WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute metabolic responses

  1. Cerebrovascular response to acute metabolic acidosis in humans.

    Ven, M.T.P. van de; Colier, W.N.J.M.; Kersten, B.T.P.; Oeseburg, B.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the cerebrovascular response (delta CBV/delta PaCO2) during baseline metabolic conditions and acute metabolic acidosis. METHODS: 15 healthy subjects, 5 m, 10 f, 56 +/- 10 yrs were investigated. For acidification, NH4Cl was given orally. CBV was measured using Near Infrared

  2. Acute metabolic response to fasted and postprandial exercise

    Lima FD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Filipe Dinato de Lima,1,2 Ana Luiza Matias Correia,1 Denilson da Silva Teixeira,2 Domingos Vasco da Silva Neto,2 Ítalo Sávio Gonçalves Fernandes,2 Mário Boratto Xavier Viana,2 Mateus Petitto,2 Rodney Antônio da Silva Sampaio,2 Sandro Nobre Chaves,2 Simone Teixeira Alves,2 Renata Aparecida Elias Dantas,2 Márcio Rabelo Mota2 1University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 2Universitary Center of Brasília (UniCEUB, Brasília, DF, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this study was to analyze the acute metabolic response to exercise in fasting and postprandial. For this, ten individuals were submitted to an incremental treadmill test, with an initial speed of 5 and 1 km/h increments every minute, with no inclination, and a body composition assessment. After this 1st day, all volunteers were submitted to two experimental procedures (fasting and postprandial, with an aerobic exercise performed for 36 minutes at 65% of maximal oxygen consumption. At postprandial procedure, all subjects ingested a breakfast containing 59.3 g of carbohydrate (76.73%, 9.97 g of protein (12.90%, 8.01 g of lipids (10.37%, with a total energy intake of 349.17 kcal. An analysis of plasma concentration of triglycerides, lactate, and glucose was performed in two stages: before and after exercise. The Shapiro–Wilk test was used to verify the normality of the data. For analysis of glucose concentration, plasma lactate, and triglycerides, we used a repeated measures analysis of variance factorial 2×2, with Bonferroni multiple comparison test. The significance level of P<0.05 was adopted. The results indicated a maintenance level of glucose at fasting and a decrease in glucose concentration at postprandial exercise. Both conditions increase plasma lactate. Triglycerides also increased in the two experimental conditions; however, after exercise fasting, the increase was significantly higher than in the postprandial exercise. These data suggest that both exercises could increase

  3. Acute responses of muscle protein metabolism to reduced blood flow reflect metabolic priorities for homeostasis.

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Irtun, Oivind; Chinkes, David L; Wolfe, Robert R

    2008-03-01

    The present experiment was designed to measure the synthetic and breakdown rates of muscle protein in the hindlimb of rabbits with or without clamping the femoral artery. l-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine was infused as a tracer for measurement of muscle protein kinetics by means of an arteriovenous model, tracer incorporation, and tracee release methods. The ultrasonic flowmeter, dye dilution, and microsphere methods were used to determine the flow rates in the femoral artery, in the leg, and in muscle capillary, respectively. The femoral artery flow accounted for 65% of leg flow. A 50% reduction in the femoral artery flow reduced leg flow by 28% and nutritive flow by 26%, which did not change protein synthetic or breakdown rate in leg muscle. Full clamp of the femoral artery reduced leg flow by 42% and nutritive flow by 59%, which decreased (P < 0.05) both the fractional synthetic rate from 0.19 +/- 0.05 to 0.14 +/- 0.03%/day and fractional breakdown rate from 0.28 +/- 0.07 to 0.23 +/- 0.09%/day of muscle protein. Neither the partial nor full clamp reduced (P = 0.27-0.39) the intracellular phenylalanine concentration or net protein balance in leg muscle. We conclude that the flow threshold to cause a fall of protein turnover rate in leg muscle was a reduction of 30-40% of the leg flow. The acute responses of muscle protein kinetics to the reductions in blood flow reflected the metabolic priorities to maintain muscle homeostasis. These findings cannot be extrapolated to more chronic conditions without experimental validation. PMID:18089763

  4. Metabolic responses to acute physical exercise in young rats recovered from fetal protein malnutrition with a fructose-rich diet

    Botezelli José D; Ghezzi Ana C; de Araujo Gustavo G; Cambri Lucieli T; Mello Maria AR

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Malnutrition in utero can "program" the fetal tissues, making them more vulnerable to metabolic disturbances. Also there is association between excessive consumption of fructose and the development of metabolic syndrome. However, there is little information regarding the acute effect of physical exercise on subjects recovered from malnutrition and/or fed with a fructose-rich diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic aspects and the response to acute p...

  5. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure

    Shannahan, Jonathan H. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Alzate, Oscar [Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Winnik, Witold M.; Andrews, Debora [Proteomics Core, Research Core Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schladweiler, Mette C. [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ghio, Andrew J. [Clinical Research Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Gavett, Stephen H. [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Kodavanti, Urmila P., E-mail: Kodavanti.Urmila@epa.gov [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA. -- Highlights: ► Biomarkers of asbestos exposure are required for disease diagnosis. ► Libby amphibole exposure is associated with increased human mortality. ► Libby amphibole increases circulating proteins involved

  6. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA. -- Highlights: ► Biomarkers of asbestos exposure are required for disease diagnosis. ► Libby amphibole exposure is associated with increased human mortality. ► Libby amphibole increases circulating proteins involved

  7. Cardiovascular and metabolic responses to acute and chronic exercise in swine

    Yucatan and Hampshire swine were subjects for studies of metabolic and cardiovascular adaptations to acute and chronic exercise. Chronic instrumentation included aortic, left atrial and pulmonary arterial catheters, aortic flow transducers and ultrasonic dimension gauges. Noninvasive measurements of exercise responses were obtained with a respiratory mask and surface electrocardiogram. Microsphere techniques were used to study regional blood flow. Trained animals were running one hr per day, 3 to 5 days per wk by the end of 9 to 12 wk of training. Swine were capable of achieving maximal oxygen consumption during progressive treadmill exercise. Maximal oxygen consumptions in untrained pigs (55.7 +/- 5.0 cc/kg/min) were comparable to human values. Exercise training produced increases in end diastolic dimensions both at rest (+1.2 mm, 4%) and during maximal exercise (+2.1 mm, 7%). Organ blood flow was directed away from splanchnic circulation to active muscle during progressive exercise. Maximal muscle blood flow was 30% greater in trained than untrained swine. Thus, similarities in adaptive responses between humans and swine recommend the pig as a useful model for studies of dynamic exercise

  8. High-fat diet did not change metabolic response to acute stress in rats

    Farrokhi, Babak; Ghalami, Jamileh; Hedayati, Mehdi; Rostamkhani, Fatemeh; Zardooz, Homeira

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of high-fat diet on metabolic factors in the presence of acute foot-shock and psychological stresses in male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into high-fat (45 % cow intra-abdominal fat) and normal (standard pellets) diet groups; then, each group was allocated into stressed and control groups. Stress was induced by a communication box. Blood samples were collected by retro-orbital-puncture method under isoflurane anesthesia. Plasma levels of gluc...

  9. Metabolic responses to acute physical exercise in young rats recovered from fetal protein malnutrition with a fructose-rich diet

    Botezelli José D

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition in utero can "program" the fetal tissues, making them more vulnerable to metabolic disturbances. Also there is association between excessive consumption of fructose and the development of metabolic syndrome. However, there is little information regarding the acute effect of physical exercise on subjects recovered from malnutrition and/or fed with a fructose-rich diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic aspects and the response to acute physical exercise in rats recovered from fetal protein malnutrition with a fructose-rich diet. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats were fed with a balanced (B diet or a low-protein (L diet. After birth and until 60 days of age, the offspring were distributed into four groups according to the diet received: B: B diet during the whole experiment; balanced/fructose (BF: B diet until birth and fructose-rich (F diet afterwards; low protein/balanced (LB: L diet until birth and B diet afterwards; low protein/fructose (LF: L diet until birth and F diet afterwards. Results The excess fructose intake reduced the body weight gain, especially in the BF group. Furthermore, the serum total cholesterol and the LDL cholesterol were elevated in this group. In the LF group, the serum total cholesterol and the muscle glycogen increased. Acute physical exercise increased the serum concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol and liver lipids and reduced the concentrations of muscle glycogen in all groups. Conclusion An excess fructose intake induced some signs of metabolic syndrome. However, protein malnutrition appeared to protect against the short term effects of fructose. In other hand, most responses to acute physical exercise were not influenced by early malnutrition and/or by the fructose overload.

  10. Metabolic responses to the acute ingestion of two commercially available carbonated beverages: A pilot study

    Mendel Ron W

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study was to compare the effects of two commercially available soft drinks on metabolic rate. Methods After giving informed consent, twenty healthy men and women were randomly assigned to ingest 12 ounces of Celsius™ and, on a separate day, 12 ounces of Diet Coke®. All subjects completed both trials using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolic rate (via indirect calorimetry and substrate oxidation (via respiratory exchange ratio were measured at baseline (pre-ingestion and at the end of each hour for 3 hours post-ingestion. Results Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p ® ingestion. No differences in respiratory exchange ratio were noted between trials. Conclusion These preliminary findings indicate Celsius™ has thermogenic properties when ingested acutely. The effects of repeated, chronic ingestion of Celsius™ on body composition are unknown at this time.

  11. Does Amifostine Reduce Metabolic Rate? Effect of the Drug on Gas Exchange and Acute Ventilatory Hypoxic Response in Humans

    Jaideep J. Pandit

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. There was no change in metabolic rate with amifostine as measured by oxygen uptake (p = 0.113. However in carbon dioxide output and respiratory quotient, we detected a small decline over time in control and drug protocols, consistent with a gradual change from carbohydrate to fat metabolism over the course of the relatively long study protocol. A novel result was that amifostine (1000 mg increased the mean ± SD acute hypoxic ventilatory response from 12.4 ± 5.1 L/min to 20.3 ± 11.9 L/min (p = 0.045. In conclusion, any cellular protective effects of amifostine are unlikely due to metabolic effects. The stimulatory effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses may be due to increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor, either peripherally in the carotid body, or centrally in the brain.

  12. Does amifostine reduce metabolic rate? Effect of the drug on gas exchange and acute ventilatory hypoxic response in humans.

    Pandit, Jaideep J; Allen, Caroline; Little, Evelyn; Formenti, Federico; Harris, Adrian L; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange) over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg) of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. There was no change in metabolic rate with amifostine as measured by oxygen uptake (p = 0.113). However in carbon dioxide output and respiratory quotient, we detected a small decline over time in control and drug protocols, consistent with a gradual change from carbohydrate to fat metabolism over the course of the relatively long study protocol. A novel result was that amifostine (1000 mg) increased the mean ± SD acute hypoxic ventilatory response from 12.4 ± 5.1 L/min to 20.3 ± 11.9 L/min (p = 0.045). In conclusion, any cellular protective effects of amifostine are unlikely due to metabolic effects. The stimulatory effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses may be due to increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor, either peripherally in the carotid body, or centrally in the brain. PMID:25894815

  13. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress.

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J; Gray, Jason D; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K; Seifert, Erin L; McEwen, Bruce S; Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-12-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism's multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal-medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  14. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters ventilatory and metabolic responses to acute hypoxia in rats.

    Morgan, Barbara J; Adrian, Russell; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bates, Melissa L; Dopp, John M

    2016-05-15

    We determined the effects of chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on chemoreflex control of ventilation in conscious animals. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH [nadir oxygen saturation (SpO2), 75%; 15 events/h; 10 h/day] or normoxia (NORM) for 21 days. We assessed the following responses to acute, graded hypoxia before and after exposures: ventilation (V̇e, via barometric plethysmography), V̇o2 and V̇co2 (analysis of expired air), heart rate (HR), and SpO2 (pulse oximetry via neck collar). We quantified hypoxia-induced chemoreceptor sensitivity by calculating the stimulus-response relationship between SpO2 and the ventilatory equivalent for V̇co2 (linear regression). An additional aim was to determine whether CIH causes proliferation of carotid body glomus cells (using bromodeoxyuridine). CIH exposure increased the slope of the V̇e/V̇co2/SpO2 relationship and caused hyperventilation in normoxia. Bromodeoxyuridine staining was comparable in CIH and NORM. Thus our CIH paradigm augmented hypoxic chemosensitivity without causing glomus cell proliferation. PMID:26917692

  15. Effect of acute induced metabolic alkalosis on the acid/base responses to sprint exercise of six racing greyhounds.

    Holloway, S A; Sundstrom, D; Senior, D F

    1996-11-01

    To investigate the effect of acute induced metabolic alkalosis on the haematological, biochemical and metabolic responses to sprint exercise, six greyhound dogs with previously placed carotid arterial catheters were raced four times over a distance of 400 metres. Each dog was raced twice after receiving oral sodium bicarbonate solution (NaHCO3) (400 mg kg-1) or lactated Ringer's solution (LRS). Before, and for intervals of up to one hour after, the exercise arterial blood samples were collected for the measurement of blood gases, packed cell volume, total protein, serum biochemistry and plasma lactate. The time to complete the 400 metre sprint ranged from 32.7 seconds to 36.9 seconds. There was no significant difference in racing times between the dogs treated with NaHCO3 and LRS, and there was no significant difference between the plasma lactate measurements after the treatments with NaHCO3 or LRS. Serum chloride concentrations were significantly lower after NaHCO3 than after LRS, and there was a trend towards a lower serum potassium concentration after NaHCO3 treatment. Plasma lactate concentrations showed a similar increase and time course of disappearance after both LRS and NaHCO3 treatments. There were significant changes in all the parameters measured after the exercise, but there were large variations between individual dogs and between races when the dogs were receiving the same treatment. PMID:8938856

  16. Metabolic responses to the acute ingestion of two commercially available carbonated beverages: A pilot study

    Mendel Ron W; Hofheins Jennifer E

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study was to compare the effects of two commercially available soft drinks on metabolic rate. Methods After giving informed consent, twenty healthy men and women were randomly assigned to ingest 12 ounces of Celsius™ and, on a separate day, 12 ounces of Diet Coke®. All subjects completed both trials using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolic rate (via indirect calorimetry) and substrate oxidation (v...

  17. The acute phase response induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide modifies the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of florfenicol in rabbits.

    Pérez, R; Palma, C; Burgos, R; Jeldres, J A; Espinoza, A; Peñailillo, A K

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase response (APR) on the pharmaco-kinetics and biotransformation of florfenicol (FFC) in rabbits. Six rabbits (3.0 ± 0.08 kg body weight (bw)) were distributed through a crossover design with 4 weeks of washout period. Pairs of rabbits similar in bw and sex were assigned to experimental groups: Group 1 (LPS) was treated with three intravenous doses of 1 μg/kg bw of E. coli LPS at intervals of 6 h, and Group 2 (control) was treated with an equivalent volume of saline solution (SS) at the same intervals and frequency of Group 1. At 24 h after the first injection of LPS or SS, an intravenous bolus of 20 mg/kg bw of FFC was administered. Blood samples were collected from the auricular vein before drug administration and at different times between 0.05 and 24.0 h after treatment. FFC and florfenicol-amine (FFC-a) were extracted from the plasma, and their concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. A noncompartmental pharmacokinetic model was used for data analysis, and data were compared using the paired Student t-test. The mean values of AUC0-∞ in the endotoxaemic rabbits (26.3 ± 2.7 μg·h/mL) were significantly higher (P CLT ) decreased from 1228 ± 107.5 mL·h/kg in the control group to 806.4 ± 91.4 mL·h/kg in the LPS-treated rabbits. A significant increase (P CLT of the drug. As a consequence of the APR induced by LPS, there was a reduction in the metabolic conversion of FFC to their metabolite FFC-a in the liver, suggesting that the mediators released during the APR induced significant inhibitory effects on the hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes. PMID:26010096

  18. Acute fatal metabolic complications in alkaptonuria.

    Davison, A S; Milan, A M; Gallagher, J A; Ranganath, L R

    2016-03-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder of tyrosine metabolism that results from a defect in an enzyme called homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. The result of this is that homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates in the body. HGA is central to the pathophysiology of this disease and the consequences observed; these include spondyloarthropathy, rupture of ligaments/muscle/tendons, valvular heart disease including aortic stenosis and renal stones. While AKU is considered to be a chronic progressive disorder, it is clear from published case reports that fatal acute metabolic complications can also occur. These include oxidative haemolysis and methaemoglobinaemia. The exact mechanisms underlying the latter are not clear, but it is proposed that disordered metabolism within the red blood cell is responsible for favouring a pro-oxidant environment that leads to the life threatening complications observed. Herein the role of red blood cell in maintaining the redox state of the body is reviewed in the context of AKU. In addition previously reported therapeutic strategies are discussed, specifically with respect to why reported treatments had little therapeutic effect. The potential use of nitisinone for the management of patients suffering from the acute metabolic decompensation in AKU is proposed as an alternative strategy. PMID:26596578

  19. Does Amifostine Reduce Metabolic Rate? Effect of the Drug on Gas Exchange and Acute Ventilatory Hypoxic Response in Humans

    Jaideep J. Pandit; Caroline Allen; Evelyn Little; Federico Formenti; Harris, Adrian L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange) over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg) of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. ...

  20. The metabolic responses induced by acute dexamethasone predict glucose tolerance and insulin secretion over 10 years in relatives of type 2 diabetic subjects

    Durck, Tina Trier; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Egede, Mette Brogaard;

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the metabolic and insulin secretory responses to dexamethasone with the metabolic responses observed at 10 years in normoglycaemic relatives of type 2 diabetic and healthy control subjects.......This study aimed to compare the metabolic and insulin secretory responses to dexamethasone with the metabolic responses observed at 10 years in normoglycaemic relatives of type 2 diabetic and healthy control subjects....

  1. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia.

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Dzal, Yvonne A; Milsom, William K

    2015-02-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O₂ for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O₂ min(-1) kg(-1), and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min(-1) kg(-1), respectively; p tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR. PMID:25520355

  2. Effects of Acute Endurance Exercise Performed in the Morning and Evening on Inflammatory Cytokine and Metabolic Hormone Responses.

    Hyeon-Ki Kim

    Full Text Available To compare the effects of endurance exercise performed in the morning and evening on inflammatory cytokine responses in young men.Fourteen healthy male participants aged 24.3 ± 0.8 years (mean ± standard error performed endurance exercise in the morning (0900-1000 h on one day and then in the evening (1700-1800 h on another day with an interval of at least 1 week between each trial. In both the morning and evening trials, the participants walked for 60 minutes at approximately 60% of the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max on a treadmill. Blood samples were collected to determine hormones and inflammatory cytokines at pre-exercise, immediately post exercise, and 2 h post exercise.Plasma interleukin (IL-6 and adrenaline concentrations were significantly higher immediately after exercise in the evening trial than in the morning trial (P < 0.01, both. Serum free fatty acids concentrations were significantly higher in the evening trial than in the morning trial at 2 h after exercise (P < 0.05. Furthermore, a significant correlation was observed between the levels of IL-6 immediately post-exercise and free fatty acids 2 h post-exercise in the evening (r = 0.68, P < 0.01.These findings suggest that the effect of acute endurance exercise in the evening enhances the plasma IL-6 and adrenaline concentrations compared to that in the morning. In addition, IL-6 was involved in increasing free fatty acids, suggesting that the evening is more effective for exercise-induced lipolysis compared with the morning.

  3. Reduced cortisol and metabolic responses of thin ewes to an acute cold challenge in mid-pregnancy: implications for animal physiology and welfare.

    Else Verbeek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low food availability leading to reductions in Body Condition Score (BCS; 0 indicates emaciation and 5 obesity in sheep often coincides with low temperatures associated with the onset of winter in New Zealand. The ability to adapt to reductions in environmental temperature may be impaired in animals with low BCS, in particular during pregnancy when metabolic demand is higher. Here we assess whether BCS affects a pregnant animal's ability to cope with cold challenges. METHODS: Eighteen pregnant ewes with a BCS of 2.7±0.1 were fed to attain low (LBC: BCS2.3±0.1, medium (MBC: BCS3.2±0.2 or high BCS (HBC: BCS3.6±0.2. Shorn ewes were exposed to a 6-h acute cold challenge in a climate-controlled room (wet and windy conditions, 4.4±0.1°C in mid-pregnancy. Blood samples were collected during the BCS change phase, acute cold challenge and recovery phase. RESULTS: During the BCS change phase, plasma glucose and leptin concentrations declined while free fatty acids (FFA increased in LBC compared to MBC (P<0.01, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively and HBC ewes (P<0.05, P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively. During the cold challenge, plasma cortisol concentrations were lower in LBC than MBC (P<0.05 and HBC ewes (P<0.05, and FFA and insulin concentrations were lower in LBC than HBC ewes (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively. Leptin concentrations declined in MBC and HBC ewes while remaining unchanged in LBC ewes (P<0.01. Glucose concentrations and internal body temperature (T(core increased in all treatments, although peak T(core tended to be higher in HBC ewes (P<0.1. During the recovery phase, T4 concentrations were lower in LBC ewes (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Even though all ewes were able to increase T(core and mobilize glucose, low BCS animals had considerably reduced cortisol and metabolic responses to a cold challenge in mid-pregnancy, suggesting that their ability to adapt to cold challenges through some of the expected pathways was reduced.

  4. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  5. Glucagon: acute actions on hepatic metabolism.

    Miller, Russell A; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the result of impaired systemic control of glucose homeostasis, in part through the dysregulation of the hormone glucagon. Glucagon acts on the liver to increase glucose production through alterations in hepatic metabolism, and reducing the elevated glucagon signalling in diabetic patients is an attractive strategy for the treatment of hyperglycaemia. Here we review the actions of the hormone in the liver, focusing on the acute alterations of metabolic pathways. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Novel data on glucagon' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Mona Abraham and Tony Lam, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3950-3 , and by Young Lee and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3965-9 ) and an overview by the Session Chair, Isabel Valverde (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3946-z ). PMID:27115415

  6. INFLAMMATION AND ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE

    Farah Aziz Khan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infection takes place by the cooperative cascade of cytokines and leukocytes. Tumor necrosis factor, interlukin-1, and interlukin-6 play important roles as proinflammatory cytokines to mediate local inflammation and activate other inflammatory cells e.g. neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. At least 15 different low molecular weight cytokine are secreted by activated leukocytes and are responsible for triggering acute phase response in the form of fever, leukocytosis, increased secretion of adreno corticotropic hormones, and production of acute phase proteins. Acute phase proteins are produced in liver under the influence of cytokines, which through blood stream passes to the site of inflammation and kill the pathogens by opsonization and activating complement pathways. The changes in the concentrations of positive acute-phase proteins and negative acute-phase proteins are due to the changes in their production by liver. Three of the best known acute phase proteins are C-reactive protein, serum anyloid A, and haptoglobin. Some disease states are casually related to acute phase proteins. C-reactive protein mediated compliment activation has a key role in some forms of tissue alteration such as cardiac infarction. Elevated S amyloid A levels are seen in chronic arthritis and tuberculosis. Other acute phase proteins show more moderate rise, usually less than fivefold.

  7. Hepatic transcriptomic and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops) to acute and chronic hypoxic insult.

    Beck, Benjamin H; Fuller, S Adam; Li, Chao; Green, Bartholomew W; Zhao, Honggang; Rawles, Steven D; Webster, Carl D; Peatman, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis), white bass (Morone chrysops), and their hybrid are an important group of fish prized for recreational angling in the United States, and there and abroad as a high-value farmed fish. Regardless of habitat, it is not uncommon for fish of the genus Morone to encounter and cope with conditions of scarce oxygen availability. Previously, we determined that hybrid striped bass reared under conditions of chronic hypoxia exhibited reduced feed intake, lower lipid and nutrient retention, and poor growth. To better understand the molecular mechanisms governing these phenotypes, in the present study, we examined the transcriptomic profiles of hepatic tissue in hybrid striped bass exposed to chronic hypoxia (90days at 25% oxygen saturation) and acute hypoxia (6h at 25% oxygen saturation). Using high-throughput RNA-seq, we found that over 1400 genes were differentially expressed under disparate oxygen conditions, with the vast majority of transcriptional changes occurring in the acute hypoxia treatment. Gene pathway and bioenergetics analyses revealed hypoxia-mediated perturbation of genes and gene networks related to lipid metabolism, cell death, and changes in hepatic mitochondrial content and cellular respiration. This study offers a more comprehensive view of the temporal and tissue-specific transcriptional changes that occur during hypoxia, and reveals new and shared mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance in teleosts. PMID:26851735

  8. INFLAMMATION AND ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE

    Farah Aziz Khan; Mohd Fareed Khan

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infection takes place by the cooperative cascade of cytokines and leukocytes. Tumor necrosis factor, interlukin-1, and interlukin-6 play important roles as proinflammatory cytokines to mediate local inflammation and activate other inflammatory cells e.g. neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. At least 15 different low molecular weight cytokine are secreted by activated leukocytes and are responsible for triggering acute phase response in the form of fever, leukocytosi...

  9. Cytokines and the hepatic acute phase response

    Moshage, H

    1997-01-01

    The acute phase response is an orchestrated response to tissue injury, infection or inflammation. A prominent feature of this response is the induction of acute phase proteins, which are involved in the restoration of homeostasis. Cytokines are important mediators of the acute phase response. Uncont

  10. REPEATED ACUTE STRESS INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM IN RAT

    Nirupama R.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute stress induced alterations in the activity levels of rate limiting enzymes and concentration of intermediates of different pathways of carbohydrate metabolism have been studied. Adult male Wistar rats were restrained (RS for 1 h and after an interval of 4 h they were subjected to forced swimming (FS exercise and appropriate controls were maintained. Five rats were killed before the commencement of the experiment (initial controls, 5 control and equal number of stressed rats were killed 2 h after RS and remaining 5 rats in each group were killed 4 h after FS. There was a significant increase in the adrenal 3β- hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity following RS, which showed further increase after FS compared to controls and thereby indicated stress response of rats. There was a significant increase in the blood glucose levels following RS which showed further increase and reached hyperglycemic condition after FS. The hyperglycemic condition due to stress was accompanied by significant increases in the activities of glutamate- pyruvate transaminase, glutamate- oxaloacetate transaminase, glucose -6- phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase and significant decrease in the glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities, whereas pyruvate kinase activity did not show any alteration compared to controls. Further, the glycogen and total protein contents of the liver were decreased whereas those of pyruvate and lactate showed significant increase compared to controls after RS as well as FS.The results put together indicate that acute stress induced hyperglycemia results due to increased gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis without alteration in glycolysis. The study first time reveals that after first acute stress exposure, the subsequent stressful experience augments metabolic stress response leading to hyperglycemia. The results have relevance to human health as human beings are exposed to several stressors in a day and

  11. Acute Isoniazid Intoxication: Convulsion, Rhabdomyolysis and Metabolic Acidosis

    OKUTUR, Sadi Kerem

    2006-01-01

    Isoniazid is one of the most commonly used antituberculous drugs. Acute intoxication is characterized by repetitious convulsions, high anion gap metabolic acidosis and coma. The basis of therapy consists of parenteral pyridoxine administration in a dose equivalent to that of isoniazid ingested. Here we present a case of acute isoniazid intoxication presenting with convulsions and metabolic acidosis with consequent rhabdomyolysis and discuss the clinical signs and pathophysiology of isoniazid ...

  12. Metabolic fingerprinting to understand therapeutic effects and mechanisms of silybin on acute liver damage in rat

    Qun Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic fingerprinting is a rapid and noninvasive analysis, representing a powerful approach for the characterization of phenotypes and the distinction of specific metabolic states due to environmental alterations. It has become a valuable analytical approach for the characterization of phenotypes and is the rapidly evolving field of the comprehensive measurement of ideally all endogenous metabolites in bio-samples. Silybin has displayed bright prospects in the prevention and therapy of liver injury, and we had conducted a preliminary exploration on the molecular mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of silybin. Because the knowledge on the metabolic responses of an acute liver damage rat to the silybin is still scarce, metabolic fi ngerprinting can provide relevant information on the intrinsic metabolic adjustments. Materials and Methods: Here, the physiological and metabolic changes in the acute liver damage rat were investigated by performing a metabolic analysis. The phenotypic response was assessed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS combined with pattern recognition approaches such as principal components analysis and partial least squares projection to supervised latent structures and discriminant analysis. Multivariate analysis of the data showed trends in scores plots that were related to the concentration of the silybin. Results: Results indicate 10 ions (7 upregulated and 3 downregulated as differentiating metabolites. Key observations include perturbations of metabolic pathways linked to glutathione metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, cysteine and methionine metabolism, etc., Overall, this investigation illustrates the power of the LC/MS combined with the pattern recognition methods that can engender new insights into silybin affecting on metabolism pathways of an acute liver damage rat. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that the combination of metabolic fi ngerprinting with appropriate

  13. Acute Phase Response in Animals: A Review

    Cray, Carolyn; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2009-01-01

    The acute phase response is a complex systemic early-defense system activated by trauma, infection, stress, neoplasia, and inflammation. Although nonspecific, it serves as a core of the innate immune response involving physical and molecular barriers and responses that serve to prevent infection, clear potential pathogens, initiate inflammatory processes, and contribute to resolution and the healing process. Acute phase proteins, an integral part of the acute phase response, have been a focus...

  14. Acute metabolic decompensation due to influenza in a mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    Peter J. McGuire

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The urea cycle functions to incorporate ammonia, generated by normal metabolism, into urea. Urea cycle disorders (UCDs are caused by loss of function in any of the enzymes responsible for ureagenesis, and are characterized by life-threatening episodes of acute metabolic decompensation with hyperammonemia (HA. A prospective analysis of interim HA events in a cohort of individuals with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC deficiency, the most common UCD, revealed that intercurrent infection was the most common precipitant of acute HA and was associated with markers of increased morbidity when compared with other precipitants. To further understand these clinical observations, we developed a model system of metabolic decompensation with HA triggered by viral infection (PR8 influenza using spf-ash mice, a model of OTC deficiency. Both wild-type (WT and spf-ash mice displayed similar cytokine profiles and lung viral titers in response to PR8 influenza infection. During infection, spf-ash mice displayed an increase in liver transaminases, suggesting a hepatic sensitivity to the inflammatory response and an altered hepatic immune response. Despite having no visible pathological changes by histology, WT and spf-ash mice had reduced CPS1 and OTC enzyme activities, and, unlike WT, spf-ash mice failed to increase ureagenesis. Depression of urea cycle function was seen in liver amino acid analysis, with reductions seen in aspartate, ornithine and arginine during infection. In conclusion, we developed a model system of acute metabolic decompensation due to infection in a mouse model of a UCD. In addition, we have identified metabolic perturbations during infection in the spf-ash mice, including a reduction of urea cycle intermediates. This model of acute metabolic decompensation with HA due to infection in UCD serves as a platform for exploring biochemical perturbations and the efficacy of treatments, and could be adapted to explore acute decompensation in other

  15. Metabolic responses to hypoglycemia in juvenile diabetics

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T;

    1980-01-01

    Glucagon and metabolic responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were studied in seven juvenile diabetics, age 31 +/- 2 years (mean and S.E.M.), duration of diabetes 17 +/- 3 years, with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (decreased beat-to-beat variation in heart rate during hyperventilation and...... both patient groups. Metabolic responses to hypoglycemia were also similar in the two patient groups. In conclusion, diabetic autonomic neuropathy has no effect on glucagon and metabolic responses to hypoglycemia in juvenile, insulin-treated diabetics....

  16. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob;

    2016-01-01

    imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N......-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.......058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration...

  17. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration. PMID:26924539

  18. Acute Metabolic Changes Associated With Analgesic Drugs

    Hansen, Tine Maria; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Simonsen, Carsten Wiberg;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is used to measure brain metabolites. Limited data exist on the analgesic-induced spectroscopy response. This was an explorative study with the aims to investigate the central effects of two analgesic drugs, an opioid and a selective...

  19. Acute phase protein response during acute ruminal acidosis in cattle

    Danscher, A. M.; Thoefner, M. B.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the acute phase protein and leukocyte responses in dairy heifers during acute, oligofructose-induced ruminal acidosis. The study included 2 trials involving oral oligofructose overload (17g/kg BW) to nonpregnant Danish Holstein heifers. Trial 1 included 12...... performed.Heifers receiving oligofructose developed a profound ruminal and systemic acidosis (in Trial 1 and 2 lowest ruminal pH was 4.3±0.2 and 3.8±0.02, respectively, and minimum SBE was −9.3±4.1 and −8.9±2.8, respectively). In Trial 1, SAA concentrations were higher than baseline concentrations on all...... than control heifers at 18 and 24h after overload (max. 13.7±4.3 billions/L). Feeding had no effect on plasma fibrinogen concentrations or WBC in Trial 1.Acute ruminal and systemic acidosis caused by oligofructose overload resulted in distinct acute phase protein and leukocyte responses in dairy...

  20. Fetal and maternal metabolic responses to exercise during pregnancy.

    Mottola, Michelle F; Artal, Raul

    2016-03-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by physiological, endocrine and metabolic adaptations creating a pseudo-diabetogenic state of progressive insulin resistance. These adaptations occur to sustain continuous fetal requirements for nutrients and oxygen. Insulin resistance develops at the level of the skeletal muscle, and maternal exercise, especially activity involving large muscle groups improve glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. We discuss the maternal hormonal and metabolic changes associated with a normal pregnancy, the metabolic dysregulation that may occur leading to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and the consequences to mother and fetus. We will then examine the acute and chronic (training) responses to exercise in the non-pregnant state and relate these alterations to maternal exercise in a low-risk pregnancy, how exercise can be used to regulate glucose tolerance in women at risk for or diagnosed with GDM. Lastly, we present key exercise guidelines to help maintain maternal glucose regulation and suggest future research directions. PMID:26803360

  1. [Metabolic response to trauma and stress].

    Omerbegović, Meldijana; Durić, Amira; Muratović, Nusreta; Mulalić, Lejla; Hamzanija, Emina

    2003-01-01

    Trauma, surgery, burns and infection are accompanied with catabolic response which is characterized by enhanced protelysis, enhanced excretion of nitrogen, neoglucogenesis and resistance of peripheral tissues to insulin. This catabolic response is mediated through neural pathways and neuroendocrine axis. The purpose of this response is restoration of adequate perfusion and oxygenation and releasing of energy and substrates for the tissues, organs and systems which functions are essential for the survival. Metabolic response to injury and severe infection leads to decomposition of skeletal muscle proteins to amino acids, intensive liver gluconcogenesis from lactate, glycerol and alanin with enhanced oxidation of aminoacids. These substrates are necessary for synthesis of various mediators of protein or lipid nature, which are important for the defense and tissue regeneration. The changes result in negative balance of nitrogen, loss of body weight, and lower plasma concentration of all aminoacids. Patients who were unable to develop this hypercatabolic response have poor prognosis, and the patients with hypercatabolic response rapidly lose their body cell mass and without metabolic and nutritive support have more complications and higher mortality. Although neoglucogenesis, proteolysis and lipolysis are resistant to exogenous nutrients, metabolic support in critical illness improves the chances for survival until the healing of the disease. Casual therapy in such conditions is elimination of "stressors" which maintain abnormal endocrine and metabolic response. Adequate oxygenation, hemostasis, infection control and control of extracellular compartment expansion and low flows, are essential for the efficacy of nutritive support and that is the only way to convalescence and wound healing. PMID:15017867

  2. Acute neuromuscular responses to car racing

    Backman, Jani

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine racing car drivers’ acute neuromuscular responses to race driving. The secondary purpose was to compare the cardiovascular loading of driving to that of maximal rowing action. Methods: The subjects of the present cross-sectional study (n = 9) were international level karting drivers. The study was performed in two parts; the laboratory tests and driving test. All subjects took part to the laboratory tests and five of the subjects per...

  3. Systemic inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction

    Lu FANG; Xiao-Lei Moore; Anthony M Dart; Le-Min WANG

    2015-01-01

    Acute cardiomyocyte necrosis in the infarcted heart generates damage-associated molecular patterns, activating complement and toll-like receptor/interleukin-1 signaling, and triggering an intense inflammatory response. Inflammasomes also recognize danger signals and mediate sterile inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Inflammatory response serves to repair the heart, but excessive inflammation leads to adverse left ventricular remodeling and heart failure. In addition to local inflammation, profound systemic inflammation response has been documented in patients with AMI, which includes elevation of circulating inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cell adhesion molecules, and activation of peripheral leukocytes and platelets. The excessive inflammatory response could be caused by a deregulated immune system. AMI is also associated with bone marrow activation and spleen monocytopoiesis, which sustains a continuous supply of monocytes at the site of inflammation. Accumulating evidence has shown that systemic inflammation aggravates atherosclerosis and markers for systemic inflammation are predictors of adverse clinical outcomes (such as death, recurrent myocardial in-farction, and heart failure) in patients with AMI.

  4. Fluid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis in acute response stage

    MAO En-qiang; TANG Yao-qing; FEI Jian; QIN Shuai; WU Jun; LI Lei; MIN Dong; ZHANG Sheng-dao

    2009-01-01

    Background Fluid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) should not only resolve deficiency of blood volume, but also prevent fluid sequestration in acute response stage. Up to date, there has not a strategy for fluid therapy dedicated to SAP. So, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of fluid therapy treatment on prognosis of SAP. Methods Seventy-six patients were admitted prospectively according to the criteria within 72 hours of SAP onset. They were randomly assigned to a rapid fluid expansion group (Group I, n=36) and a controlled fluid expansion group (Group Ⅱ, n=40). Hemodynamic disorders were either quickly (fluid infusion rate was 10-15 ml·kg-1·h-1, Group Ⅰ) or gradually improved (fluid infusion rate was 5-10 ml·kg-1·h-1, Group Ⅱ) through controlling the rate of fluid infusion. Parameters of fluid expansion, blood lactate concentration were obtained when meeting the criteria for fluid expansion. And APACHE Ⅱ scores were obtained serially for 72 hours. Rate of mechanical ventilation, incidence of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), sepsis, and survival rate were obtained. Results The two groups had statistically different (P 0.05). Total amount of fluid sequestration within 4 days was higher in Group Ⅰ ((5378±2751)ml) than in Group Ⅱ ((4215±1998)ml, P<0.05). APACHE Ⅱ scores were higher in Group Ⅰ on days 1,2, and 3 (P<0.05). Rate of mechanical ventilation was higher in group Ⅰ (94.4%) than in group Ⅱ (65%, P<0.05). The incidences of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and sepsis were significantly lower in Group Ⅱ (P <0.05). Survival rate was remarkably lower in Group Ⅰ (69.4%) than in Group Ⅱ (90%, P <0.05). Conclusions Controlled fluid resuscitation offers better prognosis in patients with severe volume deficit within 72 hours of SAP onset.

  5. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise

    Catoire, Milène; Alex, Sheril; Paraskevopulos, Nicolas; Mattijssen, Frits; Evers-van Gogh, Inkie; Schaart, Gert; Jeppesen, Jacob; Kneppers, Anita; Mensink, Marco; Voshol, Peter J.; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Tan, Nguan Soon; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.; Berbée, Jimmy F.; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise causes profound changes in energy metabolism in humans. In this study we show that resting skeletal muscle has a crucial role in the metabolic response to acute exercise. During endurance exercise, selective induction of the protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) in nonexercising muscle reduces local fatty acid uptake, presumably to prevent fat overload, while directing fatty acids to the active skeletal muscle as fuel. Our data thus suggest that nonexercising muscle has a ke...

  6. Renal response to acute acid loading--an organ physiological approach

    Osther, P J; Engel, K; Kildeberg, P

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In previous studies of the renal response to acute NH4Cl acidosis no correlation was found between systemic acid-base status and the traditionally used quantity, renal net acid excretion (NAE). If NAE is to be considered a physiologically meaningful quantity then this is surprising, as......-base metabolism during acid loading than previously described methods....

  7. Acute leptin deficiency, leptin resistance, and the physiologic response to leptin withdrawal

    Montez, Jason M.; Soukas, Alex; Asilmaz, Esra; Fayzikhodjaeva, Gulnorakhon; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2005-01-01

    Food restriction and weight loss result in reduced plasma leptin, which is associated with a pleiotropic biologic response. However, because weight loss itself is also associated with changes in numerous other humoral and metabolic signals, it can be difficult to determine the precise features of the biologic response to acute leptin deficiency. To study this response in the absence of changes in nutritional state, we have developed a protocol that allows such analysis in normal, non-food-res...

  8. [Markers of metabolic syndrome and peptides regulating metabolism in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Skoczeń, Szymon; Tomasik, Przemysław; Balwierz, Walentyna; Surmiak, Marcin; Sztefko, Krystyna; Galicka-Latała, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Along with the growing epidemic of overweight the risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality are increasing markedly. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a condition clustering together several risk factors of those complications such as visceral obesity, glucose intolerance, arterial hypertension and dislipidemia. The risk of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors is higher than in general population. We aimed to assess (1) the relationships between chosen adipokines and neuropeptides, chemotherapy, CRT, and body fatness and (2) evaluate adipokines and neuropeptides concentrations as a new markers of MS in children. We conducted cross-sectional evaluation of 82 ALL survivors (median age: 13.2 years; range: 4,8-26,2; median time from treatment: 3.2 years), including fasting laboratory testing: peptides (leptin, GLP-1, orexin, PYY, apelin), total cholesterol and its fractions, triglycerides; anthropometric measurements (weight, height), systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We estimated percentiles of body mass index and percentiles of blood pressure. Between 82 survivors overweight and diastolic hypertension was diagnosed in 31% of patients (35% in CRT group) and 15% respectively. At least one abnormality in lipids concentrations was found in 43%. Girls were more affected than boys. Statistically significant increased in leptin and apelin concentrations and decreased in soluble leptin receptor concentrations in the overweight group were observed compared to the non overweight subjects. Significant increase in orexin levels in females who had received CRT compared to those who had not received CRT was found. CRT is the main risk factor of elevated of body mass among survivors of childhood leukemia. Dyslipidemia and hypertension, along with increased adiposity indicate higher risk of MS development. Girls are more affected than boys. Leptin, orexin and apelin seem to be good markers of increased adiposity especially after CRT

  9. Acute toxicity and effect of some petroleum hydrocarbon on the metabolic index in Etroplus suratensis

    Ansari, Z.A.; Farshchi, P.

    Acute toxicity (LC sub(50)) and effect of some petroleum hydrocarbons (Toluene, Quinoline, Pyridine and Naphthalene) on the metabolic index (oxygen consumption rate) of an estuarine fish. Etroplus suratensis is reported. The LC sub(50) values were...

  10. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats#

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats ...

  11. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces peripheral metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for ozone-induced systemic metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wis...

  12. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization

    Joanna Żur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability.

  13. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization.

    Żur, Joanna; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Guzik, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability. PMID:27455220

  14. Investigation into the acute effects of total and partial energy restriction on postprandial metabolism among overweight/obese participants.

    Antoni, Rona; Johnston, Kelly L; Collins, Adam L; Robertson, M Denise

    2016-03-28

    The intermittent energy restriction (IER) approach to weight loss involves short periods of substantial (75-100 %) energy restriction (ER) interspersed with normal eating. This study aimed to characterise the early metabolic response to these varying degrees of ER, which occurs acutely and prior to weight loss. Ten (three female) healthy, overweight/obese participants (36 (SEM 5) years; 29·0 (sem 1·1) kg/m2) took part in this acute three-way cross-over study. Participants completed three 1-d dietary interventions in a randomised order with a 1-week washout period: isoenergetic intake, partial 75 % ER and total 100 % ER. Fasting and postprandial (6-h) metabolic responses to a liquid test meal were assessed the following morning via serial blood sampling and indirect calorimetry. Food intake was also recorded for two subsequent days of ad libitum intake. Relative to the isoenergetic control, postprandial glucose responses were increased following total ER (+142 %; P=0·015) and to a lesser extent after partial ER (+76 %; P=0·051). There was also a delay in the glucose time to peak after total ER only (P=0·024). Both total and partial ER interventions produced comparable reductions in postprandial TAG responses (-75 and -59 %, respectively; both P<0·05) and 3-d energy intake deficits of approximately 30 % (both P=0·015). Resting and meal-induced thermogenesis were not significantly affected by either ER intervention. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the ability of substantial ER to acutely alter postprandial glucose-lipid metabolism (with partial ER producing the more favourable overall response), as well as incomplete energy-intake compensation amongst overweight/obese participants. Further investigations are required to establish how metabolism adapts over time to the repeated perturbations experienced during IER, as well as the implications for long-term health. PMID:26819200

  15. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-04-15

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (pextraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain's response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine's effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  16. Comparison of the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on metabolic features in rats

    Fatemeh ROSTAMKHANI; Homeira ZARDOOZ; Saleh ZAHEDIASL; Babak FARROKHI

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to compare the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on metabolic factors.Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into control and stressed groups.Stress was applied by a communication box acutely (1 d) and chronically (15 and 30 d).Blood sampling was carried out by retro-orbital-puncture method.The plasma levels of glucose,cholesterol,triglyceride,insulin,and corticosterone were measured.In addition,feed and water intake,latency to eat and drink,adrenal and body weights were determined.Acute and chronic psychological stress did not significantly change basal plasma corticosterone levels.However,immediately (1 min) after acute exposure to stress,plasma corticosterone level increased compared to that before stress exposure.Acute stress increased plasma insulin levels significantly.Fifteen days of stress exposure resulted in plasma glucose increase.Chronic stress significantly increased feed intake,latency to eat,and adrenal weight compared to acute stress.The body weights of both control and stressed groups increased markedly during the experiment.Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index did not change significantly in the stressed group.In conclusion,application of acute and chronic psychological stress leads to different metabolic and/or behavioral changes but the metabolic changes resulting from acute exposure to stress seem to be more pronounced.

  17. Effect of acute acid loading on acid-base and calcium metabolism

    Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acid-base and calcium metabolic responses to acute non-carbonic acid loading in idiopathic calcium stone-formers and healthy males using a quantitative organ physiological approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five-h ammonium chloride loading studies were performed in 12...... male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone-formers and 12 matched healthy men using a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Arterialized capillary blood, serum and urine were collected hourly for measurement of electrolytes, ionized calcium, magnesium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and acid-base...... status. Concentrations of non-metabolizable base (NB) and acid (NA) were calculated from measured concentrations of non-metabolizable ions. RESULTS: The extracellular acid-base status in the stone-formers during basal conditions and acid loading was comparable to the levels in the healthy controls...

  18. The porcine acute phase protein response to acute clinical and subclinical experimental infection with Streptococcus suis

    Sørensen, Nanna Skall; Tegtmeier, C.; Andresen, Lars Ole;

    2006-01-01

    The pig acute phase protein (APP) response to experimental Streptococcus suis (S. suis) infection was mapped by the measurement of the positive APPs C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and major acute phase protein (pig-MAP) and the negative APPs albumin and apolipop......The pig acute phase protein (APP) response to experimental Streptococcus suis (S. suis) infection was mapped by the measurement of the positive APPs C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and major acute phase protein (pig-MAP) and the negative APPs albumin and...

  19. Abnormal glucose metabolism in acute myocardial infarction: influence on left ventricular function and prognosis

    Høfsten, Dan E; Løgstrup, Brian B; Møller, Jacob E;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the influence of abnormal glucose metabolism on left ventricular (LV) function and prognosis in 203 patients with acute myocardial infarction. BACKGROUND: Abnormal glucose metabolism is associated with increased mortality after acute myocardial infarction. This appears to be...... particularly attributable to an increased incidence of post-infarction congestive heart failure. A relationship between glucose metabolism and LV function could potentially explain this excess mortality. METHODS: In patients without known diabetes, glucose metabolism was determined using an oral glucose...... atrial volume index) and by measuring plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels. RESULTS: After adjustment for age and gender, a linear relationship between the degree of abnormal glucose metabolism was observed for each marker of LV dysfunction (p(trend) < 0.05) with the exception of left...

  20. Acute Modulation of Sugar Transport in Brain Capillary Endothelial Cell Cultures during Activation of the Metabolic Stress Pathway*

    Cura, Anthony J.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    GLUT1-catalyzed equilibrative sugar transport across the mammalian blood-brain barrier is stimulated during acute and chronic metabolic stress; however, the mechanism of acute transport regulation is unknown. We have examined acute sugar transport regulation in the murine brain microvasculature endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Acute cellular metabolic stress was induced by glucose depletion, by potassium cyanide, or by carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, which reduce or deplete i...

  1. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Chun-Chia Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted that autodigestion and activated leukocytes play important roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Proinflammatory cytokines are associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure syndrome in acute pancreatitis. A compensatory anti-inflammatory response occurs in parallel with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Trypsin secreted by the pancreatic acinar cells activates proteaseactivated receptor-2 which can result in the production of cytokines. Protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, gabexate mesilate, nafamostat mesilate, ulinastatin, etc. can inhibit the various enzymes and inflammatory response in experimental and clinical studies. Thus, protease inhibitors have been considered as a potential treatment to inhibit the pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis. The beneficial effects of antiproteases on experimental severe acute pancreatitis may be, in part, due to the modulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. The effect of protease inhibitors on the inflammatory response in human acute pancreatitis deserves further study.

  2. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects Are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats.

    Miller, Desinia B; Snow, Samantha J; Schladweiler, Mette C; Richards, Judy E; Ghio, Andrew J; Ledbetter, Allen D; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2016-04-01

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats underwent bilateral adrenal demedullation (DEMED), total bilateral adrenalectomy (ADREX), or sham surgery (SHAM). After a 4 day recovery, rats were exposed to air or ozone (1 ppm), 4 h/day for 1 or 2 days and responses assessed immediately postexposure. Circulating adrenaline levels dropped to nearly zero in DEMED and ADREX rats relative to SHAM. Corticosterone tended to be low in DEMED rats and dropped to nearly zero in ADREX rats. Adrenalectomy in air-exposed rats caused modest changes in metabolites and lung toxicity parameters. Ozone-induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance were markedly attenuated in DEMED rats with nearly complete reversal in ADREX rats. Ozone increased circulating epinephrine and corticosterone in SHAM but not in DEMED or ADREX rats. Free fatty acids (P = .15) and branched-chain amino acids increased after ozone exposure in SHAM but not in DEMED or ADREX rats. Lung minute volume was not affected by surgery or ozone but ozone-induced labored breathing was less pronounced in ADREX rats. Ozone-induced increases in lung protein leakage and neutrophilic inflammation were markedly reduced in DEMED and ADREX rats (ADREX > DEMED). Ozone-mediated decreases in circulating white blood cells in SHAM were not observed in DEMED and ADREX rats. We demonstrate that ozone-induced peripheral metabolic effects and lung injury/inflammation are mediated through adrenal-derived stress hormones likely via the activation of stress response pathway. PMID:26732886

  3. The porcine acute phase protein response to acute clinical and subclinical experimental infection with Streptococcus suis

    Sørensen, Nanna Skall; Tegtmeier, C.; Andresen, Lars Ole; Pineiro, M.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Campbell, F.M.; Lampreave, F.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    The pig acute phase protein (APP) response to experimental Streptococcus suis (S. suis) infection was mapped by the measurement of the positive APPs C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and major acute phase protein (pig-MAP) and the negative APPs albumin and apolipop...

  4. Acute cardiovascular responses while playing virtual games simulated by Nintendo Wii®

    Rodrigues, Gusthavo Augusto Alves; Felipe, Danilo De Souza; Silva, Elisangela; De Freitas, Wagner Zeferino; Higino, Wonder Passoni; Da Silva, Fabiano Fernandes; Carvalho, Wellington Roberto Gomes; Aparecido de Souza, Renato

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the acute cardiovascular responses that occur while playing virtual games (aerobic and balance) emulated by Nintendo Wii®. [Subjects] Nineteen healthy male volunteers were recruited. [Methods] The ergospirometric variables of maximum oxygen consumption, metabolic equivalents, and heart rate were obtained during the aerobic (Obstacle Course, Hula Hoop, and Free Run) and balance (Soccer Heading, Penguin Slide, and Table Tilt) games of Wii Fit Plus® softwar...

  5. Single and combined effects of acute and chronic non-thermal stressors on rat interscapular brown adipose tissue metabolic activity

    Cvijić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether the thermogenic potential of rat interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT changes in response to acute and/or chronic exposure to non-thermal stressors (immobilization and isolation, by measuring the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1 content, MAO-A, SOD and CAT activities, as well as the number of IBAT sympathetic noradrenaline-containing nerve fibers. Both acute immobilization (2 h and chronic isolation (21 days, as well as their combined effects, significantly increased the IBAT UCP-1 content in comparison to non-stressed animals. When applied individually, stressors increased the number of sympathetic fibers in comparison to controls, whereas in combination they decreased it. The activity of IBAT monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A decreased under the influence of each stressor independent of its type or duration. SOD activity coincided with MAO-A decrement, whereas CAT activity had an opposite pattern of changes. We conclude that acute and chronic exposure to non-thermal stressors, immobilization and isolation, respectively, affect the metabolic potential of rat IBAT, judging by the increase in UCP-1 content and sympathetic outflow. However, when acute immobilization was applied as a novel stressor to previously chronically isolated animals, an increase in the UCP-1 content was accompanied by a lower IBAT sympathetic outflow, suggesting that IBAT metabolic function under various stress condition is not solely dependent on SNS activity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173023

  6. Cardiovascular and metabolic responses to tap water ingestion in young humans: does the water temperature matter?

    Girona, M.; Grasser, Erik Konrad; Abdul G Dulloo; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Drinking water induces short-term cardiovascular and metabolic changes. These effects are considered to be triggered by gastric distension and osmotic factors, but little is known about the influence of water temperature.Methods: We determined, in a randomized crossover study, the acute cardiovascular and metabolic responses to 500 mL of tap water at 3 °C (cold), 22 °C (room) and 37 °C (body) in 12 young humans to ascertain an effect of water temperature. We measured continuous beat-to-b...

  7. [18F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [18F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [18F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BMTOT). Active bone marrow (BMACT) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BMTOT. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V10, V20, V30, and V40, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BMTOT and BMACT were 27% and 38%, respectively. BMACT volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm3, respectively; P<.0001). BMACT V30 was significantly correlated with a reduction in BMACT SUV (R2, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BMACT SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R2, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R2, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BMTOT and BMACT correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BMTOT and BMACT that are exposed to even relatively low doses of radiation are associated with a decrease in WBC counts following CRT. The loss in

  8. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Elicin, Olgun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Callaway, Sharon [Velocity Medical Solutions, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Prior, John O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bourhis, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ozsahin, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmut.ozsahin@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G., E-mail: fernanda.herrera@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  9. Acute Brain Metabolic Effects of Cocaine in Rhesus Monkeys with a History of Cocaine Use

    Henry, Porche’Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin; Votaw, John R.; Howell, Leonard L.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N=6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of i.v. drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute i.m. cocaine-induced changes in brain metabol...

  10. Resistance to chemotherapy is associated with altered glucose metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia

    SONG, KUI; Li, Min; Xu, Xiaojun; Xuan, Li; HUANG, GUINIAN; Liu, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    Altered glucose metabolism has been described as a cause of chemoresistance in multiple tumor types. The present study aimed to identify the expression profile of glucose metabolism in drug-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and provide potential strategies for the treatment of drug-resistant AML. Bone marrow and serum samples were obtained from patients with AML that were newly diagnosed or had relapsed. The messenger RNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, glucose tra...

  11. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation

    Jan, Wajanat; Wang, Zhiyue J. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zimmerman, Robert A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, Gerard T.; Kaplan, Paige B.; Kaye, Edward M. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction. (orig.)

  12. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction. (orig.)

  13. Acute phase response in Wistar rats after controlled hemorrhage

    Stepanović Predrag; Maličević Ž.; Andrić N.; Nikolovski-Stefanović Zorica

    2011-01-01

    After injury the acute-phase response of the organism activates mechanisms which imply the release of cytokines, stress hormones, and mediators of pain and inflammation. The main function of the acutephase response is to hinder further damage of the injured tissue by activating reparative processes. The increase in the concentration of acute phase proteins and the concurrent decrease in albumins and prealbumins indicate that there is a strong link between t...

  14. Global cerebral blood flow and metabolism during acute hyperketonemia in the awake and anesthetized rat

    Linde, Rasmus; Hasselbalch, Steen G.; Topp, Simon; Paulson, Olaf B.; Madsen, Peter L.

    2006-01-01

    is not known. Alterations in several parameters may possibly explain the increase in CBF and the resetting of the relation between CBF and cerebral metabolism. To study this phenomenon further, we measured global CBF and global cerebral metabolism with the Kety-Schmidt technique in the wakeful rat...... before and during infusion of ketone bodies. During acute hyperketonemia (average concentration of beta-hydroxybutyrate: 6 mmol/L), global CBF increased 65% from 108 to 178 mL/100 g min and the cerebral metabolic rates for both oxygen and glucose remained constant. This resetting of the relation between...

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  16. Acute Glucose Response Properties Beyond Feeding.

    Burnett, C Joseph; Krashes, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Hypothalamic AgRP neurons potently coordinate feeding behavior to ensure an organism's viability. However, their acute role in glucose-regulatory function remains to be addressed. Steculorum et al. now report that activation of a specific set of AgRP neurons results in an impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in brown fat through a myogenic signature program. PMID:27052261

  17. Genetic and metabolic determinants of methotrexate-induced mucositis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    den Hoed, M. A. H.; Lopez-Lopez, E.; te Winkel, M. L.; Tissing, W.; de Rooij, J. D. E.; Gutierrez-Camino, A.; Garcia-Orad, A.; den Boer, E.; Pieters, R.; Pluijm, S. M. F.; de Jonge, R.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and toxic chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this prospective study, we aimed to identify metabolic and genetic determinants of MTX toxicity. One hundred and thirty-four Dutch pediatric ALL patients were treat

  18. Clopidogrel metabolism related gene polymorphisms in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome

    冯广迅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the single nucleotide polymorphisms of clopidogrel metabolism related genes(CYP2C19,ABCB1 and PON1) in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS) by genotype analysis. Methods Genetic analysis was performed in patients admitted to

  19. Acute exercise increases fibroblast growth factor 21 in metabolic organs and circulation.

    Tanimura, Yuko; Aoi, Wataru; Takanami, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Yukari; Mizushima, Katsura; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21, a metabolic regulator, plays roles in lipolysis and glucose uptake in adipose tissues and skeletal muscles. Its expression in skeletal muscle is upregulated upon activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, which is induced by exercise and muscle contraction. We examined the increase of fibroblast growth factor 21 after acute exercise in metabolic organs, especially skeletal muscles and circulation. Participants exercised on bicycle ergometers for 60 min at 75% of their V˙O2max. Venous blood samples were taken before exercise and immediately after exercise. In an animal study, male ICR mice were divided into sedentary and exercise groups. Mice in the exercise group performed treadmill exercises at 30 m min(-1) for 60 min. Shortly thereafter, blood, liver, and skeletal muscle samples were taken from mice. Acute exercise induced the increase of serum fibroblast growth factor 21 in both humans and mice, and increased fibroblast growth factor 21 expression in the skeletal muscles and the liver of mice. Acute exercise activated Akt in mice skeletal muscle. Acute exercise increases fibroblast growth factor 21 concentrations in both serum and metabolic organs. Moreover, results show that acute exercise increased the expression of fibroblast growth factor 21 in skeletal muscle, accompanied by the phosphorylation of Akt in mice. PMID:27335433

  20. VENTROMEDIAL HYPOTHALAMIC REGULATION OF HORMONAL AND METABOLIC RESPONSES TO EXERCISE

    Vissing, John; Wallace, Jo L.; Scheurink, Anton J.W.; Galbo, Henrik; Steffens, Anton B.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated a neural regulation of hormonal and metabolic responses to exercise. Studies on the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) suggest that the VMH might be involved in neural control of exercise metabolism. We therefore studied 25 rats with or without Marcain-anesthetized VMH (Ma

  1. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  2. Metabolic response to malnutrition: its relevance to enteral feeding.

    Love, A H

    1986-01-01

    Malnutrition results in a wide variety of metabolic responses, depending on circumstances, from reactions to pure deprivation of nutrients to include the added stress of injury and sepsis. Important differences of response exist between adults and children. Weight loss with changes in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism are well documented. Disturbances of fluid and electrolyte balance are newer areas of interest as are changes in requirements for micronutrients such as trace metals. Ma...

  3. The acute impact of polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa in metabolic homeostasis: an approach combining metabolomics and gene-expression analyses.

    Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Senan-Campos, Oriol; Massucci, Francesco A; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Guimerà, Roger; Camps, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    We explored the acute multifunctional effects of polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa in humans to assess possible consequences on the host's health. The expected dynamic response was studied using a combination of transcriptomics and metabolomics to integrate specific functional pathways through network-based methods and to generate hypotheses established by acute metabolic effects and/or modifications in the expression of relevant genes. Data were obtained from healthy male volunteers after 3 hours of ingestion of an aqueous Hibiscus sabdariffa extract. The data were compared with data obtained prior to the ingestion, and the overall findings suggest that these particular polyphenols had a simultaneous role in mitochondrial function, energy homeostasis and protection of the cardiovascular system. These findings suggest beneficial actions in inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidation, which are interrelated mechanisms. Among other effects, the activation of the heme oxygenase-biliverdin reductase axis, the systemic inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, the inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme, and several actions mirroring those of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists further support this notion. We also found concordant findings in the serum of the participants, which include a decrease in cortisol levels and a significant increase in the active vasodilator metabolite of bradykinin (des-Arg(9)-bradykinin). Therefore, our data support the view that polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa play a regulatory role in metabolic health and in the maintenance of blood pressure, thus implying a multi-faceted impact in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26234931

  4. Acute exercise does not induce an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters

    Kristensen, Lena; Buhl, Rikke; Nostell, Katarina; Bak, Lars; Petersen, Ellen; Lindholm, Maria; Jacobsen, Stine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether acute strenuous exercise (1600- to 2500-m race) would elicit an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters. Blood levels of several inflammatory markers [serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, fibrinogen, white blood cell count (WBC), and iron], muscle enzymes [creatinine kinase (CK) and aspartate transaminase (AST)], and hemoglobin were assessed in 58 Standardbred trotters before and after racing. Hemoglobin levels increased and iron ...

  5. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Chun-Chia Chen; Sun-Sang Wang; Fa-Yauh Lee

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week) due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted tha...

  6. Acute effects of ghrelin administration on glucose and lipid metabolism

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Djurhuus, Christian Born; Gjedsted, Jakob;

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Ghrelin infusion increases plasma glucose and nonesterified fatty acids, but it is uncertain whether this is secondary to the concomitant release of GH. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study direct effects of ghrelin on substrate metabolism. DESIGN: This was a randomized, single-blind, p......CONTEXT: Ghrelin infusion increases plasma glucose and nonesterified fatty acids, but it is uncertain whether this is secondary to the concomitant release of GH. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study direct effects of ghrelin on substrate metabolism. DESIGN: This was a randomized, single......-blind, placebo-controlled two-period crossover study. SETTING: The study was performed in a university clinical research laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Eight healthy men aged 27.2 +/- 0.9 yr with a body mass index of 23.4 +/- 0.5 kg/m(2) were included in the study. INTERVENTION: Subjects received infusion of ghrelin...... the final 2 h of each infusion. RESULTS: Basal and insulin-stimulated glucose disposal decreased with ghrelin [basal: 1.9 +/- 0.1 (ghrelin) vs. 2.3 +/- 0.1 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.03; clamp: 3.9 +/- 0.6 (ghrelin) vs. 6.1 +/- 0.5 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.02], whereas endogenous glucose...

  7. Protein metabolism in malnourished children with acute lower respiratory infection

    We studied 19 subjects and 15 controls from November 1994 to February 1995. HIV infection is common among this population and HIV testing was done by ELISA of most subjects and controls in the course of their routine clinical care. To determine how HIV infection effects protein metabolism all HIV infected subjects and controls were grouped into a third category and compared to the subjects and controls. After the HIV subgrouping we were left with 13 subjects, 13 controls, and 8 HIV positive patients. KIC enrichments were used to calculate protein synthesis and breakdown, as KIC is believed to reflect intracellular leucine concentrations. Of note in Table 2 is the KIC/Leucine ratio is consistently greater than 1, averaging 1.3 over 16 samples. This is an unexpected finding as the KIC/Leucine ratio has been shown to be constant with a value of about 0.75 over a wide range of conditions. Samples for these eight patients have been evaluated under six different GCMS conditions to verify this unexpected observation. This ratio > 1.0 has been consistently found under all of these conditions. We are not certain what biological phenomenon can explain this, but it calls into question the validity of the four compartment model upon which these calculations are based. It is not unreasonable to expect that children with kwashiorkor metabolize ketoacids differently, and this difference could account for the increased KIC/Leucine ratio. 19 refs, 4 tabs

  8. Effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection and feed deprivation on the metabolic rate of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    Jones, M A; Powell, M D; Becker, J A; Carter, C G

    2007-10-31

    In this study, experiments were conducted to examine the effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection on the metabolic rate (M(O2)) of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Fed and unfed Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to a high concentration (5 x 10(12) CFU ml(-1)) of the bacteria Tenacibaculum maritimum, their routine and maximum metabolic rates (M(O2rout) and M(O2max), respectively) were measured, and relative metabolic scope determined. A significant decrease in metabolic scope was found for both fed and unfed infected groups. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM) decrease of 2.21 +/- 0.97 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed fish a mean +/- SEM decrease of 3.16 +/- 1.29 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). The decrease in metabolic scope was a result of significantly increased M(O2rout) of both fed and unfed infected salmon. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase in M(O2rout) of 1.86 +/- 0.66 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase of 2.16 +/- 0.72 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). Interestingly, all groups maintained M(O2max) regardless of infection status. Increases in M(O2rout) corresponded to a significant increase in blood plasma osmolality. A decrease in metabolic scope has implications for how individuals allocate energy; fish with smaller metabolic scope will have less energy to allocate to functions such as growth, reproduction and immune response, which may adversely affect the efficiency of fish growth. PMID:18159670

  9. Metabolism of biogenic amines in acute cerebral ischemia: Influence of systemic hyperglycemia

    Milovanović Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are biogenic amines which are transmitters of the central nervous system. The effects of ischemia on the brain parenchyma depends on many factors, such is the mechanism of blood flow interruption, velocity of the occurring blood flow interruption, duration of an ischemic episode, organization of anatomical structures of the brain blood vessels etc., which all influence the final outcome. During interruption of the brain circulation in experimental or clinical conditions, neurotransmitter metabolism, primarily of biogenic amines, is disturbed. Many researches with various experimental models of complete ischemia reported a decrease in the content of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the CNS tissue. It was proven that hyperglycemia can drastically increase cerebral injury followed by short-term cerebral ischemia. Considering the fact that biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin influence the size of neurologic damage, as well as the fact that in hyperglycemic conditions infarct size (from the morphological aspect is larger relative to normoglycemic status, the intention was to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in occurrence of damage in conditions of hyperglycemia, i.e. in the case of brain apoplexia in diabetics. Analysis of biogenic amines metabolism in states of acute hyperglycemia, as well as analysis of the effects of reversible and irreversible brain ischemia on metabolism of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, showed that acute hyperglycemia slows down serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine metabolism in the cerebral cortex and n. caudatus. Brain ischemia in normoglycemic animals by itself has no influence on biogenic amines metabolism, but the effect of ischemia becomes apparent during reperfusion. In recirculation, which corresponds to the occurrences in penumbra, release of biogenic amines is uncontrolled and increased. Brain ischemia in acute hyperglycemic animals

  10. Fight-flight or freeze-hide? Personality and metabolic phenotype mediate physiological defence responses in flatfish.

    Rupia, Emmanuel J; Binning, Sandra A; Roche, Dominique G; Lu, Weiqun

    2016-07-01

    Survival depends on appropriate behavioural and physiological responses to danger. In addition to active 'fight-flight' defence responses, a passive 'freeze-hide' response is adaptive in some contexts. However, the physiological mechanisms determining which individuals choose a given defence response remain poorly understood. We examined the relationships among personality, metabolic performance and physiological stress responses across an environmental gradient in the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. We employed four behavioural assays to document the existence of two distinct behavioural types ('bold' and 'shy') in this species. We found consistent metabolic differences between individuals of a given behavioural type across an environmental gradient: shy individuals had overall lower aerobic scope, maximum metabolic rate and standard metabolic rate than bold individuals in both high (25 ppt) and low (3 ppt) salinity. These behavioural and metabolic differences translated into divergent physiological responses during acute stress: shy individuals adopted a passive 'freeze-hide' response by reducing their oxygen consumption rates (akin to shallow breathing) whereas bold individuals adopted an active 'fight-flight' response by increasing their rates of respiration. These distinct defence strategies were repeatable within individuals between salinity treatments. Although it has been suggested theoretically, this is the first empirical evidence that the metabolic response to stressful situations differs between bold and shy individuals. Our results emphasize the importance of incorporating physiological measures to understand the mechanisms driving persistent inter-individual differences in animals. PMID:27044558

  11. Metabolic and Endocrine Responses to Nocturnal Eating

    Holmbäck, Ulf

    2002-01-01

    An increasing amount of people have their work hours displaced to the night and there are indications that shift work and other irregular working schedules are associated with an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and other pathological conditions. It is therefore important to address the consequences of eating at irregular hours, especially nighttime. Papers I-III refer to a study in which 7 males were given a high-carbohydrate diet (HC) or a high-fat diet (HF), using a cros...

  12. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate - a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik Bw

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  13. Neuromuscular, hormonal, and metabolic responses to different plyometric training volumes in rugby players.

    Cadore, Eduardo L; Pinheiro, Eraldo; Izquierdo, Mikel; Correa, Cleiton S; Radaelli, Régis; Martins, Jocelito B; Lhullier, Francisco L R; Laitano, Orlando; Cardoso, Marcelo; Pinto, Ronei S

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different volumes of plyometric exercise (i.e., 100, 200, or 300 hurdle jumps) on acute strength and jump performance and on the acute hormonal and lactate responses in rugby players. Eleven young male elite rugby players (age, 23.5 ± 0.9 years; height, 173 ± 4.8 cm) volunteered for the study. Maximal isometric peak torque (PT), maximal rate of force development (RFD), squat jump (SJ), and drop jump (DJ) performance were assessed before and 5 minutes, 8 hours, and 24 hours after 100, 200, or 300 jumps. In addition, total testosterone (TT), cortisol (COR), and lactate were measured before and after the 3 different plyometric exercise volumes. There were significant decreases in the PT (p plyometric exercise volumes (100, 200, and 300 jumps) resulted in similar neuromuscular, metabolic, and hormonal responses. PMID:23442289

  14. Metabolic response to surgery in the cancer patient

    The metabolic response to uncomplicated surgery in the patient undergoing primary therapy for malignancy is no different than the response to surgery of similar magnitude for benign disease. Hemodynamic, nutritional-endocrine, and convalescent changes are similar. However, with current aggressive approaches to the management of cancer, the patient often comes to surgery with evidence of major debilitating side effects from his progressive malignancy or from aggressive multimodality therapy. The surgeon must be aware of the consequences of the use of combination therapies on the expected metabolic response to surgery. Awareness of such problems such as the nutritional deficit will allow preventive methods to supercede mtabolic salvage procedures

  15. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... to baseline ventilation, whereas CMR(glu) increased. CONCLUSION: In patients with acute bacterial meningitis, we found variable levels of CBF and cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity, a low a-v DO(2), low cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose, and a cerebral lactate efflux. In these patients, a...... ventilation strategy guided by jugular bulb oximetry and/or repeated CBF measurements may be more optimal in terms of cerebral oxygenation than a strategy aiming at identical levels of P(a)CO(2) for all patients....

  16. Intersection of the unfolded protein response and hepatic lipid metabolism

    Lee, Ann-Hwee; Glimcher, Laurie H.

    2009-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in whole-body lipid metabolism by governing the synthesis, oxidization, transport and excretion of lipids. The unfolded protein response (UPR) was identified as a signal transduction system that is activated by ER stress. Recent studies revealed a critical role of the UPR in hepatic lipid metabolism. The IRE1/XBP1 branch of the UPR is activated by high dietary carbohydrates and controls the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis....

  17. Metabolic profiling of the response to an oral glucose tolerance test detects subtle metabolic changes.

    Suzan Wopereis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight is increasing globally and has become a serious health problem. Low-grade chronic inflammation in overweight subjects is thought to play an important role in disease development. Novel tools to understand these processes are needed. Metabolic profiling is one such tool that can provide novel insights into the impact of treatments on metabolism. METHODOLOGY: To study the metabolic changes induced by a mild anti-inflammatory drug intervention, plasma metabolic profiling was applied in overweight human volunteers with elevated levels of the inflammatory plasma marker C-reactive protein. Liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometric methods were used to detect high and low abundant plasma metabolites both in fasted conditions and during an oral glucose tolerance test. This is based on the concept that the resilience of the system can be assessed after perturbing a homeostatic situation. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic changes were subtle and were only detected using metabolic profiling in combination with an oral glucose tolerance test. The repeated measurements during the oral glucose tolerance test increased statistical power, but the metabolic perturbation also revealed metabolites that respond differentially to the oral glucose tolerance test. Specifically, multiple metabolic intermediates of the glutathione synthesis pathway showed time-dependent suppression in response to the glucose challenge test. The fact that this is an insulin sensitive pathway suggests that inflammatory modulation may alter insulin signaling in overweight men.

  18. Haemodialysis is an effective treatment in acute metabolic decompensation of maple syrup urine disease

    P.S. Atwal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute metabolic decompensation in maple syrup urine disease can occur during intercurrent illness and is a medical emergency. A handful of reports in the medical literature describe the use of peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis as therapeutic inventions. We report the only patient from our centre to have haemodialysis performed in this setting. Combined with dietary BCAA restriction and calorific support, haemodialysis allows rapid reduction in plasma leucine concentrations considerably faster than conservative methods.

  19. Effects of acute paroxetine administration on tryptophan metabolism and disposition in the rat.

    Badawy, A. A.; Morgan, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    1 The effects of acute oral administration of paroxetine on tryptophan metabolism and disposition were examined in the rat. 2 Basal liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity was inhibited by paroxetine in vitro and after oral administration. Maximum inhibition was caused by a 1 mg kg-1 dose. 3 Paroxetine administration also inhibited pyrrolase activity that had previously been enhanced by hormonal induction by cortisol or cofactor activation by haematin. The cortisol induction of the enzyme was, ho...

  20. Specific responses of monoamine neurotransmitters to various acute stressors

    Rongrong He; Guanyu Lin; Yifang Li; Keiich Abe; Xinsheng Yao; Hiroshi Kurihara

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the composition of histamine, serotonin and dopamine using high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection, and compared the changes in monoamine levels in plasma, the cortex and midbrain of mice exposed to acute stressors, such as blood-drawing stimulation or restraint. Results demonstrated that plasma histamine levels were markedly increased when mice were exposed to blood-drawing stimulation and restraint stress. However, serotonin levels decreased in plasma of mice treated with restraint stress, and dopamine levels in plasma had no significant response to the two acute stressors. The three monoamines (histamine, serotonin and dopamine) increased at different degrees in restraint mice, but not in brain regions of blood-drawing stressed mice. Results indicated that histaminergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic systems have their own specific response to different acute stressors.

  1. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise.

    Catoire, M.; Alex, S.; Paraskevopulos, N.; Mattijssen, F.; Evers-van Gogh, I.; Schaart, G.; Jeppesen, J.; Kneppers, A.; Mensink, M.; Voshol, P.J.; Olivecrona, G.; Tan, N.S.; Hesselink, M.K.; Berbee, J.F.; Rensen, P.C.; Kalkhoven, E.; Schrauwen, P.; Kersten, S.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity increases energy metabolism in exercising muscle. Whether acute exercise elicits metabolic changes in nonexercising muscles remains unclear. We show that one of the few genes that is more highly induced in nonexercising muscle than in exercising human muscle during acute exercise e

  2. Changes in cerebral oxidative metabolism in patients with acute liver failure

    Bjerring, P N; Larsen, F S

    2013-01-01

    Acute liver failure patients with a persistence of hyperammonemia are at an increased risk of intracranial hypertension due to development of brain oedema. In vitro studies of brain tissue and cell cultures that indicates that exposure to ammonium inhibits enzymatic activity in the tricarboxylic...... acid cycle, induces substrate depletion through marked glutamate utilization for glutamine synthesis and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. In patients with acute liver failure cerebral microdialysis studies show a linear correlation between the lactate to pyruvate ratio and the glutamine...... concentration, as well as to some of the adenosine triphosphate degradation products. However, clinical observations of cerebral exchange rates of oxygen, glucose, lactate and amino acids challenge the interpretation of these findings. In this review the conflicting data of cerebral metabolism during acute...

  3. Low malathion concentrations influence metabolism in Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera, Chironomidae in acute and chronic toxicity tests

    Débora Rebechi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Low malathion concentrations influence metabolism in Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera, Chironomidae in acute and chronic toxicity tests. Organophosphate compounds are used in agro-systems, and in programs to control pathogen vectors. Because they are continuously applied, organophosphates often reach water sources and may have an impact on aquatic life. The effects of acute and chronic exposure to the organophosphate insecticide malathion on the midge Chironomus sancticaroli are evaluated. To that end, three biochemical biomarkers, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, alpha (EST-α and beta (EST-β esterase were used. Acute bioassays with five concentrations of malathion, and chronic bioassays with two concentrations of malathion were carried out. In the acute exposure test, AChE, EST-α and EST-β activities declined by 66, 40 and 37%, respectively, at 0.251 µg L-1 and more than 80% at 1.37, 1.96 and 2.51 µg L-1. In chronic exposure tests, AChE and EST-α activities declined by 28 and 15% at 0.251 µg L-1. Results of the present study show that low concentrations of malathion can influence larval metabolism, indicating high toxicity for Chironomus sancticaroli and environmental risk associated with the use of organophosphates.

  4. Acute khat use reduces response conflict in habitual users

    Lorenza S Colzato

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Khat consumption has become a worldwide phenomenon broadening from Eastern Africa and the south west of the Arabian Peninsula to ethnic communities in the rest of the world. So far, the cognitive effects of khat use are poorly understood and no studies have looked into the relation between acute khat use and cognitive control functions, the way we control our thoughts and goal directed behavior.We studied how acute khat use affects the emergence and the resolution of response conflict, a central cognitive control function. Khat users (n=11 and khat-free controls (n=18 were matched in terms of education, sex, alcohol and cannabis consumption. Groups were tested on response conflict, as measured by the Simon task. In one single session, participants worked through two task blocks: the khat group chewed exclusively khat whereas the khat-free group chewed solely a gum.Results showed that in the second block, which reflects the acute impact of khat, the khat group was better than controls in resolving stimulus-induced response conflict as indexed by a smaller Simon effect.These results suggest that the acute intake of khat may improve participants’ ability of handling response conflict.

  5. PREDICTORS OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE RESPONSE TO OZONE EXPOSURE

    The purposes of this study were to identify personal characteristics which predict individual differences in acute response to ozone exposure and to develop a predictive model for decrements in FEV1 as a function of ozone concentration and individual predictors. esponse and predi...

  6. Compared with parenteral nutrition, enteral feeding attenuates the acute phase response and improves disease severity in acute pancreatitis

    Windsor, A; Kanwar, S; Li, A.; Barnes, E.; Guthrie, J; Spark, J; Welsh, F.; Guillou, P; Reynolds, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—In patients with major trauma and burns, total enteral nutrition (TEN) significantly decreases the acute phase response and incidence of septic complications when compared with total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Poor outcome in acute pancreatitis is associated with a high incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. 
Aims—To determine whether TEN can attenuate the acute phase response and improve clinical disease severity in patients with ac...

  7. The central role of hypothalamic inflammation in the acute illness response and cachexia.

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Michaelis, Katherine A; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    When challenged with a variety of inflammatory threats, multiple systems across the body undergo physiological responses to promote defense and survival. The constellation of fever, anorexia, and fatigue is known as the acute illness response, and represents an adaptive behavioral and physiological reaction to stimuli such as infection. On the other end of the spectrum, cachexia is a deadly and clinically challenging syndrome involving anorexia, fatigue, and muscle wasting. Both of these processes are governed by inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and immune cells. Though the effects of cachexia can be partially explained by direct effects of disease processes on wasting tissues, a growing body of evidence shows the central nervous system (CNS) also plays an essential mechanistic role in cachexia. In the context of inflammatory stress, the hypothalamus integrates signals from peripheral systems, which it translates into neuroendocrine perturbations, altered neuronal signaling, and global metabolic derangements. Therefore, we will discuss how hypothalamic inflammation is an essential driver of both the acute illness response and cachexia, and why this organ is uniquely equipped to generate and maintain chronic inflammation. First, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in acute responses to dietary and infectious stimuli. Next, we will discuss the role of cytokines in driving homeostatic disequilibrium, resulting in muscle wasting, anorexia, and weight loss. Finally, we will address mechanisms and mediators of chronic hypothalamic inflammation, including endothelial cells, chemokines, and peripheral leukocytes. PMID:26541482

  8. Mitochondrial metabolic remodeling in response to genetic and environmental perturbations

    Hollinshead, Kate E.R.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are metabolic hubs within mammalian cells and demonstrate significant metabolic plasticity. In oxygenated environments with ample carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid sources, they are able to use the tricarboxylic acid cycle for the production of anabolic metabolites and ATP. However, in conditions where oxygen becomes limiting for oxidative phosphorylation, they can rapidly signal to increase cytosolic glycolytic ATP production, while awaiting hypoxia‐induced changes in the proteome mediated by the activity of transcription factors such as hypoxia‐inducible factor 1. Hypoxia is a well‐described phenotype of most cancers, driving many aspects of malignancy. Improving our understanding of how mitochondria change their metabolism in response to this stimulus may therefore elicit the design of new selective therapies. Many of the recent advances in our understanding of mitochondrial metabolic plasticity have been acquired through investigations of cancer‐associated mutations in metabolic enzymes, including succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase. This review will describe how metabolic perturbations induced by hypoxia and mutations in these enzymes have informed our knowledge in the control of mitochondrial metabolism, and will examine what this may mean for the biology of the cancers in which these mutations are observed. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:272–285. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27196610

  9. Mitochondrial metabolic remodeling in response to genetic and environmental perturbations.

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Tennant, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are metabolic hubs within mammalian cells and demonstrate significant metabolic plasticity. In oxygenated environments with ample carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid sources, they are able to use the tricarboxylic acid cycle for the production of anabolic metabolites and ATP. However, in conditions where oxygen becomes limiting for oxidative phosphorylation, they can rapidly signal to increase cytosolic glycolytic ATP production, while awaiting hypoxia-induced changes in the proteome mediated by the activity of transcription factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1. Hypoxia is a well-described phenotype of most cancers, driving many aspects of malignancy. Improving our understanding of how mitochondria change their metabolism in response to this stimulus may therefore elicit the design of new selective therapies. Many of the recent advances in our understanding of mitochondrial metabolic plasticity have been acquired through investigations of cancer-associated mutations in metabolic enzymes, including succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase. This review will describe how metabolic perturbations induced by hypoxia and mutations in these enzymes have informed our knowledge in the control of mitochondrial metabolism, and will examine what this may mean for the biology of the cancers in which these mutations are observed. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:272-285. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27196610

  10. Acute In Vivo Response to an Alternative Implant for Urogynecology

    Sabiniano Roman Regueros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate in vivo the acute host response to an alternative implant designed for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP. Methods. A biodegradable scaffold was produced from poly-L-lactic acid (PLA using the electrospinning technique. Human and rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs were isolated and characterized by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and differentiation assays. PLA scaffolds were seeded and cultured for 2 weeks with human or rat ADSCs. Scaffolds with and without human or rat ADSCs were implanted subcutaneously on the abdominal wall of rats. After 3 and 7 days, 6 animals from each group were sacrificed. Sections from each sample were analyzed by Haematoxylin and Eosin staining, Sirius red staining, and immunohistochemistry for CD68, PECAM-1, and collagen I and III. Results. Animals responded to the scaffolds with an acute macrophage response. After 7 days of implantation, there was extensive host cell penetration, new blood vessel formation, and new collagen deposition throughout the full thickness of the samples without obvious differences between cell-containing and cell-free scaffolds. Conclusions. The acute in vivo response to an alternative implant (both with and without cells for the treatment of SUI and POP showed good acute integration into the host tissues.

  11. Expression profiling of skeletal muscle following acute and chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation: implications for hypertrophy, metabolism and circadian rhythm

    Lynch Gordon S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR agonists has been found to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and significant metabolic changes. In the context of energy homeostasis, the importance of β-AR signaling has been highlighted by the inability of β1-3-AR-deficient mice to regulate energy expenditure and susceptibility to diet induced obesity. However, the molecular pathways and gene expression changes that initiate and maintain these phenotypic modulations are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify differential changes in gene expression in murine skeletal muscle associated with systemic (acute and chronic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol. Results Skeletal muscle gene expression (from murine tibialis anterior was profiled at both 1 and 4 hours following systemic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol, using Illumina 46K mouse BeadArrays. Illumina expression profiling revealed significant expression changes in genes associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, myoblast differentiation, metabolism, circadian rhythm, transcription, histones, and oxidative stress. Differentially expressed genes relevant to the regulation of muscle mass and metabolism (in the context of the hypertrophic phenotype were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR to examine gene expression in response to both acute (1-24 h and chronic administration (1-28 days of formoterol at multiple timepoints. In terms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, attenuation of myostatin signaling (including differential expression of myostatin, activin receptor IIB, phospho-Smad3 etc was observed following acute and chronic administration of formoterol. Acute (but not chronic administration of formoterol also significantly induced the expression of genes involved in oxidative metabolism, including hexokinase 2, sorbin and SH3 domain containing 1, and uncoupling protein 3. Interestingly, formoterol

  12. Metabolomic profiling of drug responses in acute myeloid leukaemia cell lines.

    Stefano Tiziani

    Full Text Available Combined bezafibrate (BEZ and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA exert unexpected antileukaemic activities against acute myeloid leukaemia (AML and these activities are associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS within the tumor cells. Although the generation of ROS by these drugs is supported by preceding studies including our own, the interrelationship between the cellular effects of the drugs and ROS generation is not well understood. Here we report the use of NMR metabolomic profiling to further study the effect of BEZ and MPA on three AML cell lines and to shed light on the underlying mechanism of action. For this we focused on drug effects induced during the initial 24 hours of treatment prior to the onset of overt cellular responses and examined these in the context of basal differences in metabolic profiles between the cell lines. Despite their ultimately profound cellular effects, the early changes in metabolic profiles engendered by these drugs were less pronounced than the constitutive metabolic differences between cell types. Nonetheless, drug treatments engendered common metabolic changes, most markedly in the response to the combination of BEZ and MPA. These responses included changes to TCA cycle intermediates consistent with recently identified chemical actions of ROS. Notable amongst these was the conversion of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinate which was recapitulated by the treatment of cell extracts with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. These findings indicate that the actions of combined BEZ and MPA against AML cells are indeed mediated downstream of the generation of ROS rather than some hitherto unsuspected mechanism. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that metabolite profiles represent highly sensitive markers for genomic differences between cells and their responses to external stimuli. This opens new perspectives to use metabolic profiling as a tool to study the rational redeployment of drugs in new disease

  13. Erythropoietin Action in Stress Response, Tissue Maintenance and Metabolism

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO regulation of red blood cell production and its induction at reduced oxygen tension provides for the important erythropoietic response to ischemic stress. The cloning and production of recombinant human EPO has led to its clinical use in patients with anemia for two and half decades and has facilitated studies of EPO action. Reports of animal and cell models of ischemic stress in vitro and injury suggest potential EPO benefit beyond red blood cell production including vascular endothelial response to increase nitric oxide production, which facilitates oxygen delivery to brain, heart and other non-hematopoietic tissues. This review discusses these and other reports of EPO action beyond red blood cell production, including EPO response affecting metabolism and obesity in animal models. Observations of EPO activity in cell and animal model systems, including mice with tissue specific deletion of EPO receptor (EpoR, suggest the potential for EPO response in metabolism and disease.

  14. Metabolic changes in concussed American football players during the acute and chronic post-injury phases

    Ellemberg Dave

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite negative neuroimaging findings many athletes display neurophysiological alterations and post-concussion symptoms that may be attributable to neurometabolic alterations. Methods The present study investigated the effects of sports concussion on brain metabolism using 1H-MR Spectroscopy by comparing a group of 10 non-concussed athletes with a group of 10 concussed athletes of the same age (mean: 22.5 years and education (mean: 16 years within both the acute and chronic post-injury phases. All athletes were scanned 1-6 days post-concussion and again 6-months later in a 3T Siemens MRI. Results Concussed athletes demonstrated neurometabolic impairment in prefrontal and motor (M1 cortices in the acute phase where NAA:Cr levels remained depressed relative to controls. There was some recovery observed in the chronic phase where Glu:Cr levels returned to those of control athletes; however, there was a pathological increase of m-I:Cr levels in M1 that was only present in the chronic phase. Conclusions These results confirm cortical neurometabolic changes in the acute post-concussion phase as well as recovery and continued metabolic abnormalities in the chronic phase. The results indicate that complex pathophysiological processes differ depending on the post-injury phase and the neurometabolite in question.

  15. Metabolic response at repeat PET/CT predicts pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in oesophageal cancer

    Reports have suggested that a reduction in tumour 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET) examination during or after neoadjuvant chemotherapy may predict pathological response in oesophageal cancer. Our aim was to determine whether metabolic response predicts pathological response to a standardised neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen within a prospective clinical trial. Consecutive patients staged with potentially curable oesophageal cancer who underwent treatment within a non-randomised clinical trial were included. A standardised chemotherapy regimen (two cycles of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil) was used. PET/CT was performed before chemotherapy and repeated 24-28 days after the start of cycle 2. Forty-eight subjects were included: mean age 65 years; 37 male. Using the median percentage reduction in SUVmax (42%) to define metabolic response, pathological response was seen in 71% of metabolic responders (17/24) compared with 33% of non-responders (8/24; P = 0.009, sensitivity 68%, specificity 70%). Pathological response was seen in 81% of subjects with a complete metabolic response (13/16) compared with 38% of those with a less than complete response (12/32; P = 0.0042, sensitivity 52%, specificity 87%). There was no significant histology-based effect. There was a significant association between metabolic response and pathological response; however, accuracy in predicting pathological response was relatively low. (orig.)

  16. Activation of platelet aggregation and arachidonate metabolism in early stage of acute radiation injury

    The paper describes the changes of platelet aggregation and arachidonate metabolism in platelets and endothelial cells after 8.0-8.5 Gy γ-ray whole-body irradiation in rats. It was found that with 8.0 Gy exposure platelet aggregation rate and speed, and plasma TxB2 level were increased at 4h and on the 1st day post irradiation, and that 6-keto-PGF1α level was enhanced at 4h, then reduced to the control level on the 1st day post irradiation. The result of biological assay showed the ability for rat platelets to convert exogenous arachidonate into TxA2 was significantly raised at 4h and on the 1st day after 8.5 Gy γ-ray irradiation. It is suggested that the activation of platelet arachidonate metabolism may be one of the important causes of acute radiation injury is suggested that the activation of platelet arachidonate metabolism may be one of the important causes of acute radiation injury

  17. Sympathetic neural responses to mental stress during acute simulated microgravity

    Durocher, John J.; Schwartz, Christopher E.; Carter, Jason R.

    2009-01-01

    Neural and cardiovascular responses to mental stress and acute 6° head-down tilt (HDT) were examined separately and combined. We hypothesized sympathoexcitation during mental stress, sympathoinhibition during HDT, and an additive neural interaction during combined mental stress and HDT. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded in 16 healthy subjects (8 men, 8 women) in the supine position during three randomized trials: 1) menta...

  18. Acute Stress Reduces Reward Responsiveness: Implications for Depression

    Bogdan, Ryan; Pizzagalli, Diego

    2006-01-01

    Background: Stress, one of the strongest risk factors for depression, has been linked to "anbedonic" behavior and dysfunctional reward-related neural circuitry in preclinical models. Methods: To test if acute stress reduces reward responsiveness (i.e., the ability to modulate behavior as a function of past reward), a signal-detection task coupled with a differential reinforcement schedule was utilized. Eighty female participants completed the task under both a stress condition, either threat-...

  19. CB1 cannabinoid receptor modulates MDMA acute responses and reinforcement

    Touri??o Raposo, Clara; Ledent, Catherine; Maldonado, Rafael; Valverde Granados, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Background: 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a popular recreational drug widely abused by young people. The endocannabinoid system is involved in the addictive processes induced by different drugs of abuse. However, the role of this system in the pharmacological effects of MDMA has not been yet clarified. Methods: Locomotion, body temperature and anxiogenic-like responses were evaluated after acute MDMA administration in CB1 knockout mice. Additionally, MDMA rewarding propertie...

  20. Investigation of the acute inflammatory response in Crohn's disease.

    MARKS, D. J. B.

    2006-01-01

    Most theories concerning the primary cause of Crohn's disease focus on over-activation of the immune response. Paradoxically, the defect may instead relate to diminished acute inflammation. Neutrophil accumulation to sites of dermal trauma has been shown to be reduced. Were the same phenomenon to occur in the gut, it might impair bacterial clearance thus provoking granuloma formation. In this thesis, a novel technique demonstrated attenuated neutrophil accumulation following trauma to the bow...

  1. Acute Pulmonary Response in Landscape Workers: Job Redesign

    Sexton, Pauline Lethea

    2003-01-01

    Substantial efforts have been made in the study of occupational induced airway diseases. A strong link has been found between worker exposure to organic dust and resulting acute pulmonary spasms. The supporting studies behind this link are primarily in the industries of cotton, animal and swine farming; however, some studies have been related to landscaping type tasks (i.e. mowing, leaf blowing). The relationship between organic dust and pulmonary response is associated with respiratory ir...

  2. Endocrine and metabolic aspects of the acute toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)

    Gorski, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Toxic responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were characterized in male Sprague-Dawley rats in order to elucidate the mechanism of acute toxicity of this potent halogenated hydrocarbon. Studies in TCDD-treated, pair-fed control and ad libitum-fed control rates, as well as in thyroidectomized, adrenalectomized and hypophysectomized, revealed differential hormonal, toxicologic and histophathologic responses suggesting that these manifestations of TCDD exposure are the results of an insult to intermediary metabolism. Tissue specific alterations in de novo fatty acid synthesis were directly related to differential changes observed in thyroid hormone homeostasis. The increased hepatic de novo fatty acid synthesis provided a likely mechanism for the documented fact that TCDD-treated rats lose more body weight than corresponding pair-fed controls because de novo fatty acid synthesis represents an energy inefficient metabolic process. Experiments in adrenalectomized and hypophysectomized rats led to the hypothesis that severe hypoglycemia due to inhibition of gluconeogenesis is the cause of TCDD-induced death. A subsequent characterization of gluconeogenesis in TCDD-treated rats confirmed this hypothesis.

  3. Acute metabolic response to fasted and postprandial exercise

    Lima FD; Correia AL; Teixeira DS; Silva Neto DV; Fernandes ÍS; Xavier Viana MB; Petitto M; Silva Sampaio RA; Chaves SN; Alves ST; Dantas RA; Mota

    2015-01-01

    Filipe Dinato de Lima,1,2 Ana Luiza Matias Correia,1 Denilson da Silva Teixeira,2 Domingos Vasco da Silva Neto,2 Ítalo Sávio Gonçalves Fernandes,2 Mário Boratto Xavier Viana,2 Mateus Petitto,2 Rodney Antônio da Silva Sampaio,2 Sandro Nobre Chaves,2 Simone Teixeira Alves,2 Renata Aparecida Elias Dantas,2 Márcio Rabelo Mota2 1University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 2Universitary Center of Brasília (UniCEUB), Brasília, DF...

  4. Acute metabolic response to fasted and postprandial exercise

    de Lima, Filipe Dinato

    2015-01-01

    Filipe Dinato de Lima,1,2 Ana Luiza Matias Correia,1 Denilson da Silva Teixeira,2 Domingos Vasco da Silva Neto,2 Ítalo Sávio Gonçalves Fernandes,2 Mário Boratto Xavier Viana,2 Mateus Petitto,2 Rodney Antônio da Silva Sampaio,2 Sandro Nobre Chaves,2 Simone Teixeira Alves,2 Renata Aparecida Elias Dantas,2 Márcio Rabelo Mota2 1University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 2Universitary Center of Bras&iacut...

  5. Optimal Biofilm Featues: metabolic and geometric response to multiple oxidants

    Kempes, C.; Okegbe, C.; Mears-Clarke, Z.; Follows, M. J.; Dietrich, L.

    2014-12-01

    An important challenge in understanding complex microbial mat communities is determining how groups of a single species balance metabolic requirements with the dynamics of resource supply. We have investigated this problem in the context of redox resources within a single-species bacterial biofilm. We developed a mathematical model of oxidant availability and metabolic response within biofilm features and we show that observed biofilm geometries maximize cellular reproduction and growth efficiency. Our model accurately predicts the measured distribution of two types of electron acceptors: oxygen, which is available from the environment, and phenazines, redox-active small molecules produced by the bacterium. Because our model is based on resource dynamics, we are also able to predict observed shifts in feature geometry based on changes in the availability of redox resources such as variations in the external availability of oxygen or the removal of phenazines. This analysis suggests various avenues for understanding microstructure and the evolution of spatial metabolism in microbial mats.

  6. Impact of Ocean Acidification on Energy Metabolism of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas—Changes in Metabolic Pathways and Thermal Response

    Christian Bock; Sokolova, Inna M.; Silke Eilers; Pörtner, Hans O.; Gisela Lannig

    2010-01-01

    Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA) poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell [1], synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO2-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO2 levels (partial pressure ...

  7. The metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Isfahan, Iran

    Nahid Reisi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Isfahan, Iran.
    • METHODS: During a 4-year period (2003 to 2007, 55 children (33 male and 22 female diagnosed with ALL at Unit of Hematology/ Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Isfahan University of Medical Science, were enrolled in this crosssectional study. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the modified version of Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III criteria. Insulin resistance was defined based on the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR.
    • RESULTS: The mean age of participates was 10.4 years (range 6-19 years and the mean interval since completion of chemotherapy was 35 months. Twenty percent (11/55 of survivors (10 male, 1 female met criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Obesity was observed in one forth of patients and nearly 3/4 of obese patients had metabolic syndrome. High serum insulin levels were found in 16% of participants and in 63% of obese survivors. The mean insulin levels in survivors with metabolic syndrome was three-times more than those without (28.3 mu/l vs. 9.57 mu/l, p = 0.004. Insulin resistance was detected in 72.7% of survivors with metabolic syndrome and it was  ositively correlated with serum triglycerides (0.543, p < 0.001, systolic and diastolic BP (0.348, p = 0.01 and 0.368, p = 006 respectively, insulin levels (0.914, p < 0.001 and blood sugar (0.398, p = 003.
    • CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Iran is higher than developed countries. Nearly all of the obese patients had metabolic syndrome. Weight control and regular physical exercise are recommended to the survivors.
    • KEYWORDS: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, children.

  8. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    Alexis M. Stranahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6 animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds.

  9. Metabolic Response of Pakchoi Leaves to Amino Acid Nitrogen

    WANG Xiao-li; YU Wen-juan; ZHOU Qian; HAN Rui-feng; HUANG Dan-feng

    2014-01-01

    Different nitrogen (N) forms may cause changes in the metabolic profiles of plants. However, few studies have been conducted on the effects of amino acid-N on plant metabolic proifles. The main objective of this study was to identify primary metabolites associated with amino acid-N (Gly, Gln and Ala) through metabolic proifle analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Plants of pakchoi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis L.), Huawang and Wuyueman cultivars, were grown with different nitrogen forms (i.e., Gly, Gln, Ala, NO3--N, and N starvation) applied under sterile hydroponic conditions. The fresh weight and plant N accumulation of Huawang were greater than those of Wuyueman, which indicates that the former exhibited better N-use efficiency than the latter. The physiological performances of the applied N forms were generally in the order of NO3--N>Gln>Gly>Ala. The metabolic analysis of leaf polar extracts revealed 30 amino acid N-responsive metabolites in the two pakchoi cultivars, mainly consisting of sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. Changes in the carbon metabolism of pakchoi leaves under amino acid treatments occurred via the accumulation of fructose, glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Disruption of amino acid metabolism resulted in accumulation of endogenous Gly in Gly treatment, Pro in Ala treatment, and Asn in three amino acid (Gly, Gln and Ala) treatments. By contrast, the levels of endogenous Gln and Leu decreased. However, this reduction varied among cultivars and amino acid types. Amino acid-N supply also affected the citric acid cycle, namely, the second stage of respiration, where leaves in Gly, Gln and Ala treatments contained low levels of malic, citric and succinic acids compared with leaves in NO3--N treatments. No signiifcant difference in the metabolic responses was observed between the two cultivars which differed in their capability to use N. The response of primary metabolites in pakchoi leaves to amino acid-N supply

  10. Ubiquitin Metabolism Affects Cellular Response to Volatile Anesthetics in Yeast

    Wolfe, Darren; Reiner, Thomas; Keeley, Jessica L.; Pizzini, Mark; Keil, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of action of volatile anesthetics, we are studying mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have altered sensitivity to isoflurane, a widely used clinical anesthetic. Several lines of evidence from these studies implicate a role for ubiquitin metabolism in cellular response to volatile anesthetics: (i) mutations in the ZZZ1 gene render cells resistant to isoflurane, and the ZZZ1 gene is identical to BUL1 (binds ubiquitin ligase), which appears to be invo...

  11. Metabolic and circulatory evaluation of acute cerebral ischaemic accidents in man by positron emission tomography

    Positron emission tomography and oxygen-15 were used to evaluate the effects of an almitrine-raubasine combination on cerebral blood flow and oxydative metabolism in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia. In 5 patients, aged between 58 and 74 years, with cerebral ischaemic accident in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, blood flow rate, oxygen consumption and brain oxygen extraction were measured before and after a 90-min intravenous infusion of almitrine bismesilate 15 mg and raubasine 5 mg. Only one patient presented with initial relative luxury perfusion, the intensity of which was reduced by the combined treatment. The other 4 patients had focal reduction of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption prior to treatment. Satistical analysis conducted on three cerebral areas (epicentre of the lesion, anterior and posterior juxtalesional areas and homologous heterolateral areas) showed a significant 3.6% increase of oxygen consumption in the epicentre, both hemispheres included, and a significant increase of cerebral blood flow in all three areas (3% on the healthy side, 13% on the diseased side). No significant change in oxygen extraction was demonstrated. The authors conclude that acute almitrine-raubasine treatment has beneficial effects on the brain immediately after a cerebral vascular accident, reflecting respect of the circulation-metabolism couple

  12. Similar metabolic responses in pigs and humans to breads with different contents and compositions of dietary fibers: a metabolomics study

    Nielsen, Kirstine Lykke; Hartvigsen, Merete; Hedemann, Mette Skou;

    2014-01-01

    crossover design with 4 breads: white-wheat bread low in dietary fiber, rye bread with whole-rye kernels, and 2 whitewheat breads supplemented with either wheat arabinoxylan or oat b-glucan. Blood samples drawn 215, 30, and 120 min postprandially were analyzed by untargeted liquid chromatography......Background: In nutritional studies, pigs are often used as models for humans because of nutritional and physiologic similarities. However, evidence supporting similar metabolic responses to nutritional interventions is lacking. Objective: The objective was to establish whether pigs and humans...... respond similarly to a nutritional intervention. Using metabolomics, we compared the acute metabolic response to 4 test breads between conventional pigs (growing) and adult human subjects (with the metabolic syndrome). Design: Six catheterized pigs and 15 human subjects were tested in a randomized...

  13. Thermal sensation and thermophysiological responses to metabolic step-changes

    Goto, T.; Toftum, J.; de Dear, R.; Fanger, P. O.

    2006-05-01

    This study investigated the effect on thermal perception and thermophysiological variables of controlled metabolic excursions of various intensities and durations. Twenty-four subjects were alternately seated on a chair or exercised by walking on a treadmill at a temperature predicted to be neutral at sedentary activity. In a second experimental series, subjects alternated between rest and exercise as well as between exercise at different intensities at two temperature levels. Measurements comprised skin and oesophageal temperatures, heart rate and subjective responses. Thermal sensation started to rise or decline immediately (within 1 min) after a change of activity, which means that even moderate activity changes of short duration affect thermal perceptions of humans. After approximately 15 20 min under constant activity, subjective thermal responses approximated the steady-state response. The sensitivity of thermal sensation to changes in core temperature was higher for activity down-steps than for up-steps. A model was proposed that estimates transient thermal sensation after metabolic step-changes. Based on predictions by the model, weighting factors were suggested to estimate a representative average metabolic rate with varying activity levels, e.g. for the prediction of thermal sensation by steady-state comfort models. The activity during the most recent 5 min should be weighted 65%, during the prior 10 5 min 25% and during the prior 20 10 min 10%.

  14. AMPK regulates metabolism and survival in response to ionizing radiation

    Background and purpose: AMPK is a metabolic sensor and an upstream inhibitor of mTOR activity. AMPK is phosphorylated by ionizing radiation (IR) in an ATM dependent manner, but the cellular consequences of this phosphorylation event have remained unclear. The objective of this study was to assess whether AMPK plays a functional role in regulating cellular responses to IR. Methods: The importance of AMPK expression for radiation responses was investigated using both MEFs (mouse embryo fibroblasts) double knockout for AMPK α1/α2 subunits and human colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT 116) with AMPK α1/α2 shRNA mediated knockdown. Results: We demonstrate here that IR results in phosphorylation of both AMPK and its substrate, ACC. IR moderately stimulated mTOR activity, and this was substantially exacerbated in the absence of AMPK. AMPK was required for IR induced expression of the mTOR inhibitor REDD1, indicating that AMPK restrains mTOR activity through multiple mechanisms. Likewise, cellular metabolism was deregulated following irradiation in the absence of AMPK, as evidenced by a substantial increase in oxygen consumption rates and lactate production. AMPK deficient cells showed impairment of the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, and were unable to support long-term proliferation during starvation following radiation. Lastly, we show that AMPK proficiency is important for clonogenic survival after radiation during starvation. Conclusions: These data reveal novel functional roles for AMPK in regulating mTOR signaling, cell cycle, survival and metabolic responses to IR.

  15. Computations of uncertainty mediate acute stress responses in humans.

    de Berker, Archy O; Rutledge, Robb B; Mathys, Christoph; Marshall, Louise; Cross, Gemma F; Dolan, Raymond J; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stress are frequently studied, yet its proximal causes remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that subjective estimates of uncertainty predict the dynamics of subjective and physiological stress responses. Subjects learned a probabilistic mapping between visual stimuli and electric shocks. Salivary cortisol confirmed that our stressor elicited changes in endocrine activity. Using a hierarchical Bayesian learning model, we quantified the relationship between the different forms of subjective task uncertainty and acute stress responses. Subjective stress, pupil diameter and skin conductance all tracked the evolution of irreducible uncertainty. We observed a coupling between emotional and somatic state, with subjective and physiological tuning to uncertainty tightly correlated. Furthermore, the uncertainty tuning of subjective and physiological stress predicted individual task performance, consistent with an adaptive role for stress in learning under uncertain threat. Our finding that stress responses are tuned to environmental uncertainty provides new insight into their generation and likely adaptive function. PMID:27020312

  16. Effects of tempol on altered metabolism and renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats.

    Abdulla, Mohammed H; Sattar, Munavvar A; Johns, Edward J

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) on renal vasoconstrictor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II) and adrenergic agonists in fructose-fed Sprague-Dawley rats (a model of metabolic syndrome). Rats were fed 20% fructose in drinking water (F) for 8 weeks. One fructose-fed group received tempol (FT) at 1 mmol·L(-1) in drinking water for 8 weeks or as an infusion (1.5 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) intrarenally. At the end of the treatment regimen, the renal responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, methoxamine, and Ang II were determined. F rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. Tempol reduced blood glucose and insulin levels (all p vasoconstriction response to all agonists was lower in F rats than in control rats by about 35%-65% (all p < 0.05). Vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, and methoxamine but not Ang II were about 41%-75% higher in FT rats compared with F rats (all p < 0.05). Acute tempol infusion blunted responses to noradrenaline, methoxamine, and Ang II in control rats by 32%, 33%, and 62%, while it blunted responses to noradrenaline and Ang II in F rats by 26% and 32%, respectively (all p < 0.05), compared with their untreated counterparts. Superoxide radicals play a crucial role in controlling renal vascular responses to adrenergic agonists in insulin-resistant rats. Chronic but not acute tempol treatment enhances renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats. PMID:26789093

  17. Deciphering hepatocellular responses to metabolic and oncogenic stress

    Kathrina L. Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Each cell type responds uniquely to stress and fractionally contributes to global and tissue-specific stress responses. Hepatocytes, liver macrophages (MΦ, and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC play functionally important and interdependent roles in adaptive processes such as obesity and tumor growth. Although these cell types demonstrate significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, their distinctions enabling disease-specific responses remain understudied. We developed a strategy for the simultaneous isolation and quantification of these liver cell types based on antigenic cell surface marker expression. To demonstrate the utility and applicability of this technique, we quantified liver cell-specific responses to high-fat diet (HFD or diethylnitrosamine (DEN, a liver-specific carcinogen, and found that while there was only a marginal increase in hepatocyte number, MΦ and SEC populations were quantitatively increased. Global gene expression profiling of hepatocytes, MΦ and SEC identified characteristic gene signatures that define each cell type in their distinct physiological or pathological states. Integration of hepatic gene signatures with available human obesity and liver cancer microarray data provides further insight into the cell-specific responses to metabolic or oncogenic stress. Our data reveal unique gene expression patterns that serve as molecular “fingerprints” for the cell-centric responses to pathologic stimuli in the distinct microenvironment of the liver. The technical advance highlighted in this study provides an essential resource for assessing hepatic cell-specific contributions to metabolic and oncogenic stress, information that could unveil previously unappreciated molecular mechanisms for the cellular crosstalk that underlies the continuum from metabolic disruption to obesity and ultimately hepatic cancer.

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition increases glucose-induced insulin secretion in response to acute restraint.

    Schweizer, Júnia R O L; Miranda, Paulo A C; Fóscolo, Rodrigo B; Lemos, Joao P M; Paula, Luciano F; Silveira, Warley C; Santos, Robson A S; Pinheiro, Sérgio V B; Coimbra, Candido C; Ribeiro-Oliveira, Antônio

    2012-12-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting involvement of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in carbohydrate metabolism and its response to stress. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic inhibition of the RAS on glucose and insulin levels during acute restraint stress. Male Holtzman rats were treated with 10 mg/kg per day enalapril solution or vehicle for 14 days. After 14 days, rats were divided into three experimental groups: enalapril + restraint (ER), vehicle + restraint (VR) and enalapril + saline (ES). Rats in the restraint groups were subjected to 30 min restraint stress, whereas rats in the ES groups were given saline infusion instead. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 5, 10, 20 and 30 min restraint stress or saline infusion. After restraint, a hyperglycaemic response was observed in the ER and VR groups that peaked at 20 and 10 min, respectively (P inhibition with enalapril may increase glucose-induced insulin secretion in response to acute restraint. PMID:23734984

  19. Severe metabolic alkalosis and recurrent acute on chronic kidney injury in a patient with Crohn's disease

    Schmid Axel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is common in patients with Crohn's disease and may be accompanied by acid base disorders, most commonly metabolic acidosis due to intestinal loss of bicarbonate. Case Presentation Here, we present a case of severe metabolic alkalosis in a young patient suffering from M. Crohn. The patient had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and suffered from chronic kidney disease. He was now referred to our clinic for recurrent acute kidney injury, the nature of which was pre-renal due to profound volume depletion. Renal failure was associated with marked hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis which only responded to high volume repletion and high dose blockade of gastric hypersecretion. Intestinal failure with stomal fluid losses of up to 5.7 litres per day required port implantation to commence parenteral nutrition. Fluid and electrolyte replacement rapidly improved renal function and acid base homeostasis. Conclusions This case highlights the important role of gastrointestinal function to maintain acid base status in patients with Crohn's disease.

  20. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  1. Is leptin related to systemic inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis?

    Andrés Duarte-Rojo; Ana Lezama-Barreda; Mar(i)a Teresa Ram(i)rez-lglesias; Mario Peláez Luna; Guillermo Robles-Diaz

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between leptin and systemic inflammation in acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis were included. Body mass index and serum samples were obtained at admission. Leptin, TNF-α, IL-6, -8and -10 levels were determined by ELISA. Severity was defined according to Atlanta criteria.RESULTS: Fifty-two (29 females) patients were studied.Overall body mass index was similar between mild and severe cases, although women with severe pancreatitis had lower body mass index (P = 0.04) and men showed higher body mass index (P = 0.05). No difference was found in leptin levels regarding the severity of pancreatitis, but higher levels tended to appear in male patients with increased body mass index and severe pancreatitis (P = 0.1). A multivariate analysis showed no association between leptin levels and severity. The strongest cytokine associated with severity was IL-6.Correlations of leptin with another cytokines only showed a trend for IL-8 (P = 0.058).CONCLUSION: High body mass index was associated with severity only in males, which may be related to android fat distribution. Serum leptin seems not to play a role on the systemic inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis and its association with severe outcome in males might represent a marker of increased adiposity.

  2. An acute method to test leptin responsiveness in rats

    Desai, Bhavna N.; Ruth B.S. Harris

    2014-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous administration of leptin normalizes blood glucose levels in rodent models of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes independent of changes in food intake, body weight, and plasma insulin. We tested whether an acute intravenous leptin infusion changed blood glucose in normal and diet-induced leptin-resistant rats to determine whether this measure could be used as a marker of leptin sensitivity. Leptin-responsive chow-fed rats and diet-induced leptin-resistant male Sprague-Dawley ra...

  3. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  4. Effect of age on 6-mercaptopurine metabolic profile during the maintenance phase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DZHANGt; AGILBER; KYAKOUBEN; YMEDARD; EVILMER; EJACQZ-AIGRAIN

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) is a thiopurine analogue administered for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). It is an inactive pro-drug that undergoes extensive metabolism resulting in the formation of active metabolites 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) and inactive 6-mercaptopurine methylated metabolites (6-MMP) under the genetic control of the enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT). 6-MP metabolic profile (6-MMP/6-TGN) was proposed as a tool to

  5. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    Chandra Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs, and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0 and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III. Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs, i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor, and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR, due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse

  6. Lung oxidative response after acute coal dust exposure

    Coal dust exposure can induce an acute alveolar and interstitial inflammation that can lead to chronic pulmonary diseases. The objective of this study was to describe the acute and later effects of acute coal dust exposure in lung parenchyma and the involvement of reactive oxygen species in coal dust effects. Forty-eight male Wistar rats (200-250 mg) were separated into four groups: 48 h, 7 days, 30 days, and 60 days after coal dust instillation. Gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.5 mL saline) was administered directly in the lungs of the treatment group by intratracheal instillation. Control animals received only saline solution (0.5 mL). Lipid peroxidation was determined by the quantity of thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS), oxidative damage to protein was obtained by the determination of carbonyl groups, the total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP) was estimated by luminol chemoluminescence emission, catalase activity was measured by the rate of decrease in hydrogen peroxide, and superoxide dismutase activity was assayed by the inhibition of adrenaline autooxidation. Histological evaluation of coal dust-treated rats demonstrated an inflammatory infiltration after 48 h of the exposure. Initially, this was a cellular infiltration suggestive of lymphocyte infiltration with lymphoid hyperplasia that remained until 7 days after induction. This initial response was followed by a chronic inflammatory infiltration characterized by aggregates of macrophages 30 days after induction. This inflammatory response tended to resolve 60 days after induction, being similar to that of control animals. During both the acute and chronic phases of lung inflammation we observed a decrease in the TRAP in the lung of coal dust-exposed animals compared to that in control animals. We also observed an activation of superoxide dismutase 60 days after coal dust exposition. TBARS were increased 60 days after coal dust exposure and protein carbonyl groups increased at all

  7. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro- reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationships of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venotis Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). Altered vascular volume had no effect on response relations of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex but did alter the gain of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex (-7.93 q 1.71, -4.36 q 1.38, and -2.56 q 1.59 peripheral resistance units/mmHg for hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic, respectively) independent of shifts in baseline FVR and PVP. These results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulnionary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  8. Acute stress responses: A review and synthesis of ASD, ASR, and CSR.

    Isserlin, Leanna; Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2008-10-01

    Toward the development of a unifying diagnosis for acute stress responses this article attempts to find a place for combat stress reaction (CSR) within the spectrum of other defined acute stress responses. This article critically compares the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder (ASD), acute stress reaction (ASR), and CSR. Prospective studies concerning the predictive value of ASD, ASR, and CSR are reviewed. Questions, recommendations, and implications for clinical practice are raised concerning the completeness of the current acute stress response diagnoses, the heterogeneity of different stressors, the scope of expected outcomes, and the importance of decline in function as an indicator of future psychological, psychiatric, and somatic distress. PMID:19123763

  9. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significant activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these data serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  10. Metabolic and transcriptomic responses of weaned pigs induced by different dietary amylose and amylopectin ratio.

    He Jun

    Full Text Available Starch is one of the major dietary energy sources for mammals. However, the nutritional value of starch largely depends on its amylose and amylopectin ratio. In this study, the overall metabolic and transcriptomic responses of weaned pigs fed with different dietary starches were assessed. Sixteen weaned pigs were randomly allotted to two experimental diets containing either of pure cassava starch (CS or maize starch (MS as the sole energy source (the amylose-amylopectin ratio were 0.25 and 0.43, respectively. Results indicated that the body weight gain was not affected by different dietary starches. However, a moderate fatty liver was observed in CS-fed group. Long-term ingestion of CS not only increased the total liver fat content, but significantly elevated the liver triglyceride and cholesterol content (P<0.05. In addition, the serum insulin and cholesterol concentrations were both elevated in CS-fed group (P<0.05. Microarray analysis led to the identification of 648 genes differentially expressed in liver (P<0.05, and a lot of them were involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Additionally, pathway analysis indicated that both the insulin and PPAR signaling pathways were acutely affected by dietary amylose-amylopectin ratio. Long-term ingestion of CS activated the transcription of lipogenic genes such as hmgr and fasn, but decreased the expression of lipolytic genes such as aox1, ppara and fbp. The microarray results correlated well with the measurements of several key enzymes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. Our results suggested that both the metabolic and transcriptomic responses of weaned pigs were tightly regulated by dietary starch composition, and a high amylose ratio starch (i.e MS may be more healthful for mammals as the long-term energy source by down-regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and steroidogenesis.

  11. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific. PMID:26476140

  12. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro-reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationship, of the cardio-pulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venous Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). The results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  13. Reduced natriuretic response to acute sodium loading in COMT Gene deleted mice

    Uhlén Staffan

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intrarenal natriuretic hormone dopamine (DA is metabolised by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT and monoamine oxidase (MAO. Inhibition of COMT, as opposed to MAO, results in a potent natriuretic response in the rat. The present study in anaesthetized homozygous and heterozygous COMT gene deleted mice attempted to further elucidate the importance of COMT in renal DA and sodium handling. After acute intravenous isotonic sodium loading, renal function was followed. Results COMT activity in heterozygous mice was about half of that in wild type mice and was zero in the homozygous mice. MAO activity did not differ between the genotypes. Urinary sodium excretion increased 10-fold after sodium loading in wild type mice. In heterozygous and homozygous mice, the natriuretic effects of sodium loading were only 29 % and 39 %, respectively, of that in wild type mice. Arterial pressure and glomerular filtration rate did not differ between genotypes. Baseline norepinephrine and DA excretions in urine were elevated in the homozygous, but not in heterozygous, COMT gene deleted mice. Urinary DA excretion increased after isotonic sodium loading in the wild type mice but not in the COMT gene deleted mice. Conclusions Mice with reduced or absent COMT activity have altered metabolism of catecholamines and are unable to increase renal DA activity and produce normal natriuresis in response to acute sodium loading. The results support the hypothesis that COMT has an important role in the DA-mediated regulation of renal sodium excretion.

  14. Acute cardiovascular responses while playing virtual games simulated by Nintendo Wii(®).

    Rodrigues, Gusthavo Augusto Alves; Felipe, Danilo De Souza; Silva, Elisangela; De Freitas, Wagner Zeferino; Higino, Wonder Passoni; Da Silva, Fabiano Fernandes; De Carvalho, Wellington Roberto Gomes; Aparecido de Souza, Renato

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the acute cardiovascular responses that occur while playing virtual games (aerobic and balance) emulated by Nintendo Wii(®). [Subjects] Nineteen healthy male volunteers were recruited. [Methods] The ergospirometric variables of maximum oxygen consumption, metabolic equivalents, and heart rate were obtained during the aerobic (Obstacle Course, Hula Hoop, and Free Run) and balance (Soccer Heading, Penguin Slide, and Table Tilt) games of Wii Fit Plus(®) software. To access and analyze the ergospirometric information, a VO2000 analyzer was used. Normalized data (using maximum oxygen consumption and heart rate) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Scheffe's test. [Results] Significant differences were found among the balance and aerobic games in all variables analyzed. In addition, the Wii exercises performed were considered to be of light (balance games) and moderate (aerobic games) intensity in accordance with American College Sports Medicine exercise stratification. [Conclusion] Physical activity in a virtual environment emulated by Nintendo Wii(®) can change acute cardiovascular responses, primarily when Wii aerobic games are performed. These results support the use of the Nintendo Wii(®) in physical activity programs. PMID:26504308

  15. Acute cardiovascular responses while playing virtual games simulated by Nintendo Wii®

    Rodrigues, Gusthavo Augusto Alves; Felipe, Danilo De Souza; Silva, Elisangela; De Freitas, Wagner Zeferino; Higino, Wonder Passoni; Da Silva, Fabiano Fernandes; De Carvalho, Wellington Roberto Gomes; Aparecido de Souza, Renato

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the acute cardiovascular responses that occur while playing virtual games (aerobic and balance) emulated by Nintendo Wii®. [Subjects] Nineteen healthy male volunteers were recruited. [Methods] The ergospirometric variables of maximum oxygen consumption, metabolic equivalents, and heart rate were obtained during the aerobic (Obstacle Course, Hula Hoop, and Free Run) and balance (Soccer Heading, Penguin Slide, and Table Tilt) games of Wii Fit Plus® software. To access and analyze the ergospirometric information, a VO2000 analyzer was used. Normalized data (using maximum oxygen consumption and heart rate) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Scheffe’s test. [Results] Significant differences were found among the balance and aerobic games in all variables analyzed. In addition, the Wii exercises performed were considered to be of light (balance games) and moderate (aerobic games) intensity in accordance with American College Sports Medicine exercise stratification. [Conclusion] Physical activity in a virtual environment emulated by Nintendo Wii® can change acute cardiovascular responses, primarily when Wii aerobic games are performed. These results support the use of the Nintendo Wii® in physical activity programs. PMID:26504308

  16. Cholinesterase inhibition and alterations of hepatic metabolism by oral acute and repeated chlorpyrifos administration to mice.

    Cometa, Maria Francesca; Buratti, Franca Maria; Fortuna, Stefano; Lorenzini, Paola; Volpe, Maria Teresa; Parisi, Laura; Testai, Emanuela; Meneguz, Annarita

    2007-05-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide bioactivated in vivo to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPFO), a very potent anticholinesterase. A great majority of available animal studies on CPF and CPFO toxicity are performed in rats. The use of mice in developmental neurobehavioural studies and the availability of transgenic mice warrant a better characterization of CPF-induced toxicity in this species. CD1 mice were exposed to a broad range of acute (12.5-100.0mg/kg) and subacute (1.56-25mg/kg/day from 5 to 30 days) CPF oral doses. Functional and biochemical parameters such as brain and serum cholinesterase (ChE) and liver xenobiotic metabolizing system, including the biotransformation of CPF itself, have been studied and the no observed effect levels (NOELs) identified. Mice seem to be more susceptible than rats at least to acute CPF treatment (oral LD(50) 4.5-fold lower). The species-related differences were not so evident after repeated exposures. In mice a good correlation was observed between brain ChE inhibition and classical cholinergic signs of toxicity. After CPF-repeated treatment, mice seemed to develop some tolerance to CPF-induced effects, which could not be attributed to an alteration of P450-mediated CPF hepatic metabolism. CPF-induced effects on hepatic microsomal carboxylesterase (CE) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels observed at an early stage of treatment and then recovered after 30 days, suggest that the detoxifying mechanisms are actively involved in the protection of CPF-induced effects and possibly in the induction of tolerance in long term exposure. The mouse could be considered a suitable experimental model for future studies on the toxic action of organophosphorus pesticides focused on mechanisms, long term and age-related effects. PMID:17382447

  17. Exercise-mediated vasodilation in human obesity and metabolic syndrome: effect of acute ascorbic acid infusion

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Kellawan, J. Mikhail; Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Proctor, Lester T.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Schrage, William G.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of ascorbic acid (AA), a potent antioxidant, would alter vasodilator responses to exercise in human obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) was measured in lean, obese, and MetSyn adults (n = 39, 32 ± 2 yr). A brachial artery catheter was inserted for blood pressure monitoring and local infusion of AA. FBF was measured during dynamic handgrip exercise (15% maximal effort) with and without AA infusion. To acco...

  18. NMR-based Metabonomic Study on Rat's Urinary Metabolic Response to Dosage of Triptolide

    XIA,Shengan; LIU,Huilang; ZHU,Hang; ZHOU,Zhiming; ZHANG,xu; LIU,Maili

    2009-01-01

    An NMR-based metabonomic approach was used to examine rat's urinary response to dosage of triptolide (TP),a major component responsible for the immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF).The urine samples of Wistar rats were collected at various time intervals before and after dosage of TP (i.p.) and measured using conventional 1 H NMR spectroscopy.The data were statistically analyzed using a principle component analysis (PCA).The results showed that biochemical variation induced by TP was time-related,and the maximal alteration in the metabolites appeared at 16 h,and partially recovered 56 h later after dosage,Increment in relative concentrations of taurine,creatine,trimethylamine N-oxide and decrement in citrate,succinate,2-oxoglutarate and hippurate were observed in the urine after dosage of TP.In addition,2'-deoxycytidine appeared 0-16 h later after the dosage,which may be considered as another biomarker for the acute hepatotoxicity.It suggested that TP may disturb the metabolism of energy and gut microflora,and may cause acute liver lesion and a slight renal impair.These results were also supported by the conventional analysis of clinical plasma chemistry and histopathology.The information observed in this article may be useful for giving insight into mechanism of liver injury induced by TP.

  19. The metabolic responses to aerial diffusion of essential oils.

    Yani Wu

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and affect a great number of people worldwide. Essential oils, take effects through inhalation or topical application, are believed to enhance physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Although clinical studies suggest that the use of essential oils may have therapeutic potential, evidence for the efficacy of essential oils in treating medical conditions remains poor, with a particular lack of studies employing rigorous analytical methods that capture its identifiable impact on human biology. Here, we report a comprehensive gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS based metabonomics study that reveals the aromas-induced metabolic changes and the anxiolytic effect of aromas in elevated plus maze (EPM induced anxiety model rats. The significant alteration of metabolites in the EPM group was attenuated by aromas treatment, concurrent with the behavioral improvement with significantly increased open arms time and open arms entries. Brain tissue and urinary metabonomic analysis identified a number of altered metabolites in response to aromas intervention. These metabolic changes included the increased carbohydrates and lowered levels of neurotransmitters (tryptophan, serine, glycine, aspartate, tyrosine, cysteine, phenylalanine, hypotaurine, histidine, and asparagine, amino acids, and fatty acids in the brain. Elevated aspartate, carbohydrates (sucrose, maltose, fructose, and glucose, nucleosides and organic acids such as lactate and pyruvate were also observed in the urine. The EPM induced metabolic differences observed in urine or brain tissue was significantly reduced after 10 days of aroma inhalation, as noted with the loss of statistical significance on many of the metabolites in the aroma-EPM group. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the metabonomics approach can capture the subtle metabolic changes resulting from exposure to essential oils

  20. Effect of glucocorticoid therapy upon glucose metabolism in COPD patients with acute exacerbation

    Objective: To study the effect of glucocorticoids therapy upon glucose metabolism in COPD patients with acute exacerbation. Methods: Plasma glucose and insulin levels in COPD patients after intravenous administration of 10 mg dexamethasone daily for 5 days were determined oral with glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release test (IRT). Results: 1) The levels of basal plasma glucose and insulin were significantly higher in severe hypoxemic group than those in moderate hypoxemic group (p 2 (r = -0.5242, p < 0.05). 2) The levels of plasma glucose in intermediate and severe hypoxemic groups were remarkable higher (p < 0.05) than those in mild group. The two peak times of glucose curve were observed at one and two hour after oral glucose load. 3) After the administration of glucocorticoids, at half an hour and one hour plasma glucose levels were significantly higher than those before, the peak time of glucose levels appeared earlier and the insulin release levels were higher than they were before therapy (p < 0.05). Conclusion: COPD patients with acute exacerbation complicated with hypoxemia had problems of impaired glucose tolerance. The administration of glucocorticoids made the impairment worse

  1. Metabolic Acidosis and Strong Ion Gap in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    Cai-Mei Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the influence of physicochemical parameters on survival in metabolic acidosis (MA and acute kidney injury (AKI patients. Materials and Methods. Seventy-eight MA patients were collected and assigned to AKI or non-AKI group. We analyzed the physiochemical parameters on survival at 24 h, 72 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after AKI. Results. Mortality rate was higher in the AKI group. AKI group had higher anion gap (AG, strong ion gap (SIG, and apparent strong ion difference (SIDa values than non-AKI group. SIG value was higher in the AKI survivors than nonsurvivors and this value was correlated serum creatinine, phosphate, albumin, and chloride levels. SIG and serum albumin are negatively correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV scores. AG was associated with mortality at 1 and 3 months post-AKI, whereas SIG value was associated with mortality at 24 h, 72 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months post-AKI. Conclusions. Whether high or low SIG values correlate with mortality in MA patients with AKI depends on its correlation with serum creatinine, chloride, albumin, and phosphate (P levels. AG predicts short-term mortality and SIG value predicts both short- and long-term mortality among MA patients with AKI.

  2. Acute post cessation smoking. A strong predictive factor for metabolic syndrome among adult Saudis

    To determine the influence of tobacco exposure in the development of metabolic syndrome (MS) in the adult Saudi population. Six hundred and sixty-four adults (305 males and 359 females) aged 25-70 years were included in this cross-sectional study conducted at the King Abdul Aziz University Hospital, between June 2006 and May 2007. We classified the participants into non-smokers, smokers, and ex-smokers (defined as complete cessation for 1-2 years). All subjects were screened for the presence of MS using the modified American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI), International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Metabolic syndrome was highest among ex-smokers regardless of definition used. Relative risk for ex-smokers (95% CI: 2.23, 1.06-4.73) was more than twice in harboring MS as compared to non-smokers (95% CI: 2.78, 1.57-4.92) (p=0.009). Acute post-cessation smoking is a strong predictor for MS among male and female Arabs. Smoking cessation programs should include a disciplined lifestyle and dietary intervention to counteract the MS-augmenting side-effect of smoking cessation. (author)

  3. Role of central nervous system in acute radiation syndrome functional metabolic encephalopathy

    In adult rabbit, the effect on the brain of a whole-body or encephalic gamma irradiation is a function of the absorbed dose and begins after 25 rads. Three phases are described in the mechanism of radiation effect. In the initial phase, irradiation acts as a direct stimulus of cerebral structures. The second phase is a response towards aggression which includes: the effect of stimulation of various cerebral structures; their response and the induced feed-back mechanism; the release of metabolites inducing a functional metabolic encephalopathy in which occur: modification of blood pressure; modification of pulmonary ventilation; modification of acido-basic blood equilibrium. The third phase consists of functional recovery

  4. Thermal sensation and thermophysiological responses with metabolic step-changes

    Goto, Tomonobu; Toftum, Jørn; deDear, Richard;

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effect on thermal perception and thermophysiological variables of controlled metabolic excursions of various intensities and durations. Twenty-four subjects alternately were seated on a chair or exercised by walking on a treadmill at a temperature predicted to be neutral...... at sedentary activity. In a second experimental series, subjects alternated between rest and exercise as well as between exercise at different intensities at two temperature levels. Measurements comprised skin and oesophageal temperatures, heart rate and subjective responses. Thermal sensation...... started to rise or decline immediately (within one minute) after a change of activity, which means that even moderate activity changes of short duration affect thermal perceptions of humans. After approximately 15-20 min under constant activity subjective thermal responses approximated the steady...

  5. Acute Endocrine Responses to Different Strength Exercise Order in Men

    da Conceição Rodrigo Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effects of order of muscle groups’ exercised (larger to smaller muscles vs. smaller to larger muscles on the acute levels of total testosterone, free testosterone and cortisol during resistance training (RT sessions. Healthy male participants (n=8; age: 28.8 ± 6.4 years; body mass: 87.0 ± 10.6 kg; body height: 181.0 ± 0.7 cm; BMI: 26.5 ± 4.1 were randomly separated into two experimental groups. The first group (LG-SM performed an RT session (3 sets of 10 repetitions and a 2 min rest period of the exercises in following order: bench press (BP, lat pulldown (LP, barbell shoulder press (BSP, triceps pushdown (TP and barbell cut (BC. The second group (SM-LG performed an RT session in following order: BC, TP, BSP, LA, BP. Blood was collected at the end of the last repetition of each session. Control samples of blood were taken after 30 min of rest. Significant differences were observed in the concentrations of total testosterone (p < 0.05, free testosterone (p < 0.0001 and cortisol (p < 0.0001 after both RT sessions in comparison to rest. However, when comparing LG-SM and SM-LG, no significant differences were found. The results suggest that, while RT sessions induce an acute change in the levels of testosterone and cortisol, this response is independent of the order of exercising muscle groups.

  6. Changes in brain oxidative metabolism induced by inhibitory avoidance learning and acute administration of amitriptyline.

    González-Pardo, Héctor; Conejo, Nélida M; Arias, Jorge L; Monleón, Santiago; Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Parra, Andrés

    2008-05-01

    The effects of antidepressant drugs on memory have been somewhat ignored, having been considered a mere side effect of these compounds. However, the memory impairment caused by several antidepressants could be considered to form part of their therapeutic effects. Amitriptyline is currently one of the most prescribed tricyclic antidepressants, and exerts marked anticholinergic and antihistaminergic effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning and acute administration of amitriptyline on brain oxidative metabolism. Brain oxidative metabolism was measured in several limbic regions using cytochrome oxidase (CO) quantitative histochemistry. Amitriptyline produced a clear impairment in the IA task. In animals exposed only to the apparatus, amitriptyline decreased CO activity in nine brain regions, without affecting the remaining regions. In animals that underwent the IA training phase, amitriptyline reduced CO activity in only three of these nine regions. In animals treated with saline, IA acquisition increased CO activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, the prelimbic cortex, and the medial mammillary body, and diminished it in the medial septum and the nucleus basalis of Meynert with respect to animals exposed only to the IA apparatus. In animals treated with amitriptyline, IA acquisition did not modify CO activity in any of these regions, but increased it in the anteromedial nucleus of the thalamus, the diagonal band of Broca, and the dentate gyrus. The results reveal a pattern of changes in brain oxidative metabolism induced by IA training in saline-treated animals that was clearly absent in animals submitted to the same behavioural training but treated with amitriptyline. PMID:18313125

  7. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of early metabolic tumor response to therapies targeting choline metabolism.

    Mignion, Lionel; Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Porporato, Paolo E; Masquelier, Julien; Gregoire, Vincent; Muccioli, Giulio G; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2016-04-15

    The cholinic phenotype, characterized by elevated phosphocholine and a high production of total-choline (tCho)-containing metabolites, is a metabolic hallmark of cancer. It can be exploited for targeted therapy. Non-invasive imaging biomarkers are required to evaluate an individual's response to targeted anticancer agents that usually do not rapidly cause tumor shrinkage. Because metabolic changes can manifest at earlier stages of therapy than changes in tumor size, the aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) H-MRS and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) as markers of tumor response to the modulation of the choline pathway in mammary tumor xenografts. Inhibition of choline kinase activity was achieved with the direct pharmacological inhibitor H-89, indirect inhibitor sorafenib and down-regulation of choline-kinase α (ChKA) expression using specific short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). While all three strategies significantly decreased tCho tumor content in vivo, only sorafenib and anti-ChKA shRNA significantly repressed tumor growth. The increase of apparent-diffusion-coefficient of water (ADCw) measured by DW-MRI, was predictive of the induced necrosis and inhibition of the tumor growth in sorafenib treated mice, while the absence of change in ADC values in H89 treated mice predicted the absence of effect in terms of tumor necrosis and tumor growth. In conclusion, (1) H-choline spectroscopy can be useful as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for choline targeted agents, while DW-MRI can be used as an early marker of effective tumor response to choline targeted therapies. DW-MRI combined to choline spectroscopy may provide a useful non-invasive marker for the early clinical assessment of tumor response to therapies targeting choline signaling. PMID:26595604

  8. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette;

    2009-01-01

    The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other...... measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14-18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase...... protein response occurring concomitantly with the hepatic response. This suggests that the acute phase protein response is a more disseminated systemic response than previously thought. The current study provides to our knowledge the first example of porcine extrahepatic expression and regulation of C...

  9. The association of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism with acute brain dysfunction during critical illness*

    Adams Wilson, Jessica R.; Morandi, Alessandro; Girard, Timothy D.; Thompson, Jennifer L.; Boomershine, Chad S.; Shintani, Ayumi K.; Ely, E. Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Plasma tryptophan levels are associated with delirium in critically ill patients. Although tryptophan has been linked to the pathogenesis of other neurocognitive diseases through metabolism to neurotoxins via the kynurenine pathway, a role for kynurenine pathway activity in intensive care unit brain dysfunction (delirium and coma) remains unknown. This study examined the association between kynurenine pathway activity as determined by plasma kynurenine concentrations and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios and presence or absence of acute brain dysfunction (defined as delirium/coma-free days) in intensive care unit patients. Design, Setting, and Patients This was a prospective cohort study that utilized patient data and blood samples from the Maximizing Efficacy of Targeted Sedation and Reducing Neurologic Dysfunction trial, which compared sedation with dexmedetomidine vs. lorazepam in mechanically ventilated patients. Measurements and Main Results Baseline plasma kynurenine and tryptophan concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with or without tandem mass spectrometry. Delirium was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. Linear regression examined associations between kynurenine pathway activity and delirium/coma-free days after adjusting for sedative exposure, age, and severity of illness. Among 84 patients studied, median age was 60 yrs and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 28.5. Elevated plasma kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were both independently associated with significantly fewer delirium/coma-free days (i.e., fewer days without acute brain dysfunction). Specifically, patients with plasma kynurenine or kynurenine/tryptophan ratios at the 75th percentile of our population had an average of 1.8 (95% confidence interval 0.6–3.1) and 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0–3.2) fewer delirium/coma-free days than those patients with values at the 25

  10. Acute Cardiovascular Response to Sign Chi Do Exercise

    Carol E. Rogers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Safe and gentle exercise may be important for older adults overcoming a sedentary lifestyle. Sign Chi Do (SCD, a novel form of low impact exercise, has shown improved balance and endurance in healthy older adults, and there have been no SCD-related injuries reported. Sedentary older adults are known to have a greater cardiovascular (CV response to physical activity than those who regularly exercise. However their CV response to SCD is unknown. This study explored the acute CV response of older adults to SCD. Cross-sectional study of 34 sedentary and moderately active adults over age 55 with no previous experience practicing SCD. Participants completed a 10 min session of SCD. CV outcomes of heart rate, blood pressure, rate pressure product were recorded at 0, 5, 10 min of SCD performance, and after 10 min of rest. HR was recorded every minute. There was no difference in CV scores of sedentary and moderately active older adults after a session of SCD-related activity. All CV scores increased at 5 min, were maintained at 10 min, and returned to baseline within 10 min post SCD (p < 0.05. SCD may be a safe way to increase participation in regular exercise by sedentary older adults.

  11. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph;

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  12. Determinants to optimize response to clopidogrel in acute coronary syndrome

    Betti Giusti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Betti Giusti, Anna Maria Gori, Rossella Marcucci, Claudia Saracini, Anna Vestrini, Rosanna AbbateDepartment of Medical and Surgical Critical Care, University of Florence, SOD Atherothrombotic Diseases, AOU Careggi, Florence, ItalyAbstract: The inhibition of platelet function by antiplatelet therapy determines the improvement of the survival of patients with clinically evident cardiovascular disease. Clopidogrel in combination with aspirin is the recommended standard of care for reducing the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, major adverse cardiovascular events including stent thrombosis occur in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that high post-treatment platelet reactivity on antiplatelet treatment is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical events. Clopidogrel requires conversion to active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. The active metabolite inhibits ADP-stimulated platelet activation by irreversibly binding to P2Y12 receptors. Recently, the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 allele has been associated with decreased metabolization of clopidogrel, poor antiaggregant effect, and increased cardiovascular events. In high risk vascular patients, the CYP2C19*2 polymorphism is a strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events and particularly of stent thrombosis. Prospective studies evaluating if an antiplatelet treatment tailored on individual characteristics of patients, CYP2C19*2 genotypes, platelet phenotype, drug–drug interaction, as well as traditional and procedural risk factors, are now urgently needed for the identification of therapeutic strategies providing the best benefit for the single subject.Keywords: antiplatelet therapy, clopidogrel, cytochrome P450 2C19 loss-of-function polymorphism, major adverse cardiovascular events, percutaneous coronary interventions

  13. Effects of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-4α on the Regulation of the Hepatic Acute Phase Response

    Wang, Zhongyan; Burke, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Following injury, a large number of hepatic acute phase genes are rapidly modulated at the transcriptional level to restore metabolic homeostasis an limit tissue damage. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α) is a liver-enriched transcription factor that controls embryonic liver development and regulates tissue specific gene expression in adult liver cells. Many genes encoding acute phase proteins contain HNF-4α binding sites in their promoter regions and are transcriptionally regulated by HNF...

  14. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs. PMID:24714543

  15. Interactions between negative energy balance, metabolic diseases, uterine health and immune response in transition dairy cows.

    Esposito, Giulia; Irons, Pete C; Webb, Edward C; Chapwanya, Aspinas

    2014-01-30

    The biological cycles of milk production and reproduction determine dairying profitability thus making management decisions dynamic and time-dependent. Diseases also negatively impact on net earnings of a dairy enterprise. Transition cows in particular face the challenge of negative energy balance (NEB) and/or disproportional energy metabolism (fatty liver, ketosis, subacute, acute ruminal acidosis); disturbed mineral utilization (milk fever, sub-clinical hypocalcemia); and perturbed immune function (retained placenta, metritis, mastitis). Consequently NEB and reduced dry matter intake are aggravated. The combined effects of all these challenges are reduced fertility and milk production resulting in diminishing profits. Risk factors such as NEB, inflammation and impairment of the immune response are highly cause-and-effect related. Thus, managing cows during the transition period should be geared toward reducing NEB or feeding specially formulated diets to improve immunity. Given that all cows experience a reduced feed intake and body condition, infection and inflammation of the uterus after calving, there is a need for further research on the immunology of transition dairy cows. Integrative approaches at the molecular, cellular and animal level may unravel the complex interactions between disturbed metabolism and immune function that predispose cows to periparturient diseases. PMID:24378117

  16. Disrupted Nitric Oxide Metabolism from Type II Diabetes and Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution.

    Ashley P Pettit

    Full Text Available Type II diabetes is an established cause of vascular impairment. Particulate air pollution is known to exacerbate cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, particularly in susceptible populations. This study set out to determine the impact of exposure to traffic pollution, with and without particle filtration, on vascular endothelial function in Type II diabetes. Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO has previously been linked to vascular health. Reactive hyperemia induces a significant increase in plasma nitrite, the proximal metabolite of NO, in healthy subjects, while diabetics have a lower and more variable level of response. Twenty type II diabetics and 20 controls (ages 46-70 years were taken on a 1.5 hr roadway traffic air pollution exposure as passengers. We analyzed plasma nitrite, as a measure of vascular function, using forearm ischemia to elicit a reactive hyperemic response before and after exposure to one ride with and one without filtration of the particle components of pollution. Control subjects displayed a significant increase in plasma nitrite levels during reactive hyperemia. This response was no longer present following exposure to traffic air pollution, but did not vary with whether or not the particle phase was filtered out. Diabetics did not display an increase in nitrite levels following reactive hyperemia. This response was not altered following pollution exposure. These data suggest that components of acute traffic pollution exposure diminish vascular reactivity in non-diabetic individuals. It also confirms that type II diabetics have a preexisting diminished ability to appropriately respond to a vascular challenge, and that traffic pollution exposure does not cause a further measureable acute change in plasma nitrite levels in Type II diabetics.

  17. Resistance to chemotherapy is associated with altered glucose metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia

    SONG, KUI; LI, MIN; XU, XIAOJUN; XUAN, LI; HUANG, GUINIAN; LIU, QIFA

    2016-01-01

    Altered glucose metabolism has been described as a cause of chemoresistance in multiple tumor types. The present study aimed to identify the expression profile of glucose metabolism in drug-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and provide potential strategies for the treatment of drug-resistant AML. Bone marrow and serum samples were obtained from patients with AML that were newly diagnosed or had relapsed. The messenger RNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, glucose transporter (GLUT)1, and hexokinase-II was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The levels of LDH and β subunit of human F1-F0 adenosine triphosphate synthase (β-F1-ATPase) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent and western blot assays. The HL-60 and HL-60/ADR cell lines were used to evaluate glycolytic activity and effect of glycolysis inhibition on cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Drug-resistant HL-60/ADR cells exhibited a significantly increased level of glycolysis compared with the drug-sensitive HL-60 cell line. The expression of HIF-1α, hexokinase-II, GLUT1 and LDH were increased in AML patients with no remission (NR), compared to healthy control individuals and patients with complete remission (CR) and partial remission. The expression of β-F1-ATPase in patients with NR was decreased compared with the expression in the CR group. Treatment of HL-60/ADR cells with 2-deoxy-D-glucose or 3-bromopyruvate increased in vitro sensitivity to Adriamycin (ADR), while treatment of HL-60 cells did not affect drug cytotoxicity. Subsequent to treatment for 24 h, apoptosis in these two cell lines showed no significant difference. However, glycolytic inhibitors in combination with ADR increased cellular necrosis. These findings indicate that increased glycolysis and low efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation may contribute to drug resistance. Targeting glycolysis is a viable strategy for modulating chemoresistance in AML.

  18. The effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on the response of cerebral blood flow to acute hypotension.

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Sugawara, Jun; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the response of cerebral blood flow to an acute change in perfusion pressure is modified by an acute increase in central blood volume. Nine young, healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. To measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation during normocapnic and hypercapnic (5%) conditions, the change in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity was analyzed during acute hypotension caused by two methods: 1) thigh-cuff occlusion release (without change in central blood volume); and 2) during the recovery phase immediately following release of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -50 mmHg) that initiated an acute increase in central blood volume. In the thigh-cuff occlusion release protocol, as expected, hypercapnia decreased the rate of regulation, as an index of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (0.236 ± 0.018 and 0.167 ± 0.025 s(-1), P = 0.024). Compared with the cuff-occlusion release, the acute increase in central blood volume (relative to the LBNP condition) with LBNP release attenuated dynamic cerebral autoregulation (P = 0.009). Therefore, the hypercapnia-induced attenuation of dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not observed in the LBNP release protocol (P = 0.574). These findings suggest that an acute change in systemic blood distribution modifies dynamic cerebral autoregulation during acute hypotension. PMID:26159757

  19. Microbial nitrogen metabolism: response to warming and resource supply

    Buckeridge, K. M.; Min, K.; Lehmeier, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem nitrogen (N) dynamics are dependent on microbial metabolic responses to a changing climate. Most studies that investigate soil microbial N dynamics in response to temperature employ measurements reflective of many interacting and confounding phenomena, as altering soil temperature can simultaneously alter moisture regime, substrate availability, and competitive dynamics between microbial populations. As a result, it is difficult to discern how temperature alone can alter patterns of microbial N metabolism using whole soils. Without that knowledge, it is impossible to parse temperature effects on soil N fluxes from other drivers. We address this issue by exploring the sensitivity of microbial partitioning of N between assimilation (growing biomass) and dissimilation (releasing N to the environment) in response to changes in temperature and quality (C:N ratio) of substrate, using a chemostat approach in which a microbial population is maintained at steady state. We perform our experiments using a Gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens), ubiquitous in soils and dependent on organic compounds to satisfy its resource demand. Individual chemostat runs, all conducted at similar microbial growth rates, generate data describing microbial biomass N, solution N pools and microbial biomass and solution d15N. With these data we can calculate d15N enrichment (d15N microbial biomass - d15N nutrient solution) a proxy for microbial N partitioning. From a recently published model of microbial biomass d15N drivers, fractionation of N occurs with both uptake and excretion of NH3+ so that microbes with a net dissimilation become 15N enriched relative to their source. Because a related study has demonstrated increased microbial C demand with temperature, we predict that in a warming environment microorganisms will become relatively C limited. Accordingly, we hypothesize that warming will enhance microbial dissimilation, and that this N release will be exacerbated as

  20. Metabolic and Transcriptional Response to Cofactor Perturbations in Escherichia coli

    Holm, Anders Koefoed; Blank, L.M.; Oldiges, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic cofactors such as NADH and ATP play important roles in a large number of cellular reactions, and it is of great interest to dissect the role of these cofactors in different aspects of metabolism. Toward this goal, we overexpressed NADH oxidase and the soluble F1-ATPase in Escherichia coli...... general understanding of redox and energy metabolism and should help in developing metabolic engineering strategies in E. coli....

  1. Tail docking in pigs: acute physiological and behavioural responses.

    Sutherland, M A; Bryer, P J; Krebs, N; McGlone, J J

    2008-02-01

    Tail docking of piglets is a routine procedure on farms to control tail-biting behaviour; however, docking can cause an acute stress response. The objectives of this research were to determine the stress responses to tail docking in piglets and to compare two methods of tail docking; cautery iron (CAUT) and the more commonly used blunt trauma cutters (BT). At approximately 6 days of age, piglets were tail docked using CAUT (n = 20), BT (n = 20) or sham tail docked with their tails remaining intact (CON; n = 40). Blood samples were taken prior to tail docking and at 30, 60 and 90 min after tail docking to evaluate the effect of tail docking on white blood cell (WBC) measures and cortisol concentrations. The above experiment was repeated to observe behaviour without the periodic blood sampling, so as not to confound the effects of blood sampling on piglet behaviour. Piglet behaviour was recorded in the farrowing crate using 1 min scan-samples via live observations for 60 min prior to and 90 min after tail docking. Total WBC counts were reduced (P > 0.05) among BT and CAUT compared with CON piglets 30 min after tail docking. Cortisol concentrations were higher (P tail docking. Cautery and BT-docked piglets spent more (P tail docking. Piglets tail docked using CAUT and BT tended to spend more (P tail docking. Elevated blood cortisol can be reduced by the use of the CAUT rather than the BT method of tail docking. Although the tail docking-induced rise in cortisol was prevented by using CAUT, the behavioural response to BT and CAUT docking methods was similar. PMID:22445023

  2. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children. PMID:24889648

  3. The innate immune response in ischemic acute kidney injury

    Jang, Hye Ryoun; Rabb, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Kidney ischemia reperfusion injury is a major cause of morbidity in both allograft and native kidneys. Ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is characterized by early, allo-antigen independent inflammation. Major components of the innate immune system are activated and participate in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury, plus prime the allograft kidney for rejection. Soluble members of innate immunity implicated in acute kidney injury include the complement system, cytokines, an...

  4. Necrosis-Driven Systemic Immune Response Alters SAM Metabolism through the FOXO-GNMT Axis

    Fumiaki Obata

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sterile inflammation triggered by endogenous factors is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Here, we demonstrate that apoptosis-deficient mutants spontaneously develop a necrosis-driven systemic immune response in Drosophila and provide an in vivo model for studying the organismal response to sterile inflammation. Metabolomic analysis of hemolymph from apoptosis-deficient mutants revealed increased sarcosine and reduced S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM levels due to glycine N-methyltransferase (Gnmt upregulation. We showed that Gnmt was elevated in response to Toll activation induced by the local necrosis of wing epidermal cells. Necrosis-driven inflammatory conditions induced dFoxO hyperactivation, leading to an energy-wasting phenotype. Gnmt was cell-autonomously upregulated by dFoxO in the fat body as a possible rheostat for controlling energy loss, which functioned during fasting as well as inflammatory conditions. We propose that the dFoxO-Gnmt axis is essential for the maintenance of organismal SAM metabolism and energy homeostasis.

  5. Physiological responses to acute experimental hypoxia in the air-breathing Indian catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758)

    Ratnesh Kumar Tripathi; Vindhya Mohindra; Akanksha Singh; Rajesh Kumar; Rahasya Mani Mishra; Joy Krushna Jena

    2013-06-01

    With an aim to study the mechanism of adaptation to acute hypoxic periods by hypoxia-tolerant catfish, Clarias batrachus, the mass-specific metabolic rate (VO2) along with its hematological parameters, metabolic response and antioxidant enzyme activities were studied. During progressive hypoxia, C. batrachus was found to be an oxyconformer and showed a steady decline in its aquatic oxygen consumption rate. When C. batrachus was exposed for different periods at experimental hypoxia level (0.98±0.1 mg/L, DO), hemoglobin and hematocrit concentrations were increased, along with decrease in mean cellular hemoglobin concentration, which reflected a physiological adaptation to enhance oxygen transport capacity. Significant increase in serum glucose and lactate concentration as well as lactate dehydrogenase activity was observed. Antioxidant enzymes were found to operate independently of one another, while total glutathione concentration was unaffected in any of the tissues across treatments. These observations suggested that hypoxia resulted in the development of oxidative stress and C. batrachus was able to respond through increase in the oxygen carrying capacity, metabolic depression and efficient antioxidant defense system to survive periods of acute hypoxia.

  6. Cattle temperament influences metabolism: metabolic response to glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests in beef steers.

    Burdick Sanchez, N C; Carroll, J A; Broadway, P R; Hughes, H D; Roberts, S L; Richeson, J T; Schmidt, T B; Vann, R C

    2016-07-01

    Cattle temperament, defined as the reactivity of cattle to humans or novel environments, can greatly influence several physiological systems in the body, including immunity, stress, and most recently discovered, metabolism. Greater circulating concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) found in temperamental cattle suggest that temperamental cattle are metabolically different than calm cattle. Further, elevated NEFA concentrations have been reported to influence insulin sensitivity. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether cattle temperament would influence the metabolic response to a glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin sensitivity test (IST). Angus-cross steers (16 calm and 15 temperamental; 216 ± 6 kg BW) were selected based on temperament score measured at weaning. On day 1, steers were moved into indoor stanchions to allow measurement of individual ad libitum feed intake. On day 6, steers were fitted with indwelling rectal temperature probes and jugular catheters. At 9 AM on day 7, steers received the GTT (0.5-mL/kg BW of a 50% dextrose solution), and at 2 PM on day 7, steers received the IST (2.5 IU bovine insulin/kg BW). Blood samples were collected and serum isolated at -60, -45, -30, -15, 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min relative to each challenge. Serum was stored at -80°C until analyzed for cortisol, glucose, NEFA, and blood urea nitrogen concentrations. All variables changed over time (P < 0.01). For the duration of the study, temperamental steers maintained greater (P < 0.01) serum NEFA and less (P ≤ 0.01) serum blood urea nitrogen and insulin sensitivity (calculated using Revised Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index) compared with calm steers. During the GTT, temperamental steers had greater (P < 0.01) serum glucose, yet decreased (P = 0.03) serum insulin and (P < 0.01) serum insulin: serum glucose compared to calm cattle. During the IST, temperamental steers had greater (P < 0.01) serum

  7. Acute effect of high-dose isoflavones from Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi on lipid and bone metabolism in ovariectomized mice.

    Cho, Hee Joon; Jun, Hee-jin; Lee, Ji Hae; Jia, Yaoyao; Hoang, Minh Hien; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the acute metabolic effects of isoflavones from Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi (IPL) in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. After 4 weeks of IPL feeding at 500 mg/day/kg body weight (OVX500), plasma 17β-estradiol concentrations were significantly higher (+25%, p menopausal symptoms in mice. Further studies will confirm the effects of IPL in humans. PMID:22422661

  8. Acute steatohepatitis, due to extreme metabolic dysregulation, as the first presentation of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Georgios Kranidiotis; Angeliki Angelidi; Emmanouel Sevdalis; Thomas-Nikolaos Telios; Alexandra Gougoutsi; Andreas Melidonis

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a slowly progressive chronic disease, with a high prevalence among obese, dyslipidemic or diabetic people, commonly presented as an asymptomatic mild elevation of serum aminotransferases. We report a patient who experienced an acute form of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, as the first manifestation of NAFLD, due to exacerbation of pre-existing metabolic disorders by an extremely unhealthy lifestyle. A 50-year old, obese, diabetic man presented with ...

  9. Sprague-Dawley rats display metabolism-mediated sex differences in the acute toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy)

    The use of the amphetamine derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has been associated with unexplained deaths. Male humans and rodents are more sensitive to acute toxicity than are females, including a potentially lethal hyperthermia. MDMA is highly metabolized to five main metabolites, by the enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP2D. The major metabolite in rats, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), also causes hyperthermia. We postulated that the reported sex difference in rats is due to a sexual dimorphism(s). We therefore determined (1) the LD50 of MDMA and MDA, (2) their hyperthermic effects, (3) the activities of liver CYP1A2 and CYP2D, (4) the liver microsomal metabolism of MDMA and MDA, (5) and the plasma concentrations of MDMA and its metabolites 3 h after giving male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats MDMA (5 mg.kg-1 sc). The LD50 of MDMA was 2.4-times lower in males than in females. MDMA induced greater hyperthermia (0.9 deg. C) in males. The plasma MDA concentration was 1.3-fold higher in males, as were CYP1A2 activity (twice) and N-demethylation to MDA (3.3-fold), but the plasma MDMA concentration (1.4-fold) and CYP2D activity (1.3-fold) were higher in females. These results suggest that male SD rats are more sensitive to MDMA acute toxicity than are females, probably because their CYP1A2 is more active, leading to higher N-demethylation and plasma MDA concentration. This metabolic pathway could be responsible for the lethality of MDMA, as the LD50 of MDA is the same in both sexes. These data strongly suggest that the toxicity of amphetamine-related drugs largely depends on metabolic differences

  10. Effect of acute negative and positive energy balance on basal very-low density lipoprotein triglyceride metabolism in women.

    Elena Bellou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute reduction in dietary energy intake reduces very low-density lipoprotein triglyceride (VLDL-TG concentration. Although chronic dietary energy surplus and obesity are associated with hypertriglyceridemia, the effect of acute overfeeding on VLDL-TG metabolism is not known. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute negative and positive energy balance on VLDL-TG metabolism in healthy women. DESIGN: Ten healthy women (AGE: 22.0±2.9 years, BMI: 21.2±1.3 kg/m(2 underwent a stable isotopically labeled tracer infusion study to determine basal VLDL-TG kinetics after performing, in random order, three experimental trials on the previous day: i isocaloric feeding (control ii hypocaloric feeding with a dietary energy restriction of 2.89±0.42 MJ and iii hypercaloric feeding with a dietary energy surplus of 2.91±0.32 MJ. The three diets had the same macronutrient composition. RESULTS: Fasting plasma VLDL-TG concentrations decreased by ∼26% after hypocaloric feeding relative to the control trial (P = 0.037, owing to decreased hepatic VLDL-TG secretion rate (by 21%, P = 0.023 and increased VLDL-TG plasma clearance rate (by ∼12%, P = 0.016. Hypercaloric feeding increased plasma glucose concentration (P = 0.042 but had no effect on VLDL-TG concentration and kinetics compared to the control trial. CONCLUSION: Acute dietary energy deficit (∼3MJ leads to hypotriglyceridemia via a combination of decreased hepatic VLDL-TG secretion and increased VLDL-TG clearance. On the other hand, acute dietary energy surplus (∼3MJ does not affect basal VLDL-TG metabolism but disrupts glucose homeostasis in healthy women.

  11. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy.

    Slone, William L; Moses, Blake S; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-04-26

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  12. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  13. Anti-irritants I: Dose-response in acute irritation

    Andersen, Flemming; Hedegaard, Kathryn; Petersen, Thomas Kongstad;

    2006-01-01

    induced acute irritation in healthy volunteers. Each AI was used in 3 concentrations. Acute irritation was induced by occlusive tests with 1% sodium lauryl sulfate and 20% nonanoic acid in N-propanol. The irritant reactions were treated twice daily with AI-containing formulations from the time of removal...

  14. Acute toxicity, biochemical and histopathological responses of endosulfan in Chanos chanos.

    Kumar, Neeraj; Ambasankar, K; Krishnani, K K; Gupta, S K; Bhushan, Shashi; Minhas, P S

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated 96h median lethal concentration of endosulfan (99%, pure α: β ratio of 7:3) by conducting static non-renewable acute toxicity bio-assay in Chanos chanos juvenile with average weight (110±5.65g). Further, the effect of different definitive doses (18.5, 19.5, 20.5, 21.5 and 22.5µg/L) of endosulfan on metabolic, heamato-immunoligcal and histopathological response were probed. Anti-oxidative enzymes CAT, SOD and GST showed significant (p<0.01) increase of activity in the liver, gill and brain during exposure to endosulfan in a dose and time dependent manner. The brain AChE activity showed significant (p<0.01) inhibition from 18.5 to 22.5µg/L exposure of endosulfan than the control group. LDH and MDH activity gradually increased with consequent increasing dose of endosulfan exposure in the liver, gill and brain. Similarly, ALT, AST and G6PDH activities in both liver and gill increased with consequent increases in the dose of endosulfan exposure. Immunological profile such as blood glucose and serum cortisol level significantly enhanced while respiratory burst activity declined with consequent increasing doses of endosulfan exposure. Histopathological alteration in the gill demonstrated curling of secondary lamellae, thickening of primary epithelium, shorting of secondary lamellae, epithelial hyperplasia, fusion of secondary lamellae, aneurism, and collapsed secondary lamellae due to dose dependent exposure of endosulfan. Liver histology illustrated cloudy swelling and necrosis with pyknotic nuclei to the moderate dose of endosulfan, whereas higher dose of endosulfan (21.5µg/L) displayed severe necrosis of hepatic cells. Overall results clearly indicate that acute exposure of endosulfan led to pronounced deleterious alterations on biochemical, heamato-immunological, and histopathological responses of C. chanos juvenile. PMID:27213563

  15. Metabolic Alterations of the Zebrafish Brain after Acute Alcohol Treatment by 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Dong-Cheol Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the metabolic alterations associated with acute alcohol treatment in zebrafish by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS. The brain metabolism of zebrafish was investigated after acute alcohol treatment (one-hour long exposure of adult fish to 0.00%, 0.25%, 0.50%, or 1.00% ethyl alcohol with whole brain extraction. The results of this study showed that glutamate (Glu was significantly decreased, scyllo-inositol (sIns showed a small apparent increase only in the highest acute treatment dose group, and myoinositol (mIns showed a significant decrease. [Glu]/[tCr] and [mIns]/[tCr] levels were significantly reduced regardless of the alcohol dose, and [sIns]/[tCr] was increased in the highest alcohol treatment dose group. The present NMR study revealed that specific metabolites, such as Glu and mIns, were substantially decreased in case of acute alcohol exposed zebrafish brain.

  16. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, Per; Donovan, E R; Labocha, M K; Sears, M W; Downs, C J; Sorensen, Daniel; Hayes, J P

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selecti...

  17. Acute electrophysiological responses of bradykinin-stimulated human fibroblasts.

    Estacion, M

    1991-05-01

    1. Acute responses to bradykinin in human dermal fibroblasts were studied at 20-24 degrees C using both the patch-clamp technique to monitor ion currents and Fura-2 fluorescence to monitor [Ca2+]i. 2. During subconfluent culture, human dermal fibroblasts can express a diversity of ion channels as described in the preceding paper. 3. When GTP (1 mM) was included in the pipette solution, two additional ion channel populations were transiently augmented in response to bradykinin stimulation. 4. The first is a component of outwardly rectifying current which reached maximal induction within 10-15 s after bradykinin addition (1 microM) and then decayed back to near baseline over 60 s. 5. Ion substitution experiments combined with tail current analysis indicate that the outward current is carried predominantly by K+. 6. Video imaging of single-cell Fura-2 fluorescence from both intact cells and patch-clamped cells showed temporal correlation of the K+ current modulation and the Ca2+ transients in response to bradykinin stimulation. 7. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, caused both an increase in intracellular calcium and the augmentation of the outward K+ current. The amount of additional K+ current was correlated with [Ca2+]i levels and could be elicited even without the presence of GTP in the pipette. 8. Apamin, a blocker of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels, inhibited (at 1 microM) the ionomycin-induced modulation of K+ current. 9. In addition, an inward current was transiently induced in response to bradykinin. This current was strictly dependent on the presence of GTP in the pipette solution. This current showed little voltage dependence, as evidenced by a linear current vs. voltage relation, and a reversal potential near but measurably more positive than 0 mV. 10. This current could be decoupled from the Ca2+ transient and be irreversibly induced by including GTP gamma S (100 microM) in the pipette solution. 11. Ion substitution experiments show that this is a non

  18. Inflammatory response in the early prediction of severity in human acute pancreatitis.

    Viedma, J A; M. Pérez-Mateo; Agulló, J.; Domínguez, J E; F. Carballo

    1994-01-01

    The role of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis and its relation with the clinical course was examined. This study examined if the serial measurement of polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) elastase/A1PI complex, phospholipase A catalytic activity, C reactive protein, and other acute phase proteins, and the protease inhibitor alpha 2-macroglobulin, provides meaningful information for prognosis. Eighty non-consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis, classified according to their c...

  19. Discrete Cues Paired with Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal from Acute Morphine Dependence Elicit Conditioned Withdrawal Responses

    Amitai, Nurith; Liu, Jian; Schulteis, Gery

    2006-01-01

    Acute bolus doses of morphine induce a state of acute opioid dependence as measured by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Repeated morphine and precipitated withdrawal experience further enhances naloxone-induced withdrawal severity, in part due to direct neuroadaptation to repeated morphine, and in part due to conditioned associations of context and withdrawal experience. To determine whether a discrete tone/light conditioned stimulus (CS) could elicit conditioned withdrawal responses in acut...

  20. Roles of STAT3 in Protein Secretion Pathways during the Acute-Phase Response

    Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N.; Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Ferrari, Joseph D.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary A.; Mella, Juan R.; Remick, Daniel G.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characteristic of perhaps all infections, including bacterial pneumonia. In conjunction with the acute-phase response, additional biological pathways are induced in the liver and are dependent on the transcription factors STAT3 and NF-κB, but these responses are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that pneumococcal pneumonia and other severe infections increase expression of multiple components of the cellular secretory machinery in the mouse liver, including t...

  1. Multiple biomarkers responses in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, after acute exposure to a fungicide propiconazole.

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Zlabek, Vladimir; Velisek, Josef; Grabic, Roman; Machova, Jana; Kolarova, Jitka; Li, Ping; Randak, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the toxic effects of propiconazole (PCZ), a triazole fungicide present in aquatic environment, were studied in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, by acute toxicity test with the concentration of 5.04 mg/L (96 h LC50). Morphological indices, hematological parameters, liver xenobiotic-metabolizing response, and tissue antioxidant status were evaluated. Compared with the control group, fish exposed to PCZ showed significantly higher Leuko, PCV, MCHC, and hepatic EROD, and significantly lower MCV. CF and HSI were not significantly different among groups. SOD, CAT, GPx, and GR activities increased significantly in liver of experimental groups, but decreased significantly in gill. In general, antioxidant enzyme activity in intestine was less evident than in liver. Oxidative stress indices (levels of LPO and CP) were significantly higher in gill. Additionally, through chemometrics of all parameters measured in this study, two groups with 67.29% of total accumulated variance were distinguished. In short, the physiological and biochemical responses in different tissues of fish indicated that PCZ-induced the stressful environmental conditions. But according to PCZ residual status in the natural environment, more long-term experiments at lower concentrations will be necessary in the future. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2013. PMID:21384499

  2. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise

    Catoire, Milène; Alex, Sheril; Paraskevopulos, Nicolas;

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity increases energy metabolism in exercising muscle. Whether acute exercise elicits metabolic changes in nonexercising muscles remains unclear. We show that one of the few genes that is more highly induced in nonexercising muscle than in exercising human muscle during acute exercis...... use of plasma triglycerides as fuel for active muscles. Our data suggest that nonexercising muscle and the local regulation of ANGPTL4 via AMPK and free fatty acids have key roles in governing lipid homeostasis during exercise.......Physical activity increases energy metabolism in exercising muscle. Whether acute exercise elicits metabolic changes in nonexercising muscles remains unclear. We show that one of the few genes that is more highly induced in nonexercising muscle than in exercising human muscle during acute exercise......-activated receptor-δ, presumably leading to reduced local uptake of plasma triglyceride-derived fatty acids and their sparing for use by exercising muscle. In contrast, the induction of ANGPTL4 in exercising muscle likely is counteracted via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mediated down-regulation, promoting the...

  3. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    Chandra Prakash; Baltazar Zuniga; Chung Seog Song; Shoulei Jiang; Jodie Cropper; Sulgi Park; Bandana Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D recep...

  4. Acute lung injury induced by whole gastric fluid: hepatic acute phase response contributes to increase lung antiprotease protection

    Ayala, Pedro; Meneses, Manuel; Olmos, Pablo; Montalva, Rebeca; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Borzone, Gisella

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric contents aspiration in humans is a risk factor for severe respiratory failure with elevated mortality. Although aspiration-induced local lung inflammation has been studied in animal models, little is known about extrapulmonary effects of aspiration. We investigated whether a single orotracheal instillation of whole gastric fluid elicits a liver acute phase response and if this response contributes to enrich the alveolar spaces with proteins having antiprotease activity. Met...

  5. Local and disseminated acute phase response during bacterial respiratory infection in pigs

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2010-01-01

    proteins (APP) outside the liver is increasingly recognized, still little is known of extra-hepatic production of APP in pigs. 14-18 h after experimental infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, causing acute pleuropneumonia in pigs, we studied local APP gene expression changes in different......The acute phase response is playing an important role, aiming to restore the healthy state after tissue injury, inflammation and infection. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate defense reactions remain somewhat elusive. Expression of acute phase...... differentially expressed between infected and control animals. We demonstrated that acute pleuropneumonia caused by A. pleuropneumoniae leads to a rapid disseminated local intra-lung APP response, also in apparently unaffected areas of the infected lung. Further extrahepatic expression of several acute-phase...

  6. Hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass

    苏肇伉; 周成斌; 张海波; 祝忠群

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods Six pregnant ewes underwent fetal cardiopulmonary bypasses with artificial oxygenators and roller pumps for 30 minutes, which maintained the blood gas value at the fetal physiological level. The fetal blood pressure, heart rate, pH value and blood lactate levels were monitored. The levels of catecholamine, cortisol and insulin were measured pre-bypass and then again 30 minutes later. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels were monitored continuously during the bypass. Fetal hepatic PAS staining was also carried out.Results There were no changes before and during the bypass in fetal blood pressure, heart rate and blood gas. However, pH values decreased and blood lactate levels increased (P<0.05). The fetal catecholamine and cortisol levels increased significantly (P<0.01), while the levels of insulin did not change. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels increased at the beginning of the bypass (P<0.01), and then gradually slowed down during the bypass. The fetal hepatic PAS staining showed that hepatic glycogen was consumed in large amounts. After 30 minutes of bypass, the fetal lamb would not survive more than 1 hour.Conclusion The fetal lamb has a strong negative reaction to cardiopulmonary bypass.

  7. Metabolic response to dietary fibre composition in horses.

    Brøkner, C; Austbø, D; Næsset, J A; Blache, D; Bach Knudsen, K E; Tauson, A H

    2016-07-01

    The hypothesis for this study was that a higher dietary proportion of soluble fibre would result in stable and constant plasma metabolite and regulatory hormone concentrations. The study was a 4×4 Latin Square design with a sequence of 17 days adaptation to the ration followed by 8 sampling days. The feed rations consisted of only timothy hay (H), hay plus molassed sugar beet pulp combined with either whole oats (OB) or barley (BB) and hay plus a loose chaff-based concentrate (M). Four horses were fitted with permanent caecal cannulas and liquid caecal content was withdrawn manually and blood was drawn from the jugular vein at 0, 3 and 9 h postprandial. The horses were exercised daily at medium level for about 1 h. Samples were analysed for short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and metabolic traits. Caecal SCFA and propionic acid concentrations increased with increased dietary starch and soluble fibre. The diet highest in soluble fibre (M) resulted in the highest plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in the morning, which then remained stable and constant throughout the day. A strong interaction (P<0.01) between time and diet was measured for plasma urea, glucose, insulin and leptin. The greatest variations in plasma glycaemic and insulinaemic responses were associated with the cereal grain diets (OB and BB). There were indications of a negative energy balance, which was reflected in a significantly higher plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentration and a numerically higher non-esterified fatty acid concentration. In conclusion, this study found that inclusion of soluble fibre resulted in increased total caecal SCFA and propionic acid concentrations. This consequently resulted in stable and constant plasma glycaemic and insulinaemic responses. Diets with a high content of soluble fibre provided enough energy for horses at medium work level. PMID:26755337

  8. Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Metabolism Responses to Amino Acid Nutrition.

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Healthy individuals maintain remarkably constant skeletal muscle mass across much of adult life, suggesting the existence of robust homeostatic mechanisms. Muscle exists in dynamic equilibrium whereby the influx of amino acids (AAs) and the resulting increases in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) associated with the intake of dietary proteins cancel out the efflux of AAs from muscle protein breakdown that occurs between meals. Dysregulated proteostasis is evident with aging, especially beyond the sixth decade of life. Women and men aged 75 y lose muscle mass at a rate of ∼0.7% and 1%/y, respectively (sarcopenia), and lose strength 2- to 5-fold faster (dynapenia) as muscle "quality" decreases. Factors contributing to the disruption of an otherwise robust proteostatic system represent targets for potential therapies that promote healthy aging. Understanding age-related impairments in anabolic responses to AAs and identifying strategies to mitigate these factors constitute major areas of interest. Numerous studies have aimed to identify 1) the influence of distinct protein sources on absorption kinetics and muscle anabolism, 2) the latency and time course of MPS responses to protein/AAs, 3) the impacts of protein/AA intake on muscle microvascular recruitment, and 4) the role of certain AAs (e.g., leucine) as signaling molecules, which are able to trigger anabolic pathways in tissues. This review aims to discuss these 4 issues listed, to provide historical and modern perspectives of AAs as modulators of human skeletal muscle protein metabolism, to describe how advances in stable isotope/mass spectrometric approaches and instrumentation have underpinned these advances, and to highlight relevant differences between young adults and older individuals. Whenever possible, observations are based on human studies, with additional consideration of relevant nonhuman studies. PMID:27422520

  9. Effects of chronic kidney disease on platelet response to antiplatelet therapy in acute myocardial infarction patients

    邓捷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the effects of dual antiplatelet therapy on platelet response in acute myocardial infarction patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods From September 2011 to June 2012,a total of 195 acute myocardial infarction patients with drug eluting stent implanting were enrolled. Among them,133 cases had normal

  10. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose

  11. Acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses to a basketball game

    Denis Foschini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses of professional basketball players to a basketball game. The sample was composed of eight basketball athletes, with a minimum of 4 years’ experience in basketball. A real game was simulated with a total duration of 40 minutes, divided into two halves of 20 minutes each and an interval of 10 minutes between halves. Blood samples were collected before andimmediately after the game (20 ml, vacuum tube system. The variables analyzed were: testosterone and cortisol hormones, total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and the enzymes creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Statistical analysis was with descriptive statistics and the Student’s t test for paired samples to p≤0.05. The pre (13.34 nmol/L and 301.97 nmol/L and post game (17.34 nmol/L and 395.91 nmol/L levels of testosterone and cortisol were statistically different, with higher levels after the game for both hormones. The immune cell counts exhibited significant differences for total leukocytes (6393.75 nmol/L and 9158.75 nmol/L and neutrophils (3532.5 nmol/L and 6392.62 nmol/L, with levels being higher after the game. No statistical differences were observed for the enzymatic variables. Therefore, based on the markers analyzed, testosterone and cortisol exhibited pronounced increases after the game and the samebehavior was observed for total leukocytes and neutrophils.

  12. Presence of acute phase response in coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    Fernandez Rego, G; Ocio Achaerandio, G; González Cuervo, V; Rodríquez Menéndez, C; Martínez Gonezález, C; Alvarez Alvarez, C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the role of personal factors in pneumoconiosis, several acute phase proteins were studied in 62 coal miners without acute illnesses and classified as having no pneumoconiosis (n = 19), simple pneumoconiosis (n = 23), or complicated pneumoconiosis with progressive massive fibrosis (n = 20). Groups were similar for age, years of work at high risk jobs, chronic bronchitis, and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). C-reactive protein concentration was significantly higher in ...

  13. Metabolism

    ... also influenced by body composition — people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMRs. previous continue Things That Can Go Wrong With Metabolism Most of the time your metabolism works effectively ...

  14. Metabolism

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  15. A combined clinical and biomarker approach to predict diuretic response in acute heart failure

    Ter Maaten, Jozine M; Valente, Mattia A E; Metra, Marco; Bruno, Noemi; O'Connor, Christopher M; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G; Givertz, Michael M; Bloomfield, Daniel M; Dittrich, Howard C; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans L; Damman, Kevin; Voors, Adriaan A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor diuretic response in acute heart failure is related to poor clinical outcome. The underlying mechanisms and pathophysiology behind diuretic resistance are incompletely understood. We evaluated a combined approach using clinical characteristics and biomarkers to predict diuretic resp

  16. Acute steatohepatitis, due to extreme metabolic dysregulation, as the first presentation of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Georgios Kranidiotis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a slowly progressive chronic disease, with a high prevalence among obese, dyslipidemic or diabetic people, commonly presented as an asymptomatic mild elevation of serum aminotransferases. We report a patient who experienced an acute form of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, as the first manifestation of NAFLD, due to exacerbation of pre-existing metabolic disorders by an extremely unhealthy lifestyle. A 50-year old, obese, diabetic man presented with a one-week history of jaundice and malaise. Analysis revealed elevated liver enzymes, bilirubin, lipids, and glucose. Based on patient’s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings, acute non-alcoholic steatohepatitis was established as a diagnosis of exclusion. The patient was started on a low-calorie diet free of carbohydrates and fats, in combination with insulin. A dramatic improvement of clinical and laboratory parameters was observed. In the context of extreme metabolic dysregulation, induced by unhealthy diet, NAFLD may present as an acute steatohepatitis.

  17. Acute responses of regional vascular conductance to oral ingestion of fructose in healthy young humans

    Endo, Masako Y; Fujihara, Chizuko; Yamazaki, Chinami; Kashima, Hideaki; Eguchi, Kouhei; Miura, Akira; Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, it was reported in healthy young subjects that fructose containing drinks increased blood pressure acutely, without any apparent change in total vascular conductance (TVC). However, because it is well known that the splanchnic vasculature is dilated by oral fructose ingestion, it is assumed to be the concomitant vasoconstriction in other peripheral region(s) that is responsible for this finding. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the acute response of region...

  18. Manipulation of the metabolic response in clinical practice

    Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    Surgical injury is followed by profound changes in endocrine metabolic function and various host defense mechanisms leading to catabolism, immunosuppression, ileus, impaired pulmonary function, and hypoxemia. These physiologic changes are supposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of postoperati...

  19. Studies of cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolism, cerebral glucose metabolism, and tissue pH in human acute cerebral infarction using positron emission tomography

    This preliminary PET study was designed to investigate physiological and biochemical changes in acute cerebral infarction by positron emission tomography (PET). PET studies were performed in six patients with acute cerebral infarction within 48 hours after onset of stroke using continuous inhalation of C15O2 for cerebral blood flow (CBF), 15O2 for cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), 11CO for cerebral blood volume, the intravenous injection of 11C-dimethyloxazolidinedione for tissue pH and the intravenous injection of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose for cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlu). Metabolic coupling index (MCI) image was made from CBF image and CMRGlu image to investigate relation between CBF and CMRGlu. Aslo oxygen glucose index (OGI) image was made from CMRO2 image and CMRG lu image to investigate relation between CMRO2 and CMRGlu. Preliminary resul ts demonstrate that reduction of CBF, CMRO2, and CMRGlu in the affected co rtex except for reperfusion case. Increase of OER was recognized four of six cases. Patterns of MCI and OGI in the cortex which CMRO2 value is less than 65 μmol/100g/min were different from those in the cortex which CMRO2 value is more than 65. MCI of the affected cortex (CMRO22>=65). OGI of the affected cortex (CMRO22>=65). Two patients showed decrease of tissue pH and reperfusion case showed increase of tissue pH in infarcted area as compared to contralateral cortex. In addition it was suggested that threshold of CBF for tissue pH was approximately 14ml/100g/min. (J.P.N.)

  20. Distinct metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer stem cell line

    Kathleen A Vermeersch; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John F; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer metabolism is emerging as an important focus area in cancer research. However, the in vitro cell culture conditions under which much cellular metabolism research is performed differ drastically from in vivo tumor conditions, which are characterized by variations in the levels of oxygen, nutrients like glucose, and other molecules like chemotherapeutics. Moreover, it is important to know how the diverse cell types in a tumor, including cancer stem cells that are believed to b...

  1. Metabolic Response of Perfused Livers to Various Oxygenation Conditions

    Orman, Mehmet A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Berthiaume, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Isolated liver perfusion systems have been used to characterize intrinsic metabolic changes in liver as a result of various perturbations, including systemic injury, hepatotoxin exposure, and warm ischemia. Most of these studies were done using hyperoxic conditions (95% O2) but without the use of oxygen carriers in the perfusate. Prior literature data do not clearly establish the impact of oxygenation, and in particular that of adding oxygen carriers to the perfusate, on the metabolic functio...

  2. Circulatory response to hyperthermia during acute normovolaemic haemodilution

    Talwar, Anita; Fahim, M.

    Cats anaesthetized with a mixture of chloralose and urethane were exposed to heat stress in two groups. In the first group (n=10) of control animals, the effect of heat stress on haemodynamic variables was recorded at control haematocrit (HCT) of 42.0+/-1.0%. In a second group, the effect of heat stress was studied after induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution (HCT of 13.0+/-1.0%). Haemodilution was induced to a maximum of 60% replacement of blood with dextran (mol.wt. 150000). Heat stress was induced by surface heating and core body temperature was raised from 37° C to 42° C. The effect of heat stress and haemodilution on various haemodynamic variables, viz. left ventricular pressure (LVP), left ventricular contractility (LVdP/dtmax), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), arterial blood pressure (ABP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and arterial blood PO2, PCO2 and pH was examined. Haemodilution produced significant (P0.05) changes in ABP, RAP, LVdP/dtmax and total peripherial resistance (TPR). Hyperthermia caused a significant fall (P<0.05) in TPR. However, the percentage fall in TPR was higher in the control group. On exposure to heat stress, there were significant (P<0.05I increases in HR and CO in both the groups; however, HR and CO values were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the haemodiluted group compared to the control. The latter findings could be due either to the higher basal values of these variables with the fall in HCT or to inefficient cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The lack of efficient regulatory control under such severe stress conditions makes the cardiovascular system of anaemic animals more vulnerable to heat stress. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed deleterious effects of heat stress in both the groups. The higher values of HR and CO in the haemodiluted group may be responsible for circulatory failure at low HCT values, indicating a higher risk in the haemodiluted group as compared to the control group.

  3. Acute inflammation reduces kisspeptin immunoreactivity at the arcuate nucleus and decreases responsiveness to kisspeptin independently of its anorectic effects

    Castellano, J M; Bentsen, A H; Romero, M;

    2010-01-01

    the arcuate nucleus (ARC) that was not observed under conditions of metabolic stress induced by 48-h fasting. In addition, absolute responses to kisspeptin-10 (Kp-10), in terms of LH and testosterone secretion, were significantly attenuated in LPS-treated males that also displayed a decrease in food......Severe inflammatory challenges are frequently coupled to decreased food intake and disruption of reproductive function, the latter via deregulation of different signaling pathways that impinge onto GnRH neurons. Recently, the hypothalamic Kiss1 system, a major gatekeeper of GnRH function, was...... intake and body weight. Yet pair-fed males did not show similar alterations in LH and testosterone secretory responses to Kp-10, whose magnitude was preserved, if not augmented, during food restriction. In summary, our data document the impact of acute inflammation on kisspeptin content at the ARC as key...

  4. CAFFEINE ATTENUATES ACUTE GROWTH HORMONE RESPONSE TO A SINGLE BOUT OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Bo-Hun Wu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine consume on substrate metabolism and acute hormonal responses to a single bout of resistance exercise (RE. Ten resistance-trained men participated in this study. All subjects performed one repetition maximum (1RM test and then performed two protocols: caffeine (CAF, 6 mg·kg-1 and control (CON in counter balanced order. Subjects performed RE (8 exercises, 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% of 1RM after caffeine or placebo ingestion one hour prior to RE. Blood samples collected prior to treatment ingestion (pre-60, immediately prior to RE (pre-exe, and 0, 15, 30 min post to RE (P0, P15, P30 for analysis of insulin, testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, glucose, free fatty acid and lactic acid. Each experiment was separated by seven days. In this study, statistical analysis of a two-way analysis of variance (treatment by time with repeated measures was applied. After ingesting caffeine, the concentrations of free fatty acid (pre- exe, P0, P15, P30 in CAF were significantly higher than CON (p < 0.05. Additionally, the responses of GH (P0, P15, P30 in CAF were significantly lower than CON (p < 0.05, whereas the concentrations of insulin, testosterone and cortisol were not different between CAF and CON (p < 0.05 after RE. The results of this study indicated that caffeine ingestion prior to RE might attenuate the response of GH. This effect might be caused by the elevation in blood FFA concentration at the beginning of RE

  5. Mitochondrial function and regulation of macrophage sterol metabolism and inflammatory responses

    Annette; Graham; Anne-Marie; Allen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the role of mitochondria in regulating macrophage sterol homeostasis and inflammatory responses within the aetiology of atherosclerosis.Macrophage generation of oxysterol activators of liver X receptors(LXRs),via sterol 27-hydroxylase,is regulated by the rate of flux of cholesterolto the inner mitochondrial membrane,via a complex of cholesterol trafficking proteins.Oxysterols are key signalling molecules,regulating the transcriptional activity of LXRs which coordinate macrophage sterol metabolism and cytokine production,key features influencing the impact of these cells within atherosclerotic lesions.The precise identity of the complex of proteins mediating mitochondrial cholesterol trafficking in macrophages remains a matter of debate,but may include steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and translocator protein.There is clear evidence that targeting either of these proteins enhances removal of cholesterol via LXRα-dependent induction of ATP binding cassette transporters(ABCA1,ABCG1) and limits the production of inflammatory cytokines; interventions which influence mitochondrial structure and bioenergetics also impact on removal of cholesterol from macrophages.Thus,molecules which can sustain or improve mitochondrial structure,the function of the electron transport chain,or increase the activity of components of the protein complex involved in cholesterol transfer,may therefore have utility in limiting or regressing atheroma development,reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction.

  6. Molecular mechanisms governing contraction-induced metabolic responses and skeletal muscle reprogramming

    Glund, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Physical exercise enhances skeletal muscle responsiveness to insulin and regulates metabolism by an insulin-independent mechanism. Elucidation of contraction-mediated molecular mechanisms is imperative for a better understanding of skeletal muscle metabolism and function, and may lead to the identification or validation of possible drug targets for the prevention or treatment of metabolic disorders. This thesis focuses on the role of AMPK and Interleukin (IL)-6 in skeletal m...

  7. C677T gene polymorphism of MTHFR and metabolic syndrome: response to dietary intervention

    Di Renzo, Laura; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Sarlo, Francesca; Soldati, Laura; Gratteri, Santo; Abenavoli, Ludovico; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    Background Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms were found associated with body mass index (BMI)-defined obesity and lean mass. The aim of our study was to examine the role of the C677T MTHFR gene polymorphism in the response to diet in the management of metabolic syndrome. We investigated the body composition and metabolic factor changes after an hysocaloric balanced diet (HBD), in Italian obese women affected by metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods Forty four obese wom...

  8. Acute exercise does not induce an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters

    Kristensen, Lena; Buhl, Rikke; Nostell, Katarina; Bak, Lars; Petersen, Ellen; Lindholm, Maria; Jacobsen, Stine

    2014-01-01

    have been caused by exercise-induced hemolysis, which indicates that horses might experience a condition similar to athlete’s anemia in humans. The pathogenesis and clinical implications of the hematological and blood-biochemical changes elicited by acute exercise in Standardbred trotters in the...

  9. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards

  10. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  11. A double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study of the acute metabolic effects of olanzapine in healthy volunteers.

    Vance L Albaugh

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics exhibit metabolic side effects including diabetes mellitus and obesity. The adverse events are preceded by acute worsening of oral glucose tolerance (oGTT along with reduced plasma free fatty acids (FFA and leptin in animal models. It is unclear whether the same acute effects occur in humans.A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial was conducted to examine the potential metabolic effects of olanzapine in healthy volunteers. Participants included male (8 and female (7 subjects [18-30 years old, BMI 18.5-25]. Subjects received placebo or olanzapine (10 mg/day for three days prior to oGTT testing. Primary endpoints included measurement of plasma leptin, oral glucose tolerance, and plasma free fatty acids (FFA. Secondary metabolic endpoints included: triglycerides, total cholesterol, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, heart rate, blood pressure, body weight and BMI. Olanzapine increased glucose Area Under the Curve (AUC by 42% (2808±474 vs. 3984±444 mg/dl·min; P = 0.0105 during an oGTT. Fasting plasma leptin and triglycerides were elevated 24% (Leptin: 6.8±1.3 vs. 8.4±1.7 ng/ml; P = 0.0203 and 22% (Triglycerides: 88.9±10.1 vs. 108.2±11.6 mg/dl; P = 0.0170, whereas FFA and HDL declined by 32% (FFA: 0.38±0.06 vs. 0.26±0.04 mM; P = 0.0166 and 11% (54.2±4.7 vs. 48.9±4.3 mg/dl; P = 0.0184, respectively after olanzapine. Other measures were unchanged.Olanzapine exerts some but not all of the early endocrine/metabolic changes observed in rodent models of the metabolic side effects, and this suggest that antipsychotic effects are not limited to perturbations in glucose metabolism alone. Future prospective clinical studies should focus on identifying which reliable metabolic alterations might be useful as potential screening tools in assessing patient susceptibility to weight gain and diabetes caused by atypical antipsychotics.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00741026.

  12. Executive function and endocrinological responses to acute resistance exercise

    Chia-Liang Tsai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study had the following two aims: First, to explore the effects of acute resistance exercise (RE, i.e., using exercise machines to contract and stretch muscles on behavioral and electrophysiological performance when performing a cognitive task involving executive functioning in young male adults; Second, to investigate the potential biochemical mechanisms of such facilitative effects using two neurotrophic factors [i.e., growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1] and the cortisol levels elicited by such an exercise intervention mode with two different exercise intensities. Sixty young male adults were recruited and randomly assigned to a high-intensity (HI exercise group, moderate-intensity (MI exercise group, and non-exercise-intervention (NEI group. Blood samples were taken, and the behavioral and electrophysiological indices were simultaneously measured when individuals performed a Go/No-Go task combined with the Erikson Flanker paradigm at baseline and after either an acute bout of 30 minutes of moderate- or high-intensity RE or a control period. The results showed that the acute RE could not only benefit the subjects’ behavioral (i.e., RTs and accuracy performance, as found in previous studies, but also increase the P3 amplitude. Although the serum GH and IGF-1 levels were significantly increased via moderate or high intensity RE in both the MI and HI groups, the increased serum levels of neurotrophic factors were significantly decreased about 20 minutes after exercise. In addition, such changes were not correlated with the changes in cognitive (i.e., behavioral and electrophysiological performance. In contrast, the serum levels of cortisol in the HI and MI groups were significantly lower after acute RE, and the changes in cortisol levels were significantly associated with the changes in electrophysiological (i.e., P3 amplitude performance. The findings suggest the beneficial effects of acute RE on executive

  13. Metabolic product response profiles of Cherax quadricarinatus towards white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Fan, Weiwei; Ye, Yangfang; Chen, Zhen; Shao, Yina; Xie, Xiaolu; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Hai-Peng; Li, Chenghua

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the most devastating viral pathogens in both shrimp and crayfish farms, which often causes disease outbreak and leads to massive moralities with significant economic losses of aquaculture. However, limited research has been carried out on the intrinsic mechanisms toward WSSV challenge at the metabolic level. To gain comprehensive insight into metabolic responses induced by WSSV, we applied an NMR approach to investigate metabolic changes of crayfish gill and hepatopancreas infected by WSSV for 1, 6 and 12 h. In gill, an enhanced energy metabolism was observed in WSSV-challenged crayfish samples at 1 h, as marked by increased glucose, alanine, methionine, glutamate and uracil. Afterwards, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism as well as osmoregulation were markedly increased at 6 hpi, as shown by elevated glucose, alanine, methionine, fumarate, tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine, phosphorylcholine, betaine and uracil, whereas no obvious metabolites change was detected at 12 hpi. As for hepatopancreas, disturbed lipid metabolism and induced osmotic regulation was found at 6 hpi based on the metabolic biomarkers such as branched chain amino acids, threonine, alanine, methionine, glutamate, glutamine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lactate and lipid. However, no obvious metabolic change was shown in hepatopancreas at both 1 hpi and 12 hpi. Taken together, our present results provided essential metabolic information about host-pathogen interactions in crayfish, which shed new light on our understanding of WSSV infection at metabolic level. PMID:27068762

  14. Whole-body CO2 production as an index of the metabolic response to sepsis

    Whole-body carbon dioxide (CO2) production (RaCO2) is an index of substrate oxidation and energy expenditure; therefore, it may provide information about the metabolic response to sepsis. Using stable isotope techniques, we determined RaCO2 and its relationship to protein and glucose metabolism in m...

  15. Conventional and homeopathic treatments in late pregnant goats: effects on metabolic status and immune response

    Bruno Ronchi; Umberto Bernabucci; Nicola Lacetera; Pier Paolo Danieli

    2010-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the effects of conventional and homeopathic treatments on metabolic status and immune response in late pregnant goats. Administration of an antichetogenic preparation and of Echinacea purpurea in homeopathic dilution did not exert unequivocal effects on metabolic status, but improved some immunological parameters of periparturient goats.

  16. Conventional and homeopathic treatments in late pregnant goats: effects on metabolic status and immune response

    Bruno Ronchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at assessing the effects of conventional and homeopathic treatments on metabolic status and immune response in late pregnant goats. Administration of an antichetogenic preparation and of Echinacea purpurea in homeopathic dilution did not exert unequivocal effects on metabolic status, but improved some immunological parameters of periparturient goats.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced anti-inflammatory acute phase response is enhanced in spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) overexpressing mice.

    Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Sironen, Reijo; Alhonen, Leena; Uimari, Anne

    2012-02-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an effective activator of the components of innate immunity. It has been shown that polyamines and their metabolic enzymes affect the LPS-induced immune response by modulating both pro- and anti-inflammatory actions. On the other hand, LPS causes changes in cellular polyamine metabolism. In this study, the LPS-induced inflammatory response in spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase overexpressing transgenic mice (SSAT mice) was analyzed. In liver and kidneys, LPS enhanced the activity of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase and increased the intracellular putrescine content in both SSAT overexpressing and wild-type mice. In survival studies, the enhanced polyamine catabolism and concomitantly altered cellular polyamine pools in SSAT mice did not affect the LPS-induced mortality of these animals. However, in the acute phase of LPS-induced inflammatory response, the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interferon-γ were significantly reduced and, on the contrary, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 was significantly increased in the sera of SSAT mice compared with the wild-type animals. In addition, hepatic acute-phase proteins C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and α(1)-acid glycoprotein were expressed in higher amounts in SSAT mice than in the wild-type animals. In summary, the study suggests that SSAT overexpression obtained in SSAT mice enhances the anti-inflammatory actions in the acute phase of LPS-induced immune response. PMID:21814792

  18. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on motor response inhibition: An ERP study using the stop-signal task

    Chien-Heng Chu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Acute exercise has a selective and beneficial effect on cognitive function, specifically affecting the motor response inhibition aspect of executive function. Furthermore, acute exercise predominately impacts later stages of information processing during motor response inhibition, which may lead to an increase in attentional resource allocation and confer the ability to successfully withhold a response to achieve motor response inhibition.

  19. Metabolic mapping of the brain's response to visual stimulation: studies in humans

    These studies demonstrated increasing glucose metabolic rates in the human primary (PVC) and associative (AVC) visual cortex as the complexity of visual scenes increased. The metabolic response of the AVC increased more rapidly with scene complexity than that of the PVC, indicating the greater involvement of the higher order AVC for complex visual interpretations. Increases in local metabolic activity by as much as a factor of 2 above that of control subjects with eyes closed indicate the wide range and metabolic reserve of the visual cortex

  20. Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change.

    Carey, Nicholas; Sigwart, Julia D

    2014-08-01

    Variability in metabolic scaling in animals, the relationship between metabolic rate ( R: ) and body mass ( M: ), has been a source of debate and controversy for decades. R: is proportional to MB: , the precise value of B: much debated, but historically considered equal in all organisms. Recent metabolic theory, however, predicts B: to vary among species with ecology and metabolic level, and may also vary within species under different abiotic conditions. Under climate change, most species will experience increased temperatures, and marine organisms will experience the additional stressor of decreased seawater pH ('ocean acidification'). Responses to these environmental changes are modulated by myriad species-specific factors. Body-size is a fundamental biological parameter, but its modulating role is relatively unexplored. Here, we show that changes to metabolic scaling reveal asymmetric responses to stressors across body-size ranges; B: is systematically decreased under increasing temperature in three grazing molluscs, indicating smaller individuals were more responsive to warming. Larger individuals were, however, more responsive to reduced seawater pH in low temperatures. These alterations to the allometry of metabolism highlight abiotic control of metabolic scaling, and indicate that responses to climate warming and ocean acidification may be modulated by body-size. PMID:25122741

  1. The inflammatory response in myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction

    Emmens, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is about myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These are two cardiac diseases in which inflammation of the cardiac muscle occurs. In myocarditis, inflammation results in the elimination of a viral infection of the heart. During AMI, one of the coronary arteries is occluded, causing ischemia and damaged cardiac muscle cells. Here, inflammation removes these damaged cells, so that scar formation can occur. However, for both diseases, inflammation also results in additio...

  2. Opposite metabolic responses of shoots and roots to drought

    Gargallo-Garriga, A.; Sardans, J.; Pérez-Trujillo, M.; Rivas-Ubach, A.; Oravec, Michal; Večeřová, Kristýna; Urban, Otmar; Jentsch, A.; Kreyling, J.; Beierkuhnlein, C.; Parella, T.; Penuelas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 6829 (2014), s. 1-7. ISSN 2045-2322 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200871201 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : shoot and roots * autotrophic and heterotrophic organs * environmental change * growth metabolism * water and nutirens Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.578, year: 2014

  3. Flexibly combined optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle system for comprehensive imaging of hemodynamic and metabolic responses

    Shi, Lei; Qin, Jia; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    We have proposed and developed a multi-modal non-invasive biomedical optical imager. It was combined from the subsystems of optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging. The system was designed to maintain the performances of both subsystems. It was capable of simultaneously imaging the hemodynamic and metabolic responses in tissue environment in vivo. To achieve such requirements, we utilized unique optical setup, such as paired dichroic mirrors to compensate dispersion, additional relay lens to increase working distance and translational sample probe to freely select imaging area and focal plane. The multi-functionality of the system was demonstrated in an investigation of hemodynamic and metabolic responses on an acute wound healing model in mouse pinna in vivo. The microvasculature, blood flow and hemoglobin concentration from millimeter down to capillary level were comprehensively visualized. The captured instantaneous responses to wound onset differed greatly between localized areas; after that blood flow had a rebalance tendency, and hemoglobin concentration dynamically recovered to baseline situation.

  4. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed ≥ 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1

  5. Prenatal and acute cocaine exposure affects neural responses and habituation to visual stimuli

    Elizabeth Brooke Riley

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulants have many effects on visual function, from adverse, following acute and prenatal exposure to therapeutic, on attention deficit. To determine the impact of prenatal and acute cocaine exposure on visual processing, we studied neuronal responses to visual stimuli in two brain regions of a transgenic larval zebrafish expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP-HS. We found that both red light (LF and dark (DF flashes elicited similar responses in the optic tectum neuropil (TOn, while the dorsal telencephalon (dTe responded only to LF. Acute cocaine (0.5 μM reduced neuronal responses to LF in both brain regions but did not affect responses to DF. Repeated stimulus presentation led to habituation of dTe neurons to LF. Acute cocaine prevented habituation. TOn habituated to DF, but not LF, and DF habituation was not modified by cocaine. Remarkably, prenatal cocaine exposure prevented the effects of acute cocaine on LF response amplitude and habituation later in development in both brain regions, but did not affect DF responses. We discovered that, in spite of similar neural responses to LF and DF in the TO (superior colliculus in mammals, responses to LF are more complex, involving dTe (homologous to the cerebral cortex, and are more vulnerable to cocaine. Our results demonstrate that acute cocaine exposure affects visual processing differentially by brain region, and that prenatal cocaine exposure modifies zebrafish visual processing in multiple structures in a stimulus-dependent manner. These findings are in accordance with the major role that the optic tectum and cerebral cortex play in sustaining visual attention, and support the hypothesis that modification of these areas by prenatal cocaine exposure may be responsible for visual deficits noted in humans. This model offers new methodological approaches for studying the adverse and therapeutic effects of psychostimulants on attention, and for the development of new pharmacological

  6. Muscle metabolic remodelling in response to endurance exercise in salmonids

    Andrea J Morash

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle is relevant to swimming performance and metabolism in fishes, especially those that undergo extreme locomotory feats, such as seasonal migration. However, the influence of endurance exercise and the molecular mechanisms coordinating this remodelling are not well understood. The present study examines muscle metabolic remodelling associated with endurance exercise in fed rainbow trout as compared to migrating salmon. Trout were swum for 4 weeks at 1.5BL/s, a speed similar to that of migrating salmon and red and white muscles were sampled after each week. We quantified changes in key enzymes in aerobic and carbohydrate metabolism (citrate synthase (CS, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD, hexokinase (HK and changes in mRNA expression of major regulators of metabolic phenotype (AMPK, PPARs and lipid (carnitine palmitoyltransferase, CPT I, protein (aspartate aminotransferase, AST and carbohydrate (HK oxidation pathways. After one week of swimming substantial increases were seen in AMPK and PPARα mRNA expression and of their downstream target genes, CPTI and HK in red muscle. However, significant changes in CS and HK activity occurred only after 4 weeks. In contrast, there were few changes in mRNA expression and enzyme activities in white muscle over the 4-weeks. Red muscle results mimic those found in migrating salmon suggesting a strong influence of exercise on red muscle phenotype. In white muscle, only changes in AMPK and PPAR expression were similar to that seen with migrating salmon. However, in contrast to exercise alone, in natural migration HK decreased while AST increased suggesting that white muscle plays a role in supplying fuel and intermediates possibly through tissue breakdown during prolonged fasting. Dissecting individual and potentially synergistic effects of multiple stressors will enable us to determine major drivers of the metabolic phenotype and their impacts on whole animal

  7. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette; Poulsen, Karin T.; Campbell, Fiona M; Eckersall, P. David; Heegaard, Peter M.H.

    2009-01-01

    International audience The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we st...

  8. Hepatic autophagy contributes to the metabolic response to dietary protein restriction.

    Henagan, Tara M; Laeger, Thomas; Navard, Alexandra M; Albarado, Diana; Noland, Robert C; Stadler, Krisztian; Elks, Carrie M; Burk, David; Morrison, Christopher D

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular response which acts to release stored cellular substrates during nutrient restriction, and particularly plays a key role in the cellular response to amino acid restriction. However, there has been limited work testing whether the induction of autophagy is required for adaptive metabolic responses to dietary protein restriction in the whole animal. Here, we found that moderate dietary protein restriction led to a series of metabolic changes in rats, including increases in food intake and energy expenditure, the downregulation of hepatic fatty acid synthesis gene expression and reduced markers of hepatic mitochondrial number. Importantly, these effects were also associated with an induction of hepatic autophagy. To determine if the induction of autophagy contributes to these metabolic effects, we tested the metabolic response to dietary protein restriction in BCL2-AAA mice, which bear a genetic mutation that impairs autophagy induction. Interestingly, BCL2-AAA mice exhibit exaggerated responses in terms of both food intake and energy expenditure, whereas the effects of protein restriction on hepatic metabolism were significantly blunted. These data demonstrate that restriction of dietary protein is sufficient to trigger hepatic autophagy, and that disruption of autophagy significantly alters both hepatic and whole animal metabolic response to dietary protein restriction. PMID:27173459

  9. Mechanisms of the Hepatic Acute-Phase Response during Bacterial Pneumonia▿

    Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Robson, Bryanne E.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characterized by increased circulating levels of acute-phase proteins (APPs) generated by the liver. During bacterial pneumonia, APPs correlate with the severity of disease, serve as biomarkers, and are functionally significant. The kinetics and regulatory mechanisms of APP induction in the liver during lung infection have yet to be defined. Here we show that APP mRNA transcription is induced in the livers of mice whose lungs are infected with either Escherichia co...

  10. Acute phase protein response in an experimental model of ovine caseous lymphadenitis

    Lang Tamara L; Waterston Mary M; Bence Laura; Lawson Fraser P; Eckersall Peter D; Donachie William; Fontaine Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is a disease of small ruminants caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The pathogenesis of CLA is a slow process, and produces a chronic rather than an acute disease state. Acute phase proteins (APP) such as haptoglobin (Hp) serum amyloid A (SAA) and α1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) are produced by the liver and released into the circulation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. The concentration of Hp in serum increases in experimental CL...