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Sample records for acute multiple sclerosis

  1. Management of acute exacerbations in multiple sclerosis

    Ontaneda Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A key component of multiple sclerosis is the occurrence of episodes of clinical worsening with either new symptoms or an increase in older symptoms over a few days or weeks. These are known as exacerbations of multiple sclerosis. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiology and treatment of exacerbations and describe how they are related to the overall management of this disease.

  2. Acute form of multiple sclerosis in a child simulation encephalitis

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered the most common demyelinating process involving the CNS. Although usually considered an adult disease multiple sclerosis can begin to manifest during childhood. The clinical presentation of the disease in early childhood can range from paraesthesias to dramatic presentations, suggesting diffuse encephalopathy with cerebral oedema, meningismus and impaired consciousness. Multiple sclerosis is usually characterized by a typical relapsing-remitting clinical course. But there are acute, clinically fulminant forms with atypical. neurologic symptoms and death in months. MRI has become increasingly relevant in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in the past years. Yet, the specificity is limited. Atypical forms of MS and other diseases of CNS may show similar patterns on MRI. We report a case of 7 years old boy with clinically fulminant Marburg type of multiple sclerosis that ended with death in two months. The patient was a diagnostic problem despite the certain degree of clinical and radiological suspicion. The postmortem diagnosis is based on pathomorphologic changes (gross pathologic and microscopic features) in CNS.The present case is of clinical, radiological and pathomorphologic interest because of its early onset in childhood, unusual clinical course and acute progression. Awareness of the MRI features of multiple sclerosis and MS-variants (subtypes) may help in such atypical presentations in childhood. (authors)

  3. Spinal-cord swelling in acute multiple sclerosis

    Despite the frequent involvement of the spinal cord by multiple sclerosis, reports concerning neuroradiological findings regarding these lesions have been limited; most of them have demonstrated a normal or small spinal cord. Two cases of acute paraparesis showed evidence of spinal-cord swelling on myelography and CT myelography, initially suggesting the diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. Spinal-cord swelling was demonstrated more clearly on CT myelography than on conventional myelography. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made with the aid of the CSF findings, the clinical course, and the contracting-cord sign. The ''contracting-cord sign'' means the diminution of the spinal-cord diameter in the chronic stage. Since acute multiple sclerosis may produce spinal-cord swelling simulating a tumor, careful investigations are necessary to avoid unwarranted surgical interventions. (author)

  4. Multiple Sclerosis

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  5. Multiple sclerosis

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.)

  6. Restless Legs Syndrome Presenting as an Acute Exacerbation of Multiple Sclerosis

    Bernheimer, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome is common in patients with multiple sclerosis but has not been reported as occurring due to an acute, inflammatory, demyelinating attack. Restless legs syndrome is known to be related to low brain iron levels. Multiple sclerosis has been associated with the abnormal accumulation of iron in the chronic, progressive phase of axonal degeneration. Iron deficiency may play a role in demyelination. This suggests that restless legs syndrome may be caused by the inflammator...

  7. Multiple Sclerosis.

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  8. Multiple sclerosis

    Eleven patients with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined in terms of correlations between the clinical features and the results of cranial computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: In 5 of the 11 patients, both CT and MRI demonstrated lesions consistent with a finding of multiple sclerosis. In 3 patients, only MRI demonstrated lesions. In the remaining 3 patients, neither CT nor MRI revealed any lesion in the brain. All 5 patients who showed abnormal findings on both CT and MRI had clinical signs either of cerebral or brainstem - cerebellar lesions. On the other hand, two of the 3 patients with normal CT and MRI findings had optic-nerve and spinal-cord signs. Therefore, our results suggested relatively good correlations between the clinical features, CT, and MRI. MRI revealed cerebral lesions in two of the four patients with clinical signs of only optic-nerve and spinal-cord lesions. MRI demonstrated sclerotic lesions in 3 of the 6 patients whose plaques were not detected by CT. In conclusion, MRI proved to be more helpful in the demonstration of lesions attributable to chronic multiple sclerosis. (author)

  9. Multiple sclerosis

    Stenager, Egon; Stenager, E N; Knudsen, Lone;

    1994-01-01

    , need for structural changes in home and need for pension became greater with increasing physical handicap. No significant differences between gender were found. It is concluded that patients and relatives are under increased social strain, when multiple sclerosis progresses to a moderate handicap....... Ninety-five percent lived in own house or flat and 70 percent received disablement pension. More than half of the patients (56.4 percent) were dependent on help from close relatives, most frequently spouse. The need for help, the risk of divorce, loss of contact with relatives, difficulty in going out...

  10. Acute verbal dyspraxia, a rare presentation in multiple sclerosis: a case report with MRI localization.

    Jaffe, Stephen L; Glabus, Michael F; Kelley, Roger E; Minagar, Alireza

    2003-12-01

    Cortical speech disorders rarely occur in multiple sclerosis (MS). We report a patient with relapsing-remitting MS, who presented with acute verbal dyspraxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated an acute T2/Flair hyperintense, primarily white matter lesion underlying the middle third of the inferior frontal gyrus. The verbal dyspraxia cleared beginning 48 hours after the initiation of iv dexamethasone. Follow-up MRI demonstrated qualitative and quantitative diminution of the hyperintensity. This is the first report of a clinically definite MS patient with acute verbal dyspraxia. Moreover, there was a suggestive localization of verbal praxis to Brodmann areas 44/45. PMID:14664479

  11. Idiopathic acute transverse myelitis: outcome and conversion to multiple sclerosis in a large series

    Cobo Calvo, Álvaro; Mañé Martínez, M Alba; Alentorn-Palau, Agustí; Bruna Escuer, Jordi; Romero Pinel, Lucía; Martínez-Yélamos, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background: in 2002, the Transverse Myelitis Consortium Working Group (TMCWG) proposed the diagnostic criteria for idiopathic acute transverse myelitis (IATM) to delimit and unify this group of patients. This study aimed to describe the conversion rate to multiple sclerosis (MS) and variables associated with conversion, and to analyze functional outcome and prognostic factors associated with functional recovery in patients who fulfilled the current TMCWG criteria for definite and possible IAT...

  12. Therapeutic Approach to the Management of Pediatric Demyelinating Disease: Multiple Sclerosis and Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    Brenton, J Nicholas; Banwell, Brenda L

    2016-01-01

    Acquired pediatric demyelinating diseases manifest acutely with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, or with various other acute deficits in focal or polyfocal areas of the central nervous system. Patients may experience a monophasic illness (as in the case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis) or one that may manifest as a chronic, relapsing disease [e.g., multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The diagnosis of pediatric MS and other demyelinating disorders of childhood has been facilitated by consensus statements regarding diagnostic definitions. Treatment of pediatric MS has been modeled after data obtained from clinical trials in adult-onset MS. There are now an increasing number of new therapeutic agents for MS, and many will be formally studied for use in pediatric patients. There are important efficacy and safety concerns regarding the use of these therapies in children and young adults. This review will discuss acute management as well as chronic immunotherapies in acquired pediatric demyelination. PMID:26496907

  13. Acute and chronic cytokine responses to resistance exercise and training in people with multiple sclerosis

    Kjølhede, T; Dalgas, U; Gade, A B;

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established part of rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and it has been hypothesized to stimulate an anti-inflammatory environment that might be disease modifying. Yet, investigations on exercise-induced immune responses are scarce and generally not paying...... attention to the medical treatments of the patient. At present, PwMS are routinely enrolled in immunosuppressive medication, but exercise-induced immunomodulatory effects have not been investigated under these circumstances. The objective of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic cytokines...... responses to resistance exercise training in medicated PwMS. Thirty-five people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β, were randomized to a 24-week progressive resistance training (PRT) or control group. Plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17F, IL-23, tumor...

  14. Multiple Sclerosis in Children

    Soroor INALOO

    2013-06-01

     Nutr 2004 Aug; 58:1095-109. 22. Willer CJ, Dyment DA, Sadovnick AD, Rothwell PM, Murray TJ, Ebers GC, et al. Timing of birth and risk of multiple sclerosis: population based study. BMJ 2005 Jan;330(7:120.23. Mowry EM, Krupp LB, Milazzo M, Chabas D, Strober JB, Bellman AL, et al. Vitamin D status is associated with relapse rate in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis. Ann Neurol 2010 May;67(5:618-24.24. Banwell B, Bar-Or A, Arnold DL, Sadovnick D, Narayanan S, Mc Gowan M, et al. Clinical, environmental, and genetic determinants of multiple sclerosis in children with acute demyelination: a prospective national cohort study. Lnacet Neurol 2011 May;10(5:436-45.25. Disanto G, Morahan JM, Ramagopalan SV. Multiple sclerosis: risk factors and their interactions. CNS NeurolDisord Drug Targets. 2012 Aug;11(5:545-55. 26. Munger KL, Chitnis T, Ascherio A. Body size and risk of MS in two cohorts of US women. Neuroloty 2009 Nov 10;73(19:1543-50.27. Renoux C, Vukusic S, Mikaeloff Y, Edan G, Clanet M, Dubois B, et al. Natural history of multiple sclerosis withchildhood onset. N Engl J Med 2007 Jun; 356(25:2603-13.28. Gusev E, Boiko A, Bikova O, Maslova O, Guseva M, Boiko S, et al. The natural history of early onset multiple sclerosis: comparison of data from Moscow and Vancouver. Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2002 Jul;104(3:203-7.29. Simone IL, Carrara D, Tortorella C, Liquori M, Lepore V, Pellegrini F, et al. Course and prognosis in early-onsetMS: comparison with adult-onset forms. Neurology 2002 Dec;59(12:1922-8.30. McDonald WI, Compston A, Edan G, Goodkin D, Hartung HP, Lublin FD, et al. Recommended diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis: guidelines from the International Panel on the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Ann Neurol 2001 Jul; 50(1:121-7.31. Polman CH, Reingold SC, Edan G, Filippi M, Hartung HP, Kappos L, et al. Diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis: 2005 revisions to the “McDonald Criteria”. Ann Neurol 2005 Dec;58:840-6.32. Swanton JK, Rovira A, Tintore M

  15. Acute and chronic cytokine responses to resistance exercise and training in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Kjølhede, T; Dalgas, U; Gade, A B; Bjerre, M; Stenager, E; Petersen, T; Vissing, K

    2016-07-01

    Exercise is a well-established part of rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and it has been hypothesized to stimulate an anti-inflammatory environment that might be disease modifying. Yet, investigations on exercise-induced immune responses are scarce and generally not paying attention to the medical treatments of the patient. At present, PwMS are routinely enrolled in immunosuppressive medication, but exercise-induced immunomodulatory effects have not been investigated under these circumstances. The objective of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic cytokines responses to resistance exercise training in medicated PwMS. Thirty-five people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β, were randomized to a 24-week progressive resistance training (PRT) or control group. Plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17F, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor-α and IFN-γ were measured before and after 24 weeks of PRT. The acute effect was evaluated following standardized single-bout resistance exercise in the untrained and the trained state. No changes were observed in resting cytokine levels after PRT. However, an indication of reduced IL-17F secretion following resistance exercise was observed in the trained compared with the untrained state. This study suggests little acute and chronic effect of PRT on cytokine levels in IFN-treated PwMS. PMID:26105554

  16. Depression and Multiple Sclerosis

    Depression - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society ... Twitter Email Home Symptoms & Diagnosis MS Symptoms Depression Depression Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print In this ...

  17. Multiple sclerosis - discharge

    Your doctor has told you that you have multiple sclerosis. This disease affects the brain and spinal cord ( ... your doctor may prescribe medicine. Some people with multiple sclerosis need to use a urinary catheter . This is ...

  18. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    Fatigue - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society ... Twitter Email Home Symptoms & Diagnosis MS Symptoms Fatigue Fatigue Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print In this ...

  19. Effects of Single Bouts of Walking Exercise and Yoga on Acute Mood Symptoms in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Ensari, Ipek; Brian M. Sandroff; Motl, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the acute or immediate effects of walking exercise and yoga on mood in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Such an examination is important for identifying an exercise modality for inclusion in exercise-training interventions that yields mood benefits in MS. We examined the effects of single bouts of treadmill walking and yoga compared with a quiet, seated-rest control condition on acute mood symptoms in MS.

  20. Suicide and multiple sclerosis

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon; Koch-Henriksen, Nils;

    1992-01-01

    In a nationwide investigation the risk of death by suicide for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) was assessed using records kept at the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR) and the Danish National Register of Cause of Death. The investigation covers all MS patients registered with DSMR...

  1. Prediction of acute multiple sclerosis relapses by transcription levels of peripheral blood cells

    Or-Bach Rotem

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to predict the spatial frequency of relapses in multiple sclerosis (MS would enable physicians to decide when to intervene more aggressively and to plan clinical trials more accurately. Methods In the current study our objective was to determine if subsets of genes can predict the time to the next acute relapse in patients with MS. Data-mining and predictive modeling tools were utilized to analyze a gene-expression dataset of 94 non-treated patients; 62 patients with definite MS and 32 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS. The dataset included the expression levels of 10,594 genes and annotated sequences corresponding to 22,215 gene-transcripts that appear in the microarray. Results We designed a two stage predictor. The first stage predictor was based on the expression level of 10 genes, and predicted the time to next relapse with a resolution of 500 days (error rate 0.079, p Conclusion We conclude that gene expression analysis is a valuable tool that can be used in clinical practice to predict future MS disease activity. Similar approach can be also useful for dealing with other autoimmune diseases that characterized by relapsing-remitting nature.

  2. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in children: differential diagnosis from multiple sclerosis on the basis of clinical course

    Yun Jin Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS that typically presents as a monophasic disorder associated with multifocal neurologic symptoms and encephalopathy. ADEM is considered an autoimmune disorder that is triggered by an environmental stimulus in genetically susceptible individuals. The diagnosis of ADEM is based on clinical and radiological features. Most children with ADEM initially present with fever, meningeal signs, and acute encephalopathy. The level of consciousness ranges from lethargy to frank coma. Deep and subcortical white-matter lesions and gray-matter lesions such as thalami and basal ganglia on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are associated with ADEM. In a child who presents with signs of encephalitis, bacterial and viral meningitis or encephalitis must be ruled out. Sequential MRI is required to confirm the diagnosis of ADEM, as relapses with the appearance of new lesions on MRI may suggest either multiphasic ADEM or multiple sclerosis (MS. Pediatric MS, defined as onset of MS before the age of 16, is being increasingly recognized. MS is characterized by recurrent episodes of demyelination in the CNS separated in space and time. The McDonald criteria for diagnosis of MS include evidence from MRI and allow the clinician to make a diagnosis of clinically definite MS on the basis of the interval preceding the development of new white matter lesions, even in the absence of new clinical findings. The most important alternative diagnosis to MS is ADEM. At the initial presentation, the 2 disorders cannot be distinguished with certainty. Therefore, prolonged follow-up is needed to establish a diagnosis.

  3. Axon damage and repair in multiple sclerosis.

    Perry, V.H.; Anthony, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that within long-standing multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions there is axonal loss but whether it is an early or late event has been more difficult to establish. The use of immunocytochemical methods that reveal axonal end-bulbs is a valuable approach to investigating acute axonal injury in human pathological material. The application of these techniques to multiple sclerosis tissue reveals evidence of axonal injury in acute lesions; the distribution of the end-bulbs in acute and...

  4. Rehabilitation and multiple sclerosis

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation becomes of major importance in the preservation of physical, psychological and social functioning. Approximately 80% of patients have multiple sclerosis for more than 35 years and most will develop disability at some point...... of their lives, emphasising the importance of rehabilitation in order to maintain quality of life. An important aspect of multiple sclerosis rehabilitation is the preservation of physical functioning. Hot topics in the rehabilitation of physical function include (1) exercise therapy, (2) robot-assisted training...... and (3) pharmacological interventions. Exercise therapy has for many years been a controversial issue in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation and the advice generally given to patients was not to participate in physical exercise, since it was thought to lead to a worsening of symptoms or fatigue. However...

  5. Multiple sclerosis research

    This volume proceedings contains four contributions which are in INIS scope, dealing with MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and assessment of disease activity. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  6. Assessment of demyelination, edema, and gliosis by in vivo determination of T1 and T2 in the brain of patients with acute attack of multiple sclerosis

    Larsson, H B; Frederiksen, J; Petersen, J;

    1989-01-01

    This study intended to investigate the possibility of magnetic resonance (MR) to characterize the acute plaque due to multiple sclerosis (MS). To obtain information, in vivo measurements of relaxation processes were performed in 10 patients with known acute MS plaques, using a whole-body supercon...

  7. Immunopathology of multiple sclerosis.

    Dendrou, Calliope A; Fugger, Lars; Friese, Manuel A

    2015-09-15

    Two decades of clinical experience with immunomodulatory treatments for multiple sclerosis point to distinct immunological pathways that drive disease relapses and progression. In light of this, we discuss our current understanding of multiple sclerosis immunopathology, evaluate long-standing hypotheses regarding the role of the immune system in the disease and delineate key questions that are still unanswered. Recent and anticipated advances in the field of immunology, and the increasing recognition of inflammation as an important component of neurodegeneration, are shaping our conceptualization of disease pathophysiology, and we explore the potential implications for improved healthcare provision to patients in the future. PMID:26250739

  8. Immunopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    Racke Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a suspected autoimmune disease in which myelin-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells enter the central nervous system (CNS and initiate an inflammatory response directed against myelin and other components of the CNS. Acute MS exacerbations are believed be the result of active inflammation, and progression of disability is generally believed to reflect accumulation of damage to the CNS, particularly axonal damage. Over the last several years, the pathophysiology of MS is being appreciated to be much more complex, and it appears that the development of the MS plaque involves a large number of cell populations, including CD8+ T lymphocytes, B cells, and Th17 cells (a population of helper T cells that secrete the inflammatory cytokine IL-17. The axonal transection and degeneration that is thought to represent the basis for progressive MS is now recognized to begin early in the disease process and to continue in the progressive forms of the disease. Molecules important for limiting aberrant neural connections in the CNS have been identified, which suppress axonal sprouting and regeneration of transected axons within the CNS. Pathways have also been identified that prevent remyelination of the MS lesion by oligodendrocyte precursors. Novel neuroimaging methodologies and potential biomarkers are being developed to monitor various aspects of the disease process in MS. As we identify the pathways responsible for the clinical phenomena of MS, we will be able to develop new therapeutic strategies for this disabling illness of young adults.

  9. Astrocytes in multiple sclerosis.

    Ludwin, Samuel K; Rao, Vijayaraghava Ts; Moore, Craig S; Antel, Jack P

    2016-08-01

    Recent experimental and clinical studies on astrocytes are unraveling the capabilities of these multi-functional cells in normal homeostasis, and in central nervous system (CNS) disease. This review focuses on understanding their behavior in all aspects of the initiation, evolution, and resolution of the multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion. Astrocytes display remarkable flexibility and variability of their physical structure and biochemical output, each aspect finely tuned to the specific stage and location of the disease, participating in both pathogenic and beneficial changes seen in acute and progressive forms. As examples, chemo-attractive or repulsive molecules may facilitate the entry of destructive immune cells but may also aid in the recruitment of oligodendrocyte precursors, essential for repair. Pro-inflammatory cytokines may attack pathogenic cells and also destroy normal oligodendrocytes, myelin, and axons. Protective trophic factors may also open the blood-brain barrier and modulate the extracellular matrix to favor recruitment and persistence of CNS-specific immune cells. A chronic glial scar may confer structural support following tissue loss and inhibit ingress of further noxious insults and also inhibit migration of reparative cells and molecules into the damaged tissue. Continual study into these processes offers the therapeutic opportunities to enhance the beneficial capabilities of these cells while limiting their destructive effects. PMID:27207458

  10. Neurogenic Bladder and Multiple Sclerosis

    Krupin V.N.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been presented general information of neurogenic bladder and the data on pathophysiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis. The characteristics of clinical presentations of neurogenic bladder in multiple sclerosis have been stated. There have been considered diagnosis and treatment problems of urinary disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  11. An autopsy case of acute multiple sclerosis with multifocal low density areas in the cerebral white matter on CT scans

    A 34-year-old woman presented with urination difficulty and consciousness disturbance, followed by persistent neurologic findings, such as semicomatose mental status and bilateral optic neuritis, and monophasic clinical course. Cranial CT showed multifocal low density areas in cerebral white matter. The patient was clinically diagnosed as having acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. She died of sepsis four months later. Autopsy revealed multifocal large demyelinating lesions confined to the cerebral white matter, shown as low density areas on CT scans, and demyelinating plaques scattered in the optic nerves and chiasm, and cerebral peduncle. The final diagnosis was acute multiple sclerosis. The CT appearance of multifocal low density areas was most likely due to demyelinating lesions causing edema and tissue necrosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  13. Metamemory in multiple sclerosis

    Claffey, Austin M

    2010-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The concept of metamemory proposes that supplementary to typically measured memory abilities, memory monitoring and control processes are used to optimise learning. Accurate memory monitoring appears to be underpinned by a range of cognitive, and possibly affective, contributions. In populations with these deficits, metamemory has been shown to be impaired. In Multiple Sclerosis (MS), only...

  14. Albumin and multiple sclerosis

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furth...

  15. Tuberous Sclerosis: Multiple Presentations

    M. Sanei Taheri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal do-minant genetic disorder that involves multiple or-gans. The predominant lesions are the hamartomas. Classically tuberous sclerosis has been characterized by a classic clinical triad of facial angiofibromas in 90%,retardation in 50-80%,seizure 80-90% and all three in 30%."nThe disease occurs in 1:100,000 persons in all races with nearly equal distribution between the sexes. "nCase Presentation: We had six patients who admitted with different presentations of tuberous sclerosis with a past history of convulsion from childhood, skin le-sions and mental retardation, also with new onset headache and changed pattern of convulsion. In physical examination facial angiofibromas and sub-ungual fibromas apparently detected. Brain CT scan study with contrast showed multiple calcified nod-ules associated with tubers and ventriculomegaly, also an enhancing enlarged nodule at foramen of mo-nro, which was suggestive of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SGCA. In abdominal and pelvic CT scan and ultrasonography, massive bilateral angio-myolipomatosis diagnosed. Also Focal hypodense le-sions in liver which were hyperechoic in ultrasono-graphy were diagnosed. With MRI study tubers, white matter lesions and subependymal nodules asso-ciated with SGCA were detected better. After surgery SGCA was proved."nDiscussion: Our patients had different presentations and various findings of this spectrum discussed in this lecture.

  16. Multiple Sclerosis and Vitamin D

    ... Editors David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Multiple sclerosis and vitamin D Andrew J. Solomon, MD WHAT IS VITAMIN ... 133:1869 –1888. 8. Solomon AJ, Whitham RH. Multiple sclerosis and vitamin D: a review and recommendations. Curr Neurol Neurosci ...

  17. Multiple sclerosis: evidence and controversies

    Ángela María Gutiérrez-Álvarez

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple sclerosis is a chronicrecurrent inflammatory disorder of the centralnervous system. The pharmacological treatmentof multiple sclerosis has been evaluated withmultiple controlled clinical trials that allow theclinician to count with evidence based informationto decide the more indicated treatmentfor each patient.Methodology: A review of the scientific literaturewas conducted to clarify controversialissues in a clinical relevant topic.Development: The diagnostic criteria ...

  18. Metabolomics in multiple sclerosis.

    Bhargava, Pavan; Calabresi, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system with inflammatory and degenerative components. The cause of MS remains unknown although genetic and environmental factors appear to play a role in its etiopathogenesis. Metabolomics is a new "omics" technology that aims at measuring small molecules in various biological matrices and can provide information that is not readily obtained from genomics, transcriptomics, or proteomics. Currently, several different analytical platforms exist for metabolomics, and both untargeted and targeted approaches are being employed. Methods of analysis of metabolomics data are also being developed and no consensus currently exists on the optimal approach to analysis and interpretation of these data. Metabolomics has the potential to provide putative biomarkers, insights into the pathophysiology of the disease, and to aid in precision medicine for patients with MS. PMID:26754801

  19. Five-day regimen of intramuscular or subcutaneous self-administered adrenocorticotropic hormone gel for acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis: a prospective, randomized, open-label pilot trial

    Simsarian JP; Saunders C.; Smith DM

    2011-01-01

    James P Simsarian, Carol Saunders, D Michelle SmithNeurology Center of Fairfax Ltd, Fairfax, VA, USABackground: Despite over 50 years of experience with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) as a treatment for acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis, there have been no trials examining the options of the 2–3-week dosing regimen or intramuscular injection protocol used in the original trials. At our clinic, we performed a small, prospective, randomized pilot study to examine the effic...

  20. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis.

    Lee, Ji Y; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory neurologic disease that is challenging to diagnose and treat. Although there are many clinical parallels between pediatric-onset MS and adult-onset MS, there is also accumulating evidence of distinguishing clinical features that may, in part, arise from development-specific, neuroimmune processes governing MS pathogenesis in children. Here the authors describe the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric MS, with a particular focus on describing clinical features and highlighting new developments that promise a better understanding of pediatric MS pathogenesis. An important task that lies ahead for pediatric neurologists is better understanding the early gene-environment interaction that precipitates the first demyelinating event in pediatric MS. This area is of particular importance for understanding the MS etiology and the natural history of pediatric MS. Such understanding should in turn inform new developments in diagnostic tools, long-term therapies, and much-needed biomarkers. Such biomarkers are not only valuable for defining the disease onset, but also for monitoring both the treatment response and a disease evolution that spans multiple decades in children with MS. PMID:27116721

  1. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth. PMID:27067000

  2. Temporal lobe lesions and psychosis in multiple sclerosis

    Yadav, R; Zigmond, A S

    2010-01-01

    Lesions in the temporal lobe are associated with psychiatric manifestations in multiple sclerosis. The authors describe this case of a young man with multiple sclerosis who presented with first-episode psychosis and had acute lesions in the temporal lobe. He was successfully treated with olanzapine and β-interferon.

  3. Multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis

    Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Haahr, Sven; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis. However, little is known about the characteristics of this association. OBJECTIVE: To assess the significance of sex, age at and time since infectious mononucleosis......, and attained age to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis. DESIGN: Cohort study using persons tested serologically for infectious mononucleosis at Statens Serum Institut, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, and the...... Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. SETTING: Statens Serum Institut. PATIENTS: A cohort of 25 234 Danish patients with mononucleosis was followed up for the occurrence of multiple sclerosis beginning on April 1, 1968, or January 1 of the year after the diagnosis of mononucleosis or after a negative Paul...

  4. Current concepts in multiple sclerosis

    This volume contains 9 articles dealing with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and positron emitted tomography in the diagnosis and staging of multiple sclerosis. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  5. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from...... butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless, the...... study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  6. Multiple sclerosis - New treatment modalities

    Rocco Totaro; Caterina Di Carmine; Carmine Marini; Antonio Carolei

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the introduction of the first disease modifying therapies, the concept of multiple sclerosis treatment algorithms developed ceaselessly. The increasing number of available drugs is paralleled by impelling issue of ensuring the most appropriate treatment to the right patient at the right time. The purpose of this review is to describe novel agents recently approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, namely teriflunomide, alemtuzumab and dimethylfumarate, focusing on mechanism of acti...

  7. Bone Health in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Vit Zikan

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a gait disorder characterized by acute episodes of neurological defects leading to progressive disability. Patients with MS have multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures, such as progressive immobilization, long-term glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment or vitamin D deficiency. The duration of motor disability appears to be a major contributor to the reduction of bone strength. The long term immobilization causes a marked imbalance between bone formation and reso...

  8. Leptin enhances the release of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from acute multiple sclerosis patients

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of leptin on cytokine production by PBMCs obtained from MS patients either in acute (relapse) or in stable (nonrelapse) phase of disease. Methods PBMCs were collected from 25 untreated acute MS patients, 11 stable MS patients and 20 healthy controls. PBMCs were cultured either with RPMI-1640 alone or with leptin (1.25 nmol/ml), phytohemagglutinin (PHA) ( 100 μg/ml), and leptin + PHA. 72 h later the supernate of the culture medium were collected and stored at -70℃. The pro-inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ) concentration were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA), and the anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-4) concentration were investigated by radioimmunity methods. Results Our data showed that leptin induced IFN-γproduction by PBMCs of patients in an acute phase of disease but not in a stable phase or in healthy controls. Moreover, we found that PHA induced IL-4 production by PBMCs of patients in an acute phase of disease, but leptin inhibited this ability of PHA. Conclusion Leptin can affect on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by PBMCs collected from MS patients, may be this connected with leptin increase the susceptiveness of MS.

  9. Multiple sclerosis: general features and pharmacologic approach

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune, inflammatory and desmyelinization disease central nervous system (CNS) of unknown etiology and critical evolution. There different etiological hypotheses talking of a close interrelation among predisposing genetic factors and dissimilar environmental factors, able to give raise to autoimmune response at central nervous system level. Hypothesis of autoimmune pathogeny is based on study of experimental models, and findings in biopsies of affected patients by disease. Accumulative data report that the oxidative stress plays a main role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Oxygen reactive species generated by macrophages has been involved as mediators of demyelinization and of axon damage, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and strictly in multiple sclerosis. Disease diagnosis is difficult because of there is not a confirmatory unique test. Management of it covers the treatment of acute relapses, disease modification, and symptoms management. These features require an individualized approach, base on evolution of this affection, and tolerability of treatments. In addition to diet, among non-pharmacologic treatments for multiple sclerosis it is recommended physical therapy. Besides, some clinical assays have been performed in which we used natural extracts, nutrition supplements, and other agents with promising results. Pharmacology allowed neurologists with a broad array of proved effectiveness drugs; however, results of research laboratories in past years make probable that therapeutical possibilities increase notably in future. (Author)

  10. Cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis

    Lund, H; Jønsson, A; Andresen, Jesper Graubæk;

    2012-01-01

    Objectives - Although disease load in multiple sclerosis (MS) often is based on T2 lesion volumes, the changes in T2 of normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) are rarely considered. By means of magnetic resonance, (MR) we retrospectively investigated whether T2 changes in NABT explain part of the...... Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). Voxel-wise T2 estimates and total T2 lesion volume were tested for correlations with eight cognitive domains, a general cognitive dysfunction factor (CDF), and the two clinical scales. Results - We found distinct...

  11. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    ... main content Accelerating research toward a cure for multiple sclerosis Home Contact Us Search form Search Connect Volunteer ... is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  12. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis.

    Leray, E; Moreau, T; Fromont, A; Edan, G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequently seen demyelinating disease, with a prevalence that varies considerably, from high levels in North America and Europe (>100/100,000 inhabitants) to low rates in Eastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa (2/100,000 population). Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the disease and its survival data, and a better understanding of the natural history of the disease, have improved our understanding of the respective roles of endogenous and exogenous causes of MS. Concerning mortality, in a large French cohort of 27,603 patients, there was no difference between MS patients and controls in the first 20 years of the disease, although life expectancy was reduced by 6-7 years in MS patients. In 2004, the prevalence of MS in France was 94.7/100,000 population, according to data from the French National Health Insurance Agency for Salaried Workers (Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie des travailleurs Salariés [CNAM-TS]), which insures 87% of the French population. This prevalence was higher in the North and East of France. In several countries, including France, the gender ratio for MS incidence (women/men) went from 2/1 to 3/1 from the 1950s to the 2000s, but only for the relapsing-remitting form. As for risk factors of MS, the most pertinent environmental factors are infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), especially if it arises after childhood and is symptomatic. The role of smoking in MS risk has been confirmed, but is modest. In contrast, vaccines, stress, traumatic events and allergies have not been identified as risk factors, while the involvement of vitamin D has yet to be confirmed. From a genetic point of view, the association between HLA-DRB1*15:01 and a high risk of MS has been known for decades. More recently, immunogenetic markers have been identified (IL2RA, IL7RA) and, in particular thanks to studies of genome-wide associations, more than 100 genetic variants have been reported. Most of these are involved in

  13. The relation between inflammation and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis brains

    Frischer, J.M.; Bramow, S.; Dal-Bianco, A.;

    2009-01-01

    Some recent studies suggest that in progressive multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration may occur independently from inflammation. The aim of our study was to analyse the interdependence of inflammation, neurodegeneration and disease progression in various multiple sclerosis stages in relation to...... disease or brain lesions. We found that pronounced inflammation in the brain is not only present in acute and relapsing multiple sclerosis but also in the secondary and primary progressive disease. T- and B-cell infiltrates correlated with the activity of demyelinating lesions, while plasma cell...... infiltrates were most pronounced in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) and even persisted, when T- and B-cell infiltrates declined to levels seen in age matched controls. A highly significant association between inflammation and...

  14. Psychiatric onset of multiple sclerosis.

    Jongen, P.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    We present a patient with psychotic disorder as onset of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). In this patient, a 26-year-old female, neurological examination revealed only minor abnormalities. As cranial CT scan was normal, her psychosis was diagnosed as psychogenic. Literature on psychiatri

  15. Occupational therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Cardol, M.; Nes, J.C.M. van de; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are referred to occupational therapy with complaints about fatigue, limb weakness, alteration of upper extremity fine motor coordination, loss of sensation and spasticity that causes limitations in performance of activities of daily living and social part

  16. The immunogenetics of multiple sclerosis

    Svejgaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    complex genetic backgrounds. HLA controls immune response genes and HLA associations indicate the involvement of autoimmunity. Multiple sclerosis (MS) was one of the first conditions proven to be HLA associated involving primarily HLA class II factors. We review how HLA studies give fundamental...

  17. [Biological treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Sorensen, P.S.; Sellebjerg, F.

    2008-01-01

    In 1996 interferon (IFN)beta was the first biopharmaceutical product to be approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). In 2006 the more potent monoclonal antibody natalizumab was approved. Presently, a number of monoclonal antibodies are being studied, including...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    ... factors associated with an increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis include changes in the IL7R gene and environmental factors, such as exposure to the Epstein-Barr virus, low levels of vitamin D, and smoking. The HLA-DRB1 gene belongs ...

  19. Neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis

    Bennett, J. L.; de Seze, J.; Lana-Peixoto, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that preferentially targets the optic nerves and spinal cord. The clinical presentation may suggest multiple sclerosis (MS), but a highly specific serum autoantibody against the astrocytic water channel...

  20. Uric acid in multiple sclerosis

    Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    2006-01-01

    Peroxynitrite, a reactive oxidant formed by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at sites of inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS), is capable of damaging tissues and cells. Uric acid, a natural scavenger of peroxynitrite, reduces inflammatory demyelination in experimental allergic encepha

  1. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    In 26 patients with multiple sclerosis 100% responded abnormally to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Lesions in the posterior fossa were observed in 18 patients. The auditory brain stem response was abnormal in 15 patients, and 22 had abnormal immunoglobulins in the cerebrospinal fluid. The correlation between abnormalities of the auditory brain stem response and the magnetic resonance images was greatest in a subgroup where the two investigations were performed within a ten day interval. Results from magnetic resonance imaging, evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations were used to reclassify 13 of 15 patients with clinically ''possible'' or ''probable''multiple sclerosis to a higher level using Poser's criteria. Evoked potentials (the auditory brain stem response in particular) correlated best with clinical multiple sclerosis category. The authors recommend that the magnetic resonance imaging is established as a first-hand investigation in evaluation of multiple sclerosis. Evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations may prove to be more specific, however, and these investigations should also be performed as a routine. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Cortical deafness in multiple sclerosis

    Tabira, T.; Tsuji, S; Nagashima, T; T. Nakajima; Kuroiwa, Y

    1981-01-01

    Cortical deafness in a patient with multiple sclerosis is reported. Complete recovery from total deafness was seen following stages of auditory agnosia and pure word deafness. The otological and neurophysiological studies suggested lesions in subcortical white matter. This report stresses the rarity of the condition, its subcortical origin and good prognosis.

  3. Five-day regimen of intramuscular or subcutaneous self-administered adrenocorticotropic hormone gel for acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis: a prospective, randomized, open-label pilot trial

    Simsarian JP

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available James P Simsarian, Carol Saunders, D Michelle SmithNeurology Center of Fairfax Ltd, Fairfax, VA, USABackground: Despite over 50 years of experience with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH as a treatment for acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis, there have been no trials examining the options of the 2–3-week dosing regimen or intramuscular injection protocol used in the original trials. At our clinic, we performed a small, prospective, randomized pilot study to examine the efficacy and safety of, and patient satisfaction with, a short (five-day self-administered ACTH dosing protocol for exacerbations of multiple sclerosis, and to compare the subcutaneous and intramuscular routes of administration.Methods: Patients for this study were recruited from an outpatient treatment clinic. Each patient self-administered natural ACTH gel 80 U/day by subcutaneous or intramuscular injection for five consecutive days and was evaluated at baseline and on days 7 and 14. Patient feedback was collected using the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGI-C, the primary efficacy measure, a patient global visual analog scale, the Expanded Disability Status Scale, a timed walk, the Nine-hole Peg Test, and the Clinical Global Impression of Change.Results: Of the 20 enrolled patients (mean age 39.5 years, 19 completed the study. On day 14, 61.1% of patients (11 of 18 with day 14 scores were treatment responders, and rated their condition as "very much improved" or "much improved" on the PGI-C. The intramuscular group had numerically more responders, but there was no significant difference in the proportion of responders between the intramuscular and subcutaneous groups at day 14 (P = 0.3. The intramuscular route of injection was associated with more injection site pain than the subcutaneous route.Conclusion: A shorter five-day course of intramuscular or subcutaneous ACTH gel may improve symptoms associated with acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis. Larger

  4. Ipsilateral Uveitis and Optic Neuritis in Multiple Sclerosis

    Eric Thouvenot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Uveitis is 20 times more frequent in multiple sclerosis (MS patients than in the general population. Methods. A retrospective study of local multiple sclerosis (n=700 and uveitis cohorts (n=450 described the ophthalmological and neurological characteristics of patients with multiple sclerosis and uveitis. Results. Uveitis and multiple sclerosis were associated in seven patients. The time intervals between diagnoses of MS and uveitis ranged from 6 months to 15 years. Analysis of the patients’ characteristics revealed that multiple sclerosis was associated with an older age of onset than usually expected, that is, 39 years. Uveitis was bilateral in three cases and mainly posterior (5/10. Five patients presented with acute optic neuritis (two in one eye and three in both eyes. All eyes presenting with acute optic neuritis were also affected by uveitis (P=0.02, though not simultaneously. Conclusion. The ipsilateral association between optic neuritis and uveitis in this series of patients with multiple sclerosis may suggest a reciprocal potentiation between optic neuritis and uveitis in multiple sclerosis.

  5. Multiple sclerosis and herpesvirus interaction

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, and its etiology is believed to have both genetic and environmental components. Several viruses have already been implicated as triggers and there are several studies that implicate members of the Herpesviridae family in the pathogenesis of MS. The most important characteristic of these viruses is that they have periods of latency and exacerbations within their biological sanctuary, the central nervous system. The Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 viruses are the members that are most studied as being possible triggers of multiple sclerosis. According to evidence in the literature, the herpesvirus family is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, but it is unlikely that they are the only component responsible for its development. There are probably multiple triggers and more studies are necessary to investigate and define these interactions.

  6. Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters February 3, 2014 Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression Among people ... sclerosis (MS), those with higher blood levels of vitamin D had better outcomes during 5 years of ...

  7. Multiple sclerosis - New treatment modalities

    Rocco Totaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the introduction of the first disease modifying therapies, the concept of multiple sclerosis treatment algorithms developed ceaselessly. The increasing number of available drugs is paralleled by impelling issue of ensuring the most appropriate treatment to the right patient at the right time. The purpose of this review is to describe novel agents recently approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, namely teriflunomide, alemtuzumab and dimethylfumarate, focusing on mechanism of action, efficacy data in experimental setting, safety and tolerability. The place in therapy of newer treatment implies careful balancing of risk-benefit profile as well as accurate patient selection. Hence the widening of therapeutic arsenal provides greater opportunity for personalized therapy but also entails a complex trade-off between efficacy, tolerability, safety and eventually patient preference.

  8. Molecular mimicry and multiple sclerosis

    Michael Namaka; Michael R. Mulvey; Sabina Kapoor; Leann Simms; Christine Leong; Amy Grossberndt; Michael Prouta; Emma Frost; Farid Esfahani; Andrew Gomori

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Although the exact underlying mechanism leading to myelin destruction is unknown, the molecular mimicry theory is the most commonly acknowledged elucidation of MS pathology. Although various antigens have been associated with MS induction, this review presents studies focused on key bacterial and viral antigens that lead to the development of MS. The research specific to a molecular mimicry theory of MS via each implicated agent is weak; however, collectively the reports provide credible support for this theory. Given that homologous sequences are not required to lead to antigenic cross-reactivity, it is reasonable to conclude that certain viral and bacterial antigens with 5-10 similar amino acids in sequence can lead to self destruction of similar myelin sequences. Thus, this literature review has provided insight to further the understanding of the etiology of multiple sclerosis.

  9. Multiple sclerosis in magnetic resonance

    The authors analyzed MR examination of 277 patients with multiple sclerosis. White matter hyperintesities in brain were found in 270 of them, in spinal cord in 32. The most frequently they were found in periventricular white matter, in subcortical localization and in the corpus callosum. MR examination allows the estimate the activity of the disease on the basis of the presence of edema around the plaques and their contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. About one third of all cases were accompanied by cortical brain atrophy (the most often seen in the frontal lobes), subcortical brain atrophy was less frequent. In about two third of all cases the corpus callosum atrophy was found. MR examination is a highly sensitive method of multiple sclerosis diagnosis, of the assessment of its activity and progression. (author)

  10. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    Kelsey J. Weigel; Sharon G. Lynch; Steven M. LeVine

    2014-01-01

    Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis) patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular prote...

  11. Occupational therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Cardol, M.; Nes, J.C.M. van de; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are referred to occupational therapy with complaints about fatigue, limb weakness, alteration of upper extremity fine motor coordination, loss of sensation and spasticity that causes limitations in performance of activities of daily living and social participation. The primary purpose of occupational therapy is to enable individuals to participate in self-care, work and leisure activities that they want or need to perform. Objectives: to determine ...

  12. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory p...

  13. Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2011-01-01

    The spontaneous recovery observed in the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) is substituted with a later progressive course and failure of endogenous processes of repair and remyelination. Although this is the basic rationale for cell therapy, it is not clear yet to what degree the MS brain is amenable for repair and whether cell therapy has an advantage in comparison to other strategies to enhance endogenous remyelination. Central to the promise of stem cell therapy is the therapeutic pl...

  14. Vitamin D and Multiple Sclerosis

    Raghuwanshi, Anita; Joshi, Sneha S.; Christakos, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D is a principal regulator of calcium homeostasis. However, recent evidence has indicated that vitamin D can have numerous other physiological functions including inhibition of proliferation of a number of malignant cells including breast and prostate cancer cells and protection against certain immune mediated disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). The geographic incidence of MS indicates an increase in MS with a decrease in sunlight exposure. Since vitamin D is produced in the ...

  15. Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    Joana eGuimarães; Maria José eSá

    2012-01-01

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS) prevalence studies of community and clinical samples, indicate that 45–60% of patients are cognitively impaired. These cognitive dysfunctions have been traditionally described as heterogeneous, but more recent studies suggest that there is a specific pattern of MS-related cognitive dysfunctions. With the advent of disease-modifying medications for MS and emphasis on early intervention and treatment, detection of cognitive impairment at its earliest stage becomes par...

  16. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun; Bilge Koçer; Funda Kaplan; Nesrin Yılmaz; Nezih Yücemen; Canan Yücesan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neu...

  17. Multiple sclerosis and birth order.

    James, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the birth order of patients with multiple sclerosis have yielded contradictory conclusions. Most of the sets of data, however, have been tested by biased tests. Data that have been submitted to unbiased tests seem to suggest that cases are more likely to occur in early birth ranks. This should be tested on further samples and some comments are offered on how this should be done.

  18. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  19. Antioxidant use as dietary therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Laura González-González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated disease that produces chronic inflammation and neural degeneration. The disease progresses with acute attacks that result in myelin inflammation. This in turn increases oxidative stress and favors the appearance of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species damage neural cells causing apoptosis. The etiology of multiple sclerosis remains unknown and current therapy is aggressive and expensive. Recently, complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been proposed to control pathogenesis and symptoms of this disease. It is believed that these therapies help slow the progression of multiple sclerosis and improve survival. METHODS We conducted a MEDLINE/PubMed search using the following MeSH terms: diet, multiple sclerosis, antioxidants. We selected the main articles containing multiple sclerosis and diet. RESULTS We analyzed three case control studies that evaluated different dietary approaches in multiple sclerosis. For this review, we also included five experimental studies that studied the efficacy of lipoic acid in humans and rodents in diseases like multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and breast cancer.

  20. Systematic imaging review: Multiple Sclerosis

    Aparna Katdare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterised by immune-mediated demyelination, and is a leading cause of neurological disability worldwide. It has a wide spectrum of clinical presentations which overlap with other neurological conditions many times. Further, the radiological array of findings in MS can also be confused for multiple other conditions, leading to the need to look for the more typical findings, and interpret these in close conjunction with the clinical picture including temporal evolution. This review aims to revisit the MRI findings in MS, including recent innovations in imaging, and to help distinguish MS from its mimics.

  1. Assessment of neuroactive steroids in cerebrospinal fluid comparing acute relapse and stable disease in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Orefice, Ns; Carotenuto, A; Mangone, G; Bues, B; Rehm, R; Cerillo, I; Saccà, F; Calignano, A; Orefice, G

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have reported an involvement of neuroactive steroids as neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS); an analysis of their profile during a specific clinical phase of MS is largely unknown. The pregnenolone (PREG), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and allopregnanolone (ALLO) profile was evaluated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) patients as well as those in patients affected by non-inflammatory neurological (control group I) and without neurological disorders (control group II). An increase of PREG and DHEA values was shown in CSF of male and female RR-MS patients compared to those observed in both control groups. The ALLO values were significantly lower in female RR-MS patients than those found in male RR-MS patients and in female without neurological disorder. During the clinical relapse, we observed female RR-MS patients showing significantly increased PREG values compared to female RR-MS patients in stable phase, while their ALLO values showed a significant decrease compared to male RR-MS patients of the same group. Male RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed PREG and DHEA values higher than those found in female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Similary, male RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed PREG and DHEA values higher than male without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed DHEA values higher than those found in female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Male and female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed ALLO values higher than those found in respective gender groups without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. ALLO values were lower in male than in female RR-MS patients without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Considering the pharmacological properties of neuroactive steroids and the observation that neurological

  2. Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis

    Asghar Amini Harandi; Ali Amini Harandi; Hossein Pakdaman; Mohammad Ali Sahraian

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease and also is one of the most common disabling neurological disorders in young and middle-aged adults. The main pathogenesis of MS has long been thought to be an immune mediated disorder of the central nervous system. The function of the immune system is under the influence of vitamin D which as a modulator of immune response could play a role in autoimmune diseases including MS. Deficiency of vitamin D or variations in DNA sequence (po...

  3. Adaptive Immune Responses in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient with Acute Varicella-Zoster Virus Reactivation during Treatment with Fingolimod

    Andrea Harrer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod, an oral sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P receptor modulator, is approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS. The interference with S1P signaling leads to retention particularly of chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 expressing T cells in lymph nodes. The immunological basis of varicella zoster virus (VZV infections during fingolimod treatment is unclear. Here, we studied the dynamics of systemic and intrathecal immune responses associated with symptomatic VZV reactivation including cessation of fingolimod and initiation of antiviral therapy. Key features in peripheral blood were an about two-fold increase of VZV-specific IgG at diagnosis of VZV reactivation as compared to the previous months, a relative enrichment of effector CD4+ T cells (36% versus mean 12% in controls, and an accelerated reconstitution of absolute lymphocytes counts including a normalized CD4+/CD8+ ratio and reappearance of CCR7+ T cells. In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF the lymphocytic pleocytosis and CD4+/CD8+ ratios at diagnosis of reactivation and after nine days of fingolimod discontinuation remained unchanged. During this time CCR7+ T cells were not observed in CSF. Further research into fingolimod-associated VZV reactivation and immune reconstitution is mandatory to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with this potentially life-threatening condition.

  4. Sodium MRI in Multiple Sclerosis is Compatible with Intracellular Sodium Accumulation and Inflammation-Induced Hyper-Cellularity of Acute Brain Lesions

    Biller, Armin; Pflugmann, Isabella; Badde, Stephanie; Diem, Ricarda; Wildemann, Brigitte; Nagel, Armin M.; Jordan, J.; Benkhedah, Nadia; Kleesiek, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The cascade of inflammatory pathogenetic mechanisms in multiple sclerosis (MS) has no specific conventional MRI correlates. Clinicians therefore stipulate improved imaging specificity to define the pathological substrates of MS in vivo including mapping of intracellular sodium accumulation. Based upon preclinical findings and results of previous sodium MRI studies in MS patients we hypothesized that the fluid-attenuated sodium signal differs between acute and chronic lesions. We acquired brain sodium and proton MRI data of N = 29 MS patients; lesion type was defined by the presence or absence of contrast enhancement. N = 302 MS brain lesions were detected, and generalized linear mixed models were applied to predict lesion type based on sodium signals; thereby controlling for varying numbers of lesions among patients and confounding variables such as age and medication. Hierarchical model comparisons revealed that both sodium signals average tissue (χ2(1) = 27.89, p < 0.001) and fluid-attenuated (χ2(1) = 5.76, p = 0.016) improved lesion type classification. Sodium MRI signals were significantly elevated in acute compared to chronic lesions compatible with intracellular sodium accumulation in acute MS lesions. If confirmed in further studies, sodium MRI could serve as biomarker for diagnostic assessment of MS, and as readout parameter in clinical trials promoting attenuation of chronic inflammation. PMID:27507776

  5. Sodium MRI in Multiple Sclerosis is Compatible with Intracellular Sodium Accumulation and Inflammation-Induced Hyper-Cellularity of Acute Brain Lesions.

    Biller, Armin; Pflugmann, Isabella; Badde, Stephanie; Diem, Ricarda; Wildemann, Brigitte; Nagel, Armin M; Jordan, J; Benkhedah, Nadia; Kleesiek, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The cascade of inflammatory pathogenetic mechanisms in multiple sclerosis (MS) has no specific conventional MRI correlates. Clinicians therefore stipulate improved imaging specificity to define the pathological substrates of MS in vivo including mapping of intracellular sodium accumulation. Based upon preclinical findings and results of previous sodium MRI studies in MS patients we hypothesized that the fluid-attenuated sodium signal differs between acute and chronic lesions. We acquired brain sodium and proton MRI data of N = 29 MS patients; lesion type was defined by the presence or absence of contrast enhancement. N = 302 MS brain lesions were detected, and generalized linear mixed models were applied to predict lesion type based on sodium signals; thereby controlling for varying numbers of lesions among patients and confounding variables such as age and medication. Hierarchical model comparisons revealed that both sodium signals average tissue (χ(2)(1) = 27.89, p < 0.001) and fluid-attenuated (χ(2)(1) = 5.76, p = 0.016) improved lesion type classification. Sodium MRI signals were significantly elevated in acute compared to chronic lesions compatible with intracellular sodium accumulation in acute MS lesions. If confirmed in further studies, sodium MRI could serve as biomarker for diagnostic assessment of MS, and as readout parameter in clinical trials promoting attenuation of chronic inflammation. PMID:27507776

  6. Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Farnaz Etesam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment can emerge in the earliest phases of multiple sclerosis. It strongly impacts different aspects of Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients' lives, like employment, social relationships and the overall quality of life; thus, its on-time recognition and treatment is mandatory. This paper discusses issues, diagnostic methods and treatment options for cognitive dysfunctions in MS. This paper is a descriptive review of the related studies in the recent 10 years, performing a keyword search in the main databases4T. Cognitive impairment mostly involves aspects of information processing, memory and executive functioning in MS. Neuropsychological tests like MACFIMS and BRB-N are recommended for its assessment. Still, there is no fully efficient treatment for cognitive impairment. Researchers have shown some positive effects, using disease-modifying therapies and cognitive rehabilitation. Depression, pain, fatigue and other factors influencing cognitive functions must be paid attention to4T. Recognizing cognitive impairment as a major symptom for MS, makes studying this subject one of the priorities in dealing with the disease. Therefore, a consecutive research for identification and management of this part of quality of life in MS patients is obligatory4T.4T

  7. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    This thesis describes recently developed research methods for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. In Chapter X the use of the CT-scan in the detection of hemispheral or cerebellar lesions is discussed. In chapter XIII the results of the application of all methods to a group of 89 patients with definite, probable or possible multiple sclerosis and to a group of 25 purely optic neuritis patients are presented. With the aid of the CT-scan, hypo- or hyperdense areas in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were found in 52% of the 114 patients. Most reports ascribe these lesions to demyelinating cerebral plaques. The CT-scan showed no cerebellar or brainstem lesions. The CT-scan is independent of the duration of, and degree of incapacitation due to, the disease and can be helpful in giving a definite diagnosis in an early stage of the disease. The CT-scan will always play an important role for the differential diagnosis. (Auth.)

  8. Is Multiple Sclerosis CNS Leprosy?

    Noha t. Abokrysha

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is widely believed to be an autoimmune disorder. Another exciting idea regarding the aetiology of MS may be that the immune response in MS could result from a chronic infection rather than autoimmunity in the usual sense. M. leprae-induced myelin damage in the early infectious process provides valuable insights into the pathologic mechanisms of multiple sclerosis. However, no research has hypothesized the possible involvement of mycobacterium leprae or its components in pathogenesis of MS. Most of the antigens of mycobacterium leprae and mycobacterium tuberculosis are members of stress protein families. Of the M. leprae and M. tuberculosis antigens identified by monoclonal antibodies, all except the 18-kDa M. leprae antigen and the 19-kDa M. tuberculosis antigen are strongly coded with very similar genes. I hypothesize that MS is a syndrome of diseases, induced by intradermal BCG vaccine which may contain the antigen component resembling that of leprae that can either produce central demyelination by itself, or by delayed hypersensitivity. The hypothesis should be assessed in several experimental and clinical trials. If my hypothesis can be verified experimentally and clinically, then measurements to prevent MS disease could be accomplished.

  9. Reproduction and the risk of multiple sclerosis

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils Iørgen; Pfleger, Claudia Christina;

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men.......The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men....

  10. New management algorithms in multiple sclerosis

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2014-01-01

    complex. The purpose of the review has been to work out new management algorithms for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis including new oral therapies and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent large placebo-controlled trials in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis...

  11. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  12. A typical MR imaging of multiple sclerosis

    MR imaging is very useful in detecting the intracranial lesion of multiple sclerosis (MS). We present six patients of MS with atypical MR imaging findings. Six patients aged 27-56 years (mean 36 years), and sexuality of six patients were 2 men and 4 females. Three patient's clinical course had episodes of optic neuritis. The plaque's size of the predominant lesion of the patients ranged from 3.0 to 9.0 cm in diameter. The plaques were oval, elliptically and other shaped. At acute stage, MR imaging detected perfocal edema and focal mass effect in three cases of our study. Two out of six cases showed multiple irregularly enhancing lesion with Gadolinium-DTPA. Plaques of all cases did not disappear completely in final MR imaging study. (author)

  13. A typical MR imaging of multiple sclerosis

    Katagiri, Shinako; Kan, Shinichi; Ikeda, Toshiaki; Nishiyama, Syougo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Matsubayashi, Takashi; Hata, Takashi [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    MR imaging is very useful in detecting the intracranial lesion of multiple sclerosis (MS). We present six patients of MS with atypical MR imaging findings. Six patients aged 27-56 years (mean 36 years), and sexuality of six patients were 2 men and 4 females. Three patient`s clinical course had episodes of optic neuritis. The plaque`s size of the predominant lesion of the patients ranged from 3.0 to 9.0 cm in diameter. The plaques were oval, elliptically and other shaped. At acute stage, MR imaging detected perfocal edema and focal mass effect in three cases of our study. Two out of six cases showed multiple irregularly enhancing lesion with Gadolinium-DTPA. Plaques of all cases did not disappear completely in final MR imaging study. (author).

  14. Demyelination versus remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Bramow, Stephan; Frischer, Josa M; Lassmann, Hans;

    2010-01-01

    The causes of incomplete remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis are unknown, as are the pathological correlates of the different clinical characteristics of patients with primary and secondary progressive disease. We analysed brains and spinal cords from 51 patients with progressive...... multiple sclerosis by planimetry. Thirteen patients with primary progressive disease were compared with 34 with secondary progressive disease. In patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, we found larger brain plaques, more demyelination in total and higher brain loads of active demyelination...... compared with patients with primary progressive disease. In addition, the brain density of plaques with high-grade inflammation and active demyelination was highest in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and remained ~18% higher than in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after adjustments for...

  15. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia [III Neurological Clinic, University Hospital Saint Naum, Sofia (Bulgaria); Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria [Laboratory of Radiation Genetics, NCRRP, Sofia (Bulgaria); Groudeva, Violeta [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University Hospital St. Ekaterina, Sofia (Bulgaria); Hadjidekova, Savina [Department of Medical Genetics, Medical University, Sofia (Bulgaria); Domínguez, Inmaculada, E-mail: idomin@us.es [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Seville, Avda. Reina Mercedes 6, 41012 (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  16. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  17. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  18. Suicide attempts in multiple sclerosis

    Stenager, Elsebeth Nylev; Jensen, Børge; Stenager, Maria;

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were (1) to estimate the risk of suicide attempts in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Denmark and compare the risk to the background population in the County of Funen, Denmark; (2) to estimate the risk of suicide attempts in MS patients receiving immunomodulating...... therapy compared with untreated patients. The Danish MS Registry, the Danish MS Treatment Registry and the Suicide Attempt Registry are linked and merged together using a person identification number given to all persons residing in Denmark. Among 404 MS patients, 15 patients had attempted suicide......, although no increased risk for suicide attempts was found in MS patients. No difference in number of suicide attempts in treated and untreated patients was found....

  19. [Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis].

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2016-04-01

    While cognitive impairment is a major symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is commonly overlooked. This may be explained by the fact that it is difficult to evaluate cognitive function in patients with MS using screening batteries for the detection of dementia such as the mini-mental state examination. Further more, cognitive impairment in MS typically involves domain-specific deficits such as imparement of sustained attention and information processing speed rather than global cognitive decline. Cognitive impairment may influence the daily living and social lines of affected patients. This review discusses the characteristics of cognitive impairment, appropreate tests to evaluate its symptoms, and the current status of clinical trials for the treatment of MS. PMID:27056855

  20. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  1. [Emerging therapies for multiple sclerosis].

    de Lorenzo-Pinto, Ana; Rodríguez-González, Carmen Guadalupe; Ais-Larisgoitia, Arantza

    2013-01-19

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the central nervous system considered the second cause of disability in young adults. The prognosis of MS has improved significantly since the approval of the first interferon β in 1993 but, compared to other diseases, few new therapeutic products have been commercialized in the last years. However, currently, there are more than 600 ongoing clinical trials and new drugs that aim to improve efficacy and a more convenient schedule of administration, will appear shortly on the market. On the other hand, new safety issues will arise as well as a significant economic impact on the health system. The main efficacy and safety results of these drugs are reviewed in this paper. They can be classified into 2 groups: oral (fingolimod, laquinimod, teriflunomide, BG-12 [dimethyl fumarate], oral cladribine, dalfampridine) and monoclonal antibodies (rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab, daclizumab, alemtuzumab). PMID:22766059

  2. 2014 Multiple Sclerosis Therapeutic Update

    Cree, Bruce A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances are occurring in multiple sclerosis disease modifying therapies. Recent therapeutic advances include modifications to improve tolerability of existing products (e.g. interferon beta and glatiramer acetate), development of novel anti-neuroinflammatory medications (e.g. fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate, daclizumab, alemtuzumab, ocrelizumab) and investigation of treatments in progressive MS (e.g. natalizumab, mastinib, natalizumab, siponimod). The impact of vitamin D supplementation on the disease course in relapsing MS patients is also being studied in several clinical trials. This article reviews the current state of the field with a forward look to the next phase of MS research that could focus on strategies to promote remyelination and provide neuronal protection. PMID:24707333

  3. Personality aspects in multiple sclerosis.

    Diana, R; Grosz, A; Mancini, E

    1985-12-01

    To test the claim that peculiar personality bias is detectable in multiple sclerosis (MS) we used the Szondi test to investigate the psychodynamic aspects of 110 MS patients in comparison with 200 healthy subjects. MS patients appeared to have a greater need for love in a passive form than normal people, rigid defense mechanisms, difficulty in resolving their inner conflicts either by sublimation or by internalization of satisfactory new emotional experiences, feelings of autoaggressiveness, and many symptoms of depression. Some of these aspects correlate with the severity of the disease, others seem to date back to early childhood as peculiar personality patterns. An investigation of childhood events in 110 controls confirmed that MS patients had had many more unhappy experiences in childhood than might commonly be expected. Further, the oft-reported psychiatric troubles preceding MS clinical onset suggest that at least in some MS patients there are specific gaps in personality structure dating back to early phases of their development. PMID:4086262

  4. Implicit Memory in Multiple Sclerosis

    G. Latchford

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of neuropsychological studies have revealed that memory problems are relatively common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. It may be useful to compare MS with conditions such as Huntington's disease (HD, which have been referred to as subcortical dementia. A characteristic of these conditions may be an impairment in implicit (unconscious memory, but not in explicit (conscious memory. The present study examined the functioning of explicit and implicit memory in MS. Results showed that implicit memory was not significantly impaired in the MS subjects, and that they were impaired on recall but not recognition. A correlation was found between implicit memory performance and disability status in MS patients. Findings also suggest the possibility of long-term priming of implicit memory in the control subjects. The implications of these results are discussed.

  5. Oral agents in multiple sclerosis.

    Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Frau, J; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Disease-modifying drugs licensed for MS treatment have been developed to reduce relapse rates and halt disease progression. The majority of current MS drugs involve regular, parenteral administration, affecting long-term adherence and thus reducing treatment efficacy. Over the last two decades great progress has been made towards developing new MS therapies with different modes of action and biologic effects. In particular, oral drugs have generated much interest because of their convenience and positive impact on medication adherence. Fingolimod was the first launched oral treatment for relapsing-remitting MS; recently, Teriflunomide and Dimethyl fumarate have also been approved as oral disease-modifying agents. In this review, we summarize and discuss the history, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of oral agents that have been approved or are under development for the selective treatment of MS. PMID:25924620

  6. [Vitamin D in Multiple Sclerosis].

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2015-11-01

    The geographic epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests that low vitamin D levels are a modifiable risk factor. Previous studies have shown that patients with MS have significantly lower vitamin D levels compared with healthy controls. Vitamin D is a potent immunomodulator important for immune function and development, and it offers potential benefits by reducing inflammation. Vitamin D has beneficial effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS. In summation, these studies suggest that vitamin D may have therapeutic potential for MS. This has not been established although preliminary clinical trials for vitamin D in MS look promising. Genetic studies suggest that genes associated with vitamin D are critical susceptible genes for MS. In this review, we discuss current research investigating the association between vitamin D and MS and the issues that need to be resolved. PMID:26560958

  7. Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    Asghar Amini Harandi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic demyelinating disease and also is one of the most common disabling neurological disorders in young and middle-aged adults. The main pathogenesis of MS has long been thought to be an immune mediated disorder of the central nervous system. The function of the immune system is under the influence of vitamin D which as a modulator of immune response could play a role in autoimmune diseases including MS. Deficiency of vitamin D or variations in DNA sequence (polymorphism of vitamin D receptor gene diminishes its optimal function on immune system that consequently could lead to increasing risk of MS. However, its role in development and modulating the course of MS is still under investigation. In this review we aimed to discuss the role of vitamin D in body, immune system and consequently altering the risk of MS.

  8. Cognitive dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    JoanaGuimarães

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In Multiple Sclerosis (MS prevalence studies of community and clinical samples, indicate that 45–60% of patients are cognitively impaired. These cognitive dysfunctions have been traditionally described as heterogeneous, but more recent studies suggest that there is a specific pattern of MS-related cognitive dysfunctions. With the advent of disease-modifying medications for MS and emphasis on early intervention and treatment, detection of cognitive impairment at its earliest stage becomes particularly important. In this review the authors address: the cognitive domains most commonly impaired in MS (memory, attention, executive functions, speed of information processing and visual spatial abilities; the physiopathological mechanism implied in MS cognitive dysfunction and correlated brain MRI features; the importance of neuropsychological assessment of MS patients in different stages of the disease and the influence of its course on cognitive performance; the most used tests and batteries for neuropsychological assessment; therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive abilities.

  9. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C;

    2015-01-01

    to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting......Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple...... of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes...

  10. Multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases

    The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) by computerized tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance are shown, including the examination of cerebral spinal fluid. Lymphocytic, foamy histiocytic perivascular cuffing, degenerated oligodendrocytes, and microglia proliferation with relative axonal sparing are presented. In the latter stage of the chronic MS plaque there is sclerosis with microcystic formation with complete demyelination and organization. (author)

  11. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  12. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    Alexander J Steven

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP, P-selectin expression (CD62p, circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted.

  13. Registers of multiple sclerosis in Denmark

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Magyari, M; Laursen, B

    2015-01-01

    There are two nationwide population-based registers for multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark. The oldest register is The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR), which is an epidemiological register for estimation of prevalence and incidence of MS and survival, and for identifying exposures earlier...... between a number of different environmental exposures in the past and the subsequent risk of MS. Some of these studies have been able to exonerate suspected risk factors. The other register, the nationwide Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register, is a follow-up register for all patients who have...

  14. Multiple sclerosis and sexual dysfunction

    Zhen-Ni Guo; Si-Yuan He; Hong-Liang Zhang; Jiang Wu; Yi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by episodic and progressive neurologic dysfunction resulting from inflammatory and autoimmune reactions.The underlying pathogenesis of MS remains largely unclear.However,it is currently accepted as a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease.Among other clinical manifestations,sexual dysfunction (SD) is a painful but still underreported and underdiagnosed symptom of the disorder.SD in MS patients may result from a complex set of conditions and may be associated with multiple anatomic,physiologic,biologic,medical and psychological factors.SD arises primarily from lesions affecting the neural pathways involved in physiologic function.In addition,psychological factors,the side effects of medications and physical symptoms such as fatigue,muscular weakness,menstrual changes,pain and concerns about bladder and bowel incontinence may also be involved.Since MS primarily affects young people,SD secondary to MS may have a great impact on quality of life.Thus,maintaining a healthy sexual life with MS is an important priority.The treatment of SD requires multidisciplinary teamwork and cooperation among specialists,individual patients,partners and the society.

  15. FDG PET/CT in Acute Tumefactive Multiple Sclerosis Occurring in a Case of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Dong, Aisheng; Gao, Mingjun; Wang, Yang; Gao, Lei; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-09-01

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis refers to the presentation of large demyelinating lesions (≥2 cm in diameter) mimicking brain tumors clinically and radiologically. We present the MRI and FDG PET/CT findings in a case with tumefactive multiple sclerosis, who had chronic graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Head MRI showed 7 cerebral lesions with incomplete ring enhancement. All but one lesion had size more than 2 cm. All these demyelinating lesions showed increased uptake at the rims of the lesions with central hypometabolism. Stereotactic brain biopsy of the right frontal lesion revealed extensive macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration. PMID:26909714

  16. X-irradiation of thyroid during therapy of patients with multiple sclerosis

    X-radiation of 27 patients with thyroid at acute therapeutically resistant, progradient form of multiple sclerosis has been applied. Indistinct therapeutic effect attributed to depression of auto-aggressive allergic processes in cerebrospinal formations is noted in 20 patients after one or two courses of radiotherapy. The method can be used in complex therapy of progradient forms of multiple sclerosis

  17. Defining the clinical course of multiple sclerosis

    Lublin, Fred D; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A;

    2014-01-01

    Accurate clinical course descriptions (phenotypes) of multiple sclerosis (MS) are important for communication, prognostication, design and recruitment of clinical trials, and treatment decision-making. Standardized descriptions published in 1996 based on a survey of international MS experts...

  18. Recent advances in multiple sclerosis therapy

    Seven papers in this volume are in INIS scope, one dealing with autoradiographic detection of multiple sclerosis plaques with radiologands, and the others with magnetic resonance imaging of MS lesions. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Multiple Sclerosis

    ... of multiple sclerosis (MS). The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the world’s largest association of neurologists ... modifying and symptomatic treatments. ©2014 American Academy of Neurology AAN. com What is CAM therapy? How does ...

  20. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis.

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  1. Anti-Integrin Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    Motomu Shimaoka; Hiroshi Imai; Takayuki Okamoto; Susumu Nakahashi; Eiji Kawamoto

    2012-01-01

    Integrins are the foremost family of cell adhesion molecules that regulate immune cell trafficking in health and diseases. Integrin alpha4 mediates organ-specific migration of immune cells to the inflamed brain, thereby playing the critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Anti-alpha4 integrin therapy aiming to block infiltration of autoreactive lymphocytes to the inflamed brain has been validated in several clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This paper pr...

  2. The initiation and prevention of multiple sclerosis

    Ascherio, Alberto; Munger, Kassandra L; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    Although there are strong genetic determinants of multiple sclerosis, the results of migration studies support a role for the environment, and through rigorous epidemiological investigation, Epstein-Barr virus infection, vitamin D nutrition, and cigarette smoking have been identified as likely causal factors for multiple sclerosis. In this review, we discuss the strength of this evidence, as well as the potential biological mechanisms underlying these associations. Both vitamin D nutrition an...

  3. Multiple sclerosis in pregnancy- a case report

    Vedavathy Nayak; Sreelatha S; Sahana Punneshetty

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is primarily a disease of women in their reproductive years. Relapse rate decreases during pregnancy and rises after delivery. Pregnancy and puerperium have opposite effects on the course of the disease. The case presented is that of a second gravida who was a known case of multiple sclerosis. She was managed conservatively during pregnancy and puerperium. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2012; 1(1.000): 67-68

  4. SOME NEUROCHEMICAL DISTURBANCES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Vladimir V. Markelov; Maxim V. Trushin

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe data presented in this manuscript suggest a pivotal role of the central nervous system (CNS) in the regulation of immune status. We describe here that some neurochemical disturbances may provoke development of various diseases including multiple sclerosis. Some theoretic and practical backgrounds, how to improve the multiple sclerosis sufferers and patients with other autoimmune disorders, are also given.RESUMENLos datos que presentamos en este manuscrito, sugieren un papel guia d...

  5. Reproductive history and risk of multiple sclerosis

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Stenager, Egon; Jensen, Allan; Pedersen, Bo V; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Frisch, Morten

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that reproductive factors may be involved in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied associations of reproductive history with MS risk in a population-based setting.......It has been suggested that reproductive factors may be involved in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied associations of reproductive history with MS risk in a population-based setting....

  6. Natalizumab therapy of multiple sclerosis.

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest disabling neurological disease of young and middle-aged adults affecting 1 million persons world wide. The illness begins with a relapsing-remitting MS course in 85%–90% of patients; the other 10%–15% have a primary progressive onset MS. Our current understanding is that MS is an autoimmune disorder with an inflammatory T-cell attack on myelin or some component of the oligodendrocyte--myelin structure. Relapses of disease activity result in plaques of demyelination with destruction of myelin and, to a lesser, extent axons. Lymphocytes within the central nervous system tissue recruit more cells leading to an inflammatory cascade that causes myelin damage, axonal disruption, and neuronal death. If the plaque occurs in a vocal area of the central nervous system then symptoms relating to that area result. However, magnetic resonance imaging shows that approximately 10 times more lesions occur in asymptomatic areas of the brain. Recovery from an initial relapse may appear relatively complete but persistent inflammation results in axonal injury and residual disability results. With time and accumulated lesion load, secondary degeneration of denuded axons results in the phase of secondary progressive MS usually 15-20 years after onset. PMID:20874255

  7. Neuroendocrine Immunoregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Nathalie Deckx

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, it is generally accepted that multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex multifactorial disease involving genetic and environmental factors affecting the autoreactive immune responses that lead to damage of myelin. In this respect, intrinsic or extrinsic factors such as emotional, psychological, traumatic, or inflammatory stress as well as a variety of other lifestyle interventions can influence the neuroendocrine system. On its turn, it has been demonstrated that the neuroendocrine system has immunomodulatory potential. Moreover, the neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bidirectionally via shared receptors and shared messenger molecules, variously called hormones, neurotransmitters, or cytokines. Discrepancies at any level can therefore lead to changes in susceptibility and to severity of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here we provide an overview of the complex system of crosstalk between the neuroendocrine and immune system as well as reported dysfunctions involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, including MS. Finally, possible strategies to intervene with the neuroendocrine-immune system for MS patient management will be discussed. Ultimately, a better understanding of the interactions between the neuroendocrine system and the immune system can open up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MS as well as other autoimmune diseases.

  8. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  9. Multiple sclerosis: Prospects and promise.

    Hauser, Stephen L; Chan, Jonah R; Oksenberg, Jorge R

    2013-09-01

    We have entered a golden era in multiple sclerosis (MS) research. Two decades ago, our understanding of the disease was largely descriptive and there were no approved therapies to modify the natural history of MS. Today, delineation of immune pathways relevant to MS have been clarified; a comprehensive map of genes that influence risk compiled; clues to environmental triggers identified; noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the MS disease process has been revolutionized by high-field MRI; and many effective therapies for the early, relapsing, component of MS now exist. However, major challenges remain. We still have no useful treatment for progressive MS (the holy grail of MS research), no means to repair injured axons or protect neurons, and extremely limited evidence to guide treatment decisions. Recent advances have set in place a foundation for development of increasingly selective immunotherapy for patients; application of genetic and genomic discoveries to improve therapeutic options; development of remyelination or neuroprotection therapies for progressive MS; and integrating clinical, imaging and genomic data for personalized medicine. MS has now advanced from the backwaters of autoimmune disease research to the front-line, and definitive answers, including cures, are now realistic goals for the next decade. Many of the breakthrough discoveries in MS have also resulted from meaningful interactions across disciplines, and especially from translational and basic scientists working closely with clinicians, highlighting that the clinical value of discoveries are most often revealed when ideas developed in the laboratory are tested at the bedside. PMID:23955638

  10. Natalizumab therapy of multiple sclerosis.

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest disabling neurological disease of young and middle-aged adults affecting 1 million persons world wide. The illness begins with a relapsing-remitting MS course in 85%-90% of patients; the other 10%-15% have a primary progressive onset MS. Our current understanding is that MS is an autoimmune disorder with an inflammatory T-cell attack on myelin or some component of the oligodendrocyte--myelin structure. Relapses of disease activity result in plaques of demyelination with destruction of myelin and, to a lesser, extent axons. Lymphocytes within the central nervous system tissue recruit more cells leading to an inflammatory cascade that causes myelin damage, axonal disruption, and neuronal death. If the plaque occurs in a vocal area of the central nervous system then symptoms relating to that area result. However, magnetic resonance imaging shows that approximately 10 times more lesions occur in asymptomatic areas of the brain. Recovery from an initial relapse may appear relatively complete but persistent inflammation results in axonal injury and residual disability results. With time and accumulated lesion load, secondary degeneration of denuded axons results in the phase of secondary progressive MS usually 15-20 years after onset.

  11. Rehabilitation challenges in multiple sclerosis

    Burks Jack

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available While current immunomodulating drugs aim to reduce multiple sclerosis (MS exacerbations and slow disease progression, rehabilitation aims to improve and maintain the functional abilities of patients in the face of disease progression. An increasing number of journal articles are describing the value of the many rehabilitation interventions that can be used throughout the course of the disease, from the initial symptoms to the advanced stages. An integrated team of healthcare professionals is necessary to address a myriad of problems to reduce impairments, disabilities, and handicaps. The problems may be related to fatigue, weakness, spasticity, mobility, balance, pain, cognition, mood, relationships, bowel, bladder, sexual function, swallowing, speech, transportation, employment, recreation, and activities of daily living (ADL such as dressing, eating, bathing, and household chores. The team can help prevent complications and secondary disabilities, while increasing patient safety. Improving neurologically related function, maintaining good relationships, and feeling productive and creative adds enormously to the quality of life of people with MS and their families. Rehabilitation is more than an ′extra′ service that is given after medical therapies; it is an integral part of the management of the diverse set of problems encountered throughout the course of the disease. An interdisciplinary team may have many members, including physicians, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, psychotherapists, social workers, recreational therapists, vocational rehabilitation therapists, patients, families, and other caregivers.

  12. Pediatric multiple sclerosis in Venezuela

    Joaquín A. Peña

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Venezuelan pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. METHODS: Database records from the National Program for MS were searched for patients with an established diagnosis of MS whose first symptoms appeared before age 18. RESULTS: The national database held records of 1.710 patients; 3.8% had onset of the first symptoms before age 18. 46.7% were boys, yielding an F:M ratio of 1.13:1. Many children had a disease onset characterized by motor impairment (30.7%, brainstem/cerebellum and spinal cord affectation (27.6%, headache (26%. Less frequent symptoms were sensory symptoms (8% and optic neuritis (7%. DISCUSSION: Pediatric MS patients in Venezuela represent a significant proportion of all MS cases. The clinical pattern is characterized by motor symptoms at onset, and predominantly monosymptomatic presentation with a relapsing-remitting pattern. This is the first systematic attempt to estimate the prevalence of pediatric MS in Venezuela.

  13. MRI diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    Objective: It's a study of MRI diagnosis and differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in 49 cases. Methods: 49 patients were diagnosed as MS of brain or/and spinal cord in the year of 1995 to 2002. All cases had clinical informations, including evoked potential. MR brain scan was done in 49 patients, and spinal cord scan was performed in 10 cases out of 49. Enhanced scan were done in 29 cases. A follow-up examination was done in 17 patients within 30 days after the initial study. Results: Multiple brain lesions, located in peri-ventricular region, semi-elliptical center, cerebellum and brain stem, were revealed in 47 patients, MS plaques were speckle or patchy and the largest one was 2.2 x 5.0 cm. Simple spinal Cord lesions involving at least 2 sections were revealed in 2 patients. Two cases were initially misdiagnosed as encephalitis. Another case was defined as tumor because of the brainstem swelling and enhanced plaques. Optic nerve impairment was found in a case besides the brain lesions. Complicated brain and spinal Cord lesions were shown in 4 cases. Enhanced MRI scan was performed in 29 cases: non-enhanced lesions were revealed in 7 cases and lesions were enhanced in the rest 22. Mottling or plaque enhancement was presented in 20 cases, while ring enhancement was presented in 2. Follow-up study showed the improvement in 17 cases. Conclusion: Brain and spinal cord MS plaques can be demonstrated on MRI, while clinical manifestation is necessary for MRI diagnosis in atypical lesions. Serial study is helpful for differential diagnosis

  14. Taste dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    Doty, Richard L; Tourbier, Isabelle A; Pham, Dzung L; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Udupa, Jayaram K; Karacali, Bilge; Beals, Evan; Fabius, Laura; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Moonis, Gul; Kim, Taehoon; Mihama, Toru; Geckle, Rena J; Yousem, David M

    2016-04-01

    Empirical studies of taste function in multiple sclerosis (MS) are rare. Moreover, a detailed assessment of whether quantitative measures of taste function correlate with the punctate and patchy myelin-related lesions found throughout the CNS of MS patients has not been made. We administered a 96-trial test of sweet (sucrose), sour (citric acid), bitter (caffeine) and salty (NaCl) taste perception to the left and right anterior (CN VII) and posterior (CN IX) tongue regions of 73 MS patients and 73 matched controls. The number and volume of lesions were assessed using quantitative MRI in 52 brain regions of 63 of the MS patients. Taste identification scores were significantly lower in the MS patients for sucrose (p = 0.0002), citric acid (p = 0.0001), caffeine (p = 0.0372) and NaCl (p = 0.0004) and were present in both anterior and posterior tongue regions. The percent of MS patients with identification scores falling below the 5th percentile of controls was 15.07 % for caffeine, 21.9 % for citric acid, 24.66 % for sucrose, and 31.50 % for NaCl. Such scores were inversely correlated with lesion volumes in the temporal, medial frontal, and superior frontal lobes, and with the number of lesions in the left and right superior frontal lobes, right anterior cingulate gyrus, and left parietal operculum. Regardless of the subject group, women outperformed men on the taste measures. These findings indicate that a sizable number of MS patients exhibit taste deficits that are associated with MS-related lesions throughout the brain. PMID:26810729

  15. Nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis.

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  16. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    Kelsey J. Weigel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen.

  17. Hearing disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    Furst, Miriam; Levine, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that is both a focal inflammatory and a chronic neurodegenerative disease. The focal inflammatory component is characterized by destruction of central nervous system myelin, including the spinal cord; as such it can impair any central neural system, including the auditory system. While on the one hand auditory complaints in MS patients are rare compared to other senses, such as vision and proprioception, on the other hand auditory tests of precise neural timing are never "silent." Whenever focal MS lesions are detected involving the pontine auditory pathway, auditory tests requiring precise neural timing are always abnormal, while auditory functions not requiring such precise timing are often normal. Azimuth sound localization is accomplished by comparing the timing and loudness of the sound at the two ears. Hence tests of azimuth sound localization must obligatorily involve the central nervous system and particularly the brainstem. Whenever a focal lesion was localized to the pontine auditory pathway, timing tests were always abnormal, but loudness tests were not. Moreover, a timing test that included only high-frequency sounds was very often abnormal, even when there was no detectable focal MS lesion involving the pontine auditory pathway. This test may be a marker for the chronic neurodegenerative aspect of MS, and, as such could be used to complement the magnetic resonance imaging scan in monitoring the neurodegenerative aspect of MS. Studies of MS brainstem lesion location and auditory function have led to advances in understanding how the human brain processes sound. The brain processes binaural sounds independently for time and level in a two-stage process. The first stage is at the level of the superior olivary complex (SOC) and the second at a level rostral to the SOC. PMID:25726295

  18. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels in acute monosymptomatic optic neuritis: relation to clinical severity, paraclinical findings and risk of multiple sclerosis.

    Pihl-Jensen, Gorm; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2015-07-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is a common first symptom of MS and only few studies have thus far investigated vitamin D at this early stage of MS. The objectives of the study were to examine total 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (25HVITDL) in patients in acute (A) ON and to determine whether 25HVITD levels in AON (1) predict risk of RRMS and (2) are associated with visual tests of ON severity. A cross-sectional study was conducted of mean 25HVITDL differences between ON (n = 164) and MS (n = 948) patients and of prevalence of 25HVITDL deficiency (vitamin D in the early stages of MS, but does not support the use of 25HVITDL as a predictor of MS development in acute ON. PMID:25929657

  19. Bone Health in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Vit Zikan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a gait disorder characterized by acute episodes of neurological defects leading to progressive disability. Patients with MS have multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures, such as progressive immobilization, long-term glucocorticoids (GCs treatment or vitamin D deficiency. The duration of motor disability appears to be a major contributor to the reduction of bone strength. The long term immobilization causes a marked imbalance between bone formation and resorption with depressed bone formation and a marked disruption of mechanosensory network of tightly connected osteocytes due to increase of osteocyte apoptosis. Patients with higher level of disability have also higher risk of falls that combined with a bone loss increases the frequency of bone fractures. There are currently no recommendations how to best prevent and treat osteoporosis in patients with MS. However, devastating effect of immobilization on the skeleton in patients with MS underscores the importance of adequate mechanical stimuli for maintaining the bone structure and its mechanical competence. The physical as well as pharmacological interventions which can counteract the bone remodeling imbalance, particularly osteocyte apoptosis, will be promising for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with MS.

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinases in patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Rebeca A. Fernández Carriera

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fundament: The proteolitic rupture of the extracellular matrix due to metalloproteinase 2 and 9 is one of the aspects that can influence in the alteration of the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB in multiple sclerosis. Objective: To determine metalloproteinase activity with gelatinous activity in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. Methods: the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples taken from 31 patients suffering from multiple sclerosis and a control group formed by 21 patients without neurological disease. The metalloproteinase 2 and 9 activities in the cerebrospinal fluid were determined by zimográfica technique through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The bands were later analysed by their molecular weight and the relative metalloproteinase 9 activity was calculated. Total protein concentrations, albumin and immunoglobulin G (IgG, the IgG rate and the Q rate were assessed to evaluate the IgG intrathecal and the functional state of the blood-brain barrier. Results: metalloproteinase 2 activity was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of all patients and control group. Metalloproteinase 9 activity was only found in the 61.3 % of the patients. The presence of relative metalloproteinase 9 activity was neither associated with the clinical variables nor the laboratory ones. An association was found between its presence and the oligoclonal bands in patients with multiple sclerosis. In those patients under immunomodular treatment it was presented with less frequency. Conclusions: There is a possible participation of Metalloproteinase 9 in the immunopathological mechanisms of the multiple sclerosis.

  1. Anti-Integrin Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    Eiji Kawamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrins are the foremost family of cell adhesion molecules that regulate immune cell trafficking in health and diseases. Integrin alpha4 mediates organ-specific migration of immune cells to the inflamed brain, thereby playing the critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Anti-alpha4 integrin therapy aiming to block infiltration of autoreactive lymphocytes to the inflamed brain has been validated in several clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This paper provides readers with an overview of the molecular and structural bases of integrin activation as well as rationale for using anti-alpha4 integrin therapy for multiple sclerosis and then chronicles the rise and fall of this treatment strategy using natalizumab, a humanized anti-alpha4 integrin.

  2. Underlying cause of death in Danish patients with multiple sclerosis

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Stenager, Egon

    1998-01-01

    To determine the underlying causes of death in a large population based register series of patients with multiple sclerosis.......To determine the underlying causes of death in a large population based register series of patients with multiple sclerosis....

  3. Multiple Sclerosis, Personal Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Personal Stories: Nicole Lemelle, Iris Young, Michael Anthony, ... something quite different for a person living with multiple sclerosis, such as his girlfriend's brother, Chuy. The more ...

  4. Diagnostic challenges in combined multiple sclerosis and centronuclear myopathy

    Olsen, D.B.; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Schmalbruch, H;

    2000-01-01

    The first case of combined centronuclear myopathy and multiple sclerosis is reported. The difficulties of diagnosing multiple sclerosis in patients with muscular disorders associated with the central nervous system involvement are discussed......The first case of combined centronuclear myopathy and multiple sclerosis is reported. The difficulties of diagnosing multiple sclerosis in patients with muscular disorders associated with the central nervous system involvement are discussed...

  5. Multiple Sclerosis: From Molecules to Treatment

    Simon A. Broadley

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of multiple sclerosis has been radically transformed over the past 20 years and this special issue of IJMS, focusing on the molecular aspects of the disease, highlights the growing conformity of the various investigative approaches. It is a very exciting time to be involved in the research of this disease.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS AND CONCLUS...

  7. The risk of multiple sclerosis in nurses

    Stenager, Egon; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in nurses during the period 1980-1996 was calculated in a nationwide study. The cohort consisted of 69,428 nurses, 2185 men and 67,243 women. Sixty (two men and 58 women) with definite MS were observed, whereas 69.3 were expected. We found no significant...

  8. The role of diet in multiple sclerosis

    Klaudia Konikowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, occurs most commonly in adults between 20 and 40 years of age. Etiology of this disease is still not known, and one of the analyzed environmental factors is food. In this study, based on literature, discusses the impact of dietary intake of food on the occurrence and development of the disease. This study demonstrated that patients with multiple sclerosis less than healthy people ate bread and cereal products, fish, some vegetables and fruits. While patients often consumed an animal products, whole milk and sweets. It also discusses Swank’s diet, which suggest that the severity of symptoms disease may be responsible food of animal origin, which is rich in saturated fatty acids. The author found that patients who comply a diet, after 34 years of application, the risk of death due to multiple sclerosis was three times lower than in those who have not complied with all the dietary recommendations. Moreover, research demonstrated a correlation between deficiency of omega-3, vitamin D, B12, antioxidant vitamins and folic acid in diet, and the development and exacerbation of symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Results of research concerning the relationship between dietary factors and the occurrence and development of this disease are inconclusive why the need is greater the amount thereof in this field. Patients may consider using a diet or supplements, if pharmacotherapy and other alternative and complementary methods do not bring expected effects.

  9. Concordance for multiple sclerosis in Danish twins

    Hansen, T; Skytthe, Axel; Stenager, Egon;

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in twins has not previously been studied in complete nationwide data sets. The existence of almost complete MS and twin registries in Denmark ensures that essentially unbiased samples of MS cases among twins can be obtained. In this population-based study...

  10. Intravenous polyclonal human immunoglobulins in multiple sclerosis

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta-analysis of...

  11. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  12. Etiology and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M

    1998-01-01

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unknown despite decades of intense research. The major research disciplines that have been brought to bear on this question include genetics, epidemiology, neuropathology, immunology, and virology. Recent advances in the understanding of the inflammatory...

  13. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) carries a relatively higher mortality and morbidity than adult MS. Paediatric MS symptoms and paraclinical findings at the first demyelinating event have never before been characterised in a Danish setting. The aim of this study was to compare...

  14. Cigarette smoking and progression in multiple sclerosis

    Koch, Marcus; van Harten, Annemarie; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of cigarette smoking on progression and disability accumulation in multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: Information on past and present smoking of 364 patients with MS was obtained through a structured questionnaire survey. We used Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox r

  15. Psychiatric co-morbidity in multiple sclerosis

    Hoang, Huong; Laursen, Bjarne; Stenager, Elsebeth N; Stenager, Egon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of depression and anxiety in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have reported higher rates in MS patients than the general population. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of depression and anxiety and the use of tricyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors...

  16. Vitamin D Status and Multiple Sclerosis Relapse

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    Researchers at University of California, San Francisco, and State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY consecutively recruited patients with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis into a prospective cohort to determine if vitamin D status is associated with the rate of subsequent clinical relapses.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomics of Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    M.P. Stoop (Marcel)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMultiple sclerosis (MScl) is a highly heterogeneous disease of the central nervous system, and its pathology is characterized by a combination of factors such as inflammation, demyelination and axonal damage [1, 2]. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a relatively interesting body fluid in whic

  18. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...

  20. Lung volume recruitment in multiple sclerosis.

    Nadim Srour

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. OBJECTIVES: Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. METHODS: We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. RESULTS: There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9-190.3 and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72-311 over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001 and PCF (p = 0.042. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  1. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Biswas Sangita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Corticosteroids are standard treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing acute relapse. Because dyspeptic pain is a common side effect of this intervention, patients can be given a histamine receptor-2 antagonist, proton pump inhibitor or antacid to prevent or ameliorate this disturbance. Additionally, patients with multiple sclerosis may be taking these medications independent of corticosteroid treatment. Interventions for gastric disturbances can influence the activation state of the immune system, a principal mediator of pathology in multiple sclerosis. Although histamine release promotes inflammation, activation of the histamine receptor-2 can suppress a proinflammatory immune response, and blocking histamine receptor-2 with an antagonist could shift the balance more towards immune stimulation. Studies utilizing an animal model of multiple sclerosis indicate that histamine receptor-2 antagonists potentially augment disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis. In contrast, proton pump inhibitors appear to favor immune suppression, but have not been studied in models of multiple sclerosis. Antacids, histamine receptor-2 antagonists and proton pump inhibitors also could alter the intestinal microflora, which may indirectly lead to immune stimulation. Additionally, elevated gastric pH can promote the vitamin B12 deficiency that patients with multiple sclerosis are at risk of developing. Here, we review possible roles of gastric acid inhibitors on immunopathogenic mechanisms associated with multiple sclerosis.

  2. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Swathi Balantrapu; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Pula, John H.; Brian M. Sandroff; Motl, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal) and 4 (contracted). Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW)...

  3. Possibilities of computer tomography in multiple sclerosis

    Computer tomography was performed in 41 patients with multiple sclerosis, the average age of patients being 40.8 years. Native examinations were made of 17 patients, examinations with contrast medium of 19, both methods were used in the examination of 5 patients. In 26 patients, i.e. in almost two-thirds, cerebral atrophy was found, in 11 of a severe type. In 9 patients atrophy affected only the hemispheres, in 16 also the stem and cerebellum. The stem and cerebellum only were affected in 1 patient. Hypodense foci were found in 21 patients, i.e. more than half of those examined. In 9 there were multiple foci. In most of the 19 examined patients the hypodense changes were in the hemispheres and only in 2 in the cerebellum and brain stem. No hyperdense changes were detected. The value and possibilities are discussed of examinations by computer tomography multiple sclerosis. (author)

  4. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Biswas Sangita; Benedict Stephen H; Lynch Sharon G; LeVine Steven M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroids are standard treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing acute relapse. Because dyspeptic pain is a common side effect of this intervention, patients can be given a histamine receptor-2 antagonist, proton pump inhibitor or antacid to prevent or ameliorate this disturbance. Additionally, patients with multiple sclerosis may be taking these medications independent of corticosteroid treatment. Interventions for gastric disturbances can influence the activ...

  5. Musical identity of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Moreira, Shirlene Vianna; França, Cecília Cavalieri; Moreira, Marcos Aurélio; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio

    2009-03-01

    Musical autobiographies consist of a powerful therapeutic tool by which individuals define themselves. The use of this technique may help (re)construction personal identities and improve quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Eight adult patients on treatment at CIEM Multiple Sclerosis Investigation Center after selecting 10 to 15 pieces of music most significant in their lives were interviewed. The data collected were classified according to Even Rudd categories, which reveal how a person expresses his personal, social, temporal and transpersonal identities. We observed that recall of musical history makes MS patients get better perception both of their feelings and body awareness, as well as provide them with an alternative way to express themselves, activate and contextualize affective memories, and achieving a sense of life continuity in spite of the disease. PMID:19330210

  6. Multiple sclerosis--new treatment modalities.

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, Caterina; Marini, Carmine; Carolei, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Ever since the introduction of the first disease modifying therapies, the concept of multiple sclerosis treatment algorithms developed ceaselessly. The increasing number of available drugs is paralleled by impelling issue of ensuring the most appropriate treatment to the right patient at the right time. The purpose of this review is to describe novel agents recently approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, namely teriflunomide, alemtuzumab and dimethylfumarate, focusing on mechanism of action, efficacy data in experimental setting, safety and tolerability. The place in therapy of newer treatment implies careful balancing of risk-benefit profile as well as accurate patient selection. Hence the widening of therapeutic arsenal provides greater opportunity for personalized therapy but also entails a complex trade-off between efficacy, tolerability, safety and eventually patient preference. PMID:26831413

  7. Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    Nielsen, Nete M; Westergaard, Tine; Frisch, Morten; Rostgaard, Klaus; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Melbye, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute considerably to the burden of autoimmune diseases in young adults. Although HLA patterns of T1D and MS are considered mutually exclusive, individual and familial co-occurrence of the 2 diseases has been reported...... Multiple Sclerosis Register were used to identify patients with T1D, defined as patients in whom diabetes was diagnosed before age 20 years (N = 6078), and patients with MS (N = 11 862). First-degree relatives (N = 14,771) of patients with MS were identified from family information in the Danish Civil......, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.12; n = 56) for development of T1D. However, adjusting for familial relationship to patients with T1D reduced the excess risk to 44% (relative risk, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.88; n = 56). CONCLUSION: The present nationwide cohort study demonstrates...

  8. SOME NEUROCHEMICAL DISTURBANCES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Vladimir V. Markelov

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe data presented in this manuscript suggest a pivotal role of the central nervous system (CNS in the regulation of immune status. We describe here that some neurochemical disturbances may provoke development of various diseases including multiple sclerosis. Some theoretic and practical backgrounds, how to improve the multiple sclerosis sufferers and patients with other autoimmune disorders, are also given.RESUMENLos datos que presentamos en este manuscrito, sugieren un papel guia del sistema nervioso central (SNC en la regulación del estado inmune. Describimos aquí que varias alteraciones neuroquímicas pueden provocar el desarrollo de varias enfermedades, incluyendo esclerosis múltiple. También se comenta acerca del trasfondo teórico y práctico, y cómo mejorar a víctimas y pacientes con esclerosis múltiple y otras alteraciones autoinmunes.

  9. Endocannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous reports that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have for many years been self-medicating with illegal street cannabis or more recently medicinal cannabis to alleviate the symptoms associated with MS and also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These anecdotal reports have been confirmed by data from animal models and more recently clinical trials on the ability of cannabinoids to alleviate limb spasticity, a common feature of progressive MS (and also ALS) and neurodegeneration. Experimental studies into the biology of the endocannabinoid system have revealed that cannabinoids have efficacy, not only in symptom relief but also as neuroprotective agents which may slow disease progression and thus delay the onset of symptoms. This review discusses what we now know about the endocannabinoid system as it relates to MS and ALS and also the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid therapeutics as disease-modifying or symptom control agents, as well as future therapeutic strategies including the potential for slowing disease progression in MS and ALS. PMID:26408162

  10. Rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis patients in India

    Nirmal Surya

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease which is one of the leading causes of handicap in young subjects. The large range of symptoms associated with MS lead to continuing decline in neurologic status and quality of life. The coexistence of physical and cognitive impairments, together with the imprevisible evolution of the disease makes MS rehabilitation very challenging. The main objective of rehabilitation is, therefore, to ease the burden of symptoms by improving self-perf...

  11. Isolated cranial nerve palsies in multiple sclerosis

    Zadro, Ivana; Barun, Barbara; Habek, Mario; Brinar, Vesna V.

    1997-01-01

    During a 10 year period 24 patients with definite multiple sclerosis with isolated cranial nerve palsies were studied (third and fourth nerve: one patient each, sixth nerve: 12 patients, seventh nerve: three patients, eighth nerve: seven patients), in whom cranial nerve palsies were the presenting sign in 14 and the only clinical sign of an exacerbation in 10 patients. MRI was carried out in 20 patients and substantiated corresponding brainstem lesions in seven patients (...

  12. Dietary pattern and risk of multiple sclerosis

    Mahdi Aloosh; Mansoureh Toghae; Mohammad Jamal Razeghi Jahromi; Soodeh Razeghi Jahromi

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that nutrition might play a role in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, dietary patterns associated with MS risk are unknown. This study was conducted to compare the dietary patterns of patients with MS and healthy controls to find the relationship between dietary patterns and MS. Methods Usual dietary intake of 75 women with relapsing/remitting MS (RRMS) and 75 healthy controls were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire consisting of 168 ...

  13. Neuronal degeneration in spinal multiple sclerosis

    Bernhardt, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate neuronal degeneration in spinal multiple sclerosis the spinal cord of 27 post mortem patients of the years 1997 to 2000 was investigated in comparison to 29 controls matched for sex, age and year of death. In addition to immunohistochemical examinations and demonstration of pathological cell changes, we also quantified the neurons of the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. In comparison to controls, MS-patients show a significant loss of 43% of the cervical neurons and a signif...

  14. Diagnosis and management of multiple sclerosis.

    Calabresi, Peter A

    2004-11-15

    Multiple sclerosis, an idiopathic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, is characterized pathologically by demyelination and subsequent axonal degeneration. The disease commonly presents in young adults and affects twice as many women as men. Common presenting symptoms include numbness, weakness, visual impairment, loss of balance, dizziness, urinary bladder urgency, fatigue, and depression. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis should be made by a physician with experience in identifying the disease. Diagnosis should be based on objective evidence of two or more neurologic signs that are localized to the brain or spinal cord and are disseminated in time and space (i.e., occur in different parts of the central nervous system at least three months apart). Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium contrast, especially during or following a first attack, can be helpful in providing evidence of lesions in other parts of the brain and spinal cord. A second magnetic resonance scan may be useful at least three months after the initial attack to identify new lesions and provide evidence of dissemination over time. It is critical to exclude other diseases that can mimic multiple sclerosis, including vascular disease, spinal cord compression, vitamin B12 deficiency, central nervous system infection (e.g., Lyme disease, syphilis), and other inflammatory conditions (e.g., sarcoidosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome). Symptom-specific drugs can relieve spasticity, bladder dysfunction, depression, and fatigue. Five disease-modifying treatments for multiple sclerosis have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These treatments are partially effective in reducing exacerbations and may slow progression of disability. PMID:15571060

  15. Impaired neurosteroid synthesis in multiple sclerosis

    Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Ellestad, Kristofor K.; Maingat, Ferdinand; Warren, Kenneth G; Han, May H.; Steinman, Lawrence; Baker, Glen B.; Power, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput technologies have led to advances in the recognition of disease pathways and their underlying mechanisms. To investigate the impact of micro-RNAs on the disease process in multiple sclerosis, a prototypic inflammatory neurological disorder, we examined cerebral white matter from patients with or without the disease by micro-RNA profiling, together with confirmatory reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis, immunoblotting and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry...

  16. Stimulation of motor tracts in multiple sclerosis.

    Berardelli, A; Inghilleri, M; Cruccu, G.; Fornarelli, M; Accornero, N; Manfredi, M.

    1988-01-01

    Percutaneous electrical stimulation of the motor cortex was used to evaluate corticospinal conduction to upper-limb motoneurons in 29 patients with multiple sclerosis. Central motor conduction abnormalities were correlated with clinical signs and somatosensory evoked potentials. Muscle responses to cortical stimulation were altered in 20 patients. The most common abnormality was increased central motor conduction time; in two cases the responses to cortical stimulation were absent. Abnormalit...

  17. Update in vitamin D and multiple sclerosis

    Alharbi, Fatimah M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease, and its etiology remains unknown. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the possible association between MS and vitamin D deficiency. Here, we review the current literature between MS and vitamin D, showing clear evidence that vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for MS despite the lack of direct evidence for the effects of vitamin D in MS progression.

  18. Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis: an update

    Cantorna, Margherita T.

    2008-01-01

    Observational studies document a positive relationship between vitamin D from the environment (sunlight or diet), circulating vitamin D status, and improved symptoms or prevention of multiple sclerosis (MS). Experimental animal models of MS reproduce the beneficial effects of vitamin D and 1,25(OH)2D3. The geographical distribution of MS can be explained by both the hygiene hypothesis and the vitamin D hypothesis. It therefore seems more likely that both hypotheses may be correct and that the...

  19. Update in vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    Alharbi, Fatimah M

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease, and its etiology remains unknown. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the possible association between MS and vitamin D deficiency. Here, we review the current literature between MS and vitamin D, showing clear evidence that vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for MS despite the lack of direct evidence for the effects of vitamin D in MS progression. PMID:26492110

  20. Cluster headache attacks and multiple sclerosis

    Gentile, Salvatore; Ferrero, Margherita; Vaula, Giovanna; Rainero, Innocenzo; Pinessi, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed typical cluster headache attacks and was diagnosed as having multiple sclerosis (MS) at the same time. The headache attacks resolved after i.v. treatment with methylprednisolone. MR imaging showed a pontine demyelinating lesion involving the trigeminal nerve root inlet area, on the same side as the pain. The association between cluster headache and MS has been rarely described before. This case suggests that in patients with cluster headache neuro...

  1. Therapeutic potential of LIF in multiple sclerosis

    Slaets, Leen; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.; STINISSEN, Piet; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.; Hellings, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce the relapse rate but are unable to stop neurological decline. Here, we evaluate the potential of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as a novel therapeutic in diseases with a neurodegenerative and inflammatory component, such as MS. LIF, which can be a proinflammatory cytokine, can also modulate the immune response in a beneficial way. Recent evidence demonstrates a crucial role of LIF in neuroprotection and axonal regeneration as well as the preventi...

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases, synaptic injury, and multiple sclerosis

    ArekSzklarczyk

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a disease of the central nervous system in which immune mediated damage to myelin is characteristic. For an overview of this condition and its pathophysiology, please refer to one of many excellent published reviews. To follow, is a discussion focused on the possibility that synaptic injury occurs in at least a subset of patients, and that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play a role in such.

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinases, Synaptic Injury, and Multiple Sclerosis

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Conant, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system in which immune mediated damage to myelin is characteristic. For an overview of this condition and its pathophysiology, please refer to one of many excellent published reviews (Sorensen and Ransohoff, 1998; Weiner, 2009). To follow, is a discussion focused on the possibility that synaptic injury occurs in at least a subset of patients, and that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a role in such.

  4. Alemtuzumab in the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Fernandez Ó

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Óscar Fernandez Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology Department, Hospital Regional Universitario Carlos Haya, FIMABIS, Malaga, Spain Abstract: Alemtuzumab (formerly known as Campath-1H has recently been approved by the European Medicines Agency for highly-active, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS. The molecule targets the CD52 surface glycoprotein on certain T cells and B cells and is thought to exert its effect in MS through a “resetting” of the lymphocyte population. Approval was granted on the strength of two pivotal studies, Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif® Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis (CARE-MS-1 in the first-line setting and CARE-MS-2 in patients who had failed first-line therapy. In both studies, alemtuzumab significantly reduced the relapse rate compared to the comparator, interferon beta-1a (44 µg given subcutaneously three-times per week (Rebif®. In the first-line study, alemtuzumab was also found to significantly reduce the number of patients with sustained progression compared to interferon beta-1a therapy. Autoimmune disorders represent the major side effect of alemtuzumab therapy although they can be managed by careful monitoring and early treatment. Overall, alemtuzumab is likely to be a valuable addition to the neurologist´s armamentarium for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS. Keywords: alemtuzumab, multiple sclerosis, new therapies, interferon beta-1a, monoclonal antibody, treatment

  5. Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: (An update

    Hossein Zarei

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND:To study the dimensions of fatigue in multiple sclerosis, its pathophysiology, the efficacy, tolerability and safety of drug and non-drug treatments and measurement of fatigue. METHODS: Relevant articles from PubMed and Google scholar search engines from January 1987 until September 2006 were studied to compose a short clinical update (not a systematic review and make the required clinical information available for the clinicians. RESULTS: There is evidence that fatigue is very common in all types and stages of multiple sclerosis, but its pathophysiology is not well explained. Consequently, few drug options have been offered for its treatment. Amantadine is the bestknown drug, though its efficacy and duration of action are limited. Pemoline and modafinil are alternatives and have
    some effects on fatigue. DAP (diaminopyridine, ASA (acetylsalicylic acid, methylphenidate and fluoxetine are other possible options but await further confirmation. Neurorehabilitation, regular exercise and cooling are confirmed to be of value in MS treatment. Measurement of fatigue is a complicated issue. At present fatigue does not have a laboratory marker. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this short clinical update provide guidelines for diagnosing MS-related fatigue and differentiating
    it from other similar physical and psychological conditions. It also examines prescription drug options and other therapies for MS patients with fatigue.
    KEYWORDS: Multiple sclerosis, fatigue, pathophysiology, treatment, measurement.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    In 1983 the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Great Britain and Northern Ireland set up the Multiple Sclerosis NMR Research Group at the Institute of Neurology and the National Hospital, Queen Square. The first aim of the Group was to define the role of MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, and this Atlas represents a summary of that work. Our strategy was to determine the pattern of MRI abnormalities in clinically definite MS and to compare it with those of isolated clinical syndromes of the kind seen in MS (e.g. optic neuritis) and of other disorders with which MS can be confused clinically or radiologically. We have also been involved in a major program of experimental work designed to elucidate the origin of the abnormal signals in MRI. To describe this in full detail would go beyond the scope of the Atlas, but we have incorporated such results as far as they illuminate our clinical problems. The imager used was a 0.5 Tesla Picker superconducting system. Technical advances have been rapid since we began. Nevertheless, the quality of the images obtained at our relatively low field has enabled us to establish the patterns of abnormality in the brain in MS and the diseases which must be distinguished from it. (orig./MG)

  7. Statin treatment in multiple sclerosis

    Pihl-Jensen, Gorm; Tsakiri, Anna; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2015-01-01

    candidates for MS treatment due to reliable safety profiles and favorable costs. Studies of statins in a murine MS model and in open-label trials in MS have shown decreased disease severity. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess current evidence to support statin treatment in MS and clinically isolated......)-β treatment in RRMS, one of statin monotherapy in CIS, one of statin monotherapy in optic neuritis (ON)/CIS, and one of statin monotherapy in secondary progressive MS (SPMS)]. Three trials with eligible characteristics had not been published in peer-reviewed journals and were therefore not included. Due to...... activity or risk of MS between statin monotherapy and placebo. In acute ON, statin monotherapy produced better visual outcome but no difference in relapse activity, MRI activity, or risk of MS. CONCLUSIONS: The pleiotropic effects and effects in the murine model of MS could not be converted to a proven...

  8. Serial MRI studies using gadolinium DTPA in active multiple sclerosis

    It has been suggested that blood brain barrier (BBB) impairment is a necessary early event in the pathogenesis of the multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. To evaluate such an hypothesis in vivo would require: (1) serial imaging studies using a modality with high sensitivity for detecting plaques; (2) a contrast enhancing agent which demonstrates BBB impairment. A serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was undertaken of a group of MS patients using the contrast agent gadolinium-DTPA. As it has been suggested that T1 and T2 relaxation times are longer in acute than chronic MS lesions, these were also measured. 3 refs.; 1 figure

  9. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Risk Factors: A Case-Control Study

    POOROLAJAL, Jalal; Mazdeh, Mehrdokht; Saatchi, Mohammad; TALEBI GHANE, Elaheh; BIDERAFSH, Azam; LOTFI, Bahar; Mohammad FERYADRES; PAJOHI, Khabat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamadan Province is one of the high-risk regions in Iran for Multiple sclerosis (MS). A majority of the epidemiological studies conducted in Iran addressing MS are descriptive. This study was conducted to assess MS and its associated risk factors in Hamadan Province, the west of Iran.Methods: This case-control study compared 100 patients with MS (case group) and 100 patients with acute infectious diseases (control group) from September 2013 to March 2014. A checklist was used to a...

  10. Intravenous immunoglobulin and interferon: successful treatment of optic neuritis in pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    Spalice, Alberto; Properzi, Enrico; Lo Faro, Valentina; Acampora, Barbara; Iannetti, Paola

    2004-08-01

    Optic neuritis is a common clinical condition that causes loss of vision. It can be clinically isolated or can occur as one of the manifestations of multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is a severe disabling demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which is rare among children. The treatment of optic neuritis has been investigated in several trials, the results of which have shown that corticosteroids speed up the recovery of vision without affecting the final visual outcome. Treatment of neurologic disorders with intravenous immunoglobulin is an increasing feature of our practice for an expanding range of indications, including multiple sclerosis. Owing to its anti-inflammatory properties, intravenous immunoglobulin can be beneficial in the treatment of acute relapses and in the prevention of new relapses of multiple sclerosis. To our knowledge, there is only one experience of treatment of optic neuritis with intravenous immunoglobulin in multiple sclerosis, even if therapeutic trials are used in the therapy of multiple sclerosis. We report on a girl with optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis in whom treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin at first alone and subsequently associated with interferon achieved great improvement in visual acuity. PMID:15605474

  11. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey; Amato, Maria Pia; Anlar, Banu; Blinkenberg, Morten; Boon, Maartje; Filippi, Massimo; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Ketelslegers, Immy; Kornek, Barbara; Lim, Ming; Lindstrom, Eva; Nadj, Congor; Neuteboom, Rinze; Rocca, Maria A; Rostasy, Kevin; Tardieu, Marc; Wassmer, Evangeline; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene; Hintzen, Rogier

    2010-01-01

    the paediatric multiple sclerosis population has triggered the use of disease-modifying therapies that have been shown to reduce relapse rate, disease progression and cognitive decline in adult patients with multiple sclerosis. Hard evidence for the right treatment and its appropriate timing is scarce......About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity in...

  12. The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. History, data collection and validity

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Rasmussen, S; Stenager, E;

    2001-01-01

    The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry was formally established in 1956 but started operating in 1949 with a nationwide prevalence survey. Since then, the Registry has continued collecting data on new and old cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) or suspected MS from multiple sources. The Registry...

  13. "Disease modifying nutricals" for multiple sclerosis.

    Schmitz, Katja; Barthelmes, Julia; Stolz, Leonie; Beyer, Susanne; Diehl, Olaf; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    The association between vitamin D and multiple sclerosis has (re)-opened new interest in nutrition and natural compounds in the prevention and treatment of this neuroinflammatory disease. The dietary amount and type of fat, probiotics and biologicals, salmon proteoglycans, phytoestrogens and protease inhibitor of soy, sodium chloride and trace elements, and fat soluble vitamins including D, A and E were all considered as disease-modifying nutraceuticals. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice suggest that poly-unsaturated fatty acids and their 'inflammation-resolving' metabolites and the gut microflora may reduce auto-aggressive immune cells and reduce progression or risk of relapse, and infection with whipworm eggs may positively change the gut-brain communication. Encouraged by the recent interest in multiple sclerosis-nutrition nature's pharmacy has been searched for novel compounds with anti-inflammatory, immune-modifying and antioxidative properties, the most interesting being the scorpion toxins that inhibit specific potassium channels of T cells and antioxidative compounds including the green tea flavonoid epigallocatechin-3-gallate, curcumin and the mustard oil glycoside from e.g. broccoli and sulforaphane. They mostly also inhibit pro-inflammatory signaling through NF-κB or toll-like receptors and stabilize the blood brain barrier. Disease modifying functions may also complement analgesic and anti-spastic effects of cannabis, its constituents, and of 'endocannabinoid enhancing' drugs or nutricals like inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase. Nutricals will not solve multiple sclerosis therapeutic challenges but possibly support pharmacological interventions or unearth novel structures. PMID:25435020

  14. Epileptic Seizures in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Kamber Zeqiraj

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The presence of epileptic seizures in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS is a well-known phenomenon. The aims of our study, performed in our clinic are to point out the correlation of the mean age/gender and age of MS patients with the onset of seizures, to identify the types of epileptic seizures in MS patients by sex/age, to identify the correlation between relapses and seizures, and to identify the main electrophysiological / imaging changes. Material and Met-hod: The medical records of 300 MS patients observed between January 2000 and December 2009 in the Neurological Clinic of University Clinical Centre of Kosova were reviewed. All patients fulfilled the McDonald MS criteria Epilepsy diagnosis was based on the ILAE (International League against Epilepsy (1983 criteria while epileptic seizures were classified based on the ILAE classification (1981. Results: Out of 300 MS patients enrolled in this study, 49 (16.33% were identified with seizures or epilepsy. In 23 (47% patients out of 49, seizures or epilepsy appeared after the MS diagnosis. In 6 patients (12.2%, epileptic attacks preceded the MS diagnosis, while in 20 patients (40.8%, epilepsy was diagnosed before multiple sclerosis. These patients were treated with antiepileptics. Out of 23 patients (47% in whom the epileptic seizures appeared after the MS diagnosis, 17 (74% had simple partial seizures, and 6 (26% had complex partial seizures. Based to our study, the epileptic seizures in MS patients appeared about 2.2 years after the MS diagnosis. Discussion: Simple partial seizures were 2.8 times more frequent compared to complex partial seizures. In female patients the prevalence of complex partial seizures was higher than in male patients with multiple sclerosis. (Turkish Journal of Neurology 2013; 19: 40-3

  15. Reproductive History and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    Nielsen, N. M.; Jorgensen, K. T.; Stenager, E.; Jensen, A.; Pedersen, B. V.; Hjalgrim, H.; Kjaer, S. K.; Frisch, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that reproductive factors may be involved in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied associations of reproductive history with MS risk in a population-based setting. Methods: Using national databases, we established a cohort comprising 4.4 million......% confidence interval = 0.71-0.82]; in men, 0.89 [0.80-0.98]). RRs were inversely associated with number of children, age at first childbirth, and proximity in time since most recent birth. Among women, MS risk was unrelated to histories of pregnancy loss, pregnancy complications, or infertility. A...

  16. Multiple sclerosis with caudate lesions on MRI.

    Hashiguchi, S; Ogasawara, N; Mine, H; Kawachi, Y

    2001-04-01

    A 31-year-old woman displayed sleepiness and impairment of recent memory. T2-weighted MRI revealed high signal intensity lesions in the bilateral basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem. Although remission was achieved with corticosteroid therapy, she again displayed memory dysfunction and emotional disturbance one year later, at which time MRI disclosed new lesions in the right caudate nucleus and left frontal white matter. Corticosteroid therapy lead to improvement, and she suffered no recurrence on maintenance steroid therapy. These findings suggest that caudate lesions do occur in multiple sclerosis, the manifestations of which can be abulia and memory dysfunction, as in the present case. PMID:11334400

  17. Autoantigens and autoantibodies in multiple sclerosis.

    Abbas Mirshafiey

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent episodes of demyelination and axonal lesion mediated by CD4+ T cells with a proinflammatory T helper (Th1 and Th17 phenotypes, macrophages, and soluble inflammatory mediators. The overactive pro-inflammatory Th1 cells and clonal expansion of B cells initiate an inflammatory cascade with several cellular and molecular immune components participating in MS pathogenic mechanisms. In this scenario, autoantibodies and autoantigens have a significant role in immunopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic targets of MS. In this review, we try to introduce the autoantigens and autoantibodies and explain their roles in pathogenesis of MS.

  18. Developing a community multiple sclerosis nursing service.

    Quinn, Debbie; Adams, John

    2014-05-20

    Reforms to the NHS following the passing of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 have created new purchaser organisations with responsibility for planning the configuration of healthcare services in their geographic areas. If a community multiple sclerosis (MS) nursing service is to survive in this environment, it must demonstrate its ability to contribute to achieving the purchaser organisations' objectives. Evaluation data, such as hospital admission avoidance and patient satisfaction, will be crucial in demonstrating the community MS nursing service's clinical and economic effectiveness. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis of the issues facing a community MS service in this environment is provided. PMID:24823591

  19. The socioeconomic consequences of multiple sclerosis

    Jennum, Poul; Wanscher, Benedikte; Frederiksen, Jette;

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has serious negative effects on health-, social-, and work-related issues for the patients and their families, thus causing significant socioeconomic burden. The objective of the study was to determine healthcare costs and indirect illness costs in MS patient in a national...... rates of health-related contact and medication use and very low employment rate which incurred a higher socioeconomic cost. The income level of employed MS patients was significantly lower than that of control subjects. The annual total health sector costs and productivity costs were €14,575 for MS...

  20. Multiple Sclerosis and Dentistry: A Contemporary Evaluation

    Hasan Hatipoğlu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory, demyelinating condition affecting the central nervous system. MS exhibits characteristics of an auto-immune disease. Etiology of this condition remains unknown but environmental and genetic factors are often thought to be responsible. A possible relationship between dentistry and MS has often been mentioned in the literature. Special attention and interdisciplinary cooperation are required in the diagnosis of MS and the application of dental treatments in order to optimize general and dental health status of patients with MS. In this review, MS-dental related studies and recommendations for dental treatment approaches for individuals with MS are discussed.

  1. Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    Lucas, Robyn M; Byrne, Scott N; Correale, Jorge; Ilschner, Susanne; Hart, Prue H

    2015-10-01

    There is compelling epidemiological evidence that the risk of developing multiple sclerosis is increased in association with low levels of sun exposure, possibly because this is associated with low vitamin D status. Recent work highlights both vitamin D and non-vitamin D effects on cellular immunity that suggests that higher levels of sun exposure and/or vitamin D status are beneficial for both MS risk and in ameliorating disease progression. Here we review this recent evidence, focusing on regulatory cells, dendritic cells, and chemokines and cytokines released from the skin following exposure to ultraviolet radiation. PMID:26477548

  2. Epileptic Seizures in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Kamber Zeqiraj; Nexhat Shatri; Jera Kruja; Afrim Blyta; Enver Isaku; Nazim Dakaj

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The presence of epileptic seizures in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is a well-known phenomenon. The aims of our study, performed in our clinic are to point out the correlation of the mean age/gender and age of MS patients with the onset of seizures, to identify the types of epileptic seizures in MS patients by sex/age, to identify the correlation between relapses and seizures, and to identify the main electrophysiological / imaging changes. Material and Met-hod: The medi...

  3. MRI differential diagnosis of suspected multiple sclerosis.

    Chen, J J; Carletti, F; Young, V; Mckean, D; Quaghebeur, G

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosing multiple sclerosis (MS) can be very challenging owing to its variable clinical features and lack of a definitive test. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a core diagnostic tool in the detection of MS lesions and demonstration of spatial and temporal distribution of disease. Moreover, MRI plays a crucial role in the exclusion of alternative diagnoses of MS. The aim of this review is to describe the typical MRI features of MS and to present a series of common mimics of MS with emphasis on their distinguishing features from MS. PMID:27349475

  4. Job satisfaction among multiple sclerosis certified nurses.

    Gulick, Elsie E; Halper, June; Costello, Kathleen

    2007-08-01

    Several studies document high levels of job satisfaction among certified nurses, but no study has examined job satisfaction and factors influencing job satisfaction of certified multiple sclerosis (MS) nurses. This study tested a theoretical model proposing that two organizational factors, colleague relationships and benefits, will predict job satisfaction. Job satisfaction was represented by four factors: autonomy, professional status, professional growth, and time efficiency. Participants included MS nurses certified for 6 months or more practicing mostly in three countries (Canada, Great Britain, and the United States) who anonymously completed the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale, an overall job satisfaction rating, and demographic information. Findings indicate that colleague relationships and benefits significantly estimated organization structure and that autonomy, professional status, professional growth, and time efficiency significantly estimated job satisfaction; furthermore, organization factors such as colleague relationships and benefits significantly predict job satisfaction. Among the countries, several statistically significant differences were observed between job satisfaction factors as well as items in both organization and job satisfaction subscales. Average factor scores among the countries were mostly rated satisfactory. The International Organization of Multiple Sclerosis Nurses Executive Board plans to use the study findings to see how it needs to focus efforts as an organization toward enhancing and standardizing MS care and develop MS nurse professionalism worldwide. PMID:17847673

  5. Alemtuzumab for the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Willis MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mark D Willis, Neil P Robertson Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Cardiff University, University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Alemtuzumab is an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, recently approved for the treatment of active, relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS. Administration of alemtuzumab causes a rapid and dramatic reduction in circulating lymphocytes, with a predictable subsequent pattern of immune reconstitution. Although the precise mode of action remains unclear, treatment results in a marked reduction in annualized relapse rates, slowing of disability progression compared with an active comparator, and may even cause disability reversal. Although conferring clear clinical benefits, alemtuzumab carries a significant long-term risk of autoimmune disease (AID, which has a particular predilection for the thyroid gland, although a wide range of other disorders have also been reported. However, risks of AID can usually be anticipated and treated successfully, provided rigorous monitoring and surveillance protocols are followed by clinicians and patients alike. Despite its immunosuppressive mechanism of action serious infections are rare and malignancies commonly associated with immunodeficiency have not been observed to date. Alemtuzumab’s unique mode of administration, as well as it’s durability of effect, provides an important addition to currently available therapeutic interventions for MS, and in particular is a valuable treatment option in recent onset and highly active relapsing disease. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, alemtuzumab, autoimmune disease

  6. Natalizumab in the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Brandon A Brown

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Brandon A BrownDepartment of Pharmacy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Natalizumab is a monoclonal antibody, representing a new class of medication for treating relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS. Conventional treatments include interferons, glatiramer acetate and chemotherapies such as mitoxantrone and cyclophosphamide. These therapies offer only modest clinical benefits and are commonly not tolerated due to side effects. Natalizumab has been proven in large-scale, blinded, randomized, controlled trials to have an exceptional effect on preventing relapses, decreasing the risk of sustained progression of disability, and increasing the rate of disease-free patients over a 24-month period compared to placebo. These trials led to the speedy approval of natalizumab for treating relapsing MS, but its use was halted a few months after its induction after several cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a fatal demyelinating disease affecting the central nervous system. After a long deliberation by an FDA advisory panel and strong support from the MS community, natalizumab was reapproved with stringent restrictions including patient, provider and site registration. Natalizumab is now considered second-line therapy for patients who have failed first-line agents such as interferon or glatiramer acetate. As little is known about additional risk factors for PML and other potential infections, patients and providers must work together to carefully decide if potential benefits outweigh these rare but potentially devastating complications.Keywords: natalizumab, multiple sclerosis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

  7. Supporting work for people with multiple sclerosis.

    Doogan, Catherine; Playford, E Diane

    2014-05-01

    People with multiple sclerosis experience some of the highest rates of unemployment among groups of individuals with severe and chronic disabilities. While unpredictable relapses, physical and cognitive symptoms all may play a role in job loss, it is more likely that job loss can be attributed to a complex interaction between disease-related factors and contextual factors, such as the working environment, and employer attitudes. This interaction leads to the concept of work instability, that is, the mismatch between work demands and the individual's capacity to meet these demands. Vocational rehabilitation services aim to provide people with multiple sclerosis vocational assessment, rehabilitation and support to enable them to find, regain or remain in work and access other occupational and educational opportunities. Such services consist of a multidisciplinary team with the ability to provide education around disclosure, and work-place accommodations, offer emotional support, maintain work performance, liaise with employers, and support to re-enter the workplace. Helpful interventions include early disclosure, proper workplace accommodation, education of employers, and government-funded initiatives to support disabled employees. Future research needs to agree on methods of recording outcomes and evaluate specific vocational rehabilitation interventions. PMID:24526662

  8. Serum prolactin level in multiple sclerosis patients

    Mohammad Ali Shafa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple Sclerosis (MS is the most common demyelinating disease. An autoimmune basis has been confirmed for pathogenesis of MS. Prolactin (PRL has roles in these mechanisms. Its serum levels change in MS according to some reports. The purpose of this study was to survey these changes in MS patients. METHODS: Sixty MS patients were included in this cross-sectional study. The same number of controls matched for sex and age were studied. Pregnant, lactating women, consumers of specific medications and patients with underlying diseases were excluded from our study. RIA was used for determination of serum levels of PRL. RESULTS: In this study, PRL level in male patients was 14.23 ± 11.47 ng/ml compared to controls with mean level of 7.21 ± 4.12 ng/ml (P value <0.001. Mean PRL level in female patients was 20.18 ± 11.04 ng/ml whereas controls had a mean level of 14.45 ± 6.93 ng/ml (one-tailed P value <0.05. So there were significant differences in serum PRL level between case and control groups in both men and women CONCLUSIONS: PRL has a positive relation with MS in both sexes. Further studies for determination of causality relation and drug effect in endocrine system on MS pathogenesis are suggested. KEY WORDS: Multiple Sclerosis, prolactin, male, female

  9. Update on treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    Michel, Laure; Larochelle, Catherine; Prat, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    While there is no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS), numerous disease-modifying drugs are now available to treat MS patients. In fact, the therapeutic strategies are now more and more complex, directly impacting the management of patients. Despite the good safety profile of the first-line immunomodulatory drugs, the clinical response is often suboptimal. Important questions remain about the right timing to switch for a second-line agent and whether escalation therapy is an appropriate therapeutic strategy. In this review, we conducted a systematic search by PubMed using the terms: treatment, multiple sclerosis, therapeutic, DMT and treatment response. Randomized trials and reviews addressing MS, DMTs and management strategies were selected and included in this review. Herein, we present the currently approved and emerging drugs used for the treatment of MS with their relative benefit/risk profiles, and their respective positions in the therapeutic arsenal. We then focused on the different therapeutic strategies and criteria available to evaluate the response to disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). PMID:25813102

  10. [Spatial contrast sensitivity in multiple sclerosis].

    Vighetto, A; Grochowicki, M; Cousin, J

    1990-01-01

    Spatial contrast sensitivity was measured in 110 patients with multiple sclerosis (definite = 72, probable = 22, possible = 16) as part of a routine evaluation in a neuro-ophthalmological clinic. Results were compared with those of 37 normal controls matched for age. The test was abnormal in 71 p. 100 of patients. Contrast sensitivity was attenuated for 97 p. 100 of the eyes with optic neuritis and visual acuity drop, for 60 p. 100 of the eyes with recovered optic neuritis and for 36 p. 100 of the non affected eyes in the cases of unilateral optic neuritis. Among the 57 patients with normal visual acuity and no history of optic neuritis, 62 p. 100 had abnormal findings. Globally, contrast sensitivity was reduced on the whole spatial frequency range in cases of current optic neuritis, and mostly on the high or high and medium frequencies in the other cases. Our study confirms that spatial contrast sensitivity is the most sensitive of psychophysical methods to detect subclinical visual impairement in multiple sclerosis. Comparison with VEP's was performed in 66 patients. Both tests were roughly equally sensitive, but findings were concordant in only 63 p. 100 of the cases. The use of both VEP's and spatial contrast sensitivity increases the detection of latent optic neuritis. PMID:2359900

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine for multiple sclerosis.

    Schwarz, S; Knorr, C; Geiger, H; Flachenecker, P

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed characteristics, motivation, and effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in a large sample of people with multiple sclerosis. A 53-item survey was mailed to the members of the German Multiple Sclerosis Society, chapter of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Surveys of 1573 patients (48.5 +/- 11.7 years, 74% women, duration of illness 18.1 +/- 10.5 years) were analyzed. In comparison with conventional medicine, more patients displayed a positive attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine (44% vs 38%, P job, and higher education (P < 0.05). Compared with conventional therapies, complementary and alternative medicine rarely showed unwanted side effects (9% vs 59%, P < 0.00001). A total of 52% stated that the initial consultation with their physician lasted less than 15 min. To conclude, main reasons for the use of complementary and alternative medicine include the high rate of side effects and low levels of satisfaction with conventional treatments and brief patients/physicians contacts. PMID:18632773

  12. New oral disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis

    Bagert, Bridget A; Bourdette, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Several promising, oral disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. The arrival of effective oral agents for multiple sclerosis will be a major advance in the global effort to alter the natural history of this chronic disease.

  13. INVIVO PHOSPHORUS MAGNETIC-RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS

    MINDERHOUD, JM; MOOYAART, EL; KAMMAN, RL; TEELKEN, AW; HOOGSTRATEN, MC; VENCKEN, LM; GRAVENMADE, EJ; VANDENBURG, W

    1992-01-01

    Localized phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 1.5 T was performed in 39 patients with multiple sclerosis and in 15 healthy controls. The multiple sclerosis spectra showed increased creatine phosphate levels. This increase was correlated with the severity of the handicap and was greater in

  14. Multiple sclerosis with clinical and radiological features of cerebral tumour

    Sagar, HJ; Warlow, CP; Sheldon, PWE; Esiri, MM

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of multiple sclerosis, all confirmed pathologically, are described in whom both the unusual clinical features and the CT scan appearances suggested cerebral tumours. The failure of mass effect reliably to differentiate plaques and tumours on a CT scan is stressed and the literature relating to CT scanning in multiple sclerosis is reviewed.

  15. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P;

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  16. The risk of multiple sclerosis in bereaved parents

    Li, J; Johansen, C; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik;

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited.......Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited....

  17. Incidence of multiple sclerosis in Denmark 1948-1982

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Hyllested, K

    1992-01-01

    The incidence rates of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark were estimated as a result of a continuous nationwide epidemiological survey since 1948 by the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR). Among cases notified to the DMSR, 6,478 met the diagnostic criteria and had onset of MS from 1948...

  18. Clustering of multiple sclerosis in Galion, Ohio, 1982-1985

    Ingalls, T.H. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that the outbreak of 30-40 cases of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating syndromes in Galion, Ohio, USA, during 1982-1985 was related to an excess concentration of heavy-metal wastes, especially of cadmium and chromium in sewage and river water. Both multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed by board-certified neurologists.

  19. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostics of multiple sclerosis

    Multiple sclerosis is an important and frequent neurological disease and the diagnosis might be difficult. The clinical criteria of multiple sclerosis and the role of laboratory examinations in the diagnosis of the disease are discussed. In particular the help offered by the magnetic resonance imaging method is the subject of this paper. Three patients are reported and discussed

  1. Disconnection as a Mechanism for Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    Dineen, R. A.; Vilisaar, J.; Hlinka, J.; Bradshaw, C. M.; Morgan, P. S.; Constantinescu, C. S.; Auer, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been…

  2. Gender issues in multiple sclerosis: an update.

    Jobin, Céline; Larochelle, Catherine; Parpal, Hélène; Coyle, Patricia K; Duquette, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Although multiple sclerosis (MS) affects both women and men, women are more susceptible to MS than men. Accumulating evidence indicates that the incidence and prevalence of MS is increasing, more so in women than in men. Owing to pregnancy, differing hormonal states and distinct social roles, the impact of MS differs between women and men. Since Patricia K Coyle published a review on gender issues in MS, multiple studies have added to the body of knowledge. This update will summarize the current thinking on gender-related issues in MS and we will address incidence and prevalence, hormonal factors, pregnancy and breastfeeding, genetics, course and prognosis, imaging, treatment and psychosocial aspects. Future progression within this field will help elucidate the cause of and define the treatment of MS. PMID:21118039

  3. MicroRNA Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Omar ede Faria Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by central nervous system (CNS demyelination and axonal degeneration. Although the cause of MS is still unknown, it is widely accepted that novel drug targets need to focus on both decreasing inflammation and promoting CNS repair. In MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE non-coding small microRNAs (miRNAs are dysregulated in the immune and central nervous systems. Since individual miRNAs are able to downregulate multiple targeted mRNA transcripts, even minor changes in miRNA expression may lead to significant alterations in post-transcriptional gene expression. Herein, we review miRNA signatures reported in CNS tissue and immune cells of MS patients and consider how altered miRNA expression may influence MS pathology.

  4. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey;

    2010-01-01

    About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity in...... the paediatric multiple sclerosis population has triggered the use of disease-modifying therapies that have been shown to reduce relapse rate, disease progression and cognitive decline in adult patients with multiple sclerosis. Hard evidence for the right treatment and its appropriate timing is scarce...... in paediatric multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, expertise in this field has grown thanks to recent open-label trials and experience generated in specialized centres. In spring 2009, a first meeting was held in Rotterdam with clinicians from 11 European countries (one from Canada) that are all active...

  5. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Swathi Balantrapu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS, but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal and 4 (contracted. Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW, timed 25 foot walk (T25FW, and timed up-and-go (TUG, and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc. for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12 and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n=44 of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P=0.0001, d=-0.86, T25FW (P=0.003,d=0.72, TUG (P=0.001, d=0.84, MSWS-12 (P=0.0001,d=1.09, O2 cost of walking (P=0.001, d=0.75, average steps/day (P<0.05, d=-0.45, and walking velocity (P<0.05, d=-0.53 and cadence (P<0.05, d=-0.46. Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking.

  6. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Balantrapu, Swathi; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Pula, John H.; Sandroff, Brian M.; Motl, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal) and 4 (contracted). Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW), timed 25 foot walk (T25FW), and timed up-and-go (TUG), and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc.) for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n = 44) of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P = 0.0001, d = −0.86), T25FW (P = 0.003, d = 0.72), TUG (P = 0.001, d = 0.84), MSWS-12 (P = 0.0001, d = 1.09), O2 cost of walking (P = 0.001, d = 0.75), average steps/day (P < 0.05, d = −0.45), and walking velocity (P < 0.05, d = −0.53) and cadence (P < 0.05, d = −0.46). Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking. PMID:24999434

  7. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord multiple sclerosis

    Fifty-one high-field MR imaging studies (1.5 T, General Electric Signa) of the spinal cord were performed in 42 patients (27 female, 15 male; mean age, 40 years) with clinically definitive (n = 34) or probable (n = 8) multiple sclerosis and suspected spinal cord lesions. MR imaging showed focal spinal cord abnormalities in 38 (75%) of 51 studies. T2-weighted images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 38 studies, T1-weighted images were abnormal (showing areas of low signal intensity or mass effect) in 16 (42%) of 38, and GRASS images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 9 (82%) of 11 cases. Brain MR imaging showed periventricular lesions typical of multiple sclerosis in 34 (81%) of 42 studies. Spinal cord studies were positive in eight cases with normal brain MR images, and brain studies were positive in 13 instances of normal spinal cord MR images. Four lesions were at the cervicomedullary junction, 44 in the cervical spinal cord, and three in the thoracic cord. Mass effect in cord lesions, simulating neoplasm, was seen in seven patients during the acute symptomatic phase. Serial studies in three patients with decreasing symptoms showed a reduction after 3-4 weeks and resolution of the mass effect after 2-6 months

  8. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  9. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    Habib, A.C.; Zheng, W.; Haacke, E.M.; Webb, S.; Nichol, H.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  10. Exercise and disease progression in multiple sclerosis: can exercise slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis?

    Dalgas, Ulrik; Stenager, Egon

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that exercise (or physical activity) might have the potential to have an impact on multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and thereby slow down the disease process in MS patients. The objective of this literature review was to identify the literature linking physical exercise (or activity) and MS disease progression. A systematic literature search was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, SweMed+, Embase, Cochrane Library, PEDro, SPORTDiscus and ISI Web of Science. Di...

  11. Risk factors for suicide in multiple sclerosis

    Stenager, E N; Koch-Henriksen, N; Stenager, E

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to identify risk factors for suicide in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: The study is based on available information about MS patients identified in the Danish MS Registry (DMSR) with onset in the period 1950-1985. We compared the MS...... suicides with the 1950-1985 onset cohort patients in the DSMR as to distribution of age at onset, presenting symptoms, and time from onset to diagnosis. We reviewed sociodemographic data, age of onset, the course of the disease, recent deterioration, type of deterioration, Kurtzke Disability Status Scale...... (DSS) score, previous mental disorder, type of mental disorder, previous suicide attempts, expression of suicidal intentions, circumstances at suicide, and suicide method for all MS patients who had committed suicide. In order to characterize MS suicides with respect to risk factors, comparisons were...

  12. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  13. Rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis patients in India

    Nirmal Surya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic progressive disease which is one of the leading causes of handicap in young subjects. The large range of symptoms associated with MS lead to continuing decline in neurologic status and quality of life. The coexistence of physical and cognitive impairments, together with the imprevisible evolution of the disease makes MS rehabilitation very challenging. The main objective of rehabilitation is, therefore, to ease the burden of symptoms by improving self-performance and independence. Inpatient, outpatient and Home rehabilitation with multidisciplinary team has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability. Individualized programs elaborated by a multidisciplinary team of experts are the key to success of rehabilitation. Family plays a big role and Family Based Rehabilitation will be important in long term rehab program in MS.

  14. Neuropsychology in Multiple Sclerosis: A literature review.

    Rodneys Mauricio Jiménez Morales

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by demyelination and degeneration. The objective of this article is to offer a review of the latest scientific discoveries in the field of neuropsychology in ME. A description is presented of the most frequent neuropsychological manifestations and their probable association with other factors such as: school level, fatigue, disability, cerebral dysfunction, time and clinical form of evolution, as well as depression and other states of mind starting from recent evidences in the scientific community. Also addressed is the development of tests and valid sensitive neuropsychological sets to evaluate cognitive functions. The use of sensitive and specific test facilitates the evaluation of neuropsychological alterations associated to ME, besides other socio-demographic and clinical-evaluative factors to contemplate in the exploration.

  15. Benefits of Exercise Training in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Motl, Robert W; Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise training represents a behavioral approach for safely managing many of the functional, symptomatic, and quality of life consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). This topical review paper summarizes evidence from literature reviews and meta-analyses, supplemented by recent individual studies, indicating that exercise training can yield small but important improvements in walking, balance, cognition, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in MS. The paper highlights limitations of research on exercise training and its consequences and future research directions and provides an overview for promotion of exercise training in MS based on recent prescriptive guidelines. Collectively, the evidence for the benefits of exercise training in MS suggests that the time is ripe for the promotion of exercise by healthcare providers, particularly neurologists as a central part of the clinical care and management of MS patients. PMID:26223831

  16. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Rommer, P S; Dudesek, A; Stüve, O; Zettl, UK

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab. PMID:24001305

  17. Multiple sclerosis in India: An overview

    Bhim S Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is being increasingly diagnosed in India mainly due to increase in the number of practicing neurologists and easy and affordable availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The clinical features and course are largely similar to those seen in the West. The term optico-spinal MS (Asian MS was coined in the pre-MRI days. Many such patients turn out to be cases of neuromyelitis optica - a distinct disorder and not a variant of MS. Others have shown the classical features of MS on MRI scan. Several of the disease-modifying agents, not all, are now available in India. Their use, however, has been limited in view of the high cost.

  18. Modifiable environmental factors in multiple sclerosis

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Potential environmental modifiable factors involved in multiple sclerosis (MS include low adherence to treatment, smoking, obesity, low levels of liposoluble vitamins A and D, high consumption of salt, and a sedentary lifestyle. Chronic tobacco use, obesity, sedentarism and insufficient levels of these vitamins all contribute to maintenance of a proinflammatory state. It is unlikely that there will be noticeable improvement in the inflammatory condition of MS if stopping smoking, reducing weight, exercising, increasing vitamin levels are done in an isolated and erratic manner. Modification of each and every one of these environmental risk factors is likely to be an important approach in the management of MS. The present review presents the arguments for an association between these hazardous modifiable factors and the chronic inflammatory state observed in MS.

  19. Astrocytes in the tempest of multiple sclerosis.

    Miljković, Djordje; Timotijević, Gordana; Mostarica Stojković, Marija

    2011-12-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell population within the CNS of mammals. Their glial role is perfectly performed in the healthy CNS as they support functions of neurons. The omnipresence of astrocytes throughout the white and grey matter and their intimate relation with blood vessels of the CNS, as well as numerous immunity-related actions that these cells are capable of, imply that astrocytes should have a prominent role in neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The role of astrocytes in MS is rather ambiguous, as they have the capacity to both stimulate and restrain neuroinflammation and tissue destruction. In this paper we present some of the proved and the proposed functions of astrocytes in neuroinflammation and discuss the effect of MS therapeutics on astrocytes. PMID:21443873

  20. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  1. Pelvic floor rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    De Ridder, D; Vermeulen, C; Ketelaer, P; Van Poppel, H; Baert, L

    1999-03-01

    Although primarily used for treatment of stress incontinence, pelvic floor rehabilitation has been reported to have some value in the treatment of detrusor instability and urgency. In neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to Multiple Sclerosis, many authors have suggested the possible use of pelvic floor rehabilitation as a treatment modality. Therefore, we designed an open prospective trial to look at the possible role of pelvic floor rehabilitation in voiding dysfunction due to MS, concentrating upon the clinical and neurological parameters in relation to the outcome. A new scoring system for pelvic floor dysfunction is introduced. Thirty female patients were evaluated. In 25, the strength of the pelvic floor was significantly improved after one month (p rehabiltation has a place in the treatment of MS patients with a low Kurtzke score and without pelvic floor spasticity. PMID:10218095

  2. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one

  3. Recurrent myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis: a case report of a child with Schilder's variant of multiple sclerosis

    Myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis (MDS, Schilder's disease) is a rare CNS demyelinating disorder affecting mainly children and usually presenting as an intracranial mass lesion. We report the first case of recurrent intracranial MDS where the third episode of demyelination involved the cervical spinal cord. This may represent a subset of the disease, which should be considered as Schilder's variant (childhood form) of multiple sclerosis. (orig.)

  4. Differential Micro RNA Expression in PBMC from Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    David Otaegui; Baranzini, Sergio E; Ruben Armañanzas; Borja Calvo; Maider Muñoz-Culla; Puya Khankhanian; Iñaki Inza; Lozano, Jose A.; Tamara Castillo-Triviño; Ana Asensio; Javier Olaskoaga; Adolfo López de Munain

    2009-01-01

    Differences in gene expression patterns have been documented not only in Multiple Sclerosis patients versus healthy controls but also in the relapse of the disease. Recently a new gene expression modulator has been identified: the microRNA or miRNA. The aim of this work is to analyze the possible role of miRNAs in multiple sclerosis, focusing on the relapse stage. We have analyzed the expression patterns of 364 miRNAs in PBMC obtained from multiple sclerosis patients in relapse status, in rem...

  5. A biopsychosocial model of resilience for multiple sclerosis.

    Black, Rebecca; Dorstyn, Diana

    2015-11-01

    The concept of resilience remains under-researched in the multiple sclerosis literature. Consequently, current understanding of the unique and joint contribution of disability-specific variables, cognitive-behavioural skills and social resources to this dynamic process is limited. A holistic model of resilience was therefore developed and tested. Results of an online survey completed by 196 adults with multiple sclerosis revealed both direct and indirect pathways to resilience, with positive affect and self-efficacy being the strongest predictors. The findings lend support to psychological interventions which focus on promoting the personal resources and assets needed to cope effectively with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24323335

  6. Update on immunopathogenesis and immunotherapy in multiple sclerosis

    Selter RC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca C Selter,1 Bernhard Hemmer1–3 1Department of Neurology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany; 2Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy, Munich, Germany; 3Competence Network on Multiple Sklerosis, Munich, Germany Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Both genetic and environmental factors are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Histopathological findings suggest that multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated disease, involving both the cellular and humoral immune systems. Within the last 20 years, several disease-modifying therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis were established. Moreover, promising new substances are currently being tested in clinical trials and will likely broaden the therapeutic opportunities available within the upcoming years. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, immunopathogenesis, disease-modifying therapy

  7. The evaluation of focal lesions with diffusion MRI in multiple sclerosis attack

    Çubuk R et al.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to determine if there are quantifiable diffusion differences among focal multiple sclerosis lesions that appear differently on T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance images in MS patients with acute attack. Methods: Average apparent diffusion coefficient was calculated for 153 lesions identified on T2-weighted images in 15 patients with acute multiple sclerosis attack. One hundred and thirty-tree nonenhancing lesions (78 isointense, 55 hypointense and 20 enhancing lesions (5 isointense, 15 hypointense were categorized on the basis of un-enhanced T1-weighted images. Results: In 18 of 20 active lesions, which were seen in 9 patients, the contrast enhancement was homogeneous. White matter of multiple sclerosis patients showed significantly higher ADC than normal white matter (p=0.01. Hypointense non-enhancing lesions showed higher ADC values than isointense non-enhancing lesions (p<0.05. Diffusion in enhancing portions of enhancing lesions was decreased when compared with non-enhanced hypointense lesions. Conclusion: The data of our patients showed that hipointense lesions of non-active ones had higher ADC than active lesions with homogeneous contrast enhancement. These quantitative differences may indicate another easy and useful measurement in documenting acute multiple sclerosis attack.

  8. The symptomatic management of multiple sclerosis

    Schapiro Randall

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of multiple sclerosis (MS revolves around disease management, symptom management, and person management. Of these, symptom management takes up the bulk of the time of the practicing physician. Some symptoms are easily managed whereas others are more difficult. Decisions have often to be made on whether to treat or to wait and watch. This article discusses the varied symptoms of MS and the approaches to management, which involves rehabilitation, pharmacological treatments, and surgical procedures. The skilled physician managing MS should be familiar with the multiple approaches to improving the quality of life of those with MS. After the diagnosis has been established and the decisions regarding treatment approaches have been made, the talk in a typical office appointment for MS usually turns to symptom management. Thus, the majority of management decisions made by the clinician revolve around that important topic. It is symptom management that will determine quality of life for those with MS, It is the basis for improving function, and, up until twenty years ago, it was the only basis for treating MS. Now, however, we can approach treatment by disease management, symptom management, and person management. The MS specialist must be well versed in all three areas.

  9. Multiple sclerosis and positive lyme serology

    Marco Aurélio Lana-Peixoto

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available As Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB may clinically mimick multiple sclerosis (MS the presence of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi in serum of patients with a MS-like disease in non-edemic areas for Lyme disease may be troublesome. We report the case of a 45-year-old white female with the diagnosis of relapsing/ remitting form of MS due to a 15-year history of optic neuritis and recurrent episodes of motor and sensation disturbance in the upper right limb and in both lower extremites associated with bladder dysfunction. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple high intensity periventricular white matter lesions. The patient had been exposed to ticks but did not recall the presence of erythema migrans. ELISA for Lyme disease was positive in two different laboratories and the positive serology was confirmed by Western blotting. No convincing reponse followed treatment with ceftriaxone. Although it is clear that the patient had been infect by Borrelia burgdorferi the relationship of this spirochetal infection with the neurological disease could not be ascertained.

  10. MR in the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis: An overview

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, persistent inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that typically presents as an acute clinically isolated syndrome attributable to a monofocal or multifocal demyelinating lesion, which usually affects the optic nerve, spinal cord, or brainstem and cerebellum. Although the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is still based on clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging is now integrated in the overall diagnostic scheme of the disease because of its unique sensitivity to demonstrate the spatial and temporal dissemination of demyelinating plaques in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques, such as T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted sequences are highly sensitive in detecting multiple sclerosis plaques and provide a quantitative assessment of inflammatory activity and lesion load. However, there is a persisting mismatch between clinical and magnetic resonance imaging efficacy of approved treatments, which underlies the fact that this technique does not suffice to explain the entire spectrum of the disease process. In recent years, great effort has been dedicated to overcoming these limitations by using non-conventional magnetic resonance-derived metrics that can selectively measure the more destructive aspects of multiple sclerosis pathology and monitor the reparative mechanisms. These metrics, which include unenhanced T1-weighted imaging, measures of central nervous system atrophy, magnetization transfer imaging, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, provide a better approximation of the pathological substrate of the multiple sclerosis plaques, have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and have proven useful for studying the natural history of multiple sclerosis and monitoring the effects of new treatments. Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging not only plays an

  11. New Feature of Tuberous Sclerosis or Acute Periventricular Leukomalacia?

    A Vossough

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We read with interest the article by Langer et al., describing the MRI findings in a neonatal patient with tuberous sclerosis. They describe the presence of periventricular white matter lesions in the centrum semiovale, with linear, circular, and semicircular shapes, with hyperintense margins, and isointense centers, and better seen on T1-weighted and T1 FLAIR sequences than on T2-weighted sequences. They propose that these "target"-like lesions have not been previously reported in patients with tuberous sclerosis."nWe believe that what Langer et al. are showing is unrelated to tuberous sclerosis itself, and represents additional classical MRI findings of acute periventricular leukomalacia and acute white matter injury.

  12. Lymphocyte radiosensitivity in multiple sclerosis patients

    The purpose of the study was to characterize the radiosensitivity of the peripheral blood lymphocytes from Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients in order to get insights in the ability of these cells to deal with DNA damage. Genetic defects in the repair mechanisms of DNA have not been systematically observed in MS but they have been found in other autoimmune diseases such as lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as in several disorders of the nervous system. Up to now investigations into cellular radio-sensitivity in MS patients comparative to healthy controls have yielded contradictory results. The following methods were used: The chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was assessed after in vitro 2 Gy gamma irradiation in G0 phase of the cell cycle, using the micronucleus (MN) assay. The MN assay was performed on whole blood cultures, separated PBMC cultures, and CD4+ and CD8+ subsets of T lymphocytes from blood samples of the MS (n=26) patients and on concurrent samples of healthy individuals (n=22). The results obtained are summarized as follows: The spontaneous MN induction was found significantly higher in whole blood and PBMC cultures for MS patients comparatively to controls. The differences had statistical significance for total lymphocyte population and also for separated CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. No correlation has been observed between the spontaneous MN yield and illness duration for the group of MS patients. No difference in radiosensitivity was observed between patients and controls after 2 Gy irradiation of whole blood. In irradiated PBMC cultures, a slightly lower induction of MN was observed in the case of MS patients. For the MS patients, lymphocyte radiosensitivity was significantly higher in whole blood culture environment compared to PBMC culture environment. The CD4+ lymphocyte subset from MS patients was significantly less radiosensitive compared to healthy controls. On the other hand, CD8+ lymphocytes

  13. Direct and indirect economic consequences of multiple sclerosis in Ireland

    Fogarty, Emer

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has significant financial consequences for healthcare systems, individual patients and households, and the wider society. This study examines the distribution of MS costs and resource utilisation across cost categories and from various perspectives, as MS disability increases.

  14. Multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis: record linkage study

    Goldacre, M.; Wotton, C.; Seagroatt, V; Yeates, D

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain if infectious mononucleosis is a risk factor for the development of multiple sclerosis (MS); and, if it is, whether its effect is close to or remote in time from the onset of MS.

  15. Cognitive analysis of multiple sclerosis utilizing fuzzy cluster means

    Imianvan Anthony Agboizebeta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis, often called MS, is a disease that affects the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord. Myelin provides insulation for nerve cells improves the conduction of impulses along the nerves and is important for maintaining the health of the nerves. In multiple sclerosis, inflammation causes the myelin to disappear. Genetic factors, environmental issues and viral infection may also play a role in developing the disease. Ms is characterized by life threatening symptoms such as; loss of balance, hearing problem and depression. The application of Fuzzy Cluster Means (FCM or Fuzzy CMean analysis to the diagnosis of different forms of multiple sclerosis is the focal point of this paper. Application of cluster analysis involves a sequence of methodological and analytical decision steps that enhances the quality and meaning of the clusters produced. Uncertainties associated with analysis of multiple sclerosis test data are eliminated by the system

  16. Cognitive analysis of multiple sclerosis utilizing fuzzy cluster means

    Imianvan Anthony Agboizebeta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis, often called MS, is a disease that affects the central nervous system (the brain andspinal cord. Myelin provides insulation for nerve cells improves the conduction of impulses along thenerves and is important for maintaining the health of the nerves. In multiple sclerosis, inflammationcauses the myelin to disappear. Genetic factors, environmental issues and viral infection may alsoplay a role in developing the disease. Ms is characterized by life threatening symptoms such as; loss ofbalance, hearing problem and depression. The application of Fuzzy Cluster Means (FCM or Fuzzy CMeananalysis to the diagnosis of different forms of multiple sclerosis is the focal point of this paper.Application of cluster analysis involves a sequence of methodological and analytical decision stepsthat enhances the quality and meaning of the clusters produced. Uncertainties associated withanalysis of multiple sclerosis test data are eliminated by the system

  17. Depression and Sub-clinical Markers of Multiple Sclerosis

    GH Salehpoor

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease that depression has been found in more than 40% of its patients and by several sub-clinical markers associated with disease the opportunity will appearance. Aim of this present study was investigation depression and multiple sclerosis sub-clinical markers. Methods: In this analytical cross-sectional study, 162 patients with multiple sclerosis were selected by consecutive sampling and using the clinical and demographic variables inventory, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, Short Form Health Survey questionnaire, Fatigue Severity Scale along with identical analog-spring balance were examined. The data were analyzed by pearson correlation coefficient, one way analysis of variance, Tukey's test and stepwise multiple regression. Results: Patients with 3 or more times the number of relapses and hospitalizations experienced, received significantly more depression scores than patients with lower frequent relapse and hospitalization. In addition, sub-clinical markers of the disease together could explain 30% of the shared variance of depression. Overall in final step limitations due to physical problems, fatigue and bodily pain could significantly predicts depression scores in patients (P <0.0001. Conclusion: This study highlighted the impact of multiple sclerosis sub-clinical markers in depression of patients. Hence, is requirement that identified key predictors of this research be considered as possible risk factors in development of depression associated with multiple sclerosis and used for the regular management of the disease. Key words: Multiple Sclerosis, Depression, Fatigue, Pain

  18. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Sosnoff, J. J.; Sandroff, B. M.; J. H. Pula; Morrison, S. M.; R. W. Motl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry) in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist f...

  19. Multiple sclerosis among patients with previous diagnosis of leishmaniasis

    Mehrdad Farrokhi; Mosoud Etemadifar; Ali Rezaei; Ali Amani Beni

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a protozoan parasitic disease which is caused by leishmania genus and is transmitted by sand flies. Multiple sclerosis (MS), however, is a chronic inflammatory disease of central nervous system (CNS). Since co-existence of these two diseases in an individual is rare, we aimed to evaluate prevalence of leishmaniasis among MS patients. At first, total Isfahan MS (TIMS) records of 5123 MS patients who registered in Isfahan multiple sclerosis society (IMMS) from April 2003 till J...

  20. Neuroprotection in a Novel Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Katie Lidster; Samuel J Jackson; Zubair Ahmed; Peter Munro; Pete Coffey; Gavin Giovannoni; Baker, Mark D.; David Baker

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease that currently lacks any neuroprotective treatments. Innovative neuroprotective trial designs are required to hasten the translational process of drug development. An ideal target to monitor the efficacy of strategies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis is the visual system, which is the most accessible part of the human central nervous system. A novel C57BL/6 mouse line was generated that expressed transge...

  1. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in Tehran: a three year study

    Ghabaae M; Qelichnia Omrani H; Roostaeizadeh M

    2007-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is the most common demyelinating disease of central nervous system. We prepared this study to find its epidemiologic pattern in the Iranian society.Methods: This case-series study involved 70 patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis according to the McDonald criteria and admitted to the Iranian Center of Neurological Research at Imam Khomeini Hospital from 2002 to 2004. Informed consent was obtained prior to patients completing a questionnaire, which included ...

  2. Meditation as an Adjunct to the Management of Multiple Sclerosis

    Levin, Adam B.; Hadgkiss, Emily J.; Weiland, Tracey J.; Jelinek, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) disease course is known to be adversely affected by several factors including stress. A proposed mechanism for decreasing stress and therefore decreasing MS morbidity and improving quality of life is meditation. This review aims to critically analyse the current literature regarding meditation and MS. Methods. Four major databases were used to search for English language papers published before March 2014 with the terms MS, multiple sclerosis, meditation, a...

  3. Vitamin D tweets light to genes in multiple sclerosis

    LOMMERS, Emilie; Lecrompe, Laurence; MOONEN, Gustave; PHAN BA, Remy; Belachew, Shibeshih

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between sunlight exposure and the incidence of multiple sclerosis and the understanding of immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D triggered, in recent years, a broad range of investigations. Immunological studies performed in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated how tolerogenic vitamin D can be. Epidemiological studies confirmed an increased incidence of multiple sclerosis in vitamin D deficient subjects and signs of increased disease activity in such MS ...

  4. Inflammatory Cytokines and Physical Activity in Multiple Sclerosis

    Margarida Florindo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Besides the functional benefits, physical activity triggers a hormonal pattern of immunologic responses with an anti-inflammatory effect in individuals who suffer from multiple sclerosis. Purpose. To analyze the influence of physical activity on multiple sclerosis and identify the intensity threshold which triggers the anti-inflammatory physiological mechanism. Methodology. A systematic review was made on the databases Medline, PubMed, ScienceDirect, PloS, PEDro, and Web of Scienc...

  5. The effect of exercise therapy on fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    Andreasen, A; Stenager, E; Dalgas, U

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue occurs in the majority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and therapeutic possibilities are few. Exercise therapy is a therapeutic option but no studies have systematically reviewed the existing literature evaluating the effect of exercise therapy on MS fatigue.......Fatigue occurs in the majority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and therapeutic possibilities are few. Exercise therapy is a therapeutic option but no studies have systematically reviewed the existing literature evaluating the effect of exercise therapy on MS fatigue....

  6. MRI parameters in multiple sclerosis patients

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of 20 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) are presented. The studies were performed on a 0.5 Tesla magnet using spin-echo technique. Analysis of the MRI findings included detailed linear measurements of the ventricular and the subarachnoid spaces and reading of the intensity of the gray and white matter and intensity of the MS plaques. The plaques were sorted according to their number and size. The younger patients (20-40 years) had overall more plaques than the older ones (over 40 years). The small plaques were the most numerous and the large ones were the least common. Statistically significant association was found between the number of plaques and the calla media width. The intensity ratios between the nonplaque white matter/grey matter showed a significant correlation with the ventricular score. A significant negative correlation was found between the antero-posterior diameter of the spinal cord and the number of MS plaques in the brain. The plaque/white matter ratio had a significantly negative correlation with the cervical cord's width. (orig.)

  7. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Escalation and emerging treatments.

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Boyko, Alexey; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pohl, Daniela

    2016-08-30

    Over the last 20 years, there have been significant advances in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapeutics, with regulatory approval for 13 therapies in adults by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration. However, there is only limited approval for interferon-β and glatiramer acetate use in children 12 years and older by the EMA. Availability of disease-modifying therapies to children and adolescents with MS is variable by region, and is extremely limited in some regions of the world. Up to 30% of children experience breakthrough disease requiring therapies beyond traditional first-line agents. Recent legislation in both the United States and Europe has mandated clinical studies for all new therapeutics applicable to children. Several clinical trials in children are underway that will provide important information regarding the efficacy and safety of newer drugs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of breakthrough disease, escalation, and induction treatment approaches in children with MS, especially pertaining to disease course and disability outcomes in this group of patients. In addition, ongoing clinical trials and approaches and challenges in conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population are discussed. PMID:27572854

  8. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Rogers, Kim A; MacDonald, Megan

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research. PMID:26270955

  9. Gait termination in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Roeing, Kathleen L; Wajda, Douglas A; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2015-09-01

    Despite the ubiquitous nature of gait impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information concerning the control of gait termination in individuals with MS. The purpose of this investigation was to examine planned gait termination in individuals with MS and healthy controls with and without cognitive distractors. Individuals with MS and age matched controls completed a series of gait termination tasks over a pressure sensitive walkway under non-distracting and cognitively distracting conditions. As expected the MS group had a lower velocity (89.9±33.3 cm/s) than controls (142.8±22.4 cm/s) and there was a significant reduction in velocity in both groups under the cognitive distracting conditions (MS: 73.9±30.7 cm/s; control: 120.0±25.9 cm/s). Although individuals with MS walked slower, there was no difference between groups in the rate a participant failed to stop at the target (i.e. failure rate). Overall failure rate had a 10-fold increase in the cognitively distracting condition across groups. Individuals with MS were more unstable during termination. Future research examining the neuromuscular mechanisms contributing to gait termination is warranted. PMID:26228021

  10. Activation of Necroptosis in Multiple Sclerosis

    Dimitry Ofengeim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS, a common neurodegenerative disease of the CNS, is characterized by the loss of oligodendrocytes and demyelination. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in MS, can activate necroptosis, a necrotic cell death pathway regulated by RIPK1 and RIPK3 under caspase-8-deficient conditions. Here, we demonstrate defective caspase-8 activation, as well as activation of RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL, the hallmark mediators of necroptosis, in the cortical lesions of human MS pathological samples. Furthermore, we show that MS pathological samples are characterized by an increased insoluble proteome in common with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and Huntington’s disease (HD. Finally, we show that necroptosis mediates oligodendrocyte degeneration induced by TNF-α and that inhibition of RIPK1 protects against oligodendrocyte cell death in two animal models of MS and in culture. Our findings demonstrate that necroptosis is involved in MS and suggest that targeting RIPK1 may represent a therapeutic strategy for MS.

  11. Symptom overlap in anxiety and multiple sclerosis.

    O Donnchadha, Seán

    2013-02-14

    BACKGROUND: The validity of self-rated anxiety inventories in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) is unclear. However, the appropriateness of self-reported depression scales has been widely examined. Given somatic symptom overlap between depression and MS, research emphasises caution when using such scales. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates symptom overlap between anxiety and MS in a group of 33 individuals with MS, using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). METHODS: Participants underwent a neurological examination and completed the BAI. RESULTS: A novel procedure using hierarchical cluster analysis revealed three distinct symptom clusters. Cluster one (\\'wobbliness\\' and \\'unsteady\\') grouped separately from all other BAI items. These symptoms are well-recognised MS-related symptoms and we question whether their endorsement in pwMS can be considered to reflect anxiety. A modified 19-item BAI (mBAI) was created which excludes cluster one items. This removal reduced the number of MS participants considered \\'anxious\\' by 21.21% (low threshold) and altered the level of anxiety severity for a further 27.27%. CONCLUSION: Based on these data, it is suggested that, as with depression measures, researchers and clinicians should exercise caution when using brief screening measures for anxiety in pwMS.

  12. Emerging injectable therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    Oh, Jiwon; Calabresi, Peter A

    2013-11-01

    Available treatment options for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) have expanded in recent years, and several injectable therapies are under development. In this Rapid Review, we summarise emerging injectable therapies for relapsing-remitting MS, and discuss pharmacological mechanisms, clinical trials, adverse events, and use in clinical practice. Many new potential treatments for MS are at an intermediate to advanced stage of development. Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that has shown efficacy in phase 3 trials but, because of serious adverse events associated with this drug, clinical monitoring is essential. Pegylated interferon beta-1a has shown efficacy in a phase 3 trial. Daclizumab and ocrelizumab are monoclonal antibodies that have shown efficacy and acceptable safety profiles in phase 2 trials; both are under investigation in ongoing phase 3 trials. Ofatumumab is a monoclonal antibody that has shown efficacy in a small phase 2 trial. Animal models suggest that anti-LINGO1 antibody has remyelinating potential, and phase 2 trials of the antibody are underway. Further clarification of purported mechanisms of action and continued surveillance will be essential to establish the safety and clinical efficacy of these drugs in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. PMID:24090587

  13. Female reproductive issues in multiple sclerosis.

    McCombe, Pamela A; Greer, Judith M

    2013-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is more common in females than males and frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Thus, issues surrounding pregnancy and reproduction are of concern to women with MS. This review documents studies that shed light on reproductive issues in women with MS. The available literature was searched for papers relating to pregnancy and MS. Pregnancy is protective in MS in the short term, perhaps due to modulation of the immune system in pregnancy. It also possible that changes in the brain in pregnancy could protect against the effects of inflammation. The long-term effects of pregnancy also seem to be beneficial to MS, perhaps due to long-term epigenetic changes or possibly due to the effects of fetal microchimerism. Obstetric outcomes in women with MS are similar to those in the general population. In addition, there have been no reports of severe fetal abnormalities in babies exposed to first-line MS therapies. There is no good evidence that breast-feeding is protective in MS. There is no evidence that oral contraceptive pill use predisposes to MS, nor influences the clinical course of MS. After menopause, there is possible deterioration of MS, but it's difficult to disentangle this from the effects of aging and the natural progressive history of MS. The strong biological effect of pregnancy on MS deserves further study, so that these mechanisms can possibly be replicated as therapies for MS. PMID:22733837

  14. A toolbox for multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation

    Roura, Eloy; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; Llado, Xavier [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Cabezas, Mariano; Pareto, Deborah; Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Dept. of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Lesion segmentation plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). This task is very time-consuming and subject to intra- and inter-rater variability. In this paper, we present a new tool for automated MS lesion segmentation using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Our approach is based on two main steps, initial brain tissue segmentation according to the gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) performed in T1w images, followed by a second step where the lesions are segmented as outliers to the normal apparent GM brain tissue on the FLAIR image. The tool has been validated using data from more than 100 MS patients acquired with different scanners and at different magnetic field strengths. Quantitative evaluation provided a better performance in terms of precision while maintaining similar results on sensitivity and Dice similarity measures compared with those of other approaches. Our tool is implemented as a publicly available SPM8/12 extension that can be used by both the medical and research communities. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance tomography in confirmed multiple sclerosis

    The authors report on 21 cases of confirmed multiple sclerosis examined by both CT and magnetic resonance tomography. To safeguard the results, strict criteria were applied in accordance with the suggestions made by neurological work teams. Pathological lesons were seen in 20 patients; the MR image did not reveal anything abnormal in one case. On the average, 10.3 lesions were seen in the MR tomogram, whereas CT images showed on the average only 2.1 foci. The size and number of lesions in the MR tomogram were independent of the duration of the disease, the presented clinical symptoms, or the type of treatment at the time of examination. Evidently the sensitivity of MR tomography is very high in MS patients, but it has not yet been clarified to what extent this applies also to the specificity. Further research is mandatory. First experiences made by us show that lesions of a similar kind can also occur in diseases such as malignant lymphoma involving the brain, in vitamin B 12 deficiency syndrome, or encephalitis, and can become manifest in the MR tomogram. (orig.)

  16. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging in multiple sclerosis

    Tedeschi, G.; Bonavita, S. [Istituto di Scienze Neurologiche, Seconda Universita di Napoli (Italy); Department of Neuroimaging, National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); McFarland, H.F.; Richert, N. [Department of Neuroimmunology, National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Duyn, J.H.; Frank, J.A. [Laboratory of Diagnostic Radiology Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2002-01-01

    We studied 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) to assess the neurochemical pathology of the white-matter lesions (WML) and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Our 1H-MRSI technique allowed simultaneous measurement of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), and creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr) signal intensities from four 15-mm slices divided into 0.84 ml single-volume elements. In WML we found significantly lower NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios and a significantly higher Cho/Cr ratio than in NAWM or control white matter. In NAWM, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr were significantly lower than in control white matter. 1H-MRSI was compatible with damage to myelin in WML, and with axonal damage and/or dysfunction in WML and NAWM. These findings extend data on involvement of NAWM in MS beyond the abnormalities visible on MRI. (orig.)

  17. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging in multiple sclerosis

    We studied 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) to assess the neurochemical pathology of the white-matter lesions (WML) and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Our 1H-MRSI technique allowed simultaneous measurement of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), and creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr) signal intensities from four 15-mm slices divided into 0.84 ml single-volume elements. In WML we found significantly lower NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios and a significantly higher Cho/Cr ratio than in NAWM or control white matter. In NAWM, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr were significantly lower than in control white matter. 1H-MRSI was compatible with damage to myelin in WML, and with axonal damage and/or dysfunction in WML and NAWM. These findings extend data on involvement of NAWM in MS beyond the abnormalities visible on MRI. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance tomography in confirmed multiple sclerosis

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Dickmann, E.; Beyer, H.K.; Gehlen, W.

    1985-03-01

    The authors report on 21 cases of confirmed multiple sclerosis examined by both CT and magnetic resonance tomography. To safeguard the results, strict criteria were applied in accordance with the suggestions made by neurological work teams. Pathological lesions were seen in 20 patients; the MR image did not reveal anything abnormal in one case. On the average, 10.3 lesions were seen in the MR tomogram, whereas CT images showed on the average only 2.1 foci. The size and number of lesions in the MR tomogram were independent of the duration of the disease, the presented clinical symptoms, or the type of treatment at the time of examination. Evidently the sensitivity of MR tomography is very high in MS patients, but it has not yet been clarified to what extent this applies also to the specificity. Further research is mandatory. First experiences made by us show that lesions of a similar kind can also occur in diseases such as malignant lymphoma involving the brain, in vitamin B 12 deficiency syndrome, or encephalitis, and can become manifest in the MR tomogram.

  19. Cognitive impairment in relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Saška Roškar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify changes in cognitive abilities that affect patients with relapsing remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS and to find out which instrument manifests them best. The performance of MS patients was compared to a matched group of healthy people using three neuropsychological tests: Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST, Stroop color and word test and Trail making test (TMT part B. Results on all three tests indicate general cognitive impairments in the group of patients. Compared to the group of healthy people patients with MS exhibited impaired ability of abstract reasoning (WCST, impaired cognitive flexibility and less resistance to irrelevant stimuli (Stroop color and word test, slowed information processing and impaired ability of shifting attention from one symbol to another (TMT. The largest differences between groups occured in Stroop color and word test as well as in TMT. The estimation of cognitive abilities of MS patients is of high importance and sistematicaly observing of changes in those abilities should be considered.

  20. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    Anne-Katrin Pröbstel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS, it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies.

  1. Natalizumab in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Outteryck, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Natalizumab is the first humanized moclonal antibody indicated in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Based on its remarkable efficacy in reducing disease activity and reducing the risk of disability progession in RRMS, and the risk of a serious adverse event (progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy [PML]), natalizumab was indicated in active RRMS, mostly as a second-line therapy. With natalizumab and other recent anti-inflammatory therapies, the concept of no evidence of disease activity has emerged and may sometimes be achievable. Use of natalizumab in other inflammatory diseases of the nervous system has been less encouraging than in MS. PML remains the main serious adverse event occuring during natalizumab therapy. PML risk stratification according to JCV serology and JCV index is now being applied more often. Other PML risk biomarkers are being evaluated. If stopping natalizumab is planned, the wash-out period needs to be less than 12 weeks and probably closer to 4-8 weeks with efficient validated immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapies in RRMS. PMID:27008031

  2. Connective tissue diseases mimicking multiple sclerosis

    Maryam Moghaddassi-Jahromi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Connective tissue diseases (CTD can involve nervous system. Diagnosis and differentiation from multiple sclerosis (MS can be difficult especially when the disease presented by symptoms and signs related to demyelinating process. The aim of this article is to review the variant forms of central nervous system involvement in CTD especially useful points for differentiation from demyelinating disorders. Materials and Method: We used the relevant articles in PUBMED, Scopus and other databases especially published in recent ten years. Results: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, Behcet’s disease (BD, Sjogren's syndrome (SS, and some vasculitides can involve nervous system. Patients may be present by demyelination areas in the white matter of the brain and spinal cord, which are difficult to differentiate from MS and other demyelinating processes, such as transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. On the other hand, autoantibodies such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA and antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL can also occur in MS. Treatment and prognosis of these diseases are quite different. In demyelinating diseases the diagnosis is established on the basis of clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination, visual evoked potentials (VEP and autoantibody investigation.Conclusion: In many patients, distinction between different etiologies of demyelination can be made by considering clinical and paraclinical data, but in some cases, accurate diagnosis can only be made after long-term follow-up

  3. Sustained-release fampridine in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Hadavi, S; Baker, M D; Dobson, R

    2014-01-01

    Sustained-release fampridine, a slow release formulation of 4-aminopryridine, is a voltage-dependent potassium channel blocker licensed for the treatment of walking difficulties in multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies have demonstrated that approximately one-third of MS patients respond with a clear benefit to their walking speed. Sustained-release Fampridine is not currently available on the National Health Service (NHS), although it has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA and European Medicine Agency (EMA). It appears to have an acceptable adverse event profile, with data from open-label extension studies now becoming available. Concerns have been raised that the use of fampridine may increase the risk of seizures, which were seen at higher rates in patients treated with high doses of sustained-release fampridine. The rate of seizures in those patients on lower doses has not been found to be significantly increased. There are significant barriers at present to the widespread use of fampridine in the UK, which have limited its use in clinical practice to date. Patients with MS are in need of interventions to improve walking and many clinicians feel that this drug may have a role in the symptomatic management of MS. PMID:25877967

  4. A toolbox for multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation

    Lesion segmentation plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). This task is very time-consuming and subject to intra- and inter-rater variability. In this paper, we present a new tool for automated MS lesion segmentation using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Our approach is based on two main steps, initial brain tissue segmentation according to the gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) performed in T1w images, followed by a second step where the lesions are segmented as outliers to the normal apparent GM brain tissue on the FLAIR image. The tool has been validated using data from more than 100 MS patients acquired with different scanners and at different magnetic field strengths. Quantitative evaluation provided a better performance in terms of precision while maintaining similar results on sensitivity and Dice similarity measures compared with those of other approaches. Our tool is implemented as a publicly available SPM8/12 extension that can be used by both the medical and research communities. (orig.)

  5. Olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Li, Li-Min; Yang, Li-Na; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Fu, Ying; Li, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Da-Qi; Zhang, Ningnannan; Liu, Jingchun; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Association of changes in olfactory-related structures with olfactory function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. We used a T&T olfactometer test kit to evaluate olfactory function in 26 patients with MS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Then, Brain MRI were performed and olfactory-related structures were analyzed in these subjects. Olfactory detection and recognition threshold were significantly higher in the MS group, interestingly olfactory recognition threshold positively correlated with expanded disability status scale scores in these patients. Olfactory bulb (OB) volume reduced in patients with olfactory dysfunction (ODF). At the same time, reductions in gray matter (GM) volume were observed in the parahippocampal gyrus (PCG), amygdala, piriform cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus in patients with MS compared to HC. Atrophy of the PCG was more obvious in patients with ODF than patients without ODF and the PCG volume correlated with the olfactory recognition threshold, while no difference was found in fractional anisotropy values of tract-based spatial statistics analysis in the two groups. Olfactory function in patients with MS tends to become gradually more impaired with disability aggravation. Decreases in the volume of the OB and olfactory-related GM might provide valuable information about disease status in patients with MS with olfactory impairment. PMID:27206870

  6. Husbands and wives living with multiple sclerosis.

    Courts, Nancy Fleming; Newton, Amanda N; McNeal, Linda J

    2005-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently is diagnosed in young adults. Coping with symptoms of MS is challenging not only for the person with the disease, but also for his or her spouse. The well spouse often assumes the caregiving role. The purpose of this qualitative research was to investigate the experiences of persons whose spouses have MS. Twelve people participated in a 2-hour focus group: 8 men and 4 women. The husbands were, on average, 50 years old, and the wives averaged 55 years old. The length of time since diagnosis ranged from 2 to 11 years for the husbands and from 3 to 13 years for the wives. The focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Participants talked freely. Four major themes emerged: caregiver roles, need for information, relationship changes, and barriers. Men attempted to protect their wives' energy, intervening for them. Wives encouraged independence in their husbands. Spouses need information about MS, complementary interventions, and support. They want increased public awareness of invisible symptoms and awareness in the workplace of continuing capabilities of persons with MS. Role reversals were challenging for the women who felt that "MS is the third person in a marriage." Spouses need help to maintain appropriate boundaries. Limitations of the study include the small, economically homogeneous sample and the single encounter with the subjects. A longitudinal intervention study is needed. PMID:15794441

  7. Cognitive dysfunction in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    Suppiej A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Agnese Suppiej,1 Elisa Cainelli1,2 1Child Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Pediatric University Hospital, Padua, Italy; 2Lifespan Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory (LCNL, Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Italy Abstract: Cognitive and neuropsychological impairments are well documented in adult ­multiple sclerosis (MS. Research has only recently focused on cognitive disabilities in pediatric cases, highlighting some differences between pediatric and adult cases. Impairments in several functions have been reported in children, particularly in relation to attention, processing speed, visual–motor skills, and language. Language seems to be particularly vulnerable in pediatric MS, unlike in adults in whom it is usually preserved. Deficits in executive functions, which are considered MS-specific in adults, have been inconsistently reported in children. In children, as compared to adults, the relationship between cognitive dysfunctions and the two other main symptoms of MS, fatigue and psychiatric disorders, was poorly explored. Furthermore, data on the correlations of cognitive impairments with clinical and neuroimaging features are scarce in children, and the results are often incongruent; interestingly, involvement of corpus callosum and reduced thalamic volume differentiated patients identified as having a cognitive impairment from those without a cognitive impairment. Further studies about pediatric MS are needed in order to better understand the impact of the disease on brain development and the resulting effect on cognitive functions, particularly with respect to different therapeutic strategies. Keywords: central nervous system, child, deficit, IQ, inflammatory demyelination, neuropsychological

  8. Role of pathogens in multiple sclerosis.

    Libbey, Jane E; Cusick, Matthew F; Fujinami, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Although the etiology of MS is unknown, genetic and environmental factors play a role. Infectious pathogens are the likely environmental factors involved in the development of MS. Pathogens associated with the development or exacerbation of MS include bacteria, such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae, the Staphylococcus aureus-produced enterotoxins that function as superantigens, viruses of the herpes virus (Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus 6) and human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) families and the protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii. Evidence, from studies with humans and animal models, supporting the association of these various pathogens with the development and/or exacerbation of MS will be discussed along with the potential mechanisms including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading and bystander activation. In contrast, infection with certain parasites such as helminthes (Schistosoma mansoni, Fasciola hepatica, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercolaris, Enterobius vermicularis) appears to protect against the development or exacerbation of MS. Evidence supporting the ability of parasitic infections to protect against disease will be discussed along with a brief summary of a recent Phase I clinical trial testing the ability of Trichuris suis ova treatment to improve the clinical course of MS. A complex interaction between the CNS (including the blood-brain barrier), multiple infections with various infectious agents (occurring in the periphery or within the CNS), and the immune response to those various infections may have to be deciphered before the etiology of MS can be fully understood. PMID:24266364

  9. Clinical and MRI features in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and MRI features of multiple sclerosis in children, including the clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapse. Methods: In total, 16 cases of pediatric multiple sclerosis were included in this study. Of them, 11 patients were female and 5 were male, with the mean onset age of 10.1 years. They were followed up for 4 months to 7 years and found to have 1- 5 relapses. The clinical manifestations of CIS and relapse were analyzed by a pediatric neurologist. An experienced neuroradiologist reviewed the MRI images of CIS and relapse. Information on the location, size, and pattern of the lesions was gathered. The location of lesions included subcortical, central, and periventricular white matter, cortex, deep gray matter, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results: CIS episode presented acute onsets in 13/16 cases, with symptoms of cortices in 10 cases and visual impairment in 6 cases. Relapse occurred in 14/16 cases within one year. The incidence of symptoms of cortices was less frequent and severe in the second episode of MS, whereas the visual impairment had a high incidence. All patients had full recovery after the last episode. MRI of CIS showed confluent subcortical white matter lesions in 13/16 cases, abutting on central white matter lesions. The most frequently involved brain part was the frontal lobe, followed by the parietal lobe. Cortical involvement was observed in 9/16 cases. In 6 cases, periventricular white matter lesions were detected. Bilateral deep gray matter was abnormal in 4 cases. Other abnormalities included brain stem lesions in 5 cases, cerebellum lesions in 3 cases, optic nerve involvement in 3 cases, and pyramidal tract lesions in 2 cases. MRI of relapse revealed more small lesions in the subcortical and periventricular white matter in the patients. In the second episode, only 2 cases presented cortical involvement. Lesions were found in the brain stem in 4 cases and in the cerebellum in 5 cases. Pyramidal tract

  10. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Risk Factors: A Case-Control Study

    Jalal POOROLAJAL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hamadan Province is one of the high-risk regions in Iran for Multiple sclerosis (MS. A majority of the epidemiological studies conducted in Iran addressing MS are descriptive. This study was conducted to assess MS and its associated risk factors in Hamadan Province, the west of Iran.Methods: This case-control study compared 100 patients with MS (case group and 100 patients with acute infectious diseases (control group from September 2013 to March 2014. A checklist was used to assess the demographic, medical, and family history of the patients. The Friedman-Rosenman questionnaire was also used to assess personality type. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression model with Stata 11 software program.Results: The adjusted odds ratio (OR estimate of MS was 4.37 (95% CI: 2.33, 8.20 for females compared to males; 0.15 (95% CI: 0.06, 0.43 for people aged above 50 years compared to aged 14 to 29 years; 0.44 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.91 for overweight or obese people compared to normal weights. Crude OR indicated a significant association between the occurrence of MS and exclusive breast feeding, season of birth, and smoking. However, the association was not statistically significant after adjustment for other covariates.Conclusion: The risk of MS is significantly lower in male gender, obese/overweight, and old people. Furthermore, non-smoking, non-exclusive breast-feeding, and born in autumn may increase the risk of MS but need further investigation. However, long-term large prospective cohort studies are needed to investigate the true effect of the potential risk factors on MS. Keywords: Multiple sclerosis, Risk factors, Case-control study, Iran

  11. [The Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System MSDS. Discussion of a documentation standard for multiple sclerosis].

    Pette, M; Eulitz, M

    2002-02-01

    The MSDS (multiple sclerosis documentation system) has been developed at the Department of Neurology, Technical University of Dresden, Germany, during the last 4 years. The first version of this database application has been in use since October 2000. The MSDS manages information on MS patients, their treating physicians, patient history (symptoms, other diseases, biographical history, family history, habits, medication), clinical signs, results of laboratory examinations (blood chemistry, autoantibodies, borrelia serology, evoked potentials, cranial and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging), clinical scores relevant for MS, and biosamples. In principle, MSDS allows online data input and semiautomatically generates reports to all general practitioners and neurologists treating the respective patient. Patient information sheets and internal treatment guidelines are part of the system. During a 3-month evaluation, the first version of MSDS was tested at eight university multiple sclerosis ambulatory care units and one general neurology hospital. The overall judgement was favorable. Suggestions for changes and improvements, as well as practical experiences, were considered when developing MSDS 2.0, which will be available by the end of 2001. PMID:11975090

  12. Antibody producing B lineage cells invade the central nervous system predominantly at the time of and triggered by acute Epstein-Barr virus infection: A hypothesis on the origin of intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis in multiple sclerosis.

    Otto, Carolin; Hofmann, Jörg; Ruprecht, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), typically have an intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Intrathecal IgG is produced by B lineage cells that entered the CNS, but why and when these cells invade the CNS of patients with MS is unknown. The intrathecal IgG response in patients with MS is polyspecific and part of it is directed against different common viruses (e.g. measles virus, rubella virus, varicella zoster virus). Strong and consistent evidence suggests an association of MS and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and EBV seroprevalence in patients with MS is practically 100%. However, intriguingly, despite of the universal EBV seroprevalence, the frequency of intrathecally produced IgG to EBV in patients with MS is much lower than that of intrathecally produced IgG to other common viruses. The acute phase of primary EBV infection is characterized by a strong polyclonal B cell activation. As typical for humoral immune responses against viruses, EBV specific IgG is produced only with a temporal delay after acute EBV infection. Aiming to put the above facts into a logical structure, we here propose the hypothesis that in individuals going on to develop MS antibody producing B lineage cells invade the CNS predominantly at the time of and triggered by acute primary EBV infection. Because at the time of acute EBV infection EBV IgG producing B lineage cells have not yet occurred, the hypothesis could explain the universal EBV seroprevalence and the low frequency of intrathecally produced IgG to EBV in patients with MS. Evidence supporting the hypothesis could be provided by large prospective follow-up studies of individuals with symptomatic primary EBV infection (infectious mononucleosis). Furthermore, the clarification of the molecular mechanism underlying an EBV induced invasion of B lineage cells into the CNS of individuals going on to develop MS could corroborate it, too. If true, our

  13. Early detection of multiple sclerosis: MR findings during the initial manifestations of multiple sclerosis

    The MR results in 21 patients showing the initial manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS) were compared with those in 45 patients with a long history of MS. As in the old cases, MR proved a very sensitive technique during the early manifestations, with abnormal findings in 20 out of 21 patients. The relatively characteristic MR findings in long-standing MS (predominant peri-ventricular involvement with a relatively typical pattern) was seen in the early stages is only rare cases. The value of MR during the initial manifestations of MS is in cases where the clinical findings are not conclusive and laboratory diagnosis (evoked potentials, CSF findings) are indefinite. In these patients the finding of multiple lesions in the brain can confirm the suspected diagnosis of MS. (orig.)

  14. Sphingolipids: Important Players in Multiple Sclerosis

    Ramona Halmer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is the most common cause for permanent disability in young adults. Current pathophysiological understanding has identified an autoaggressive immune reaction with infiltration of immune cells into the central nervous system and local inflammatory and demyelinating reactions. The current therapy focuses on a modulation or suppression of immune functions. Sphingolipids, main components of nervous tissue, have been linked to MS already 60 years ago with the description of an unusual myelin lipid distribution in diseased patients. There is tremendous information developing on the role of different sphingolipids in MS. Antibodies against sphingomyelin, sulfatide or galacosylceramide have been detected in serum or CSF of MS patients, although up to now, this knowledge did not find its way into clinical use. Ceramide and the enzymes linked to its production have been described to play a pivotal role in oligendrocyte damage and demyelination. Nowadays, especially sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is in the focus of pathophysiological research and therapy development. A S1P analogue, FTY720, is a widely distributed therapy against relapsing-remitting MS, attenuating the emigration of activated, autoreactive lymphocytes from lymph nodes, thereby preventing new inflammatory infiltration into the central nervous system. Beside, there is more and more evidence, that especially S1P receptors on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are involved in demyelination processes and subsequent axonal degeneration, important features of chonic progressive MS disease course. Further information and research on the manifold role of sphingolipids are needed to prepare the ground for further clinical trials. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of sphingolipids in MS and describes the current therapeutical implications.

  15. Multiple sclerosis:New insights and trends

    Khaled Mohamed Mohamed Koriem

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most famous autoimmune disease attacking the central nervous system. It attacks people from age 20–50 years old and the females' attacks double than males' attacks. MS is an autoimmune disease affecting principally the central nervous system that cause nerve sheath demyelination followed by axon damage and paralysis. MS symptoms include muscle weakness, weak reflexes, muscle spasm, difficult in move, miss-coordination and unbalance with others. There are many factors may be responsible for MS:microbial, viral, smoking, stress, environmental toxins, contaminated diet, and gout. MS is wide spread in the populations in North Europe and this related to lack of vitamin D due to decrease of sunlight exposure. MS biomarkers include nitric oxide, interleukin-6, nitric oxide synthase, fetuin-A and osteopontin. MS is not a genetic disease where MS occurs when human leukocyte antigen system related genes are changed in chromosome 6. The physiology of MS is monitored by activation of immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress pathways. MS is including two main steps:(1) myelin sheath destruction and formation of lesions and, (2) inflammation. Four types of MS can be distinguished: relapsing-remitting, primary progressive, secondary pro-gressive and progressive relapsing. Nine treatments have been accepted for relapsing-remitting MS type: interferon b-1a, interferon b-1b, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, glatir-amer acetate, fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate, teriflunomide, and alemtuzumab, however, the only treatment used is mitoxantrone for progressive MS but many of MS treatments side effects are recorded. Complementary treatments also used in MS treatments such as:vitamin D, Yoga, medicinal plants, oxygen therapy, acupuncture and reflexology.

  16. Altered thalamic functional connectivity in multiple sclerosis

    Highlights: •We demonstrated decreased connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions in MS. •Increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity was also observed in MS. •The increased functional connectivity is attenuated by increasing disease duration. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare thalamic functional connectivity (FC) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls (HC), and correlate these connectivity measures with other MRI and clinical variables. Methods: We employed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to examine changes in thalamic connectivity by comparing thirty-five patients with MS and 35 age- and sex-matched HC. Thalamic FC was investigated by correlating low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations in thalamic voxels with voxels in all other brain regions. Additionally thalamic volume fraction (TF), T2 lesion volume (T2LV), EDSS and disease duration were recorded and correlated with the FC changes. Results: MS patients were found to have a significantly lower TF than HC in bilateral thalami. Compared to HC, the MS group showed significantly decreased FC between thalamus and several brain regions including right middle frontal and parahippocampal gyri, and the left inferior parietal lobule. Increased intra- and inter-thalamic FC was observed in the MS group compared to HC. These FC alterations were not correlated with T2LV, thalamic volume or lesions. In the MS group, however, there was a negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity (r = −0.59, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We demonstrated decreased FC between thalamus and several cortical regions, while increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity in MS patients. These complex functional changes reflect impairments and/or adaptations that are independent of T2LV, thalamic volume or presence of thalamic lesions. The negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity could indicate an adaptive role of thalamus that is

  17. Dietary Pattern and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    Mahdi Aloosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:It has been suggested that nutrition might play a role in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS. However,dietary patterns associated with MS risk are unknown. This study was conducted to compare the dietary patterns of patients with MS and healthy controls to find the relationship between dietary patterns and MS.Methods:Usual dietary intake of 75 women with relapsing/remitting MS (RRMS and 75 healthy controls were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire consisting of 168 food items. To define major dietary patterns, we used factor analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between dietary patterns and risk of MS.Results:Traditional pattern (high in low-fat dairy products,red meat, vegetable oil, onion, whole grain, soy, refined grains, organ meats, coffee, and legumes was inversely related to the risk of MS [odds ratio (OR = 0.15; 95%confidence interval (CI: 0.03-0.18; P = 0.028]. A similar inverse relationship was noted between MS risk andlacto-vegetarian (high in nuts, fruits, French fries, coffee,sweets and desserts, vegetables, and high-fat dairy products and vegetarian (high in green leafy vegetables, hydrogenated fats, tomato, yellow vegetables, fruit juices, onion, and other vegetablespatterns (OR = 0.31; 95% CI: 0.12-0.82; P = 0.018 and OR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.19-0.90; P = 0.026, respectively. In contrast, the prevalence of MS was higher in those who had high animal fat dietary pattern (high in animal fats,potato, meat products, sugars, and hydrogenated fats and low in whole grains (OR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.63-2.94;P < 0.005.Conclusion:Our findings showed that the risk of RRMS can be affected by major dietary patterns.

  18. Multiple sclerosis: New insights and trends

    Khaled Mohamed Mohamed Koriem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most famous autoimmune disease attacking the central nervous system. It attacks people from age 20–50 years old and the females' attacks double than males' attacks. MS is an autoimmune disease affecting principally the central nervous system that cause nerve sheath demyelination followed by axon damage and paralysis. MS symptoms include muscle weakness, weak reflexes, muscle spasm, difficult in move, miss-coordination and unbalance with others. There are many factors may be responsible for MS: microbial, viral, smoking, stress, environmental toxins, contaminated diet, and gout. MS is wide spread in the populations in North Europe and this related to lack of vitamin D due to decrease of sunlight exposure. MS biomarkers include nitric oxide, interleukin-6, nitric oxide synthase, fetuin-A and osteopontin. MS is not a genetic disease where MS occurs when human leukocyte antigen system related genes are changed in chromosome 6. The physiology of MS is monitored by activation of immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress pathways. MS is including two main steps: (1 myelin sheath destruction and formation of lesions and, (2 inflammation. Four types of MS can be distinguished: relapsing-remitting, primary progressive, secondary progressive and progressive relapsing. Nine treatments have been accepted for relapsing-remitting MS type: interferon β-1a, interferon β-1b, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, glatiramer acetate, fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate, teriflunomide, and alemtuzumab, however, the only treatment used is mitoxantrone for progressive MS but many of MS treatments side effects are recorded. Complementary treatments also used in MS treatments such as: vitamin D, Yoga, medicinal plants, oxygen therapy, acupuncture and reflexology.

  19. Epigenetics of multiple sclerosis: an updated review.

    Küçükali, Cem İsmail; Kürtüncü, Murat; Çoban, Arzu; Çebi, Merve; Tüzün, Erdem

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease characterized with autoimmune response against myelin proteins and progressive axonal loss. The heterogeneity of the clinical course and low concordance rates in monozygotic twins have indicated the involvement of complex heritable and environmental factors in MS pathogenesis. MS is more often transmitted to the next generation by mothers than fathers suggesting an epigenetic influence. One of the possible reasons of this parent-of-origin effect might be the human leukocyte antigen-DRB1*15 allele, which is the major risk factor for MS and regulated by epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. Moreover, major environmental risk factors for MS, vitamin D deficiency, smoking and Ebstein-Barr virus are all known to exert epigenetic changes. In the last few decades, compelling evidence implicating the role of epigenetics in MS has accumulated. Increased or decreased acetylation, methylation and citrullination of genes regulating the expression of inflammation and myelination factors appear to be particularly involved in the epigenetics of MS. Although much less is known about epigenetic factors causing neurodegeneration, epigenetic mechanisms regulating axonal loss, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction in MS are in the process of identification. Additionally, expression levels of several microRNAs (miRNAs) (e.g., miR-155 and miR-326) are increased in MS brains and potential mechanisms by which these factors might influence MS pathogenesis have been described. Certain miRNAs may also be potentially used as diagnostic biomarkers in MS. Several reagents, especially histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to ameliorate the symptoms of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Ongoing efforts in this field are expected to result in characterization of epigenetic factors that can be used in prediction of treatment responsive MS patients, diagnostic screening panels

  20. Perceived Behavioral Changes in Early Multiple Sclerosis

    Fabiana Souza Lima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired behavioral changes have essentially been described in advanced multiple sclerosis (MS. The present study was designed to determine whether behavioral modifications specifically related to the MS pathological process could be identified in the initial phase of the disease, as compared to control patients with chronic, relapsing and progressive inflammatory disorders not involving the central nervous system (CNS. Eighty-eight early MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤ 2.5 and 48 controls were tested. Perceived changes by informants in behavioral control, goal-directed behavior, decision making, emotional expression, insight and interpersonal relationships were assessed using the Iowa Scale of Personality Change (ISPC. Executive behavioral disturbances were screened using the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX. The mean change between the premorbid and postmorbid ISPC ratings was similar in the MS [12.2 (SD 15.6] and in the control [11.5 (SD 15.1] group. The perceived behavioral changes (PBCs most frequently reported in both groups were lack of stamina, lability/moodiness, anxiety, vulnerability to stress and irritability. Pathological scores in the DEX were also similar in both groups. Correlations between PBCs and DEX scores were different in MS and control groups. MS patients with cognitive impairment had a marginally higher number of PBCs than control patients (p = 0.056 and a significantly higher DEXp score (p = 0.04. These results suggest that (1 PBCs occurring in early MS patients were not different from those induced by comparable chronic non-CNS disorders, (2 qualitative differences in the relationship between behavioral symptoms and executive-behavioral changes may exist between MS and control groups, and (3 behavioral symptoms seem associated with cognitive deficits in MS. We further plan to assess these observations longitudinally.

  1. Altered thalamic functional connectivity in multiple sclerosis

    Liu, Yaou; Liang, Peipeng; Duan, Yunyun; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Jia, Xiuqin [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Dong, Huiqing; Ye, Jing [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shi, Fu-Dong [Department of Neurology and Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We demonstrated decreased connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions in MS. •Increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity was also observed in MS. •The increased functional connectivity is attenuated by increasing disease duration. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare thalamic functional connectivity (FC) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls (HC), and correlate these connectivity measures with other MRI and clinical variables. Methods: We employed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to examine changes in thalamic connectivity by comparing thirty-five patients with MS and 35 age- and sex-matched HC. Thalamic FC was investigated by correlating low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations in thalamic voxels with voxels in all other brain regions. Additionally thalamic volume fraction (TF), T2 lesion volume (T2LV), EDSS and disease duration were recorded and correlated with the FC changes. Results: MS patients were found to have a significantly lower TF than HC in bilateral thalami. Compared to HC, the MS group showed significantly decreased FC between thalamus and several brain regions including right middle frontal and parahippocampal gyri, and the left inferior parietal lobule. Increased intra- and inter-thalamic FC was observed in the MS group compared to HC. These FC alterations were not correlated with T2LV, thalamic volume or lesions. In the MS group, however, there was a negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity (r = −0.59, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We demonstrated decreased FC between thalamus and several cortical regions, while increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity in MS patients. These complex functional changes reflect impairments and/or adaptations that are independent of T2LV, thalamic volume or presence of thalamic lesions. The negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity could indicate an adaptive role of thalamus that is

  2. Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder with Tumefactive Demyelination mimicking Multiple Sclerosis: A Rare Case

    Roy, Ujjawal; Saini, Dinesh Satyanarayan; Pan, Koushik; Pandit, Alak; Ganguly, Goutam; Panwar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a diverse condition which not only encompasses isolated longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) and optic neuritis but also includes area postrema syndrome, acute brainstem syndrome, symptomatic narcolepsy or acute diencephalic clinical syndrome, and symptomatic cerebral syndrome. Imaging may reveal periependymal lesions surrounding the ventricular system or involvement of corticospinal tracts, area postrema, diencephalon, and corpus callosum. Rarely, there may be hemispheric tumefactive lesions that enhance in a “Cloud-like” fashion on gadolinium injection unlike in tumefactive multiple sclerosis where there is incomplete ring enhancement. Here, we present a case of aquaporin-4 positive relapsing NMOSD who presented to us with recurrent episodes of paraparesis with LETM and tumefactive lesions of brain on imaging, which enhanced in an incomplete ring like pattern resembling multiple sclerosis.

  3. Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder with Tumefactive Demyelination mimicking Multiple Sclerosis: A Rare Case.

    Roy, Ujjawal; Saini, Dinesh Satyanarayan; Pan, Koushik; Pandit, Alak; Ganguly, Goutam; Panwar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a diverse condition which not only encompasses isolated longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) and optic neuritis but also includes area postrema syndrome, acute brainstem syndrome, symptomatic narcolepsy or acute diencephalic clinical syndrome, and symptomatic cerebral syndrome. Imaging may reveal periependymal lesions surrounding the ventricular system or involvement of corticospinal tracts, area postrema, diencephalon, and corpus callosum. Rarely, there may be hemispheric tumefactive lesions that enhance in a "Cloud-like" fashion on gadolinium injection unlike in tumefactive multiple sclerosis where there is incomplete ring enhancement. Here, we present a case of aquaporin-4 positive relapsing NMOSD who presented to us with recurrent episodes of paraparesis with LETM and tumefactive lesions of brain on imaging, which enhanced in an incomplete ring like pattern resembling multiple sclerosis. PMID:27242658

  4. Therapeutic use of sport climbing for patients with multiple sclerosis

    Ana Ožura

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sport climbing is a form of exercise that requires complex and variable movement. Because of the use of the so-called "top-rope system", this is a safe activity appropriate for individuals with physical disabilities. Therefore, climbing might prove to be an effective form of therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease that may include motor and cognitive deficits as well as affective disturbances. The illness is characterized by multifocal areas of brain damage (plaques, as consequence of autoimmune inflammation. Sport climbing might be a potentially useful activity for treating spasticity, improving a person's self image and certain aspects of cognition, such as attention and executive functions, as well as for managing emotional disturbances. All of the above are areas where patients with multiple sclerosis might be in need of assistance. The article also describes the experience of a patient with multiple sclerosis who was enrolled in our climbing program. Future research is needed to evaluate the effect of climbing therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis.

  5. Excercise and disease progression in multiple sclerosis - can exercise slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis

    Dalgas, Ulrik; Stenager, Egon

    2012-01-01

    (3) and data from the EAE model (4) indicate a possible disease-modifying effect of exercise, but the strength of the evidence limits definite conclusions. It was concluded that some evidence supports the possibility of a disease-modifying potential of exercise (or physical activity) in MS patients......It has been suggested that exercise (or physical activity) might have the potential to have an impact on multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and thereby slow down the disease process in MS patients. The objective of this literature review was to identify the literature linking physical exercise (or...... studies evaluating the effects on clinical outcome measures, (2) cross-sectional studies evaluating the relationship between fitness status and MRI findings, (3) cross-sectional and longitudinal studies evaluating the relationship between exercise/physical activity and disability/relapse rate and, finally...

  6. Kynurenines and Multiple Sclerosis: The Dialogue between the Immune System and the Central Nervous System

    Cecilia Rajda; Zsófia Majláth; Dániel Pukoli; László Vécsei

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which axonal transection takes place in parallel with acute inflammation to various, individual extents. The importance of the kynurenine pathway in the physiological functions and pathological processes of the nervous system has been extensively investigated, but it has additionally been implicated as having a regulatory function in the immune system. Alterations in the kynurenine pathway have been described in ...

  7. [The possibility of using music therapy in neurology on the example of multiple sclerosis].

    Boiko, E A; Ivanchuk, E V; Gunchenko, M M; Batysheva, T T

    2016-01-01

    Currently music therapy plays an important role in the drug-free treatment and rehabilitation of children and adults with acute and chronic neurological and somatic diseases including demyelinating diseases. Existing studies show the effectiveness of music therapy in the improvement of social skills, cognitive function and sleep as well as in the reduction in the severity of depression, anxiety and pain in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:27070365

  8. Association of celiac disease with multiple sclerosis

    Abolfazli.R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS and the gluten intolerance disease, celiac disease, (CD are immune-mediated diseases. Better testing for antibodies associated with CD, including anti-gliadin antibody [AGA], as well as anti-endomysial and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, has improved the diagnosis of CD. Certain neurologic conditions have a reported association with CD. Previous researchers have investigated the role of a gluten-free diet in the treatment of MS and found no benefits. Here, we investigate the possible immunological association of CD with MS.Methods: Using ELISA, we estimated serum IgG and IgA anti-gliadin and IgA anti-endomysial antibodies in 34 MS patients, who were new or previous cases without immunosuppressant treatment for at least the last six months. The mean age was 29.6 years (range 15-46 years, with 30 patients relapsing-remitting, and four secondary-progressive MS. Thirty-four random anonymous blood donors were used as serologic controls (mean age 31.4 years, range 19-50 years. The individuals in both groups with elevated AGA (IgG or IgA or anti-endomysial antibody (IgA underwent duodenal biopsy.Results: In the MS group, high levels of IgG AGA were found in 5.9% of the subjects, and 5.9% had elevated IgA AGA. In the controls, elevated IgG AGA was detected in 5.9% of the subjects and IgA AGA in 2.9% (p=0.051 and 0.48, respectively. For IgG and IgA AGA levels, no significant differences were found between the patient and control groups. IgA anti-endomysial antibodies were not found in either group. Upon biopsy, the specific pathological features of celiac were absent.Conclusion: The same number of MS patients and controls had high levels of AGA, with normal levels of IgA anti-endomysial antibodies, which is more specific for CD, while the GI biopsies from both groups were not specific for CD. Therefore, AGA levels in any neurologic case should be interpreted with caution. The present study showed no

  9. Sibship characteristics and risk of multiple sclerosis

    Bager, Peter; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Bihrmann, Kristine;

    2006-01-01

    Sclerosis Register. The cohort of 1.9 million Danes was followed for 28.1 million person-years; during that time, 1,036 persons developed MS. Overall, there was no association between number of older siblings, number of younger siblings, total number of siblings, age distance from the nearest younger...

  10. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with an Acute Hypertensive Crises

    Lee, Ha Lim; Lee, Ju Kang

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder involving the systemic motor neurons, but autonomic nervous function is relatively well preserved. A few studies related to autonomic dysfunction have been reported, but autonomic dysfunction is rare in ALS. Moreover, dysautonomia symptoms are not prominent in patients with ALS. We present a 55-year-old male patient with ALS, who had acute severe hypertension and tachycardia crises, as well as sudden falls in his ...

  11. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    J. J. Sosnoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P.05. Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  12. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Sosnoff, J. J.; Sandroff, B. M.; Pula, J. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Motl, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry) in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample) reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P .05). Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis. PMID:22966459

  13. Mechanisms and pharmacology of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis.

    Iannitti, T; Kerr, B J; Taylor, B K

    2014-01-01

    The neuropathic pain of multiple sclerosis is quite prevalent and severely impacts quality of life. A few randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trials suggest that cannabis- and anticonvulsant-based treatments provide partial pain relief, but at the expense of adverse events. An even smaller, but emerging, number of translational studies are using rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which exhibit pain-like behaviors resembling those of Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. These studies not only support the possible effectiveness of anticonvulsants, but also compel further clinical trials with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, or drugs which interfere with glutamatergic neurotransmission. Future behavioral studies in EAE models are essential toward a new pharmacotherapy of multiple sclerosis pain. PMID:24590824

  14. Non-invasive examination of multiple sclerosis patients

    Multiple sclerosis is characterized by a wide range of symptoms and, in many cases, by a highly erratic course. As a result diagnosis is often a problem. Two non-invasive examinations, Computer Tomography (CT scan) and the Evoked Response test (ER), are the subjects of this study which, according to available literature, both can play a role in the establishment of the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Clinical trials have been performed and both methods demonstrated abnormalities of the central nervous system which were not suspected on clinical grounds; as a result both methods of examination can contribute to the early establishment of the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. In addition the diagnosis can be determined with greater certainty when the findings of the CT-scan and the evoked response test are taken into consideration. (Auth.)

  15. Kynurenines and Multiple Sclerosis: The Dialogue between the Immune System and the Central Nervous System

    Cecilia Rajda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which axonal transection takes place in parallel with acute inflammation to various, individual extents. The importance of the kynurenine pathway in the physiological functions and pathological processes of the nervous system has been extensively investigated, but it has additionally been implicated as having a regulatory function in the immune system. Alterations in the kynurenine pathway have been described in both preclinical and clinical investigations of multiple sclerosis. These observations led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets in multiple sclerosis, such as synthetic tryptophan analogs, endogenous tryptophan metabolites (e.g., cinnabarinic acid, structural analogs (laquinimod, teriflunomid, leflunomid and tranilast, indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase inhibitors (1MT and berberine and kynurenine-3-monooxygenase inhibitors (nicotinylalanine and Ro 61-8048. The kynurenine pathway is a promising novel target via which to influence the immune system and to achieve neuroprotection, and further research is therefore needed with the aim of developing novel drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases.

  16. Can multiple sclerosis as a cognitive disorder influence patients’ dreams?

    Abdorreza Naser Moghadasi; Mahsa Owji

    2013-01-01

    Dream should be considered as a kind of cognitive ability that is formed parallel to other cognitive capabilities like language. On the other hand, multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease that can involve different aspects of our cognition. Therefore, MS may influence patients’ dreams. In fact, we do not know what the importance of dream is in MS, but further studies may introduce dream and dreaming as a sign of improvement or progression in MS disease.Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a diseas...

  17. Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Hope Through Research Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table ... that television journalist Neil Cavuto was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) more than 15 years ago. And that ...

  18. The extracellular matrix in multiple sclerosis: an update

    Sobel R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM molecules play important roles in the pathobiology of the major human central nervous system (CNS inflammatory/demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS. This mini-review highlights some recent work on CNS endothelial cell interactions with vascular basement membrane ECM as part of the cellular immune response, and roles for white matter ECM molecules in demyelination and remyelination in MS lesions. Recent basic and clinical investigations of MS emphasize axonal injury, not only in chronic MS plaques, but also in acute lesions; progressive axonal degeneration in normal-appearing white matter also may contribute to brain and spinal cord atrophy in MS patients. Remodeling of the interstitial white matter ECM molecules that affect axon regeneration, however, is incompletely characterized. Our ongoing immunohistochemical studies demonstrate enhanced ECM versican, a neurite and axon growth-inhibiting white matter ECM proteoglycan, and dermatan sulfate proteoglycans at the edges of inflammatory MS lesions. This suggests that enhanced proteoglycan deposition in the ECM and axonal growth inhibition may occur early and are involved in expansion of active lesions. Decreased ECM proteoglycans and their phagocytosis by macrophages along with myelin in plaque centers imply that there is "injury" to the ECM itself. These results indicate that white matter ECM proteoglycan alterations are integral to MS pathology at all disease stages and that they contribute to a CNS ECM that is inhospitable to axon regrowth/regeneration.

  19. Predicting and preventing the future: actively managing multiple sclerosis.

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) has a highly variable clinical course but a number of demographic, clinical and MRI features can guide the clinician in the assessment of disease activity and likely disability outcome. It is also clear that the inflammatory activity in the first five years of relapsing-remitting MS results in the neurodegenerative changes seen in secondary progressive MS 10-15 years later. While conventional first-line disease modifying therapy has an effect on relapses, about one third of patients have a suboptimal response to treatment. With the advent of highly active second-line therapies with their evident marked suppression of inflammation, the clinician now has the tools to manage the course of relapsing-remitting MS more effectively. The development of treatment optimisation recommendations based on the clinical response to first-line therapies can guide the neurologist in more active management of the early course of relapsing-remitting MS, with the aim of preventing both acute inflammatory axonal injury and the neurodegenerative process which leads to secondary progressive MS.

  20. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  1. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis spasticity: multiple sclerosis spasticity guidelines.

    Gold, Ralf; Oreja-Guevara, Celia

    2013-12-01

    Symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS) is an important part of a comprehensive treatment plan that aims to improve patients' quality of life. In the current era of medical progress, several factors have led to the development of guidelines for MS management. There is continued need for an evidence-based approach supported by high-quality data from controlled clinical trials. Most healthcare systems require this approach and include it in the reimbursement process. Guidelines are usually committed by national or continental neurological societies. The Spanish Society of Neurology demyelinating diseases working group has developed a consensus document on spasticity in patients with MS. MS experts from the group used the metaplan method to sum up the most important recommendations about spasticity for inclusion in the guidance. Recommendations were classified according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network system and approved by all members of the group. In Germany, the guideline panel of the German Neurological Society endorsed the national competence network for multiple sclerosis (Krankheitsbezogenes Kompetenznetz Multiple Sklerose) to update the existing recommendations. The most recent fifth edition of the guidelines (dated April 2012) now also includes recommendations for treatment of key symptoms such as spasticity. More than 30 MS neurologists contributed to the new edition reflecting the need for broad expertise. After a first round in which key topics were defined, a web-based decision process was undertaken to further develop individual topics such as symptomatic therapy. The draft manuscript was reviewed once again by the group prior to submission to the official review process. The aims of spasticity treatment are to improve mobility and dexterity, achieve physiological movement patterns, reduce pain, facilitate nursing measures and avoid complications such as contractures. Representative antispasticity medications include baclofen

  2. Effect of 12-Week Pilates Trainning on EDSS in Women Suffering fromMultiple Sclerosis

    Z Shanazari; SM Marandi; S Samie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background & aim: Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating disease that strikes the immune system. Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease which debilitates the nervous system. The study was evaluated the effects of Pilates exercise on women with physical disabilities suffering from multiple sclerosis for 12 weeks .The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of Pilates trainning on EDSS of women suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS) for 12 weeks. Methods: In the pres...

  3. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  4. Fatigue characteristics in multiple sclerosis: the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS survey

    Vollmer Timothy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is a common disabling symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS and has a significantly negative impact on quality of life. Persons with MS enrolled in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS Patient Registry are invited to complete follow-up surveys every six months to update their original registration information. One of these surveys was designed to focus on the severity and impact of fatigue, and its association with other clinical parameters of MS such as physical disability. Methods In addition to the usual data collected in Registry update surveys such as demographic characteristics, MS-related medical history, disability and handicap, immunomodulatory and symptomatic therapies taken, and healthcare services used, the survey for this study included two validated self-report fatigue scales, the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS and questions about the use of symptomatic management for fatigue, both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments. This Registry update survey was mailed to all NARCOMS registrants (n = 18,595 in November 2002. Information provided by registry participants was approved for research purposes by the Yale University Institutional Review Board. Results The response rate for the survey was 49.5% (9205/18,595. Severe fatigue as measured with the FSS using the developer's recommended severity cutpoint of ≥ 36 was reported by 6691 (74% of evaluable respondents (n = 9077. A higher prevalence of severe fatigue was observed in relapsing-worsening MS compared with relapsing-stable and primary progressive MS. A distinct pattern of fatigue was observed across the disability levels of the Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS. Although there were no differences in the severity or impact of fatigue by immunomodulatory agents (IMA, respondents who recalled therapy changes in the prior six months reported different patterns of change in

  5. Selective association of multiple sclerosis with infectious mononucleosis

    Zaadstra, B.M.; Chorus, A.M.J.; Buuren, S. van; Kalsbeek, H.; Noort, J.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested an association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and infectious mononucleosis (IM) but data on the exact strength of this association or its selectivity have been conflicting. In this study we have evaluated the association between MS and a variety of common childhood i

  6. Modifiable factors influencing relapses and disability in multiple sclerosis

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Nagels, G.; Bissay, V.; De Keyser, J.

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that the natural course of multiple sclerosis can be influenced by a number of factors. Strong evidence suggests that relapses can be triggered by infections, the postpartum period and stressful life events. Vaccinations against influenza, hepatitis B and tetan

  7. Ocular flutter in suspected multiple sclerosis: a presenting paroxysmal manifestation.

    D. A. Francis; Heron, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A patient with suspected multiple sclerosis is described who presented with attacks of blurring of vision and ocular flutter. This has not previously been reported as an isolated paroxysmal manifestation of brain stem demyelination. As with other paroxysmal disturbances ocular flutter may present as the first sign of the disease.

  8. Standardized cannabis in multiple sclerosis: a case report

    Hornby, Paul; Sharma, Manju

    2010-01-01

    A 52 year old female suffering from severe progressive multiple sclerosis was administered quantifiable amounts of standardized cannabis and monitored over the period of one year, while providing daily pain charts and records of her condition. An average daily intake of 500 mg of Tetrahydrocannabinol as cannabis was required to achieve a desired quality of life.

  9. Multiple sclerosis or neurological manifestations of Celiac disease

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS and celiac disease (CD are considered to be T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. We discuss about a known case of CD-showed relapsing - remitting neurological symptoms compatible with MS. In this rare co-occurrence subject, MS-CD patient, the interaction between MS - and CD-related inflammatory processes is open to discussion.

  10. Selective association of multiple sclerosis with infectious monocleosis

    Zaadstra, B.; Chorus, A.M.J.; van Buuren, S.; Kalsbeek, H.; van Noort, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested an association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and infectious mononucleosis (IM) but data on the exact strength of this association or its selectivity have been conflicting. In this study we have evaluated the association between MS and a variety of common childhood i

  11. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    Rudick, R.A.; Stuart, W.H.; Calabresi, P.A.; Confavreux, C.; Galetta, S.L.; Radue, E.W.; Lublin, F.D.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Wynn, D.R.; Lynn, F.; Panzara, M.A.; Sandrock, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon beta is used to modify the course of relapsing multiple sclerosis. Despite interferon beta therapy, many patients have relapses. Natalizumab, an alpha4 integrin antagonist, appeared to be safe and effective alone and when added to interferon beta-1a in preliminary studies. MET

  12. Conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis

    Kuhle, J; Disanto, G; Dobson, R;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We explored which clinical and biochemical variables predict conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in a large international cohort. METHODS: Thirty-three centres provided serum samples from 1047 CIS cases with...

  13. Risk for multiple sclerosis in dizygotic and monozygotic twins

    Hansen, Thomas; Skytthe, Axel; Stenager, Egon;

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the risks of twins for multiple sclerosis (MS). Our data are linked registers of all Danish twins and of all Danes born between 1920 and 1970 in whom MS was diagnosed before 1997. We compared differences in the risks for MS by Cox regression and standardized incidence ratios. Our ...

  14. Sun Exposure and Reduced Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The association between red hair color (RHC melanocortin 1 receptor genotype, past environmental sun exposure, and risk of multiple sclerosis (MS was investigated in a population-based case-control study in Tasmania, Australia, involving 136 cases with MS and 272 controls.

  15. The role of the cerebellum in multiple sclerosis

    Weier, Katrin; Banwell, Brenda; Cerasa, Antonio;

    2015-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebellar signs and symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunction are frequent and contribute to clinical disability with only poor response to symptomatic treatment. The current consensus paper highlights the broad range of clinical signs and symptoms of MS patients, which...

  16. The changing demographic pattern of multiple sclerosis epidemiology

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2010-01-01

    The uneven distribution of multiple sclerosis (MS) across populations can be attributed to differences in genes and the environment and their interaction. Prevalence and incidence surveys could be affected by inaccuracy of diagnosis and ascertainment, and prevalence also depends on survival. These...

  17. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and venous stenoses in multiple sclerosis

    Blinkenberg, M; Akeson, P; Sillesen, H;

    2012-01-01

    The traditional view that multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease has recently been challenged by the claim that MS is caused by chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI). Although several studies have questioned this vascular theory, the CCSVI controversy is still ongoing. Our...

  18. Therapeutic interference with leukocyte recirculation in multiple sclerosis

    Sellebjerg, F; Sørensen, P S

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease where T cells are thought to initiate an inflammatory reaction in the brain and spinal cord, resulting in demyelination and axonal pathology. Interfering with the activation and recruitment of immune cells reduces disease activity in MS. We...

  19. Survival of patients with multiple sclerosis in Denmark

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Hyllested, K

    1994-01-01

    We estimated survival probability and excess death rates for patients with MS on the basis of data from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, which includes virtually all patients diagnosed with MS in Denmark (population, five million) since 1948. We reviewed and reclassified all case records...

  20. The incidence and prevalence of psychiatric disorders in multiple sclerosis

    Marrie, Ruth Ann; Reingold, Stephen; Cohen, Jeffrey;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with lower quality of life, more fatigue, and reduced adherence to disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review are to estimate the incidence and prevalence of selected comorbid psychiatric...

  1. Monthly oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Ratzer, Rikke; Iversen, Pernille; Börnsen, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a large unmet need for treatments for patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Phase 2 studies with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker outcomes may be well suited for the initial evaluation of efficacious treatments. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of monthly oral...

  2. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  3. Principles of a new treatment algorithm in multiple sclerosis

    Hartung, Hans-Peter; Montalban, Xavier; Sorensen, Per Soelberg;

    2011-01-01

    We are entering a new era in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The first oral treatment (fingolimod) has now gained US FDA approval, addressing an unmet need for patients with MS who wish to avoid parenteral administration. A second agent (cladribine) is currently being...

  4. Clinical Relevance of Brain Volume Measures in Multiple Sclerosis

    De Stefano, Nicola; Airas, Laura; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos;

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease with an inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathology. Axonal loss and neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course and may lead to irreversible neurological impairment. Changes in brain volume, observed from the earliest stage of MS and...

  5. Statistical Analysis of Questionnaire on Physical Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Martinková, Patrícia; Řasová, K.

    -, č. 3 (2010), S340. ISSN 1210-7859. [Obnovené neuroimunologickjé a likvorologické dny. 21.05.2010-22.05.2010, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : questionnaire * physical rehabilitation * multiple sclerosis Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  6. Vitamin D and Multiple Sclerosis: Correlation, Causality, and Controversy

    Joost Smolders

    2010-01-01

    The last years, many studies reported associations between correlates of vitamin D exposure and several correlates of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity. This review discusses studies on vitamin D status, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and relapse activity of MS. Furthermore, several considerations for intervention studies on vitamin D supplementation in MS are provided.

  7. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of cortical multiple sclerosis pathology

    Tardif, Christine L; Bedell, Barry J; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed;

    2012-01-01

    Although significant improvements have been made regarding the visualization and characterization of cortical multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cortical lesions (CL) continue to be under-detected in vivo, and we have a limited understanding of the causes of GM...

  8. Permanent tremor reduction during thalamic stimulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Schweder, Patrick; Joint, Carole; Ray, Nicola; Pretorius, Pieter; Gregory, Ralph; Aziz, Tipu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background: Unlike thalamic lesioning, thalamic stimulation is considered a reversible treatment for tremor. However, tremor in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) can sometimes permanently improve during thalamic stimulation. Such 'permanent tremor reduction' (PTR) has been attributed to limb weakness preventing tremor expression. In this study, eleven consecutive patients with MS tremor treated with thalamic stimulation were assessed for PTR. Eighteen upper limbs had tremor, of ...

  9. Prediction of response to interferon therapy in multiple sclerosis

    Sellebjerg, F; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Koch-Henriksen, N;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding interferon response factor (IRF)-5, IRF-8 and glypican-5 (GPC5) have been associated with disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon (IFN)-β. We analysed whether SNPs in the IRF5, IRF8 and GPC5...

  10. Reliability of Clinical Functioning Measures in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Martinková, Patrícia; Šedová, Michaela; Řasová, K.

    Prague, 2009. s. 147-147. [ISCB 2009. Annual Conference /30./. 23.08.2009-27.08.2009, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Grant ostatní: GA MZd(CZ) 1A8628 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : multiple sclerosis * reliability * clinical functioning Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  11. Exercise and Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Dietrich, Frederick; Larson, Rebecca; White, Lesley J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of quality of life after a 4-month progressive resistance training program for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). A second purpose was to examine participants' views about factors that facilitated or impeded exercise behavior. Qualitative interviews were conducted with eight females…

  12. Clinical Manifestations of Multiple Sclerosis in Taiwanese Children

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and onset before 18 years were treated over the past 22 years and their records retrospectively analyzed at the National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, and Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

  13. Evaluating Functional Decline in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Rosenblum, Sara; Weiss, Patrice L.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease with a wide-ranging impact on functional status. The aim of the study was to examine the added value of simultaneously evaluating fatigue, personal ADL and handwriting performance as indicators for functional decline among patients with MS. Participants were 50 outpatients with MS and 26 matched healthy…

  14. Childhood body mass index and multiple sclerosis risk

    Munger, Kassandra L; Bentzen, Joan; Laursen, Bjarne; Stenager, Egon; Koch-Henriksen, Nils Iørgen; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Baker, Jennifer Lyn

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity in late adolescence has been associated with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, it is not known if body size in childhood is associated with MS risk. METHODS: Using a prospective design we examined whether body mass index (BMI) at ages 7-13 years was...

  15. Intrathecal synthesis of free immunoglobulin light chains in multiple sclerosis

    Krakauer, M; Schaldemose Nielsen, H; Jensen, J; Sellebjerg, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The detection of oligoclonal immunoglobulin free light chains (FLC) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was compared to IgG isoelectric focusing. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from 69 patients with possible first attacks of MS, 50 patients with...

  16. Principles of a new treatment algorithm in multiple sclerosis

    Hartung, Hans-Peter; Montalban, Xavier; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Vermersch, Patrick; Olsson, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    We are entering a new era in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The first oral treatment (fingolimod) has now gained US FDA approval, addressing an unmet need for patients with MS who wish to avoid parenteral administration. A second agent (cladribine) is currently being con...

  17. Clinical and radiographic spectrum of pathologically confirmed tumefactive multiple sclerosis

    Lucchinetti, C.F.; Gavrilova, R. H.; Metz, I.; Parisi, J.E.; Scheithauer, B. W.; Weigand, S.; Thomsen, K.; Mandrekar, J.; Altintas, A.; Erickson, B. J.; König, F.; C. Giannini; Lassmann, H; Linbo, L.; Pittock, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Atypical imaging features of multiple sclerosis lesions include size >2 cm, mass effect, oedema and/or ring enhancement. This constellation is often referred to as ‘tumefactive multiple sclerosis’. Previous series emphasize their unifocal and clinically isolated nature, however, evolution of these lesions is not well defined. Biopsy may be required for diagnosis. We describe clinical and radiographic features in 168 patients with biopsy confirmed CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD). ...

  18. Environmental Factors and Multiple Sclerosis Severity: A Descriptive Study

    Daniele Mandia; Ferraro, Ottavia E.; Guido Nosari; Cristina Montomoli; Elisabetta Zardini; Roberto Bergamaschi

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that environmental factors play a key role in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). This study was conducted to examine whether environmental factors may also be associated with the evolution of the disease. We collected data on smoking habits, sunlight exposure and diet (particularly consumption of vitamin D-rich foods) from a sample of 131 MS patients. We also measured their serum vitamin D concentration. The clinical impact of MS was quantified using the Multiple ...

  19. Parenteral Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis: The Advent of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Singer, Barry A

    2016-04-01

    Improved disease control is critical for enhancing the lives of those living with multiple sclerosis. With specific immunologic targets, monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatments are highly effective options for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. The mechanism, efficacy, and current safety profiles are detailed for the two mAb therapies, natalizumab and alemtuzumab, with regulatory approval in multiple countries. Daclizumab, which targets the interleukin-2 receptor, and ocrelizumab, which depletes B cells, have convincing phase 3 clinical trial data and may very well provide new options in the near future. Trial results of other B-cell-directed therapies, ofatumumab and rituximab, are reviewed. Less-frequent dosing of glatiramer acetate and interferon β-1a highlight developments in the first generation of parenteral immunomodulatory therapy. Remyelination using mAbs has moved into clinical trials with the first agents, anti-LINGO-1, rHIgM22, and anti-SEMA 4D. PMID:27116720

  20. [A review of multiple sclerosis (2). Diagnosis and treatment].

    Martinez-Altarriba, M C; Ramos-Campoy, O; Luna-Calcaño, I M; Arrieta-Antón, E

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a major demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It has a significant economic and social impact. Its etiology is unclear, although there are several hypotheses, such as infections or genetics. In its pathophysiology, it seems that immune activation attacks the myelin sheath, causing a progressive and irreversible axonal degeneration. The disease produces a variety of symptoms, and diagnosis requires fulfilling a number of criteria and the exclusion of other possible causes. The role of neuroimaging is very important, especially Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Despite the availability of disease-modifying drugs, none of them are able to halt its progress, and the most useful drugs are those designed to alleviate the symptoms of outbreaks. Overall, multiple sclerosis requires a significant effort in research to clarify not only why and how it occurs, as well as the development of new measures to improve quality of life of affected patients. PMID:25442466

  1. An update of teriflunomide for treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Oh J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Jiwon Oh,1,2 Paul W O’Connor2 1Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Division of Neurology, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: There are a number of oral agents emerging as potential disease-modifying agents in multiple sclerosis (MS. Among these investigational agents, teriflunomide has shown promise in large, multicenter, phase III clinical trials with respect to safety and efficacy in relapsing MS patients, and is the latest disease-modifying agent approved for use in MS patients in the United States. This review will summarize teriflunomide's historical development, clinical pharmacology, studies in animals, clinical trials, and safety data, and will end with a discussion of the role of teriflunomide in MS in the context of existing treatment options. Keywords: teriflunomide, multiple sclerosis, clinical trials, review

  2. Theranostic Implications of Nanotechnology in Multiple Sclerosis: A Future Perspective

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis is a multifactorial disease with several pathogenic mechanisms and pathways. Successful MS management and medical care requires early accurate diagnosis along with specific treatment protocols based upon multifunctional nanotechnology approach. This paper highlights advances in nanotechnology that have enabled the clinician to target the brain and CNS in patient with multiple sclerosis with nanoparticles having therapeutic and imaging components. The multipartite theranostic (thera(py + (diagnostics approach puts forth strong implications for medical care and cure in MS. The current nanotheranostics utilize tamed drug vehicles and contain cargo, targeting ligands, and imaging labels for delivery to specific tissues, cells, or subcellular components. A brief overview of nonsurgical nanorepair advances as future perspective is also described. Considering the potential inflammatory triggers in MS pathogenesis, a multifunctional nanotechnology approach will be needed for the prognosis.

  3. T–CELL VACCINE PREPARATION FOR MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS TREATMENT

    I. P. Ivanova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A two–stage technology of preparation of T–cell vaccine designated for multiple sclerosis treatment is described. At the first stage myelin–specific lymphocytes undergoe antigen–dependent cultural selection, whereas at the second stage they are grown by means of non–specific stimulation. The vaccine prepared in this way was found to induce specific anti–idiotypic immune response, directed against myelin–reactive T–lymphocytes. The results of 1–year follow–up of 18 vaccinated patients with a cerebral–spinal type of multiple sclerosis indicated the absence of side effects of T–cell vaccination, and suggest the possibility of effective application of this treatment within early stages of disease. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 1, pp 27532

  4.  Potential pathogens in multiple sclerosis (MS

    Mariola Zawada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available  Multiple sclerosis is a neuroimmunological disease in which etiologic agents have not been identified yet. The etiology of MS is complex in its nature and may involve many different agents acting simultaneously or in a cascade manner leading to the development of the disease. The causes of MS development were sought among the factors associated with HLA and TCR genes and human endogenous retroviruses (HERV. Environmental factors such as bacterial, fungal and viral infections as well as potential participation of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of the disease have also been examined. The current state of knowledge concerning potential factors participating in the etiopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis has been reviewed in this paper.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in clinically-definite multiple sclerosis

    Forty-two patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging using a 1.5-T instrument. Magnetic resonance imaging detected an abnormality in 90% of patients. In four patients, no lesions were demonstrated. The number, size and site of the lesions by magnetic resonance imaging were compared with the patients' clinical status and other variables. The Kurtzke disability status scale score increased in patients with corpus callosum atrophy, brainstem and basal ganglia lesions, and correlated with the total number of lesions. No correlation was shown between the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and disease duration, age, sex or pattern-reversal visual-evoked potentials. The variety of magnetic resonance images that could be obtained in patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis is highlighted. 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: A review

    :During the last two decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been widely used In the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of multiple sclerosis. MRI, both conventional and non conventional methods, has transformed all aspects of M S research and clinical practice in recent years. Although advanced imaging methods have added much more to our knowledge about pathogenesis and natural history of the disease but their cost, availability, complexity and lack of validation have limited their use in routine clinical practice. Conventional MR techniques including proton density, T1/T2-Weighted images and fluid- attenuated inversion recovery sequences are now accepted in standard protocols for diagnosis and treatment outcome measures in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis. This review will focus on the type, morphology and evolution of M S lesions regarding conventional MRI and their use for treatment monitoring in daily clinical practice

  8. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis. PMID:27021143

  9. Differential micro RNA expression in PBMC from multiple sclerosis patients.

    David Otaegui

    Full Text Available Differences in gene expression patterns have been documented not only in Multiple Sclerosis patients versus healthy controls but also in the relapse of the disease. Recently a new gene expression modulator has been identified: the microRNA or miRNA. The aim of this work is to analyze the possible role of miRNAs in multiple sclerosis, focusing on the relapse stage. We have analyzed the expression patterns of 364 miRNAs in PBMC obtained from multiple sclerosis patients in relapse status, in remission status and healthy controls. The expression patterns of the miRNAs with significantly different expression were validated in an independent set of samples. In order to determine the effect of the miRNAs, the expression of some predicted target genes of these were studied by qPCR. Gene interaction networks were constructed in order to obtain a co-expression and multivariate view of the experimental data. The data analysis and later validation reveal that two miRNAs (hsa-miR-18b and hsa-miR-599 may be relevant at the time of relapse and that another miRNA (hsa-miR-96 may be involved in remission. The genes targeted by hsa-miR-96 are involved in immunological pathways as Interleukin signaling and in other pathways as wnt signaling. This work highlights the importance of miRNA expression in the molecular mechanisms implicated in the disease. Moreover, the proposed involvement of these small molecules in multiple sclerosis opens up a new therapeutic approach to explore and highlight some candidate biomarker targets in MS.

  10. Psychometric Evaluation of the Perceived Stress Scale in Multiple Sclerosis

    Wu, Salene M.; Dagmar Amtmann

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease characterized by neurological symptoms and sometimes heightened levels of distress. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) is often used in MS samples to measure stress but has not been validated in this population. Participants (n=446) completed the PSS as well as measure of depression, anxiety, and mental and physical health. Factor analyses indicated that the general factor of a bifactor model accounted for a large amount of the variance in the 14...

  11. Multiple Sclerosis Increases Fracture Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Guixian Dong; Ning Zhang; Zhanpo Wu; Yumin Liu; Litao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and fracture risk has been reported, but results of previous studies remain controversial and ambiguous. To assess the association between MS and fracture risk, a meta-analysis was performed. Method. Based on comprehensive searches of the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, we identified outcome data from all articles estimating the association between MS and fracture risk. The pooled risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs...

  12. Cannabinoid control of neuroinflammation related to multiple sclerosis

    Baker, D.; Jackson, S. J.; Pryce, G.

    2007-01-01

    The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa) has been known by many names but the question remains ‘Can we call it medicine?' There has been renewed interest in the value of cannabis for the control of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis, where it has been shown to have some effect on spasticity and pain both experimentally and in clinical trials in humans. However, in addition to symptom control potential, the question remains whether cannabinoids can modify the neuroinflammatory...

  13. Mechanisms and Pharmacology of Neuropathic Pain in Multiple Sclerosis

    Iannitti, T; Kerr, B.J.; Taylor, BK

    2014-01-01

    The neuropathic pain of multiple sclerosis is quite prevalent and severely impacts quality of life. A few randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trials suggest that cannabis- and anticonvulsant-based treatments provide partial pain relief, but at the expense of adverse events. An even smaller, but emerging, number of translational studies are using rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which exhibit pain-like behaviors resembling those of MS patients. The...

  14. Multiple sclerosis, cannabis, and cognition: A structural MRI study

    Kristoffer Romero; Bennis Pavisian; William R. Staines; Anthony Feinstein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A subset of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) smoke cannabis to relieve symptoms including spasticity and pain. Recent evidence suggests that smoking cannabis further impairs cognition in people with MS and is linked to impaired functional brain changes. No such association, however, has been reported between cannabis use and structural brain changes, hence the focus of the present study. Methods: Twenty patients with MS who smoke cannabis for symptom relief, and 19 matched ...

  15. Multiple sclerosis in Northern Ireland: a historical and global perspective.

    McDonnell, G.V.; Hawkins, S A

    2000-01-01

    The uneven worldwide distribution of multiple sclerosis has been of interest to epidemiologists, neurologists and statisticians for over a century, prevalence rates for the disease apparently being determined by variations in age, gender, geography, race and ethnic group. Northern Ireland has been recognised as an area of high MS prevalence since the truly seminal work of Allison and Millar almost 50 years ago. The most recent study in Northern Ireland was undertaken in 1996 and involved the ...

  16. A functional variant in ERAP1 predisposes to multiple sclerosis

    Guerini, F R; Cagliani, R.; De Forni, D; C. Agliardi; Caputo, D.; A. Cassinotti; Galimberti, D.; Fenoglio, C; M. Biasin; R. Asselta; Scarpini, E.; Comi, G P; Bresolin, N.; M. S. Clerici; Sironi, M

    2012-01-01

    The ERAP1 gene encodes an aminopeptidase involved in antigen processing. A functional polymorphism in the gene (rs30187, Arg528Lys) associates with susceptibility to ankylosying spondylitis (AS), whereas a SNP in the interacting ERAP2 gene increases susceptibility to another inflammatory autoimmune disorder, Crohn's disease (CD). We analysed rs30187 in 572 Italian patients with CD and in 517 subjects suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS); for each cohort, an independent sex- and age-matched ...

  17. Treatment selection and experience in multiple sclerosis: survey of neurologists

    Hanson KA; Agashivala N; Wyrwich KW; Raimundo K; Kim E; Brandes DW

    2014-01-01

    Kristin A Hanson,1 Neetu Agashivala,2 Kathleen W Wyrwich,3 Karina Raimundo,2 Edward Kim,2 David W Brandes4 1UBC: An Express Scripts Company, Dorval, QC, Canada; 2Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 3Evidera, Bethesda, MD, USA; 4Hope MS Center, Knoxville, TN, USA Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease with many therapeutic options. Little is known about how neurologists select particular disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for their patients. Objectiv...

  18. Evaluation of the Needs of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Ali Dehghani; Sima Mohammadkhan-Kermanshahi; Robabeh Memarian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that causes many problems in patients. Since training should be done in according to the educational needs, this study is performed to assess the educational needs of MS patients.Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study, and its tool was a questionnaire on the educational needs of MS patients. Fifty patients referred to the MS society were selected through simple sampling.Res...

  19. Cow′s milk allergy in multiple sclerosis patients

    Fereshteh Ashtari; Fatemeh Jamshidi; Raheleh Shokouhi Shoormasti; Zahra Pourpak; Mojtaba Akbari

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposure to some environmental agent such as different nutrition and contact with allergens may have a role in developing multiple sclerosis (MS). The present study was aimed to evaluate the cow's milk allergy (CMA) in MS patients compared to healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Between March 2012 and July 2012, 48 MS patients were selected and compared with 48 healthy subjectsto assess the frequency of CMA in MS patients compared to healthy control. Cow's milk specific immuno...

  20. Promoting return of function in multiple sclerosis: An integrated approach

    Gacias, Mar; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination, axonal degeneration and progressive brain atrophy. Most of the currently available disease modifying agents proved to be very effective in managing the relapse rate, however progressive neuronal damage continues to occur and leads to progressive accumulation of irreversible disability. For this reason, any therapeutic strategy aimed at restoration of function must take into account not only immunomodulation, but also...

  1. Brain Plasticity Effects of Neuromodulation Against Multiple Sclerosis Fatigue

    Tecchio, Franca; Cancelli, Andrea; Cottone, Carlo; Ferrucci, Roberta; Vergari, Maurizio; Zito, Giancarlo; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Filippi, Maria Maddalena; Ghazaryan, Anna; Lupoi, Domenico; Smits, Fenne M.; Giordani, Alessandro; Migliore, Simone; Porcaro, Camillo; Salustri, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Rationale We recently reported on the efficacy of a personalized transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) treatment in reducing multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue. The result supports the notion that interventions targeted at modifying abnormal excitability within the sensorimotor network could represent valid non-pharmacological treatments. Objective The present work aimed at assessing whether the mentioned intervention also induces changes in the excitability of sensorimotor c...

  2. Identifying responders and nonresponders to interferon therapy in multiple sclerosis

    Prosperini L

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Luca Prosperini,1 Marco Capobianco,2 Costanza Giannì31Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy; 2Regional Multiple Sclerosis Centre, University Hospital San Luigi Gonzaga, Orbassano, Italy; 3Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Interferon beta is a well established disease-modifying agent used for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Despite treatment, a relevant proportion of patients continue to experience clinical (ie, relapses, worsening of disability and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI activity. Early identification of responders and nonresponders to interferon beta is strongly recommended to select patients who need a prompt switch to another disease-modifying agent and to ultimately avoid accumulation of fixed disability over time. Detecting responders and nonresponders to interferon beta can be challenging, mainly because of the lack of a clear and shared clinical definition of response to treatment. Clinical features at the start of treatment should be considered as prognostic factors, but MRI parameters assessed during treatment, such as contrast-enhancing lesions or new T2-hyperintense lesions, may be sensitive markers of response to interferon beta. Quantitative scoring systems derived from a combination of relapses and MRI activity have recently been proposed as practical tools for use in the everyday clinical setting. Blood biomarkers, such as neutralizing antibodies to interferon beta and Myxovirus resistance protein A, provide further useful information for detecting responders and nonresponders to interferon beta. However, since the presence of neutralizing antibodies can only partially explain the nonresponse to interferon beta, biomarkers of interferon beta activity possibly related to the pathogenesis of the disease could represent a future step toward a tailored, long-lasting effective treatment against multiple sclerosis

  3. Assessing cost-effectiveness in the management of multiple sclerosis

    Phillips, Ceri J; Ioan Humphreys

    2009-01-01

    Ceri J Phillips, Ioan HumphreysInstitute for Health Research, School of Health Science, Swansea University, Swansea, Wales, UKAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common causes of neurological disability in young and middle-aged adults, with current prevalence rates estimated to be 30 per 100,000 populations. Women are approximately twice as susceptible as males, but males are more likely to have progressive disease. The onset of the disease normally occurs between 20 and 40 y...

  4. The Latest Innovations in the Drug Pipeline for Multiple Sclerosis

    Radick, Lea; Mehr, Stanton R.

    2015-01-01

    Several new medications are being investigated in late-phase studies for the treatment of patients with relapsing or progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). These agents represent a variety of mechanisms of action and provide not only lower relapse rates but also improvement in disabilities. The majority of investigational trials involve selective sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 immunomodulators, such as laquinimod, ozanimod, ponesimod, and siponimod, in an effort to build on the success of f...

  5. Cannabinoids in the management of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis

    Anna Maria Malfitano; Maria Chiara Proto; Maurizio Bifulco

    2008-01-01

    Anna Maria Malfitano, Maria Chiara Proto, Maurizio BifulcoDipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di SalernoAbstract: The endocannabinoid system and cannabinoid-based treatments have been involved in a wide number of diseases. In particular, several studies suggest that cannabinoids and endocannabinoids may have a key role in the pathogenesis and therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study we highlight the main findings reported in literature about the r...

  6. Targeting synaptic pathology in multiple sclerosis: fingolimod to the rescue?

    Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disorder affecting the brain and spinal cord. Major hallmarks of MS typically include inflammation, demyelination and axon degeneration, although recent studies have also implicated synaptic dysfunction and degeneration in disease pathogenesis. The discovery that treatment with the orally active immunomodulatory drug fingolimod (FTY720) confers benefits in animal models and human patients has opened up new avenues for the treatment of MS. In the pres...

  7. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in a Chronic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Zoe eFonseca-Kelly; Mayssa eNassrallah; Jorge eUribe; Khan, Reas S.; Kimberly eDine; Mahasweta eDutt; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally-occurring polyphenol that activates SIRT1, an NAD-dependent deacetylase. SRT501, a pharmaceutical formulation of resveratrol with enhanced systemic absorption, prevents neuronal loss without suppressing inflammation in mice with relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. In contrast, resveratrol has been reported to suppress inflammation in chronic EAE, although neuroprotective effects were not evaluated. The current st...

  8. A mighty mouse: building a better model of multiple sclerosis

    Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2006-01-01

    The 2 cardinal cell populations mediating adaptive immunity are T and B lymphocytes. These cells play important but poorly understood roles in the immunopathological demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and in a widely used animal model of human MS known as EAE. In the current issue of the JCI, 2 research teams report their parallel studies of double-transgenic mice expressing T and B cell receptors that recognize the same myelin protein (see the related articles beginning on pages 2...

  9. Multiple, sclerosis: clinical feature, pathogenesis and current therapeutical approaches

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered as a T-cell mediated autoimmune disease. Caused by central nervous system demyelination and axonal damage varying clinical signs do occur either with relapsing-remitting or with chronic progressive course. Based on pathogenetic considerations immunomodulative and immunosuppressive therapeutical approaches are used to limit the disease progression. Clinical symptoms, diagnostic criteria, pathogenetical considerations, and consecutive therapeutical interventions are summarized. (orig.)

  10. Bipolar disorder preceding the onset of multiple sclerosis

    Ciro Marangoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common inflammatory demyelinating brain disease. The occurrence of psychiatric disorders, especially for major depression, in the course of MS is high. Reports concerning bipolar disorder (BD remain rather scarce although early descriptions were found in the old neurological literature. The purpose of this article is to provide a critical review of the epidemiology, comorbidity, and treatment findings regarding BD preceding the onset of MS.

  11. Pain is Associated with Prospective Memory Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    Miller, Ashley K.; Basso, Michael R.; Candilis, Philip J.; Combs, Dennis R.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) pertains to the execution of a future goal or behavior. Initial research implies that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) are apt to show impaired prospective memory for activities of daily living (Rendell, Jensen, & Henry, 2007; Rendell et al., 2012). Yet, PM impairment does not occur in all people with MS. Thus, some other variable besides disease status alone may contribute to PM dysfunction in people with MS. Chronic pain may be such a variable. Approximately 50-70...

  12.  Potential pathogens in multiple sclerosis (MS

    Mariola Zawada

    2012-01-01

     Multiple sclerosis is a neuroimmunological disease in which etiologic agents have not been identified yet. The etiology of MS is complex in its nature and may involve many different agents acting simultaneously or in a cascade manner leading to the development of the disease. The causes of MS development were sought among the factors associated with HLA and TCR genes and human endogenous retroviruses (HERV). Environmental factors such as bacterial, fungal and viral infections as well as pote...

  13. Peripheral Vasculitis, Intermediate Uveitis and Interferon Use in Multiple Sclerosis

    Haluk Esgin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. A 40-year-old female patient with a 12-year history of MS was admitted to our clinic with blurred vision and floaters in her right eye for about 1 month. Here, we share the findings and the management of intermediate uveitis and retinal periphlebitis in an MS case being treated with interferon beta-1a for 7 years.

  14. Promoting remyelination in multiple sclerosis-recent advances

    Jolanda Münzel, E; Williams, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS), concentrating on advances in the understanding of the pathology and the regenerative response, and we summarise progress on the development of new therapies to enhance remyelination aimed at reducing progressive accumulation of disability in MS. We discuss key target pathways identified in experimental models, as although most identified targets have not yet progressed to the stage of being tested in human c...

  15. The multiple sclerosis visual pathway cohort: understanding neurodegeneration in MS

    Martínez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Fraga-Pumar, Elena; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Torres-Torres, Ruben; Ortiz-Pérez, Santiago; Llufriu, Sara; Tercero, Ana; Andorra, Magi; Roca, Marc Figueras; Lampert, Erika; Zubizarreta, Irati; Saiz, Albert; Sanchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Villoslada, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of the Central Nervous System with two major underlying etiopathogenic processes: inflammation and neurodegeneration. The latter determines the prognosis of this disease. MS is the main cause of non-traumatic disability in middle-aged populations. Findings The MS-VisualPath Cohort was set up to study the neurodegenerative component of MS using advanced imaging techniques by focusing on analysis of the visual pathway in a middle-...

  16. Color blindness among multiple sclerosis patients in Isfahan

    Vahid Shaygannejad; Khodayar Golabchi; Alireza Dehghani; Fereshteh Ashtari; Sepehr Haghighi; Mahsa Mirzendehdel; Majid Ghasemi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of young and middle aged individuals with a demyelinative axonal damage nature in central nervous system that causes various signs and symptoms. As color vision needs normal function of optic nerve and macula, it is proposed that MS can alter it via influencing optic nerve. In this survey, we evaluated color vision abnormalities and its relationship with history of optic neuritis and abnormal visual evoked potentials (VEPs) among MS patients. M...

  17. Effects of applying hydrotherapy on fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients

    Somaiyeh Ghafari; Fazlolah Ahmadi; Masood Nabavi

    2008-01-01

    (Received 10 May, 2008 ; Accepted 3 Oct, 2008) Abstract Background and purpose: Fatigue is a common symptom of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) that is purported to cause significant distress and have detrimental effects on daily living functioning, social and occupational obligations, and overall well-being. Complementary therapies are widely used by people with MS and Progressive Hydrotherapy is a form of complementary therapies. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of applying Hydrotherap...

  18. Multiple Sclerosis in relation to sex steroid exposure

    Kempe, Per

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially severe chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and is usually diagnosed between 20 and 40 years of age. The incidence of MS is two to three times higher among women and the type and course of the disease often differ between the sexes. Sex steroids, especially estrogens, have been shown to influence the immunopathology involved in MS and the mouse model experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), as well as radiological and ...

  19. SPECT, MRI and cognitive functions in multiple sclerosis.

    Pozzilli, C; Passafiume, D; Bernardi, S.; Pantano, P.; Incoccia, C.; Bastianello, S.; Bozzao, L; Lenzi, G L; Fieschi, C

    1991-01-01

    Seventeen patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and mild physical disability had neuropsychological testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT) using technetium 99m (99mTc) hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO). Performance in verbal fluency, naming and memory testing appeared to be impaired in MS patients compared with 17 age-sex and education matched normal controls. Weighted periventricular and confluent lesion ...

  20. Metabolic Reprograming of Mononuclear Phagocytes in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Tannahill, Gillian Margaret; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Frezza, Christian; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Accumulation of brain damage in progressive MS is partly the result of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) attacking myelin sheaths in the CNS. Although there is no cure yet for MS, significant advances have been made in the development of disease modifying agents. Unfortunately, most of these drugs fail to reverse established neurological deficits and can have adverse effects. Recent evidence s...

  1. Towards immunotherapeutic drugs and vaccines against multiple sclerosis

    Maria Katsara; John Matsoukas; George Deraos; Vasso Apostolopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune,demyelinating disease of the central nervous system.Numerous treatment options are available to MS patients;however,these options need to be improved.Herein,we review the current drugs and therapeutic approaches available to MS patients,preclinical trial interventions and recent animal model studies for the potential therapy of MS.Since the current treatment of MS remains elusive and is limited,animal studies and clinical research offers an optimistic outlook.

  2. Insights into the Changing Perspectives of Multiple Sclerosis in India

    Lekha Pandit

    2011-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is being diagnosed in increasing numbers in metropolitan cities of India for which the availability of specialist neurologists and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilities are primarily responsible. Epidemiological data are unavailable. Existing data have been obtained from small often retrospective studies from different parts of the country. These earlier studies suggested that optic nerve and spinal cord involvement are considerably high, and that perhaps optic s...

  3. Change in disability profile and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients : a five-year longitudinal study using the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP)

    Wynia, K.; van Wijlen, A. T.; Middel, B.; Reijneveld, S. A.; Meilof, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the progress of disease severity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is generally limited in scope. Objectives: To examine the course of a broad spectrum of MS-related disabilities and quality of life (QOL) in relation to disease severity, and responsiveness of the Multiple Sclerosis

  4. Serum Homocysteine level in patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    F Ashtari

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic demyelinative disease-is unknown. The damage of blood–brain barrier (BBB vasculature is a characteristic of MS and Homocystein (Hcy can damage BBB, then increase in total Hcy may be important in MS pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to compare the serum level of total Hcy in MS patients with control group. Methods: In a case control study, serum level of total Hcy measured in 35 MS patient and compared with 30 healthy matched controls. All patients had definitive MS according to Poser criteria, without history of myocardial infarction, stroke, neuropathy, transient ischemic attack, homocystinuria or renal failure. Results: The serum concentration of total homocystein was significantly higher in multiple sclerosis patients than healthy controls. The mean total Hcy level was 17.92± 6.9 mmol/lit in cases and 14.6±2.92 mmol/lit in controls (P=0.013. Conclusion: Serum total Homocystein may have a role in MS pathogenesis and reduction of it should be studied moreover. Key words: Multiple Sclerosis, Homocystein, Serum level

  5. Neuroprotection in a novel mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Katie Lidster

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease that currently lacks any neuroprotective treatments. Innovative neuroprotective trial designs are required to hasten the translational process of drug development. An ideal target to monitor the efficacy of strategies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis is the visual system, which is the most accessible part of the human central nervous system. A novel C57BL/6 mouse line was generated that expressed transgenes for a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific T cell receptor and a retinal ganglion cell restricted-Thy1 promoter-controlled cyan fluorescent protein. This model develops spontaneous or induced optic neuritis, in the absence of paralytic disease normally associated with most rodent autoimmune models of multiple sclerosis. Demyelination and neurodegeneration could be monitored longitudinally in the living animal using electrophysiology, visual sensitivity, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography all of which are relevant to human trials. This model offers many advantages, from a 3Rs, economic and scientific perspective, over classical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models that are associated with substantial suffering of animals. Optic neuritis in this model led to inflammatory damage of axons in the optic nerve and subsequent loss of retinal ganglion cells in the retina. This was inhibited by the systemic administration of a sodium channel blocker (oxcarbazepine or intraocular treatment with siRNA targeting caspase-2. These novel approaches have relevance to the future treatment of neurodegeneration of MS, which has so far evaded treatment.

  6. [A case of multiple sclerosis manifesting piano playing movement].

    Nagano, T; Mizoi, R; Watanabe, I; Tomi, H; Sunohara, N

    1993-04-01

    We report a case of 33-year-old man with multiple sclerosis, showing piano playing movement in both hands. His course of multiple sclerosis was remittent/progressive during 2 years and the clinical manifestation suggested the spinal cord involvement. On July 15, 1991, he was admitted with numbness of the right limbs, and then developed piano playing movement in both hands, more marked in the right side. Neurological examination revealed mild weakness in the right upper extremity, and rough touch, pain, and temperature sensation were slightly decreased. However, there was no deep sensory abnormalities, such as vibration, fine touch, and position senses. Vibration sense was lost below ilium. CSF examination showed elevation of IgG index (1.6), three oligoclonal bands and myelin basic protein content of 2.4 ng/ml. There was no HTLV-I antibody in CSF. SSEP, elicited by median nerve stimulation at the right wrist, showed no N13 and low amplitude of N20. T2-weighted images of cervical MRI revealed area of high signal intensity at the C3-C4 level. The piano playing movement gradually improved and disappeared by the initiation of steroid hormone therapy. It was considered that involuntary movement in this patient was due to the spinal cord lesion caused by multiple sclerosis. These findings suggested that the involuntary movement like pseudoathetosis could present without deep sensory abnormalities. PMID:8370208

  7. Management of neurogenic bladder in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Phé, Véronique; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2016-05-01

    Lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is common in patients with multiple sclerosis and is a major negative influence on the quality of life of these patients. The most commonly reported symptoms are those of the storage phase, of which detrusor overactivity is the most frequently reported urodynamic abnormality. The clinical evaluation of patients' LUT symptoms should include a bladder diary, uroflowmetry followed by measurement of post-void residual urine volume, urinalysis, ultrasonography, assessment of renal function, quality-of-life assessments and sometimes urodynamic investigations and/or cystoscopy. The management of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. Intermittent self-catheterization is the preferred option for management of incomplete bladder emptying and urinary retention. Antimuscarinics are the first-line treatment for patients with storage symptoms. If antimuscarinics are ineffective, or poorly tolerated, a range of other approaches, such as intradetrusor botulinum toxin A injections, tibial nerve stimulation and sacral neuromodulation are available, with varying levels of evidence in patients with multiple sclerosis. Surgical procedures should be performed only after careful selection of patients. Stress urinary incontinence owing to sphincter deficiency remains a therapeutic challenge, and is only managed surgically if conservative measures have failed. Multiple sclerosis has a progressive course, therefore, patients' LUT symptoms require regular, long-term follow-up monitoring. PMID:27030526

  8. Diffusion weighted MR imaging in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is one of the best methods in diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, particularly in disclosure of active demyelinating lesions. Aim of this study was to compare diffusion weighted imaging and contrast enhancement in the detection of active lesions. A MR study with a contrast enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequence with magnetization transfer presaturation and a diffusion weighted echoplanar pulse sequence (b=1000 s/mm2) was performed in 17 patients (11 women, 6 men) with multiple sclerosis. 29 of 239 lesions showed an increased signal intensity in diffusion weighted imaging, 24 lesions a contrast enhancement, but only 16 lesions were visible in both pulse sequences. In patients with short clinical symptomatology significant more lesions could be detected with diffusion-weighted pulse sequence in comparison to patients with long standing symptomatology showing more lesions with contrast enhancement. Hence it is likely, that both pulse sequences detect different histopathologic changes. The early detection of demyelinating lesions in diffusion weighted imaging is attributed to the extracellular edema, however the contrast enhancement is caused by a blood brain barrier abnormality. It can be expected that diffusion weighted imaging will have a high impact on imaging of multiple sclerosis not only in therapeutic trials, but also in clinical routine. (orig.)

  9. Localized in vivo proton spectroscopy in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis

    Larsson, H B; Christiansen, P; Jensen, M;

    1991-01-01

    Localized proton spectroscopy was performed in 15 patients with acute or chronic multiple sclerosis (MS). Some of the patients were investigated serially, being given a total of 22 spectroscopic investigations. Resonances corresponding to free lipids were observed in six plaques. This was......, and the relative concentration of choline (Cho) was significantly higher in patients than in controls. These differences were most pronounced in older plaques. MR spectroscopic demonstration of lipids in a MS plaque probably reflects disintegration of myelin, and a decreased NAA/Cho ratio may be...

  10. Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis: Update on Diagnostic Criteria, Imaging, Histopathology and Treatment Choices.

    Chou, I-Jun; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Whitehouse, William P; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2016-07-01

    Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) represents less than 5 % of the MS population, but patients with paediatric-onset disease reach permanent disability at a younger age than adult-onset patients. Accurate diagnosis at presentation and optimal long-term treatment are vital to mitigate ongoing neuroinflammation and irreversible neurodegeneration. However, it may be difficult to early differentiate paediatric MS from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), as they often have atypical presentation that differs from that of adult-onset MS. The purpose of this review is to summarize the updated views on diagnostic criteria, imaging, histopathology and treatment choices. PMID:27271748

  11. Multiple sclerosis in the very young: a case report and review of the literature.

    Sivaraman, Indu; Moodley, Manikum

    2016-02-01

    Onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the very young (girl with MS, the youngest reported case in the USA. She presented to an outside hospital with acute onset of ataxia on three occasions before presenting to our institution, initially misdiagnosed as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and treated with intravenous methylprednisolone. MRI of the brain during each presentation revealed new areas of demyelination. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies and MRI of the spine were normal. Repeat MRI of the brain at our institution, 7 months later, revealed new demyelinating lesions and CSF analysis revealed elevated myelin basic protein, negative oligoclonal band and neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin and normal IgG synthesis. Her clinical presentation with multiple relapses and new MRI findings validated the diagnosis of MS. PMID:26782315

  12. Leptomeningeal enhancement in Susac's syndrome and multiple sclerosis: Time to expect the unexpected?

    Sastre-Garriga, Jaume

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging detection of leptomeningeal enhancement has long been considered a red flag for a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. However, recent studies seem to suggest that leptomeningeal enhancement can be detected in up to 25% of patients with multiple sclerosis. The case reported here suggest a distinct set of features of leptomeningeal enhancement in a patient with Susac's syndrome which may still be helpful in the differential diagnosis between Susac's syndrome and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27207451

  13. Multiple sclerosis : MRI diagnosis, potential treatment and future potential for nanoparticle applications

    Wu, Xingchen

    2005-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging is an important tool for diagnosing of Multiple Sclerosis and for, in vivo, monitoring its evolution of pathology. The introduction of interferon (IFN)-beta therapy has altered the natural course of Multiple Sclerosis. We investigated the effect of low-dose low-frequency and high-dose highfrequency IFNbeta- 1a treatment in patients w...

  14. Disturbance of Erection in Patients with a Multiple Sclerosis: Review of Literature and Proper Results

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated, that a sexual dysfunction is a frequent sign of a multiple sclerosis. The data of the sexual function disorder rate and types, modern views of the erectile dysfunction pathogenesis in the given contingent of patients are presented. The proper preliminary data of the erectile dysfunction different variants in males with a multiple sclerosis is briefly presented. The possibilities of the erection disturbance therapy at a multiple sclerosis are regarded.

  15. Walking Speed and Brain Glucose Uptake are Uncoupled in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Kindred, John H.; Tuulari, Jetro J.; Bucci, Marco; Kalliokoski, Kari K.; Rudroff, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Motor impairments of the upper and lower extremities are common symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). While some peripheral effects like muscle weakness and loss of balance have been shown to influence these symptoms, central nervous system activity has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine if alterations in glucose uptake were associated with motor impairments in patients with multiple sclerosis. Eight patients with multiple sclerosis (four men) and eight sex m...

  16. Walking speed and brain glucose uptake are uncoupled in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Tuulari, Jetro J.; Thorsten Rudroff

    2015-01-01

    Motor impairments of the upper and lower extremities are common symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). While some peripheral effects like muscle weakness and loss of balance have been shown to influence these symptoms, central nervous system activity has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine if alterations in glucose uptake were associated with motor impairments in patients with multiple sclerosis. Eight patients with multiple sclerosis (4 men) and 8 sex match...

  17. Atypical and clinically silent multiple sclerosis: a report of 12 cases discovered unexpectedly at necropsy.

    Phadke, J G; Best, P. V.

    1983-01-01

    Twelve cases are reported in which multiple sclerosis was discovered unexpectedly at necropsy. Four of the patients had no known previous history of neurological illness, four did have a previous neurological or neuropsychiatric disturbance, but multiple sclerosis was never entertained in the differential diagnosis and four had a history of disorder in the nervous system, but a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was either rejected or regarded as unlikely. In six of the eight patients with a pre...

  18. Circulating antibody to myelin basic protein in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Sera from multiple sclerosis patients with relapsing-remitting disease and normal subjects were tested for antibody to myelin basic protein by a sensitive radioimmunoassay. The results showed a marginally decreased titre in multiple sclerosis superimposed on a seasonal variation. There was no correlation with the clinical state of the patients. Results are discussed briefly in relation to humoral antibody function in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalitis. (author)

  19. Clinical diagnostic criteria of multiple sclerosis: the role of magnetic resonance imaging

    The objective of this article is to summarize the diagnostic criteria recommended by the International Panel on the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis in 2001. The recommendations of another working group, the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers Consensus Meeting, which met in Vancouver in 2001, concerning the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple sclerosis are also presented in an effort to standardize the protocols for magnetic resonance imaging of these patients. (author)

  20. CYTOKINES AND HERPESVIRUSES IN CHILDREN WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    G. F. Zheleznikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was determined earlier (G.P. Ivanova, 2012 that a chronic course of leukoencephalitis in teenagers caused by inadequate response of cytokine system to the combination of two herpesviruses (HV — EBV and HHV-6, leads to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS in 44% of cases. The research objective was to characterize the cytokine response in children with MS with simultaneous screening of the presence of active HV infections. 39 children with the diagnosis “MS” were under observation, 34 of them had relapsing-remitting (RR MS, and 5 children had a progressing course of MS (PMS. Concentration of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFNα, IFNγ, and IL-4 was identified in blood serum and cerebrospinal liquid (CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, HV DNA was revealed by PCR. Cytokine status in children with MS had some differences depending on the phase of the disease, clinical severity of the relapse and the course of MS. The relapse phase of RRMS was associated with the accumulation of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-6 in the blood, and index IFNγ/IL-4 modulations in accordance with the clinical severity of the relapse. A severe aggravation of the disease in children with PMS was accompanied by the increase of IL-8 system response. HV DNA was revealed in 27 patients from 39 ones (69% in blood and in 17 patients (44% in CSF with the predominance of EBV (93%, frequently in combination with HHV-6. During an acute period the frequency of HV DNA identification increased 2–3 times to compare with the remission period. Unlike children with RRMS, a mixed-infection of 3–4 herpes viruses was revealed in all 5 patients with PMS. According to the results summary it is possible to make a conclusion that HV-infection has an important role in MS pathogenesis in teenagers, taking part in the aggravation and progression of the disease by its effect on the cytokine system response. EBV-infection dominates among HV, however the risk of MS development

  1. MR spectroscopy of cervical spinal cord in patients with multiple sclerosis

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain in patients with multiple sclerosis has been well studied. However, in vivo MRS of the spinal cord in patients with MR spectroscopy has not been reported to our knowledge. We performed MRS of normal-appearing cervical spinal cords in multiple sclerosis patients and in healthy controls. N-acetyl aspartate was shown to be reduced within the cervical spinal cord of multiple sclerosis patients when compared with healthy controls. This finding supports axonal loss and damage within even normal-appearing spinal cords of multiple sclerosis patients. (orig.)

  2. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management.

    Ajami, Sima; Ahmadi, Golchehreh; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS), such as other information system (IS), depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis), their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management. PMID:25709660

  3. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management

    Sima Ajami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS, such as other information system (IS, depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis, their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management.

  4. Pain is associated with prospective memory dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    Miller, Ashley K; Basso, Michael R; Candilis, Philip J; Combs, Dennis R; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) pertains to the execution of a future goal or behavior. Initial research implies that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) are apt to show impaired prospective memory for activities of daily living. Yet, PM impairment does not occur in all people with MS. Thus, some other variable besides disease status alone may contribute to PM dysfunction in people with MS. Chronic pain may be such a variable. Approximately 50-70% of people with MS experience significant pain, and such pain has been thought to diminish memory function. To investigate this possibility, 96 patients with MS and 29 healthy subjects were administered the Memory for Intentions Screening Test (MIST; Woods, S. P., Iudicello, J. E., Moran, L. M, Carey, C. L., Dawson, M. S., & Grant, I. (2008). HIV-associated prospective memory impairment increases risk of dependence in everyday functioning. Neuropsychology, 22, 110-117.), a well-validated measure of prospective memory, and the Medical Outcomes Study Pain Effects Scale (PES; Fischer, J. S., Rudick, R. A., Cutter, G. R., & Reingold, S. C. (1999). The multiple sclerosis functional composite measure (MSFC): An integrated approach to MS clinical outcome assessment. National MS Society Clinical Outcomes Assessment Task Force. Multiple Sclerosis, 5, 244-250.) to assess chronic pain. After controlling for demographic variables and disability severity, subjective pain accounted for significant variance in PM, particularly for time-based intentions over sustained delay periods. These data accord well with assertions that pain may degrade ability to remember new intentions and suggests that pain is associated with PM dysfunction in people with MS. PMID:25338929

  5. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management

    Ajami, Sima; Ahmadi, Golchehreh; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS), such as other information system (IS), depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis), their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management. PMID:25709660

  6. High-dose erythropoietin in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis

    Schreiber, Karen; Magyari, Melinda; Sellebjerg, Finn;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a part of an endogenous neuroprotective system in the brain and may address pathophysiological mechanisms in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a treatment effect of EPO on progressive MS. METHODS: This was a single-center, randomized......, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, in which 52 patients with secondary or primary progressive MS were allocated to treatment with recombinant EPO (48,000 IU) or placebo, administered intravenously 17 times during 24 weeks. Patients had an Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) from 4 to 6...

  7. Body composition and physical function in women with multiple sclerosis

    Christie L. Ward, MS; Yoojin Suh, PhD; Abbi D. Lane, PhD; Huimin Yan, MS; Sushant M. Ranadive, PhD; Bo Fernhall, PhD; Robert W. Motl, PhD; Ellen M. Evans, PhD

    2013-01-01

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have reduced physical activity (PA) and lower-limb physical function and potentially disordered body composition compared with their peers without MS. The aim of this study was to determine whether PA and body composition were differentially associated with lower-limb physical function in persons with MS compared with controls. Females with MS and age- and body mass index-matched female controls (n = 51; average age 48.1 +/– 9.7 yr) were measured for PA wi...

  8. Clinical and imaging assessment of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis

    Rocca, Maria A; Amato, Maria P; De Stefano, Nicola; Enzinger, Christian; Geurts, Jeroen J; Penner, Iris-K; Rovira, Alex; Sumowski, James F; Valsasina, Paola; Filippi, Massimo; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini

    2015-01-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), grey matter damage is widespread and might underlie many of the clinical symptoms, especially cognitive impairment. This relation between grey matter damage and cognitive impairment has been lent support by findings from clinical and MRI studies. However......, many aspects of cognitive impairment in patients with MS still need to be characterised. Standardised neuropsychological tests that are easy to administer and sensitive to disease-related abnormalities are needed to gain a better understanding of the factors affecting cognitive performance in patients...

  9. Fish and egg specific immunoglobin e in multiple sclerosis patients

    Fereshteh Ashtari; Fatemeh Jamshidi; Raheleh Shokouhi Shoormasti; Zahra Pourpak; Mojtaba Akbari; Faiborz Zandieh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The effect of nutrition in the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is a topic of great interest. The present study was aimed to evaluate the immunoglobin E (IgE) against egg and fish in MS patients compared to healthy controls. Methods: Between March 2012 and July 2012, 48 MS patients were selected and compared with 48 healthy subjects to assess the frequency of IgE against egg and fish in MS patients compared to healthy control. Fish and Egg specific IgE was determined by Immuno CA...

  10. Physical and social environment and the risk of multiple sclerosis

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C.; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2014-01-01

    effects were not found in men. Educational level, housing conditions in youth, or the presence of children unrelated by blood in the household did not influence the risk of MS. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not reveal any additional factors beyond the previously published childbirths which could explain the......BACKGROUND: The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men. The rapid epidemiological changes suggest that environmental factors may modify the risk of MS. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether occupational, physical, or...

  11. Role of cytokine p40 family in multiple sclerosis

    Brahmachari, S.; Pahan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last couple of decades of neuro-immunological research, the p40 family of cytokines has emerged out as one of the most intriguing areas of interest because of multi-faceted roles of these cytokine in immune-modulation and inflammation. The IL-12, the most widely studied cytokine of this family, is well-characterized for its Th1-favoring activity, and therefore plays a key role in the pathophysiology of Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). On the other hand, ...

  12. Mechanism of Erhuang capsule for treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Kangning Li; Yongping Fan; Tao Yang; Lei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Erhuang capsule, a typical formula based on traditional Chinese medicine theory, is widely used to ameliorate multiple sclerosis, inflammation and side effects of glucocorticoid treatment. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells are neural stem cells that are important for myelin repair and regeneration. In the present study, Erhuang capsule effectively improved clinical symptoms and neurological function scores, reduced mortality and promoted recovery of neurological functions of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The mechanism of action involved significant increases in oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation in specific regions of the brain and spinal cord, increased oligodendrocyte lineage gene 2 expression and enhanced oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation.

  13. Multiple sclerosis in a family on the Faroe Islands

    Binzer, Stefanie; Imrell, K; Binzer, M; Vang, S; Rogvi-Hansen, B; Hillert, J; Stenager, E

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: John Kurtzke has proposed that multiple sclerosis (MS) on the Faroe Islands occurred as a result of the spread of a transmittable agent brought to the country during World War II. AIM: Kurtzke's theory has been opposed earlier and in this study, we present a family from the Faroe...... Islands containing a total of 14 family members with MS which show further inconsistencies with the theory. The present study is to our knowledge, the first description of familial incidences of MS on the Faroe Islands. METHODS: Medical histories were gathered from 12 family members and 6 of the 8 living...

  14. Vitamin D, Multiple Sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Cantorna, Margherita T.

    2011-01-01

    It has now been more than 20 years since the vitamin D receptor was identified in cells of the immune system. The immune system has now been established as an important target of vitamin D. Vitamin D receptor knockout and vitamin D deficient mice have a surplus of effector T cells that have been implicated in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The active form of vitamin D directly and indirectly suppresses the function of these pathogenic T cells wh...

  15. Serum Vitamin D Levels in Indian Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Suresh Kumar, Radhakrishnan; Syed, Sajid; Anand Kumar, Anandakuttan; Subha Kumari, K. N.; Sajitha, K.

    2012-01-01

    Low serum vitamin D level has an increased association with risk of multiple sclerosis (MS).There has been no published data on the levels of this vitamin in Indian population with MS. Hence we decided to undertake this study to document if there is evidence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with MS in our population. 26 patients with diagnosis of MS by modified Mc Donald’s criteria were enrolled in this study. Serum vitamin D (1,25 hydroxy) levels were measured by electro-chemiluminescence...

  16. A very rare paroxysmal symptom in multiple sclerosis: convergence spasm.

    Anlıaçık, Süleyman; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Akpınar, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects many regions of the central nervous system and leads to visual, oculomotor, motor, sensorial, cerebellar, and cognitive disorders. In addition to classic clinical findings, sudden paroxysmal symptoms triggered by motion, hyperventilation, or sensory stimulus may occur. In this article, we present a case of convergence spasm attended by paroxysmal symptoms, a rarely observed situation but one which can have complete recovery through administration of 5-day intravenous (i.v.) methylprednisolone therapy, together with its imaging findings and video records. PMID:26164409

  17. Serum Iron and Ferritin in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Farhad Iranmanesh; Hamid Bakhsgi; Abbas Akbaripoor

    2013-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most frequent and debilitating disease of the nervous system. Some recent studies show the possible role for iron and ferritin in the course of MS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of serum iron and ferritin in patients with MS and comparision of them with control group. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, serum iron and ferritin were determined in 30 patients with MS and compared with 30 healthy persons, which wer...

  18. The risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Peeters, P J H L; Bazelier, M T; Uitdehaag, B M J;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), disability and autoinflammatory processes may result in an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of VTE associated with MS. METHODS: We conducted an observational-cohort study within the Clinical Practice...... Research Datalink (1987-2009) linked to the National Registry of Hospitalizations (1997-2008). At the time of MS diagnosis, a comparison cohort (N = 33 370) without a recorded MS diagnosis during the study period was matched (6:1) to the MS cohort (n = 5566) by birth year, sex, and practice. Subjects were...

  19. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  20. Information processing speed in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Rao, S M; St Aubin-Faubert, P; Leo, G J

    1989-08-01

    We have recently proposed that the cognitive deficits of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) share numerous characteristics associated with the syndrome of subcortical dementia. One such characteristic, slowness of mental processing, was evaluated in the present study. Thirty-six MS patients were compared to 26 normal controls of equivalent age, education, and verbal intelligence on the Sternberg memory scanning test. As anticipated, the motor-involved MS patients had an overall slower reaction time than did controls. Their scanning rate, a measure of pure cognitive speed, was also significantly slower than controls. These results suggest that MS patients exhibit a slowing of mental processing independent of motor involvement. PMID:2760182

  1. Disability profile of multiple sclerosis in New Zealand.

    Alla, Sridhar; Pearson, John F; Taylor, Bruce V; Miller, David H; Clarke, Glynnis; Richardson, Ann; Willoughby, Ernie; Abernethy, David A; Sabel, Clive E; Mason, Deborah F

    2016-06-01

    New Zealand is a high risk region for multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to investigate demographic, clinical and temporal factors associated with disability status in the New Zealand National Multiple Sclerosis Prevalence Study (NZNMSPS) cohort. Data were obtained from the 2006 NZNMSPS with MS diagnosis based on the 2005 McDonald criteria. Disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Disability profiles were generated using multiple linear regression analysis. A total of 2917 persons with MS was identified, of whom disability data were available for 2422 (75% females). The overall disability was EDSS 4.4±standard deviation 2.6. Higher disability was associated with older age, longer disease duration, older and younger ages of onset, spinal cord syndromes with motor involvement at onset, and a progressive onset type. Lower disability was associated with sensory symptoms at onset and a relapsing onset type. Overall, the factors studied explained about one-third of the variation in disability, and of this, about two-thirds was accounted for by age, age of onset and disease duration and one-third by the nature of first symptoms and type of disease onset (progressive or relapsing). Current age, age at onset and disease duration all had independent associations with disability and their effects also interacted in contributing to higher disability levels over the course of the disease. PMID:26765754

  2. Early-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Isfahan, Iran: Report of the Demographic and Clinical Features of 221 Patients.

    Etemadifar, Masoud; Nourian, Sayed-Mohammadamin; Nourian, Niloofaralsadat; Abtahi, Seyed-Hossein; Sayahi, Farnaz; Saraf, Zahra; Fereidan-Esfahani, Mahboobeh

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that early-onset multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis (early-onset multiple sclerosis) approximately incorporates 3-5% of the multiple sclerosis population. In this report on early-onset multiple sclerosis, the authors aimed to define demographic, clinical and imaging features in a case-series of true-childhood multiple sclerosis and to compare its characteristics with juvenile multiple sclerosis. The authors inspected the records of multiple sclerosis patients who were registered by Isfahan MS Society. Clinical and demographic data of children with less than 16 years of age were reviewed retrospectively. Out of 4536 multiple sclerosis patients referred to the authors' center, 221 patients (4.8%) had multiple sclerosis starting at the age of 16 or less (11 true-childhood multiple sclerosis vs 210 juvenile-onset multiple sclerosis); the female to male ratio was 4.81:1. In the mean follow-up period of 6.2 years, 22 patients (10.5%) had positive family history of multiple sclerosis, 196 (88.6%) patients were classified as relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, the mean (± SD Expanded Disability Status Scale) was 1.5 ± 1.1 at the last evaluation. The most common initial presentation was optic nerve involvement (36.1%) and cerebellar sign and symptoms (14.6%). In all, 13 patients (5.8%) had experienced seizure in the course of multiple sclerosis. This study indicated that early-onset multiple sclerosis is not rare condition and overwhelmingly affects girls even at prepubertal onset. Physicians should consider multiple sclerosis in suspicious pediatric cases. PMID:26979097

  3. Modifiable factors influencing relapses and disability in multiple sclerosis.

    D'hooghe, M B; Nagels, G; Bissay, V; De Keyser, J

    2010-07-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that the natural course of multiple sclerosis can be influenced by a number of factors. Strong evidence suggests that relapses can be triggered by infections, the postpartum period and stressful life events. Vaccinations against influenza, hepatitis B and tetanus appear to be safe. Surgery, general and epidural anaesthesia, and physical trauma are not associated with an increased risk of relapses. Factors that have been associated with a reduced relapse rate are pregnancy, exclusive breastfeeding, sunlight exposure and higher vitamin D levels. A number of medications, including hormonal fertility treatment, seem to be able to trigger relapses. Factors that may worsen progression of disability include stressful life events, radiotherapy to the head, low levels of physical activity and low vitamin D levels. Strong evidence suggests that smoking promotes disease progression, both clinically and on brain magnetic resonance imaging. There is no evidence for an increased progression of disability following childbirth in women with multiple sclerosis. Moderate alcohol intake and exercise might have a neuroprotective effect, but this needs to be confirmed. PMID:20483884

  4. [Mitoxantrone role in treatment of primary progressive multiple sclerosis].

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Stępień, Adam; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Durka-Kęsy, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, autoimmunological disease of central nervous system in which axonal damage in brain and spinal cord is observed. It is second most common cause of disability in young adults in West Europe and North America after injuries. There is 2.5 million people suffered from multiple sclerosis worldwide. The worse prognosis is connected with primary progressive MS in which recovery after first symptoms of central nervous system damage isn't observed. That subtype of disease is seen in case of 10-20% people with MS. MTX is a synthetic antracycline with antineoplastic, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Drug was allowed to treatment of leukemia. It is also used in treatment of breast, prostate, ovarian, stomach and liver cancer. Additionally MTX is used in treatment of secondary progressive SM and relapsing - remitting subtype of disease with no respond to treatment with interferon beta and glatiramer acetate. MTX inhibits topoisomerase II activity, matches to DNA molecule and damage her structure. Drug inhibits limphocyte T, B and macrophages activity and antibodies synthesis. The most dangerous side effects of MTX treatment are cardiotoxicity and induction of leukemia. There is lack of studies describing MTX effectiveness and safety in treatment of primary progressive SM. PMID:26891441

  5. Thermal comfort requirements: A study of people with multiple sclerosis

    Webb, L.H.; Parsons, K.C.; Hodder, S.G.

    1999-07-01

    Existing specifications for thermal comfort in built environments are coming under increased criticism for failing to consider the requirements of specific populations. People with physical disabilities are an example of one such population. This paper presents the results of a study on the thermal comfort requirements of 32 people with multiple sclerosis. Subjects were exposed to three conditions: 18.5 C, PMV = {minus}1.5, slightly cool to cool; 23 C, PMV = 0, neutral; 29 C, PMV = +1.5, slightly warm to warm. Results indicate that people with multiple sclerosis have a wide range of responses to the three experimental conditions. The actual percentage dissatisfied was much higher than predicted by Fange's (1970) predicted percentage dissatisfied. Their preferred environment is slightly warmer than 23 C, PMV = 0, neutral. A subgroup of the population prefers an environment that is slightly cooler than 23 C. Further work is needed to qualify if their preferred environments match that of PMV+1 and PMV{minus}1 and to identify if any of the factors such as age, duration of disability, and medication affect the actual mean vote.

  6. Cannabinoids in the management of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis

    Anna Maria Malfitano

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Maria Malfitano, Maria Chiara Proto, Maurizio BifulcoDipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di SalernoAbstract: The endocannabinoid system and cannabinoid-based treatments have been involved in a wide number of diseases. In particular, several studies suggest that cannabinoids and endocannabinoids may have a key role in the pathogenesis and therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS. In this study we highlight the main findings reported in literature about the relevance of cannabinoid drugs in the management and treatment of MS. An increasing body of evidence suggests that cannabinoids have beneficial effects on the symptoms of MS, including spasticity and pain. In this report we focus on the effects of cannabinoids in the relief of spasticity describing the main findings in vivo, in the mouse experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model of MS. We report on the current treatments used to control MS symptoms and the most recent clinical studies based on cannabinoid treatments, although long-term studies are required to establish whether cannabinoids may have a role beyond symptom amelioration in MS.Keywords: cannabinoids, multiple sclerosis, spasticity

  7. New approaches in the management of multiple sclerosis

    Laurie J Barten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Laurie J Barten1, Douglas R Allington1, Kendra A Procacci2, Michael P Rivey11The University of Montana and Community Medical Center, Missoula, MT, USA; 2The University of Montana School of Pharmacy, Missoula, MT, USAAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a central nervous system chronic inflammatory disease that is characterized by an extensive and complex immune response. Scientific advances have occurred in immunology, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and clinical assessment tools, and recent discovery of unique therapeutic targets has spurred numerous Phase II and Phase III clinical trials. Reductions in MS relapse rates and improvements in T2 or gadolinium-enhancing lesion burdens have been reported from Phase III trials that include fingolimod, alemtuzumab, cladribine, and rituximab. Promising Phase II trial data exist for teriflunomide, daclizumab, laquinimod, and fumarate. The optimism created by these favorable findings must be tempered with evaluation of the adverse effect profile produced by these new agents. Given the discovery of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with the use of natalizumab, ongoing vigilance for rare and life-threatening reactions due to new agents should be paramount. Patients with MS often experience difficulty with ambulation, spasticity, and cognition. Recent clinical trial data from two Phase III dalfampridine-SR trials indicate certain patients receive benefits in ambulation. This article provides an overview of data from clinical trials of newer agents of potential benefit in MS.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, Phase II trials, Phase III trials, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, monoclonal antibody

  8. Profile of the Brazilian scientific production in multiple sclerosis

    Araujo C.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the profile of the Brazilian output in the field of multiple sclerosis from 1981 to 2004. The search was conducted through the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, selecting papers in which the term "multiple sclerosis" was defined as the main topic and "Brazil" or "Brasil" as others. The data were analyzed regarding the themes, the state in Brazil and institution where the papers were produced, the journals where the papers were published, journal's impact factor, and language. The search disclosed 141 documents (91 from MEDLINE and LILACS, and 50 from LILACS only published in 44 different journals (23 of them MEDLINE-indexed. A total of 111 documents were produced by 17 public universities, 29 by 3 private medical schools and 1 by a non-governmental organization. There were 65 original contributions, 37 case reports, 20 reviews, 6 PhD dissertations, 5 guidelines, 2 validation studies, 2 clinical trials, 2 chapters in textbooks, 1 Master of Science thesis, and 1 patient education handout. The journal impact factor ranged from 0.0217 to 6.039 (median 3.03. Of 91 papers from MEDLINE, 65 were published by Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria. More than 90% of the papers were written in Portuguese. São Paulo was the most productive state in the country, followed by Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais and Paraná. Eighty-two percent of the Brazilian output came from the Southeastern region.

  9. Insights into the Changing Perspectives of Multiple Sclerosis in India

    Lekha Pandit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is being diagnosed in increasing numbers in metropolitan cities of India for which the availability of specialist neurologists and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI facilities are primarily responsible. Epidemiological data are unavailable. Existing data have been obtained from small often retrospective studies from different parts of the country. These earlier studies suggested that optic nerve and spinal cord involvement are considerably high, and that perhaps optic spinal MS was the most prevalent form in India. On this basis it was also speculated that neuromyelitis optica (NMO may be overrepresented in Indians. However in recent times, prospective studies backed by MRI data have shown no distinct differences between MS seen in the west and India. Sero positivity for NMO IgG is low though NMO phenotype disorders constitute nearly 20% of demyelinating disorders in India. Genetic susceptibility for MS among Indians may be similar to that for white populations. In the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, HLA DR1*1501 has been strongly associated with MS in Indians. A recent study that evaluated the established non-MHC multiple sclerosis loci in a small data set of Indian patients suggested a strong similarity with white populations. This review highlights some of the background information available on MS from India and so also some recent studies that unveiled the disease characteristics in Indian patients.

  10. Epidemiology and genetic aspects of multiple sclerosis in India

    Rohit Bhatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a complex pathophysiology. Considered a rare disease in India in the past, studies over time suggest an increase in subjects with MS in India, although the observations are limited by the lack of formally conducted epidemiological studies and the absence of a nationwide registry. The current World Health Organization (WHO Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (MSIF "Atlas of MS" 2013 estimates a prevalence rate of 5-20 per 100,000, which also seems an underestimate. Although there have been reports of phenotypic differences between MS in Indians and the Western counterparts, recent studies report a reasonable similarity in disease types and characteristics. A few studies on the genetics of MS have been reported, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA associations and non-major histopathology complex (MHC disease loci. The current review discusses the pivotal studies of the past, newer observations on MS from India, and the need for a national registry.

  11. Correlarions of Brain MRI Parameters to Disability in Multiple Sclerosis

    E. Rahimian

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous sys-tem causing severe disability via the progressive dam-age of the white matter. MRI is a powerful computer assisted analysis approach to detect progressive atro-phy of the brain. The pathophysiology of CNS atro-phy in MS is unknown, but likely represents effects of inflammation including chronic demyelination, axonal injury, neuronal loss, and wallerian degenera-tion. The objective of this study was to correlate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, T2 weighted le-sion load, TI weighted lesion load, and measures of white matter atrophy in the brain to disability in 40 patients with established multiple sclerosis. Patients & Methods: A semi-automated and automated technique was used to quantify T2W and TIW lesions load on MRI. Abnormal white matter fraction was calculated. Expanded disability Status Score (EDSS was used. Correlation between MRI parameters and EDSS was measured. Results: Results showed that there was good correlation between EDSS and T2W and TI W lesions load as well as abnormal white matter fraction. Conclusion: MRI could be a good prognostic test in MS patients.

  12. Multiple sclerosis among patients with previous diagnosis of leishmaniasis

    Mehrdad Farrokhi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a protozoan parasitic disease which is caused by leishmania genus and is transmitted by sand flies. Multiple sclerosis (MS, however, is a chronic inflammatory disease of central nervous system (CNS. Since co-existence of these two diseases in an individual is rare, we aimed to evaluate prevalence of leishmaniasis among MS patients. At first, total Isfahan MS (TIMS records of 5123 MS patients who registered in Isfahan multiple sclerosis society (IMMS from April 2003 till July 2014 were searched in order to find cases suffering from leishmaniasis. Secondly, a comparison between the prevalence of leishmaniasis among the general population and the rate of leishmaniasis in population of MS patients was done. Among 5123 MS patients, we could find two cases (both female with leishmaniasis and the type of leishmaniasis in both of them were cutaneous and also they had developed MS after diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL. Further analysis showed that CL patients have a lower risk of MS, suggesting a protective effect of CL against MS. Our data suggests that although leishmaniasis and MS may have similarities in some aspects of their pathogenesis, leishmaniasis patients have a lower risk of MS than general population.

  13. Allopregnanolone and Neuroinflammation: a Focus on Multiple Sclerosis

    Farshid Noorbakhsh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The progesterone derivative, allopregnanolone (ALLO, is one of the most widely studied compounds among neurosteroids. Through interactions with GABA-A receptors expressed by neurons and glial cells, ALLO has been shown to affect diverse aspects of neural cell physiology, including cell proliferation and survival, migration and gene expression. Recent data point to important roles for ALLO in different neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS. Dysregulation in ALLO biosynthesis pathways has been reported in brain tissue from MS patients as well as in the central nervous system (CNS tissue derived from MS animal models. Administration of ALLO has been shown to ameliorate neurobehavioral deficits together with neuropathology and inflammation in the CNS of animals with autoimmune demyelination. These findings are in line with previous reports indicating growth- and differentiation-promoting actions of ALLO on neurons and glial cells as well as its neuroprotective effects in the context of other CNS diseases. Nonetheless, these findings have also raised the possibility that ALLO might influence leukocyte biology and associated neuroinflammatory mechanisms independent of its neuroregenerative properties. Herein, we review the current knowledge regarding the role of ALLO in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, and discuss the potential cell and molecular pathways that might be influenced by ALLO in the context of disease.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal lesions in multiple sclerosis

    We were able to detect spinal lesions by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in three cases of multiple sclerosis with suspected cervical spinal lesions. In two cases MRI was examined during relapse. MRI revealed marked swelling of the spinal cord. The lesions had low MRI-signal intensity in inversion-recovery images and high signal intensity in T2-weighted spin-echo images. As symptoms improved, a later MRI revealed that the spinal cord became thinner and signal intensity normalized. Prolongation of T1 relaxation time is said to be useful in evaluating lesion activity, but from our observations, T2-weighted images were more effective in detecting the earliest lesions of multiple sclerosis. We thought the MRI changes were due to edema because the time course of proton relaxation time resembled that in the experimental studies of brain edema reported previously and because in one case the swelling of the spinal cord and high signal areas on spin-echo image disappeared so rapidly in response to anti-edema therapy. In the last case MRI was examined in the remission phase. Although the spinal cord was almost normal in size, skip lesions of low signal intensity on the inversion-recovery image were detected, and we were still able to find high signal areas on spin-echo image. We supposed these might be lesions full of foamy cells, but further investigation is necessary to clarify the meaning of MRI in remission phase. (author)

  15. Plasma biomarkers discriminate clinical forms of multiple sclerosis.

    Marta Tejera-Alhambra

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis, the most common cause of neurological disability in young population after trauma, represents a significant public health burden. Current challenges associated with management of multiple sclerosis (MS patients stem from the lack of biomarkers that might enable stratification of the different clinical forms of MS and thus prompt treatment for those patients with progressive MS, for whom there is currently no therapy available. In the present work we analyzed a set of thirty different plasma cytokines, chemokines and growth factors present in circulation of 129 MS patients with different clinical forms (relapsing remitting, secondary progressive and primary progressive MS and 53 healthy controls, across two independent cohorts. The set of plasma analytes was quantified with Luminex xMAP technology and their predictive power regarding clinical outcome was evaluated both individually using ROC curves and in combination using logistic regression analysis. Our results from two independent cohorts of MS patients demonstrate that the divergent clinical and histology-based MS forms are associated with distinct profiles of circulating plasma protein biomarkers, with distinct signatures being composed of chemokines and growth/angiogenic factors. With this work, we propose that an evaluation of a set of 4 circulating biomarkers (HGF, Eotaxin/CCL11, EGF and MIP-1β/CCL4 in MS patients might serve as an effective tool in the diagnosis and more personalized therapeutic targeting of MS patients.

  16. Clinical correlates of grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis

    Horakova Dana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditionally, multiple sclerosis has been viewed as a disease predominantly affecting white matter. However, this view has lately been subject to numerous changes, as new evidence of anatomical and histological changes as well as of molecular targets within the grey matter has arisen. This advance was driven mainly by novel imaging techniques, however, these have not yet been implemented in routine clinical practice. The changes in the grey matter are related to physical and cognitive disability seen in individuals with multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, damage to several grey matter structures can be associated with impairment of specific functions. Therefore, we conclude that grey matter damage - global and regional - has the potential to become a marker of disease activity, complementary to the currently used magnetic resonance markers (global brain atrophy and T2 hyperintense lesions. Furthermore, it may improve the prediction of the future disease course and response to therapy in individual patients and may also become a reliable additional surrogate marker of treatment effect.

  17. Effect of Air Pollutant Markers on Multiple Sclerosis Relapses.

    Masoud Mehrpour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is one of the autoimmune diseases with an unknown cause. The aim of this study was to explore the link between air quality and MS relapses in patients who suffer from MS.This time-series study was conducted on patients registered at the Iranian Multiple Sclerosis Society in 2011-2012. They were randomly selected from patients lived in Tehran in the last five years, and had at least one relapse in the last three years. The link between monthly mean air pollutant levels and the relapses of MS in the participants was studied.Among the registered 160 participants, at least 150 had one attack during 2009 and 2012. Most air pollutants such as NO2, NO and CO are in high levels in the rainy season. Others like Pm10 and Nox are in high levels in the dry season. The correlation between NO2 levels of all markers of air quality and MS relapses (P=0.03, r=0.27 is weak. Best ARIMA model (p,d,q; 1,0,1 was determined between number of monthly relapses and living place, although this model was not significant (P=0.3 (AR; P=0.000, MA;P=0.4.Air pollutants might be regarded as a risk factor for MS relapse.

  18. Dimethyl fumarate: a new oral treatment option for multiple sclerosis

    Sarjana S. Atal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a slowly progressive, immunologically mediated disease of the CNS. The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis. There is a clear need for more effective, safe and at the same time orally available treatment options. Here we review the recently approved drug Dimethyl fumarate (DMF, Tecfidera® as a new therapeutic option for MS and its role in context to the existing oral treatment options for MS. Dimethyl fumarate is the methyl ester of fumaric acid and has been claimed to possess immunomodulatory properties and is already in clinical use as Fumaderm for severe systemic psoriasis. In addition, Dimethyl fumarate was also shown to act on the blood-brain barrier and exert neuroprotective properties via activation of anti-oxidative pathways and displayed beneficial effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a model mimicking many aspects of MS. Based on two global phase III studies. Dimethyl fumarate has been clinically proven to significantly reduce important measures of disease activity, including relapses and development of brain lesions, as well as to slow disability progression over time, while demonstrating a favourable safety and tolerability profile. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 849-856

  19. Outpatient physiotherapy and complex inpatient rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis patients: are there any differences?

    Řasová, K.; Bartušková, T.; Rybníčková, M.; Dobrovodská, G.; Marková, M.; Jandová, D.; Zimová, D.; Bučilová, V.; Štětkářová, I.; Špaňhelová, S.; Kovari, M.; Cichy, B.; Krupová, M.; Vlčková, K.; Martinková, Patrícia

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, 11 Suppl. (2013), s. 116-116. ISSN 1352-4585. [Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis /29./. 02.10.2013-05.10.2013, Copenhagen] Grant ostatní: Univerzita Karlova(CZ) Prvouk P34 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : physiotherapy * multiple sclerosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  20. Perspective and Experiences of Iranian People With Multiple Sclerosis Regarding Leisure: A Qualitative Study

    Ghanbari; Shayanpour

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis, as a progressive disease, influences most of occupational performance areas. Objectives This study was conducted to describe the perspectives and experiences regarding leisure of people with multiple sclerosis in Ahvaz city, Iran. Patients and Methods The study was a descriptive phenomenological study using purposeful sampling. Data saturation was ach...

  1. Gene expression analysis of relapsing– remitting, primary progressive and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    Ratzer, R; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Christensen, Jeppe Romme; Börnsen, Lars Svend; Borup, Rasmus; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Sellebjerg, Finn Thorup

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of multiple sclerosis (MS) have indicated differences in the pathogenesis in relapsing-remitting (RRMS), secondary progressive (SPMS) and primary progressive (PPMS) disease.......Previous studies of multiple sclerosis (MS) have indicated differences in the pathogenesis in relapsing-remitting (RRMS), secondary progressive (SPMS) and primary progressive (PPMS) disease....

  2. Dietary patterns in clinical subtypes of multiple sclerosis : an exploratory study

    Ramsaransing, Geeta S. M.; Mellema, Sanne A.; De Keyser, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Backround: Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder with a wide range in disease course severity. Many factors seem to be implicated in multiple sclerosis disease course, and diet has been suggested to play a role. Because limited data is present in the literature it was investigated wheth

  3. Street-Experienced Peripheral B cells Traffic to the CNS in Multiple Sclerosis

    Lu, Daniel R.; Robinson, William H

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of immunoglobulin repertoires in patients with multiple sclerosis reveals that antigen-experienced B cells traffic between the peripheral lymph nodes and the central nervous system, suggesting the involvement of peripheral immunity in the autoimmune pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

  4. Is Hypovitaminosis D One of the Environmental Risk Factors for Multiple Sclerosis?

    Pierrot-Deseilligny, Charles; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The role of hypovitaminosis D as a possible risk factor for multiple sclerosis is reviewed. First, it is emphasized that hypovitaminosis D could be only one of the risk factors for multiple sclerosis and that numerous other environmental and genetic risk factors appear to interact and combine to trigger the disease. Secondly, the classical…

  5. Conventional MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging of tumour-like multiple sclerosis in a child

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a rare entity in children. Differential diagnosis includes other mass lesions such as neoplasm and abscess. A case of tumefactive multiple sclerosis in a child is presented. The open-ring pattern of enhancement on conventional MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging was important for the initial diagnosis and the evaluation of the course of the disease. (orig.)

  6. Reliability and Clinical Significance of Mobility and Balance Assessments in Multiple Sclerosis

    Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Paul, Lorna; McFadyen, Angus K.; Mattison, Paul; Miller, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the test-retest reliability, clinical significance and precision of four mobility and balance measures--the Timed 25-Foot Walk, Six-minute Walk, Timed Up and Go and the Berg Balance Scale--in individuals moderately affected by multiple sclerosis. Twenty four participants with multiple sclerosis (Extended…

  7. No evidence for shared genetic basis of common variants in multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Goris, An; van Setten, Jessica; Diekstra, Frank; Ripke, Stephan; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; van Es, Michael; Andersen, Peter M.; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Hardiman, Orla; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Shatunov, Aleksey; Leigh, Nigel; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Mora, Gabriele; Ophoff, Roel A.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Van Damme, Philip; Compston, Alastair; Robberecht, Wim; Dubois, Bénédicte; van den Berg, Leonard H.; De Jager, Philip L.; Veldink, Jan H.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying common variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. From these studies, it has emerged that there is substantial overlap in susceptibility loci between diseases. In line with those findings, we hypothesized that shared genetic pathways may exist between multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While both diseases may have inflammatory and neurodegenerative features, epidemiological studies have indicated an increased co-occurrence within individuals and families. To this purpose, we combined genome-wide data from 4088 MS patients, 3762 ALS patients and 12 030 healthy control individuals in whom 5 440 446 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were successfully genotyped or imputed. We tested these SNPs for the excess association shared between MS and ALS and also explored whether polygenic models of SNPs below genome-wide significance could explain some of the observed trait variance between diseases. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of SNPs as well as polygenic analyses fails to provide evidence in favor of an overlap in genetic susceptibility between MS and ALS. Hence, our findings do not support a shared genetic background of common risk variants in MS and ALS. PMID:24234648

  8. MRI findings of multiple sclerosis involving the brainstem

    To describe MRI findings of multiple sclerosis involving the brainstem. Among 35 cases of clinically definite multiple sclerosis, the authors retrospectively analysed 20 in which the brainstem was involved. MR images were analysed with regard to involvement sites in the brainstem or other locations, signal intensity, multiplicity, shape, enhancement pattern, and contiguity of brainstem lesions with cisternal or ventricular CSF space. The brainstem was the only site of involvement in five cases (25%), while simultaneous involvement of the brainstem and other sites was observed in 15 cases (75%). No case involved only the midbrain or medulla oblongata, and simultaneous involvement of the midbrain, pons and medulla oblongata was noted in 12 cases (60%). The most frequently involved region of the brainstem was the medulla oblongata (n=13; 90%), followed by the pons (n=17; 85%) and the midbrain (n=16; 80%). Compared with normal white matter, brainstem lesions showed low signal intensity on T1 weighted images, and high signal intensity on T2 weighted, proton density weighted, and FLAIR images. In 17 cases (85%), multiple intensity was observed, and the shape of lesions varied: oval, round, elliptical, patchy, crescentic, confluent or amorphous were seen on axial MR images, and in 14 cases (82%), coronal or sagittal scanning showed that lesions were long and tubular. Contiguity between brainstem lesions and cisternal or ventricular CSF space was seen in all cases (100%) involving midbrain (16/16) and medulla oblongata (18/18) and in 15 of 17 (88%) involving the pons. Contrast enhancement was apparent in 7 of 12 cases (58%). In the brainstem, MRI demonstrated partial or total contiguity between lesions and cisternal or ventricular CSF space, and coronal or sagittal images showed that lesions were long and tubuler

  9. The essential role of t cells in multiple sclerosis: A reappraisal

    Cris S Constantinescu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which destruction of myelin and nerve axons has been shown to be mediated by immune mechanisms. Although the focus of research has been traditionally on T cells as key mediators of the immunopathology, more recent efforts at understanding this complex disorder have been directed increasingly at other cellular and humoral elements of the immune response. This review is a reappraisal of the crucial role of T cells, in particular the CD4+ helper T-cell subset, in multiple sclerosis. Recent evidence is discussed underlining the predominant contribution of T-cell-associated genes to the genome-wide association study results of multiple sclerosis susceptibility, the loss of T-cell quiescence in the conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to clinically definite multiple sclerosis, and the fact that T cells represent the main target of effective immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive treatments in multiple sclerosis.

  10. The Etiology of Multiple Sclerosis: Genetic Evidence for the Involvement of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-Fc1

    Nexø, Bjørn Andersen; Christensen, Tove; Frederiksen, Jette;

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the role of human endogenous retroviruses in multiple sclerosis by analyzing the DNA of patients and controls in 4 cohorts for associations between multiple sclerosis and polymorphisms near viral restriction genes or near endogenous retroviral loci with one or more intact or ...... conclude that HERV-Fc1 and TRIM5 play a role in the etiology of multiple sclerosis. If these results are confirmed, they point to new modes of treatment for multiple sclerosis....

  11. 25 Hydroxyvitamin D and Cytokines in Multiple Sclerosis

    Slavov Georgi Sv.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Clinical trials of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS have produced inconsistent results for the profile of cytokine secretion in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with multiple sclerosis during periods of relapse and remission. Epidemiological and clinical observations data reveal an association of the changes in vitamin D serum concentration with the risk of developing MS. AIM: To evaluate changes in serum concentrations of 25(OHD, IL17, IFN-gamma, TGFβ1, IL4, IL10 in relapse and remission and their correlation with the severity of disability. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty-three persons (30 clinically healthy controls and 23 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis living between 41° and 42° northern latitude were registered during the astronomical winter period (October 2012- May 2013. -Patients were diagnosed according to Mc Donald 2010 criteria. The degree of neurological deficit was assessed by EDSS. Serum concentrations of 25(OHD (nmol/l and cytokines (pg/ml were tested by ELISA - once for controls and twice for patients (during relapse and remission. RESULTS: In the studied population average levels of 25(OHD were close to insufficiency, most pronounced in patients in relapse, as differences were not statistically significant. A reverse correlation was found between the levels of 25(OHD and the deficit in relapse and remission. Concentrations of TGFβ1 significantly increased in remission compared with exacerbation and controls. Serum level of IL4 was significantly lower in relapse compared with controls. In remission there was a marked tendency of increase compared with exacerbation. During clinical improvement IL17 and IFN-gamma tended to decrease compared to the average levels in relapse. In both periods, the average concentrations of IFN-gamma in patients were significantly lower compared with controls. No statistically significant differences were found comparing cytokine changes with those of 25

  12. Symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis using cannabinoids: recent advances.

    Smith, Paul F

    2007-09-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of clinical trials investigating the potential efficacy of medicinal cannabinoids for the symptomatic treatment of chronic pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). A number of different cannabinoids have been used, including: delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) itself; the synthetic delta9-THC, dronabinol; a 1:1 ratio of delta9-THC:cannabidiol (Sativex); and the synthetic delta9-THC metabolites CT-3 and nabilone. Other Cannabis extracts have also been tested. While 2-3 years ago there was little consensus in the literature, now the majority of studies are beginning to suggest that cannabinoids are useful in the treatment of MS in at least a subset of individuals. Their adverse side-effect profile has generally been mild compared with other drugs used for pain and spasticity; nonetheless, there is still concern about potential long-term side effects, particularly psychiatric side effects and effects on fetal development. PMID:17868014

  13. Sativex for the management of multiple sclerosis symptoms.

    Perras C

    2005-09-01

    Sativex (R) is a cannabis-based pharmaceutical product containing delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in a 1:1 ratio, delivered in an oromucosal (mouth) spray. It has been approved as adjunctive treatment for neuropathic pain in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is being investigated for the management of other MS symptoms, such as spasticity. THC:CBD spray is regulated as a narcotic. Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared the benefits and harms of THC:CBD spray with placebo. A total of 368 patients with various neurological conditions (including MS) were recruited. In some trials, THC:CBD spray significantly reduced neuropathic pain, spasticity, muscle spasms and sleep disturbances. The most common adverse events (AEs) reported in trials were dizziness, sleepiness, fatigue, feeling of intoxication and a bad taste. Long-term safety and the potential for dependence, abuse, misuse and diversion are unknown. PMID:16317825

  14. MicroRNAs associated with the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

    Huang, Qingrong; Xiao, Bo; Ma, Xinting; Qu, Mingjuan; Li, Yanmin; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Zhou, Juhua

    2016-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is not only an autoimmune disease in which autoreactive immune cells against myelin damage axons and nerves in the central nervous system, but also a neurodegenerative disease, in which progressive loss of structure and function of neurons occurs. The mechanisms of MS pathogenesis have not been fully understood. It has been reported that miRNAs may play a critical role in MS pathogenesis. In this review, we have extensively discussed the alterations in the expression of miRNAs detected in patients with MS. The dysregulated miRNAs have been shown to be associated with the pathogenesis of MS. We suggest that such dysregulated miRNAs may potentially be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of MS, to discover new therapeutic targets for MS treatment, and to predict prognostic markers in responses to MS treatment. PMID:27235360

  15. Gray matter is targeted in first-attack multiple sclerosis.

    Steven E Schutzer

    Full Text Available The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS, its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups compared to established relapsing remitting (RR MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse. Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation.

  16. Novel Agents for Relapsing Forms of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Straus Farber, Rebecca; Harel, Asaff; Lublin, Fred

    2016-01-14

    Since 2004, five drugs with new mechanisms of action have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The expanded armamentarium of treatment options offers new opportunities for improved disease control and increased tolerability of medications, and also presents new safety concerns and monitoring requirements with which physicians must familiarize themselves. We review each of the newly approved agents-natalizumab, fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab-with regard to their mechanism of action, clinical trial data, safety and tolerability concerns, and monitoring requirements. We also review available data for promising agents that are currently in late-phase clinical trials, including daclizumab, ocrelizumab, and ofatumumab. PMID:26394285

  17. Restriction genes for retroviruses influence the risk of multiple sclerosis.

    Bjørn A Nexø

    Full Text Available We recently described that the autoimmune, central nervous system disease, multiple sclerosis (MS, is genetically associated with the human endogenous retroviral locus, HERV-Fc1, in Scandinavians. A number of dominant human genes encoding factors that restrict retrovirus replication have been known for a long time. Today human restriction genes for retroviruses include amongst others TRIMs, APOBEC3s, BST2 and TREXs. We have therefore looked for a role of these retroviral restriction genes in MS using genetic epidemiology. We here report that markers in two TRIMs, TRIM5 and TRIM22 and a marker in BST2, associated statistically with the risk of getting MS, while markers in or near APOBEC3s and TREXs showed little or no effect. This indicates that the two TRIMs and BST2 influence the risk of disease and thus supports the hypothesis of a viral involvement.

  18. [Genetic aspects in multiple sclerosis. II: HLA system].

    De Rezende, P A; Arruda, W O

    1996-09-01

    Review of studies about HLA antigens and multiple sclerosis (MS). The HLA system, in special class II antigens, subregions DR and DQ, is probably involved in the immunopathogenesis of MS. Haplotype DRB1*1501.DQA1*0102.DQB1*0602, corresponding to phenotype DR2.Dw2.DQ6, is positively associated with MS in several caucasoid populations. Clinical heterogeneity of MS, as well as different diagnostic criteria adopted by investigators are potential sources of confusion and may lead to discrepant results. A better standardization of clinical and laboratorial methodology, appropriate subdivision of patients with different clinical forms of MS, may allow a more accurate evaluation of the role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:9109989

  19. Disability outcome measures in multiple sclerosis clinical trials

    Cohen, Jeffrey A; Reingold, Stephen C; Polman, Chris H;

    2012-01-01

    Many of the available disability outcome measures used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis are insensitive to change over time, inadequately validated, or insensitive to patient-perceived health status or quality of life. Increasing focus on therapies that slow or reverse disability...... progression makes it essential to refine existing measures or to develop new tools. Major changes to the expanded disability status scale should be avoided to prevent the loss of acceptance by regulators as a measure for primary outcomes in trials that provide substantial evidence of effectiveness. Rather, we......, and measurement of biomarkers, show promise as adjuncts to the current disability measures, but are insufficiently validated to serve as substitutes. A collaborative approach that involves academic experts, regulators, industry representitives, and funding agencies is needed to most effectively develop disability...

  20. Evaluation of the Needs of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Ali Dehghani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that causes many problems in patients. Since training should be done in according to the educational needs, this study is performed to assess the educational needs of MS patients.Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study, and its tool was a questionnaire on the educational needs of MS patients. Fifty patients referred to the MS society were selected through simple sampling.Results: Based on the obtained results, 60% of patients were female, 52% were single, and 16% were high school undergraduates. Seventy-eight percent of the patients needed training about disease nature, 82% about treatment and care, 46% about nutrition, and 32% about physical activity.Conclusion: The findings showed that patients need more education about treatment and self-care.

  1. Emerging Concepts on the Gut Microbiome and Multiple Sclerosis.

    Glenn, Justin D; Mowry, Ellen M

    2016-06-01

    Microbiota of the human body perform fundamental tasks that contribute to normal development, health, and homeostasis and are intimately associated with numerous organ systems, including the gut. Microbes begin gut inhabitance immediately following birth and promote proper gut epithelial construction and function, metabolism and nutrition, and immune system development. Inappropriate immune recognition of self-tissue can lead to autoimmune disease, including conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), in which the immune system recognizes and attacks central nervous system tissue. Preclinical studies have demonstrated a requirement of gut microbiota for neuroinflammatory autoimmune disease in animal models, and a growing number of clinical investigations are finding associations between MS status and the composition of the gut microbiota. In this review, we examine current undertakings into better understanding the role of gut bacteria and their phages in MS development, review associations of the gut microbiota makeup and MS, and discuss potential mechanisms by which the gut microbiota may be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27145057

  2. Internal Jugular Vein Entrapment in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient

    Marian Simka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multiple sclerosis patient presenting with compression of the internal jugular vein caused by aberrant omohyoid muscle. Previously this patient underwent balloon angioplasty of the same internal jugular vein. Ten months after this endovascular procedure, Doppler sonography revealed totally collapsed middle part of the treated vein with no outflow detected. Still, the vein widened and the flow was restored when the patient’s mouth opened. Thus, the abnormality was likely to be caused by muscular compression. Surgical exploration confirmed that an atypical omohyoid muscle was squeezing the vein. Consequently, pathological muscle was transected. Sonographic control three weeks after surgical procedure revealed a decompressed vein with fully restored venous outflow. Although such a muscular compression can be successfully managed surgically, future research has to establish its clinical relevance.

  3. Risk of Multiple Sclerosis in Patients with Psoriasis

    Egeberg, Alexander; Mallbris, Lotus; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Skov, Lone; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis and multiple sclerosis (MS) are inflammatory disorders with similarities in genetic risk variants and inflammatory pathways. Limited evidence is available on the relationship between the two diseases. We therefore investigated the risk of incident (new-onset) MS in patients with mild and...... severe psoriasis, respectively. All Danish citizens aged ≥ 18 years from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2011 were identified by linkage of nationwide registries at the individual level. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, gender, socioeconomic status, smoking, medication......, comorbidity, and UV phototherapy by Poisson regression. There were 58,628 and 9,952 cases of mild and severe psoriasis, respectively, and 9,713 cases of MS. Incidence rates of MS per 10,000 person-years for the reference population, mild psoriasis, and severe psoriasis were 1.78, 3.22, and 4.55, respectively...

  4. Internal Jugular Vein Entrapment in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient

    Simka, Marian; Majewski, Eugeniusz; Fortuna, Marek; Zaniewski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    We describe a multiple sclerosis patient presenting with compression of the internal jugular vein caused by aberrant omohyoid muscle. Previously this patient underwent balloon angioplasty of the same internal jugular vein. Ten months after this endovascular procedure, Doppler sonography revealed totally collapsed middle part of the treated vein with no outflow detected. Still, the vein widened and the flow was restored when the patient's mouth opened. Thus, the abnormality was likely to be caused by muscular compression. Surgical exploration confirmed that an atypical omohyoid muscle was squeezing the vein. Consequently, pathological muscle was transected. Sonographic control three weeks after surgical procedure revealed a decompressed vein with fully restored venous outflow. Although such a muscular compression can be successfully managed surgically, future research has to establish its clinical relevance. PMID:23097738

  5. Role of T Follicular Helper cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    Schmitt, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease which results from the destruction of myelin and associated collateral tissue damage within the central nervous system (CNS). MS is a highly diverse disease with different clinical profiles. During the past decade, several new treatment options have been introduced, but no treatment completely stops the disease progression. Therefore deeper understanding of the disease mechanism is necessary to develop novel therapeutic strategies. While yet to be proven, there is evidence suggesting the involvement of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, a CD4 T cell subset specialized for the provision of help to B cells, in the pathogenesis of MS. In this review, I will discuss the potential pathogenic roles of Tfh cells in the course of MS. PMID:26082945

  6. SWI enhances vein detection using gadolinium in multiple sclerosis

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) combined with the FLAIR sequence provides the ability to depict in vivo the perivenous location of inflammatory demyelinating lesions – one of the most specific pathologic features of multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, in MS white matter (WM) lesions, gadolinium-based contrast media (CM) can increase vein signal loss on SWI. This report focuses on two cases of WM inflammatory lesions enhancing on SWI images after CM injection. In these lesions in fact the CM increased the contrast between the parenchyma and the central vein allowing as well, in one of the two cases, the detection of a vein not visible on the same SWI sequence acquired before CM injection

  7. Aggressive multiple sclerosis: proposed definition and treatment algorithm.

    Rush, Carolina A; MacLean, Heather J; Freedman, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a CNS disorder characterized by inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration, and is the most common cause of acquired nontraumatic neurological disability in young adults. The course of the disease varies between individuals: some patients accumulate minimal disability over their lives, whereas others experience a rapidly disabling disease course. This latter subset of patients, whose MS is marked by the rampant progression of disability over a short time period, is often referred to as having 'aggressive' MS. Treatment of patients with aggressive MS is challenging, and optimal strategies have yet to be defined. It is important to identify patients who are at risk of aggressive MS as early as possible and implement an effective treatment strategy. Early intervention might protect patients from irreversible damage and disability, and prevent the development of a secondary progressive course, which thus far lacks effective therapy. PMID:26032396

  8. [Vestibular rehabilitation in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis].

    Pavan, Karina; Marangoni, Bruna E M; Schmidt, Kizi B; Cobe, Fernanda A; Matuti, Gabriela S; Nishino, Lúcia K; Thomaz, Rodrigo B; Mendes, Maria Fernanda; Lianza, Sérgio; Tilbery, Charles Peter

    2007-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating, inflammatory illness, that attack the white matter of the central nervous system, and abnormal vestibular sensations (vertigo, disequilibrium) are frequent. The vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is determined by mechanisms of adaptations, neural substitutions and compensations. This study evaluated the improvement of the central or peripheral vertigo in patients with relapsing-remitting MS submitted to the VR (exercises of Cawthorne-Cooksey), through the scale of Berg and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). In this sample of 4 cases the VR, carried through in a period of 2 months, demonstrated the improvement in 3 patients according to the Berg scale and in 2 patients considering that of the DHI. PMID:17607438

  9. Reviewing the Unmet Needs of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Mehr, Stanton R; Zimmerman, Marj P

    2015-11-01

    Significant innovations in the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have primarily addressed the frequency of flare-ups in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Many advances have been made in this area, and the medical community may be on the verge of a serious discussion of what constitutes a truly effective MS treatment. Certainly, it is important to further delay MS flare-ups and more effectively treat RRMS symptoms. However, great strides in reducing or preventing MS-related disability and providing neuroprotection have been elusive. Many unmet needs are still voiced by patients with MS, clinicians, and caregivers. Current information on the need for progress in various areas is reviewed in this article, including psychosocial care, treatments for progressive MS, biomarker identification, functional outcome measures, individualization of treatment, reducing side effects of medications, and improving medication adherence. PMID:26702334

  10. Clinical predictors of response to immunomodulators for multiple sclerosis

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine, based on clinical criteria, the proportion of multiple sclerosis (MS patients responsive to immunomodulators (RI and nonresponsive to immunomodulators (NRI, and to ascertain whether clinical and epidemiological data differs between RI and NRI patient groups. METHODS: Patients were assessed on rate of exarcerbations per year, for the period before and after commencement of treatment. The RI and NRI groups were compared for several clinical and epidemiological characteristics. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: A total of 31.4% of the patients were nonresponders to the immunomodulatory treatment. The main predictors of immunomodulatory response were early diagnostic and commencement of therapy and high rate of annual exacerbations prior to treatment. Given the arsenal of medication options available for MS management, screening potential candidates for different therapeutic approaches are critical to optimize evolution of patients with the disease.

  11. High-throughput sequencing of immune repertoires in multiple sclerosis.

    Lossius, Andreas; Johansen, Jorunn N; Vartdal, Frode; Holmøy, Trygve

    2016-04-01

    T cells and B cells are crucial in the initiation and maintenance of multiple sclerosis (MS), and the activation of these cells is believed to be mediated through specific recognition of antigens by the T- and B-cell receptors. The antigen receptors are highly polymorphic due to recombination (T- and B-cell receptors) and mutation (B-cell receptors) of the encoding genes, which can therefore be used as fingerprints to track individual T- and B-cell clones. Such studies can shed light on mechanisms driving the immune responses and provide new insights into the pathogenesis. Here, we summarize studies that have explored the T- and B-cell receptor repertoires using earlier methodological approaches, and we focus on how high-throughput sequencing has provided new knowledge by surveying the immune repertoires in MS in even greater detail and with unprecedented depth. PMID:27081660

  12. Luteolin as a therapeutic option for multiple sclerosis

    Theoharides Theoharis C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple sclerosis (MS remains without an effective treatment in spite of intense research efforts. Interferon-beta (IFN-β reduces duration and severity of symptoms in many relapsing-remitting MS patients, but its mechanism of action is still not well understood. Moreover, IFN-β and other available treatments must be given parenterally and have a variety of adverse effects. Certain naturally occurring flavonoids, such as luteolin, have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, including inhibition of activated peripheral blood leukocytes from MS patients. Luteolin also inhibits mast cells, as well as mast cell-dependent T cell activation, recently implicated in MS pathogenesis. Moreover, luteolin and structurally similar flavonoids can inhibit experimental allergic allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS in rodents. An appropriate luteolin formulation that permits sufficient absorption and reduces its metabolism could be a useful adjuvant to IFN-β for MS therapy.

  13. Social Cognition in Multiple Sclerosis: a Meta-Analysis.

    Bora, Emre; Özakbaş, Serkan; Velakoulis, Dennis; Walterfang, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with cognitive decline and impairment in social functioning. Accumulating evidence suggests that patients with MS are impaired in social cognition, including theory of mind (ToM) and emotion recognition. In this meta-analysis of 24 studies, facial emotion recognition and ToM performances of 989 patients with MS and 836 healthy controls were compared. MS was associated with significant impairments with medium effect sizes in ToM (d = 0.57) and facial emotion recognition (d = 0.61). Among individual emotions recognition of fear and anger were particularly impaired. The severity of social cognitive deficits was significantly associated with non-social cognitive impairment. These deficits in social cognition may underpin difficulties in social functioning in MS. However, there is a need for further studies investigating the longitudinal evolution of social cognitive deficits and their neural correlates in MS. PMID:27324894

  14. Nonconventional MRI and microstructural cerebral changes in multiple sclerosis

    Enzinger, Christian; Barkhof, Frederik; Ciccarelli, Olga;

    2015-01-01

    MRI has become the most important paraclinical tool for diagnosing and monitoring patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, conventional MRI sequences are largely nonspecific in the pathology they reveal, and only provide a limited view of the complex morphological changes associated with MS....... Nonconventional MRI techniques, such as magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) promise to complement existing techniques by revealing more-specific information on microstructural tissue changes. Past years have witnessed dramatic advances...... in the acquisition and analysis of such imaging data, and numerous studies have used these tools to probe tissue alterations associated with MS. Other MRI-based techniques-such as myelin-water imaging, (23)Na imaging, magnetic resonance elastography and magnetic resonance perfusion imaging-might also...

  15. Gray Matter Is Targeted in First-Attack Multiple Sclerosis

    Schutzer, Steven E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xie, Fang; Bergquist, Jonas P.; Vecsei, Lazlo' ; Zadori, Denes; Camp, David G.; Holland, Bart K.; Smith, Richard D.; Coyle, Patricia K.

    2013-09-10

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups) compared to established relapsing remitting (RR) MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse). Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation.

  16. Seasonal pattern to multiple sclerosis in newborns in Bashkortostan

    Magzhanov R.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Research objective is to investigate the seasonal pattern to multiple sclerosis (MS in newborns in the Republic of Bashkortostan (RB depending on months of year in comparison with the RB population. Materials. Months of the birth of 1224 patients with MS republican have been analyzed in the center of the Republic of Bashkortostan (Ufa. The data of patients were compared to the data of birth rate in the RB within a year. Results. The majority of patients was born in May (12%, and the minimal amount of patients was determined in November (5.6% and December (4.4% that authentically differs from the rate of birth in various months of the year in the RB (p<0.05. Conclusion. Data provided by foreign researchers concerning influence of such environmental factor as insolation on pre-natal development were confirmed in the work.

  17. Cladribine tablets for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Rammohan, Kottil; Giovannoni, Gavin; Comi, Giancarlo; Cook, Stuart; Rieckmann, Peter; Soelberg Sørensen, Per; Vermersch, Patrick; Hamlett, Anthony; Kurukulasuriya, Nuwan

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the phase III CLARITY study, treatment with cladribine tablets at cumulative doses of 3.5 or 5.25mg/kg over 96 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rates (ARR) versus placebo in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Further post hoc analyses of...... CLARITY study data were conducted to determine the efficacy of cladribine tablets across patient subgroups stratified by baseline characteristics. METHODS: Relapse rates over the 96-week CLARITY study were analyzed in cohorts stratified by demographics; disease duration; treatment history and disease...... activity at baseline. RESULTS: In the intent-to-treat population (n=437, 433 and 456 in the placebo, cladribine 3.5 and 5.25mg/kg groups, respectively), treatment with cladribine tablets 3.5 and 5.25mg/kg led to consistent improvements in ARR versus placebo in patients stratified by gender; age (≤40...

  18. The Temporal Dynamics of Visual Processing in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Lopes Costa, Silvana; Gonçalves, Oscar F; DeLuca, John; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Chakravarthi, Ramakrishna; Almeida, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Although the integrity of the visual system is often affected in multiple sclerosis (MS), the potential relationship between the temporal dynamics of visual processing and performance on neuropsychological tests assessing processing speed (PS) remains relatively unexplored. Here, we test if a PS deficit is related to abnormalities within the visual system, rather than impaired higher-level cognitive function. Two groups of participants with MS (1 group with PS deficits and another without) and a healthy control group, matched for age and education, were included. To explore the temporal dynamics of visual processing, we used 2 psychophysical paradigms: attention enhancement/prioritization and rapid serial visual presentation. Visual PS deficits were associated with a decreased capability to detect visual stimuli and a higher limitation in visual temporal-processing capacity. These results suggest that a latent sensorial temporal limitation of the visual system is significantly associated to PS deficits in MS. PMID:26508328

  19. Socioeconomic Factors in Childhood and the Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    Nielsen, N. M.; Jorgensen, K. T.; Bager, P.;

    2013-01-01

    In a national cohort comprising 1.5 million Danes born from 1966 to 1992, we studied the association between childhood socioeconomic status (SES) and the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) from 1981 to 2007 using information about household income and parental educational levels at the persons 15th...... birthday. The association between childhood SES and MS was evaluated using MS incidence rate ratios with 95 confidence intervals obtained in log-linear Poisson regression analyses. We found no strong association between childhood SES and MS but did observe a tendency toward a reduced risk of MS among...... children from households with more highly educated parents, particularly mothers. Children whose mothers had a secondary (rate ratio 0.95, 95 confidence interval: 0.86, 1.04) or higher (rate ratio 0.86, 95 confidence interval: 0.76, 0.97) education had reduced risks of MS (5 and 14, respectively) compared...

  20. Multiple sclerosis : experience in neuroimaging era from western India.

    Mani J

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available 31 patients of multiple sclerosis (MS diagnosed in the last six years in a large teaching hospital were reviewed. The hospital incidence of 0.85% of total admissions in neurology unit in western India is comparable to the series from other parts of India. The mean age at onset was slightly lower compared to other series. The female preponderence was noted in addition to higher incidence of Devic′s syndrome. Visual loss (47% and motor weakness (27% were the commonest presenting symptoms. The clinical pattern was more similar to Asian series of MS than the western series. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan. 24 out of 25 MRI of Brain and 15 out of 16 MRI of spine were abnormal. CSF immuno-globulins were raised in 80% of patients who underwent CSF study. The data has been compared with other Indian, Asian and Western series.