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Sample records for acute lumbar spinal

  1. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    Yoon S Timothy; Bui Tuan L; Freedman Brett A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5) cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst.

  2. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    Yoon S Timothy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5 cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst.

  3. Acute Presentation of Lumbar Spinal Schwannoma Due to Torsion: A Case Report

    Khanna, Ryan; Ortmeier, Thomas C; Tapia-Zegarra, Gino G; Lindley, Timothy E; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Although schwannomas are common spinal tumors with insidious presentations, acute neurological deterioration is an extremely rare manifestation that can occur in the setting of tumor torsion and infarction. The present case reports an unusual presentation of a spinal schwannoma that underwent torsion and infarction. A 65-year-old male presented initially with acute radicular pain progressing to cauda equina syndrome and confusion. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed an intradural extramedullary lesion at the level of L1/L2 measuring 1.1x0.9 cm. Intraoperatively, a reddish mass was seen caudally twisted around itself. Gross total resection was achieved with a final diagnosis of schwannoma with areas of infarction. At his six week follow up clinical visit, the patient was asymptomatic and his neurological exam was normal. The neurosurgeon should be aware of such atypical radiographic and clinical presentation amongst the spectrum of clinical manifestation of these nerve sheath tumors.  PMID:27226945

  4. Acute Presentation of Lumbar Spinal Schwannoma Due to Torsion: A Case Report.

    Choy, Winward; Khanna, Ryan; Ortmeier, Thomas C; Tapia-Zegarra, Gino G; Lindley, Timothy E; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Although schwannomas are common spinal tumors with insidious presentations, acute neurological deterioration is an extremely rare manifestation that can occur in the setting of tumor torsion and infarction. The present case reports an unusual presentation of a spinal schwannoma that underwent torsion and infarction. A 65-year-old male presented initially with acute radicular pain progressing to cauda equina syndrome and confusion. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed an intradural extramedullary lesion at the level of L1/L2 measuring 1.1x0.9 cm. Intraoperatively, a reddish mass was seen caudally twisted around itself. Gross total resection was achieved with a final diagnosis of schwannoma with areas of infarction. At his six week follow up clinical visit, the patient was asymptomatic and his neurological exam was normal. The neurosurgeon should be aware of such atypical radiographic and clinical presentation amongst the spectrum of clinical manifestation of these nerve sheath tumors. PMID:27226945

  5. Traumatic lumbar spinal subdural hematoma

    Gordon, William E.; Brent Y. Kimball; Arthur, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition associated with trauma, lumbar puncture, hemorrhagic disorder, anticoagulant therapy, spinal surgery, tumor, vascular malformations, and spinal or epidural anesthesia. Traumatic SDH is even more uncommon than other forms of SDH with only 10 reported cases in the literature. Following a punch to the head and loss of consciousness, a 35-year-old man reported headaches, right-sided tinnitus, and dull ache behi...

  6. Traumatic lumbar spinal subdural hematoma

    William E. Gordon

    2014-12-01

    Our case illustrates rapid resolution of a posttraumatic spinal SDH after treatment with oral corticosteroids. Recognition of blood products on MRI is vital to diagnosis and expedient treatment. There is agreement that prompt laminectomy with evacuation of SDH should be performed before permanent damage to the spinal cord occurs. Including our patient, 4 of 11 reported cases of thoracic or lumbar SDH resolved with conservative treatment.

  7. [Anesthetic management of posterior lumbar spinal fusion in a patient suspected of having acute exacerbation of chronic interstitial pneumonia].

    Sakai, Mayuko; Takenami, Tamie; Otsuka, Tomohisa; Hayashi, Norito; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Matsumoto, Shigehiro; Okamoto, Hirotsugu

    2014-02-01

    A patient complicated with interstitial pneumonia required emergency posterior lumbar spinal fusion. The blood gas analysis showed relatively benign values (PaO2 81 torr, PaCO2 44 torr, under room air), but the honeycombing lungs were noted in the bilateral lung fields on CT, and the KL-6 level was high (1,000 U x ml(-1)), for which the acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was suspected. Sivelestat sodium administration was initiated during the surgery and continued postoperatively. During surgery, setting the FIO2 at 0.34, the P/F ratio and intra-airway pressure could be maintained at 500 and 25 mmHg, respectively. To reduce postoperative respiratory complication, anesthesia was maintained with desflurane, which is dissipated easily, and 0.5% ropivacaine 15 ml was subcutaneously injected to the surgical field at the time of wound closure to reduce the total doses of intraoperative fentanyl and postoperative analgesics. After the completion of surgery, the endotracheal tube was removed with head elevated position, and the patient was transported back to the ward. No acute exacerbation occurred thereafter, and the patient was discharged 67 days after surgery. The prediction of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia is difficult. Moreover, there is no established preventive method, although the mortality is high. Therefore, physicians should be thoroughly informed about the currently available evidence, including developmental factors. PMID:24601111

  8. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  9. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  10. Imaging of lumbar spinal surgery complications

    Malhotra, Ajay; Kalra, Vivek B; Wu, Xiao; Grant, Ryan; Bronen, Richard A; Abbed, Khalid M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lumbar spine surgery for spinal stenosis is a frequently performed procedure and was the fastest growing type of surgery in the US from 1980 to 2000. With increasing surgical invasiveness, postoperative complications also tend to be higher. Cross-sectional imaging techniques (CT and MRI) are more sensitive than radiographs and play an increasingly important role in evaluation of patients with lumbar spine surgery. Their use in patients with metallic implants is somewhat limited by ar...

  11. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel;

    2007-01-01

    Although cost-effectiveness is becoming the foremost evaluative criterion within health service management of spine surgery, scientific knowledge about cost-patterns and cost-effectiveness is limited. The aims of this study were (1) to establish an activity-based method for costing at the patient......) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means......-level, (2) to investigate the correlation between costs and effects, (3) to investigate the influence of selected patient characteristics on cost-effectiveness and, (4) to investigate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of (a) posterior instrumentation and (b) intervertebral anterior support in lumbar...

  12. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  13. Acute Lumbar Burst Fracture Treated by Minimally Invasive Lateral Corpectomy

    Rodrigo Amaral

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Burst fractures in acute spinal traumas are a difficult problem to solve. Different approaches and techniques have been utilized, but with high incidence of morbidity and mortality, besides unsatisfactory clinical and radiological results. Mini-open approaches recently emerged and have been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of several spinal conditions. Here we report a case of acute lumbar burst fracture at L2 treated by minimally invasive true lateral approach posteriorly instrumented with percutaneous pedicle screws. The minimum disruptive access in addition to a rigid construction allowed a lumbar corpectomy without the morbidity of standard open approaches, lowering surgery costs and accelerating the patient recovery with successfully clinical and radiological results.

  14. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy mimicking a lumbar spinal stenosis syndrome.

    Ginsberg, L; Platts, A. D.; Thomas, P K

    1995-01-01

    A patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) established by biopsy developed cauda equina symptoms due to swelling of the nerve roots in the lumbar spinal canal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine showed profoundly thickened nerve roots from the level of the conus medullaris, filling the caudal thecal sac. Immunosuppressant treatment produced partial clinical and radiological resolution. This case shows that spinal compressive syndromes may occur in acqu...

  15. Complex radiodiagnosis of the lumbar spine spinal canal stenosis

    Ultrasound study was done in 67 patients with osteochondrosis of the lumbar spine revealed by x-ray study, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. Ultrasound technique is highly informative in visualizing location, direction, size of the hernia in lumbar osteochondrosis and stenosis of spinal canal

  16. LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS. A REVIEW OF BIOMECHANICAL STUDIES

    戴力扬; 徐印坎

    1998-01-01

    ObjectS. To investigate the biomechanical aspects of etiology, pathology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and surgical treatment of the lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods. A series of biomechanical methods, such as three-dimensional finite element models, threedimensional kinematic measurement, cadeveric evaluation, and imaging assessment was applied to correlate lumbar biomechanics and lumber spinal stenosls. Surgery of lumber spinal stenosis has been improved. Results.The stresses significantly concentrate on the posterolateral part of the annulus fibrcsms of disc, the posterior surface of vertebral body, the pedlcle, the interarticularis and the beet joints. This trend is intensified by disc degeneration and lumber backward extension. Posterior elcxnent resection has a definite effect upon the biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebrae. The improved operations proved satisfactory. Conclusion. Stress concentration in the lumber vertebrae is of importance to the etiology of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosls, and disc degeneratkm is the initial key of this process. Than these will be aggravatnd by backward extension. Functloval radiography and myelography are of assistance to the diagnosis of the lumhar spinal stenosls. For the surgcal treatment of the lumber spinal stenosis, destruction of the posterior element should be avoid as far as possible based upon the thorough decmnpression. Maintaining the lumbar spine in flexion by fusion after decorapression has been proved a useftd method. When developmental spinal stenoals is combined with disc herniation, discectoray through laminotomy is recommend for decompression.

  17. MANAGEMENT OF LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS

    Mukhergee G. S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal stenosis is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. It is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. The term stenosis is derived from the Greek word for narrow, which is “Stenos”. The first description of this condition is attributed to Antoine portal in 1803. Verbiest is credited with coining the term spinal stenosis and the associated narrowing of the spinal canal as its potential cause. [1-10] Kirkaldy–Willis subsequently described the degenerative cascade in the lumbar spine as the cause for the altered anatomy and pathophysiology in spinal stenosis. [11-15] If compression does not occur, the canal should be described as narrow but not stenotic. Some studies defined lumbar spinal stenosis as a “narrowing of the osteoligamentous vertebral canal and/or the intervertebral foramina causing compression of the thecal sac and/or the caudal nerve roots; at a single vertebral level, narrowing may affect the whole canal or part of it” (Postacchini 1983. This definition distinguished between disc herniation and stenosis. [16] . The most common type of spinal stenosis is caused by degenerative arthritis of the spine. Hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which usually are confined to the cervical spine, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome also may result in an acquired form of spinal stenosis. Congenital forms caused by disorders such as achondroplasia and dysplastic spondylolisthesis are much less common. Congenital spinal stenosis usually is central and is evident or imaging studies. Idiopathic congenital narrowing usually involves the anteroposterior dimension of the canal secondary to short pedicles; the patient otherwise is normal. In contrast, in achondroplasia, the canal is narrowed in the anteroposterior plane owing to shortened pedicles and in lateral dimension because of diminished interpedicular distance. Acquired forms of spinal stenosis usually are

  18. [Enlargement in managment of lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Steib, J P; Averous, C; Brinckert, D; Lang, G

    1996-05-01

    Lumbar stenosis has been well discussed recently, especially at the 64th French Orthopaedic Society (SOFCOT: July 1989). The results of different surgical treatments were considered as good, but the indications for surgical treatment were not clear cut. Laminectomy is not the only treatment of spinal stenosis. Laminectomy is an approach with its own rate of complications (dural tear, fibrosis, instability... ).Eight years ago, J. Sénégas described what he called the "recalibrage" (enlargement). His feeling was that, in the spinal canal, we can find two different AP diameters. The first one is a fixed constitutional AP diameter (FCAPD) at the cephalic part of the lamina. The second one is a mobile constitutional AP diameter (MCAPD) marked by the disc and the ligamentum flavum. This diameter is maximal in flexion, minimal in extension. The nerve root proceeds through the lateral part of the canal: first above, between the disc and the superior articular process, then below, in the lateral recess bordered by the pedicle, the vertebral body and the posterior articulation. With the degenerative change the disc space becomes shorter, the superior articular process is worn out with osteophytes. These degenerative events are complicated by inter vertebral instability increasing the stenosis. The idea of the "recalibrage" is to remove only the upper part of the lamina with the ligamentum flavum and to cut the hypertrophied anterior part of the articular process from inside. If needed the disc and other osteophytes are removed. The surgery is finished with a ligamentoplasty reducing the flexion and preventing the extension by a posterior wedge.Our experience in spine surgery especially in scoliosis surgery, showed us that it was possible to cure a radicular compression without opening the canal. The compression is then lifted by the 3D reduction and restoration of an anatomy as normal as possible. Lumbar stenosis is the consequence of a degenerative process. Indeed, hip

  19. Lumbar spinal mobility changes among adults with advancing age

    Ismaila Adamu Saidu

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : Using these data, we developed normative values of spinal mobility for each sex and age group. This study helps the clinicians to understand and correlate the restrictions of lumbar spinal mobility due to age and differentiate the limitations due to disease.

  20. Lumbar spinal canal size of sciatica patients

    Hurme, M.; Alaranta, H.; Aalto, T.; Knuts, L.R.; Vanharanta, H.; Troup, J.D.G. (Turku City Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Surgery; Social Insurance Institution, Turku (Finland). Rehabilitation Research Centre; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Liverpool Univ. (UK). Dept. of Orthopaedic and Accident Surgery)

    Seven measures at the three lowest lumbar interspaces were recorded from conventional radiographs of the lumbar spines of 160 consecutive patients with low back pain and sciatica admitted for myelography and possible surgery. Eighty-eight patients were operated upon for disc herniation, and of the conservatively-treated 72 patients, 18 had a pathologic and 54 a normal myelogram. The results were evaluated after one year using the occupational handicap scales of WHO. Correlations of radiographic measures to stature were moderate and to age small. After adjusting for stature and age, only the male interpedicular distances and the antero-posterior diameter of intervertebral foramen at L3 were greater than those of females. The males with a pathologic myelogram had smaller posterior disc height at L3 and a smaller interarticular distance at L3 and L4 than those with normal myelogram, likewise the midsagittal diameter at L3 and L4 in females. In all patients other measures besides posterior disc height were smaller than those for low back pain patients (p<0.001) or for cadavers (p<0.001). The only correlation between measures and clinical manifestations was between pedicular length at L3 and limited straight leg raising. Where the disc material had been extruded into the spinal canal, the interpedicular distance was significantly wider. Only anterior disc height at L3 revealed differences between good and poor outcome one year after surgery, as did the interarticular distance at S1 in patients with normal myelogram after conservative treatment. (orig.).

  1. [Acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation].

    Li, J S

    1989-08-01

    Five cases of acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation are reported. After protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral disc were treated by violent manipulation, the lumbo-leg pain were severe suddenly. The operations found that the annulus fibrosus had ruptured and the nerve root or cauda equina was constricted by the nucleus pulposus which had entered into the spinal canal. It must be emphasized that their is in danger of more damaging intervertebral disc degenerated by violent manipulation, then the adhesion of the nerve root will occur gradually. We don't suggest to make violent manipulation for the patient with the nerve root injured. We have acquired good results in treating protrusion of lumbar intervertebral disc by combined therapy and they are introduced in this article. PMID:2620603

  2. Spinal CT scan, 2. Lumbar and sacral spines

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ., Aichi (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival.

  3. The association of spinal osteoarthritis with lumbar lordosis

    Sapkas Georgios; Kampanis Nikos; Papadokostakis Georgios; Papadakis Michael; Papadakis Stamatios A; Katonis Pavlos

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Careful review of published evidence has led to the postulate that the degree of lumbar lordosis may possibly influence the development and progression of spinal osteoarthritis, just as misalignment does in other joints. Spinal degeneration can ensue from the asymmetrical distribution of loads. The resultant lesions lead to a domino- like breakdown of the normal morphology, degenerative instability and deviation from the correct configuration. The aim of this study is to i...

  4. Introducing new implants and imaging techniques for lumbar spinal stenosis

    Moojen, Wouter Anton

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to compare bony decompression with implantation of interspinous process devices (IPDs) in patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication (INC) caused by lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). A national survey among Dutch spine surgeons is presented about the usual ca

  5. Hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma as a complication of lumbar spinal anaesthesia: MRI

    We report two cases of hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma secondary to lumbar spinal anaesthesia, identified with MRI. Prompt diagnosis of this infrequent, potentially serious complication of spinal anaesthesia is essential, as early surgical evacuation may be needed. Suggestive MRI findings in this early phase include diffuse occupation filling of the spinal canal with poor delineation of the spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and a poorly-defined high-signal lesion with a low-signal rim on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  6. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  7. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Koshi Ninomiya; Koichi Iwatsuki; Yu-ichiro Ohnishi; Toshika Ohkawa; Toshiki Yoshimine

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  8. [Spinal stroke in the acute myeloblast leucosis].

    Kotova, N A; Klimovich, A V; Krasnoruzhskiĭ, A I; Skoromets, A A; Aliev, K T; Volkova, S A; Lalaian, T V

    2013-01-01

    Data of literature on the frequency of the nervous system lesions in different variants of leucosis are analyzed. A case of a man with petechial skin rash and bruises on the body, gingival hemorrhage and general sickness is described in details. The hematologic tests revealed acute myeloblast leucosis. A lumbar puncture revealed blood in the cerebrospinal fluid and MRI showed an epidural hematoma in lumbar segments 3 and 4. At this level, the hematoma compressed the dural bag and roots of the horse tail with accompanying vessels (the radicular medullar artery and large radicular veins). A paracentetic removal of the hematoma with the decompression of spinal roots was carried out. The blasts in the cerebrospinal fluid and symptoms of the left facial nerve lesion allowed to diagnose neuroleucosis. This case presented the mixed pathogenesis of myeloischemia. The epidural hematoma compressed not only the roots of the horse tail but the accompanying vessels (arteries and veins). The venous outflow obstruction along radicular veins worsened the microcirculation in the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord. Complex polychemotherapy in the combination with neuroprotectors (cortexin, gliatiline), antiaggregants and vitamins is recommended. PMID:23612398

  9. Assessment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis by magnetic resonance phlebography

    There is evidence to suggest that cauda equina intermittent claudication is caused by local circulatory disturbances in the cauda equina as well as compression of the cauda equina. We evaluated the role of magnetic resonance phlebography (MRP) in identifying circulatory disturbances of the vertebral venous system in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Extensive filling defects of the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus were evident in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (n=53), whereas only milder abnormalities were noted in patients with other lumber diseases (n=16) and none in normal subjects (n=13). The extent of the defect on MRP correlated with the time at which intermittent claudication appeared. In patients with lumber spinal canal stenosis, extensive defects of the internal vertebral venous plexus on MRP were noted in the neutral spine position, but the defect diminished with anterior flexion of the spine. This phenomenon correlated closely with the time at which intermittent claudication appeared. Our results highlight the importance of MRP for assessing the underlying mechanism of cauda equina intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and suggest that congestive venous ischemia is involved in the development of intermittent claudication in these patients. (author)

  10. Acute Sciatic Neuritis following Lumbar Laminectomy

    Foad Elahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly accepted that the common cause of acute/chronic pain in the distribution of the lumbosacral nerve roots is the herniation of a lumbar intervertebral disc, unless proven otherwise. The surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation is successful in radicular pain and prevents or limits neurological damage in the majority of patients. Recurrence of sciatica after a successful disc surgery can be due to many possible etiologies. In the clinical setting we believe that the term sciatica might be associated with inflammation. We report a case of acute sciatic neuritis presented with significant persistent pain shortly after a successful disc surgery. The patient is a 59-year-old female with complaint of newly onset sciatica after complete pain resolution following a successful lumbar laminectomy for acute disc extrusion. In order to manage the patient’s newly onset pain, the patient had multiple pain management visits which provided minimum relief. Persistent sciatica and consistent physical examination findings urged us to perform a pelvic MRI to visualize suspected pathology, which revealed right side sciatic neuritis. She responded to the electrical neuromodulation. Review of the literature on sciatic neuritis shows this is the first case report of sciatic neuritis subsequent to lumbar laminectomy.

  11. Amelioration of motor/sensory dysfunction and spasticity in a rat model of acute lumbar spinal cord injury by human neural stem cell transplantation

    van Gorp, S.; Leerink, M.; Kakinohana, O.; Platoshyn, O.; Santucci, C.; Galik, J.; Joosten, E. A.; Hruška-Plocháň, Marian; Goldberg, D.; Marsala, S.; Johe, K.; Ciacci, J. D.; Marsala, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 57 (2013). ISSN 1757-6512 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : spinal cord injury * human neural stem cells * spinal grafting * functional recovery * rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.634, year: 2013

  12. [Surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in Gabon].

    Loembe, P M; Ndong-Launay, M; Chouteau, Y; Mwanyombet-Ompounga, L; Dukuly, L; Bouger, D

    1990-01-01

    The authors report their experiences based on 41 cases operated on for lumbar spinal stenosis between 1981 and 1988. The series included 28 men and 13 women aged between 23 and 63 years (mean age: 48 years). Neurogenic intermittent claudication was the presenting symptom in only 12% of the cases, as opposed to lumbago-sciatica in 78%. Clinical examination did not provide any specific elements. The key to diagnosis was lumbar myelography. Laminectomy was the most important aspect of treatment which, in certain cases, was associated with vertebral stabilization by arthrodesis (3 cases). There were ten minor operative complications. Further surgery was necessary in five cases (12%). Therapeutic results in patients followed from one to eight years (35 cases) were satisfactory. The discussion covers nosologic, clinicoradiologic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:2142258

  13. Spinal anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Thoracic vs. Lumbar Technique

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In our group, after a study showing that spinal anesthesia is safe when compared with general anesthesia, spinal anesthesia has been the technique of choice for this procedure. This is a prospective study with all patients undergoing LC under spinal anesthesia in our department since 2007. Settings and Design: Prospective observational. Materials and Methods: From 2007 to 2011, 369 patients with symptoms of colelithiasis, laparoscopic cholecystectomy were operated under spinal anesthesia with pneumoperitoneum and low pressure CO 2. We compared 15 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine and lumbar puncture with 10 or 7.5 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine thoracic puncture, all with 25 μg fentanyl until the sensory level reached T 3 . Intraoperative parameters, post-operative pain, complications, recovery, patient satisfaction, and cost were compared between both groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Means were compared by ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis test, the percentages of the Chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test when appropriate. Time of motor and sensory block in spinal anesthesia group was compared by paired t test or Mann-Whitney test. Differences were considered significant when P ≤ 0.05, and for comparisons of mean pain visual scale, we employed the Bonferroni correction applied to be considered significant only with P ≤ 0.0125 Results: All procedures were completed under spinal anesthesia. The use of lidocaine 1% was successful in the prevention of shoulder pain in 329 (89% patients. There were significant differences in time to reach T 3 , obtaining 15 mg > 10 mg = 7.5 mg. There is a positive correlation between the dose and the incidence of hypotension. The lowest doses gave a decrease of 52.2% in the incidence of hypotension. There was a positive correlation between the dose and duration of sensory and motor block. Sensory block was almost twice the motor block at all doses. With low doses, 60% of patients went from table to stretcher

  14. The Effect of Early Initiation of Rehabilitation after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Bünger, Cody;

    2012-01-01

    examined patients' subsequent rehabilitation. Group-based rehabilitation is both efficient and cost-effective in rehabilitation of lumbar spinal fusion patients.Methods: Patients with degenerative disc diseases undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion were randomly assigned to initiate their......ABSTRACT: Study design: A multicenter RCT including 82 patients.Objective: To examine the effect of early initiation of rehabilitation after instrumented lumbar spinal fusion.Summary of Background Data: Lumbar spinal fusion has been performed for more than 70 years. Yet, only few studies have...... rehabilitation 6 weeks (6w-group) or 12 weeks after lumbar spinal fusion (12w-group). Both groups received the same group-based rehabilitation. Primary outcome was the Oswestery Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcome was the Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), the Low Back Pain Rating Scale, and absence from...

  15. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case–Control Study

    Leila Asadian; Kaveh Haddadi; Mohsen Aarabi; Amirhossein Zare

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. STUDY DESIGN This is a cross-sectional study. METHODS This case–control study was performed during 2012–2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 par...

  16. Postural stability disorders in rural patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

    Aleksandra Truszczyńska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hard work in farming may lead to lumbar spinal stenosis, and consequently, to pain. The pain and neurological disorders may lead to disability and postural disorders. Objective. The aim of the presented study was to analyse postural stability and its correlation with functional disability of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis living in rural areas. Materials and methods. The study population consisted of 30 rural patients with lumbar spinal stenosis; mean age: 51.40 (±12.92; mean BMI: 28.60 (±3.77. The control group consisted of 30 rural inhabitants without spinal disorders. Postural stability was tested on the Biodex Balance System. The patients were also evaluated according to the ODI, the Rolland- Morris disability questionnaire, and VAS. Results. The mean results of the patients studied were as follows: 49.37 (±17.39 according to ODI, 15 (±6.19 according to the Rolland-Morris disability scale, and pain intensity of 7 (±1.93 according to the VAS. The following statistically significant differences were found: the mean balance index result was 1.8 (±1.88 and 0.64 (±0.41 in the control group. The mean centre of mass deviation in the A/P plane was 1.39 (±1.88 and 0.46 (±0.41 in the control group. The mean centre of mass deviation in the M/L plane was 0.8 (±0.51 and 0.32 (±0.22 in the control group. The balance in the studied population correlated significantly with the Rolland-Morris disability questionnaire and the VAS. Conclusions: 1 Serious disability was found in rural patients with spinal stenosis. There was a statistically significant correlation between the disability and postural stability disorders. 2 Most of the patients (84% were overweight. 3 Postural stability disorders were statistically significant for both the stability index and the A/P plane deviation.

  17. Lumbar spinal loads and muscle activity during a golf swing.

    Lim, Young-Tae; Chow, John W; Chae, Woen-Sik

    2012-06-01

    This study estimated the lumbar spinal loads at the L4-L5 level and evaluated electromyographic (EMG) activity of right and left rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi muscles during a golf swing. Four super VHS camcorders and two force plates were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics of golf swings performed by five male collegiate golfers. Average EMG levels for different phases of golf swing were determined. An EMG-assisted optimization model was applied to compute the contact forces acting on the L4-L5. The results revealed a mean peak compressive load of over six times the body weight (BW) during the downswing and mean peak anterior and medial shear loads approaching 1.6 and 0.6 BW during the follow-through phases. The peak compressive load estimated in this study was high, but less than the corresponding value (over 8 BW) reported by a previous study. Average EMG levels of different muscles were the highest in the acceleration and follow-through phases, suggesting a likely link between co-contractions of paraspinal muscles and lumbar spinal loads. PMID:22900401

  18. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case–Control Study

    Asadian, Leila; Haddadi, Kaveh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Zare, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. STUDY DESIGN This is a cross-sectional study. METHODS This case–control study was performed during 2012–2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 participants who were referred to the clinic and did not show clinical signs of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine entered the study as a control group. Demographic data and medical histories of the patients were collected using checklists. RESULTS A total of 50 patients (15.2%) were diagnosed with diabetes, which comprised 32 (29.1%) in the stenosis group, 7 (6.4%) in the lumbar disk herniation group, and 11 (10%) in the control group. The prevalence of diabetes in women with spinal stenosis and women with lumbar disk herniation was 35.9% and 10.3%, respectively, whereas prevalence of diabetes in women was 10.9% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant in the spinal stenosis group in comparison with the controls (P diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis.

  19. Puncture laser microdiscectomy in treatment of large lumbar spinal hernias

    Zorin M.M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Degree of hernia size influence on final result of PLME in 34 patients with discogenic neurocompressive lumbar spinal syndrome was detected. In medical center "Endoscopic Neurosurgery" from 2006 to 2010 we examined and treated 34 patients with hernia size from 6 to 8 mm by CT data. Patients were from 19 to 49 years of age. Average age was 35.9 ± 1.5 years. Males – 16 (47.1%, females – 18 (52.9%. Disease duration – 5.53 ± 0.44 months with duration of last exacerbation – 1.87 ± 0.21 months. Duration of conservative therapy is 4.6 ± 2.1 weeks. During survey and objec¬tive examination we determined pain syndrome intensity, pain location, degree of spinal static – dynamic function disorder. Neurological examination determined severity of sensory and motor disorders. Pain syndrome intensity, quality of life in patients before and after surgery, surgery effectiveness were determined by common scales: VAS, OSWESTRY, Roland - Morris, McNab. Before PLME we evaluated preoperative spondylograms performed with functional load. Height of intervertebral fissure was determined by these images. By SCT and MRI data we measured hernia size, its shape and location as well as intervertebral disk dehydration degree. For PLME performance we used neodymium laser with aluminum garnet (Dorinyer Fibertom Medilas 4060 with wave-length of 1.06 micrometers. In the next period of observation after PLME its effectiveness was 79%, and in 3-5 years - 76%. At the same time it must be emphasized that 75% of patients with discogenic neurocompressive lumbar spinal syndrome significantly and for a long time improved their life quality avoiding more traumatic surgery. Satisfactory results with PLM use in the nearest future could be obtained in 79% of patients, in the remote term - in 76% of patients with large hernia size.

  20. Apoptosis of lumbar spinal cord neurons in cauda equina syndrome rats

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the law of apoptosis of lumbar spinal cord neurons in cauda equina syndrome (CES). Methods Cauda equina of rats was compressed by a piece of silica gel stick. From day 1 to day 28,the lumbar spinal cord specimens were harvested and assessed by Nissl's staining and TUNEL staining. Results Compression of cauda equina caused lesion and apoptosis of neurons in lumbar spinal cord,and the extent of apoptosis reached the peak on 7th day after compression. Conclusion Apoptosis of neurons in lum...

  1. Fibromyalgia and arachnoiditis presented as an acute spinal disorder

    Zamzuri Idris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesive arachnoiditis is a chronic, insidious condition that causes debilitating intractable pain and a range of other neurological problems. Its pathophysiology is not well understood. This manuscript discusses its presentations, which can mimic an acute spinal disorder, its hypothetical pathophysiology, treatment, and its relationship with fibromyalgia. Case Description: The authors present a case of a 47-year-old female who presented with clinical features mimicking an acute spinal disorder but later found to have an adhesive arachnoiditis. She was admitted following a trauma with complaints of back pain and paraplegia. On examination, there was marked tenderness over thoracolumbar spine with lower limbs upper motor neuron weakness. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the spine revealed multiple lesions at her thoracic and lumbar spinal canals, which did not compress the spinal cord. Therefore, conservative management was initiated. Despite on regular therapies, her back and body pain worsened and little improvement in her limbs power was noted. Laminectomy was pursued and found to have spinal cord arachnoiditis. Subsequently, she was operated by other team members for multiple pelvic masses, which later proved to be benign. After gathering all the clinical information obtained at surgery and after taking detailed history inclusive of cognitive functions, diagnosis of an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome was made. Currently, she is managed by neuropsychologist and pain specialist. Conclusion: This case report highlights the importance of knowing an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome - a rarely discussed pathology by the neurosurgeon, which discloses a significant relationship between immune and nervous systems.

  2. Idiopathic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis in the Lumbar Spine.

    Al-Omari, Ali A; Phukan, Rishabh D; Leonard, Dana A; Herzog, Tyler L; Wood, Kirkham B; Bono, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Overgrowth of epidural fat, known as spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL), can cause symptomatic compression of the spinal cord, conus medullaris, or cauda equina. Suggested predisposing factors such as obesity, steroid use, and diabetes mellitus have been based on a few reported cases, many of which were not surgically confirmed. There is a paucity of epidemiological data in surgically confirmed cases for this disorder. The purpose of this independently reviewed, retrospective, matched cohort analysis was to compare the demographics and incidence of comorbidities of patients who underwent lumbar decompression for SEL vs degenerative stenosis without SEL. Two surgeons' databases were reviewed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent decompression surgery for magnetic resonance imaging-verified, symptomatic lumbar SEL. A matched control group comprised an equal number of patients with degenerative stenosis (n=14). Demographic data, body mass index, symptom type/duration, comorbidities, complications, treatment history, and associated pathology were collected from medical records. Previously suggested risk factors, such as obesity, endocrinopathy, and epidural steroid injections, were not significantly different between the SEL and control groups. Furthermore, there were no differences in operative times, complications, or blood loss. The only noted difference between the 2 groups was the preoperative duration of symptoms, on average double in patients with SEL. This series represents the largest of its kind reported to date. Because symptom duration was the only difference noted, it is postulated to be the result of lack of awareness of SEL. Future prospective study in a larger group of patients is warranted. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):163-168.]. PMID:27018608

  3. Lumbar disc herniation treated with qi pathway intervention and spinal adjustment:a randomized controlled trial

    杨军雄

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy difference in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation(LDH)between the comprehensive therapy of Qi pathway intervention and the spinal adjustment and the conventional therapy of acupuncture and Tuina and explore the analgesic mechanism

  4. Two Portal Percutaneous Endoscopic Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Preliminary Study

    Torudom, Yingyong; Dilokhuttakarn, Thitinut

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To report the outcomes of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis treated with percutaneous endoscopic decompression, focusing on the results of clinical evaluations. Overview of Literature There are no studies about two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods Medical and surgical complications were examined and clinical results were analyzed for 30 patients who consecutively underwent two portal percuta...

  5. MRI Changes of the Spinal Subdural Space after Lumbar Spine Surgeries: Report of Two Cases

    Sakai, Toshinori; Sairyo, Koichi; Bhatia, Nitin N.; Miyagi, Ryo; Tamura, Tatsuya; Katoh, Shinsuke; Yasui, Natsuo

    2011-01-01

    Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used to assess the lumbar spine, there are few reports in the medical literature that have evaluated using MRI immediately following spinal surgery. Furthermore, descriptions of the subdural changes after lumbar spine surgery are also infrequent. In this paper, we present two cases with subdural change seen on MRI immediately after lumbar surgery. Both the patients had mild symptoms that resolved spontaneously, and the follow-up MRI scan...

  6. Acute Hydrocephalus Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Son, Seong; Lee, Sang Gu; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Woo Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of acute hydrocephalus secondary to cervical spinal cord injury in a patient with diffuse ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A 75-year-old male patient visited the emergency department with tetraparesis and spinal shock. Imaging studies showed cervical spinal cord injury with hemorrhage and diffuse OPLL from C1 to C4. We performed decompressive laminectomy and occipitocervical fusion. Two days after surgery, his mental status had deteriorated to drow...

  7. Management of acute spinal cord injury.

    Wagner, F C

    1977-06-01

    Based on the experience with 58 patients with acute spinal cord injuries, a system for rapidly evaluating such patients has been developed. With the knowledge that has been acquired clinically and experimentally of spinal cord injury and with the information provided by laminography and by either air or Pantopaque myelography, a reasonably certain diagnosis of the type of spinal cord injury may be made. Treatment designed to restore neurological function may then be instituted promptly. PMID:882906

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF SPINAL MOBILIZATION WITH LEG MOVEMENT (SMWLM) IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR RADICULOPATHY (L5 / S1 NERVE ROOT) IN LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    Sahiba Yadav; Megha Arora Nijhawan; Paresh Panda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various manual therapy techniques are known to treat discogenic pain. Research is limited and controversial in the effectiveness of manual therapy for treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to lumbar disc disease. In manual therapy, Mulligan has described spinal mobilisation with leg movement technique, for improvement in lumbar lesion resulting in pain and other signs below knee. Purpose of the study: To find out if Mulligan’s Spinal Mobilisation with Leg Movement technique (...

  9. Value of spinal computed tomography in diagnosis of herniated lumbar discs

    Sachsenheimer, W.; Hamer, J. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neurochirurgie); Mueller, H.A. (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer spez. onkologische Diagnostik)

    1982-01-01

    In this study the diagnostic value and topographical accuracy of spinal computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations were tested in 36 patients with surgically proven herniated discs. All patients also underwent metrizamide myelography. CT findings and myelograms were compared and correlated with the surgical observations. Especially in demonstrating exact diagnosis (lateral or more medial protrusion), and in showing the extent of upward and downward displacement of free disc material, CT provides valuable preoperative information. As a non-invasive diagnostic procedure, spinal CT scan may replace lumbar myelography in many patients with radicular lumbar pain.

  10. Rare ligamentum flavum cyst causing incapacitating lumbar spinal stenosis: Experience with 3 Chinese patients

    Cheung Kai-Yin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three Chinese patients suffered from severe lumbar spinal stenosis with debilitating symptoms due to a rare condition of ligamentum flavum cysts in the midline of the lumbar spine. This disease is distinct from synovial cyst of the facet joints or ganglion cysts, both intraoperatively and histopathologically. Magnetic Resonance imaging features of the ligamentum flavum cyst are also demonstrated. We share our surgical experiences of identification of the ligamentum flavum cysts, decompression and excision for two of the patients with demonstrably good recovery. This disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an extradural instraspinal mass in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

  11. Spinal capillary hemangioma involving the lumbar epidural and paraspinal spaces: A case report

    Yim, Bong Guk; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Chan Kum; Paik, Seung Sam [Hanyang University Medical Center, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Spinal capillary hemangiomas in the epidural space are extremely rare; however, a preoperative radiological diagnosis is very important because of the risk of massive intraoperative hemorrhage. We report a case of a spinal capillary hemangioma involving the lumbar epidural and paraspinal spaces.

  12. Congenital lumbar spinal stenosis with ossification of the ligamentum flavum in achondroplasia: a case report

    Saito, Kimio; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Kasukawa, Yuji; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Shimada, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Achondroplasia is a genetic disorder of bone growth. Congenital spinal stenosis is a well-known complication of this disease, but, to the best of our knowledge, no cases involving combined stenosis with congenital lumbar spinal stenosis and ossification of the ligamentum flavum in achondroplasia have been reported previously. In this report, we describe a case of a patient with congenital spinal stenosis with achondroplasia combined with ossification of the ligamentum flavum at t...

  13. Dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal: variations and correlations with somatometric parameters using CT

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of vertebral dimensions with somatometric parameters in patients without clinical symptoms and radiological signs of central lumbar spinal stenosis. One hundred patients presenting with low back pain or sciatica were studied with CT. In each of the L3, L4 and L5 vertebra three slices were taken with the following measurements: 1. Slice through the intervertebral disc: (a) spinal canal area; (b) interarticular diameter; (c) interligamentous diameter. 2. Slice below the vertebral arcus: (a) dural sac area; (b) vertebral body area. 3. Pediculolaminar level: (a) anteroposterior diameter and interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal; (b) spinal canal area; (c) width of the lateral recesses. The Jones-Thomson index was also estimated. The results of the present study showed that there is a statistically significant correlation of height, weight and age with various vertebral indices. The conventional, widely accepted, anteroposterior diameter of 11.5 mm of the lumbar spinal canal is independent of somatometric parameters, and it is the only constant measurement for the estimation of lumbar spinal stenosis with a single value. The present study suggests that there are variations of the dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal and correlations with height, weight and age of the patient. (orig.)

  14. Dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal: variations and correlations with somatometric parameters using CT

    Karantanas, A.H. [Department of CT-MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece); Zibis, A.H.; Papaliaga, M.; Georgiou, E.; Rousogiannis, S. [Larissa Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of vertebral dimensions with somatometric parameters in patients without clinical symptoms and radiological signs of central lumbar spinal stenosis. One hundred patients presenting with low back pain or sciatica were studied with CT. In each of the L3, L4 and L5 vertebra three slices were taken with the following measurements: 1. Slice through the intervertebral disc: (a) spinal canal area; (b) interarticular diameter; (c) interligamentous diameter. 2. Slice below the vertebral arcus: (a) dural sac area; (b) vertebral body area. 3. Pediculolaminar level: (a) anteroposterior diameter and interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal; (b) spinal canal area; (c) width of the lateral recesses. The Jones-Thomson index was also estimated. The results of the present study showed that there is a statistically significant correlation of height, weight and age with various vertebral indices. The conventional, widely accepted, anteroposterior diameter of 11.5 mm of the lumbar spinal canal is independent of somatometric parameters, and it is the only constant measurement for the estimation of lumbar spinal stenosis with a single value. The present study suggests that there are variations of the dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal and correlations with height, weight and age of the patient. (orig.) With 1 fig., 6 tabs., 24 refs.

  15. Aperius interspinous device for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a review.

    Ramesh, Ashwanth; Lyons, Frank; Kelleher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    With an aging population, degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) leading to neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC) is a growing problem. For patients suffering from this condition, interspinous process distraction devices (IPDs) offer an effective and cheap alternative to conservative or decompressive surgery. Aperius is one such device that has been gaining popularity for its percutaneous insertion under local anesthetic, short operative time, and low risk of complications. The main objective of this review was to carry out a comprehensive search of the literature to evaluate the effectiveness and potential complications of Aperius. A database search, including PubMed, Clinical trials.gov, Cochrane (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Scopus, was carried out to identify relevant articles written in English reporting on complications with a minimum 12-month follow-up. The literature search resulted in six eligible studies; two nonrandomized comparative and four prospective case series were available. The analysis revealed that in total, 433 patients underwent treatment with Aperius, with all studies demonstrating an improvement in outcome measures. The average follow-up was 17 months with an overall complication rate of 10.62 %. Overall, the quality of evidence is low, suggesting that currently, the evidence is not compelling and further prospective randomized trials including cost-effectiveness studies are required. PMID:26324829

  16. Impact of obesity on lumbar spinal surgery outcomes.

    Cao, Junming; Kong, Lingde; Meng, Fantao; Zhang, Yingze; Shen, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effect of obesity on surgical outcomes and complications following lumbar spinal surgery. A systematic electronic literature review of all relevant studies through to June 2015 was performed using the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases. Pooled risk ratios (RR) or standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random or fixed effects models. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to evaluate the methodological quality, and Stata 11.0 was used to analyse data (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). Significant differences between obese and non-obese patients were found for operation time (SMD, -0.273; 95%CI, -0.424 to -0.121), blood loss (SMD, -0.265; 95%CI, -0.424 to -0.107), surgical site infections (RR, 0.610; 95%CI, 0.446 to 0.834), and nerve injury (RR, 0.188; 95%CI, 0.042 to 0.841). Deep vein thrombosis, dural tear, revision surgery, and mortality were not significantly differences between the two groups (Pnerve injuries. However, the results of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution due to heterogeneity amongst the included studies. PMID:27021227

  17. Lumbar Lordosis of Spinal Stenosis Patients during Intraoperative Prone Positioning

    Lee, Su-Keon; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Song, Kyung-Sub; Park, Byung-Moon; Lim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Geun; Lee, Beom-Seok; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis on the OSI (Jackson; Orthopaedic Systems Inc.) frame. Restoration of lumbar lordosis is important for maintaining sagittal balance. Physiologic lumbar lordosis has to be gained by intraoperative prone positioning with a hip extension and posterior instrumentation technique. There are some debates about changing lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame after an intraoperative prone position. We evaluated the effect of spondyloli...

  18. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system: an in-vitro mechanical evaluation

    Kok, Dennis; Firkins, Paul John; Wapstra, Frits H; Veldhuizen, Albert G

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices (for example: DePuy Spines Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System). The Memory Metal Spinal System of this study consists of a single square spinal rod made of a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) use...

  19. Treatment of the Moderate Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with an Intespinous Distraction Device IMPALA

    Haso Sefo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was the evaluation of symptom improvements in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis, who consecutively underwent placement of interspinous distraction deviceIMPALA®.Methods: This study included a total of 11 adult patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis. Clinical evaluations were performed preoperatively and 3-months after surgery using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI.Results: The mean preoperative VAS was 7.09 and fell to 2.27 a 3-months after surgery. The mean preoperative ODI was 59.45 fell to 20.72 a 3-months after surgery.Conclusions: Using the IMPALA® device in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis is a minimal invasive, effective and safe procedure. Clinical symptoms were improved 3 months after surgery.

  20. Rare ligamentum flavum cyst causing incapacitating lumbar spinal stenosis: Experience with 3 Chinese patients

    Cheung Kai-Yin; Leung Simon; Sieh Koon-Man; Wong Tsz; Chan Alexander; Fung Kwai-Yau

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Three Chinese patients suffered from severe lumbar spinal stenosis with debilitating symptoms due to a rare condition of ligamentum flavum cysts in the midline of the lumbar spine. This disease is distinct from synovial cyst of the facet joints or ganglion cysts, both intraoperatively and histopathologically. Magnetic Resonance imaging features of the ligamentum flavum cyst are also demonstrated. We share our surgical experiences of identification of the ligamentum flavum cysts, deco...

  1. RADIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC METHODS OF SOFT-TISSUE COMPONENTS IN THE SPINAL CANAL FORMING LUMBAR STENOSIS

    OTABEK ABLYAZOV

    2011-01-01

    The modern categorization defines the different forms of lumbar part spine stenosis, coming from anatomical and pathological of the principle. One of the varieties is a central lumbar stenosis. Compression of medulla spinalis occurs due to reduction of sizes of the spine central cannel caused either by osseous structure or softtissue of the spine canal. All softtissue components of the spinal canal can form stenos including defeat of intervertebral disk (the hernia of the disk). This work s...

  2. Full-endoscopic interlaminar removal of chronic lumbar epidural hematoma after spinal manipulation

    Yen-Po Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal manipulation is widely used for low back pain treatments. Complications associated with spinal manipulation are seen. Lumbar epidural hematoma (EDH is one of the complications reported in the literature. If lumbar chronic EDH symptoms are present, which are similar to those of a herniated nucleus pulposus, surgery may be considered if medical treatment fails. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy utilizing an interlaminar approach can be successfully applied to those with herniated nucleus pulposus. We use the same technique to remove the lumbar chronic EDH, which is the first documented report in the related literature. Methods: We present a case with chronic lumbar EDH associated with spinal manipulation. Neurologic deficits were noted on physical examination. We arranged for a full-endoscopic interlaminar approach to remove the hematoma for the patient with the rigid endoscopy (Vertebris system; Richard Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany. Results: After surgery, the patient′s radiculopathy immediately began to disappear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI follow-up 10 days after the surgery revealed no residual hematoma. No complications were noted during the outpatient department follow up. Conclusions: Lumbar EDH is a possible complication of spinal manipulation. Patient experiencing rapidly progressive neurologic deficit require early surgical evacuation, while conservative treatment may only be applied to those with mild symptoms. A percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar approach may be a viable alternative for the treatment of those with chronic EDH with progressive neurologic deficits.

  3. Quantitative morphometric analysis of the lumbar vertebral facets and evaluation of feasibility of lumbar spinal nerve root and spinal canal decompression using the Goel intraarticular facetal spacer distraction technique: A lumbar/cervical facet comparison

    Savni R Satoskar; Aimee A Goel; Mehta, Pooja H.; Atul Goel

    2014-01-01

    Objective : The authors evaluate the anatomic subtleties of lumbar facets and assess the feasibility and effectiveness of use of ′Goel facet spacer′ in the treatment of degenerative spinal canal stenosis. Materials and Methods : Twenty-five lumbar vertebral cadaveric dried bones were used for the purpose. A number of morphometric parameters were evaluated both before and after the introduction of Goel facet spacers within the confines of the facet joint. Results : The spacers achieved distrac...

  4. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS: a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

    Friedly Janna L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone. Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization

  5. RADIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC METHODS OF SOFT-TISSUE COMPONENTS IN THE SPINAL CANAL FORMING LUMBAR STENOSIS

    OTABEK ABLYAZOV

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The modern categorization defines the different forms of lumbar part spine stenosis, coming from anatomical and pathological of the principle. One of the varieties is a central lumbar stenosis. Compression of medulla spinalis occurs due to reduction of sizes of the spine central cannel caused either by osseous structure or softtissue of the spine canal. All softtissue components of the spinal canal can form stenos including defeat of intervertebral disk (the hernia of the disk. This work studies efficiency of Xray (at 33 patients and MRI (at 92 patients methods in diagnostics of the hernia of the disk that participates in forming lumbar part spine stenosis.

  6. A database of lumbar spinal mechanical behavior for validation of spinal analytical models.

    Stokes, Ian A F; Gardner-Morse, Mack

    2016-03-21

    Data from two experimental studies with eight specimens each of spinal motion segments and/or intervertebral discs are presented in a form that can be used for comparison with finite element model predictions. The data include the effect of compressive preload (0, 250 and 500N) with quasistatic cyclic loading (0.0115Hz) and the effect of loading frequency (1, 0.1, 0.01 and 0.001Hz) with a physiological compressive preload (mean 642N). Specimens were tested with displacements in each of six degrees of freedom (three translations and three rotations) about defined anatomical axes. The three forces and three moments in the corresponding axis system were recorded during each test. Linearized stiffness matrices were calculated that could be used in multi-segmental biomechanical models of the spine and these matrices were analyzed to determine whether off-diagonal terms and symmetry assumptions should be included. These databases of lumbar spinal mechanical behavior under physiological conditions quantify behaviors that should be present in finite element model simulations. The addition of more specimens to identify sources of variability associated with physical dimensions, degeneration, and other variables would be beneficial. Supplementary data provide the recorded data and Matlab® codes for reading files. Linearized stiffness matrices derived from the tests at different preloads revealed few significant unexpected off-diagonal terms and little evidence of significant matrix asymmetry. PMID:26900035

  7. Radiographic changes of lumbar spine and pelvis in chronic spinal injury

    Shamsa Shariatpanahi

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The most frequent cause of chronic spinal injuries of our patients has been the injury by quiver, it seems our results may not be extended to all patients with spinal cord injury. In lumbar spine radiography of the patients, osteophytes, the quiver and psoriasis like ossifications were mostly seen. In the pelvis x-rays the most changes were hip joint narrowing, sacroiliitis and the heterotopic ossification.

  8. Treatment of Acute Lumbar Sprain by Acupuncture plus Cupping

    WANG Jun-ying; WANG Si-you

    2003-01-01

    Fifty cases of acute lumbar sprain were treated by the combination of acupuncture, cupping and kinesitherapy. Forty-three cases were cured and 7 cases improved, the total effective rate being 100%. This therapy has an exact effect with a short course of treatment.

  9. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  10. Early experience with endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions.

    McGrath, Lynn B; Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Wang, Michael Y; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2016-02-01

    Approximately half a million spinal fusion procedures are performed annually in the US. It is estimated that up to one-third of arthrodesis constructs require revision surgeries. In this study the authors present endoscopic treatment strategies targeting 3 types of complications following arthrodesis surgery: 1) adjacent-level foraminal stenosis; 2) foraminal stenosis at an arthrodesis segment; and 3) stenosis caused by a displaced interbody cage. A retrospective chart review of 11 patients with a mean age of 68 ± 15 years was performed (continuous variables are shown as the mean ± SEM). All patients had a history of lumbar arthrodesis surgery and suffered from unilateral radiculopathy. Endoscopic revision surgeries were done as outpatient procedures, and there were no intraoperative or perioperative complications. The cohort included 3 patients with foraminal stenosis at the level of previous arthrodesis. They presented with unilateral radicular leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS] score: 7.3 ± 2.1) and were severely disabled, as evidenced by an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) of 46 ± 4.9. Transforaminal endoscopic foraminotomies were performed, and at a mean follow-up time of 9.0 ± 2.5 months VAS was reduced by an average of 6.3. The cohort also includes 7 patients suffering unilateral radiculopathy due to adjacent-level foraminal stenosis. Preoperative VAS for leg pain of the symptomatic side was 6.0 ± 1.6, VAS for back pain was 5.2 ± 1.7, and ODI was 40 ± 6.33. Endoscopic decompression led to reduction of the ipsilateral leg VAS score by an average of 5, resulting in leg pain of 1 ± 0.5 at an average of 8 months of follow-up. The severity of back pain remained stable (VAS 4.2 ± 1.4). Two of these patients required revision surgery for recurrent symptoms. Finally, this study includes 1 patient who presented with weakness and pain due to retropulsion of an L5/S1 interbody spacer. The patient underwent an endoscopic interlaminar approach with partial

  11. Limited Unilateral Decompression and Pedicle Screw Fixation with Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Unilateral Radiculopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of 25 Cases

    Zhang, Li; Miao, Hai-xiong; Wang, Yong; Chen, An-fu; Zhang, Tao; Xiao-guang LIU

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lumbar spinal stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical decompression. However, bilateral decompression and laminectomy is more invasive and may not be necessary for lumbar stenosis patients with unilateral radiculopathy. We aimed to report the outcomes of unilateral laminectomy and bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with unilateral lower extremity rad...

  12. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Hansen, Christopher N; Norden, Diana M; Faw, Timothy D; Deibert, Rochelle; Wohleb, Eric S; Sheridan, John F; Godbout, Jonathan P; Basso, D Michele

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24h and 7days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24h after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  13. Diagnosis of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis An Updated Systematic Review of the Accuracy of Diagnostic Tests

    de Schepper, Evelien I. T.; Overdevest, Gijsbert M.; Suri, Pradeep; Peul, Wilco C.; Oei, Edwin H. G.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Luijsterburg, Pim A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Systematic review of diagnostic studies. Objective. To update our previous systematic review on the diagnostic accuracy of tests used to diagnose lumbar spinal stenosis. Summary of Background Data. A wide range of clinical, radiological, and electrodiagnostic tests are used to diagnose

  14. General anesthesia versus segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Yousef, Gamal T.; Lasheen, Ahmed E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy became the standard surgery for gallstone disease because of causing less postoperative pain, respiratory compromise and early ambulation. Objective: This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia, (segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar) vs the gold standard general anesthesia as three anesthetic techniques for healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, evaluating intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery an...

  15. Topacheous gout as a rare cause of spinal stenosis in the lumbar region. Case report.

    Kelly, Joseph

    2012-02-03

    Despite the fact that gout is a common metabolic disorder, because its involvement of the axial skeleton is rare the diagnosis is often delayed, even in patients with long-standing gout who present with neurological deficits. The authors report the case of a woman with a history of extensive gout, emphasizing the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of a lumbar spinal stenosis.

  16. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with spinal cord compression

    A 14-year-old boy developed spinal cord compression during remission of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Metrizamide myelography disclosed complete block at the level of the 8th thoracic vertebra. Subsequent metrizamide CT clearly showed the subarachnoid space compressed and stenosed from the 8th thoracic vertebra to the 2nd lumber verbetra, and an extradural mass compressing the spinal cord. The function in the lower extremities was almost completely recovered by radiation therapy with a total dose of 10 Gy from the 6th thoracic vertebra to the 4th lumbar vertebra. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    Surendra Mohan Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine.

  18. Paraplegia by Acute Cervical Disc Protrusion after Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    Sheng-Huan Chen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-traumatic paraplegia caused by herniation of the cervical intervertebral disc is anuncommon postoperative complication. A patient with claudication and radiculopathy wasscheduled for lumbar laminectomy due to spinal stenosis. Postoperatively, numbness belowT6 was found in his both legs of the patient. MRI showed a protruded intervertebral discbetween C6 and C7. Despite urgent disectomy, the patient's lower extremities remained paralyzedwithout significant improvement for 3 months. Loss of muscle support during generalanesthesia, excessive neck extension during endotracheal intubation and positioning, as wellas bucking and agitation are believed as triggering factors for the protrusion of the cervicaldisc. We suggest that a complete history taking and physical examination be accomplishedin patients scheduled for lumbar spine surgery in order to exclude coexisting cervical spinedisorders. In addition, skillful endotracheal intubation and careful neck positioning aremandatory for patients receiving surgery in the prone position.

  19. Preferred locomotor phase of activity of lumbar interneurons during air-stepping in subchronic spinal cats.

    AuYong, Nicholas; Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Lemay, Michel A

    2011-03-01

    Spinal locomotor circuits are intrinsically capable of driving a variety of behaviors such as stepping, scratching, and swimming. Based on an observed rostrocaudal wave of activity in the motoneuronal firing during locomotor tasks, the traveling-wave hypothesis proposes that spinal interneuronal firing follows a similar rostrocaudal pattern of activation, suggesting the presence of spatially organized interneuronal modules within the spinal motor system. In this study, we examined if the spatial organization of the lumbar interneuronal activity patterns during locomotor activity in the adult mammalian spinal cord was consistent with a traveling-wave organizational scheme. The activity of spinal interneurons within the lumbar intermediate zone was examined during air-stepping in subchronic spinal cats. The preferred phase of interneuronal activity during a step cycle was determined using circular statistics. We found that the preferred phases of lumbar interneurons from both sides of the cord were evenly distributed over the entire step cycle with no indication of functional groupings. However, when units were subcategorized according to spinal hemicords, the preferred phases of units on each side largely fell around the period of extensor muscle activity on each side. In addition, there was no correlation between the preferred phases of units and their rostrocaudal locations along the spinal cord with preferred phases corresponding to both flexion and extension phases of the step cycle found at every rostrocaudal level of the cord. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that interneurons operate as part of a longitudinally distributed network rather than a rostrocaudally organized traveling-wave network. PMID:21084683

  20. [A Case of Cramps Caused by Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Treated Successfully with Arterial Stenting following Lumbar Sympathetic Ganglion Block].

    Takekawa, Kimiko

    2016-04-01

    An 82-year-old woman who had received two operations for lumbar spinal stenosis was treated successfully for persistent nocturnal leg cramps with lumbar sympathetic ganglion block. The stent in the right popliteal artery improved cramps again following the recurrence one month after the block. The head up position in bed against gastroesophageal reflux was found injurious at the time of second recurrence one year after stenting. After the correction of lying position, her legs were in good condition for over one year. Cramps in this case might be caused by disturbances of blood flow supply for motor nerves of the legs by obstructive arterial sclerosis of the nerve injured from root compression. PMID:27188122

  1. Outcome after surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis: the lumbar extension test is not a predictive factor

    Westergaard, Lars; Hauerberg, John; Springborg, Jacob B

    2009-01-01

    the lumbar spine has predictive value for the outcome after decompression. The aim of this study was to investigate this theory in a larger group of patients. METHODS: One hundred forty-six consecutive patients surgically treated for LSS were included in the study. The clinical condition was recorded...... before surgery and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery using 3 different scoring systems: Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, Neurogenic Claudication Outcome Score, and Oswestry Disability Index. The group of patients with preoperative aggravation of the symptoms by the lumbar extension test......, (positive extension test), was compared with the group of patients without aggravation by the test, (negative extension test). RESULTS: Before surgery, patients with a positive extension test scored significantly worse on all disability scoring systems than patients with a negative test. However, the...

  2. Can spinal anaesthesia be a routine for single level lumbar discectomy

    To compare the efficacy of spinal anaesthesia with general anaesthesia for lumbar discectomy in terms of theatre time and post-operative effects. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Neurosurgery department Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from November 2013 to April 2014. Material and Methods: A total 60 consecutive patients with herniated lumbar discs were enrolled in this study to undergo randomly into assigned spinal anaesthesia group SA (n=30, group A) or General anaesthesia GA (n=30, group B). Variables included age, gender, level of lumbar disc prolapse, type of anaesthesia, operative time, and combined total theatre time, post-operative pain using visual analogue scale (VAS) and hospital stay in days. Results: Mean theatre time in group A was 62.70 and for group B it was 90.73 (p<0.001). The mean hospital stay after surgery in group A was 2.0 days and in group B was 2.27 days (p 0.002). Peak post- operative pain scores according to visual analogue scale and resultant analgesic requirements in group A was 5.10 while for group B it was 6.87 p <0.001. Conclusion: Spinal anaesthesia is safe and can be routine anaesthesia for most of the patients undergoing lumbar discectomy. (author)

  3. Lumbar spinal loading during bowling in cricket: a kinetic analysis using a musculoskeletal modelling approach.

    Zhang, Yanxin; Ma, Ye; Liu, Guangyu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate two types of cricket bowling techniques by comparing the lumbar spinal loading using a musculoskeletal modelling approach. Three-dimensional kinematic data were recorded by a Vicon motion capture system under two cricket bowling conditions: (1) participants bowled at their absolute maximal speeds (max condition), and (2) participants bowled at their absolute maximal speeds while simultaneously forcing their navel down towards their thighs starting just prior to ball release (max-trunk condition). A three-dimensional musculoskeletal model comprised of the pelvis, sacrum, lumbar vertebrae and torso segments, which enabled the motion of the individual lumbar vertebrae in the sagittal, frontal and coronal planes to be actuated by 210 muscle-tendon units, was used to simulate spinal loading based on the recorded kinematic data. The maximal lumbar spine compressive force is 4.89 ± 0.88BW for the max condition and 4.58 ± 0.54BW for the max-trunk condition. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the two techniques in trunk moments and lumbar spine forces. This indicates that the max-trunk technique may not increase lower back injury risks. The method proposed in this study could be served as a tool to evaluate lower back injury risks for cricket bowling as well as other throwing activities. PMID:26343905

  4. ROLE OF EPIDURAL INJECTIONS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE LUMBAR DISCOGENIC PAIN

    Srinivas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of epidural injections in the cervical , thoracic and lumbo sacral spine for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has developed as an important part of a comprehensive interdisci plinary approach to spinal pain . (1, 2 It is well known that structural abnormalities see n on CT or MRI scans do not always cause pain and diagnostic injections often can help correlate abnormalities on imaging studies with associated pain complaints. Therapeutically , epidural injections can provide significant pain relief during which , time r ecovery of disc and nerve root injuries can occur and patients also can progress their level of physical activity. In acute disc injury with or without radiculopathy , therapeutic injections can help and manage the patient ’ s pain without reliance on oral analgesics. Epidural cortico steroid injections with physical therapy is recommended in conjunction . (1 Mechanism of pain relief is due to potent and anti - inflammatory properties of the cortico steroids . ( 3,2 Aim to know the effic acy and results of the epidural steroid injection in acute lumbar discogenic pain . ( 2 MATERIALS AND METHODS: I have treated 800 patients with lumbar epidural injections for 3 weeks ( W eekly interval since 2005 at Sri Venkata Hospital and pain management ce ntre SP Nagar , Kukatpally , Hyderabad , Telangana. F or the management of Lumbar Discogenic Pain till 2014. RESULTS: E xcellent in 90% of patients and no patient complained of recurrence of symptoms and reached their normal activities without surgery after epidural injection treatment. Lumbar Epidural steroid injection is usually performed in about 6 weeks after the onset of low back pain or radicular pain. Lumbar Epidural steroid injection is appropriate for an outpatient setting provided all necessary resu scitative equipment is available i.e. O 2 , intubation equipment , emergency drugs , IV access and we can avoid the hospitalization . DISCUSSION: LESIs

  5. Quantitative morphometric analysis of the lumbar vertebral facets and evaluation of feasibility of lumbar spinal nerve root and spinal canal decompression using the Goel intraarticular facetal spacer distraction technique: A lumbar/cervical facet comparison

    Savni R Satoskar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The authors evaluate the anatomic subtleties of lumbar facets and assess the feasibility and effectiveness of use of ′Goel facet spacer′ in the treatment of degenerative spinal canal stenosis. Materials and Methods : Twenty-five lumbar vertebral cadaveric dried bones were used for the purpose. A number of morphometric parameters were evaluated both before and after the introduction of Goel facet spacers within the confines of the facet joint. Results : The spacers achieved distraction of facets that was more pronounced in the vertical perspective. Introduction of spacers on both sides resulted in an increase in the intervertebral foraminal height and a circumferential increase in the spinal canal dimensions. Additionally, there was an increase in the disc space or intervertebral body height. The lumbar facets are more vertically and anteroposteriorly oriented when compared to cervical facets that are obliquely and transversely oriented. Conclusions : Understanding the anatomical peculiarities of the lumbar and cervical facets can lead to an optimum utilization of the potential of Goel facet distraction arthrodesis technique in the treatment of spinal degenerative canal stenosis.

  6. Clinical Analysis of Acute Radiculopathy after Osteoporotic Lumbar Compression Fracture

    Kim, Do Eon; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Hyun Sook

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between fracture pattern and the development of acute radiculopathy after osteoporotic lumbar compression fracture. Methods This study included 59 patients who underwent bone cement augmentation for osteoporotic compression fracture below the L2 level, which can lead to radiculopathic radiating pain. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of radiculopathy (group A : back pain only; group B : back ...

  7. Lumbar spinal loads vary with body height and weight.

    Han, Kap-Soo; Rohlmann, Antonius; Zander, Thomas; Taylor, William R

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge about spinal loading is required for designing and preclinical testing of spinal implants. It is assumed that loading of the spine depends upon body weight and height, as well as on the spine level, but a direct measurement of the loading conditions throughout the spine is not yet possible. Here, computer models can allow an estimation of the forces and moments acting in the spine. The objective of the present study was to calculate spinal loads for different postures and activities at several levels of the thoracolumbar spine for various combinations of body height and weight. A validated musculoskeletal model, together with commercially available software (AnyBody Technology), were used to calculate the segmental loads acting on the centre of the upper endplate of the vertebrae T12 to L5. The body height was varied between 150 and 200 cm and the weight between 50 and 120 kg. The loads were determined for five standard static postures and three lifting tasks. The resultant forces and moments increased approximately linearly with increasing body weight. The body height had a nearly linear effect on the spinal loads, but in almost all loading cases, the effect on spinal loads was stronger for variation of body weight than of body height. Spinal loads generally increased from cranial to caudal. The presented data now allow the estimation of the spinal load during activities of daily living on a subject specific basis, if body height and weight are known. PMID:23040051

  8. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Sipola, Petri; Vanninen, Ritva; Manninen, Hannu (Univ. of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Clinical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland)), email: petri.sipola@kuh.fi; Leinonen, Ville (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland)); Niemelaeinen, Riikka (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Clinical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Aalto, Timo (Kyyhkylae Rehabilitation Center and Hospital, Mikkeli (Finland)); Airaksinen, Olavi (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine and Univ. of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio (Finland)); Battie, Michele C. (Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  9. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  10. Effects of flexion-distraction manipulation therapy on pain and disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

    Choi, Jioun; Lee, Sangyong; Jeon, Chunbae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of flexion-distraction manipulation therapy on pain and disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. [Subjects] Thirty patients with lumbar spinal stenosis were divided into two groups: a conservative treatment group (n=15) and a flexion-distraction manipulation group (n=15). [Methods] The conservative treatment group received conservative physical therapy, and the flexion-distraction group received both conservative physical therapy and flexio...

  11. Comparison of Modic Changes in the Lumbar and Cervical Spine, in 3167 Patients with and without Spinal Pain

    Sheng-yun, Li; Letu, Suyou; JIAN, CHEN; Mamuti, Maiwulanjiang; Jun-Hui, Liu; Zhi, Shan; Chong-yan, Wang; Shunwu, Fan; Zhao, Fengdong

    2014-01-01

    Background Context There are few comparisons of Modic changes (MCs) in the lumbar and cervical spine. Purpose Compare the prevalence of MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine, and determine how MC prevalence depends on spinal pain, age, disc degeneration, spinal level, and the presence or absence of kyphosis. Study Design Retrospective clinical survey. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were compared from five patient groups: 1. 1223 patients with low-back pain/radiculopathy...

  12. Hemorrhagic Lumbar Synovial Cyst

    Park, Hyun Seok; Sim, Hong Bo; Kwon, Soon Chan; Park, Jun Bum

    2012-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are an uncommon cause of back and radicular pain. These cysts most frequently present as back pain, followed by chronic progressive radiculopathy or gradual onset of symptoms secondary to spinal canal compromise. Although less common, they can also present with acute spinal cord or root compression symptoms. We report of a case in which hemorrhaging into a right L2-3 facet synovial cyst caused an acute onset of back pain and radiculopathy, requiring surgical...

  13. Health economic evaluation in lumbar spinal fusion: a systematic literature review anno 2005

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B

    2006-01-01

    clinical practice are present, economic evaluation is needed in order to facilitate the decision-makers' budget allocations. NHS Economic Evaluation Database, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched. Two independent reviewers (one clinical content expert and one economic content expert) applied...... fact that the clinical effects are statistically synonymous, it does not support the use of high-cost techniques. There is a great potential for improvement of methodological quality in economic evaluations of lumbar spinal fusion and further research is imperative.......The goal of this systematic literature review was to assess the evidence for cost-effectiveness of various surgical techniques in lumbar spinal fusion in conformity with the guidelines provided by the Cochrane Back Review Group. As new technology continuously emerges and divergent directions in...

  14. Incidence of Vascular Complications Arising from Anterior Spinal Surgery in the Thoraco-Lumbar Spine

    Klezl, Zdenek; Swamy, Girish Nanjunda; Vyskocil, Thomas; Kryl, Jan; Stulik, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Modern biomaterials and instrumentation have popularised surgery of the thoraco-lumbar spine through an anterior route. The advantage of anterior surgery is that it allows for a direct decompression of the compromised spinal canal. However, the potential for devastating long-term sequelae as a result of complications is high. Purpose The aim of this study was to give a general overview and identify the incidence of vascular complications. Overview of Literature There is limited l...

  15. Lumbar neuropathic pain of lower limbs treated by spinal infusion of ziconotide a case – report

    Luca Quadrino

    2008-01-01

    The Author reports the case of a patient with severe lumbar pain unresponsive to NSAIDs. Initial treatment with tramadol gave poor results and a new protocol with hydromorphone – pregabalin was started. The analgesic response was observed only following high hydromorphone doses, associated with unacceptable side effects. A spinal device for continuous intrathecal infusion was then implanted, in order to administer ziconotide, a new opioid drug. Associated therapy included hydromorphone – p...

  16. Diagnostic value of multiplanar reconstruction in CT recognition of lumbar spinal disorders

    Im, S. K.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, C. H.; Sohn, M. H.; Lim, K. Y.; Choi, K. C. [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    The computer tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the lumbar spine. Recently, the multiplanar reconstruction of lumbar spine of CT of significant value for the anatomical localization and for the myelographic and surgical correlation. We observed 177 cases of lumbar spine CT, who complains of spinal symptom, during the period from Dec. 1982 to Aug. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 113 males and 44 females. The CT diagnosis showed 152 cases of herniated lumbar disc, 15 cases of degenerative disease, 5 cases of spine tbc., 3 cases of spine trauma and 2 cases of meningocele. 2. CT findings of herniated disc were as follows: focal protrusion of posterior disc margin and obliteration of anterior epidural fat in all cases, indentation on dural sac in 92 cases (60.5%) soft tissue mass in epidural fat in 85 cases (55.9%), compression or displacement of nerve root sheath in 22 cases(14.4%). 3. Sites of herniated lumbar disc were at L4-L5 level in 100 cases(59.1%) and at L5-S1 level in 65 cases (38.4%). Location of it were central type in 70 cases(41.1%), left-central type in 46 cases (27.2%), right-central type in 44 cases(26.0%) and lateral type in 9 cases (5.1%). 4. The sagittal reconstruction images were helpful in evaluating neural foramina, size of disc bluge into spinal canal, especially at L5-S1, and patients with spondylolisthesis. The coronal reconstruction images were the least informative, although they contributed to the evaluation of lumbar nerve roots of course, the axial CT scans were the most sensitive and specific.

  17. Diagnostic value of multiplanar reconstruction in CT recognition of lumbar spinal disorders

    The computer tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the lumbar spine. Recently, the multiplanar reconstruction of lumbar spine of CT of significant value for the anatomical localization and for the myelographic and surgical correlation. We observed 177 cases of lumbar spine CT, who complains of spinal symptom, during the period from Dec. 1982 to Aug. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 113 males and 44 females. The CT diagnosis showed 152 cases of herniated lumbar disc, 15 cases of degenerative disease, 5 cases of spine tbc., 3 cases of spine trauma and 2 cases of meningocele. 2. CT findings of herniated disc were as follows: focal protrusion of posterior disc margin and obliteration of anterior epidural fat in all cases, indentation on dural sac in 92 cases (60.5%) soft tissue mass in epidural fat in 85 cases (55.9%), compression or displacement of nerve root sheath in 22 cases(14.4%). 3. Sites of herniated lumbar disc were at L4-L5 level in 100 cases(59.1%) and at L5-S1 level in 65 cases (38.4%). Location of it were central type in 70 cases(41.1%), left-central type in 46 cases (27.2%), right-central type in 44 cases(26.0%) and lateral type in 9 cases (5.1%). 4. The sagittal reconstruction images were helpful in evaluating neural foramina, size of disc bluge into spinal canal, especially at L5-S1, and patients with spondylolisthesis. The coronal reconstruction images were the least informative, although they contributed to the evaluation of lumbar nerve roots of course, the axial CT scans were the most sensitive and specific.

  18. Lumbar spinal nerve roots imaging using balanced sequence with inversion recovery (IR) pulse

    We devised a method for visualizing the distal portion of lumbar spinal nerve roots in the direction of the long axis using a three-dimensional balanced sequence with inversion recovery pulse, and we established the imaging parameters. This pulse sequence was used with the following parameters: 260 mm field of view, 4.8 ms repetition time, 2.4 ms echo time, 90 degree flip angle, 1.5 mm slice thickness (0.75 mm overlap), and low-high radial k-space profile order. We assessed the signal intensity and contrast for the phantom and healthy volunteer images with different inversion times (TI). Moreover, we evaluated this method by using the optimal TI in clinical cases. The optimal TI obtained from the phantom and human studies was 600 ms. In clinical cases, this method with 600 ms of TI provided the best definition in images of abnormal pathway and compression of the lumbar spinal nerve roots. Our imaging method makes it possible to clearly and noninvasively visualize the lumbar spinal nerve roots. (author)

  19. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection via a preganglionic approach for lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar discogenic pain with radiculopathy

    Kabatas Serdar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESIs is one of the treatment modalities for chronic low back pain (CLBP with various degrees of success. Aim: We analyzed the efficacy of fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs via a preganglionic approach in patients with foraminal stenosis due to lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar discogenic pain with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the data of 40 patients (February 2008 and April 2009 with the diagnosis of CLBP and treated by fluoroscopically guided TFESIs via a preganglionic approach. Patients were followed-up at one month (short term, six months (midterm and one year (long term after injections. Follow-up data collection included the Visual Numeric Pain Scale (VNS and North American Spine Society (NASS patient satisfaction scores. Results: The mean age of the patients was 59.87 ± 15.06 years (range 30 - 89 years, 25 women. Average follow-up period was 9.22 ± 3.56 months. Statistically significant differences were observed between the pre-procedure and post-procedure VNSs (P < 0.01, Pearson Correlation Test. Improvements in VNS scores were correlated with improvements in the NASS scores. When the VNS scores were evaluated with respect to the age of patient, level numbers, gender, pre-procedure symptom duration and pre-procedure VNS, no significant differences were found (P < 0.05, linear regression test. At short term evaluation in post treatment (one month, 77.78 % of patients were found to have a successful outcome and 22.22 % were deemed failures. Overall patient satisfaction was 67.23 % in the midterm period. Additionally, 54.83 % of patients (N/n: 15/8 had a successful long-term outcome at a follow-up of one year. Conclusion: Our data suggest that fluoroscopically guided TFESIs via a preganglionic approach, in patients with foraminal stenosis due to lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar discogenic pain with radiculopathy, has effective outcome and

  20. Lumbar spinal anesthesia with cervical nociceptive blockade. Critical review of a series of 1,330 procedures

    Percio Ramón Becker Benitez; Celso Schmalfuss Nogueira; Ana Cristina Carvalho de Holanda; José Caio Santos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The manufacture of minimally traumatic needles and synthesis of pharmacological adjuncts with safe and effective action on inhibitory and neuromodulatory synapses distributed along the nociceptive pathways were crucial for a new expansion phase of spinal anesthesia. The objectives of this paper are present our clinical experience with 1330 lumbar spinal anesthesia performed with purposeful nociceptive blockade of the thoracic and cervical spinal nerves correspondin...

  1. Surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. A case series

    Ploumis Avraam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspinous distraction devices (IPDD are indicated as stand-alone devices for the treatment of spinal stenosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis with a combination of unilateral microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. Methods This is a prospective clinical and radiological study of minimum 2 years follow-up. Twenty-two patients (average age 64.5 years with low-back pain and unilateral sciatica underwent decompressive surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. Visual Analogue Scale, Oswestry Disability Index and walking capacity plus radiologic measurements of posterior disc height of the involved level and lumbar lordosis Cobb angle were documented both preoperatively and postoperatively. One-sided posterior subarticular and foraminal decompression was conducted followed by dynamic stabilization of the diseased level with an IPDD (X-STOP. Results The average follow-up time was 27.4 months. Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index improved statistically significantly (p Conclusions The described surgical technique using unilateral microdecompression and IPDD insertion is a clinically effective and radiologically viable treatment method for symptoms of spinal stenosis resistant to non-operative treatment.

  2. Noradrenergic modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of lumbar motoneurons in the neonatal rat spinal cord

    Maylis Tartas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Although it is known that noradrenaline powerfully controls spinal motor networks, few data are available regarding the noradrenergic modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons in motor networks. Our work explores the cellular basis of noradrenergic modulation in the rat motor spinal cord. We first show that lumbar motoneurons express the three classes of adrenergic receptors at birth. Using patch-clamp recordings in the newborn rat spinal cord preparation, we characterized the effects of noradrenaline and of specific agonists of the three classes of adrenoreceptors on motoneuron membrane properties. Noradrenaline increases the motoneuron excitability partly via the inhibition of a KIR like current. Methoxamine (α1, clonidine (α2 and isoproterenol (β differentially modulate the motoneuron membrane potential but also increase motoneuron excitability, these effects being respectively inhibited by the antagonists prazosin (α1, yohimbine (α2 and propranolol (β. We show that the glutamatergic synaptic drive arising from the T13-L2 network is enhanced in motoneurons by noradrenaline, methoxamine and isoproterenol. On the other hand, noradrenaline, isoproterenol and clonidine inhibit both the frequency and amplitude of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs while methoxamine increases their frequency. The T13-L2 synaptic drive is thereby differentially modulated from the other glutamatergic synapses converging onto motoneurons and enhanced by presynaptic α1 and β receptor activation. Our data thus show that the noradrenergic system exerts a powerful and complex neuromodulation of lumbar motor networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord.

  3. TREATMENT OF 20 CASES OF ACUTE LUMBAR DISC PROTRUSION WITH YIN THERAPY FOR YANG DISORDER

    TAO Jing; KANG Ming-fei; ZHAO Rong

    2006-01-01

    @@ Lumbar disc protrusion is one of the common reasons of lumbar and leg pain. How to alleviate acute pain effectively is the major problem encountered in the clinical medicine. From June 2005 to March 2006, yin therapy for yang disorder had been adopted in the treatment of 20 cases of acute lumbar disc protrusion and the significant therapeutic effects had been achieved. The report is as follows.

  4. EFFECTIVENESS OF SPINAL MOBILIZATION WITH LEG MOVEMENT (SMWLM IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR RADICULOPATHY (L5 / S1 NERVE ROOT IN LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    Sahiba Yadav

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various manual therapy techniques are known to treat discogenic pain. Research is limited and controversial in the effectiveness of manual therapy for treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to lumbar disc disease. In manual therapy, Mulligan has described spinal mobilisation with leg movement technique, for improvement in lumbar lesion resulting in pain and other signs below knee. Purpose of the study: To find out if Mulligan’s Spinal Mobilisation with Leg Movement technique (SMWLM in conjunction with conventional treatment is better than conventional treatment alone in improving leg pain intensity (VAS, localization of leg pain (body diagram by Donelson, back specific disability (RMQ in patients with lumbar radiculopathy (L5/ S1 nerve root in lumbar disc herniation. Methods: The study is a randomized controlled trial performed on 30 patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Both the groups received back extension exercises, hot pack, precautions and ergonomic advice. The experimental group received SMWLM technique in addition to the conventional treatment. Outcomes included leg pain intensity, Roland Morris Questionnaire and body diagram by Donelson. Results: There was significant improvement in VAS (p=0.000, body diagram (p=0.000 for experimental group and p=0.003 for conventional group and Roland Morris Questionnaire score (p=0.000 within the groups. Between group analysis showed significant improvement in VAS (p=0.000, body diagram score (p=0.000. Although there was significant improvement in Roland Morris Questionnaire score within the groups but there no significant difference between the group (p=0.070. Conclusion: Spinal Mobilization with Leg Movement technique in addition to conventional physical therapy produced significant improvement in leg pain intensity, location of pain and back specific disability in patients with lumbar radiculopathy in lumbar disc herniation.

  5. MR imaging of lumbar herniated intervertebral disc and spinal stenosis: Correlation with CT

    Lee, Won Jae; Park, Kil Sun; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Jip; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    MR imagings obtained in 40 patients with surgically proven lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) and/or spinal stenosis were retrospectively analysed and compared with CT scans, in order to evaluate the MR findings of HIVD and spinal stenosis, and to assess the diagnostic accuracy of MR. The MR imaging was performed on a 2.0 T superconducting unit, using multislice spin echo (SE) and gradient echo (GE) techniques. The results were as follows: 1. The texture of vertebral body with spinal stenosis had the tendency to be more heterogeneous than that with HIVD. 2. The signal intensity of the diseased disc was isointense relative to normal disc in 81 % (60/74) and the remainder (19%) was hypointense on both T1 weighted SE and GE images. There was no significant difference in signal intensity among HIVD, HIVD combined with spinal stenosis and spinal stenosis groups, but there was the tendency of lower signal intensity of the diseased disc in patients with severe degenerative change of spine in both T1 weighted SE imaged and GE image. 3. The diagnostic accuracy of MR was 92%, which was similar to that of CT. 4. T1 weighted SE image appears superior to GE image in evaluation of most of the structural differentiation, but as for differentiating between lumina and ligamentum flavum, and for the vacuum phenomenon, GE image seems to be better than T1 weighted SE image. In conclusion, MR appears to be better than CT as a initial imaging modality in evaluation of the patients with suspected lumbar spinal stenosis or HIVD because MR has the capability of demonstrating rupture of anulus fibrosus in sagittal plane.

  6. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction. (author)

  7. Lumbar spine CT scan

    ... an x-ray of the spinal cord and spinal nerve roots (myelography) or an x-ray of the disk (discography). ... spine Bone problems Fracture Lumbar disk herniation Lumbar spinal stenosis Spondylolisthesis

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders; A comparison with myelography and discography

    Nojiri, Hajime (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    To evaluate the stenotic condition of the lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelography and with discography in 102 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Various pathologic conditions were studied including 50 cases of herniated nucleus pulposus, 39 cases of lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral type or combined type), and 13 cases of spondylolisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, and dysplastic type). High correlation was detected between the T2 weighted mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and the lateral view of a full-column myelogram, but subtle changes such as adhesive changes, or redundancy, or anomalous changes of the nerve roots were more clearly demonstrated on myelograms than on MRI. Actually some of these changes could not be detected on MRI. The degrees of disc degeneration were classified into five grades according to the signal intensity and the irregularity of the disc on the T2-weighted image. The MRI evaluation of disc degeneration in this series was similar to that of the discography. However, MRI could not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI might be the imaging modality for diagnostic screening and for detecting stenotic conditions of the lumbar spinal canal, it will not be able to replace myelography and/or discography for determining indication for surgery and preferred surgical approach. (author).

  9. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  10. Accuracy and reproducibility of a retrospective outcome assessment for lumbar spinal stenosis surgery

    Kuittinen Pekka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrospective assessment of surgery outcome is considered problematic. The aims of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility and accuracy of a retrospective outcome assessment of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery with reference to prospective outcome scale measurements. Method Outcome of surgery from 100 lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS patients was evaluated retrospectively from patient files of a 3-month outpatient visit performed according to a standard clinical protocol by two independent researchers. In the retrospective analysis, outcome was graded as 2 = good if the clinical condition had clearly improved, 1 = moderate if it had just slightly improved, 0 = poor if it had not improved or was even worse than before the surgical treatment (Retrospective 3- point scale. A prospectively assessed Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire (ODI, Visual analogue pain scale (VAS and a patient satisfaction questionnaire were used as references of standards. Reproducibility of the measurements was evaluated. Results The retrospective 3-point scale correlated with ODI (r = 0.528; P  Conclusions Retrospective assessment of spinal surgery outcome is highly reproducible. Accuracy is highest in the patients with poor and good surgical result.

  11. Late effects of radiation on the lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs: Re-treatment tolerance

    Using a guinea pig model of lumbar myelopathy, various factors affecting the tolerance of spinal cord to irradiation were assessed: (a) extent of initial injury; (b) time interval between priming and test doses; and (c) animal age at the time of initial radiation treatment. A 3 cm section of lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs was irradiated with fractionated doses of 4.5 Gy gamma rays given as 9 fractions per week. Guinea pigs were primed with 9 x 4.5 Gy in 7 days which is 60% of the ED50 for a continuous course of treatment. After 28 or 40 weeks, animal were retreated with 6-14 fractions of 4.5 Gy. Animals were observed for 2 years following the priming dose and both the incidence and latency of myelopathy recorded. Young adult guinea pigs (8 wk old) showed both a decreased radiation tolerance and latency compared to old individuals (40 wk old). At 28 or 40 wk after 9 x 4.5 Gy, only about 8% of the initial injury was remembered in young adult guinea pigs. The amount of residual injury was dependent on the initial damage as a proportion of the tolerance dose. The spinal cord shows a greater capacity for long-term recovery than generally appreciated and re-treatment doses clinically prescribed may be lower than necessary. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Early diagnosis and treatment of acute or subacute spinal epidural hematoma

    YU Hang-ping; FAN Shun-wu; YANG Hui-lin; TANG Tian-si; ZHOU Feng; ZHAO Xing

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite low morbidity, acute or subacute spinal epidural hematoma may develop quickly with a high tendency to paralysis. The delay of diagnosis and therapy often leads to serious consequences. In this study we evaluated the effects of a series of methods for the diagnosis and treatment of the hematoma in 11 patients seen in our hospital.Methods Of the 11 patients (8 males and 3 females), 2 had the hematoma involving cervical segments, 2 cervico-thoracic, 4 thoracic, 1 thoraco-lumbar, and 2 lumbar. Three patients had quadriplegia, including one with central cord syndrome; another had Brown-Sequard's syndrome; and the other seven had paraplegia. Five patients were diagnosed at our hospitals within 3-48 hours afterappearance of symptoms, and 6 patients were transferred from community hospitals within 21-106 hours after development of symptoms. Key dermal points, key muscles and the rectal sphincter were determined according to the American Spinal Injury Society Impairment Scales as scale A in two patients,B in 5 and C in 4. Emergency MRI in each patient confirmed that the dura mater was compressed in the spinal canal, with equal intensity or hyperintensity on T1 weighted image and mixed hyperintensity on T2 weighted image. Preventive and curative measures were taken preoperatively and emergency operation was performed in all patients. Open laminoplasty was done at the cervical and cervico-thoracic segments, laminectomy at the thoracic segments, laminectomy with pedicle screw fixation at the thoraco-lumbar and lumbar segments involving multiple levels, and double-sided laminectomy with the integrity of articular processes at the lumbar segments involving only a single level. During the operation, special attention was given to hematoma evacuation, hemostasis and drainage tube placement.Results Neither uncontrollable hemorrhage nor postoperative complications occurred. All patients were followed up for 1-6 years. A marked difference was noted between

  13. Spinal shortening and monosegmental posterior spondylodesis in the management of dorsal and lumbar unstable injuries

    Tarek A Aly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with spinal injuries have been treated in the past by laminectomy in an attempt to decompress the spinal cord. The results have shown insignificant improvement or even a worsening of neurologic function and decreased stability without effectively removing the anterior bone and disc fragments compressing the spinal cord. The primary indication for anterior decompression and grafting is narrowing of the spinal canal with neurologic deficits that cannot be resolved by any other approach. One must think of subsequent surgical intervention for increased stability and compressive posterior fusion with short-armed internal fixators. Aim: To analyze the results and efficacy of spinal shortening combined with interbody fusion technique for the management of dorsal and lumbar unstable injuries. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three patients with traumatic fractures and or fracture-dislocation of dorsolumbar spine with neurologic deficit are presented. All had radiologic evidence of spinal cord or cauda equina compression, with either paraplegia or paraparesis. Patients underwent recapping laminoplasty in the thoracic or lumbar spine for decompression of spinal cord. The T-saw was used for division of the posterior elements. After decompression of the cord and removal of the extruded bone fragments and disc material, the excised laminae were replaced exactly in situ to their original anatomic position. Then application of a compression force via monosegmental transpedicular fixation was done, allowing vertebral end-plate compression and interbody fusion. Results: Lateral Cobb angle (T10-L2 was reduced from 26 to 4 degrees after surgery. The shortened vertebral body united and no or minimal loss of correction was seen. The preoperative vertebral kyphosis averaged +17 degrees and was corrected to +7 degrees at follow-up with the sagittal index improving from 0.59 to 0.86. The segmental local kyphosis was reduced from +15 degrees to −3

  14. Gait Analysis Using a Support Vector Machine for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Toribatake, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Hideki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) is diagnosed based on physical examination and radiological documentation of lumbar spinal canal narrowing. Differential diagnosis of the level of lumbar radiculopathy is difficult in multilevel spinal stenosis. Therefore, the authors focused on gait analysis as a classification method to improve diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to identify gait characteristics of L4 and L5 radiculopathy in patients with LSS and to classify L4 and L5 radiculopathy using a support vector machine (SVM). The study group comprised 13 healthy volunteers (control group), 11 patients with L4 radiculopathy (L4 group), and 22 patients with L5 radiculopathy (L5 group). Light-emitting diode markers were attached at 5 sites on the affected side, and walking motion was analyzed using video recordings and the authors' development program. Potential gait characteristics of each group were identified to use as SVM parameters. In the knee joint of the L4 group, the waveform was similar to that of normal gait, but knee extension at initial contact was slightly greater than that of the other groups. In the ankle joint of the L5 group, the one-peak waveform pattern with disappearance of the second peak was present in 10 (45.5%) of 22 cases. The total classification accuracy was 80.4% using the SVM. The highest and lowest classification accuracies were obtained in the control group (84.6%) and the L4 group (72.7%), respectively. The authors' walking motion analysis system identified several useful factors for differentiating between healthy individuals and patients with L4 and L5 radiculopathy, with a high accuracy rate. PMID:26558674

  15. Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat

    Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient

  16. Unilateral Approach for Bilateral Decompression of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Minimal Invasive Surgery

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of a novel, minimally invasive spinal surgery technique for the correction of lumbar spinal stenosis involving unilateral approach for bilateral decompression. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Neurosurgery Department of PGMI, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, from January to December 2010. Methodology: A total of 60 patients with lumbar stenosis were randomly assigned to undergo either a conventional laminectomy (30 patients, Group A), or a unilateral approach (30 patients, Group B). Clinical outcomes was measured using the scale of Finneson and Cooper. All the data was collected by using a proforma and different parameters were assessed for a minimum follow-up period of three months. Data was analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17. Results: Adequate decompression was achieved in all patients. Compared with patients in the conventional laminectomy group, patients who received the novel procedure (unilateral approach) had a reduced mean duration of hospital stay, a faster recovery rate and majority of the patients (88.33%) had an excellent to fair operative result according to the Finneson and Cooper scale. Five major complications occurred in all patient groups, 2 patients had unintended dural rent and 2 wound dehiscence each and fifth patient had worsening of symptoms. There was no mortality in the series. Conclusion: The ultimate goal of the unilateral approach to treat lumbar spinal stenosis is to achieve adequate decompression of the neural elements. An additional benefit of a minimally invasive approach is adequate preservation of vertebral stability, as it requires only minimal muscle trauma, preservation of supraspinous/intraspinous ligament complex and spinous process, therefore, allows early mobilization. This also shortens the hospital stay, reduces postoperative back pain, and leads to satisfactory outcome. (author)

  17. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  18. QUANTITATIVE SIZE ASSESSMENT OF THE LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL BY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    M. Midia Z. Miabi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available By determining normal ranges of spinal canal diameters we can make early diagnosis in persons who have lower diameters of spinal canal. These persons are predisposed to spinal canal stenosis that is a major cause of spinal radiculopathies. In different studies performed in several countries, minimum and maximum ranges of spinal canal diameters were different for each population. In this study, we tried to determine the mean values of normal spinal canal diameters and areas in Tabriz and its suburb. 39 healthy, young to mid-age cases were selected. Our study was focused on L3-L4 and L4-L5. The following parameters were measured: the area of cross-section of the vertebral body, the area of cross-section of the dural sac, interarticular diameter, interligamentous diameter, antero-posterior diameter of the lumbar canal, inter-pedicular diameter, and the area of cross-section of the vertebral canal. A correlation between the parameters studied and the height of subjects was significant for interligamentous diameter (for L3/L4 and L4/L5 and interarticular diameter (only at L3/L4, cross-section area of the vertebrae (both L3 and L4, cross-section area of vertebral canal (only at L5 level, area of dural sac (at L3/L4 and L4. It was suggested that these diameters and areas should be interpreted as a unction of height of the subject. Most of diameters studied had smaller means than those in previous studies. This can be attributed to differences between populations and it can be interpreted as predisposition to spinal canal stenosis in our population.

  19. Spinal-cord swelling in acute multiple sclerosis

    Despite the frequent involvement of the spinal cord by multiple sclerosis, reports concerning neuroradiological findings regarding these lesions have been limited; most of them have demonstrated a normal or small spinal cord. Two cases of acute paraparesis showed evidence of spinal-cord swelling on myelography and CT myelography, initially suggesting the diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. Spinal-cord swelling was demonstrated more clearly on CT myelography than on conventional myelography. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made with the aid of the CSF findings, the clinical course, and the contracting-cord sign. The ''contracting-cord sign'' means the diminution of the spinal-cord diameter in the chronic stage. Since acute multiple sclerosis may produce spinal-cord swelling simulating a tumor, careful investigations are necessary to avoid unwarranted surgical interventions. (author)

  20. MRI diagnosis of acute spinal cord decompression sickness

    Objective: To describe MRI findings of acute spinal cord decompression sickness. Methods: MRI findings of 5 cases with clinical definite acute spinal cord decompression sickness were retrospectively analyzed. The main clinical informations included underwater performance history against regulations, short-term complete or incomplete spinal cord injury symptoms after fast going out of water, sensory disability and urinary and fecal incontinence, etc. Results: Spinal cord vacuole sign was found in all 5 cases. Iso-signal intensity (n=3), high signal intensity (n=1), and low signal intensity (n=1) was demonstrated on T1WI, and high signal intensity (n=5) was found on T2WI. Owl eye sign was detected in 3 cases, and lacune foci were seen in 2 cases. Conclusion: MRI findings of acute spinal cord decompression sickness had some characteristics, and it was easy to diagnose by combining diving history with clinical manifestations. (authors)

  1. Health-related quality of life of patients following selected types of lumbar spinal surgery: A pilot study

    Androwich Ida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 500,000 spinal surgeries are performed annually in the United States. Although pain relief and improved health-related quality of life (HRQOL are expectations following lumbar spinal surgery, there is limited research regarding this experience from the individual's perspective. In addition, no studies have examined the HRQOL of persons who have had this surgery using a comprehensive approach. The intent of this study was to address this deficiency by an assessment of both the individual and environmental factors that impact perceived HRQOL using the Wilson and Cleary Model for Health-Related Quality of Life in persons who have undergone lumbar spinal surgery. Methods This was a pilot study of 57 adult patients undergoing elective lumbar spinal surgery for either herniated disk and/or degenerative changes. Individuals completed questionnaires measuring perceived pain, mood, functional status, general health perceptions, social support and HRQOL preoperatively and three months following surgery. Descriptive statistics, dependent t-tests, and MANOVAs were used to describe and compare the differences of the study variables over time. Results Preliminary results indicate overall perceived physical HRQOL was significantly improved postoperatively (t [56] = 6.45, p Conclusion Although perceived physical HRQOL was significantly improved three months postoperatively, fatigue and lack of vigor were issues for subjects postoperatively. Excessive fatigue and low vigor may have implications for successful rehabilitation and return to work for patients following lumbar spinal surgery. Further research is needed with a larger sample size and subgroup analyses to confirm these results.

  2. Effectiveness of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Gustavo C Machado

    Full Text Available The management of spinal stenosis by surgery has increased rapidly in the past two decades, however, there is still controversy regarding the efficacy of surgery for this condition. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and comparative effectiveness of surgery in the management of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.Electronic searches were performed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS and Cochrane Library from inception to November 2014. Hand searches were conducted on included articles and relevant reviews. We included randomised controlled trials evaluating surgery compared to no treatment, placebo/sham, or to another surgical technique in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Primary outcome measures were pain, disability, recovery and quality of life. The PEDro scale was used for risk of bias assessment. Data were pooled with a random-effects model, and the GRADE approach was used to summarise conclusions.Nineteen published reports (17 trials were included. No trials were identified comparing surgery to no treatment or placebo/sham. Pooling revealed that decompression plus fusion is not superior to decompression alone for pain (mean difference -3.7, 95% confidence interval -15.6 to 8.1, disability (mean difference 9.8, 95% confidence interval -9.4 to 28.9, or walking ability (risk ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 1.9. Interspinous process spacer devices are slightly more effective than decompression plus fusion for disability (mean difference 5.7, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 10.0, but they resulted in significantly higher reoperation rates when compared to decompression alone (28% v 7%, P < 0.001. There are no differences in the effectiveness between other surgical techniques for our main outcomes.The relative efficacy of various surgical options for treatment of spinal stenosis remains uncertain. Decompression plus fusion is not more effective than decompression alone. Interspinous process spacer devices

  3. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  4. Acute spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma in a child

    Spontaneous spinal epidural haematomas rarely occur. Patients tend to be in their sixties or seventies. Acute spontaneous spinal epidural haematomas in children without a predisposition for bleeding disorders, trauma, vascular malformations or anticoagulant therapy have seldom been described. We present a case of a 4-year-old girl with a spontaneous cervical epidural haematoma diagnosed with MR. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic value of MR imaging in acute spinal traumas

    MR imaging is a helpful, sometimes even pathfinding complementary diagnostic tool for assessment of acute spinal trauma and often yields the decisive information in respect of the prediction of pathologic changes of neurological conditions. (orig./CB)

  6. Sparing of descending axons rescues interneuron plasticity in the lumbar cord to allow adaptive learning after thoracic spinal cord injury

    Christopher Nelson Hansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI. Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX. This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI. To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm. In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days or late (42 days after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7d, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between

  7. A calvarial acute subdural hematoma migrating into the spinal canal in a young male.

    Köksal, Vaner; Özdemir, Bülent

    2015-10-01

    It is not common for an acute subdural hematoma (SDH) in the supratentorial region to show rapid resolution or migration during the clinical course. In this report, we present a rare case where the SDH in the supratentorial region was observed to rapidly migrate into the lumbar spinal canal, leading to severe radiculopathy. A 20-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with severe headache after head trauma. The patient's overall condition was good, whereas his Glasgow Coma Scale score was 15 and blood pressure was normal. He had vomited 3 times after the onset of pain. No stiff neck was found, and the computed tomography showed an ASDH over the outer layer of the right hemisphere, causing a 7- to 8-mm shift. During the follow-up, the headache regressed and eventually resolved after 12 hours; however, another severe pain occurred in the lumbar region and in both legs. The pain worsened over time, progressing to sciatica in both legs. Acute SDH associated with a minor head trauma may migrate from the supratentorial compartment into the spinal canal by the help of elastic cerebral tissues in young adults and children. PMID:26314217

  8. Optimal imaging parameters to visualize lumbar spinal nerve roots in MRI

    Yamato, Hidetada; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Funata, Tomonari; Nitta, Masaru; Nakazawa, Yasuo [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    2001-05-01

    Radiculopathy due to lumber spine disorders is diagnosed mainly by radiculography. Recent advances in MRI have enabled non-invasive visualization of the lumbar nerve roots. Fifty normal volunteers were evaluated for optimal imaging angle to visualize the lumbar nerve roots and optimal imaging sequences. Results showed that in the coronal oblique plane, angles that visualized the nerve roots best were L4 17, L5 29.6, and S1 36.8. In the left sagittal oblique plane, the angles were L4 17.9, L5 21.4, and S1 12.6, and in the right sagittal oblique plane, L4 16.3, L5 19.4 and S1 12.6. SPGR showed the best results both in CNR values and visually. In summary, the optimal angle by which to visualize the lumbar spinal nerve roots increased as the roots became more caudal, except for S1 of the sagittal oblique plane, where individual variations were pronounced. SPGR was the best sequence for visualizing the nerve roots. (author)

  9. Age-related contrast enhancement study of normal bone marrow in lumbar spinal MR imaging

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement of normal bone marrow in L-spine relating to aging and to determine the range of contrast enhancement in normal bone marrow. We analyzed a total of 120 patients (20 per decade) who had undergone lumbar spinal MRI and who ranged in age from the 2nd decade to more than the 7th. Bone marrow revealed no abnormal pathology. Sagittal T1-weighted spin echo sequences were obtained before and after gadolinium administration. For each sequence, a region of interest was drawn within the L1 vertebral body from the midsagittal slice. Signal intensity (SI) values of each sequence were ascertained and the percentage increase in SI was calculated. After contrast enhancement, lumbar MRI revealed no statistically significant in the percentage increase in SI of normal bone marrow in relation to aging. Most patients (99%) however showed an SI increase of between 10% and 49%. In only four, none of whom were aged over 40, was this increase above 50%. Lumbar MRI, revealed no statistically significant difference in percentage increase in SI in normal bone marrow relating to aging, but when the increase is above 50% in a patient aged over 40, bone marrow pathology should be further investigated

  10. Optimal imaging parameters to visualize lumbar spinal nerve roots in MRI

    Radiculopathy due to lumber spine disorders is diagnosed mainly by radiculography. Recent advances in MRI have enabled non-invasive visualization of the lumbar nerve roots. Fifty normal volunteers were evaluated for optimal imaging angle to visualize the lumbar nerve roots and optimal imaging sequences. Results showed that in the coronal oblique plane, angles that visualized the nerve roots best were L4 17, L5 29.6, and S1 36.8. In the left sagittal oblique plane, the angles were L4 17.9, L5 21.4, and S1 12.6, and in the right sagittal oblique plane, L4 16.3, L5 19.4 and S1 12.6. SPGR showed the best results both in CNR values and visually. In summary, the optimal angle by which to visualize the lumbar spinal nerve roots increased as the roots became more caudal, except for S1 of the sagittal oblique plane, where individual variations were pronounced. SPGR was the best sequence for visualizing the nerve roots. (author)

  11. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    Masala, Salvatore, E-mail: salva.masala@tiscali.it [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Tarantino, Umberto [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Nano, Giovanni, E-mail: gionano@gmail.com [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Iundusi, Riccardo [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Fiori, Roberto, E-mail: fiori.r@libero.it; Da Ros, Valerio, E-mail: valeriodaros@hotmail.com; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  12. A comparison between MRI and CT in acute spinal trauma

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at 0.3T and computed Tomography (CT) were compared in the retrospective evaluation of 34 patients with acute spinal cord injury. MRI was highly accurate in the imaging of vertebral body fracture, and spondylitic changes, and is the method of choice for imaging ligament injury, traumatic disc protrusion and spinal cord compression. It was also useful for the identification of subtle subluxations in the sagittal plane. It is concluded that while CT remains the method of choice for imaging neural arch fractures, MRI at 0.3T is a valid technique for assessing patients with acute spinal trauma. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  13. TCM Treatment for 50 Cases of Acute Protrusion of the Lumbar Intervertebral Disc

    梁述元

    2001-01-01

    @@ From January 1998 to August 2000, the author has treated 50 cases of acute protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral disc by Chinese herbs, massotherapy, and functional exercise with satisfactory therapeutic results reported in the following.

  14. Firearm bullet settling into the lumbar spinal canal without causing neurological deficit: A report of two cases

    Tayfun Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Bullet settling into the lumbar spinal canal without causing neurological deficit may require surgical intervention. Removal of bullets provided not only pain relief in both the cases but also prevented future complications such as migration of the bullets, plumbism, and neuropathic pain and instability.

  15. Physiotherapy rehabilitation following lumbar spinal fusion: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Rushton, Alison; Eveleigh, Gillian; Petherick, Emma-Jane; Heneghan, Nicola; Bennett, Rosalie; James, Gill; Wright, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy intervention following lumbar spinal fusion. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. 2 independent reviewers searched information sources, assessed studies for inclusion and evaluated risk of bias. Quantitative synthesis using standardised mean differences was conducted on comparable outcomes across trials with similar interventions. Information sources Predefined terms were employed to search electronic databases. Additional studie...

  16. Percutaneous Decompression of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with a New Interspinous Device

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of the implantation of a new interspinous device (Falena) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The clinical outcomes and imaging results were assessed by orthostatic MR during an up to 6-month follow-up period. Methods: Between October 2008 and February 2010, the Falena was implanted at a single level in 26 patients (17 men; mean age, 69 (range, 54–82) years) who were affected by degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. All of the patients were clinically evaluated before the procedure and at 1 and 3 months. Furthermore, 20 patients have completed a 6-month follow-up. Pain was assessed before and after the intervention using the Visual Analogue Scale score and the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire. Orthostatic MR imaging was performed before the implantation and at 3 months to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Results: The mean ODI score decreased from 48.9 before the device implantation to 31.2 at 1 month (p < 0.0001). The mean VAS score decreased from 7.6 before to 3.9 (p < 0.0001) at 1 month and 3.6 at 3 months after the procedure (p = 0.0115). These values were stable at 6 months evaluation. No postimplantation major complications were recorded. MRI evaluation documented in most cases an increased size of the spinal canal area. Similarly a bilateral foraminal area improvement was found. The variation of the intervertebral space height measured on the posterior wall was not significant. Conclusions: In our preliminary experience with the Falena in a small cohort of patients, we obtained clinical and imaging results aligned to those reported with similar interspinous devices.

  17. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Initially Diagnosed as Lumbar Disc Hernia or Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Personal Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Nagata, Kosei; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Kota; Sato, Masaki; Arino, Yusuke; Mikami, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic vasculitis and is difficult to diagnose. EGPA has a number of symptoms including peripheral dysesthesia caused by mononeuropathy multiplex, which is similar to radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, EGPA patients with mononeuropathy multiplex often visit orthopedic clinics, but orthopedic doctors and spine neurosurgeons have limited experience in diagnosing EGPA because of its rarity. We report a consecutive series of patients who were initially diagnosed as having lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis by at least 2 medical institutions from March 2006 to April 2013 but whose final diagnosis was EGPA. All patients had past histories of asthma or eosinophilic pneumonia, and four out of five had peripheral edema. Laboratory data showed abnormally increased eosinophil counts, and nerve conduction studies of all patients revealed axonal damage patterns. All patients recovered from paralysis to a functional level after high-dose steroid treatment. We shortened the duration of diagnosis from 49 days to one day by adopting a diagnostic algorithm after experiencing the first case. PMID:27549670

  18. Radiopathomorphological alterations in lumbar and thoracic spine fractures consequences in term of their effect on spinal function

    Basing on clinico-radiological examination of 224 patients who suffered thoracic and lumbar spinal fractures, and on the results of radiopathomorphological study of 56 spines of persons with this pathology correlated with the electrophysiological findings, possible outcomes of the spinal fractures have been described. They are viewed from the standpoint of the effects of alterations that occurred on locomotor and prospective functions of the spine. Complete and relative compensation, as well as sub- and decompensation of spinal function disorders were revealed and characterized

  19. Increased multiaxial lumbar motion responses during multiple-impulse mechanical force manually assisted spinal manipulation

    Gunzburg Robert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal manipulation has been found to create demonstrable segmental and intersegmental spinal motions thought to be biomechanically related to its mechanisms. In the case of impulsive-type instrument device comparisons, significant differences in the force-time characteristics and concomitant motion responses of spinal manipulative instruments have been reported, but studies investigating the response to multiple thrusts (multiple impulse trains have not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine multi-axial segmental and intersegmental motion responses of ovine lumbar vertebrae to single impulse and multiple impulse spinal manipulative thrusts (SMTs. Methods Fifteen adolescent Merino sheep were examined. Tri-axial accelerometers were attached to intraosseous pins rigidly fixed to the L1 and L2 lumbar spinous processes under fluoroscopic guidance while the animals were anesthetized. A hand-held electromechanical chiropractic adjusting instrument (Impulse was used to apply single and repeated force impulses (13 total over a 2.5 second time interval at three different force settings (low, medium, and high along the posteroanterior axis of the T12 spinous process. Axial (AX, posteroanterior (PA, and medial-lateral (ML acceleration responses in adjacent segments (L1, L2 were recorded at a rate of 5000 samples per second. Peak-peak segmental accelerations (L1, L2 and intersegmental acceleration transfer (L1–L2 for each axis and each force setting were computed from the acceleration-time recordings. The initial acceleration response for a single thrust and the maximum acceleration response observed during the 12 multiple impulse trains were compared using a paired observations t-test (POTT, alpha = .05. Results Segmental and intersegmental acceleration responses mirrored the peak force magnitude produced by the Impulse Adjusting Instrument. Accelerations were greatest for AX and PA measurement axes. Compared to

  20. Paraplegia caused by giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in total hip arthroplasty.

    Sawai, Toshiyuki; Nakahira, Junko; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Total paraplegia after epidural or spinal anesthesia is extremely rare. We herein report a case of total paraplegia caused by a giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk at the L3-L4 level after total hip arthroplasty for coxarthrosis. The patient had no preoperative neurologic abnormalities. Intraoperative anesthetic management involved combined spinal-epidural anesthesia at the L3-L4 level with continuous intravenous propofol administration. Postoperatively, the patient complained of numbness and total paraplegia of the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant herniation of a lumbar disk compressing the spinal cord at the L3-L4 level. The intradural herniation was surgically treated, and the patient's symptoms completely resolved. PMID:27290969

  1. Lumbar neuropathic pain of lower limbs treated by spinal infusion of ziconotide a case – report

    Luca Quadrino

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Author reports the case of a patient with severe lumbar pain unresponsive to NSAIDs. Initial treatment with tramadol gave poor results and a new protocol with hydromorphone – pregabalin was started. The analgesic response was observed only following high hydromorphone doses, associated with unacceptable side effects. A spinal device for continuous intrathecal infusion was then implanted, in order to administer ziconotide, a new opioid drug. Associated therapy included hydromorphone – pregabalin. At the 4 mcg/die dose ziconotide resulted highly effective (with a VAS reduction pain 6-7 to 2-3 even at 1st day after implantation; in addition at day 10, opioid dose was strongly reduced and pregabalin withdrawn. The treatment was associated with a good tolerability. The encouraging results prompted the Author to test ziconotide in further cases of severe chronic pain.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders; A comparison of myelography, discography, and magnetic resonance imaging

    Nojiri, Hajime; Matsui, Norio; Fujiyoshi, Fuminori; Izumida, Makoto; Wakita, Sato; Sekiya, Isato (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    In order to evaluate the stenotic condition of lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelogram and with discogram in 82 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Pathologic conditions were studied including herniated nucleus pulposus in 36, lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral portion, combined) in 35, and spondylisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, dysplastic) in 11. Correlation between T2 mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and profile view of full-column myelogram was very high, but fine parts such as adhesive change or redundancy or anomalous condition of nerve roots were more clearly observed on myelogram than on MRI. And some of them were not detected on MRI. The stage of disc degeneration was classified in 5 grades according to signal intensity and irregularity of the disc on T2-weighted image. The evaluation of disc degeneration was similar to discogram. But MRI will not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI is the most important imaging modality to diagnostic screening and to post-operative evaluation of the stenotic condition, determination of the strict indication and the method of the operation will need myelogram and/or discogram and so on. (author).

  3. Pregabalin for Refractory Radicular Leg Pain due to Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Preliminary Prospective Study

    Sumihisa Orita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the efficacy of pregabalin (PGB for neuropathic leg pain in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS patients with disturbed activities of daily living (ADL/quality of life (QOL in a prospective observational study. Subjects were a total of 104 LSS patients with neuropathic pain (NeP in leg and neurological intermittent claudication (IMC refractory to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs for at least a month. NeP was identified using screening tool, Pain DETECT questionnaire. Visual analog scale (VAS scores and responses to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ were assessed before and 6 weeks after PGB treatment initiation. Changes in IMC distance and adverse events were also recorded. PGB significantly improved their VAS scores for pain and sleep quality (P<0.001. With respect to JOABPEQ, significant improvements were observed with regard to the following dimensions: pain-related disorders (P<0.01, lumbar spine dysfunction (P=0.031, gait disturbance (P=0.028, and psychological disorders (P=0.014. The IMC distance showed an improvement tendency after PGB treatment, albeit with no significance (P=0.063. Minor adverse events such as dizziness were observed. PGB can be effective for neuropathic leg pain refractory to NSAIDs in LSS patients, resulting in not only pain control but also improving lower back pain-related ADL/QOL scores.

  4. Management of Acute Lumbar Injuries in the Workplace.

    Lurati, Ann Regina

    2016-01-01

    Occupational acute lumbar injuries are a common injury. One intervention that is unique to occupational health is the determination of the amount of physical activity that an injured worker can perform without increasing the risk of further injury. Clinical recommendations suggest that workers continue to stay active; however, it is still the clinician's responsibility to determine the level of activity. The level of work activity is determined on a case-to-case basis and is done by evaluating the physical capacity of an injured worker and the job description. Current evidence-based guidelines suggest that staying active may actually reduce pain levels. The purpose of this evidence-based literature review is to outline the proper assessment and management of workers who have sustained a work-related low back injury. The related literature has been reviewed as well as red flags for more severe neurological conditions that require more in-depth evaluation. Determining the safe level of activity and guided return to work have been discussed. PMID:27187219

  5. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  6. Differences in Gait Characteristics of Patients with Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis (L4 Radiculopathy) and Those with Osteoarthritis of the Hip

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Toribatake, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Hideki; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    It is important to differentially diagnose thigh pain from lumbar spinal stenosis (particularly lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy) and osteoarthritis of the hip. In this study, using a treadmill and a motion analysis method, gait characteristics were compared between these conditions. Patients with lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy had increased physiological knee flexion immediately after foot-ground contact, possibly owing to a slight decrease in the muscle strength of the quadric...

  7. Acute rehabilitation of spinal cord injury

    KIDRIČ-SIVEC, Urška; SEDEJ, Bogdana; Marolt, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury presents with loss of function of neuromuscular and other systems below the level of injury. Patients may suffer from minor loss of strength to complete quadriplegia with respiratory distress. All the patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who are admitted and treated in University Medical Centre Ljubljana are evaluated after admission and individualized plan of rehabilitation is made. The neurological level of injury is documented with international standa...

  8. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks.

    Zelenin, Pavel V; Lyalka, Vladimir F; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Deliagina, Tatiana G

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  9. Characterization of DTI Indices in the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spinal Cord in Healthy Humans

    The aim of this study was to characterize in vivo measurements of diffusion along the length of the entire healthy spinal cord and to compare DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), between cord regions. The objective is to determine whether or not there are significant differences in DTI indices along the cord that must be considered for future applications of characterizing the effects of injury or disease. A cardiac gated, single-shot EPI sequence was used to acquire diffusion-weighted images of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions of the spinal cord in nine neurologically intact subjects (19 to 22 years). For each cord section, FA versus MD values were plotted, and a k-means clustering method was applied to partition the data according to tissue properties. FA and MD values from both white matter (average , average  mm2/s) and grey matter (average , average mm2/s) were relatively consistent along the length of the cord

  10. The Current Testing Protocols for Biomechanical Evaluation of Lumbar Spinal Implants in Laboratory Setting: A Review of the Literature

    Sabrina A. Gonzalez-Blohm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro biomechanical investigations have become a routinely employed technique to explore new lumbar instrumentation. One of the most important advantages of such investigations is the low risk present when compared to clinical trials. However, the best use of any experimental data can be made when standard testing protocols are adopted by investigators, thus allowing comparisons among studies. Experimental variables, such as the length of the specimen, operative level, type of loading (e.g., dynamic versus quasistatic, magnitude, and rate of load applied, are among the most common variables controlled during spinal biomechanical testing. Although important efforts have been made to standardize these protocols, high variability can be found in the current literature. The aim of this investigation was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify the current trends in the protocols reported for the evaluation of new lumbar spinal implants under laboratory setting.

  11. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat.

    Paul J Austin

    Full Text Available Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four 'disability-specific' genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular

  12. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat.

    Austin, Paul J; Bembrick, Alison L; Denyer, Gareth S; Keay, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four 'disability-specific' genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular structure

  13. Fusion Rates of Instrumented Lumbar Spinal Arthrodesis according to Surgical Approach: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

    Lee, Choon Sung; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Dong-Ho; Kim, Yung-Tae; Lee, Hee Sang

    2011-01-01

    Background Lumbar spine fusion rates can vary according to the surgical technique. Although many studies on spinal fusion have been conducted and reported, the heterogeneity of the study designs and data handling make it difficult to identify which approach yields the highest fusion rate. This paper reviews studies that compared the lumbosacral fusion rates achieved with different surgical techniques. Methods Relevant randomized trials comparing the fusion rates of different surgical approach...

  14. The Efficacy of Physical Therapy and Physical Therapy Plus Calcitonin in the Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Sahin, Fusun; YILMAZ, Figen; Kotevoglu, Nurdan; Kuran, Banu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of physical therapy alone and in combination with calcitonin in patients with neurogenic claudication (NC). Materials and Methods In this single blind, and randomized study, patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis who were diagnosed by clinical findings and MRI and having NC were included. Patients were observed for 8 weeks and evaluated before and after treatment. Patients were randomized between the salmon calcitonin 200 U/day + ph...

  15. Massive hematothorax after thoracic spinal manipulation for acute thoracolumbar pain

    Johannes Struewer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal manipulation usually represents a widely used and effective method for physicians in order to relieve acute patient pain and muscular dysbalance. Although life-threatening complications (e.g. pneumothorax, vertebral artery dissection, stroke after manual treatment are reported with regard to actual medical literature millions of patients undergo manual treatment to manage thoracolumbar pain each year. The authors present the case of a 17 year old male patient with a life-threatening hematothorax after thoracic high velocity spinal manipulation for acute thoracolumbar pain. The patient required emergency chest tube thoracostomy and afterwards thoracoscopic haemostasis for an intercostal venous lesion. A massive hematothorax after spinal manipulation represents an extremely rare but life-threatening complication. Physicians are encouraged to promote the benefits of manual/chiropratic therapy on the one hand but on the other hand are obliged to educate about potential serious dangers and adverse events.

  16. Value of additional cervicothoracic sagittal T2- weighted images in elderly patients with symptoms suggestive of lumbar spinal stenosis

    Park, Sung Hee; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and predictive factors of tandem cervical spinal stenosis (CSS) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) based on MR. From January to May of 2011, 140 consecutive patients (36 men, 94 women; mean age, 68.9 years; age range, 60-87 years) were included for the analysis. All patients were at least 60 years old, had undergone lumbar spine MRI including additional cervicothoracic sagittal T2-weighted images, and were clinically suspected of LSS. Two spine radiologists evaluated the risk factors for CSS, considering the possible risk factors such as age, sex, alignment disorder of the lumbar spine, number of levels of LSS, and severity of LSS, based on MR. Of the 140 patients, 42 (30%) patients had tandem spinal stenosis. CSS was more common among patients with LSS (42 of 61, 69%) than among patients without LSS (27 of 79, 34%) (p = 0.000). Grade 2 or 3 CSS was more commonly observed among patients with grade 2 or 3 LSS (15 of 53, 28%), than among patients with grade 0 or 1 LSS (8 of 87, 9%) (p = 0.003). Only the severity of LSS showed a significant association with the severity of CSS (p = 0.045). Tandem CSS is common in LSS, and the severity of LSS is a risk factor of CSS.

  17. Value of additional cervicothoracic sagittal T2- weighted images in elderly patients with symptoms suggestive of lumbar spinal stenosis

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and predictive factors of tandem cervical spinal stenosis (CSS) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) based on MR. From January to May of 2011, 140 consecutive patients (36 men, 94 women; mean age, 68.9 years; age range, 60-87 years) were included for the analysis. All patients were at least 60 years old, had undergone lumbar spine MRI including additional cervicothoracic sagittal T2-weighted images, and were clinically suspected of LSS. Two spine radiologists evaluated the risk factors for CSS, considering the possible risk factors such as age, sex, alignment disorder of the lumbar spine, number of levels of LSS, and severity of LSS, based on MR. Of the 140 patients, 42 (30%) patients had tandem spinal stenosis. CSS was more common among patients with LSS (42 of 61, 69%) than among patients without LSS (27 of 79, 34%) (p = 0.000). Grade 2 or 3 CSS was more commonly observed among patients with grade 2 or 3 LSS (15 of 53, 28%), than among patients with grade 0 or 1 LSS (8 of 87, 9%) (p = 0.003). Only the severity of LSS showed a significant association with the severity of CSS (p = 0.045). Tandem CSS is common in LSS, and the severity of LSS is a risk factor of CSS

  18. The sacral networks and neural pathways used to elicit lumbar motor rhythm in the rodent spinal cord

    Aharon Lev-Tov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of neural networks and pathways involved in activation and modulation of spinal central pattern generators (CPGs in the absence of the descending control from the brain is important for further understanding of neural control of movement and for developing innovative therapeutic approaches to improve the mobility of spinal cord injury patients. Activation of the hindlimb innervating segments by sacrocaudal afferent input and by specific application of neurochemicals to the sacral networks is feasible in the isolated spinal cord preparation of the newborn rat. Here we review our recent studies of sacral relay neurons with lumbar projections and evaluate their role in linking the sacral and thoracolumbar networks during different motor behaviors. Our major findings show that: 1 Heterogeneous groups of dorsal, intermediate and ventral sacral-neurons with ventral and lateral ascending funicular projections mediate the activation of the locomotor central pattern generators through sacral sensory input, and 2 Rhythmic excitation of lumbar flexor motoneurons, produced by bath application of alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists to the sacral segments is mediated exclusively by ventral clusters of sacral-neurons with lumbar projections through the ventral funiculus.

  19. Complications from the use of intrawound vancomycin in lumbar spinal surgery: a systematic review.

    Ghobrial, George M; Cadotte, David W; Williams, Kim; Fehlings, Michael G; Harrop, James S

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The use of intrawound vancomycin is rapidly being adopted for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) in spinal surgery. At operative closure, the placement of vancomycin powder in the wound bed-in addition to standard infection prophylaxis-can provide high concentrations of antibiotics with minimal systemic absorption. However, despite its popularity, to date the majority of studies on intrawound vancomycin are retrospective, and there are no prior reports highlighting the risks of routine treatment. METHODS A MEDLINE search for pertinent literature was conducted for studies published between 1966 and May 2015 using the following MeSH search terms: "intrawound vancomycin," "operative lumbar spine complications," and "nonoperative lumbar spine complications." This was supplemented with references and known literature on the topic. RESULTS An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 6, 2015, using the search string "intrawound vancomycin" found 22 results. After a review of all abstracts for relevance to intrawound vancomycin use in spinal surgery, 10 studies were reviewed in detail. Three meta-analyses were evaluated from the initial search, and 2 clinical studies were identified. After an analysis of all of the identified manuscripts, 3 additional studies were included for a total of 16 studies. Fourteen retrospective studies and 2 prospective studies were identified, resulting in a total of 9721 patients. A total of 6701 (68.9%) patients underwent treatment with intrawound vancomycin. The mean SSI rate among the control and vancomycin-treated patients was 7.47% and 1.36%, respectively. There were a total of 23 adverse events: nephropathy (1 patient), ototoxicity resulting in transient hearing loss (2 patients), systemic absorption resulting in supratherapeutic vancomycin exposure (1 patient), and culture-negative seroma formation (19 patients). The overall adverse event rate for the total number of treated patients was 0.3%. CONCLUSIONS Intrawound

  20. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Radiology /Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) {sup 18}F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following {sup 18}F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, {sup 18}F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest

  1. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of 18F-fluoride PET/CT

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of 18F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after 18F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) 18F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following 18F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, 18F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest Oswestry Disability Index category

  2. Evidence-based treatment for acute spinal cord injury

    Zhouming Deng; Jiajia Su; Lin Cai; Ansong Ping; Wei Jin; Renxiong Wei; Yan Zhan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To formulate an evidence-based treatment for one patient with acute spinal cord injury and summarize evidence for evaluating acute spinal cord injury treatment. METHODS: Studies related to the treatment for acute spinal cord injury were identified via a search of National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC, 2000-11), the Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2011), TRIP Database (2000-11), and PubMed (1966-2011). Treatment strategies were formulated according to three basic principles: best evidence, doctor's professional experience, and wishes of the patient. RESULTS: A total of 34 articles were selected, including 1 NGC guideline, 22 systematic reviews, and 11 randomized controlled trials. Based on our review, we arrived at the following recommendations: no clinical evidence exists definitively to recommend the use of any of neuroprotective pharmaceuticals; surgery should be undertaken early; mechanical compression devices and low-molecular weight heparin should be employed to prevent thrombosis; respiratory muscle training is beneficial for pulmonary function and quality of life; and functional electrical stimulation and acupuncture can promote functional recovery. The patient accordingly underwent surgery 6 hours after trauma without receiving any neuroprotective pharmaceuticals; low-molecular weight heparin and intermittent pneumatic compression were applied to prevent thrombosis. He also underwent respiratory muscle training daily for 8 weeks and received functional electrical stimulation for 15 minutes and acupuncture for 30 minutes every day. After follow-up for 3 months, the above therapeutic regimen was confirmed efficacious for acute spinal cord injury.CONCLUSION: Evidence-based medicine provides an individualized treatment protocol for acute spinal cord injury, which can significantly improve the therapeutic effect and prognosis.

  3. Nerve cells culture from lumbar spinal cord on surfaces modified by plasma pyrrole polymerization.

    Zuñiga-Aguilar, E; Olayo, R; Ramírez-Fernández, O; Morales, J; Godínez, R

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are several techniques for modified cell culture surfaces under research to improve cell growth and adhesion. Recently, different methods have been used for surface coating, using biomolecules that enhance cell attachment and growth of nerve cells from spinal cord, such as the use of Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin. Plasma-polymerized pyrrole (PPy)-treated surfaces have showed improvement on surfaces biocompatibility with the cells in culture since they do not interfere with any of the biological cell functions. In the present work, we present a novel mouse nerve cell culture technique, using PPy-treated cell culture surfaces. A comparative study of cell survival using Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-treated surfaces was performed. Our results of cell survival when compared with data already reported by other investigators, show that cells cultured on the PPy-modified surface increased survival up to 21 days when compared with Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-coated culture, where 8 days cell survival was obtained. There were electrical and morphological differences in the nerve cells grown in the different surfaces. By comparing the peak ion currents of Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-seeded cells for 8 days with cells grown for 21 days on PPy, an increase of 516% in the Na(+) current and 127% in K(+) currents in cells seeded on PPy were observed. Immunofluorescence techniques showed the presence of cell synapses and culture viability after 21 days. Our results then showed that PPy-modified surfaces are an alternative culture method that increases nerve cells survival from lumbar spinal cord cell culture by preserving its electrical and morphological features. PMID:24650203

  4. Evaluation of the results of operative management of lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    Islam, M S; Ara, R; Salam, M A; Rahman, M W; Alam, M J; Karim, M R; Rahman, M; Alam, M N; Hussain, M F

    2013-10-01

    Lumber spinal canal stenosis is an important cause of low back pain and it frequently presents with low backache with neurogenic claudication. Operative management of lumbar spinal canal stenosis by decompression surgery is an effective method. This prospective interventional (quasi experimental) study was performed in patient having history of characteristic clinical features like low backache with radicular pain, neurogenic claudication, signs of root compression, positive MRI findings attending in the department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Neurosurgery, Dhaka Medical College Hospital and NITOR. Dhaka, from July 2008 to June 2010. Thirty patients were evaluated among those 18(60%) were 50 years and above. Male to female ratio was roughly 9:1. About 87% of the patients had sensory deficit and 50% had neurogenic claudication. Majority (83.3%) of the patients at presentation had a suffering of 12 or >12 months. Diagnosis shows that 3.5% of patients had L4 lesion, 60% L5, 6.5% patients had L4 & L5 and 30% S1. Laminectomy was done in 43.3% of patients, laminectomy and disectomy in 30% and laminectomy, discectomy & foraminal decompression in 26.7% of patients. Relief of symptoms occurred in 25(83.5%) of patients. Over three-quarter (76.7%) of patients exhibited minimal disability and 23.3% moderate disability based on Oswestry Disability Index, while by MacNab criteria, most (80%) of patients was excellent, 10% good and another 10% fair. Repeated measure ANOVA statistics showed that mean Oswestry score decreased significantly from 54.5% at baseline to 22% at the end of 1 year (p<0.001). PMID:24292296

  5. A single injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus into the lumbar cistern delivers transgene expression throughout the whole spinal cord

    Guo, Yansu; Wang, Dan; Qiao, Tao; Yang, Chunxing; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Xu, Zuoshang

    2015-01-01

    The lack of methods to deliver transgene expression in spinal cord has hampered investigation of gene function and therapeutic targets for spinal cord diseases. Here we report that a single intrathecal injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus rhesus-10 (rAAVrh10) into the lumbar cistern led to transgene expression in sixty to ninety percent of the cells in the spinal cord. The transgene was expressed in all cell types, including neurons, glia, ependymal cells and endothelial cells. Add...

  6. Increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor is associated with hypertrophic ligamentum flavum in lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    Jirathanathornnukul, Napaphat; Limthongkul, Worawat; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Parkpian, Vinai; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2016-04-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) is the most common spinal disorder in elderly patients, causing low back and leg pain, radiculopathy, and cauda equina syndrome. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent regulator of many cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, wound healing, and angiogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the pattern of VEGF expression in the ligamentum flavum (LF) of patients with LSCS. 24 patients with LSCS were recruited in this prospective study. We quantified and localized VEGF expression in LF tissues obtained during surgery. VEGF messenger RNA and protein expression in LF were determined using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. VEGF expression was significantly higher in the hypertrophic LF group than in the non-pathological LF group (plumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26956787

  7. Spinal aneurysmal bone cyst presenting as acute paraparesis during pregnancy.

    Li, Luyuan; Tan, Lee A; Wewel, Joshua T; Kasliwal, Manish K; O'Toole, John E

    2016-06-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are benign but locally aggressive osseous lesions characterized by blood-filled cystic cavities that account for 1-2% of all bone tumors. While pain remains the most common presenting symptom of spinal ABC, extensive anterior column involvement can result in vertebral fractures, spinal instability, and neurological deficits from compression of neural elements. An exceedingly rare case of thoracic ABC presenting as acute paraparesis in a 21-year-old pregnant woman, that was successfully treated with urgent surgical decompression and stabilization, is reported, with discussion of management strategies and review of the pertinent literature. PMID:26846358

  8. THE CORRELATION OF RADIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION AND VOLITIONAL VOIDING IN THORACO - LUMBAR FRACTURES AND SPINAL INJURY

    Mathangi Santhosh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal Cord Injury (SCI is a devastating medical condition which results in paraplegia with decreased bladder and bowel control. Investigation used to predict volitional voiding in persons with acute SCI include clinical examination, X - rays of the spine, CT scan, MRI, even though the later ones are not available in every medical center and all cannot afford. AIM: To determine if those with a mild narrowing of the vertebral canal have a better prognosis for volitional voiding. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Prospective study of 20 consecutive patients with thoracolumbar fractures and spinal injury, admitted in the Department of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation, Christian Medical College, and Vellore within three weeks of injury, were recruited into the study. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Initial neurological examination was performed on admission and final between 16 - 20 weeks after the injury. Lateral and anteroposterior X - rays of the spine were done to measure the antero - posterior and transverse diameters of the spinal canal as well as the canal - body ratio at the level of the lesion. Bladder function was assessed between 16 - 20 weeks following the injury by Urodynamic study. The bladder outcome was divided into first category was assisted bladder emptying, which included intermittent catheterization, indwelling catheterization and second category was with volitional voiding. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: D ata collection was subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS Version 11.0. Fisher’s exact test, Independent t - test and Mann - Whitney test were used. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The level of fracture did not correspond to the type of bladder. The use of Canal body ratio at the level of vertebral fracture on plain radiographs was not useful in prediction of volitional voiding. (P> 0.05. Therefore plain radiography was not found to be a good predictor of bladder function in persons with spinal injuries.

  9. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study.

    Shin, Chul-Ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson "drop" technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation. PMID:26504350

  10. Excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes, aseptic meningitis and acute mental symptoms, following metrizamide lumbar myelography

    A clinical constellation of excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE), together with aseptic meningitis, and acutre mental symptoms occurred following lumbar myelography with metrizamide. Excacerbation of SLE has not been previously described following myelography with any contrast agent. Meningeal reactions and acute mental symptoms have been reported earlier, but this clinical constellation is new. (orig.)

  11. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

    Shearwood McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level.

  12. Repeat Lumbar Puncture: CSF Lactic Acid Levels are Predictive of Cure with Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    Burke A. Cunha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A common clinical problem concerns the utility of repeat lumbar puncture (LP in adults with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM, e.g., pneumococcal meningitis [1]. An LP is initially done for diagnostic purposes in patients with suspected ABM, i.e., diagnostic lumbar puncture (DLP. A repeat LP (RLP may be done 1–3 days after the initial DLP, if the patient shows no improvement. If a patient with ABM is not doing well after three days, adequacy of antimicrobial therapy is the main concern. Other reasons for RLP is to detect possible intracranial complications of ABM unrelated to adequacy of therapy [1–2].

  13. Impact of pedicle-lengthening osteotomy on spinal canal volume and neural foramen size in three types of lumbar spinal stenosis

    Li, P.; Qian, L.; Wu, W. D.; Wu, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pedicle-lengthening osteotomy is a novel surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), which achieves substantial enlargement of the spinal canal by expansion of the bilateral pedicle osteotomy sites. Few studies have evaluated the impact of this new surgery on spinal canal volume (SCV) and neural foramen dimension (NFD) in three different types of LSS patients. Methods CT scans were performed on 36 LSS patients (12 central canal stenosis (CCS), 12 lateral recess stenosis (LRS), and 12 foraminal stenosis (FS)) at L4-L5, and on 12 normal (control) subjects. Mimics 14.01 workstation was used to reconstruct 3D models of the L4-L5 vertebrae and discs. SCV and NFD were measured after 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, or 5 mm pedicle-lengthening osteotomies at L4 and/or L5. One-way analysis of variance was used to examine between-group differences. Results In the intact state, SVC and NFD were significantly larger in the control group compared with the LSS groups (PCCS>FS>Control. After lengthening at L5 and L4-L5, the percentage increase in SCV (per millimetre) was LRS>FS>CCS>Control. After lengthening at L4 and L4-L5, the percentage increase in NFD (per millimetre) was FS>CCS>LRS>Control. After lengthening at L5, the percentage increase in NFD (per millimetre) was CCS>LRS>control>FS. Conclusions LRS patients are the most suitable candidates for treatment with pedicle-lengthening osteotomy. Lengthening L4 pedicles produced larger percentage increases in NFD than lengthening L5 pedicles (p lumbar spinal stenosis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:239–246. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000469. PMID:27340140

  14. Minimally invasive treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with a novel interspinous spacer

    Shabat S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Shay Shabat1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block3, Reuven Gepstein11Spinal Care Unit, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E Block, PhD, Inc, San Francisco, CA, USAPurpose: To assess the safety and effectiveness of a novel, minimally invasive interspinous spacer in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS.Methods: A total of 53 patients (mean age, 70 ± 11 years; 45% female with intermittent neurogenic claudication secondary to moderate LSS, confirmed on imaging studies, were treated with the Superion® Interspinous Spacer (VertiFlex, Inc, San Clemente, CA and returned for follow-up visits at 6 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years. Study endpoints included axial and extremity pain severity with an 11-point numeric scale, Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ, back function with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, health-related quality of life with the Physical Component Summary (PCS and Mental Component Summary (MCS scores from the SF-12, and adverse events.Results: Axial and extremity pain each decreased 54% (both P < 0.001 over the 2-year follow-up period. ZCQ symptom severity scores improved 43% (P < 0.001 and ZCQ physical function improved 44% (P < 0.001 from pre-treatment to 2 years post-treatment. A statistically significant 50% improvement (P < 0.001 also was noted in back function. PCS and MCS each improved 40% (both P < 0.001 from pre-treatment to 2 years. Clinical success rates at 2 years were 83%–89% for ZCQ subscores, 75% for ODI, 78% for PCS, and 80% for MCS. No device infection, implant breakage, migration, or pull-out was observed, although two (3.8% patients underwent explant with subsequent laminectomy.Conclusion: Moderate LSS can be effectively treated with a minimally invasive interspinous spacer. This device is appropriate for select patients who have failed nonoperative treatment measures for LSS and meet strict anatomical criteria.Keywords: Superion, axial

  15. Biomechanical comparison of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and bilateral laminotomy for spinal stenosis syndrome – an experimental study in porcine model

    Chen Lih-Huei; Chen Weng-Pin; Hsieh Pang-Hsing; Tai Ching-Lung; Chen Wen-Jer; Lai Po-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The association of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and laminotomy has been clinically studied, but the corresponding in vitro biomechanical studies have not been reported. We investigated the hypothesis that the integrity of the posterior complex (spinous process-interspinous ligament-spinous process) plays an important role on the postoperative spinal stability in decompressive surgery. Methods Eight porcine lumbar spine specimens were studied. Each specimen ...

  16. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling for lumbar spinal stenosis using a specially designed needle

    Ahn Kang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes the methodological approach and clinical application of a minimally invasive intervention to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS. Methods Thirty-four patients with LSS underwent fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling using a specially designed flexed Round Needle. The needle was inserted 8-12 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the stenosis and advanced to a position between the anterior side of the facet joint and pedicle up to the outer-third of the pedicle. The needle was advanced medially and backed laterally within a few millimetres along the canal side of the inferior articular process between the facet joint and pedicle. The procedure was completed when a marked reduction in resistance was felt at the tip of the needle. The procedure was performed bilaterally at the level of the stenosis. Results The average follow-up period was 12.9 ± 1.1 months. The visual analogue scale (VAS pain score was reduced from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 4.6 ± 2.5 points, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score decreased from 41.4 ± 17.2 to 25.5 ± 12.6% and the average self-rated improvement was 52.6 ± 33.1%. The VAS scores indicated that 14 (41.2% patients reported a "good" to "excellent" treatment response, while 11 (32.4% had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the ODI and 22 (64.7% had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the self-rated improvement scale. Conclusions These results suggest that fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling is effective for managing LSS.

  17. Preoperative dexamethasone reduces acute but not sustained pain after lumbar disk surgery

    Nielsen, Rikke V; Siegel, Hanna; Fomsgaard, Jonna S;

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have attracted increasing attention as adjuvants in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Furthermore, anecdotal reports may support glucocorticoids for preventing sustained postoperative pain. We explored preoperative dexamethasone combined with paracetamol and ibuprofen on...... acute and sustained pain after lumbar disk surgery. In this blinded study, 160 patients undergoing lumbar disk surgery were randomly assigned to 16 mg IV dexamethasone or placebo. All patients received perioperative paracetamol and ibuprofen, and postoperative IV patient-controlled analgesia with...... morphine. Primary outcome was pain during mobilization (visual analog scale) 2 to 24 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were acute pain at rest, morphine consumption, nausea, vomiting, ondansetron consumption, sedation, and quality of sleep. Patients were followed up by written questionnaire 3...

  18. Treadmill training induced lumbar motoneuron dendritic plasticity and behavior recovery in adult rats after a thoracic contusive spinal cord injury.

    Wang, Hongxing; Liu, Nai-Kui; Zhang, Yi Ping; Deng, Lingxiao; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shields, Christopher B; Walker, Melissa J; Li, Jianan; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is devastating, causing sensorimotor impairments and paralysis. Persisting functional limitations on physical activity negatively affect overall health in individuals with SCI. Physical training may improve motor function by affecting cellular and molecular responses of motor pathways in the central nervous system (CNS) after SCI. Although motoneurons form the final common path for motor output from the CNS, little is known concerning the effect of exercise training on spared motoneurons below the level of injury. Here we examined the effect of treadmill training on morphological, trophic, and synaptic changes in the lumbar motoneuron pool and on behavior recovery after a moderate contusive SCI inflicted at the 9th thoracic vertebral level (T9) using an Infinite Horizon (IH, 200 kDyne) impactor. We found that treadmill training significantly improved locomotor function, assessed by Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, and reduced foot drops, assessed by grid walking performance, as compared with non-training. Additionally, treadmill training significantly increased the total neurite length per lumbar motoneuron innervating the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of the hindlimbs as compared to non-training. Moreover, treadmill training significantly increased the expression of a neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the lumbar motoneurons as compared to non-training. Finally, treadmill training significantly increased synaptic density, identified by synaptophysin immunoreactivity, in the lumbar motoneuron pool as compared to non-training. However, the density of serotonergic terminals in the same regions did not show a significant difference between treadmill training and non-training. Thus, our study provides a biological basis for exercise training as an effective medical practice to improve recovery after SCI. Such an effect may be mediated by synaptic plasticity, and neurotrophic modification in the

  19. Automated detection of spinal centrelines, vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in CT and MR images of lumbar spine

    Štern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2010-01-01

    We propose a completely automated algorithm for the detection of the spinal centreline and the centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in images acquired by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The developed methods are based on the analysis of the geometry of spinal structures and the characteristics of CT and MR images and were evaluated on 29 CT and 13 MR images of lumbar spine. The overall mean distance between the obtained and the ground truth spinal centrelines and centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs were 1.8 ± 1.1 mm and 2.8 ± 1.9 mm, respectively, and no considerable differences were detected among the results for CT, T1-weighted MR and T2-weighted MR images. The knowledge of the location of the spinal centreline and the centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs is valuable for the analysis of the spine. The proposed method may therefore be used to initialize the techniques for labelling and segmentation of vertebrae.

  20. A poly(propylene glycol-co-fumaric acid) based bone graft extender for lumbar spinal fusion: in vivo assessment in a rabbit model

    Hile, David D.; Kandziora, Frank; Lewandrowski, Kai-Uwe; Doherty, Stephen A.; Kowaleski, Michael P.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    2005-01-01

    Study design: An animal model of posterolateral intertransverse process lumbar spinal fusion compared fusion rates amongst autologous bone (group 1), a porous, bioabsorbable, scaffold based on the biopolymer, poly(propylene glycol-co-fumaric acid) (PPF) (group 2), and a combination of autograft and the bioabsorbable scaffold (group 3). Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of augmenting spinal fusion with an osteoconductive and bioabsorbable scaffold as an alternative or as an adjunct, i.e....

  1. Oligodendrocyte-like cell transplantation for acute spinal cord injury

    Yongtao Xu; Anmin Chen; Feng Li; Hougeng Lu

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we used insulin-like growth factor-1 to induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into oligodendrocyte-like cells. Cell surface marker identification showed that they expressed myelin basic protein and galactosylceramide, two specific markers of oligodendrocytes. These cells were transplanted into rats with acute spinal cord injury at T10. At 8 weeks post-implantation, oligodendrocyte-like cells were observed to have survived at the injury site. The critical angle of the inclined plane, and Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores were all increased. Furthermore, latencies of motion-evoked and somatosensory-evoked potentials were decreased. These results demonstrate that transplantation of oligodendrocytic-induced MSCs promote functional recovery of injured spinal cord.

  2. Serial Neu rophysiologieal Changes in Experimental Selective Lumbar Spinal Nerve Root Compression in a Feline Model

    Zhou Hui; XH He; HK Wong

    2000-01-01

    The spinal nerve root may be subjected to compression in a variety of clinical conditions which may lead to disabling leg pain and disability. The objective documentation of the clinical symptoms by electrophysiological tests could be procedure dependent. In the experimental study of nerve root compression in animal models, electrophytsiological tests are one of the few available methods to assess the effects of in nerve root compression. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of compression of the spinal nerve root on the motor conduction velocity(MCV) and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials(SCEP) over a period of 6 weeks in a feline model. Ten cats were used in this study. Under anaesthesia, a laminectomy at L6 and L7 was performed. The right L6 nerve root was exposed and compressed by a Surg i-loop around nerve root and maintained by a Ligacap. MCV was recorded by stimulating the proximal end of nerve root before and after compression. Stimulating the right posterior tibial nerve and recording at the skull performed CSEP. After nerve root compression, MCV showed a significant reduction of amplitudes (immediate:64 ± 11%; 3-week: 73± 13%; 6-week: 73± 12% p<0.01 ) . The lateneies of MCV were not significant changed. The amplitudes of CSEP were also reduced significantly (immediate:56±9%; 5-minute:74± 12%). The N1 peak disappeared and latencies prolonged. We conclude that amplitude changes of MCV and CSEP could be used for diagnosis of acute peripheral nerve injury in the feline model, which may have clinical implication.

  3. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti, Kimberly A. Cash, Carla D. McManus, Vidyasagar Pampati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted delivery. The literature on the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing central spinal stenosis after failure of epidural injections has not been widely studied.Study Design: A prospective evaluation.Setting: An interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center, a private practice setting in the United States.Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain with lumbar central spinal stenosis.Methods: Seventy patients were recruited. The initial phase of the study was randomized, double-blind with a comparison of percutaneous adhesiolysis with caudal epidural injections. The 25 patients from the adhesiolysis group continued with follow-up, along with 45 additional patients, leading to a total of 70 patients. All patients received percutaneous adhesiolysis and appropriate placement of the Racz catheter, followed by an injection of 5 mL of 2% preservative-free lidocaine with subsequent monitoring in the recovery room. In the recovery room, each patient also received 6 mL of 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and 6 mg of non-particulate betamethasone, followed by an injection of 1 mL of sodium chloride solution and removal of the catheter.Outcomes Assessment: Multiple outcome measures were utilized including the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI, employment status, and opioid intake with assessment at 3, 6

  4. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion aided with computer-assisted spinal navigation system combined with electromyography monitoring

    LUO Wei; ZHANG Fan; LIU Tie; DU Xing-li; CHEN An-ming; LI Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive techniques are gaining wide-spread application in lumbar fusion surgery,because they may have advantage over conventional open surgery in approach-related morbidity.This research was aimed to evaluate the safety and accuracy of the techniques of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion by using a computer-assisted spinal navigation system combined with electromyography monitoring.Methods Sixteen patients underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.A computer-assisted spinal navigation system and electromyography were used for guiding pedicle screw placement.The operative duration,blood loss,complications,and fluoroscopic time were recorded.Clinical outcome was assessed by Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index.Radiographic images were obtained to evaluate the accuracy of pedicle screw placement and fusion rates.Results The Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores were vastly improved postoperatively.A total of 64 pedicle screws were implanted and three were regarded as misplacement by post-operative CT scan.Three screw trajectories were adjusted according to intra-operative stimulus-evoked electromyography monitoring.The average fluoroscopy time in each patient was 31.8 seconds,which equals to 7.9 seconds per pedicle screw.No patients had instrument related neurological complications,infection,implant failure or revision.Successful fusion was found in all patients.Conclusions The combination of navigation system and real-time electromyography monitoring can make the minimally invasive operation more safe and accurate while decreasing radiation exposure time of the medical staff and patient and minimizing the chance and the degree of the pedicle screw misplacement.

  5. The value of the dynamic mechanical spinal test in the management of automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    Objective: To prospectively assess the predictive power of centralization phenomenon in the curative effect of automated PLD. Methods: The survey population was consisted of 109 patients with inclusion heraiation demonstrated by CT/MRI, 74 men and 35 women with average age of 43.1 years(17-75 years). All were complained of low back pain, with varying degrees of lower extremity pain and altered sensation, lasting for more than 2 months; including one symptomatic disc in 99 patients and two symptomatic discs in 10 patients. Patients were undergone dynamic mechanical spinal test and reported whether the test would aggravate their pain. The assessment included forward flexion, extension, rotation of the trunk to the right and left, rotation to the left with right extension, rotation to the right with left extension, and whether straight leg raising in the supine position would aggravate back pain or leg pain. Symptom resposes were categorized into three groups: centralization group (CG), partial-centralization group (PCG) and noncentralization group (NCG). Centralization of pain is the progressive retreat of the most distal extent of the referred or radicular pain toward or to the lumbar midline. Noncentralization of pain is the peripheralization of pain in one or more directions, and no change in the distal-most pain location or intensity. All patients received a single therapy with PLD. Results: A follow-up of 109 patients for 3 to 6 months, including 46 cases with 24 as exellent and 22 as good reaching 100% of excellent good rate in CG by MacNab standards; 43 cases with 5 as exellent, 29 as good, 9 as fair and poor, with total effective rate of 79.1% in PCG. Twenty cases of NCG symptoms showed no improvement and therefore surgery was considered. Conclusions: Centralization phenomenon occurrence during initial mechanical evaluation is a very accurate predictor for successful PLD outcome. Nonoccurrence of centralization would accurately predict poor PLD outcome and

  6. Height and weight are correlated with lumbar spinal bone mineral contents and densities in Chinese adolescents with early ankylosing spondylitis

    MA Xing; HU Yun-yu; MA Xiang-dong; WANG Quan-ping; LI Xiao-juan; LU Rong; WANG Jun; XU Xin-zhi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possible factors influencing lumbar spinal bone mineral contents and bone mineral densities in Chinese adolescents with early ankylosing spondylitis(AS). Methods: Thirty-one male Chinese adolescent outpatients with early AS were included and compared with 31 age-matched male controls. Age (year), height (cm), total body weight (kg) together with body mass index (BMI, kg/m2 ) of all subjects and disease duration (month), BASMI,BASFI, BASDAI, SASSS as well as ESR (mm/h) of AS patients were obtained. Lumbar2-4 bone mineral content (L2-4BMC, g) and lumbar2-4 areal bone mineral density (L2-4 BMD, g/cm2 ) were evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) with Lunar DPX-IQ device and lumbar2-4 volumetric bone mineral apparent density (L2-4 BMAD, g/cm3 )was subsequently calculated. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were performed. Results: Compared with 31 agematched male controls, AS patients had significantly lower L2-4 BMD [ (0. 984 ± 0.142) g/cm2 vs ( 1.055 ± 0. 137) g/cm2,P = 0.049 ] and L2- 4 BMAD [ (0. 1527 ± 0. 0173) g/cm3 vs (0. 1630 ± 0. 0195) g/cm3, P = 0. 032 ]. In AS patients,multiple regression analysis identified that only the factor of height was significantly correlated with L2- 4 BMC ( R = 0. 673,P = 0.000) and the factor of weight had predominant influences on L2-4 BMD ( R = 0. 620, P = 0. 000) as well as L2-4BMAD (R=0.510, P = 0.003). Conclusion: The young patients with early AS had marked reduction in lumbar spine bone mineral densities, which indicated an important primary event leading to osteoporosis. Positive effects of height and weight on lumbar spine bone mass and densities could expectantly make favorable contributions to early prevention of AS associated bone loss and subsequent osteoporosis.

  7. Acute Spinal Cord Ischemia during Aortography Treated with Intravenous Thrombolytic Therapy

    Restrepo, Lucas; Guttin, Jorge F.

    2006-01-01

    Acute anterior spinal cord ischemia is a rare but disastrous complication of endovascular aortic procedures. Although intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment for acute brain ischemia, its use for the treatment of spinal cord ischemia has not previously been reported. We report the case of a patient who developed anterior spinal cord ischemia during diagnostic aortography. He was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen ac...

  8. Freeze-dried fibular allograft in anterior spinal surgery: cervical and lumbar applications.

    Wetzel, F.T.; Hoffman, M. A.; Arcieri, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-six patients who underwent anterior fusion utilizing fibular allograft are reviewed. Thirty-two patients underwent multiple-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion utilizing fibular strut allograft, and 24 underwent anterior lumbar discectomy and fusion using fibular strut allograft. Cervical surgery was performed via the strut technique of Whitecloud and LaRocca and lumbar surgery was performed via a transperitoneal or retroperitoneal approach. Postoperatively, patients were assi...

  9. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p≥0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p≥0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p≥0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p≤0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  10. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation

    Danner, Simon M.; Matthias Krenn; Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Andrea Toth; Winfried Mayr; Karen Minassian

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous...

  11. Preferred locomotor phase of activity of lumbar interneurons during air-stepping in subchronic spinal cats

    AuYong, Nicholas; Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Lemay, Michel A.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal locomotor circuits are intrinsically capable of driving a variety of behaviors such as stepping, scratching, and swimming. Based on an observed rostrocaudal wave of activity in the motoneuronal firing during locomotor tasks, the traveling-wave hypothesis proposes that spinal interneuronal firing follows a similar rostrocaudal pattern of activation, suggesting the presence of spatially organized interneuronal modules within the spinal motor system. In this study, we examined if the spat...

  12. Diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for detecting lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis

    This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a relatively new radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for diagnosing lumbar spinal stenosis. The literature search was based on PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database up to March 2014. A total of 120 articles were identified. Seven studies involving 1,182 patients were included. The quality of the methodology of the seven studies was good. Overall, the pooled weighted value showed that the sedimentation sign had moderate sensitivity of 0.80 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.83] and high specificity of 0.96 (95 % CI 0.94-0.98). The area under the curve was 0.76. Subgroup analysis showed that the degree of morphological spinal stenosis was responsible for the heterogeneity. In the patients with severe morphological lumbar spinal stenosis, the sedimentation sign had even higher sensitivity and specificity: 0.899 (95 % CI 0.87-0.92) and 0.99 (95 % CI 0.98-1.00), respectively. The area under the curve was 0.96. In the patients with lumbar spinal stenosis without definition of morphological stenosis, there was a notable threshold effect and significant heterogeneity. The area under the curve was 0.63. Current evidence suggests that the sedimentation sign has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing severe lumbar spinal stenosis. Its performance in diagnosing moderate and mild spinal stenosis, however, has yet to be corroborated in properly designed studies. (orig.)

  13. Diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for detecting lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis

    Zhang, Liangming; Chen, Ruiqiang; Xie, Peigen; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Rong, Limin [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-11-28

    This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a relatively new radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for diagnosing lumbar spinal stenosis. The literature search was based on PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database up to March 2014. A total of 120 articles were identified. Seven studies involving 1,182 patients were included. The quality of the methodology of the seven studies was good. Overall, the pooled weighted value showed that the sedimentation sign had moderate sensitivity of 0.80 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.83] and high specificity of 0.96 (95 % CI 0.94-0.98). The area under the curve was 0.76. Subgroup analysis showed that the degree of morphological spinal stenosis was responsible for the heterogeneity. In the patients with severe morphological lumbar spinal stenosis, the sedimentation sign had even higher sensitivity and specificity: 0.899 (95 % CI 0.87-0.92) and 0.99 (95 % CI 0.98-1.00), respectively. The area under the curve was 0.96. In the patients with lumbar spinal stenosis without definition of morphological stenosis, there was a notable threshold effect and significant heterogeneity. The area under the curve was 0.63. Current evidence suggests that the sedimentation sign has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing severe lumbar spinal stenosis. Its performance in diagnosing moderate and mild spinal stenosis, however, has yet to be corroborated in properly designed studies. (orig.)

  14. Does Co-Existing Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis Impair Functional Outcomes and Activity Levels after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    Jauregui, Julio J; Banerjee, Samik; Issa, Kimona; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Mont, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a cause for substantial morbidity in the elderly population: many often undergo total hip arthroplasty for associated hip arthritis. With a matched cohort we investigated the effect of co-existing LSS on aseptic survivorship, functional outcomes, activity levels, overall subjective physical and mental health status, and satisfaction rates in patients undergoing primary THA. The aseptic-implant survivorship was similar in LSS and non-stenosis cohort. Although both cohorts significantly improved, the LSS cohort achieved lower improvements in HHS, UCLA, SF-36 physical, and satisfaction rates than the matched non-stenotic cohort. Surgeons should consider cautioning patients with LSS that although they can expect relief of their arthritic symptoms following THA, they may continue to expect limitations in function, physical-status, activity-levels, and satisfaction rates. PMID:25865814

  15. Abnormal growth of the corticospinal axons into the lumbar spinal cord of the hyt/hyt mouse with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Hsu, Jung-Yu C; Stein, Stuart A; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2008-11-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency may cause severe neurological disorders resulting from developmental deficits of the central nervous system. The mutant hyt/hyt mouse, characterized by fetal-onset, life-long hypothyroidism resulting from a point mutation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor of the thyroid gland, displays a variety of abnormalities in motor behavior that are likely associated with dysfunctions of specific brain regions and a defective corticospinal tract (CST). To test the hypothesis that fetal and neonatal hypothyroidism cause abnormal CST development, the growth of the CST was investigated in hypothyroid hyt/hyt mice and their euthyroid progenitors, the BALB/cByJ mice. Anterograde labeling with biotinylated dextran amine demonstrated a decrease in the number of CST axons in the hyt/hyt mouse at the first lumbar level at postnatal day (P) 10. After retrograde tracing with fast blue (FB), fewer FB-labeled neurons were found in the motor cortex, the red nucleus, and the lateral vestibular nucleus of the hyt/hyt mouse. At the fourth lumbar level, the hyt/hyt mouse also showed smaller CST cross-sectional areas and significantly lower numbers of unmyelinated axons, myelinated axons, and growth cones within the CST during postnatal development. At P10, the hyt/hyt mouse demonstrated significantly lower immunoreactivity of embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule in the CST at the seventh cervical level, whereas the expression of growth-associated protein 43 remained unchanged. Our study demonstrated an abnormal development of the CST in the hyt/hyt mouse, manifested by reduced axon quantity and retarded growth pattern at the lumbar spinal cord. PMID:18543337

  16. Application of classification based cognitive functional therapy for a patient with lumbar spinal stenosis: A case report.

    Irfan, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    This report describes the case of a 52 year old male administrative assistant presenting with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Despite patho-anatomical considerations, the patient's pain related functional behaviour, mal-adapted presentation, motor control strategies, incorrect belief system, and faulty cognition of associating disc healing with a lordotic posture adversely contributed to his presentation. With limited specific guidelines in the literature for this specific lumbar spine condition, the patient response during the assessment guided the intervention. Treatment that incorporated a cognitive functional therapy resulted in a successful outcome. The patient attended for twelve treatment sessions in three months and demonstrated improvement in overall function. By week 12, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) reduced from 68% to 19% and further reduced to 15% at three months following discharge. The patient's self-reported tolerance for standing improved from 10 min to 60 min and his self-reported tolerance of walking improved from 200 m to three kilometres. The effects were maintained three months post discharge. This case report supports the clinical utility of a patient-centred multidimensional classification system that utilised cognitive functional therapy in a patient with LSS. PMID:26476566

  17. Successful management of aortic thrombi resulting in spinal cord infarction in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute cholecystitis

    Izumi M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Manabu Izumi, Shoko Teraoka, Keisuke Yamashita, Kenji Matsumoto, Tomohiro Muronoi, Yoshimitsu Izawa, Chikara Yonekawa, Masaki Ano, Masayuki SuzukawaDepartment of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, JapanAbstract: A 74-year-old man with coronary artery disease was suffering from acute nonobstructive cholecystitis and was admitted to a nearby hospital. Dual antiplatelet (aspirin and ticlopidine therapy was discontinued before preparation for surgical resection of the gall bladder. During his time in hospital he was aware of lumbar pain and weakness in both legs. He was transferred to our hospital for further evaluation and therapy. Diffuse intra-aortic thrombi were revealed by computed tomography with contrast media, and magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord infarction. However, computed tomography scans of the descending aorta obtained 4 months before admission exhibited no signs of atherosclerotic plaques or intra-aortic thrombi. Laboratory data suggest that antiphospholipid antibody syndrome might have caused these acute multiple intra-arterial thrombi. By restarting dual antiplatelet therapy and increasing the dose of heparin (from 10,000 IU/day to 15,000 IU/day we successfully managed the patient's clinical condition and symptoms. It is important to understand that stopping antiplatelet therapy may rapidly grow thrombi in patients with a hypercoagulative state.Keywords: intra-aortic thrombus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, spinal cord infarction

  18. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care.

  19. Effect of fibrin glue on the prevention of persistent cerebral spinal fluid leakage after incidental durotomy during lumbar spinal surgery

    Jankowitz, Brian T.; Atteberry, Dave S.; Gerszten, Peter C; Karausky, Patricia; Cheng, Boyle C.; Faught, Ryan; Welch, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately one million spinal surgeries are performed in the United States each year. The risk of an incidental durotomy (ID) and resultant persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a significant concern for surgeons, as this complication has been associated with increased length of hospitalization, worse neurological outcome, and the development of CSF fistulae. Augmentation of standard dural suture repair with the application of fibrin glue has been suggested to reduce the frequenc...

  20. [Acute ischemic spinal cord disease. Spinal cord infarction. A clinical study and MRI in 8 cases].

    Pau Serradell, A

    1994-01-01

    Acute spinal cord infarction (ASCI) occurs infrequently and may have diverse causes. The diagnosis of ASCI, and particularly of an anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS) can be confirmed nowadays by MRI, whereas in the past only necropsy confirmation was possible. Pathophysiology and long-term prognosis may be better known at present and treatments more consistent. We present the longitudinal study and clinical features of 8 patients suffering from ASCI. All of them were personally studied and had MRI examinations, often with sequential studies. three groups must be considered: one included 4 cases of ASAS at cervical level, the second 2 cases of ASAS at thoracic level and the third group with infarction of the conus medullaris (ICM), one of them developed during surgical repair of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm. Motor and sensory sequelae were assessed in each case together with possible etiological factors. In conclusion, recovery after ASAS tends to be dependent on the severity of the initial deficit. At cervical level, clinical and morphological findings argue in favour of an extrinsic selective compression of the C7 right radiculo-medullary artery as responsible for the ASA. At thoracic level, the artery preferentially occluded seems to be the sulco-commisural artery as a consequence of disc compression. Finally, an underlying peculiarity of the pattern of arterial supply is a probable predisposing factor for ICM. Generally, the long-term prognosis of ASCI is not necessarily bad. PMID:7801036

  1. CLINICAL OBSERVATION ON THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE PLUS MANUAL REPOSITION FOR TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUMBAR VERTEBRAL ARTICULAR DYSKINESIA

    骆钧梵

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of acupuncture plus manual reposition for treatment of acute lumbar vertebral articular dyskinesia for choosing a better remedy. Methods: 66 cases of acute lumbar vertebral articular dyskinesia were randomly divided into acupuncture plus manual reposition group (treatment group, n= 33) and routine manual reposition group (control group, n = 33). Yaotong-point was punctured, when, the patient was asked to move his or her waist simultaneously. Results: After one session of treatment, of the two 33 cases in treatment and control groups, 28 (84.85%) and20 (60.61%) were cured, 4 (12.12%) and 9 (27.27%) were improved, and 1 (3.03%) and 4 (12.12%) failed in the treatment. The therapeutic effect of treatment group was significantly superior to that of control group ( P< 0.05). Conclusion: Acupuncture combined with manual reposition is apparently superior to simple routine manual reposition in relieving acute lumbar vertebral articular dyskinesia.

  2. Spinal surgeons' learning curve for lumbar microendoscopic discectomy:a prospective study of our first 50 and latest 10 cases

    RONG Li-min; XIE Pei-gen; SHI De-hai; DONG Jian-wen; LIU Bin; FENG Feng; CAI Dao-zhang

    2008-01-01

    Background Microendoscopic discectomy (MED) is a minimally invasive operation that allows rapid recovery from surgery for lumbar disc herniation,but has replaced traditional open surgery in few hospitals because most surgeons avoid its long learning curve.We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of lumbar MED at stages of spinal surgeons'learning curve.Methods Fifty patients receiving MED from June 2002 to February 2003 were divided into chronological groups of ten each:A-E.The control group F was ten MED patients treated later by the same medical team (September-October 2006).All operations were performed by the same team of spinal surgeons with no MED experience before June 2002.We compared groups by operation time,blood loss,complications and need for open surgery after MED failure.Results Operation times by group were:A,(107±14) minutes;B,(85±13) minutes;C,(55±19) minutes;D,(52±12) minutes;E,(51±13) minutes;and F,(49±15) minutes.Blood loss were:A,(131±73) ml;B,(75±20) ml;C,(48±16) ml;D,(44±17) ml;E,(45±18) ml;and F,(45±16) ml.Both operation time and blood loss in groups C,D,E and F were smaller and more stable compared with groups A and B.Japanese Orthopedic Association assessment (JOA) score of each group in improvement rate immediately and one year after operation were as follows (in percentage):A,(79.8±8.8)/(89.8±7.7);B,(78.6±8.5)/(88.5±7.8);C,(80.8±11.3)/(90.8±6.7);D,(77.7±11.4)/(88.9±9.3);E,(84.0±8.7)/(89.6±9.0);and F,(77.8±11.6)/(86.9±8.4).Groups showed no statistical difference in improvement rates.Complications developed in three patients in group A,two in group B,and none in the other groups.Conclusions Spinal surgeons performing MED become proficient after 10-20 operations,when their skill becomes fairly sophisticated.Patients' improvement rate is the same regardless of surgeons' phase of learning curve.

  3. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery

    Balaji, V.; Kaila, R.; Wilson, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the safety and efficacy of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) compared with bone graft when used specifically for revision spinal fusion surgery secondary to pseudarthrosis. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched using defined search terms. The primary outcome measure was spinal fusion, assessed as success or failure in accordance with radiograph, MRI or CT scan review at 24-month follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was time to fusion. Results A total of six studies (three prospective and three retrospective) reporting on the use of BMP2 met the inclusion criteria (203 patients). Of these, four provided a comparison of BMP2 and bone graft whereas the other two solely investigated the use of BMP2. The primary outcome was seen in 92.3% (108/117) of patients following surgery with BMP2. Although none of the studies showed superiority of BMP2 to bone graft for fusion, its use was associated with a statistically quicker time to achieving fusion. BMP2 did not appear to increase the risk of complication. Conclusion The use of BMP2 is both safe and effective within the revision setting, ideally in cases where bone graft is unavailable or undesirable. Further research is required to define its optimum role. Cite this article: Mr P. Bodalia. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:145–152. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000418. PMID:27121215

  4. Treatment of Acute Tuberculous Spondylitis by the Spinal Shortening Osteotomy: A Technical Notes and Case Illustrations

    Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Chanplakorn, Niramol; Kraiwattanapong, Chaiwat; Wajanavisit, Wiwat; Laohacharoensombat, Wichien

    2011-01-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis is necessary in particular cases that a large amount of necrotic tissue is encountered and there is spinal cord compression. A spinal shortening osteotomy procedure has previously been described for the correction of the sagittal balance in a late kyphotic deformity, but there have been no reports on this as a surgical treatment in the acute stage. Thus, the aim of this report is to present the surgical techniques and clinical results of 3 patients w...

  5. A Study of Measurements of Spinal Canal at the Level of Lower Three Lumbar Vertebra by 16 Slice CT Scanner in Nepalese Population

    Mukesh Mallik; Keshav Paudel; Nuwadatta Subedi; Sanjay Sah; Anish Subedee; Deepak Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The study was conducted with the objectives to establish the measurements of spinal canal and lumbar vertebra at L3 to L5 region in Nepalese population. Methodology: It is a cross-sectional study among 36 patients (17 males and 19 females) having age variation from 20-60years whose abdomen was scanned by GE bright speed 16 slice CT scanner with slice thickness 10mm and then reconstructed at 1.2mm for images in different body plains for the measurement of spinal canal...

  6. Intraoperative Three-Dimensional Imaging in Selective Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Useful Tool in Theory but Also in Everyday Practice?

    Background. We conducted a pilot study to investigate the value of an Iso-C3D imaging system in determining the extent of decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis during surgery. We now address the question whether this imaging has become a routine tool. Material and Methods. Ten patients who underwent unilateral decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis were intraoperatively examined using the Iso-C3D imaging system. Four years after this study, we investigated whether this intraoperative imaging modality is still being used. Results. Evaluable images were intraoperatively obtained for all patients. In two cases, the surgical procedure was changed on the basis of the images. Myelography did not provide any additional information. In the four years following the study, this intraoperative imaging technique has not been used again. Conclusion. Intraoperative imaging using the Iso-C3D system provides additional safety. It, however, has not become established as a routine procedure

  7. Acute injuries of the spinal cord and spine

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots are involved. Patients may even die of a spinal shock. Besides presenting the important embryologic and anatomical basis underlying the typical radiological findings of spinal trauma, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are correlated. Special situations, such as the involvement of the alar ligaments and typical injuries in children, will be discussed as well as specific traumatic patters relevant for imaging. Based on the actual literature and recommendations of professional organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic evaluation of spinal injuries. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual imaging modalities are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  8. The Effect and Safety of Steroid Injection in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: With or Without Local Anesthetics

    Song, Sung Hyuk; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Ho Jun; Nam, Ki Yeun; Kim, Hyojun; Kim, Seung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the long-term effect and safety of an epidural steroid injection in spinal stenosis patients, with or without local anesthetics. Methods Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with spinal stenosis were included and randomly divided into two groups. Translaminar epidural and selective nerve root spinal injection procedures were performed using steroids mixed with local anesthetics or normal saline. The effects of spinal injection procedures were measured with visual analogue scale (VAS) and functional rate index (FRI). These measurements were performed before injection, at 1 month after injection and at 3 months after injection. The occurrence of side effects was investigated each time. Results The VAS and FRI scores were significantly reduced in both the local anesthetics group and normal saline group at 1 and 3 months after the injection. However, there was no significant difference in VAS and FRI score reduction between the two groups each time. Side effects are not noted in both groups. Conclusion The spinal injection procedures using steroids mixed either with local anesthetics or normal saline have an effect in reducing pain and improving functional activities. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in relation to side effects and the long-term effects of pain and function. PMID:26949664

  9. A Soft Tissue Chondroma Originating from the Dura Mater of the Lumbar Spinal Canal and it Mimicked a Nerve Sheath Tumor: A Case Report with the MR Imaging

    Soft tissue chondromas are the benign chondro-osseous tumors of soft tissue that usually occur in the extra-osseous and extra-synovial regions of the extremities. We present here a rare location for a soft tissue chondroma that originated from the dura mater in the lumbar spinal canal, and it mimicked a nerve sheath tumor. We present here the MRI findings and pathologic features of this tumor

  10. Transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder with metastasis in lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression in an ocelot(Leopardus pardalis)

    Karen Y.R. Nakagaki; Pâmela A. Lima; Kiyoko U. Utiumi; Marco A.M. Pires; Rosana Zanatta; Fabiana M Boabaid; Edson M. Colodel; Djeison L. Raymundo

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a case of nonpapillary and infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder with metastasis of lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression in an adult female ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), from the Mato Grosso state, Brazil. The ocelot had pelvic limb paralysis and skin ulcers in the posterior region of the body and was submitted to euthanasia procedure. At necropsy was observed a multilobulated and irregular shaped, yellowish to white nodule in the urin...

  11. 3D visualization of Thoraco-Lumbar Spinal Lesions in German Shepherd Dog

    Azpiroz, J.; Krafft, J.; Cadena, M.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2006-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been found to be an excellent imaging modality due to its sensitivity to characterize the morphology of the spine in dogs. This technique is considered to be particularly helpful for diagnosing spinal cord atrophy and spinal stenosis. The three-dimensional visualization of organs and bones can significantly improve the diagnosis of certain diseases in dogs. CT images were acquired of a German shepherd's dog spinal cord to generate stacks and digitally process them to arrange them in a volume image. All imaging experiments were acquired using standard clinical protocols on a clinical CT scanner. The three-dimensional visualization allowed us to observe anatomical structures that otherwise are not possible to observe with two-dimensional images. The combination of an imaging modality like CT together with imaging processing techniques can be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of a number of animal diseases.

  12. 3D visualization of Thoraco-Lumbar Spinal Lesions in German Shepherd Dog

    Computed tomography (CT) has been found to be an excellent imaging modality due to its sensitivity to characterize the morphology of the spine in dogs. This technique is considered to be particularly helpful for diagnosing spinal cord atrophy and spinal stenosis. The three-dimensional visualization of organs and bones can significantly improve the diagnosis of certain diseases in dogs. CT images were acquired of a German shepherd's dog spinal cord to generate stacks and digitally process them to arrange them in a volume image. All imaging experiments were acquired using standard clinical protocols on a clinical CT scanner. The three-dimensional visualization allowed us to observe anatomical structures that otherwise are not possible to observe with two-dimensional images. The combination of an imaging modality like CT together with imaging processing techniques can be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of a number of animal diseases

  13. Does obesity preclude lumbar puncture with a standard spinal needle? The use of computed tomography to measure the skin to lumbar subarachnoid space distance in the general hospital population.

    Halpenny, Darragh

    2013-06-05

    OBJECTIVES: Failed lumbar puncture (LP) is a common indication for referral for radiologically guided LP. This study aims to evaluate what percentage of the hospital population would fail an LP using a standard 9-cm needle because of obesity and a skin to subarachnoid space distance greater than 9 cm. METHODS: Images of 402 consecutive patients undergoing computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis were reviewed. Skin to subarachnoid space distance was calculated using sagittal images. A survey was conducted among junior hospital doctors to assess their experience of performing lumbar puncture in obese patients. RESULTS: Four hundred patients were included. Fifty-five patients (13.8 %) had a skin to subarachnoid space distance greater than 9 cm. Intra-abdominal fat, subcutaneous fat and abdominal girth correlated with distance between the skin and subarachnoid space. Among junior doctors, 68.3 % (n = 41) reported LP failure on an obese patient; 78.4 % (n = 47) were unaware of the existence of a longer needle and 13.3 % (n = 8) had experience using a longer needle. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of the hospital population will fail LP with a standard length spinal needle. Selecting a longer needle may be sufficient to successfully complete LP in obese patients. KEY POINTS : • Lumbar puncture failure commonly leads to referral for an image-guided procedure • Standard lumbar puncture may fail in 13.8 % of patients due to obesity • 78.4 % of trainee doctors are unaware of the existence of longer spinal-needles • Using longer spinal needles may allow successful LP in obese patients.

  14. ICF Based Comprehensive Evaluation for Post-Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Kwang Dong; Shin, Hyung Ik

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of the ICF for initial comprehensive evaluation of early post-acute spinal cord injury. Method A comprehensive evaluation of 62 early post-acute spinal cord injury (SCI) patients was conducted by rehabilitation team members, such as physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, nutritionists, medical social-workers, and nurses. They recorded each of their evaluation according to the ICF first level classification. The contents of the comprehen...

  15. Decreased elastic fibers and increased proteoglycans in the ligamentum flavum of patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    Yabe, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Honda, Masahito; Hatori, Kouki; Sonofuchi, Kazuaki; Kanazawa, Kenji; Koide, Masashi; Sekiguchi, Takuya; Itaya, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    Elastic fibers and proteoglycans are major components of the extracellular matrix and their changes have been reported in some pathological conditions. Further, recent studies have indicated that some glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans inhibit elastic fiber assembly. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of the elastic fibers and proteoglycans in the ligamentum flavum and analyze their relationships to thickening of the ligamentum flavum from lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS). Ligamentum flavum samples were collected from 20 patients with LSCS (thickened flavum group) and 10 patients with lumbar disc herniation (non-thickened flavum group) as a control. Elastica-Masson staining and alcian blue staining were used to compare the relationship between the changes in the elastic fibers and proteoglycans. Gene and protein expressions of the elastic fibers and proteoglycans were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Histological changes indicated that proteoglycans mainly increased on the dorsal side of the ligamentum flavum in accordance with the decreased elastic fibers in the thickened flavum group. The gene and protein expressions of fibrillin-2 and DANCE were significantly lower and decorin, lumican, osteoglycin, and versican were significantly higher in the thickened flavum group. Our study shows that elastic fibers decrease and proteoglycans increase in the thickened ligamentum flavum. Decreased gene expression of elastogenesis and disrupted elastic fiber assembly caused by increased proteoglycans may lead to a loss of elasticity in the thickened ligamentum flavum. Decreased elasticity may cause buckling of the tissue, which leads to thickening of the ligamentum flavum. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1241-1247, 2016. PMID:26679090

  16. Effectiveness of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Machado, G.C. (Gustavo C.); P.H. Ferreira (P.); Harris, I.A. (Ian A.); Pinheiro, M.B. (Marina B.); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); Rzewuska, M. (Magdalena); C. Maher (Chris); M.L. Ferreira (Manuela L.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The management of spinal stenosis by surgery has increased rapidly in the past two decades, however, there is still controversy regarding the efficacy of surgery for this condition. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and comparative effectiveness of surgery in the manage

  17. Diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound study in stenosis of the spinal canal lumbar portion

    The performed investigations showed that ultrasound study allows easy and accurate calculation of the area of the spinal canal at the level f the disk as well as takes into consideration the characteristics of the hernia localization and its influence on the size of stenosis

  18. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Simon M Danner

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we

  19. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Danner, Simon M; Krenn, Matthias; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Toth, Andrea; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals) biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we recommend conducting

  20. The impact of magnetic resonance on the diagnostic evaluation of acute cervicothoracic spinal trauma

    From 1984 to 1987 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed on 100 patients suffering acute spinal trauma. MR demonstrated one or more injuries to the cervicothoracic region in 31 patients. It displayed a spectrum of spinal cord injury ranging from mild compression and swelling to complete transection. MR was also useful in evaluating alignment at the cervicothoracic junction, in depicting ligamentous injury, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in identifying unsuspected levels of injury. We present a diagnostic algorithm that incorporates the role of MR in evaluating acute cervicothoracic spinal trauma and emphasizes the replacement of myelography by MR in the initial assessment of neurologic deficit. (orig.)

  1. Enthesitis of lumbar spinal ligaments in clinically suspected spondyloarthritis: value of gadolinium-enhanced MR images in comparison to STIR

    Agten, Christoph A.; Zubler, Veronika; Rosskopf, Andrea B.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [Balgrist University Hospital, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Weiss, Bettina [Balgrist University Hospital, Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    To compare detection of spinal ligament enthesitis between gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1+Gd) and STIR sequences in patients with suspected spondyloarthritis. Sixty-eight patients (37 males, 42 ± 14 years) with a sacroiliac-joint (SIJ) and lumbar spine MRI for suspected spondyloarthritis were prospectively included. Sagittal T1+Gd and STIR images of the lumbar spine were assessed by two readers for enthesitis of interspinous/supraspinous ligaments, and for capsulitis of facet-joints between T12-S1. Patients' MRI were grouped according to ASAS (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society) criteria in positive (group A) or negative (group B) SIJs. Enthesitis/capsulitis were compared between groups. Interreader agreement was assessed. Enthesitis/capsulitis per patient was statistically significantly more frequent with T1+Gd compared to STIR (p ≤ 0.007), except for interspinous ligaments for reader 1 (p = 0.455). Interspinous enthesitis, supraspinous enthesitis, and capsulitis were present with T1+Gd(STIR) in 64.7 %(72.1 %), 60.3 %(17.7 %), and 61.8 %(29.4 %) for reader 1, and 51.5 %(41.2 %), 45.6 %(7.4 %), and 91.2 %(45.5 %) for reader 2. There were 76.5 %(52/68) patients in group A and 23.5 %(16/68) in group B. Total number of enthesitis/capsulitis on T1+Gd was statistically significantly higher in group A than B (4.96 vs. 2.94, p = 0.026; 8.12 vs. 5.25, p = 0.041 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). Interreader agreement showed mixed results for interspinous/supraspinous/capsulitis but was higher on T1+Gd (ICC = 0.838/0.783/0.367; p ≤ 0.001) compared to STIR (ICC = 0.652/0.298/0.224; p ≤ 0.032). In patients with suspected spondyloarthritis, enthesitis/capsulitis in the lumbar spine are common findings and more frequently/reliably detected with T1+Gd than STIR. In patients with positive SIJ-MRI, the total number of enthesitis/capsulitis in T1+Gd was higher compared to patients with

  2. Enthesitis of lumbar spinal ligaments in clinically suspected spondyloarthritis: value of gadolinium-enhanced MR images in comparison to STIR

    To compare detection of spinal ligament enthesitis between gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1+Gd) and STIR sequences in patients with suspected spondyloarthritis. Sixty-eight patients (37 males, 42 ± 14 years) with a sacroiliac-joint (SIJ) and lumbar spine MRI for suspected spondyloarthritis were prospectively included. Sagittal T1+Gd and STIR images of the lumbar spine were assessed by two readers for enthesitis of interspinous/supraspinous ligaments, and for capsulitis of facet-joints between T12-S1. Patients' MRI were grouped according to ASAS (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society) criteria in positive (group A) or negative (group B) SIJs. Enthesitis/capsulitis were compared between groups. Interreader agreement was assessed. Enthesitis/capsulitis per patient was statistically significantly more frequent with T1+Gd compared to STIR (p ≤ 0.007), except for interspinous ligaments for reader 1 (p = 0.455). Interspinous enthesitis, supraspinous enthesitis, and capsulitis were present with T1+Gd(STIR) in 64.7 %(72.1 %), 60.3 %(17.7 %), and 61.8 %(29.4 %) for reader 1, and 51.5 %(41.2 %), 45.6 %(7.4 %), and 91.2 %(45.5 %) for reader 2. There were 76.5 %(52/68) patients in group A and 23.5 %(16/68) in group B. Total number of enthesitis/capsulitis on T1+Gd was statistically significantly higher in group A than B (4.96 vs. 2.94, p = 0.026; 8.12 vs. 5.25, p = 0.041 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). Interreader agreement showed mixed results for interspinous/supraspinous/capsulitis but was higher on T1+Gd (ICC = 0.838/0.783/0.367; p ≤ 0.001) compared to STIR (ICC = 0.652/0.298/0.224; p ≤ 0.032). In patients with suspected spondyloarthritis, enthesitis/capsulitis in the lumbar spine are common findings and more frequently/reliably detected with T1+Gd than STIR. In patients with positive SIJ-MRI, the total number of enthesitis/capsulitis in T1+Gd was higher compared to patients with

  3. Efficacy of laminectomy spinal fixation on degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis%全椎板切除脊柱内固定治疗老年退行性腰椎管狭窄症的疗效

    胡德亚

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investgate the clinical effect and value of laminectomy spinal fixation on degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis .Methods The clinical data of 127 patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis from January 2012 to January 2014 were retrospectively analyzed;the treatment effects were evaluated and compared .Results In using laminectomy spinal fixation experiment treatment group , the scores, patient satisfaction scores for postoperative VAS score , evaluation of postoperative JOA good rate , intervertebral relative distance were significantly better than those of the control group(P0.05 ) .Conclusions Within laminectomy spinal fixation surgery can significantly improve the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and postoperative VAS , JOA score, increase the intervertebral distance and help patients complete decompression , and can also maintain the degenerative lumbar spinal canal stability of the spine stenosis , so it is worth to promote the use in clinical practice .%目的 探讨全椎板切除脊柱内固定治疗老年退行性腰椎管狭窄症的临床效果及应用价值. 方法 回顾性分析晋中市第一人民医院骨科2012年1月至2014年1月收治的127 例老年退行性腰椎管狭窄患者的临床资料,对比观察两组不同治疗方法的治疗效果. 结果 运用全椎板切除脊柱内固定治疗的实验组治疗效果评分、患者满意度评分、术后VAS评分、术后JOA评价优良率、椎间相对距离均明显优于对照组( P0.05 ). 结论 全椎板切除脊柱内固定术能够显著提高老年退行性腰椎管狭窄症患者的治疗效果,改善术后VAS、JOA评分,增加椎间距离,帮助患者彻底减压,还可维持老年退行性腰椎管狭窄症患者的脊柱稳定性,值得在临床上加以推广应用.

  4. Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection for Painful Spasticity in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    Bang, Hyun; Chun, Seong Min; Park, Hee Won; Bang, Moon Suk; Kim, Keewon

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old male with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). He could not maintain a standing position because of painful spasticity in his lower limbs. A magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography indicated chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy, explaining his chronic low back pain before the injury. For diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI) to the right L5 root was performed. After the intervention, the spast...

  5. Lumbar Disc Screening Using Back Pain Questionnaires: Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screening Questionnaire

    Kim, Do Yeon; Oh, Chang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyung Chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness of back pain questionnaires for lumbar disc screening among Korean young males. Methods We carried out a survey for lumbar disc screening through back pain questionnaires among the volunteers with or without back pain. Three types of back pain questionnaire (Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screeing Questionnaire) were randomly assigned to the examinees. The authors reviewed lumbar imaging studies (simple ...

  6. 39. Ultrastructural Changes of Neurons Located at Anterior Horn of Lumbar Spinal cord in Ethylene Oxide Exposed Mice

    2001-01-01

    Mice inhaled ethylene oxide at concentration of 360 mg/m3 for two hours a day, six days a week for 14 weeks. At the end of second and third month, the neurons located at anterior horn of lumbar spinal cord were observed under transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope with freeze etching. The results showed that the morphological changes in neuron cells became more obvious as the inhalation period prolonged. Following changes were observed : The distribution of integrating proteins in neuron membrane changed from normal stochastic into clustered one, the endoplasmic reticulum reduced in number and appeared as small vesicles, the ribosomes attached to the surface of rough endoplasmic reticulum were also decreased in number, arranged irregularly, disintegrated or even degranulated. The numher of mitochondria was also decreased. Observed aiso were the swelling of the axons of myelinated nerve fibers and loss of stratification of their myelin sheaths. The above results indicated that the ethylene oxide can induce structural changes in neuron cells, and this inevitably may cause functional abnormality of nervous system and manifestation of neurotoxic symptoms in ethylene oxide exposed individuals.

  7. Substance P immunoreactivity in the lumbar spinal cord of the turtle Trachemys dorbigni following peripheral nerve injury

    W.A. Partata

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoreactive substance P was investigated in turtle lumbar spinal cord after sciatic nerve transection. In control animals immunoreactive fibers were densest in synaptic field Ia, where the longest axons invaded synaptic field III. Positive neuronal bodies were identified in the lateral column of the dorsal horn and substance P immunoreactive varicosities were observed in the ventral horn, in close relationship with presumed motoneurons. Other varicosities appeared in the lateral and anterior funiculi. After axotomy, substance P immunoreactive fibers were reduced slightly on the side of the lesion, which was located in long fibers that invaded synaptic field III and in the varicosities of the lateral and anterior funiculus. The changes were observed at 7 days after axonal injury and persisted at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after the lesion. These findings show that turtles should be considered as a model to study the role of substance P in peripheral axonal injury, since the distribution and temporal changes of substance P were similar to those found in mammals.

  8. 运动行针法治疗急性腰扭伤65例%Treatment of 65 cases of acute lumbar sprain with active exercise and needle manipulation

    史丽英

    2010-01-01

    @@ Acute lumbar sprain is a common symptom in acupuncture and moxibustion department. It is acute laceration induced by over traction of soft tissues,such as lumbar muscle, fascia and ligament due to external exertions. Lumbar pain is typical in clinic.The pain is drastic, persistent, with fixed location and combined with limited motor function.

  9. 2-Octyl-cyanoacrylate for wound closure in cervical and lumbar spinal surgery

    Wachter, Dorothee; Brückel, Anja; Stein, Marco; Oertel, Matthias; Christophis, Petros; Böker, Dieter-Karsten

    2010-01-01

    It is claimed that wound closure with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate has the advantages that band-aids are not needed in the postoperative period, that the wound can get in contact with water and that removal of stitches is not required. This would substantially enhance patient comfort, especially in times of reduced in-hospital stays. Postoperative wound infection is a well-known complication in spinal surgery. The reported infection rates range between 0% and 12.7%. The question arises if the advant...

  10. Results of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis in patients aged 80 years or more. A retrospective study of thirty-four cases.

    Ishac, R; Alhayek, G; Fournier, D; Mercier, P; Guy, G

    1996-03-01

    As life expectancy increases and spinal imaging techniques improve, surgery is being increasingly viewed as a therapeutic alternative for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis in patients older than 80 years. Thirty-four patients (21 men and 13 women) who had surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis in our department between 1979 and 1994 were studied retrospectively. The most common initial symptoms were walking-related disorders (n = 29) and sciatica or femoral neuralgia (n = 34). All 34 patients underwent laminectomy at one or more levels. Ten patients also had a herniated disk. There were no deaths and only two patients had serious complications (persistent foot drop in one and left-sided hemiplegia in the other). Results were evaluated immediately after surgery and after three and 12 months. The overall result on pain and walking-related disorders was good in 53% of cases, acceptable in 32%, and poor in 15%. Our data suggest that surgery is a reasonable alternative in symptomatic elderly patients who are in good general health. Satisfactory results can be obtained although disabling complications can occur. PMID:8731237

  11. Transplantation of an Acutely Isolated Bone Marrow Fraction Repairs Demyelinated Adult Rat Spinal Cord Axons

    SASAKI, MASANORI; HONMOU, OSAMU; Akiyama, Yukinori; Uede,Teiji; Hashi,Kazuo; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    2001-01-01

    The potential of bone marrow cells to differentiate into myelin-forming cells and to repair the demyelinated rat spinal cord in vivo was studied using cell transplantation techniques. The dorsal funiculus of the spinal cord was demyelinated by x-irradiation treatment, followed by microinjection of ethidium bromide. Suspensions of a bone marrow cell fraction acutely isolated from femoral bones in LacZ transgenic mice were prepared by centrifugation on a density gradient (Ficoll-Paque) to remov...

  12. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature.

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin; Park, Moon Soo

    2015-10-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  13. Effects of acute exposure of heavy ion to spinal cord on the properties of motoneurons and muscle fibers in rats (the 3rd report)

    The effects of acute exposure of heavy ion on the properties of spinal motoneurons and their innervating muscle fibers were investigated. A 15, 20, 40, 50, or 70 Gy dose of heavy ion was applied to the lumbar 4th to 6th segments of the spinal cord in 8-week-old male rats. Both the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats were sacrificed one month after exposure to heavy ion. The number, cell body size, and oxidative enzyme activity of spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus and plantaris muscles were analyzed by a computer-assisted image processing system. In addition, cell size, oxidative enzyme activity, and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the soleus and plantaris muscles were analyzed. There were no differences in the number of spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus and plantaris muscles between the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats, irrespective of the dose level. On the other hand, cell body sizes were decreased and oxidative enzyme activities were disappeared in spinal motoneurons of the heavy-ion-exposed rats at the dose levels of 40, 50, and 70 Gy. There were no differences in the cell size, oxidative enzyme activity, or expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms of the soleus and plantaris muscles between the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats, irrespective of the dose level. It is concluded that more than 40 Gy dose of heavy ion affects the properties of spinal motoneurons, although there are no influences on the properties of muscle fibers which they innervate. (author)

  14. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation.

    Fuchs, M; Putzier, M; Pumberger, M; Hermann, K G; Diekhoff, T

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies. PMID:27270922

  15. Treatment of symptomatic lumbar spinal degenerative pathologies by means of combined conservative biochemical treatments.

    Alexandre, A; Corò, L; Paradiso, R; Dall'aglio, R; Alexandre, A M; Fraschini, F; Spaggiari, P G

    2011-01-01

    Research in spine surgery has proposed new soft and less invasive techniques. These are the results of our experience with oxygen-ozone therapy, which we could experiment within the Italian National Health System over 3 years. A total of 1,920 patients were admitted on the basis of unselected enrolment because of lumbosciatic pain. Patients were divided into three groups: (A) Patients with degenerative disc disease and arthropathy: 509 (26.5%), (B) Patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS): 1,027 (53.489%), and (C) Patients with pure herniated lumbar disc: 384 (20%). The rationale of the treatment for all these different pathologies we have taken into consideration is the biochemical mechanism by which they can engender pain and dysfunction. Treatment for group A: paravertebral injection and phleboclysis (two cycles of 6 sessions, one each 3 days) +endoscopic neurolysis. Treatment for group B: paravertebral injection and phleboclysis (two cycles of 6 sessions, one each 3 days) + endoscopic neurolysis with intradiscal procedure (named percutaneous peridurodiscolysis). Treatment for group C: paravertebral injection (two cycles of 6 sessions, one each 3 days) + percutaneous discolysis.The perceived quality of result for this minimally invasive procedure makes oxygen-ozone therapy an interesting weapon in the hands of doctors. Furthermore, if the technique loses its clinical effectiveness, it can be repeated without harm for the patient, and costs for the health organization are notably very low, above all if compared to surgical procedures.We underline the need that this treatment should be performed in protected structures, in operative rooms, under anesthesiologic control, and in the hands of specialists. PMID:21107949

  16. The use of PRV-Bartha to define premotor inputs to lumbar motoneurons in the neonatal spinal cord of the mouse.

    Ksenija Jovanovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neonatal mouse has become a model system for studying the locomotor function of the lumbar spinal cord. However, information about the synaptic connectivity within the governing neural network remains scarce. A neurotropic pseudorabies virus (PRV Bartha has been used to map neuronal connectivity in other parts of the nervous system, due to its ability to travel trans-neuronally. Its use in spinal circuits regulating locomotion has been limited and no study has defined the time course of labelling for neurons known to project monosynaptically to motoneurons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the ability of PRV Bartha, expressing green and/or red fluorescence, to label spinal neurons projecting monosynaptically to motoneurons of two principal hindlimb muscles, the tibialis anterior (TA and gastrocnemius (GC. As revealed by combined immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, 24-32 h after the viral muscle injection the label was restricted to the motoneuron pool while at 32-40 h the fluorescence was seen in interneurons throughout the medial and lateral ventral grey matter. Two classes of ipsilateral interneurons known to project monosynaptically to motoneurons (Renshaw cells and cells of origin of C-terminals were consistently labeled at 40 h post-injection but also a group in the ventral grey matter contralaterally. Our results suggest that the labeling of last order interneurons occurred 8-12 h after motoneuron labeling and we presume this is the time taken by the virus to cross one synapse, to travel retrogradely and to replicate in the labeled cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study establishes the time window for virally-labelling monosynaptic projections to lumbar motoneurons following viral injection into hindlimb muscles. Moreover, it provides a good foundation for intracellular targeting of the labeled neurons in future physiological studies and better understanding the functional organization of

  17. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Full Text Available ... a bony spur, or whether it’s a degenerative process that lumbar spinal stenosis, which is a very ... a little bit more. I mean with conservative management, people think about taking the non-steroidal anti- ...

  18. Different preoperative approaches for acute lumber spinal fractures

    Tian, Lu-Feng; Yuan, Yan-Sheng; Li, En-Hui; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To compare the long and short term effectiveness of different preoperative approaches for lumber spinal fractures and finds a better surgical method for the disease. Follow up records of 144 patients received hyperbaric oxygen therapy or methylprednisolone infusion within 8 hours after the lubmer spinal injury were analyzed. Postoperative outcome immediately and 3, 6, 12, 36 months after the surgery were compared to evaluate the effectiveness two different approaches. The results indicated th...

  19. Synchronous and asynchronous electrically evoked motor activities during wind-up stimulation are differentially modulated following an acute spinal transection

    Frigon, Alain; Hurteau, Marie-France; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C.J.; Telonio, Alessandro; Thibaudier, Yann

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used a novel technique to study reflex wind-up when the spinal cord is intact and following an acute spinal transection. Specifically, we evaluated reflex responses evoked by a series of 10 electrical pulses to the tibial or superficial peroneal nerves in 9 decerebrate adult cats, before and after an acute spinal transection. Electromyograms were recorded in four hindlimb muscles (lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, semitendinosus, and sartorius) to evaluate reflex amp...

  20. Axon diameter and myelin sheath thickness in nerve fibres of the ventral spinal root of the seventh lumbar nerve of the adult and developing cat.

    Berthold, C H; Nilsson, I; Rydmark, M

    1983-01-01

    The axon diameter (d) and the number of myelin sheath lamellae (nl) were estimated in electron micrographs of cross sectioned ventral spinal roots of the seventh lumbar nerve of adult cats, kittens and cat fetuses. Myelination started between the 40th and the 45th day after mating (about 3 weeks before birth). From birth onwards the calibre spectrum consisted of a group of small fibres and a group of large fibres. During the first two postnatal months the point distribution of the number of m...

  1. A non-linear finite element model of human L4-L5 lumbar spinal segment with three-dimensional solid element ligaments

    2011-01-01

    This paper establishes a non-linear finite element model (NFEM) of L4-L5 lumbar spinal segment with accurate three-dimensional solid ligaments and intervertebral disc. For the purpose, the intervertebral disc and surrounding ligaments are modeled with four-nodal three-dimensional tetrahedral elements with hyper-elastic material properties. Pure moment of 10 N·m without preload is applied to the upper vertebral body under the loading conditions of lateral bending, backward extension, torsion, and forward fle...

  2. Superion® InterSpinous Spacer for treatment of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: durable three-year results of a randomized controlled trial

    Patel VV

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vikas V Patel,1 Pierce D Nunley,2 Peter G Whang,3 Thomas R Haley,4 W Daniel Bradley,5 Raphael P Davis,6 Jon E Block,7 Fred H Geisler8 1The Spine Center, University of Colorado Hospital, Denver, CO, 2Spine Institute of Louisiana, Shreveport, LA, 3Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 4Performance Spine and Sports Physicians, PC, Pottstown, PA, 5Texas Back Institute, Denton, TX, 6Department of Neurological Surgery, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, 7Jon Block, Ph.D. San Francisco, CA, 8McLaren Hospital, Petoskey, MI, USA Purpose: This report provides the 3-year clinical outcomes from the randomized, controlled US Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trial of the Superion® for the treatment of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Patients and methods: The Superion® was evaluated in the treatment of subjects aged 45 years or older suffering from symptoms of intermittent neurogenic claudication, secondary to a confirmed diagnosis of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis at one or two contiguous levels from L1 to L5. Patients were treated between June 2008 and December 2011 at 31 investigational sites. Three hundred ninety-one subjects were included in the randomized study group consisting of 190 Superion® and 201 X-STOP® control subjects. The primary composite endpoint was individual patient success based on four components: improvement in two of three domains of the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, no reoperations at the index level, no major implant/procedure-related complications, and no clinically significant confounding treatments. Results: At 3 years, the proportion of subjects achieving the primary composite endpoint was greater for Superion® (63/120, 52.5% than for X-STOP® (49/129, 38.0% (P=0.023 and the corresponding success rates exceeded 80% for each of the individual components of the primary endpoint in the Superion® group

  3. Age-Related Loss of Lumbar Spinal Lordosis and Mobility – A Study of 323 Asymptomatic Volunteers

    Dreischarf, Marcel; Albiol, Laia; Rohlmann, Antonius; Pries, Esther; Bashkuev, Maxim; Zander, Thomas; Duda, Georg; Druschel, Claudia; Strube, Patrick; Putzier, Michael; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Background The understanding of the individual shape and mobility of the lumbar spine are key factors for the prevention and treatment of low back pain. The influence of age and sex on the total lumbar lordosis and the range of motion as well as on different lumbar sub-regions (lower, middle and upper lordosis) in asymptomatic subjects still merits discussion, since it is essential for patient-specific treatment and evidence-based distinction between painful degenerative pathologies and asymp...

  4. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

    Shearwood McClelland; Stefan S Kim

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot) concomitant wit...

  5. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  6. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    Wilmink, Jan T. [University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. Radiology

    2010-07-01

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  7. Multishot diffusion-weighted MR imaging features in acute trauma of spinal cord

    To analyse diffusion-weighted MRI of acute spinal cord trauma and evaluate its diagnostic value. Conventional MRI and multishot, navigator-corrected DWI were performed in 20 patients with acute spinal cord trauma using 1.5-T MR within 72 h after the onset of trauma. Twenty cases were classified into four categories according to the characteristics of DWI: (1) Oedema type: ten cases presented with variable hyperintense areas within the spinal cord. There were significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between lesions and unaffected regions (t = -7.621, P < 0.01). ADC values of lesions were markedly lower than those of normal areas. (2) Mixed type: six cases showed heterogeneously hyperintense areas due to a mixture of haemorrhage and oedema. (3) Haemorrhage type: two cases showed lesions as marked hypointensity due to intramedullary haemorrhage. (4) Compressed type (by epidural haemorrhage): one of the two cases showed an area of mild hyperintensity in the markedly compressed cord due to epidural haematoma. Muti-shot DWI of the spinal cord can help visualise and evaluate the injured spinal cord in the early stage, especially in distinguishing the cytotoxic oedema from vasogenic oedema. It can assist in detecting intramedullary haemorrhage and may have a potential role in the evaluation of compressed spinal cord. (orig.)

  8. Third-Degree Hindpaw Burn Injury Induced Apoptosis of Lumbar Spinal Cord Ventral Horn Motor Neurons and Sciatic Nerve and Muscle Atrophy in Rats

    Sheng-Hua Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Severe burns result in hypercatabolic state and concomitant muscle atrophy that persists for several months, thereby limiting patient recovery. However, the effects of burns on the corresponding spinal dermatome remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether burns induce apoptosis of spinal cord ventral horn motor neurons (VHMNs and consequently cause skeletal muscle wasting. Methods. Third-degree hindpaw burn injury with 1% total body surface area (TBSA rats were euthanized 4 and 8 weeks after burn injury. The apoptosis profiles in the ventral horns of the lumbar spinal cords, sciatic nerves, and gastrocnemius muscles were examined. The Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve were marked with S100. The gastrocnemius muscles were harvested to measure the denervation atrophy. Result. The VHMNs apoptosis in the spinal cord was observed after inducing third-degree burns in the hindpaw. The S100 and TUNEL double-positive cells in the sciatic nerve increased significantly after the burn injury. Gastrocnemius muscle apoptosis and denervation atrophy area increased significantly after the burn injury. Conclusion. Local hindpaw burn induces apoptosis in VHMNs and Schwann cells in sciatic nerve, which causes corresponding gastrocnemius muscle denervation atrophy. Our results provided an animal model to evaluate burn-induced muscle wasting, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Different preoperative approaches for acute lumber spinal fractures.

    Tian, Lu-Feng; Yuan, Yan-Sheng; Li, En-Hui; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To compare the long and short term effectiveness of different preoperative approaches for lumber spinal fractures and finds a better surgical method for the disease. Follow up records of 144 patients received hyperbaric oxygen therapy or methylprednisolone infusion within 8 hours after the lubmer spinal injury were analyzed. Postoperative outcome immediately and 3, 6, 12, 36 months after the surgery were compared to evaluate the effectiveness two different approaches. The results indicated that there are no significant differences regarding age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) score as well as Frankel scores before the surgery, and significant differences VAS score as well as Frankel scores immediately after the surgery. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy within 8 hours after the injury can be more effective than methylprednisolone infusion in patients with lumber spinal injury. PMID:26309686

  10. Treatment of Acute Tuberculous Spondylitis by the Spinal Shortening Osteotomy: A Technical Notes and Case Illustrations

    Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Chanplakorn, Niramol; Kraiwattanapong, Chaiwat; Laohacharoensombat, Wichien

    2011-01-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis is necessary in particular cases that a large amount of necrotic tissue is encountered and there is spinal cord compression. A spinal shortening osteotomy procedure has previously been described for the correction of the sagittal balance in a late kyphotic deformity, but there have been no reports on this as a surgical treatment in the acute stage. Thus, the aim of this report is to present the surgical techniques and clinical results of 3 patients who were treated with this procedure. Three patients with tuberculous spondylitis at the thoracic spine were surgically treated with this procedure. All the patients presented with severe progressive back pain, kyphotic deformity and neurological deficit. The patients recovered uneventfully from surgery without further neurological deterioration. Their pain was improved and the patients remained free of pain during the follow-up period. In conclusion, posterior spinal shortening osteotomy is an alternative method for the management of tuberculous spondylitis. PMID:22164318