be more sensitive for detection of adenovirus and influenza A virus, though some infections with influenza A virus could only be diagnosed by the radioimmunoassay. In other cases (respiratory syncytial virus, influenza B virus) antigen detection by radioimmunoassay is more efficient. Presently the combination of both antigen-detection-systems still is the optimal diagnostic procedure for detecting virus infections of the respiratory tract. (orig./MG)

  12. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of honey bee viruses, Nosema microsporidia, protozoan parasites, and parasitic mites in China.

    Yang, Bu; Peng, Guangda; Li, Tianbang; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2013-02-01

    China has the largest number of managed honey bee colonies, which produce the highest quantity of honey and royal jelly in the world; however, the presence of honey bee pathogens and parasites has never been rigorously identified in Chinese apiaries. We thus conducted a molecular survey of honey bee RNA viruses, Nosema microsporidia, protozoan parasites, and tracheal mites associated with nonnative Apis mellifera ligustica and native Apis cerana cerana colonies in China. We found the presence of black queen cell virus (BQCV), chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV), deformed wing virus (DWV), Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), and sacbrood virus (SBV), but not that of acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) or Kashmir bee virus (KBV). DWV was the most prevalent in the tested samples. Phylogenies of Chinese viral isolates demonstrated that genetically heterogeneous populations of BQCV, CBPV, DWV, and A. cerana-infecting SBV, and relatively homogenous populations of IAPV and A. meliifera-infecting new strain of SBV with single origins, are spread in Chinese apiaries. Similar to previous observations in many countries, Nosema ceranae, but not Nosema apis, was prevalent in the tested samples. Crithidia mellificae, but not Apicystis bombi was found in five samples, including one A. c. cerana colony, demonstrating that C. mellificae is capable of infecting multiple honey bee species. Based on kinetoplast-encoded cytochrome b sequences, the C. mellificae isolate from A. c. cerana represents a novel haplotype with 19 nucleotide differences from the Chinese and Japanese isolates from A. m. ligustica. This suggests that A. c. cerana is the native host for this specific haplotype. The tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi, was detected in one A. m. ligustica colony. Our results demonstrate that honey bee RNA viruses, N. ceranae, C. mellificae, and tracheal mites are present in Chinese apiaries, and some might be originated from native Asian honey bees. PMID:23467539

  13. Identification of avian leukosis virus subgroup J-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying the v-src oncogene in layer chickens.

    Wang, Yixin; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Fang, Lichun; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the molecular basis for the rapid oncogenicity of an acutely transforming avian leukosis virus (ALV), isolated from fibrosarcomas in Hy-Line Brown commercial layer chickens infected with ALV subgroup J (ALV-J), the complete genomic structure of the provirus was determined. In addition to ALV-J replication-complete virus SDAU1102, five proviral DNA genomes, named SJ-1, SJ-2, SJ-3, SJ-4 and SJ-5, carrying different lengths of the v-src oncogene were amplified from original tumours and chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) infected with viral stocks. The genomic sequences of the SJ-1-SJ-5 provirus were closely related to that of SDAU1102 but were defective. The results of Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining also showed overexpression of the p60v-src protein in infected CEFs and tumour tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation and identification of acutely transforming viruses carrying the v-src oncogene with ALV-J as the helper virus. It also offers insight into the generation of acutely transforming ALVs carrying the v-src oncogene. PMID:26842006

  14. Elevation of soluble VCAM-1 plasma levels in children with acute dengue virus infection of varying severity.

    Koraka, P.; Murgue, B.; Deparis, X.; Gorp, E. van; Setiati, T.E.; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Groen, J.

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 1,000 million infections with dengue viruses are estimated to occur annually. The majority of the cases develop mild disease, whereas only small proportion of the infected individuals develop severe hemorrhagic manifestations at the end of the acute phase of illness. In this study, the

  15. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of Acute and Mild Strains of Classical Swine Fever Virus Subgenotype 3.2.

    Lim, Seong-In; Han, Song-Hee; Hyun, HyeSook; Lim, Ji-Ae; Song, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of two classical swine fever virus strains (JJ9811 and YI9908). Both belong to subgenotype 3.2. Strain JJ9811 causes mild symptoms and strain YI9908 causes acute symptoms. The sequences were 95.7% homologous at the nucleotide level and 95.6% homologous at the amino acid level. PMID:26823570

  16. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of Acute and Mild Strains of Classical Swine Fever Virus Subgenotype 3.2

    Lim, Seong-In; Han, Song-Hee; Hyun, HyeSook; Lim, Ji-Ae; SONG, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of two classical swine fever virus strains (JJ9811 and YI9908). Both belong to subgenotype 3.2. Strain JJ9811 causes mild symptoms and strain YI9908 causes acute symptoms. The sequences were 95.7% homologous at the nucleotide level and 95.6% homologous at the amino acid level.

  17. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    Kandeel Amr M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of risk factors of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egypt is crucial to develop appropriate prevention strategies. Methods We conducted a case–control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two infectious disease hospitals in Cairo and Alexandria. Case-patients were defined as: any patient with symptoms of acute hepatitis; lab tested positive for HCV antibodies and negative for HBsAg, HBc IgM, HAV IgM; and 7-fold increase in the upper limit of transaminase levels. Controls were selected from patients’ visitors with negative viral hepatitis markers. Subjects were interviewed about previous exposures within six months, including community-acquired and health-care associated practices. Results Case-patients were more likely than controls to have received injection with a reused syringe (OR=23.1, CI 4.7-153, to have been in prison (OR=21.5, CI 2.5-479.6, to have received IV fluids in a hospital (OR=13.8, CI 5.3-37.2, to have been an IV drug user (OR=12.1, CI 4.6-33.1, to have had minimal surgical procedures (OR=9.7, CI 4.2-22.4, to have received IV fluid as an outpatient (OR=8, CI 4–16.2, or to have been admitted to hospital (OR=7.9, CI 4.2-15 within the last 6 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that unsafe health facility practices are the main risk factors associated with transmission of HCV infection in Egypt. Conclusion In Egypt, focusing acute HCV prevention measures on health-care settings would have a beneficial impact.

  18. Increased vagal tone accounts for the observed immune paralysis in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Kox, M.; Pompe, J.C.; Pickkers, P.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Vugt, A.B. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in the younger population. In the acute phase after TBI, patients are more vulnerable to infection, associated with a decreased immune response in vitro. The cause of this immune paralysis is poorly understood. Apart

  19. Hemifacial paralysis in a child treated for leukemia: unusual side effect of omeprazole?

    Bauters, Tiene G M; Verlooy, Joris; Mondelaers, Veerle; Robays, Hugo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2010-06-01

    We report a hemifacial paralysis as an adverse drug reaction possibly related to the use of omeprazole in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We believe that this case, although very rare, is clinically significant and worth mentioning, owing to the frequent use of omeprazole in the oncology setting. PMID:19617305

  20. Practical aspects in the management of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    Levitt Jacob O

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Management considerations in hypokalemic periodic paralysis include accurate diagnosis, potassium dosage for acute attacks, choice of diuretic for prophylaxis, identification of triggers, creating a safe physical environment, peri-operative measures, and issues in pregnancy. A positive genetic test in the context of symptoms is the gold standard for diagnosis. Potassium chloride is the favored potassium salt given at 0.5–1.0 mEq/kg for acute attacks. The oral route is favored, but if necessary, a mannitol solvent can be used for intravenous administration. Avoidance of or potassium prophylaxis for common triggers, such as rest after exercise, high carbohydrate meals, and sodium, can prevent attacks. Chronically, acetazolamide, dichlorphenamide, or potassium-sparing diuretics decrease attack frequency and severity but are of little value acutely. Potassium, water, and a telephone should always be at a patient's bedside, regardless of the presence of weakness. Perioperatively, the patient's clinical status should be checked frequently. Firm data on the management of periodic paralysis during pregnancy is lacking. Patient support can be found at http://www.periodicparalysis.org.

  1. Kyrieleis plaques associated with Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 acute retinal necrosis

    Neha Goel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 55-year-old immunocompetent male who presented with features typical of acute retinal necrosis (ARN. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous tap was positive for Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV – 1. Following therapy with intravenous Acyclovir, followed by oral Acyclovir and steroids, there was marked improvement in the visual acuity and clinical picture. At one week after initiation of treatment, Kyrieleis plaques were observed in the retinal arteries. They became more prominent despite resolution of the vitritis, retinal necrosis and vasculitis and persisted till six weeks of follow-up, when fluorescein angiography was performed. The appearance of this segmental retinal periarteritis also known as Kyrieleis plaques has not been described in ARN due to HSV-1 earlier.

  2. Acute acalculous cholecystitis by Epstein-Barr virus infection: a rare association

    Liliana Branco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC is a rare complication of Epstein Barr virus (EBV infection, with only a few cases reported among pediatric population. This clinical condition is frequently associated with a favorable outcome and, usually, a surgical intervention is not required. We report a 16-year-old girl who presented with AAC following primary EBV infection. The diagnosis of AAC was documented by clinical and ultrasonographic examination, whereas EBV infection was confirmed serologically. A conservative treatment was performed, with a careful monitoring and serial ultrasonographic examinations, which led to the clinical improvement of the patient. Pediatricians should be aware of the possible association between EBV and AAC, in order to offer the patients an appropriate management strategy.

  3. Cytokine kinetics of Zika virus-infected patients from acute to reconvalescent phase.

    Tappe, Dennis; Pérez-Girón, José Vicente; Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Rissland, Jürgen; Ferreira, Davis F; Jaenisch, Thomas; Gómez-Medina, Sergio; Günther, Stephan; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus currently causing large epidemics in the Pacific Ocean region and Brazil. Clinically, Zika fever resembles dengue fever, but is less severe. Whereas the clinical syndrome and laboratory diagnostic procedures have been described, little attention was paid to the immunology of the disease and its possible use for clinical follow-up of patients. Here, we investigate the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of Zika fever in travelers returning from Asia, the Pacific, and Brazil. Polyfunctional T cell activation (Th1, Th2, Th9, and Th17 response) was seen during the acute phase characterized by respective cytokine level increases, followed by a decrease in the reconvalescent phase. PMID:26702627

  4. Neonatal herpes simplex virus type-1 central nervous system disease with acute retinal necrosis.

    Fong, Choong Yi; Aye, Aye Mya Min; Peyman, Mohammadreza; Nor, Norazlin Kamal; Visvaraja, Subrayan; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Ong, Lai Choo

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 central nervous system disease with bilateral acute retinal necrosis (ARN). An infant was presented at 17 days of age with focal seizures. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction was positive for HSV-1 and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebritis. While receiving intravenous acyclovir therapy, the infant developed ARN with vitreous fluid polymerase chain reaction positive for HSV-1 necessitating intravitreal foscarnet therapy. This is the first reported neonatal ARN secondary to HSV-1 and the first ARN case presenting without external ocular or cutaneous signs. Our report highlights that infants with neonatal HSV central nervous system disease should undergo a thorough ophthalmological evaluation to facilitate prompt diagnosis and immediate treatment of this rapidly progressive sight-threatening disease. PMID:24378951

  5. Recurrent Vocal Fold Paralysis and Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

    Marcus Vinicius Pinto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA, is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years before. Conclusions. We emphasize that shoulder pain and amyotrophy should be inquired in any patient suffering from inexplicable dysphonia, and Parsonage-Turner syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic VFP.

  6. Tenofovir induced Fanconi syndrome: A rare cause of hypokalemic paralysis.

    Venkatesan, E P; Pranesh, M B; Gnanashanmugam, G; Balasubramaniam, J

    2014-03-01

    We report a 55-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with acute onset quadriparesis. She was diagnosed to have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome 7 years ago and was on tenofovir based anti-retroviral therapy for past 10 months. As the patient also had hypophosphatemia, glucosuria and proteinuria Fanconi syndrome (FS) was suspected. She improved dramatically over next 12 h to regain normal power and also her renal functions improved over next few days. Tenofovir induced FS presenting as hypokalemic paralysis is very rare complication and is the first case reported from India. PMID:24701043

  7. Hypokalemic paralysis secondary to tenofovir induced fanconi syndrome.

    Ramteke, Vishal V; Deshpande, Rushi V; Srivastava, Om; Wagh, Adinath

    2015-01-01

    Tenofovir induced fanconi syndrome (FS) presenting as hypokalemic paralysis is an extremely rare complication in patients on anti-retroviral therapy. We report a 50-year-old male with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome on tenofovir-based anti-retroviral therapy who presented with acute onset quadriparesis. On evaluation, he was found to have hypokalemia with hypophosphatemia, glucosuria and proteinuria suggesting FS. He regained normal power in limbs over next 12 h following correction of hypokalemia. Ours would be the second reported case in India. PMID:26692618

  8. Hypokalemic paralysis secondary to tenofovir induced fanconi syndrome

    Vishal V Ramteke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenofovir induced fanconi syndrome (FS presenting as hypokalemic paralysis is an extremely rare complication in patients on anti-retroviral therapy. We report a 50-year-old male with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome on tenofovir-based anti-retroviral therapy who presented with acute onset quadriparesis. On evaluation, he was found to have hypokalemia with hypophosphatemia, glucosuria and proteinuria suggesting FS. He regained normal power in limbs over next 12 h following correction of hypokalemia. Ours would be the second reported case in India.

  9. Recurrent Vocal Fold Paralysis and Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

    Joffily, Lucia; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2013-01-01

    Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP) represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years before. Conclusions. We emphasize that shoulder pain and amyotrophy should be inquired in any patient suffering from inexplicable dysphonia, and Parsonage-Turner syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic VFP. PMID:24288639

  10. Recurrent vocal fold paralysis and parsonage-turner syndrome.

    Pinto, Marcus Vinicius; Joffily, Lucia; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2013-01-01

    Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP) represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years before. Conclusions. We emphasize that shoulder pain and amyotrophy should be inquired in any patient suffering from inexplicable dysphonia, and Parsonage-Turner syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic VFP. PMID:24288639