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Sample records for activity programme establishing

  1. Instrumental neutron activation analysis as an analytical tool supporting the establishment of guidelines and databases for workers' health awareness programmes

    dangerous diseases that are easily identified. The main problem is that the majority of workers are exposed to low levels of toxic chemicals that can be lethal in the long term, owing to chronic diseases. Most often the onset of the diseases goes unnoticed, and the presence of a lung cancer or heart disease is attributed to non-occupational causes. As a result, these cases of illness do not become part of the compiled data. Besides, there is no specialized and complete literature concerning occupational aetiology, nor is there an evaluation of the onset of disease linked to long term exposure to low levels of toxic agents. With the aim of giving support to the Workers' Health Awareness Programme of the Secretaria Municipal de Saude (Municipal Department of Health) of Belo Horizonte, capital of Minas Gerais state, an assessment was done in galvanizing factories by means of airborne particulate matter collected in air filters and in hair and toenails as biomonitors. This project was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, COEP-UFMG. All research involving human beings has to be submitted to this committee in order to protect the population studied. The k0 instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) technique was chosen to be applied for the determination of elements in air filters and in hair and toenail samples, as it can determine several elements in the same sample almost simultaneously, with a low detection limit and without any chemical procedure as is required in the majority of non-nuclear techniques, and also because it requires only a small amount of sample for the analysis. The k0 method was applied to all samples, demonstrating its quality as a versatile technique, and it was confirmed to be one of the most advantageous and suitable nuclear analytical techniques

  2. Referral from primary care to a physical activity programme: establishing long-term adherence? A randomized controlled trial. Rationale and study design

    Puig-Ribera Anna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Declining physical activity is associated with a rising burden of global disease. There is little evidence about effective ways to increase adherence to physical activity. Therefore, interventions are needed that produce sustained increases in adherence to physical activity and are cost-effective. The purpose is to assess the effectiveness of a primary care physical activity intervention in increasing adherence to physical activity in the general population seen in primary care. Method and design Randomized controlled trial with systematic random sampling. A total of 424 subjects of both sexes will participate; all will be over the age of 18 with a low level of physical activity (according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, IPAQ, self-employed and from 9 Primary Healthcare Centres (PHC. They will volunteer to participate in a physical activity programme during 3 months (24 sessions; 2 sessions a week, 60 minutes per session. Participants from each PHC will be randomly allocated to an intervention (IG and control group (CG. The following parameters will be assessed pre and post intervention in both groups: (1 health-related quality of life (SF-12, (2 physical activity stage of change (Prochaska's stages of change, (3 level of physical activity (IPAQ-short version, (4 change in perception of health (vignettes from the Cooperative World Organization of National Colleges, Academies, and Academic Associations of Family Physicians, COOP/WONCA, (5 level of social support for the physical activity practice (Social Support for Physical Activity Scale, SSPAS, and (6 control based on analysis (HDL, LDL and glycated haemoglobin. Participants' frequency of visits to the PHC will be registered over the six months before and after the programme. There will be a follow up in a face to face interview three, six and twelve months after the programme, with the reduced version of IPAQ, SF-12, SSPAS, and Prochaska's stages

  3. Establishing the quality assurance programme for a nuclear power plant project

    This Safety Guide provides requirements, recommendations and illustrative examples for establishing the overall quality assurance programme, and its constituent programmes, for a nuclear power plant project. It also provides guidance on the planning and documenting of programme plans and actions that are intended to ensure the achievement of the appropriate quality throughout the design, procurement, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. The provisions of this Safety Guide are applicable to all organizations performing activities affecting the quality of items important to safety, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, manufacturing, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling, modifying and decommissioning

  4. Establishing a Professional Identity via Mentoring in Design Programmes

    Bennyson, René; Hansen, Birgitte Kjølner; Blond, Malene

    2016-01-01

    student’s job entry in the industry as opposed to professional mentoring within the industry where professionals mentor professionals for career development In conclusion this article is seeking to present an example of how a student becomes aware of a professional identity by being a legitimate......The use of a mentor mentee relation in the course of a not well known design programme in Bachelor of Applied Science will strengthen the establishment of the student’s professional identity, with the overall purpose of the student positioning themselves as a professional. The relation to the...... mentor is made through regular meetings where the mentee gradually positions himself professionally. This research addresses the student perspective and the students’ transition to become a part of the profession and to position themselves as professionals. The focus in this research is to facilitate the...

  5. Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) Programme - 12397

    Waste material from the reprocessing of irradiated fuel has been stored under water for several decades leading to the water becoming highly radioactive. As a critical enabler to the decommissioning strategy for the Sellafield site, the Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) programme has been established to provide a processing route for this highly radioactive liquor. This paper reviews the progress that has been made since the start of routine LAR transfer cycles (July 2010) and follows on from the earlier paper presented at WM2011. The paper focuses on the learning from the first full year of routine LAR transfer cycles and the application of this learning to the wider strategies for the treatment of further radioactive liquid effluents on the Sellafield site. During this period over 100,000 Curies of radioactivity has been safely removed and treated. The past year has witnessed the very successful introduction of the LAR programme. This has lead to hazard reduction at MSSS and demonstration that the SIXEP facility can meet the significantly increased challenge that the LAR programme represents. Part of the success has been the ability to predict and deliver a realistic production schedule with the availability of the MSSS, EDT and SIXEP facilities being central to this. Most importantly, the LAR programme has been successful in bringing together key stakeholders to deliver this work while integrating with the existing, day to day, demands of the Sellafield site. (authors)

  6. Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) Programme - 12397

    Pether, Colin; Carrol, Phil; Birkett, Eddie; Kibble, Matthew [Sellafield Ltd, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Waste material from the reprocessing of irradiated fuel has been stored under water for several decades leading to the water becoming highly radioactive. As a critical enabler to the decommissioning strategy for the Sellafield site, the Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) programme has been established to provide a processing route for this highly radioactive liquor. This paper reviews the progress that has been made since the start of routine LAR transfer cycles (July 2010) and follows on from the earlier paper presented at WM2011. The paper focuses on the learning from the first full year of routine LAR transfer cycles and the application of this learning to the wider strategies for the treatment of further radioactive liquid effluents on the Sellafield site. During this period over 100,000 Curies of radioactivity has been safely removed and treated. The past year has witnessed the very successful introduction of the LAR programme. This has lead to hazard reduction at MSSS and demonstration that the SIXEP facility can meet the significantly increased challenge that the LAR programme represents. Part of the success has been the ability to predict and deliver a realistic production schedule with the availability of the MSSS, EDT and SIXEP facilities being central to this. Most importantly, the LAR programme has been successful in bringing together key stakeholders to deliver this work while integrating with the existing, day to day, demands of the Sellafield site. (authors)

  7. Present activities of the Danube environmental Programme

    The international character of the Danube river basin reflects among other aspects also the importance and the need of international co-operation at various levels. The response of this need has been expressed by the formation of different international commissions and organisations in the basin, covering mainly technical but in the recent time also the environmental interests of the riparian states. The Danube countries, several G-24 governments, as well as international and non governmental organisations decided in the autumn of 1991 to start the Environmental Programme for the Danube River Basin (EPDRB) and form the Danube Task Force. A joint Programme work plan was agreed by the Task Force in February 1992, thereby launching a series of priority projects designed to built environmental co-operation among the Danube countries. The main objective was to establish an operational basis for strategic and integrated management of the Danube river basin environment. The planning and working documents, which were outlining the activities within the EPDRB are the Strategic Action Plan (SAP-1994) and the Strategic Action Plan Implementation Programme (SIP-1996). These documents frame the works of the 13 Tasks of the Applied Research Programme, Sub-Groups of the Accident Emergency Warning System, Monitoring, Laboratories and Information Management and Data Management as well as the major areas of work, divided in Groups and Clusters, each of which will involve projects to be carried out in a number of Danube countries. All activities are oriented to the improvement of the environment, however special attention is paid to task dealing with biodiversity, wetlands restoration, water and soil protection. The main funding, which is secured until the year 2000 comes from the Danube countries, the EU Phare and Tacis programmes, the UN GEF, international banks and foundations. (author)

  8. Establishment of radiation protection and safety programme in Nuclear Medicine

    Radiation is useful because of its ability to penetrate tissue, allowing imaging of internal structures. However radiation may produce harmful biological effects. Observations of exposed human populations and animal experimentation indicate that exposure to low levels of radiation over a period of time may lead to stochastic radiation effects. Exposures to high levels of radiation above threshold also leads to deterministic effects. Establishment of radiation protection and safety programme and implement it without fail may help prevent deterministic effect and limit chances of stochastic effects. This is achieved by assigning responsibilities to the proposed organizational structure, management commitment to safety culture by providing continuous education and training to employees, regular reviewing and auditing of radiation safety policies. Occupational, public and environmental radiation exposure is further achieved by implementation of set local rules and operational procedures, proper management of radioactive waste and safe transport of radioactive material. Medical radiation exposure is achieved by justified procedures, optimization of doses, guidance levels, quality assurance and quality control programme through image quality, radiopharmaceutical quality and records keeping of radiation doses, calibration certificates of equipment used, equipment service and test certificates. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals must deliver the minimum possible radiation dose to the patient while therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals must deliver the maximum dose to the target organ or tissue, while minimizing the dose to non-target tissues such as the bone marrow. Special considerations shall be given to pregnant and breast-feeding patients. The proper facility design and shielding of a nuclear medicine facility shall further provide for the radiation protection to the worker, the patient, public and the environment. Precautions should be given to radioactive patients as there

  9. Preliminary measurements of the establishment of a quality control programme for the activimeter calibration reference system

    The nuclear medicine techniques efficiency and safety depends on, beside other factors, a quality control programme, mainly regards to the nuclides activimeter utilization. The Calibration Laboratory of IPEN uses as a work standard, a tertiary standard system Capintec, calibrated at the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory of the Medical radiation Research Center - University of Wisconsin. In this work, as preliminary measurements to establish a quality control programme for the activimeter calibration procedures, initially the repeatability and reproducibility (long term stability) tests were performed using a sealed check source of 133Ba. Later on, to complete this quality control programme other check sources (137Cs, 57Co, 60Co) will be used to perform the same tests. A series of 80 experiments of 10 measurements each has been carried out. The reference system showed a good behaviour to the repeatability test, considering the tolerance limits of 5%. The percent deviations of all tested sources in the activity measurements were lower 1% to 133Ba. (author)

  10. Graduate nuclear engineering programmes motivate educational and research activities

    Some fifteen years ago the University of Ljubljana, Faculty for Mathematics and Physics together with the national research organisation the J. Stefan jointly established a Graduate programme of Nuclear Engineering. From the onset, the programme focused on nuclear technology, nuclear safety, and reactor physics and environment protection. Over the years this graduate programme has became the focal point of nuclear related, research and educational activities in Slovenia. It has grown into a meeting ground for recognised national and distinguished foreign educators and experienced professionals from the industry. In conjunction with an important national project, supported by the Slovenian government, entitled 'Jung Researcher' it also enhances the knowledge transfer to the next generation. Since the programme was introduced, the interest for this programme has been steadily growing. Accordingly, a number of PhD and MS degrees in NE have been awarded. The graduates of this programme have encountered very good job opportunities in nuclear as well as in non-nuclear sector. (author)

  11. Procedures for establishing defensible programmes for assessing practice performance.

    Lew, Stephen R; Page, Gordon G; Schuwirth, Lambert W T; Baron-Maldonado, Margarita; Lescop, Joelle M J; Paget, Neil S; J Southgate, Lesley; Wade, Winifred B

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of the performance of doctors in practice is becoming more widely accepted. While there are many potential purposes for such assessments, sometimes the consequences of the assessments will be 'high stakes'. In these circumstances, any of the many elements of the assessment programme may potentially be challenged. These assessment programmes therefore need to be robust, fair and defensible, taken from the perspectives of consumer, assessee and assessor. In order to inform the design of defensible programmes for assessing practice performance, a group of education researchers at the 10th Cambridge Conference adopted a project management approach to designing practice performance assessment programmes. This paper describes issues to consider in the articulation of the purposes and outcomes of the assessment, planning the programme, the administrative processes involved, including communication and preparation of assessees. Examples of key questions to be answered are provided, but further work is needed to test validity. PMID:12390461

  12. Establishing a pharmacotherapy induced ototoxicity programme within a service-learning approach.

    Schellack, Natalie; Wium, Anna M; Ehlert, Katerina; van Aswegen, Yolande; Gous, Andries

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy-induced ototoxicity is growing, especially in developing countries such as South Africa. This highlights the importance of ototoxicity monitoring and management of hearing loss. This article focuses on the establishment of an ototoxicity clinic as a site for the implementation of a service-learning module in the Audiology programme. The clinic offers a unique opportunity of collaboration between pharmacists and an audiologist where pharmacotherapy-induced ototoxicity is uniquely monitored. The Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University (SMU) provides training to both the disciplines, audiology and pharmacy. The main aim of this article is to describe how ototoxicity monitoring is implemented in the curriculum within such an academic service-learning approach. Through service learning students develop a deeper understanding of course content, acquire new knowledge and engage in civic activity. It simultaneously provides a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration between the disciplines of audiology and pharmacy. The objectives for this programme are therefore to facilitate learning and to provide a service to the local community by identifying, preventing and monitoring medicine-induced hearing loss in in-hospital and out-patients; as well as to establish inter-disciplinary collaboration between the disciplines and stakeholders for more effective service delivery. The constant interdisciplinary teamwork between the audiologist, pharmacist, physician and nursing staff in the wards results in best practice and management of patients with ototoxic damage. PMID:26304216

  13. Establishing a pharmacotherapy induced ototoxicity programme within a service-learning approach

    Natalie Schellack

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacotherapy-induced ototoxicity is growing, especially in developing countries such as South Africa. This highlights the importance of ototoxicity monitoring and management of hearing loss. This article focuses on the establishment of an ototoxicity clinic as a site for the implementation of a service-learning module in the Audiology programme. The clinic offers a unique opportunity of collaboration between pharmacists and an audiologist where pharmacotherapy-induced ototoxicity is uniquely monitored. The Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University (SMU provides training to both the disciplines audiology and pharmacy. The main aim of this article is to describe how ototoxicity monitoring is implemented in the curriculum within such an academic service-learning approach. Through service learning students develop a deeper understanding of course content, acquire new knowledge and engage in civic activity. It simultaneously provides a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration between the disciplines of audiology and pharmacy. The objectives for this programme are therefore to facilitate learning and to provide a service to the local community by identifying, preventing and monitoring medicine-induced hearing loss in in-hospital and out-patients; as well as to establish inter-disciplinary collaboration between the disciplines and stakeholders for more effective service delivery. The constant interdisciplinary teamwork between the audiologist, pharmacist, physician and nursing staff in the wards results in best practice and management of patients with ototoxic damage.

  14. Establishing a method to support academic and professional competence throughout an undergraduate radiography programme

    Ng, Curtise K.C. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: or.curtis@polyu.edu.hk; White, Peter [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: htpwhite@polyu.edu.hk; McKay, Janice C. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: htjanmck@polyu.edu.hk

    2008-08-15

    Purpose: Radiography degree programmes are coming under increasing pressure from the community to ensure that graduates have not only the necessary academic development but also the practice-based skills. This study aims to establish a method of monitoring students' progress towards, and ability to meet, academic and professional competences throughout a radiography programme. Methods: Questionnaires were designed for students and academic staff to determine the stages and standards of progress of competence development, and to inform the review process of the current assessment tools throughout the programme. A literature search identified the appropriate pedagogy as a basis for devising the method. Another questionnaire was distributed to overseas radiography institutions to gain insights into other assessment practices to validate the framework. Results and discussion: It was established that years of study rather than semester periods were appropriate to allow students to meet the standards. Discrepancies were noted in the expectations between academic staff (higher expectations) and students (more realistic) in terms of the pace of development expected. As students progress at different rates, and do not experience the same clinical exposure, their ability to meet expectations may differ and so both sets of expectations were combined as a range of criteria. A multi-dimensional assessment approach should be adequate to gauge students' progress but time and resource effectiveness has not yet been addressed. The portfolio was identified as the pedagogy capable of integrating all the competence assessment tools, linked by reflective writing, to gather individual outcomes into a whole, and form a holistic framework. Outcome: The portfolio framework will initially run as a voluntary activity and standards of progress corresponding to the students' stages will be delivered to participants in advance. Participants will be required to select materials

  15. Establishing a method to support academic and professional competence throughout an undergraduate radiography programme

    Purpose: Radiography degree programmes are coming under increasing pressure from the community to ensure that graduates have not only the necessary academic development but also the practice-based skills. This study aims to establish a method of monitoring students' progress towards, and ability to meet, academic and professional competences throughout a radiography programme. Methods: Questionnaires were designed for students and academic staff to determine the stages and standards of progress of competence development, and to inform the review process of the current assessment tools throughout the programme. A literature search identified the appropriate pedagogy as a basis for devising the method. Another questionnaire was distributed to overseas radiography institutions to gain insights into other assessment practices to validate the framework. Results and discussion: It was established that years of study rather than semester periods were appropriate to allow students to meet the standards. Discrepancies were noted in the expectations between academic staff (higher expectations) and students (more realistic) in terms of the pace of development expected. As students progress at different rates, and do not experience the same clinical exposure, their ability to meet expectations may differ and so both sets of expectations were combined as a range of criteria. A multi-dimensional assessment approach should be adequate to gauge students' progress but time and resource effectiveness has not yet been addressed. The portfolio was identified as the pedagogy capable of integrating all the competence assessment tools, linked by reflective writing, to gather individual outcomes into a whole, and form a holistic framework. Outcome: The portfolio framework will initially run as a voluntary activity and standards of progress corresponding to the students' stages will be delivered to participants in advance. Participants will be required to select materials and reflect on

  16. Inspection of licensee - Maintenance programme and activities

    An effective maintenance programme is critical to sustained safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) concluded that when a licensee has an effective maintenance programme, the overall operating safety of the plant is improved and the protection of public health and safety enhanced. All Regulatory Bodies (RB) consider maintenance to be an important area for oversight. Although a variety of inspection practices are being used; RB are actively monitoring licensee performance. Specifically the following conclusions were reached and commendable practices identified: - Maintenance oversight by regulators appears to be in a stable continuous improvement state. Most regulators are executing inspection oversight based on an existing regulatory framework. - The performance of a licensee's maintenance programme is recognized as important part of maintaining nuclear safety. The result of the maintenance program assessment is included in the overall performance assessment of a license. - Maintenance inspection activities are recognized as an important part of the regulatory oversight process. Inspection activities are based on the safety significance and nature of work being performed by the licensee. - The effectiveness of the maintenance inspection activities is recognized to rely on properly qualified inspectors; who are adequately supported by specialists. Training and qualification of inspectors should be based on how the RB reviews and inspects licensee maintenance programmes. - Reporting requirements are identified to provide information on the licensees maintenance programme, and to help guide inspection activities. - Performance Indicators are recognized as a useful tool for helping focus regulatory activities. Basic PI are identified and tracked by the RB, and use of PI by the licensee is monitored. - Inspections are designed to confirm that the licensee is planning and scheduling maintenance with due

  17. Microarray of programmable electrochemically active elements

    S. McCaskill, John; Maeke, Thomas; Straczek, Lukas; Oehm, Jürgen; Funke, Dominic; Mayr, Pierre; Sharma, Abhishek; Müller, Asbjørn; Tangen, Uwe; H. Packard, Norman; Rasmussen, Steen

    This paper describes possible applications of a two dimensional array of programmable electrochemically active elements to Alife. The array has been developed as part of the MICREA-gents project, and after several design phases, is now a mature enough device for general use beyond the project. He...

  18. Establishing the Safety Infrastructure for a Nuclear Power Programme. Specific Safety Guide (Russian Edition)

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on the establishment of a national nuclear safety infrastructure as a key component of the overall preparations required for emerging nuclear power programmes. It provides recommendations, presented in the form of 200 sequential actions, on meeting the applicable IAEA safety requirements during the first three phases of the development of a nuclear power programme. It is intended for use by persons or organizations participating in the preparation and implementation of a nuclear power programme, including government officials and legislative bodies, regulatory bodies, operating organizations and external support entities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Implementing general IAEA safety requirements for establishment of the safety infrastructure; 3. Implementing the specific IAEA safety requirements for establishment of the safety infrastructure; Appendix: Overview of actions to be taken in each phase for establishment of the safety infrastructure

  19. Diversity Programme Activity Report 2012-2015

    Guinot, Genevieve; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2016-01-01

    CERN’s Diversity programme was launched in 2012 and is now firmly established as one of the pillars of the Organization’s Human Resources strategy. This report provides information on the actions undertaken in pursuit of the seven diversity strategic objectives set for the period from 2012 to 2015 in the priority areas identified for actions of recruitment, career development and work environment. The report highlights the progress made in anchoring the diversity principles in policies, procedures and practices within the Organization, as well as the persistent difficulties for the Organization to improve the representation of some nationalities and to attract female applicants in science and engineering. It shows a constant increase of female representation in managerial positions and encouraging results in building a diverse talent pool of scientists and engineers through the various student and graduate programmes. The report also outlines how the Diversity Office contributed through several actions,...

  20. The European Commission Cooperative Support Programme: Activities and Cooperation

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) bases its technical and scientific programme on voluntary contributions from Member States, constituting the Member States Support Programme (MSSP). The European Commission Cooperative Support Programme (EC-SP) started in 1981 to support IAEA activities in the field of nuclear safeguards. Since its beginning, the EC-SP has been operated by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in close collaboration and coordination with the European Commission's Directorate General for Energy-Directorate Nuclear Safeguards implementing the Euratom treaty. EC-SP tasks provide technology and expertise in technical areas related to the effective implementation of safeguards verification measures including the detection of undeclared materials, activities, and facilities. The EC-SP fosters cooperation with Support Programmes from European Union Member States, as well as with non-EU states with which the European Commission has specific research and development agreements, e.g., the United States Department of Energy, ABACC. Information on the research and development activities under these frameworks is shared with the IAEA and complements core EC-SP work. The paper describes the EC-SP, its modus operandi, collaborations, and main activities, namely, (a) the specific R&D work as part of tasks with well-defined milestones and deadlines, (b) training activities; (c) the technical support in establishing Safeguards guidelines and approaches and (d) the technical consultancy support to IAEA meetings and expert groups. (author)

  1. Establishment of a national programme for QC of nuclear medicine instruments in Cuba

    Full text: A national programme for the quality control of nuclear medicine instruments has been organized and established. It is the result of a multi-institutional project during three years. The work was participated in by an expert group of experienced medical physicists working in the nuclear medicine field: from the national regulatory authorities, research centers, hospitals, and other local institutions. The programme for the quality control of nuclear medicine instruments included the following aspects: implementation of national protocols and regulations according to the local conditions and resources, education and training, organization and implementation of a phantom bank, evaluation of the current state of the nuclear medicine instruments, and establishment and registration of an audit service to be performed annually by the national regulatory authority. It created the document 'National protocols for quality control of nuclear medicine instruments'. The objective of this workbook was to propose standardized and homogeneous quality control procedures, taking into account the technical features of the local instrumentation and availability of complementary resources (phantoms, sources, etc). These protocols are mainly based on international publications such as the IAEA-TECDOC-602, the NEMA standards, etc. The document contains 84 pages, and includes topics related to the quality control of gamma cameras, SPECT systems, whole body systems, directional detectors, etc. Descriptions of the proposed tests such as the objectives, materials, procedures, periodicity, range of normal values and other information, are included. This document was evaluated and approved by the Cuban authorities (CCEEM) to be used as the basic protocol for the quality control of local nuclear medicine instruments. A national course about quality control of nuclear medicine instruments was organized and established. It was mainly addressed to educate and train the responsible

  2. Technical Support Activities of a Nuclear Materials Management Programme

    The development of a nuclear materials management programme in the United States of America has recognized from its inception the value and need of strong technical support. The success of that programme has depended to a large extent on the development of a closely allied technical support effort. This effort has drawn on the technical competency of top governmental, industrial and academic consultants, in addition to that within the USAEC. Under the planning, development and administration of the USAEC's Division of Nuclear Materials Management, a broad spectrum of technical activities has evolved. These include: (a) The establishment of an Advisory Committee for Standard Reference Materials and Methods of Measurement, (b) Preparation and USAEC co-ordination with the National Bureau of Standards in the development of a series of uranium and plutonium chemical and isotopic standards, (c) Research and development programmes designed to provide improved measurement techniques, (d) Compilation and publication of a book of selected measurement methods for uranium and plutonium. Each of these technical support activities is discussed in some detail, including the conditions that gave rise to their need and development, and their application to the USAEC's nuclear materials management programme. Included is a discussion of the USAEC's Advisory Committee for Standard Reference Materials and Methods of Measurement, which was established to provide guidance to the nuclear materials management programme and recommend research and development activities. Resulting from these recommendations was a USAEC co-operative effort with the National Bureau of Standards for the development of chemical and isotopic standard reference materials of uranium and plutonium; particular attention is devoted to the results of that joint effort. The need for research and development efforts in areas of mutual interest is examined, and the cooperation of other nations of the world is elicited in

  3. Establishing the Nuclear Security Infrastructure for a Nuclear Power Programme. Implementing Guide

    This publication provides guidance on the actions that should be taken by a State to implement an effective nuclear security infrastructure for a nuclear power programme. The topics covered are: development of national policy and strategy; common nuclear security measures; infrastructure issues relating to nuclear and other radioactive material, associated facilities and cooperation with other States. The guidance provided is intended primarily for use by national policy makers, national legislators, competent authorities, institutions and individuals that are involved in the establishment, implementation, maintenance or sustainability of the nuclear security infrastructure for a nuclear power programme.

  4. A study to analyze IAEA planning of 2004-2005 programme and to establish cooperation directions with the IAEA

    The objective of this study is to utilize the IAEA effectively through reflecting Korea's opinion fully for the planning of the Agency's 2004∼2005 Programme. This study first analyzed the current status of the IAEA Programme and Budget and reviewed the issues relevant to Korea. Second, this study assessed the IAEA 2004∼2005 Programme and drew up Korea's opinion for it. The official document including the opinions was submitted to the Secretariat. In reviewing the Programme, this study considered the strengths of Korea related to the Programme. Also some projects and CRPs, which can be lead by Korea, were proposed. The IAEA 2004∼2005 Programme reflected well the technical and social changes and its structure seems to be proper. The budget was proposed to be increased over 10%, violating the zero-real growth principle. This seems to be inevitable considering the increase of safeguards activities. However, there should be prepared some measures to avoid rapid increase of the burdens of the Member States. In the process of the planning of the IAEA 2004∼2005 Programme, the following points should be emphasized. First, SMR activities should be given a high priority considering the high interests of developing countries and be set up as a separate project as in the 2002∼2003 Programme. Second, more budget should be allocated for Project A.4.04(Support for demonstration of nuclear seawater desalination), considering the highest priority of the project in Program A. Third, it's better to change the title of Subprogram C.3 to 'Nuclear knowledge Preservation' to stick to the original rationale of the subprogram. There is a need for further activities such as establishing and implementing the concept of international nuclear school based on the result of the feasibility study done in 2002∼2003. Fourth, further activities needs to be added to the Project D.2.03 for the efficient conversion to high density, low enriched uranium in Member States; for instance, review

  5. Food Service Establishment Inspections: Beginning 2005 (ACTIVE)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This data includes the name and location of active food service establishments and the violations that were found at the time of the inspection. Active food service...

  6. Establishing a pharmacotherapy induced ototoxicity programme within a service-learning approach

    Natalie Schellack; Anna M. Wium; Katerina Ehlert; Yolande van Aswegen; Andries Gous

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy-induced ototoxicity is growing, especially in developing countries such as South Africa. This highlights the importance of ototoxicity monitoring and management of hearing loss. This article focuses on the establishment of an ototoxicity clinic as a site for the implementation of a service-learning module in the Audiology programme. The clinic offers a unique opportunity of collaboration between pharmacists and an audiologist where pharmacotherapy-induced ototoxicity is unique...

  7. Establishing an independent mobile health programme for chronic disease self-management support in Bolivia

    John D Piette

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile health (m-health work in low and middle-income countries (LMICs mainly consists of pilot programmes with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: 364 primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. 165 of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly Interactive Voice Response (IVR calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: 37% of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home, and 38% had six or fewer years of education. 82% had a mobile phone; half (45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR programme participants completed 1007 self-management support calls, with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health via IVR increased during programme participation, and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the programme, with 19/20 (95% reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusions: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programmes can be transferred from higher-resource centres to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among people

  8. Establishment of a quality audit programme for radiation therapy dosimetry in Algeria

    A quality audit programme for external radiotherapy was set up at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of Algeria. The programme was initiated in the framework of an IAEA coordinated research project. The first step of the programme was to set-up a recognized External Audit Group (EAG), comprising a radiation physicist from the SSDL, medical physicist and a radiation oncologist form the hospitals. The IAEA methodology using TLD 100 LiF powder was established. Capsules containing an amount of about 160 mg of LiF powder used as dosemeters, were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water by comparison with an ionization chamber whose calibration factor is traceable to the BIPM. The calibration curve was validated with irradiations performed by the IAEA, the radiotherapy centres of Leuven (Belgium) and IGR (France) and the primary standard dosimetry laboratory of NRC (Canada). The programme covered first Co-60 beams and was extended to include high-energy photon beams, at a later stage. For high energy photon beams, it was necessary to study the energy dependence of the LiF dosimeters, using the linear accelerators in the hospitals. Furthermore, a fading effect of the TLD 100 powder was studied. It was found that after 3 months, a TL signal decreases by 3%. An intercomparison with the reference centres cited above, and with two laboratories involved in similar programmes, was made for absorbed doses between 140 cGy to 280 cGy. The maximum deviation obtained was 2%, which is within the acceptance level of ±3.5%. In the present paper, the methodology followed by the EAG is presented and the results of the beam calibration checks performed from 1997 to 1999 are analysed

  9. Establishment of an X radiation equipment quality control programme using non invasive meters

    The objective of this work was to study the behavior of the mainly X ray equipment calibration laboratory of IPEN, operated in the range from 25 kV to 150 kV using a PTW non invasive meter, model DiavoltTM, and an ORTEC spectrometry system, model NOMAD-PLUS 92X, for the establishment of a quality control programme. The Diavolt meter was used for measurements of air kerma, peak voltage and practical peak voltage. The measurements were made varying parameters such as electrical current, X radiation quality for radiation diagnostic, angulations of the meter and its distance in relation to the focal spot of the X ray tube. The results were compared with data found in the literature. Several spectra were generated with the spectrometer system with the purpose of determine the peak voltage in function of the nominal voltage and to characterize the radiation qualities for radiation diagnostic previously determined. The established quality control programme enables the management of the appropriate functioning of the measurement instruments (ionization chambers, voltage and current meter and spectrometer) as well as of the X radiation system. This work also has proposed a time interval to run each one of the tests. (author)

  10. Issues related to a programme of activities under the CDM

    Ellis, J.

    2006-05-15

    need to be defined and clarified (such as what is meant by a programme of activities in the CDM context? How is it different from bundles of CDM projects? Does guidance on bundling also apply to PCDM? Is a programme of activities that is designed to implement a local/national/regional policy or standard eligible under the CDM?); (2) Guidance specific to PCDM may need to be established for some issues. For example, since the EB is examining new approaches to demonstrate additionality prior to COP/MOP2, it may wish to assess whether any future guidance on additionality should distinguish between PCDM and other CDM project activities. Other issues may also warrant guidance (or methodologies) specific to PCDM, such as crediting periods, determining baselines, ex ante definition (or not) of unique project locations.

  11. Costs and benefits of Danish active labour market programmes

    Jespersen, Svend; Munch, Jakob Roland; Skipper, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Since 1994, unemployed workers in the Danish labour market have participated in active labour market programmes on a large scale. This paper contributes with an assessment of costs and benefits of these programmes. Long-term treatment effects are estimated on a very detailed administrative dataset...

  12. Evidence required for establishing the absence of tsetse and trypanosomosis associated with tsetse eradication programmes

    This paper considers entomological and epidemiological criteria for establishing the absence of tsetse and trypanosomosis associated with tsetse eradication programmes. The sampling goal is simple - to maximise the probability of detecting tsetse flies in the field or trypanosomes in hosts, if they exist. Sampling strategies cannot guarantee the absence of tsetse and trypanosomes but they can be used to estimate the probability of their eradication. Because tsetse eradication programmes are targeted at defined areas, geographical information system (GIS) tools are very useful in guiding spatial sampling strategies. Two approaches to assess tsetse eradication are discussed. The first depends only on information on the sensitivity of tsetse trapping methods used. The second combines information on pre-eradication tsetse trapping and the proportion of time during which no tsetse have been trapped, assuming either a stable or declining (preferred) pre-eradication tsetse population. For establishing the absence of trypanosomosis in host populations, there are standard sampling techniques that can be adjusted for the sensitivity and specificity of the trypanosome detection methods used. Required sample sizes can be calculated for both direct trypanosome detection methods of 100% specificity or indirect tests with imperfect sensitivity and specificity. For the latter, both the sample size and the number of reactors (assumed to be false positive) are estimated for the required confidence level. These entomological and epidemiological methods were then applied to assess the eradication of tsetse and trypanosomosis from Unguja island of Zanzibar using the sterile insect technique (SIT). Pre- and post-eradication data collected were sufficient to establish with 95% confidence that both tsetse and trypanosomosis were eradicated. (author)

  13. RFID Key Establishment Against Active Adversaries

    Bringer, Julien; Cohen, Gérard; Kindarji, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to strengthen a very low cost solution for key agreement with a RFID device. Starting from a work which exploits the inherent noise on the communication link to establish a key by public discussion, we show how to protect this agreement against active adversaries. For that purpose, we unravel integrity $(I)$-codes suggested by Cagalj et al. No preliminary key distribution is required.

  14. Round one of the Adelaide and Meath Hospital/Trinity College Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme: programme report and analysis based on established international key performance indices.

    McNamara, D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men, after prostate cancer, and the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, after breast cancer. By 2020, the number of new cases diagnosed annually in Ireland is projected to have increased by 79% in men and 56% in women. Organised screening for CRC is already underway or is in the process of being rolled out in several European countries, either at a regional or national level. The Adelaide and Meath Hospital\\/ Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme (TTC-CRC-SP) is Ireland\\'s first pilot population based bowel screening programme. METHOD: Based on a biennial test model the pilot aimed to assess the accuracy of FIT and to evaluate the whole programme based on established international key performance indices. RESULTS: To date 9,993 individuals aged 50-74 years have been invited to participate in the TTC-CRC-SP with over 5,000 FIT\\'s analysed. Overall uptake was 51% and FIT positivity was 10%. The programme has undertaken over 400 screening colonoscopies and detected 154 precancerous adenomas and 38 cancerous lesions. CONCLUSIONS: The first round of The Adelaide and Meath Hospital Tallaght\\/Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme has been highly successful and confirmed that there is an advantage for FIT based two stage bowel cancer screening programmes.

  15. Mexican experience in the establishment of a national programme on nuclear science and technology

    Mexico started its first institutional programmes for the development of nuclear science and technology thirty years ago. In the light of the resources, both human and financial, invested in this effort, the results obtained so far can only be described as modest. Understandably, this is discouraging, perhaps even frustrating, particularly for the younger generations of specialists-to-be in the field of energy, for whom the nuclear area therefore seems unpromising. On the other hand, this same reflection invites a careful and realistic evaluation of the path followed so far, not just so as to criticize past deficiencies, but so as to learn from them and gain useful experience for the design and setting of future goals. The evolution of the nuclear sector in Mexico shares some of the most common characteristics and obstacles that define the history of national attempts to establish research programmes on nuclear science and technology, coloured, however, by the specific circumstances of the local environment. From the most recent analysis and evaluation of the projects being developed at the National Institute for Nuclear Research in 1984, hard lessons had to be learned; projects over ten years old lacked any serious planning or control and, worst of all, any link to national priorities. Besides presenting basic historical data on the development of nuclear R and D in Mexico from 1956 to the present, the paper presents the current scheme for evaluation, approval and control of R and D projects now oriented to satisfy the national needs of a country currently in its worst economic crisis since the second decade of this century. (author)

  16. The European Commission Cooperative Support Programme: Activities and Achievements

    Goncalves, Joao; ABOUSAHL Said; FRIGOLA PIERRE

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA bases its technical and scientific Programme on contributions from the Member State Support Programmes (MSSP). The European Commission Cooperative Support Programme (EC-SP) started in 1981 to support IAEA¿s activities in the field of nuclear safeguards. Since its beginning, the EC-SP has been operated by the European Commission¿s Joint Research Centre (JRC) and its institutes at Ispra-Italy, Geel-Belgium and Karlsruhe-Germany. The EC-SP tasks provide technology and expertise in many ...

  17. Halden IASCC programme activities for 1996

    This report describes two new investigations on IASCC, which begin in 1996. In one of the investigations (IFA 618) the initiation of cracks in pressurised tube specimens prepared from common structural component materials 304, 316 and 347 SS is being studied as function of stress level and fluence. In the second investigation (IFA 612) the benefits of hydrogen additions in suppressing crack growth also in materials with high accumulated fluence are addressed. Bellows loaded Compact Tension specimens, fabricated from irradiated 304 and 347 SS, and instrumented for in-pile crack growth monitoring are being used in the study. Also described are plans for the validation of miniaturised three point bend specimens which are expected to be used in the future test programme together with already qualified crack growth sensors and the evaluation of the electrochemical noise technique which is to be used in conjunction with pressurised tube specimens in crack initiation studies. (author)

  18. Approach for Establishment of an Ageing Management Programme for Thai Research Reactor-1/Modification 1 (TRR- 1/M1)

    Thai Research Reactor-1/Mod. 1 is a TRIGA Mark III reactor and has been in operation for more than 30 years. As the reactor has become older, ageing issues have been more prominent. Therefore, the ageing management programme of TRR-1/M1 is being systematically formulated to manage ageing issues. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the approach being taken for the establishment of the TRR-1/M1 programme. Essentially, the approach is based on the new IAEA Safety Guide SSG-10 Ageing Management for Research Reactors, which was published in 2010. The key to success for the approach is to develop the ageing management programme and then integrate it into the current quality assurance programme. The formulation of the ageing management programme takes into account both major ageing categories, i.e. physical ageing and non-physical ageing. The physical ageing management begins by screening the SSCs for ageing management review. The SSCs in the SR-A class (SSCs performing safety functions) and the SR-B class (SSCs not performing safety functions but safety relevant) are evaluated whether to be included in the ageing review routine. The ageing mechanisms of these SSCs are then thoroughly studied to better understand the ageing degradation processes. The examples of ageing mechanisms of these SSCs are fatigue, corrosion and erosion, stress corrosion cracking and irradiation effects. Due to the wide variety of disciplines involved in the evaluation, external experts in each specific field are sought for consultation. The results from the study are to be reviewed for improvement of practices used in operation, maintenance, inspection and testing. The programme will also identify the measures to be taken for detection, monitoring and analysis of ageing degradation trends. The measures will be formulated and included in the routine inspection, maintenance and testing programme. The current conditions of the SSCs are to be factored into the programme. In addition, mitigating

  19. Establishment of antimicrobial residue monitoring programme for food of animal origin in Sri Lanka

    Full text: Antibiotic drugs are often used both therapeutically and prophylactically in animal production, and are necessary for many production systems. However, the presence of unacceptable levels of antimicrobial residues in animal products may lead to direct effects on the consumer, such as allergies and toxicities such as dose-independent idiosyncratic reactions that can be triggered due to chloramphenicol residues. Indirect adverse reactions include the promotion of antimicrobial resistance. Further, the parent drugs and their metabolites of the nitrofuran group of antimicrobials are known to be carcinogens. In order to promote awareness on food safety and quality assurance, it is necessary to monitor antimicrobial residues in animal products. This can be done only by having well equipped laboratories and validated techniques. Sri Lanka, as an export country for cultured shrimp, needs to comply with EU regulations. The establishment of the residue monitoring programme in Sri Lanka was commenced in 2002 at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya. Three techniques have been established in Sri Lanka for monitoring antimicrobial residues in food of animal origin. The modified EU Six Plate Test (SPT) is a bioassay technique, which screens six groups of antimicrobials, namely; penicillin, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides (erythromycin), tetracycline and sulphonamides. Food commodities are screened for chloramphenicol residues using a commercially available ELISA kit (Euro Diagnostica, Netherlands), which is a microtiter plate, based competitive enzyme immunoassay. A HPLC-DAD technique has been established to detect nitrofuran metobolites in shrimp including the primary metobolites of furazolidone, furaltadone, nitrofurantoin and nitrofurazon. Since July 2002 a total of 1712 samples including 900 chicken samples and 812 shrimp samples were screened for antimicrobial residues using the SPT. Since November 2002

  20. Biennial activity report of Metallurgy Programme - 1985 and 1986

    The biennial activity report of the Metallurgy Programme of the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research covers the period of the years 1985 and 1986. Along with NDT, welding metallurgy, low cycle fatigue, creep and creep fatigue interactions, structure-property correlations, thermodynamics and corrosion metallurgy of alloy steels with respect to their compatibility with aqueous and liquid sodium environments continue to be the major thrust areas of the Programme. Some of the basic research contributions of the Programme are: the observation of uniform and homogeneous distribution of voids in cyclically deformed 304 SS, the role of grain boundaries and precipitation in dynamic strain ageing of 316 SS and the determination of the activities of component metals in 316 and 304 SS by metastable EMF method. (author)

  1. Research reactor activities in support of national nuclear programmes

    This report is the result of an IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Research Reactor Activities in Support of National Nuclear Programmes held in Budapest, Hungary during 10-13 December 1985. The countries represented were Belgium, Finland, France, Federal Republic of Germany, German Democratic Republic, India, Poland, Spain, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia and Hungary. The purpose of the meeting was to present information and details of several well-utilized research reactors and to discuss their contribution to national nuclear programmes. A related Agency activity, a Seminar on Applied Research and Service Activities for Research Reactor Operations was held in Copenhagen, Denmark during 9-13 September 1985. Selected papers from this Seminar relevant to the topic of research reactor support of national nuclear programmes have been included in this report. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 19 papers presented at the Technical Committee Meeting on Research Reactor Activities in Support of National Nuclear Programmes and for each of 15 papers selected from the presentations of the Seminar on Applied Research and Service Activities for Research Reactor Operations

  2. International programme to mitigate the health effects of the Chernobyl accident: Establishment of an international centre

    In April 1990, an agreement was signed between the WHO and the USSR Ministry of Health to set up a long-term international programme to assist the populations affected by the Chernobyl accident, as well as to increase the body of scientific knowledge about radiation effects. This report outlines the contents of the agreement and describes the action taken by the WHO to implement the programme

  3. Primer on CDM programme of activities

    Hinostroza, M. (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark)); Lescano, A.D. (A2G Carbon Partners (Peru)); Alvarez, J.M. (Ministerio del Ambiente del Peru (Peru)); Avendano, F.M. (EEA Fund Management Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    As an advanced modality introduced in 2005, the Programmatic CDM (POA) is expected to address asymmetries of participation, especially of very small-scale project activities in certain areas, key sectors and many countries with considerable potential for greenhouse gas emission reductions, not reached by the traditional single-project-based CDM. Latest experiences with POAs and the recently finalized official guidance governing the Programmatic CDM are the grassroots of this Primer, which has the purpose of supporting the fully understanding of rules and procedures of POAs by interpreting them and analyzing real POA cases. Professional and experts from the public and private entities have contributed to the development of this Primer, produced by the UNEP Risoe Centre, as part of knowledge support activities for the Capacity Development for the CDM (CD4CDM) project. The overall objective of the CD4CDM is to develop the capacities of host countries to identify, design, approve, finance, implement CDM projects and commercialize CERs in participating countries. The CDM4CDM is funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. (author)

  4. The Republic of Korea's R and D programme and activities for nuclear desalination

    Since, its introduction in the late 1970s, nuclear energy has been one of the major sources of energy required to support the ambitious and successful economic development and industrialization of the Republic of Korea. Naturally, a strong national desire to achieve self-reliance in nuclear energy technology has developed, and various integrated efforts have been pursued intensively in the domestic nuclear field. The long term national effort has resulted in the firm establishment of associated technologies. These technologies will be further advanced and improved through related R and D programmes and through application to various areas other than electricity generation. Among the various applications of nuclear energy technology, energy supply for sea water desalination has received much favourable attention. Fresh water shortage problems are occurring in certain regions of the country, some of which are expected to become more severe from around the year 2006 unless well planned countermeasures are taken. When combined, the firmly established nuclear energy technology and the desalination technology could be a promising solution to the expected water shortage problems. A feasibility survey on nuclear desalination was carried out, resulting in the establishment of a special R and D programme that started in November 1996. Major efforts are being concentrated on developing a 330 MW(th) co-generation reactor and associated systems to be used for the desalination of sea water for demonstration purposes. An integrated nuclear desalination system will also be developed. The programme will continue for 5 years, until the basic design and development are completed. A summary is given of the status and development programme for nuclear energy technology, the prospects for fresh water demand and supply, the desalination technology established in the Republic of Korea, the specific R and D programme for developing a 330 MW(th) nuclear co-generation reactor, and some

  5. How to Establish a Bioinformatics Postgraduate Degree Programme: A Case Study from South Africa

    Machanick, Philip; Bishop, Ozlem Tastan

    2014-01-01

    The Research Unit in Bioinformatics at Rhodes University (RUBi), South Africa offers a Masters of Science in Bioinformatics. Growing demand for Bioinformatics qualifications results in applications from across Africa. Courses aim to bridge gaps in the diverse backgrounds of students who range from biologists with no prior computing exposure to computer scientists with no biology background. The programme is evenly split between coursework and research, with diverse modules from a range of dep...

  6. Towards the establishment and standardization of a veterinary antimicrobial resistance surveillance and monitoring programme in South Africa

    H. Nel

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish a repeatable, standardized laboratory procedure for monitoring the development of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from animals and food of animal origin in South Africa, with reagents prepared in-house. The emergence of resistance and the spread of resistant bacteria can be limited by implementing a veterinary antimicrobial drug policy, in which inter alia systematic monitoring and prudent use play essential roles. The bacteria included in this study represented three different categories, namely zoonotic bacteria (Salmonella, indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium and veterinary pathogens (Mannheimia haemolytica. Thirty isolates of each species were collected with the aim of standardizing the laboratory methodology for a future national veterinary surveillance and monitoring programme. Susceptibility to ten selected antimicrobial drugs was determined by means of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs using the microdilution method. The method according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards was used as the standard. Multi-well plates containing varying dilutions of antimicrobial drugs and prepared in-house for MIC determinations, yielded repeatable results. Storage of plates for 2 months at -70 oC did not influence results meaningfully. Within this limited sample of bacteria, MIC results did not indicate meaningful resistance against any of the ten selected antimicrobial drugs. The findings of the study will be used to establish a national veterinary antimicrobial resistance surveillance and monitoring programme in South Africa. To allow for international comparison of data, harmonisation of the surveillance and monitoring programme in accordance with global trends is encouraged. Ideally it should be combined with a programme monitoring the quantities of antimicrobial drugs used. The aim is to contribute to slowing down

  7. Recent Activities on the Experimental Research Programme Using Small Tokamaks

    A new concept of interactive co-ordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is discussed in this paper. Besides the presentation of the recent activities on the experimental research programme using small tokamaks and scientific results achieved at the participating laboratories, information is provided about the organisation of the co-ordinated research project. Future plans of the co-ordinated activities within the CRP are discussed

  8. Present state and programme for establishing safety procedures for management of radioactive sources in Tunisia

    In Tunisia there is no research nor power reactor programme. All the equipment and sources of ionizing radiation are imported. In order to ensure the radiation protection and sources safety, a legal infrastructure and a regulatory authority have been implemented since 1981. The National Centre of Radiation Protection (CNRP) is entitled to authorize and inspect ionizing radiation practices and facilities. A guidelines book is available to provide the administrative and technical procedures concerning licenses and controls of sources. A central collection data related to equipment, users and intervening parties of ionizing radiation is available and updated. The review of the radiation safety programme leads us up to complete it by adoption of new regulation in relation to new recommendations of ICRP, radioactive transport and waste management. For the guarantee of safety prescriptions, a continuous training must be developed and culture of safety and radiological protection for the staff and the users must be introduced. The estimate of this safety infrastructure should be regular. (author)

  9. Establishing an Entrepreneurial Subject on the Territory of the Czech Republic and its Development Programme

    Šenkyřík, Michal

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give an overview about the possibilities of establishing a business entity in the Czech Republic. Summarizing the legal requirements, setting objectives and preparing a business plan. Further implementation of business plan into praxis by establishing a fictitious company.

  10. Quality control programme established in the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority Hospitals

    The Vancouver Coastal Health Authority (VCH) covers a large area of Southern British Columbia that includes 14 hospitals. Five of them have Nuclear Medicine (NM) departments with a total of 18 cameras of different ages and produced by different manufacturers. A flawless operation of these cameras is of paramount importance for the accuracy of diagnostic studies. Consequently, a comprehensive quality control (QC) programme has been designed to detect changes in their performance that might degrade the accuracy of clinical images. The most extensive testing is done at acceptance of the new equipment, simpler tests continue regularly throughout the whole period of camera operation. The tests are based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recommendations on how to perform QC experiments and how to analyse the results. The QC programme in all five NM departments follows the same principles. It is supervised by a 'regional' physicist. Initially, however, problems were encountered. At first, analysis of the QC data coming from these different cameras was seriously hindered by the lack or rigidity of the proprietary manufacturers' software. In particular, it was very difficult, if not impossible, to reliably compare the performance of different systems. An additional problem was caused by the large distances between hospital departments which made regular consultations by the physicist and test supervision difficult. In this paper, we present a practical solution to these problems and discuss our particular implementation of a QC programme that covers 18 cameras and unites five busy NM departments. To address the first problem and make the analysis of test results reliable and camera independent, we have developed a software application 'Nuclear Medicine QC' (NMQC) which implements the basic scintillation camera QC analyses and follows exactly the most recent NEMA standard. Our software allows multiple types of QC tests to be analysed within a single

  11. How Belgium helped establish a surveillance programme for Argentina's Atucha-2

    Collaboration between Belgian experts and Argentina on the commissioning of Argentine reactors helped overcome problems caused by delays with construction. Marc Scibetta, deputy manager for nuclear materials science, from the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN) gave an interview in which he told some facts to Lubomir Mitev of NucNet. The cooperation between SCK CEN an Argentina's Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) started in 2002. The first project was a support for the safety evaluation of the Atucha-1 reactor pressure vessel. When Argentina resumed the construction of Atucha-2 in 2006 - originally, construction started in 1981 but was suspended in 1985 due to financial reasons -, SCK CEN was asked to develop and implement a surveillance programme for the unit.

  12. How Belgium helped establish a surveillance programme for Argentina's Atucha-2

    Mitev, Lubomir [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-02-15

    Collaboration between Belgian experts and Argentina on the commissioning of Argentine reactors helped overcome problems caused by delays with construction. Marc Scibetta, deputy manager for nuclear materials science, from the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN) gave an interview in which he told some facts to Lubomir Mitev of NucNet. The cooperation between SCK CEN an Argentina's Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) started in 2002. The first project was a support for the safety evaluation of the Atucha-1 reactor pressure vessel. When Argentina resumed the construction of Atucha-2 in 2006 - originally, construction started in 1981 but was suspended in 1985 due to financial reasons -, SCK CEN was asked to develop and implement a surveillance programme for the unit.

  13. Active-Pixel Image Sensors With Programmable Resolution

    Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nakamura, Junichi; Matthies, Larry H.

    1996-01-01

    Active-pixel image sensors with programmable resolution proposed for use in applications in which speed and efficiency of processing of image data enhanced by providing those data at varying resolutions. Such applications include modeling of biological vision, stereoscopic range-finding, recognition of patterns, tracking targets, and progressive transmission of compressed images. In target-tracking application, sensor initially forms low-resolution image from which area of interest identified, then sensor set at high resolution for examination of identified area. Outputs of contiguous pixels combined. Sensor of this type made to act as though it comprised fewer and larger pixels.

  14. Senior expert group for the review of the Agency's programme of activities. Opening remarks by the Director General

    The document reproduces the opening remarks made by the Director General of the IAEA on 23 March 1998 at the first meeting of the Senior Expert Group for the review of the Agency's programme and activities. The Director General explains his considerations in establishing the group, and the major challenges facing the safe use of nuclear energy and technologies

  15. Public acceptance activities and tasks in Japan's high-level waste management programme

    In Japan, the current 'Long-Term Programme for Research, Development and Utilisation of Nuclear Energy', that was revised in June 1994, states that the treatment and disposal of high-level radioactive waste remain the most important issues to be resolved in the nuclear power programme of the country. Research and development activities have aimed at establishing geological disposal technologies, with the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) as a core organisation. By comparison, an implementing organisation for the disposal business is planned to be set up by the year 2000. For this purpose, the Steering Committee on the High-Level Radioactive Waste Project (SHP) was set up in 1993 to initiate full-scale preparation in collaboration with the government and the authorities concerned. The Long-Term Programme provides for enhanced transparency of measures for radioactive waste treatment and disposal for the sake of increasing understanding on the part of the Japanese public. For this and other reasons, it is intended to publish and report widely to the public on the status of R and D and its findings, at appropriate times. The paper discusses the current status of high-level waste disposal in Japan, as well as that of the promotion of public relations activities. The Horonobe-cho and Rokkasho-mura public relations activities are also discussed, as well as the particularity of the disposal business and the requirements for acquiring public understanding, and future challenges in this area. (author)

  16. Establishing a national system for radioactive waste management. A publication within the RADWASS programme

    This Safety Standard is intended to cover the requirements for establishing a national system for safe management of radioactive wastes especially, for solid, liquid and airborne radioactive waste resulting from the nuclear fuel cycle. The main text of the Safety Standard is organized as follows: (a) Section 2 sets out the main objective for radioactive waste management and the principle on which radioactive waste management policy and strategies should be based; (b) Section 3 presents the basic components of a national framework for radioactive waste management; (c) Section 4 outlines the responsibilities of the Member State, the regulatory body and the waste generators and operators of radioactive waste management facilities; and (d) Section 5 describes important features of radioactive waste management

  17. Is there a case for establishing a multi-Centre Masters Programme in Public Health across Kent, Surrey and Sussex? A feasibility study

    Cornish, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    This study, which was commissioned by the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Workforce Development Confederation, assesses the feasibility of establishing a multi-centred modular masters programme in public health. The purpose of such a programme, would be to support the development of the public health workforce within the South East of the Region, to ensure that it is ‘fit for purpose’ in terms of delivering the current public health agenda.

  18. Stability analysis of active acoustic metamaterial with programmable bulk modulus

    Acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) have been considered as an effective means of controlling the propagation of acoustical wave energy through metamaterials. However, most of the currently exerted efforts are focused on studying passive metamaterials with fixed material properties. In this paper, the emphasis is placed on the development of a new class of one-dimensional acoustic metamaterials with effective bulk moduli that are programmed to vary according to any prescribed pattern along the volume of the metamaterial. Acoustic cavities coupled with either actively controlled Helmholtz or flush-mounted resonators are introduced to develop two possible configurations for obtaining active AMMs (AAMMs) with programmable bulk modulus capabilities. The resonators are provided with piezoelectric boundaries to enable control of the overall bulk modulus of the acoustic cavity through direct acoustic pressure feedback. Theoretical analyses of these two configurations of AAMMs are presented using the lumped-parameter modeling approach. The presented analyses are utilized to study the stability characteristics of the two configurations in an attempt to define their stable regions of operation. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance characteristics of the proposed AAMM configurations and their potential for generating prescribed spatial and spectral patterns of bulk modulus variation

  19. Active Labour Market Programmes and Unemployment in a Dual Labour Market

    Fukushima, Yoshihiko

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical analysis of the macroeconomic effects of active labour market programmes in a dual labour-market framework. The paper uses the Shapiro-Stiglitz efficiency-wage model. Active labour market programmes train unskilled labour and transfer them from a high-unemployment to a low-unemployment sector. Programmes have a direct labour-transfer effect which tends to reduce total unemployment. They also have effects on wages via expectations. The later effects were to a v...

  20. Programme Costing of a Physical Activity Programme in Primary Prevention: Should the Costs of Health Asset Assessment and Participatory Programme Development Count?

    Silke B. Wolfenstetter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis aims to discuss the implications of the “health asset concept”, introduced by the WHO, and the “investment for health model” requiring a “participatory approach” of cooperative programme development applied on a physical activity programme for socially disadvantaged women and to demonstrate the related costing issues as well as the relevant decision context. The costs of programme implementation amounted to €48,700. Adding the costs for developing the programme design of €48,800 results in total costs of €97,500; adding on top of that the costs of asset assessment running to €35,600 would total €133,100. These four different cost figures match four different types of potentially relevant decisions contexts. Depending on the decision context the total costs, and hence the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of a health promotion intervention, could differ considerably. Therefore, a detailed cost assessment and the identification of the decision context are of crucial importance.

  1. Adult Workers in Theory or Practice? : Lone Mothers’ Participation in Active Labour Market Programmes in Germany

    Cordula Zabel

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines lone mothers’ participation in active labour market programmes in Germany. Since the 2005 Hartz IV employment and welfare policy reforms, expectations that non-em- ployed parents receiving means-tested benefits should be ready for employment or labour market programme participation have grown stronger. However, discretion for programme assignments is left to individual caseworkers. As a consequence, it is not clear to what extent the formal policy orientation towards an ad...

  2. Establishing the credibility for the Midbrain Activation Workshop

    FU, HAO

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to establish the creditability of the Midbrain Activation workshop to the Chinese public. The workshop is basically a brain development training course for the kids. Based on that choosing the social media includes the online advertising, video marketing can enhance the consumer’s perception to the Midbrain Activation Workshop which will results in improving business profitability. By implementing a variety of social media channels as their marketing strategi...

  3. Earth observation space programmes, SAFISY activities, strategies of international organisations, legal aspects. Volume 3

    This volume is separated in four sessions. First part is on earth observation space programmes (international earth observation projects and international collaboration, the ERS-1, SPOT and PRIRODA programmes, the first ESA earth observation polar platform and its payload, the future earth observation remote sensing techniques and concepts). The second part is on SAFISY activities (ISY programmes, education and applications, demonstrations and outreach projects). The third part is on programme and strategies of international organisations with respect to earth observation from space. The fourth part is on legal aspects of the use of satellite remote sensing data in Europe. (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  4. A telecare programme for self-management of COPD exacerbations and promotion of an active lifestyle

    Tabak, Monique; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Ommeren, Clara; Kotte, Hayke; Weltevreden, Paul; Hermens, Hermie; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Condition Coach (CoCo) is a technology-supported care programme for self-management of COPD exacerbations and for promotion of an active lifestyle. The objective is to investigate the added value of the telecare programme in terms of clinical changes compared to usual care, and in add

  5. Teacher development programme and worklife practice in interplay: An inquiry into the transition from experienced to established teacher.

    Rump, Camilla Østerberg; Kobayashi, Sofie; Frederik V Christiansen; Johannsen, Bjørn Friis

    2014-01-01

    Impacts of teacher development programmes on participants’ development are often measured using questionnaires that gauge approaches to teaching and self-efficacy beliefs. While important in gaining a sense of the efficacy of such programmes, they tell only of a development that has occurred in parallel with TDP participation. They do not tell how this development came about. In this study we use time-line interviews to inquire into how TDP participants match their development as teachers wit...

  6. Combustion chemistry - activities in the CHEK research programme

    Dam-Johansen, K.; Johnsson, J.E.; Glarborg, P.; Frandsen, F.; Jensen, A.; Oestberg, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The combustion chemistry in the oxidation of fossil fuels and biofuels determines together with mixing and heat transfer the required size of a furnace, the emission of gaseous pollutants, and the formation of ash and deposits on surfaces. This presentation describes technologies for solid fuels combustion and gives a summary of the fuels, the pollutant chemistry and the inorganic chemistry in combustion processes. Emphasis is put on the work carried out in the CHEC (Combustion and Harmful Emission Control) Research Programme. (orig.)

  7. The Effect of Sanctions and Active Labour Market Programmes on the Exit Rate From Unemployment

    Ahmad, Nisar; Svarer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    ). Hence, modeling only one of them as treatment might over or underestimate the true effect. Therefore, by using a multivariate mixed proportional hazard model (MMPH), we model the hazard rate out of unemployment along with the sanction rate and hazard rate into active labour market programmes. We......This paper simultaneously investigates the effectiveness of benefit sanctions and active labour market programmes on the exit rate from unemployment using Danish data. In the data about one third of the individuals who are sanctioned also participate in some active labour market programmes (ALMPs...... optimally select the number of supports point for the distribution of unobserved heterogeneity. Results show that pre-specifying two support points underestimates the effect of sanctions and active labour market programmes. Failing to control for selectivity for sanctions not only underestimates the...

  8. The Effect of Sanctions and Active Labour Market Programmes on the Exit Rate From Unemployment

    Ahmad, Nisar; Svarer, Michael

    ). Hence, modeling only one of them as treatment might over or underestimate the true effect. Therefore, by using a multivariate mixed proportional hazard model (MMPH), we model the hazard rate out of unemployment along with the sanction rate and hazard rate into active labour market programmes. We......This paper simultaneously investigates the effectiveness of benefit sanctions and active labour market programmes on the exit rate from unemployment using Danish data. In the data about one third of the individuals who are sanctioned also participate in some active labour market programmes (ALMPs...... optimally select the number of supports point for the distribution of unobserved heterogeneity. Results show that pre-specifying two support points underestimates the effect of sanctions and active labour market programmes. Failing to control for selectivity for sanctions not only underestimates the...

  9. Factors affecting uptake of an education and physical activity programme for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

    Visram, S.; Bremner, A.S.; Harrington, B.E.; Hawthorne, G

    2008-01-01

    Background: Intensive lifestyle intervention involving weight reduction and moderate physical activity has been shown to help regulate, and even prevent, type 2 diabetes. Aim: This study sought to explore factors affecting uptake of an education and physical activity programme for those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Method: Focus group discussions were conducted with individuals who completed the programme and semi-structured interviews were conducted with those who decline...

  10. From activity to learning: using cultural historical activity theory to model school library programmes and practices

    E.M. Meyers

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. changes in educational policy and practice demand that we examine school library programmes from a new perspective. As a model that takes a developmental view of minds in context, Cultural Historical Activity Theory is particularly well suited to the study of school libraries and the learning that occurs therein. This paper focuses on the activity theoretic concepts of 'contradictions' and 'expansive learning' as they relate to the development of best practices. Method. Developmental Work Research was applied as a guiding methodology in an intervention study of six high school libraries in Washington State, USA. Library activity is illustrated from multiple perspectives using a triangulated, qualitative approach. Analysis. contradictions and tensions in the general school library activity system are identified, and an intervention was designed to facilitiate the development of expansive instruments. A case example illustrates a second level of analysis and specific points of intervention. Results. analysis reveals that the tensions and contradictions provide opportunities for expansive learning on the part of the teacher-Librarians. The research team can use practitioners' zones of proximal development to guide the alignment of library programme goals and practices. Conclusion. : some limitations and future promise of the framework and its application are discussed. The proposed activity theory toolkit suggest a new way of exploring the practices of teacher-librarians, incorporating research evidence, professional expertise, and reflective decision making.

  11. Translating group programmes into online formats: establishing the acceptability of a parents’ sex and relationships communication serious game

    Bayley, Julie E.; Brown, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Background With ongoing concerns about the sexual health and wellbeing of young people, there is increasing need to innovate intervention approaches. Engaging parents as agents to support their children, alongside capitalising on increasingly sophisticated technological options could jointly enhance support. Converting existing programmes into interactive game based options has the potential to broaden learning access whilst preserving behaviour change technique fidelity. However the acceptab...

  12. Combustion chemistry. Activities in the CHEC research programme

    Dam-Johansen, K.; Johnsson, J.E.; Glarborg, P.; Frandsen, F.; Jensen, A.; Oestberg, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The combustion chemistry in the oxidation of fossil fuels and biofuels determines together with mixing and heat transfer the required size of a furnace, the emission of gaseous pollutants, and the formation of ash and deposits on surfaces. This paper describes technologies for solid fuels combustion and gives a summary of the fuels, the pollutant chemistry and the inorganic chemistry in combustion processes. Emphasis is put on the work carried out in the CHEC (Combustion and Harmful Emission Control Research Programme). (au) 173 refs.

  13. Adult Workers in Theory or Practice? : Lone Mothers’ Participation in Active Labour Market Programmes in Germany

    Cordula Zabel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines lone mothers’ participation in active labour market programmes in Germany. Since the 2005 Hartz IV employment and welfare policy reforms, expectations that non-em- ployed parents receiving means-tested benefits should be ready for employment or labour market programme participation have grown stronger. However, discretion for programme assignments is left to individual caseworkers. As a consequence, it is not clear to what extent the formal policy orientation towards an adult worker model of the family is reflected in practical policy implemen- tations. Thus, lone mothers’ participation in active labour market programmes is studied empiri- cally here on the basis of large-scale administrative data, using event-history analysis. Findings are that lone mothers are treated as adult workers with respect to workfare and training pro- grammes even when their children are still quite young. As soon as their youngest child is 3 - 5 years old, lone mothers’ transition rates into these programmes are as high as for childless single women. In the case of programmes that provide more direct pathways into regular employment, like job subsidies and in-firm training programmes, however, participation rates for lone mothers of young children are substantially lower than for childless single women.

  14. IRIS guidelines. 2014 ed. Integrated Review of Infrastructure for Safety (IRIS) for self-assessment when establishing the safety infrastructure for a nuclear power programme

    The IAEA safety standards reflect an international consensus on what constitutes a high level of safety for protecting people and the environment, and therefore represent what all Member States should achieve, whilst recognizing the ultimate responsibility of each State to ensure safety when implementing a nuclear power programme. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-16, entitled Establishing the Safety Infrastructure for a Nuclear Power Programme was published in order to provide recommendations, presented in the form of sequential actions, on meeting safety requirements progressively during the initial three phases of the development of safety, as described in INSAG-22, Nuclear Safety Infrastructure for a National Nuclear Power Programme Supported by the IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles. To that end, the 200 safety related actions, which are proposed by SSG-16, constitute a roadmap to establish a foundation for promoting a high level of safety over the entire lifetime of the nuclear power plant. These actions reflect international consensus on good practice in order to achieve full implementation of IAEA safety standards. The IAEA has developed a methodology and tool, the Integrated Review of Infrastructure for Safety (IRIS), to assist States in undertaking self-assessment with respect to SSG-16 recommendations when establishing the safety infrastructure for a nuclear power programme, and to develop an action plan for improvement. The IRIS methodology and the associated tool are fully compatible with the IAEA safety standards and are also used, when appropriate, in the preparation of review missions, such as the Integrated Regulatory Review Service and advisory missions. The present guidelines describe the IRIS methodology for self-assessment against SSG-16 recommendations. Through IRIS implementation, every organization concerned with nuclear safety may gain proper awareness and engage in a continuous progressive process to develop the effective national

  15. Are they working? Market Orientation and the Effectiveness of Active Labour Market Programmes in Ireland

    Philip J O'Connell

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the first findings of a new study of the labour market impact of a range of active labour market programmes (ALMPs) in Ireland. The paper combines the results of two individual-level data sets to compare the employment outcomes of participants in ALMPs with a comparison group of non-participants over the 1994-1996 period. The analysis focuses on employment probabilities two years post-programme, and shows that programmes with strong linkages to the labour market are more l...

  16. Overview of EU research activities in transmutation and innovative reactor systems within the Euratom framework programmes

    European Community (EC) (currently 27 Member States) shared-cost research has been organised in Framework Programmes (FP) of durations of 4 - 5 years since 1984. The 6th European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) Framework Programme (2002 - 06) and the current 7th FP (2007 - 11) have been allocated a fission research budget respectively of 209 and 287 Million Euro from the EC. There are 10 projects (total budget 70 M Euro, EC contribution 38 M Euro) in all aspects of transmutation ranging from road-mapping exercise to large integrated projects on accelerator driven systems, lead-cooled fast critical systems for waste transmutation, technology, fuel, accelerator facilities for nuclear data etc. In Innovative Reactor concepts, there are about half-a-dozen projects (total budget 30 M Euro, EC contribution 16 M Euro) including High Temperature Reactors, Gas-cooled Fast reactors, road-mapping exercise on sodium fast reactors etc. The main research and training activities in FP7 are: management of radioactive waste, reactor systems, radiation protection, infrastructures, human resources and mobility and training. In the two call for proposals (2007 and 2008) in FP7, 8 projects have been accepted in transmutation and innovative reactor concepts (total budget 53 M Euro, EC contribution 32 M Euro). These research projects cover activities ranging from materials, fuels, treatment of irradiated graphite waste, European sodium fast reactor to the establishment of a Central Design Team of a fast-spectrum transmutation device in Europe. The third call for proposals is underway requesting proposals on nuclear data, thermal hydraulics, gas and lead-cooled fast reactor systems with a total EC budget of 20 M Euro. International collaboration is an important element of the EU research policy. This overview paper will present elements of the strategy of EURATOM research and training in waste management including accelerator driven transmutation systems and Innovative reactor concepts

  17. Objects prompt authentic scientific activities among learners in a museum programme

    Achiam, Marianne; Simony, Leonora; Kramer Lindow, Bent Erik

    2016-04-01

    Although the scientific disciplines conduct practical work in different ways, all consider practical work as the essential way of connecting objects and phenomena with ideas and the abstract. Accordingly, practical work is regarded as central to science education as well. We investigate a practical, object-based palaeontology programme at a natural history museum to identify how palaeontological objects prompt scientific activity among upper secondary school students. We first construct a theoretical framework based on an analysis of the programme's palaeontological content. From this, we build our reference model, which considers the specimens used in the programme, possible palaeontological interpretations of these specimens, and the conditions inherent in the programme. We use the reference model to analyse the activities of programme participants, and illustrate how these activities are palaeontologically authentic. Finally, we discuss our findings, examining the mechanism by which the specimens prompt scientific activities. We also discuss our discipline-based approach, and how it allows us to positively identify participants' activities as authentic. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings.

  18. Research programme 'Active Solar Energy Use - Solar Heating and Heat Storage'. Activities and projects 2003

    In this report by the research, development and demonstration (RD+D) programme coordinators the objectives, activities and main results in the area of solar heating and heat storage in Switzerland are presented for 2003. In a stagnating market environment the strategy of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy mainly consists in improving the quality and durability of solar collectors and materials, optimizing combisystems for space heating and domestic hot water preparation, searching for storage systems with a higher energy storage density than in the case of sensible heat storage in water, developing coloured solar collectors for more architectonic freedom, and finalizing a seasonal heat storage project for 100 dwellings to demonstrate the feasibility of solar fractions larger than 50% in apartment houses. Support was granted to the Swiss Testing Facility SPF in Rapperswil as in previous years; SPF was the first European testing institute to perform solar collector labeling according to the new rules of the 'Solar Keymark', introduced in cooperation with the European Committee for Standardization CEN. Several 2003 projects were conducted within the framework of the Solar Heating and Cooling Programme of the International Energy Agency IEA. Computerized simulation tools were improved. With the aim of jointly producing high-temperature heat and electric power a solar installation including a concentrating collector and a thermodynamic machine based on a Rankine cycle is still being developed. Seasonal underground heat storage was studied in detail by means of a validated computer simulation programme. Design guidelines were obtained for such a storage used in the summer time for cooling and in the winter time for space heating via a heat pump: depending on the ratio 'summer cooling / winter heating', cooling requires a cooling machine, or direct cooling without such a machine is possible. The report ends up with the list of all supported RD+D projects

  19. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programmes

    Full text: The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country of origin where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programmes have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium, and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. It is hoped that an announcement of the extension of the U.S. Acceptance Programme, which is expected in the very near future, will facilitate the life extensions of many productive TRIGA reactors around the world. (author)

  20. Benefits from joint research activities by universities and national institutions for nuclear programmes in a developing country

    In a developing country such as Greece where a nuclear power programme is under consideration and faces special problems, collaboration between universities and national institutions in joint research projects, besides helping to obtain valuable results, is the best way to benefit both parties in their individual programmes. Ten years ago a joint research programme between the Control Group of the University of Patras and subsequently the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) on the one side, and the Group of Research Reactor Modelling, Reliability and Failure Detection of the Nuclear Technology Department of the NRCPS 'Democritos' on the other, was established. The co-operation proved to be fruitful as regards (a) exchanging information and know-how relating to academically oriented activities and nuclear reactor and laboratory experiments and research; (b) working in joint research programmes on systems control theory and applications to nuclear reactors; and (c) training of post-graduate students in theory and applications as well as in methods and techniques used in a nuclear laboratory. Particular areas of joint activity and research are nuclear reactor modelling, simulation and identification; control theory methodology as applied to nuclear reactors; treatment of nuclear power systems using large scale systems techniques; microprocessor-based systems for nuclear reactor measurements, data acquisition and nuclear signal processing and control; analysis and optimization of system reliability and maintenance with application to nuclear reactor systems; dynamic failure detection of nuclear systems using state observers and filters; and application of knowledge-based systems and artificial intelligence techniques to nuclear reactor systems (evaluation, operation, maintenance and safety procedures). Naturally, this co-operation has contributed to the preparation of the necessary manpower for carrying out research and practical work in the systems and

  1. The radiation protection programme activities of the World Health Organization

    The radiation protection activities of the World Health Organization are reviewed. They include studies of radiation protection standards and guidelines, and public health aspects of nuclear power. WHO also provides member states with world data on radioactivity in air, water and food, and assessments of population exposure and health effects. (H.K.)

  2. Application of programme system BRAND for analysis of activation experiments

    Questions related to application of the BRAND program complex, simulating the processes of neutron radiation transfer by Monte Carlo method for analysing the results of measuring the cross sections by activation method, are considered. Results of calculating the corrections to neutron scattering in the air, in the activated sample, which are compared to results by other authors, are presented. The problem of choosing sufficient statistical accuracy of calculation results obtained is considered, choice criterion is proposed and grounded on the base of analysing the calculation results obtained. Questions related to possibilities of applying the complex when planning the forthcoming experiments, analysing experimental results, are discussed and the desired directions in extending the BRAND program complex capabilities are indicated as well. 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  3. What works, who works? The impact of active labour market programmes on the employment prospects of young people in Ireland

    O'Connell, Philip J.; MacGinnity, Fran

    1996-01-01

    The international literature on active labour market programmes has generated inconsistent and confusing, but generally pessimistic, conclusions regarding their impact on the employment prospects of participants. This paper argues that much of this confusion is due to a general lack of attention to qualitative differences between programmes. The paper develops a typology of active labour market programmes, differentiating between training and employment measures on the basis of their orientat...

  4. National programmes and activities on nuclear desalination in India

    Desalination and water reuse has been suggested to augment sources in the coastal areas where water is scarce. The desalination plants are generally located at thermal power stations because steam and electric power are required. The thermal power stations in these areas obtain coal from far distances. Nuclear power coupled to desalination plants is therefore considered to be more useful. The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre has been engaged in R and D work on desalination for the past 15-20 years. The salient details of these activities are discussed

  5. Biennial activity report of metallurgy programme for 1987 and 1988

    The research and development (R and D) activities in the field of metallurgy at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam during 1987-1988 are reported in the form of individual summaries arranged under headings : (1) Mechanical Metallurgy Section, (2) Physical Metallurgy Section, (3) Chemical Metallurgy Section, (4) Materials Technology Section, (5) Division for PIE and NDT Development and (6) Quality Engineering Section. A list of publications by the staff scientists working in the field of metallurgy during report period is given in one of the appendices. (author). figs., tabs

  6. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'. PMID:24780858

  7. Evaluation of physical activity programmes for elderly people - a descriptive study using the EFQM' criteria

    Santos Rute

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past years, there has been a growing concern in designing physical activity (PA programmes for elderly people, because evidence suggests that such health promotion interventions may reduce the deleterious effects of the ageing process. Quality is an important issue when designing a PA programme for older people. Some studies support the Excellence Model of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM as an operational framework for evaluating the quality of an organization. Within this context, the aim of this study was to characterize the quality management models of the PA programmes developed by Portuguese Local Administration to enhance quality of life for elderly people, according to the criteria of the EFQM Excellence Model. Methods A methodological triangulation was conducted in 26 PA programmes using questionnaire surveys, semi-structured interviews and document analysis. We used standard approaches to the statistical analysis of data including frequencies and percentages for the categorical data. Results Results showed that Processes (65,38%, Leadership (61,03%, Customer results (58,46 and People (51,28% had high percentage occurrences of quality practices. In contrast, Partnerships and resources (45,77%, People results (41,03%, Policy and strategy (37,91%, Key performance results (19,23% and Society results (19,23% had lower percentage occurrences. Conclusions Our findings suggest that although there are some good practices in PA programmes, there are still relevant areas that require improvement.

  8. Quality Control in Mammography: A Pilot Programme for First Level Activity

    Di Maggio, C.; Gambaccini, M.; Gennaro, G.; Indovina, P.L.; Mazzei, F.; Tuffanelli, A

    1998-07-01

    Quality control programmes are the best tools for maintaining optimal performances of mammographic units. Programmes to spread quality control activities have been organised in various countries. This study presents the results of an educational programme having three main objectives: quality assurance promotion, operator training with simple instruments and procedures, and operator training in quality control data analysis. Special kits have been distributed to several mammographic centres. In each centre the kit has been used to execute the following tests: AEC performance, processing conditions, entrance exposure and image quality. The data gathered in 53 centres for a period of 4 weeks are compared and discussed. Several centres were found not to satisfy completely the technical recommendations of the Italian protocol, implying training for radiographers and radiologists in QC procedures is desirable. (author)

  9. How to implement a balanced programme for musical activities in kindergarten

    Zgonc, Nadja

    2016-01-01

    The preschool and school periods are the most important time for intensive music education. In order to successfully enhance a child’s musical development, nursery teachers should ensure that music activities are equally represented within the programme (singing, playing musical instruments, listening to music, listening to music during creative activities, creating music itself, didactic music games). One of the principles that should be followed by nursery teachers and is set out in the Slo...

  10. Sharing of benefits and risks in regard to the establishment of nuclear power programmes in developing countries

    The establishment of a nuclear power program in a developing country is dependent upon the needs of a number of different parties being satisfied. One key area in this regard is the structuring of a reasonable and equitable sharing of both risks and benefits. This paper is intended to provide an overview and introduction to this topic. The points to be addressed here are: the key players involved; the relationships between the players; the benefits of a nuclear power program; the sharing of benefit; the risks involved; the sharing of risks through appropriate business arrangements; some possible arrangements. Many business arrangements are possible, however the most appropriate arrangement for a specific project must take into account the needs, desires and priorities of the specific developing country whilst providing acceptable incentives and compensation to the suppliers and to the financiers. This paper does not attempt to reach a conclusion that would be applicable in each and every case, but it is intended to point out that this is a very complex area requiring a great deal of creativity and innovation in order to establish an appropriate arrangement for each case

  11. Programme wood/energy 2000-2006. Activity Report for 2000-2004

    When ADEME launched its Wood fuel programme throughout all of France in late 1999, its aim was to guide this resource supply chain to maturity and stable development in all user sectors: domestic, multi-family housing, commercial/institutional and industrial applications. To this end the Wood fuel Programme 2000-2006 was assigned objectives and endowed with significant financial means for studies and coordination in order to support and carry out general-interest projects, piloted by ADEME. The stated goal was to replace fossil fuels, avoid carbon emissions and establish quality assurance standards for household firewood and wood-fired devices. This report makes a status of ADEME's Wood fuel programme for the 2000-2004 era: - Domestic heating: After a drop during the 1990's, figures since 1999 of sales of wood-fuel domestic heating equipment (closed heaters, glass-door fires and stoves) have shown a significant rise. On average over 30 years, wood consumption has risen to 7.2 million TOE (40 million cubic metres) per year; - Industry: It is thought there are 1000 wood-fired heaters (above 1 megawatt) used in French industry. These are found mainly in timber-based industries and in timber crushing plants. This amounts to a total power output of 2.5 gigawatts. In the primary and secondary wood processing industries, the increase in the number of wood-fired boilers and energy produced has reached 5% per year Results of a call for carbon energy projects (APEC) was 61 submitted of which 52 were selected; 9 projects pending (166.5 K of aid from ADEME); and 35 projects begun (1,649 K of aid from ADEME). - Local authority and service sector wood-fired heating systems: At the end of 2004, the number of local authority active boilers was 641, producing 430 megawatts. This is an increase of an average of 13% year on year since 2000. By the end of 2004, the target had already been met for the number of boilers being financed (1,090). By 2006 however we still need to generate a

  12. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: Relationship between fluoroscopic time and skin doses according to diagnoses. Basis to establish a quality assurance programme

    Radiofrequency Cardiac Catheter Ablation is an Interventional Radiology procedure of great complexity because the cardiologist needs a simultaneous evaluation of fluoroscopic images and electrophysiologic information. Therefore, the procedure typically involves extended fluoroscopic time that may cause radiation-skin injures to patients. Skin doses depend on many factors: equipment design features and its proper use, cardiologist practice, fluoroscopic time, irradiated areas, application of radiation protection recommendations, etc. We evaluate fluoroscopic time in relation to pathology and we estimate skin doses on 233 procedures at the Electrophysiology Laboratory in Casa de Galicia, Montevideo, Uruguay. Significant differences among the medians of fluoroscopic time were found in those procedures depending on diagnoses and results. Higher fluoroscopic time was found in flutter and auricular tachycardia (median was 83 minutes, p=0.0001). In successful procedures (almost 90%), median skin doses was 2.0 Grays (p=0.0001). On the basis of records information, the standard operating procedure and the clinical protocol, expanding close cooperation between the cardiologists and the experts in Radiation Protection will secure the establishment of an Assurance Quality Program. (author)

  13. Process evaluation of a school based physical activity related injury prevention programme using the RE-AIM framework

    van Mechelen Willem

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, only information regarding the effectiveness of an intervention programme is ever published. However, in recent years evaluating the translatability and feasibility of an intervention programme has become more important. Therefore, this paper presents the results of the evaluation of the iPlay programme aimed at preventing physical activity related injuries in primary school children. Methods The iPlay programme targeted injuries gained through physical activity, and consisted of a teacher's manual, informative newsletters and posters, a website, and set exercises to be carried out during physical education (PE classes. In order to evaluate the iPlay programme for translatability and feasibility, teachers, children and parents who participated in the iPlay programme filled out a questionnaire The objective of this study is to describe the results of the process-evaluation of the iPlay programme based on the five dimensions of the RE-AIM framework. Results The results showed that the participation rate of the children was 100% (reach. Nine percent of the schools who were invited to take part were willing to participate in the study (adoption rate. Teachers stated that they implemented the different elements of the programme partly as intended (implementation. The percentage of children and parents who followed the programme was less than expected. In addition, 52% of the teachers indicated that the current iPlay programme could become standard practice in their teaching routine (maintenance. Conclusion The iPlay programme is a first start in the prevention of physical activity related injuries in children, but further improvements need to be made to the programme on the basis of this process evaluation. Trial registration ISRCTN78846684; http://www.controlled-trials.com

  14. New and recently finalised activities within the NKS Programmes for Nordic cooperation on nuclear reactor safety and emergency preparedness

    Andgren, Karin; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Magnússon, Sigurður M.;

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, NKS has provided funding for hundreds of research activities in fields comprising reactor safety, decommissioning, nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness, and management of radioactive waste. Advanced technologies and methods developed under the NKS framework have been used...... within the Nordic countries as well as internationally. Two programme areas are defined under the NKS platform: The NKS-R programme on nuclear reactor safety and the NKS-B programme on emergency preparedness. Three articles, giving an introduction to NKS and its two programmes, were published in...

  15. Planetary protection R&D activities in the ESA exploration programme

    Kminek, G.

    Since the begin of the Aurora exploration programme in 2001 the Human Spaceflight Microgravity and Exploration Directorate HME of ESA has invested in research and development activities related to planetary protection Some of these activities are focused on the recently approved ExoMars mission others are applicable to Mars missions in general including MSR the technology development of the latter one being part of the exploration core programme The proposed activities have been approved and initiated An overview of the activities and first results will be presented The main activities are begin itemize item Bioburden and Biodiversity evaluation in S C Facilities this activity will cover a period of almost two years and include the standard assay extension of the standard assay culture conditions identification of isolates using 16S rDNA via PCR and test of a rapid spore assay Protocols are developed in coordination with NASA-JPL item Extension of dry heat microbial reduction process to higher temperatures this activity will include a detailed study of the humidity effect on the inactivation kinetics This activity is in coordination with efforts at NASA-JPL item Validation of a dry heat sterilization process item Development of a low-temperature sterilization method the focus of this activity is on vapor hydrogen peroxide item Robotic capabilities for clean AIV AIT item Decontamination of man-rated systems item Definition of functional requirements for a Mars Sample Return Biological Containment Facility end itemize In

  16. Establishment of rabbit radiation facility for neutron activation analysis

    The transfer principle and the composition of a rabbit radiation facility for neutron activation analysis in a reactor were introduced. The functions and security designs of the pneumatic transfer system and automatic control system in the irradiation device were studied. By the testing,the transfer speed of the facility is 7.0 m/s. The facility has advantages of steady transmission, simple operation, easy maintenance, etc. The facility satisfies the demand of the neutron activation analysis for short half-life nuclides. (authors)

  17. Quality assurance (QA) training at Westinghouse including innovative approaches for achieving an effective QA programme and establishing constructive interaction

    Experience of the Westinghouse Water Reactors Division with indoctrination and training of quality engineers includes training of personnel from Westinghouse divisions in the USA and overseas as well as of customers' personnel. A written plan is prepared for each trainee in order to fit the training to the individual's needs, and to cover the full range of information and activities. The trainee is also given work assignments, working closely with experienced quality engineers. He may prepare inspection plans and audit check lists, assist in the preparation of QA training modules, write procedures, and perform supplier surveillance and data analyses, or make special studies of operating systems. The trainee attends seminars and special courses on work-related technical subjects. Throughout the training period, emphasis is placed on inculcating an attitude of team work in the trainee so that the result of the training is the achievement of both quality and productivity. Certification is extended (given that education/experience/skill requirements are met) to such functions as mechanical equipment quality engineering, electrical equipment quality engineering, and start-up and testing quality engineering. A well-trained quality engineer is equipped to provide technical assistance to other disciplines and, through effective co-operation with others, contributes to the success of the organization's endeavours. (author)

  18. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M; Seidelin, J B; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder, be dis...

  19. Nuclear data activity at Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar, Dhaka

    The nuclear data activity at AERE, Savar is briefly presented in this paper. Major thrust is on the customization of cross section libraries for general purpose reactor and shielding calculations. The processing codes that are available are NJOY91.91, some AMPX-Modules and the modules in SCALE-PC. Recent measurements on cross section data over the energy range 13-15 MeV at the Institute of Nuclear science and Technology have been reviewed. Measurements and calculations are based on the determination of excitation functions of neutron induced reactions on the elements and isotopes of FRT-relevant structural materials. (author)

  20. Contaminated land rehabilitation - activities, networks and programmes of the European Union; Altlastenaktivitaeten auf europaeischer Ebene

    Kasamas, H. [CLARINET Koordinierungsstelle, Wien (Austria)

    2000-07-01

    The paper discusses EU programmes and cooperative projects for soil and groundwater rehabilitation, R and D activities for rehabilitation technology development, and the outcome of programmes and projects when available. (orig./CB) [German] Um den Herausforderungen der Altlastenproblematik in den industrialisierten Laendern noch effektiver zu begegnen, wurde die internationale Zusammenarbeit, vor allem auf europaeischer Ebene, verstaerkt in Angriff genommen. Internationale Initiativen zu diversen altlastenrelevanten Problemstellungen sollen eine koordinierte Vorgangsweise zum Nutzen aller teilnehmenden Laender ermoeglichen. Parallele Anstrengungen in der technischen und wissenschaftlichen Entwicklung sollen vermieden und der Einsatz begrenzt vorhandener Mittel effektiviert werden. Der multinationale Erfahrungsaustausch soll die Wiederholung von weniger zielfuehrenden Entwicklungen in anderen Laendern vermeiden helfen. Dieser Beitrag bietet einen Ueberblick ueber Ziele und Ergebnisse diverser internationaler Initiativen im Altlastenbereich und verweist zu weiterfuehrenden Informationsquellen. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of Activities in Primary Education Programme with The Teachers’ Views (Sample of Sinop Province

    Necdet AYKAÇ

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This research, aims to investigate the concept of activity on the basis of learning-teaching duration inaccordance with teachers’ views, teachers guide and class materials in the primary education programme put in to practice in 2005- 2006. The research has two subjects. The first one is the quantitative subject aiming to determine the teachers’ views, the second is theoretical subject aiming to analyze the guide books and class metarials. The quantitative research, aiming to determine the teachers’ ideas is consisted of 184 teachers in total in the center and in the central villages of Sinop. The exemplification in this research is occupied by means of 86 teachers applying the teachers’ views determinating scale. In the research as a tool to collect data, determining teachers’ views scale prepared in 5 likert-type scale with 18 articles has been used. Analyzing with SPSS programme, the data gained from the scale has been stated as frequency and percentage. Theoretical dimension examining teachers’ guide and lesson metarials to put the teachers’ views on a objective base, aims to examine teachers guide books and lesson materials analytically and display the base of teachers’ views. It is stated that most of the teachers present their views in that way: They feel themselves insufficent to applythe activities,the physical opportunities of the schools and the facilities are not enough to apply some activities, the classes are crowded, the activities are not student-centered and active teaching methods are not used in the activities.

  2. RPII Inspection and Licensing Activities and Annual Inspection Programme for 2013

    The objective of this report is to provide an overview of inspection activities of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland RPII, to examine the evolution in licensee numbers and to outline the rationale in developing annual inspection programmes. All inspection activities are now carried out within the framework of a quality management system including inspection planning, the training of inspectors, the conduct of inspections as well as post inspection follow up and review. This report also provides an overview of the main features of the quality system

  3. MATHEMATICAL OPTIMIZATION METHODS TO ESTABLISH ACTIVE PHASES ON HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS: CASE OF BULK TRANSITION METAL SULPHIDES

    Iván Machín

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of procedures based on mathematical optimization methods to establish optimal active sulphide phases with higher HDS activity. This paper proposes a list of active phases as a guide for orienting the experimental work in the search of new catalysts that permit optimize the HDS process. Studies in this paper establish Co-S, Cr-S, Nb-S and Ni-S systems have the greatest potential to improve HDS activity.

  4. Objects prompt authentic scientific activities among learners in a museum programme

    Achiam, Marianne; Simony, Leonora; Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Although the scientific disciplines conduct practical work in different ways, all consider practical work as the essential way of connecting objects and phenomena with ideas and the abstract. Accordingly, practical work is regarded as central to science education as well. We investigate a practical......, object-based palaeontology programme at a natural history museum to identify how palaeontological objects prompt scientific activity among upper secondary school students. We first construct a theoretical framework based on an analysis of the programme’s palaeontological content. From this, we build our...... palaeontologically authentic. Finally, we discuss our findings, examining the mechanism by which the specimens prompt scientific activities. We also discuss our discipline-based approach, and how it allows us to positively identify participants’ activities as authentic. We conclude by discussing the implications of...

  5. Co-ordinated research and environmental surveillance programme related to sea disposal of radioactive waste CRESP activity report 1986-1990

    The Co-ordinated Research and Environmental Surveillance Programme relevant to sea disposal of radioactive waste (CRESP) was created in 1981 in the framework of the 1977 Decision of the OECD Council establishing a Multilateral Consultation and Surveillance Mechanism for Sea Dumping of Radioactive Waste. The main task of CRESP was to set up a site-specific scientific research programme to increase current knowledge of the processes controlling the transfer of radionuclides in the marine environment, so that impact of past dumping could be monitored and future assessments could be based on more accurate and comprehensive scientific data. The CRESP mandate was extended in 1987 to respond to a request from the Paris Commission to include consideration of radioactive discharges in the maritime area covered by the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution from Land-Based Sources. This report summarizes the CRESP activities carried out during the 1986-1990 five year phase. Concerning the review of deep sea results, the report relates progress achieved above the level of knowledge which was available when the present phase of the CRESP programme was decided and which has been taken into account in the 1985 Site Suitability Review. With respect to coastal discharges, it presents a summary of R and D work undertaken by member countries, including those carried out in other programmes such as MARINA. Finally, it makes proposals for future work within CRESP

  6. Activities of the Sofia EC Energy Center in the framework of the THERMIE programme

    The European Community Energy Center in Sofia is responsible for the EC implementation of the THERMIE programme. The programme's activities are promotion and dissemination of existing European technologies leading to better energy management and covering the fields of rational use of hydrocarbons, solid fuels and renewable energy sources. Application of these technologies would lead to substantial energy savings resulting in significant financial and environmental benefits. During its one-year operation the EC Energy Centre has organized and performed specific action as energy audits (food and beverage industrial units and buildings), demonstration projects (local heating control in buildings, diesel engine regulation of buses), training courses and seminars (in energy management and in space heating measuring and regulation), workshops (energy conservation in buildings, the bricks and clays sector and the food and beverage sector) and studies (wind energy potential, 'clean' coal technologies potential). Some of these actions have had very encouraging results showing potential energy savings of the order of 10-20% just by application of simple measures and with small additional investment. The activities of the EC Energy Centre in the coming year aimed at electricity savings along the entire line of electricity generation, transmission and consumption are outlined. (author)

  7. Building Social Capital : A Field Study of the Active, Beautiful and Clean Waters (ABC Waters) Programme in Singapore

    Tovatt, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents a field study examining the effect of the Active, Beautiful and Clean Waters (ABC Waters) Programme in Singapore on social capital. Based on a multi-disciplinary approach and following the theoretical framework of bonding and bridging social capital developed by Robert Putnam and others, three different cases of the ABC Programme were compared, looking particularly at the level of blue-green landscape integration. The three cases comprised the ABC flagship project ‘Bishan...

  8. Short-term results of community-based interventions for improving physical activity: Isfahan Healthy Heart Programme

    Rabiei, Katayoun; Kelishadi, Roya; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sadri, Gholamhossein; Amani, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Introduction To assess the effect of a comprehensive community-based programme for increasing physical activity (PA) after 2 years of interventions. Material and methods A 6-year, action-oriented, comprehensive, and integrated community-based study, entitled the Isfahan Healthy Heart Programme, was conducted in Iran from the year 2000. The interventions targeted the whole population of nearly 2,180,000 living in two cities, and were compared with another city considered as a reference. Educat...

  9. Status on the Finnish activities regarding qualification of programmable automation systems

    The research work on qualification of programmable automation system is described which describe the development of methods, tools and practices for the evaluation and licensing of safety critical programmable automation systems. 26 refs

  10. The ProActive trial protocol – a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a family-based, domiciliary intervention programme to increase physical activity among individuals at high risk of diabetes [ISRCTN61323766

    Ekelund Ulf

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing prevalence of obesity and disorders associated with sedentary living constitute a major global public health problem. While previous evaluations of interventions to increase physical activity have involved communities or individuals with established disease, less attention has been given to interventions for individuals at risk of disease. Methods/design ProActive aims to evaluate the efficacy of a theoretical, evidence- and family-based intervention programme to increase physical activity in a sedentary population, defined as being at-risk through having a parental family history of diabetes. Primary care diabetes or family history registers were used to recruit 365 individuals aged 30–50 years, screened for activity level. Participants were assigned by central randomisation to three intervention programmes: brief written advice (comparison group, or a psychologically based behavioural change programme, delivered either by telephone (distance group or face-to-face in the family home over one year. The protocol-driven intervention programme is delivered by trained facilitators, and aims to support increases in physical activity through the introduction and facilitation of a range of self-regulatory skills (e.g. goal setting. The primary outcome is daytime energy expenditure and its ratio to resting energy expenditure, measured at baseline and one year using individually calibrated heart rate monitoring. Secondary measures include self-report of individual and family activity, psychological mediators of behaviour change, physiological and biochemical correlates, acceptability, and costs, measured at baseline, six months and one year. The primary intention to treat analysis will compare groups at one-year post randomisation. Estimation of the impact on diabetes incidence will be modelled using data from a parallel ten-year cohort study using similar measures. Discussion ProActive is the first efficacy trial of an

  11. National Wood-fuel Programme 2000-2006. Activity Report 2000-2006

    When ADEME launched its Wood-fuel programme throughout all of France in late 1999, its aim was to guide this resource supply chain to maturity and stable development in all user sectors: domestic, multi-family housing, commercial/institutional and industrial applications. To this end the Wood-fuel Programme 2000-2006 was assigned objectives and endowed with significant financial means for studies and coordination in order to support and carry out general-interest projects, piloted by ADEME. The stated goal was to replace fossil fuels, avoid carbon emissions and establish quality assurance standards for household firewood and wood-fired devices. This report presents: 1 - the Wood Energy stakes for the environment, for employment, and for the economy, the biomass energy net benefits; 2 - the Wood Energy key figures: Production and consumption, Single-family homes and wood heating, Breakdown of types of devices used, Sales of wood-fired devices, Number of housing/institutional boilers in use, Number of industrial boilers in use; 3 - the Wood Energy objectives: Domestic heating, Industrial boiler plants, District heating for housing/institutional/commercial uses; 4 - the Wood Energy program operation: Program coordination by ADEME, Partnerships and State-Region planning agreements, 2000-2006 funding system (modified in 2004) and Other financial instruments; 5 - the 2000-2006 assessment: Main results, Conclusions and recommendations, Evaluation contributions: five key points, Evaluation of employment in the solid biofuels supply chain, Supply for community, institutional and commercial boilers; 6 - Information and communication: Initiatives supported or accompanied by ADEME between 2000 and 2004, Publications supported by ADEME. In appendix: fuels and energy content, regional assessments, national research program on bio-energies - PNRB 2006 (Review and stakes, PNRB results in 2006), wood heating R and D, studies funded by ADEME, 2006 ADEME's correspondents, glossary

  12. What is the IAEA? Programmes and activities that maximize the contribution of nuclear technology to society, while verifying its peaceful use

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) serves as the world's foremost international governmental forum for scientific and technical co-operation in the peaceful use of nuclear technology. Established as an autonomous organization under the United Nations (UN) in 1957, the IAEA represents the culmination of international efforts to make a reality of US President Eisenhower's proposal in his 'Atoms for Peace' speech to the UN General Assembly in 1953. He envisioned the creation of an international body to control and develop the use of atomic energy. Today, the Agency's broad spectrum of services, programmes, and activities is based on the needs of its 130 Member States

  13. A quality assurance programme for the determination of selenium in foods by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Selenium is unevenly distributed through the biosphere. The levels, species and bioavailability of selenium in foods depend greatly on the geochemical environment in which they are grown. Variation in geochemical conditions can not only lead to certain diseases in animals but also influence the selenium body burden in humans. For these reasons, there is an increasing interest in monitoring selenium levels in foods and diets. A quality assurance programme has been developed for the determination of low levels of selenium in foods and diets by cyclic and pseudo-cyclic instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using the short-lived (half-life = 17.4 s) 77Sem nuclide. Both conventional and anti-coincidence gamma ray spectrometry techniques have been employed. Pseudo-cyclic INAA in conjunction with anti-coincidence counting has been found to provide the most reliable results. Internal and external quality assessments have been done using a number of parameters. (author)

  14. Ghana's nuclear programme

    The Paper gives the purpose of Ghana's Nuclear Programme and describes some specific research activities and peaceful applications of atomic energy in agriculture, medicine and industry. A discussion of some of the problem facing the programme concludes the Paper. (author)

  15. Education, Training and the Euratom Framework Programme

    The maintaining of knowledge implies education and training programmes that ensure not only the instruction of students and trainees but also the transfer of knowledge across generations. This is especially important for research in the Euratom field in the present context of nuclear renaissance. DG-Research is responsible for the implementation of the Euratom Framework Programme on nuclear research and training. Through these activities, it is striving to promote the integration of national radiation protection research programmes in Europe, including education and training in radiation protection. These education and training activities supported in the Euratom Programme are helping to establish top-quality teaching modules assembled into masters programmes or higher-level training packages jointly qualified and mutually recognised across the EU. This Euratom approach is entirely in line with the Bologna process. This paper presents and discusses the various actions in education and training in radiation protection supported by DG- Research. (authors)

  16. Re-thinking global health sector efforts for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control: promoting integration of programme activities within a strengthened health system

    Maher Dermot

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global financial crisis threatens global health, particularly exacerbating diseases of inequality, e.g. HIV/AIDS, and diseases of poverty, e.g. tuberculosis. The aim of this paper is to reconsider established practices and policies for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, aiming at delivering better results and value for money. This may be achieved by promoting greater integration of HIV and tuberculosis control programme activities within a strengthened health system. Discussion HIV and tuberculosis share many similarities in terms of their disease burden and the recommended stratagems for their control. HIV and tuberculosis programmes implement similar sorts of control activities, e.g. case finding and treatment, which depend for success on generic health system issues, including vital registration, drug procurement and supply, laboratory network, human resources, and financing. However, the current health system approach to HIV and tuberculosis control often involves separate specialised services. Despite some recent progress, collaboration between the programmes remains inadequate, progress in obtaining synergies has been slow, and results remain far below those needed to achieve universal access to key interventions. A fundamental re-think of the current strategic approach involves promoting integrated delivery of HIV and tuberculosis programme activities as part of strengthened general health services: epidemiological surveillance, programme monitoring and evaluation, community awareness of health-seeking behavior, risk behaviour modification, infection control, treatment scale-up (first-line treatment regimens, drug-resistance surveillance, containing and countering drug-resistance (second-line treatment regimens, research and development, global advocacy and global partnership. Health agencies should review policies and progress in HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, learn mutual lessons for policy

  17. A cluster-randomised controlled trial of a physical activity and nutrition programme in retirement villages: a study protocol

    Holt, Anne-Marie; Jancey, Jonine; Lee, Andy H; Kerr, Deborah A; Hills, Andrew P; Anderson, Annie S; Peter A Howat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity levels of Australia's ageing population are declining and coincidentally rates of overweight and obesity are increasing. Adequate levels of physical activity and a healthy diet are recognised as important lifestyle factors for the maintenance of a healthy weight and prevention of chronic diseases. Retirement village (RV) residents rarely engage in physical activity and nutrition programmes offered, with poor attendance and low use of existing facilities such as ...

  18. Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments; Preprint

    Kandt, A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper details the Indian Solar City Programme, provides an overview of one city's Master Plan and implementation progress, describes NREL's support of the Indian Solar City Programme, and outlines synergies and differences between the Indian and American programs including unique challenges and opportunities India is facing.

  19. Establishment of an international reference data library of nuclear activation cross sections. Summary report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    The present report contains the Summary of the Second IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''Establishment of an International Reference Data Library of Nuclear Activation Cross Sections''. The meeting was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section with co-operation and assistance of local organizers from the Instituto de Fusion Nuclear de la Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain, from 13 to 16 May 1996. Summarized are the conclusions and recommendations of the meeting together with a list of actions and deadlines. Attached are the detailed agenda and list of participants. (author). 4 refs, 1 tab

  20. Hydrogen activities in the European Union work-programme; Activites liees a l'hydrogene dans le programme de travail de l'Union Europeenne

    Bahbout, A.; Tartaglia, G.P. [Joint Research Centre, IHCP, Ispra (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    vehicles using hydrogen have joined forces with the aim of improving the coordination of licensing and approval procedures needed for putting hydrogen powered vehicles on the road. The 5. Framework Programme eventually includes hydrogen activities, even if no specific reference is made to hydrogen, following the policy of the Commission to provide directions and fund research according to broad objectives. Hydrogen appears integrated in the wider context of the thematic lines of the work programme. In the programme 'Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development', the activities are concerned with the generation of electricity, and/or heat, with reduced CO{sub 2} emissions from biomass or other fuels. Moreover, development, demonstration, integration of new and renewable energy sources into energy systems is foreseen. Specifically for fuel cells: independent evaluation of their performance against standardised measurement procedures, study of materials involved and possibilities for improvement (abstract only). (authors)

  1. Active optics null test system based on a liquid crystal programmable spatial light modulator

    Ares, Miguel; Royo, Santiago; Sergievskaya, Irina; Riu, Jordi

    2010-11-10

    We present an active null test system adapted to test lenses and wavefronts with complex shapes and strong local deformations. This system provides greater flexibility than conventional static null tests that match only a precisely positioned, individual wavefront. The system is based on a cylindrical Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a commercial liquid crystal programmable phase modulator (PPM), which acts as the active null corrector, enabling the compensation of large strokes with high fidelity in a single iteration, and a spatial filter to remove unmodulated light when steep phase changes are compensated. We have evaluated the PPM's phase response at 635 nm and checked its performance by measuring its capability to generate different amounts of defocus aberration, finding root mean squared errors below {lambda}/18 for spherical wavefronts with peak-to-valley heights of up to 78.7{lambda}, which stands as the limit from which diffractive artifacts created by the PPM have been found to be critical under no spatial filtering. Results of a null test for a complex lens (an ophthalmic customized progressive addition lens) are presented and discussed.

  2. Establishment of human T cell clones exhibiting natural killer-like activity

    Alam, Shahabuddin; Katakura, Yoshinori; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    1999-01-01

    We have succeeded in establishing a method to reproducibly immortalize human T cells by oncogene(s) transfection (Alam, 1997). This study was based on our previous discoveries that these immortalized T cell lines contained T cells which showed cytotoxicity against K562 cells in MHC-nonrestricted manner. Then we attempted to obtain human T cell clones exhibiting natural killer-like activity. Here, we tried to establish clones from these immortalized T cell lines by limiting dilution after stim...

  3. Modern professional development of specialists of preschool educational establishments status to educationally-health activity

    Makovetskaya N.V.

    2010-01-01

    In the article the modern consisting of problem of professional development of teachers is analysed in Ukraine. The features of educational space are described in our country. The priority tasks of professional development of teachers, basis and key going, are certain near professional development of specialists of preschool educational establishments to educationally-health activity. Specialists of preschool educational establishments are needed in creation of conditions for further professi...

  4. JRC/IE support activities to PHARE nuclear safety programmes. Dissemination of PHARE project results

    Nuclear safety in Europe is one of European Union's primary concerns, therefore the European Union decided to take a prominent role to help the New Independent States and countries of Central and Eastern Europe to ensure the safety of their nuclear reactors. The European Union TACIS and PHARE programmes in nuclear safety have been undertaken since 1990. The European Commission's Directorate General External Relations (EC DG RELEX) and, Directorate General Europe Aid Co-operation Office (EC DG AIDCO), are responsible for programming and management of implementation of TACIS projects. Directorate General Enlargement (EC DG ELARG) is responsible for programming PHARE programmes, but implementation of most projects has been decentralised since 1999 budget year to the Beneficiary countries. DG ELARG acts as backstopping for the relevant EC Delegations. In these activities, the TSSTP Unit at the JRC/IE in Petten, The Netherlands, is a technical and scientific adviser of DG RELEX and DG AIDCO and provides support to DG ELARG for very specific technical issues. Several PHARE projects aiming at improving nuclear safety have been successfully implemented for a number of plants from Central and Eastern Europe. In some cases major safety issues have been addressed by means of multi-country projects and results have been disseminated to the rest of the nuclear community. Although a lot of information has been exchanged at a bilateral level, further effort is needed to collect the project results in a systematic way and make them available by means of the internet. At present the TSSTP Unit is implementing two projects for dissemination of PHARE project results. This activity will take a better advantage of today's communication technologies and ensure the management of the acquired knowledge through preservation and user-friendly access and retrieval of the project results. The paper provides an outline of the TSSTP Unit relevant knowledge preservation initiative, a description

  5. Establishment and evolution of Radiological Environmental Monitoring Programmes in nuclear power plants; Establecimiento y evolucion de los programas de vigilancia radiologica ambiental en las centrales nucleares

    Marugan, I.; Luque, S.; Martin, J. L.; Rey, C.; Salas, R.; Sterling, A.; Ramos, L. M.

    2013-09-01

    This article presents a brief overview of how the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Programmes carried out around nuclear power plants have evolved associated to different reasons as the legal framework, operational phases of the facilities, development on the detection and measurement of low levels of radiation due to the state of art and best available technologies, changes within sites as well as in their surroundings and accident taken place inside and outside of our borders. (Author)

  6. Labour market programmes and labour market outcomes: a study of the Swedish active labour market interventions

    Adda, Jérôme; Costa Dias, Mónica; Meghir, Costas; Sianesi, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of Swedish welfare-to-work programmes on labour market performance including wages, labour market status, unemployment duration and future welfare-to-work participation. We develop a structural dynamic model of labour supply which incorporates detailed institutional features of these policies and allows for selection on observables and unobservables. We estimate the model from a rich administrative panel data set and show that training programmes - which account...

  7. Activating welfare recipients with health complaints: Reasons for failure of a cognitive training programme

    Inge Bramsen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Activating welfare recipients with health complaints: Reasons for failure of a cognitive training programme In western welfare states, a trend towards activation has led to the development of interventions aimed at welfare recipients with health complaints. Forms of coercion are increasingly applied within this activation policy. An example of this approach is the Dutch project Healthy to Work (HtW which developed and evaluated an intervention combining an exercise program with cognitive training. Although HtW had been selected as an example of good practice, a randomized clinical trial did not show beneficial effects. This cognitive training programme based on rational-emotive therapy has not been studied separately as yet. Therefore, an in-depth qualitative study was conducted to examine reasons for failure. A purposive sample of six trainers were interviewed. The results indicated that trainers encountered problems with the heterogeneity of participants and different problems, expectations and labour market obstructions than expected beforehand. The mandatory nature of HtW had a negative effect on motivation of both participants and trainers. The discussion questions the assumption that coping style and cognitions of welfare recipients with health problems are the main obstacles to finding work, and the policy to ignore physical limitations of participants. We suggest that in this complex area of practice, improvement can be achieved by allowing trainers to adapt and learn during the process, while also reflecting on normative aspects, and by taking perspectives of welfare recipients themselves into account. Het activeren van uitkeringsgerechtigden met gezondheidsklachten: Oorzaken voor het falen van een cognitief trainingsprogramma Een groeiende nadruk op de activering van uitkeringsgerechtigden heeft in veel Westerse verzorgingsstaten geleid tot de ontwikkeling van interventies die gericht zijn op uitkeringsgerechtigden met

  8. Technology Programme

    The technology activities carried out by the Euratom-ENEA Association in the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement concern the Next Step (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER), the Long-Term Programme (breeder blanket, materials, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - IFMIF), Power Plant Conceptual Studies and Socio-Economic Studies. The Underlying Technology Programme was set up to complement the fusion activities as well to develop technologies with a wider range of interest. The Technology Programme mainly involves staff from the Frascati laboratories of the Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit and from the Brasimone laboratories of the Advanced Physics Technologies Unit. Other ENEA units also provide valuable contributions to the programme. ENEA is heavily engaged in component development/testing and in design and safety activities for the European Fusion Technology Programme. Although the work documented in the following covers a large range of topics that differ considerably because they concern the development of extremely complex systems, the high level of integration and coordination ensures the capability to cover the fusion system as a whole. In 2004 the most significant testing activities concerned the ITER primary beryllium-coated first wall. In the field of high-heat-flux components, an important achievement was the qualification of the process for depositing a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles. This new process, pre-brazed casting (PBC), allows the hot radial pressing (HRP) joining procedure to be used also for CFC-based armour monoblock divertor components. The PBC and HRP processes are candidates for the construction of the ITER divertor. In the materials field an important milestone was the commissioning of a new facility for chemical vapour infiltration/deposition, used for optimising silicon carbide composite (SiCf/SiC) components. Eight patents were deposited during 2004

  9. Technology Programme

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The technology activities carried out by the Euratom-ENEA Association in the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement concern the Next Step (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER), the Long-Term Programme (breeder blanket, materials, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - IFMIF), Power Plant Conceptual Studies and Socio-Economic Studies. The Underlying Technology Programme was set up to complement the fusion activities as well to develop technologies with a wider range of interest. The Technology Programme mainly involves staff from the Frascati laboratories of the Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit and from the Brasimone laboratories of the Advanced Physics Technologies Unit. Other ENEA units also provide valuable contributions to the programme. ENEA is heavily engaged in component development/testing and in design and safety activities for the European Fusion Technology Programme. Although the work documented in the following covers a large range of topics that differ considerably because they concern the development of extremely complex systems, the high level of integration and coordination ensures the capability to cover the fusion system as a whole. In 2004 the most significant testing activities concerned the ITER primary beryllium-coated first wall. In the field of high-heat-flux components, an important achievement was the qualification of the process for depositing a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles. This new process, pre-brazed casting (PBC), allows the hot radial pressing (HRP) joining procedure to be used also for CFC-based armour monoblock divertor components. The PBC and HRP processes are candidates for the construction of the ITER divertor. In the materials field an important milestone was the commissioning of a new facility for chemical vapour infiltration/deposition, used for optimising silicon carbide composite (SiCf/SiC) components. Eight patents were deposited during 2004

  10. Formation of Practical Activity Competence of Future Professionals in Higher Educational Establishments of Ukraine and Germany

    Gritchenko Iryna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses topical issues of implementation competency-based approach in the modern educational system of Ukraine and Germany. A comparative characterization of competency models in these countries is given. The essence of “organizational pedagogical conditions” concept is enlightened. Its author's interpretation is presented. The following organizational pedagogical conditions of practical activity competence formation in future foreign language teachers in the higher pedagogical educational establishment are defined and described: the availability of appropriate logistical and personnel support, complex Internet-technologies use in the process of future foreign language teachers' preparation during studying in the higher educational establishment and the creation of educational creative environment with the inclusion of future specialists in educational and research activities. The author sees the implementation of these organizational pedagogical conditions in conducting proper teachers' preparation in terms of innovative pedagogy, the activation methods use of students' educational and cognitive activity, the introduction of the latest educational informational technologies. The following means are defined as effective: trainings, methodological support, e-education (Moodle platform, where it can be best implemented. It is noted that the establishment of the appropriate educational environment in HEE affects the motivation of students' learning, involves them in various types of independent work, thereby increasing the level of future professionals' knowledge and skills, acquiring creative activity experience, forming valuable attitude to professional activities, and thus improving the quality of education.

  11. Establishing the added benefit of measuring MMP9 in FOB positive patients as a part of the Wolverhampton colorectal cancer screening programme

    Wakelam Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bowel cancer is common and a major cause of death. The NHS is currently rolling out a national bowel cancer screening programme that aims to cover the entire population by 2010. The programme will be based on the Faecal Occult Blood test (FOBt that reduces mortality from colon cancer by 16%. However, FOB testing has a relatively low positive predictive value, with associated unnecessary cost, risk and anxiety from subsequent investigation, and is unacceptable to a proportion of the target population. Increased levels of an enzyme called matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 have been found to be associated with colorectal cancer, and this can be measured from a blood sample. MMP9 has potential for detecting those at risk of having colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to assess whether MMP9 estimation enhances the predictive value of a positive FOBt. Methods and design FOBt positive people aged 60–69 years attending the Wolverhampton NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Unit and providing consent for colonoscopy will be recruited. Participants will provide a blood sample prior to colonoscopy and permission for collection of the clinical outcome from screening unit records. Multivariate logistic regression analyses will determine the independent factors (patient and disease related, MMP9 associated with the prediction of neoplasia. Discussion Colorectal cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Pilot studies have confirmed the feasibility of the national cancer screening programme that is based on FOBt. However, the test has high false positive rates. MMP9 has significant potential as a marker for both adenomas and cancers. This study is to examine whether using MMP9 as an adjunct to FOBt improves the accuracy of screening and reduces the number of false positive tests that cause anxiety and require invasive and potentially harmful investigation.

  12. The IAEA co-ordinated research programme on activation cross sections for the generation of long-lived radionuclides of importance in fusion reactor technology. Final report

    The present report summarizes the final results of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''Activation Cross Section for the Generator of Long-lived Radionuclides of Importance in Fusion Reactor Technology''. The goal of the CRP was to obtain reliable information (experimental and evaluated) for 16 long-lived activation reactions of special importance to fusion reactor technology. By limiting the scope of the CRP to just 16 reactions it was possible to establish a very effective focus to the joint effort of many laboratories that has led to the generation of a set of valuable new data which provide satisfactory answers to several questions of technological concern to fusion. (author). 11 refs, 5 tabs

  13. Fusion reactor technology studies common development activities of CEA and KFK in the frame of the european community fusion programme

    In 1982, it was decided in the European Community to complement the fusion programme by a technology part. The initial content of this technology programme was defined by European experts. The laboratories associated to Euratom were invited to participate with proposals, which were then selected by the Fusion Technology Steering Committee. Coherent with these activities, steps were taken to define the next generation of fusion experiments by the newly founded Next European Torus (NET) Team. To contribute in the most efficient way, CEA and KfK have agreed to cooperate by complementary activities, common experiments and by forming common research groups. The particular agreements have been kept open for partners from other EC laboratories to join. The different cooperative activities in the field of nuclear technologies are described below together with first results and findings

  14. National Report Germany: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Research Activities Supported by the German Space Programme in 2013-2015

    Kuhl, R.; Gritzner, C.; Friedrichs, D.

    2015-09-01

    Mainly sounding rockets but also stratospheric balloons have played a crucial role in implementing the German Space Programme since many years. Research activities were conducted in the fields of Microgravity Research, Space Science, Earth Observation, Space Technology Development, and Education. Currently, the mesosphere and ionosphere of the Earth and the photosphere and chromosphere of the Sun are in the focus of German research activities in the field of Space Science. Microgravity related topics are studied in the disciplines of Life and Physical Sciences during ballistic TEXUS and MAPHEUS rocket flights. A lot of student activities are currently supported by the agencies SNSB and DLR under the auspices of the Swedish-German programme REXUS/BEXUS.

  15. SET-Routes programme

    CERN audiovisual service

    2009-01-01

    The SET-Routes programme, launched in 2007 with the goal of attracting girls and young women to careers in science, came to an end in April this year. The result of a collaboration between EMBL, EMBO and CERN, the programme established a network of "ambassadors", women scientists who went out to talk about their careers in science at schools and universities across Europe.

  16. The Impact of Adventure Based Activity at Malaysian National Service Training Programme on Team Cohesion: A Demographic Analysis.

    Jaffry Zakaria

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the effects of physical module elements (adventure based activity included in the Malaysian National Service Programme and to investigate the socio-demographic variables impact on team cohesion building among the participants. In this study, the participants were selected from three different camps, namely, Tasoh camp, Guar Chenderai camp and Meranti camp, located in the state of Perlis, Malaysia. The participants were those from the second batch intake in the year 2007. The sample sizes comprised of 994 participants (480=males, 514=females. The present study applied a pre-test and post-test design. The group was tested before and after the programme. This design was chosen because it could measure the impacts of the adventure-based activity towards team cohesion over time through the pre- and post-test scores (Berg & Latin, 2004. The variables comprised of the demographic factors (age, gender and place of residence, which included team cohesion were measured by Group Environmental Questionnaire (GEQ (Carron, Widmeyer, & Brawley, 1985. Results indicated that the participants of the National Service Training Programme underwent group cohesion change during the Physical Module activities (adventure based activities that were carried out at the camp. The changes were observable based on the statistically analyzed data during the pre and post-test.

  17. The Impact of Adventure Based Activity at Malaysian National Service Training Programme on Team Cohesion: A Demographic Analysis.

    Jaffry Zakaria; Mazuki Mohd Yasim; Md Amin Md Taff

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of physical module elements (adventure based activity) included in the Malaysian National Service Programme and to investigate the socio-demographic variables impact on team cohesion building among the participants. In this study, the participants were selected from three different camps, namely, Tasoh camp, Guar Chenderai camp and Meranti camp, located in the state of Perlis, Malaysia. The participants were those from the second batch intake in the yea...

  18. Do welfare-to-work initiatives work? : evidence from an activation programme targeted at social security recipients in Norway

    Rønsen, Marit; Skarðhamar, Torbjørn

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: This paper presents results from an evaluation of a Norwegian initiative to combat poverty launched in 2003. Central to the plan is a broad spectrum of rehabilitation and activation measures intended to help long-term social security recipients from welfare to work. We illuminate short-term effects up to the end of 2004, taking a dual approach: First, we analyse transitions to work among participants in the programme and study the determinants of this process by means of survival...

  19. Longitudinal changes in heart rate after participating in the Groningen Active Living Model (GALM) recreational sports programme

    Jong, Johan de; Lemmink, Koen; Scherder, Erik; Stewart, Roy; King, Abby

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in heart rate during submaximal exercise as an index of cardiovascular function in older adults participating in the Groningen Active Living Model recreational sports programme who were sedentary or underactive at baseline. A repeated measurement design was conducted; 151 participants were included, providing 398 heart rate files over a period of 18 months. Multi-level analyses were conducted; growth and final models were developed. Significant...

  20. Decrease in heart rate after longitudinal participation in the Groningen Active Living Model (GALM) recreational sports programme

    Jong, Johan de; Lemmink, Koen; Scherder, Erik; Stewart, Roy; King, Abby; Stevens, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in heart rate during submaximal exercise as an index of cardiovascular function in older adults participating in the Groningen Active Living Model recreational sports programme who were sedentary or underactive at baseline. A repeated measurement design was conducted; 151 participants were included, providing 398 heart rate files over a period of 18 months. Multi-level analyses were conducted; growth and final models were developed. Significant...

  1. Have guidelines addressing physical activity been established in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease?

    Carmine Finelli; Giovanni Tarantino

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to highlight,in relation to the currently accepted pathophysiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD),the known exercise habits of patients with NAFLD and to detail the benefits of lifestyle modification with exercise (and/or physical activity) on parameters of metabolic syndrome.More rigorous,controlled studies of longer duration and defined histopathological end-points comparing exercise alone and other treatment are needed before better,evidence-based physical activity modification guidelines can be established,since several questions remain unanswered.

  2. Establishment and application of the cyclic neutron activation analysis method on mini-reactor

    Background: Instrument neutron activation analysis is a nondestructive analytic method. Some elements after irradiation produce short half-life radio-nuclides (<60 s), and others produce both long-lived and short-lived nuclides. For these short-lived nuclides, the single measurement has big error. Purpose: In order to reduce the error, cyclic neutron activation analysis can be used to improve the sensitivity. Methods: A device was designed to be connected to the sample transporter, detector and irradiation pipeline in the reactor, which can automatically control the irradiation time and counting time. According to the nuclear parameters of certain elements, irradiation time and counting time and cycle times were determined by experiment. Cyclic activation analysis method was established at the mini-reactor. Results: This paper studied cyclic activation analysis conditions of 17 kinds of element, and applied to the determination of actual samples. Cyclic epithermal neutron activation analysis (CENAA) method was discussed too. By the analysis of national standard reference materials, the reliability of this method was confirmed. Conclusion: Cyclic neutron activation analysis (CNAA) is an effective analytic method for only short life nuclide elements. For both short and long lived nuclides of elements, the cyclic activation analysis method can make the analytical cycle shorten, from a few days or several weeks to within a few minutes. Cyclic activation analysis has the advantages of high sensitivity, and its precision and accuracy are better than single short irradiation activation analysis. (authors)

  3. Active surveillance and control programme for Salmonella Dublin in Cattle

    Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Rattenborg, Erik

    2011-01-01

    surveillance systems. Register data might be useful for design of effective surveillance programmes for Salmonella Dublin in cattle in the future. Statistical analysis of register-based variables confirmed previously known risk factors for becoming test-positive (i.e. purchase of animals from test...

  4. Finnish Fusion Research Programme Yearbook 1993-1994

    Finnish Fusion Research Programme (FFUSION) is one of the national energy research programmes funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry and from 1995 by TEKES. National organization for fusion research is necessary for efficient and successful participation in international fusion programmes. FFUSION programme serves well for this purpose and it made possible to establish relations and the dialogue with the European Fusion Programme. The process led to the Finnish Association Euratom-TEKES in early 1995. The first period of the FFUSION programme (1993-1994) was preparation for the association to the Community Programme. The strategy was to emphasize fusion technology parallel with the basic fusion and plasma physics and to activate the related Finnish industry to collaborate and participate in the FFUSION programme and later in the European Fusion Programme. The key element in the strategy is the focusing our fairly small R and D effort to a few topics, which increases possibilities to be competitive in Europe. The physics programme in FFUSION deals mainly with theoretical and computational studies of radio-frequency heating in tokamak plasmas. Technology programme started with prestudies in 1993 and it concentrates into two areas: fusion reactor materials and remote handling systems. (8 figs., 3 tabs.)

  5. Petten establishment. Annual report 1978

    1978 was the second year in the Joint Research Centre's 1977-1980 multiannual research programme. Since the following exercise is intended to run from 1980 to 1983 with a one year overlap, new proposals will be placed before the Council of Ministers in 1979. To this end, a considerable part of the programme and project management staff activities has been devoted to the peliminary preparation of future plans. In general it is expected that the Establishment's three research activities will continue along the lines already proceeding successfully in the present programme in the materials testing reactor (HFR), high temperature materials and organic chemistry spheres with some updating and refocussing where necessary. Consultation with the appropriate Advisory Committees for Programme Management has been contributed to these processes. Another important development has been the question of site security, following decisions of the European Commission and the Dutch Government to apply International Atomic Agency regulations. The work to apply the necessary measures has had to be executed in the shortest possible time. We have endeavoured to maintain and increase for all three programmes the already intensive contacts with research institutes and industry in the Member States. Important in this connection are the international conferences, 'Alloy 800' held in March and 'Ramping and Load following Behaviour of Reactor Fuel' in December, as well as an international meeting of the 'irradiation Devices Working Party' which took place in May

  6. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study

    Bischoff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO) nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives.Design: This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify th...

  7. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study

    Alexander Bischoff

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO) nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives. Design: This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify t...

  8. The CERN & Society programme launches its newsletter

    Matteo Castoldi

    2016-01-01

    The newsletter will be issued quarterly. Sign up to remain informed about the latest initiatives of the CERN & Society programme!    The CERN & Society programme encompasses projects in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and creativity that spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society. The programme is funded primarily by the CERN & Society Foundation, a charitable foundation established by CERN and supported by individuals, trusts, organisations and commercial companies. The projects are inspired or enabled by CERN but lie outside of the Laboratory’s specific research mandate. We especially want to help young talent from around the world to flourish in the future. The programme is now launching its newsletter, which will be issued quarterly. Everybody who wants to be informed about CERN & Society’s activities, stay up-to-date with its latest in...

  9. Protocol of a longitudinal cohort study on physical activity behaviour in physically disabled patients participating in a rehabilitation counselling programme: ReSpAct

    Alingh, Rolinde A; Hoekstra, Femke; van der Schans, Cees P; Hettinga, Florentina J; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stimulating physical activity behaviour in persons with a physical disability is important, especially after discharge from rehabilitation. A tailored counselling programme covering both the period of the rehabilitation treatment and the first months at home seems on the average effective. However, a considerable variation in response is observed in the sense that some patients show a relevant beneficial response while others show no or only a small response on physical activity behaviour. The Rehabilitation, Sports and Active lifestyle (ReSpAct) study aims to estimate the associations of patient and programme characteristics with patients’ physical activity behaviour after their participation in a tailored counselling programme. Methods and analysis A questionnaire-based nationwide longitudinal prospective cohort study is conducted. Participants are recruited from 18 rehabilitation centres and hospitals in The Netherlands. 2000 participants with a physical disability or chronic disease will be followed during and after their participation in a tailored counselling programme. Programme outcomes on physical activity behaviour and patient as well as programme characteristics that may be associated with differences in physical activity behaviour after programme completion are being assessed. Data collection takes place at baseline and 14, 33 and 52 weeks after discharge from rehabilitation. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has been approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of the University Medical Centre Groningen and at individual participating institutions. All participants give written informed consent. The study results will provide new insights into factors that may help explain the differences in physical activity behaviour of patients with a physical disability after they have participated in the same physical activity and sports stimulation programme. Thereby, it will support healthcare professionals to tailor their guidance and

  10. REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL RESTOCKING PROGRAMMEACTIVE PROTECTION OF NATIVE CRAYFISH IN POLAND” 1999-2001

    ŠMIETANA P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available After the first spread of crayfish plague (aphanomycosis at the end of the nineteenth century, the formerly abundant populations of native crayfish in Poland declined drastically. Analysis of historical data on the occurrence and distribution of crayfish in Poland led to the conclusion that without human intervention the native crayfish species would be at high risk of being made extinct. The largest programme concerning crayfish monitoring and restocking in Poland was “Active protection of native crayfish in Poland” conducted by the Inland Fisheries Institute, the Department of Ecology, University of Szczecin, the Department of Zoology, Warsaw Agricultural University and the University of Warmia and Mazury that was funded by the EkoFundusz Foundation and Inland Fisheries Institute in 1999-2001. One of the main objectives and results of this programme was the determination of indigenous crayfish distribution in Poland (mainly Astacus astacus and Astacus leptodactylus and the restocking of suitable habitats with indigenous crayfish. The densest populations (> 2 500 adult individuals per hectare were used as a source of restocking material. Restocking was performed in 54 water bodies using a total of 45 200 individuals of A. astacus and 9 800 of A. leptodactylus. Between 2001-2002, the success of the restocking programme was monitored. According to the results obtained so far, the restocking exercise has been successful in at least 60.8% of the cases.

  11. [Analysis of fourteen French national programmes on physical activity and sports as determinants of health from 2001 to 2006].

    Bréchat, Pierre-Henri; Vogel, Thomas; Berthel, Marc; Kaltenbach, Georges; Le Divenah, Aude; Segouin, Christophe; Rymer, Roland; Lonsdorfer, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity and sports are considered as one of the determinants of health. The aim of this study is to review the rationale for the formulation of this public health issue and its integration in national action plans. The study shows that fourteen national programmes were drafted and implemented between 2001 and 2006 by seven institutions. The research methodology was based on crossing data obtained from semi-directed interviews and documents regarding the design, implementation and follow-up of these programmes. For the conditions of the success, the fourteen actions scored an average of 175.0 +/- 66.9 out of 300%. Public health actors and professionals must be given more opportunities to involve themselves and engage in developing stronger relationships and linkages, in particular with the institutional and community settings. In general, the most invested parts of a programme are the structural and operational aspects of activities. Six significant points surfaced from the study: consideration of drug use as an addictive behaviour; recognition of the psychological stress of professional athletes; acknowledgment of youth as being at high risk for doping behaviour; integration of the concept that physical activity and sports must take the benefit/risk perspective into account; and the necessity to promote health. Through the exchange of numerous local and regional experiences, an optimisation of their synergistic connections was made possible on a continuum extending from "health promotion through physical activity and sports" to "prevention of drug-use and doping behaviours". Professionals have been able to develop actions in the above-mentioned domains across this continuum that have, to date, remained isolated. Proposals are made to strengthen these dynamics. Other health determinants and public health priorities could be investigated with the same methodology. PMID:19425524

  12. Programme development for the controlled removal of contamination and activated materials during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    Over the past decade Taywood Engineering Limited has been carrying out a development programme on the use of explosives for the controlled removal of activated and/or contaminated parts of nuclear facilities undergoing decommissioning. Factors likely to affect the concrete removal have been investigated including concrete removal from re-entrant corners, curved surfaces and ducts, and from behind reinforcement and steel liners. Procedures for achieving a required level of material removal without impairing the remaining structure had been developed. The application of finite element methods to this class of problem with emphasis on numerical modelling of the concrete material has been investigated. (author)

  13. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study

    Alexander Bischoff

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives. Design: This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify the key difficulties involved with establishing and implementing a new nursing school, and which factors helped the project achieve its goals. Results: Six themes emerged from the experiences that shaped the course of the project: 1 Motivation can be sustained if the rationale of the project is in line with its aims. Indeed, the project's primary health care focus was to strengthen the nursing workforce and build a public–private partnership with an FBO. All these were strengths, which helped in the midst of all the uncertainties. 2 Communication was an important and often underrated factor for all types of development projects. 3 Managing the unknown and 4 managing expectations characterised the project inception. Almost all themes had to do with 5 handling conflicts. With so many participants having their own agendas, tensions were unavoidable. A final theme was 6 the need to adjust to ever-changing targets. Conclusions: This retrospective auto-ethnographic manuscript serves as a small-scale case study, to illustrate how issues that can be generalised to other settings can be deconstructed to demonstrate how they influence health development projects in developing countries. From this narrative of experiences, key recommendations include the following: 1 Find the right ratio of stakeholders, participants, and agendas, and do not overload the project; 2 Be alert and communicate as much as possible with staff and do not ignore issues hoping they will solve

  14. Technology programme

    The technology activities carried out by the EURATOM-ENEA Association concern the continuation of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) as well as the ITER activities coordinated by the ITER International Office and Fusion for Energy. Also included in the activities are design and RD under the Broader Approach Agreement between the EU and Japan. In order to better contribute to the programme a number of consortium agreements among the Associations are being signed. Collaboration with industries in view of their participation in the construction of ITER was further strengthened, mainly in the field of magnet and divertor components. The new European Test Blanket Facility at ENEA Brasimone was completed; the design of the ITER radial neutron camera was optimised and the performance achievable with the in-vessel viewing system was further assessed by experimental trials. Design activities for the JT-60SA magnet and power supply system as well as the design and experimental activities related to the target of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility were continued. Significant work was done to define quality assurance for neutronics analyses. Mockups of the ITER pre-compression ring made in glass fibre epoxy were tested. The activities and results documented in the following illustrate ENEA's efforts to support fusion development

  15. The special programme of research in human reproduction: forty years of activities to achieve reproductive health for all.

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; d'Arcangues, Catherine; Harris Requejo, Jennifer; Schafer, Alessandra; Say, Lale; Merialdi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Special Programme of Research in Human Reproduction (HRP), co-sponsored by the UNDP, UNFPA, WHO, and the World Bank, is celebrating 40 years of activities with an expansion of its mandate and new co-sponsors. When it began, in 1972, the main focus was on evaluating the acceptability, effectiveness, and safety of existing fertility-regulating methods, as well as developing new, improved modalities for family planning. In 1994, HRP not only made major contributions to the Plan of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD); it also broadened its scope of work to include other aspects of health dealing with sexuality and reproduction, adding a specific perspective on gender issues and human rights. In 2002, HRP's mandate was once again broadened to include sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS and in 2003 it was further expanded to research activities on preventing violence against women and its many dire health consequences. Today, the work of the Programme includes research on: the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents, women, and men; maternal and perinatal health; reproductive tract and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV/AIDS); family planning; infertility; unsafe abortion; sexual health; screening for cancer of the cervix in developing countries, and gender and reproductive rights. Additional activities by the Programme have included: fostering international cooperation in the field of human reproduction; the elaboration of WHO's first Global Reproductive Health Strategy; work leading to the inclusion of ICPD's goal 'reproductive health for all by 2015' into the Millennium Development Goal framework; the promotion of critical interagency statements on the public health, legal, and human rights implications of female genital mutilation and gender-biased sex selection. Finally, HRP has been involved in the creation of guidelines and tools, such as the 'Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use

  16. Research programme 'Active Solar Energy Use - Solar Heating and Heat Storage'. Activities and projects 2003; Programme 'Solaire actif - Chaleur et Stockage de chaleur'. Activites et projets en 2003

    Hadorn, J.-C. [Base Consultants, Geneva (Switzerland); Renaud, P. [Planair SA, La Sagne (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    In this report by the research, development and demonstration (RD+D) programme coordinators the objectives, activities and main results in the area of solar heating and heat storage in Switzerland are presented for 2003. In a stagnating market environment the strategy of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy mainly consists in improving the quality and durability of solar collectors and materials, optimizing combisystems for space heating and domestic hot water preparation, searching for storage systems with a higher energy storage density than in the case of sensible heat storage in water, developing coloured solar collectors for more architectonic freedom, and finalizing a seasonal heat storage project for 100 dwellings to demonstrate the feasibility of solar fractions larger than 50% in apartment houses. Support was granted to the Swiss Testing Facility SPF in Rapperswil as in previous years; SPF was the first European testing institute to perform solar collector labeling according to the new rules of the 'Solar Keymark', introduced in cooperation with the European Committee for Standardization CEN. Several 2003 projects were conducted within the framework of the Solar Heating and Cooling Programme of the International Energy Agency IEA. Computerized simulation tools were improved. With the aim of jointly producing high-temperature heat and electric power a solar installation including a concentrating collector and a thermodynamic machine based on a Rankine cycle is still being developed. Seasonal underground heat storage was studied in detail by means of a validated computer simulation programme. Design guidelines were obtained for such a storage used in the summer time for cooling and in the winter time for space heating via a heat pump: depending on the ratio 'summer cooling / winter heating', cooling requires a cooling machine, or direct cooling without such a machine is possible. The report ends up with the list of all supported RD

  17. Review of twenty-five years' activities of Co-60 irradiation facility in Tokai Research Establishment

    Since the Co-60 irradiation facility was established in Tokai Research Establishment in 1958, it has been used for many irradiation services in a wide field in responce to the various needs both in JAERI and from the outside of JAERI. During this period the reconstructions and repairs have been performed in many respects of the equipments and the building, and the irradiation sources were newly added in several times. The present report is a history of the activity of the Co-60 irradiation facility for 25 years, describing 1) the maintenance and the reformations of the equipments associated with the cave such as a reinforcement of the cave shielding, the renewal of the shielding windows and the reformation of the source storage, 2) the specifications and the assembly workes of the sources, 3) the summary of the main apparatuses used in the experiments, 4) the extention and the reconstructions of the building, 5) the historical changes of the themes of experiments performed by the users. (author)

  18. Experience from the Inspection of Licensees' Outage Activities, Including Fire Protection Programmes, Event Response Inspections, and the Impact of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident on Inspection Programmes. Workshop Proceedings, Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States, 7-10 April 2014

    The main purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum of exchange of information on the regulatory inspection activities. Participants had the opportunity to meet with their counterparts from other countries and organisations to discuss current and future issues on the selected topics. They developed conclusions regarding these issues and hopefully, identified methods to help improve their own inspection programmes. The NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established working groups and groups of experts in specialised topics. The Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) was formed in 1990 with the mandate '..to concentrate on the conduct of inspections and how the effectiveness of inspections could be evaluated..'. The WGIP facilitates the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA member countries. These proceedings cover the 12. International Workshop held by WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. This workshop, which is the twelfth in a series, along with many other activities performed by the Working Group, is directed towards this goal. The consensus from participants at previous workshops, noted that the value of meeting with people from other inspection organisations was one of the most important achievements. The focus of this workshop was on experience gained from regulatory inspection activities in three areas: - Inspection of Outage Activities Including Fire Protection Programmes. - Event Response Inspections. - The Impact of Inspection Programmes of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Accident. The main objectives of the WGIP workshops are to enable inspectors to meet with inspectors from other organisations, to exchange information regarding regulatory inspection

  19. Establishment of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility at PARR-1

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility at through tube of upgraded PARR-1 reactor has been established. The salient features of the facility have been described. The in-pile as well as external collimators, beam shutter, target assembly and beam catcher were designed and fabricated indigenously. The flux at target position is 1.8x10/sup 10/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/sec and the cadmium ratio is about 10 Anti-Compton/pair spectrometer has been installed at 90 deg. to the incident beam. The measurements of the prompt gamma rays from thermal neutron capture in chlorine, nitrogen and chromium were carried out to calibrate HPGe detector up to 10 MeV. The set-up will be used in the determination of non-metals that form the elements of geological and biological materials or other trace elements with high thermal capture cross sections with improved peak/compton ratio of the spectrometer. (author)

  20. Finnish bioenergy research programme

    Asplund, D. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Finland is a leading country in the use of biofuels and has excellent opportunities to increase the use of biofuels by up to 25-30 %. The Finnish Government has set an objective for the promotion of bioenergy. The aim is to increase the use of bioenergy by about 25 % from the present level by 2005, and the increment corresponds to 1.5 million tonnes of oil equivalent (toe) per year. The R and D work has been considered as an important factor to achieve this ambitious goal. Energy research was organised into a series of research programmes in 1988 in accordance with the proposal of Finnish Energy Research Committee. The object of the research programmes is to enhance research activities and to bundle individual projects together into larger research packages. The common target of the Finnish energy research programmes is to proceed from basic and applied research to product development and pilot operation, and after that to the first commercial applications, e.g. demonstrations. As the organisation of energy research to programmes has led to good results, the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry decided to go on with this practice by launching new six-year programmes in 1993-1998. One of these programmes is the Bioenergy Research Programme and the co-ordination of this programme is carried out by VTT Energy. Besides VTT Energy the Finnish Forest Research Institute, Work Efficiency Institute, Metsaeteho and University of Joensuu are participating in the programme 7 refs.

  1. 2000-2006 National Wood Energy Programme. 2000-2005 Activities Report

    2005 was marked by key decisions which were taken with the aim of developing the biomass sector as a substitute for fossil fuels. Indeed, to achieve the ambitious objectives for renewable sources of energy set out by the July 2005 Energy Policy Orientation Programme (POPE), we must make great use of biomass, particularly to increase by 50% the share of renewable thermal energy between now and 2010 and to enable biofuels to represent 7% of all fuels used at the same date. To a lesser extent, and in conjunction with heat production, the share of biomass in renewable electricity production also needs to rise. Both the resource and key supply players are there and are ready to get organised in order to rise to these challenges. There is an abundant supply of agricultural and forest by-products. More than sixty companies organise and deliver heating wood. More than 300 government and professional promotion, regulatory, PR, finance, equipment construction and operation, research and engineering organizations are involved in this market. The strategic and economic context is highly favourable in the light of laws, directives and international agreements aiming to combat greenhouse gas emissions, but also due to the structural pressure on the price of fossil fuels. Wood energy, as a renewable energy source, has an important role to play in this context of growth. Furthermore, the wood energy sector should be developed using an exemplary sustainable development approach, which means that all the economic, social and environmental effects are taken into account. In order to comprehensively assess the sector's environmental impact, a full chapter of this report presents the work and programmes set up by ADEME to reduce pollutant emissions produced by biomass combustion, particularly from private households. Moreover, consultation and dialogue between those involved must be widened in order to enable all wood users to benefit from 'best forest use' which will be a key

  2. THE FINANCING OF THE ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE SECTORIAL OPERATIONAL PROGRAMME “INCREASE OF ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS”

    Vasile POPEANGĂ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sectorial Operational Programme “Increase of Economic Competitiveness” (further referred to as SOP IEC is one of the seven instruments (OPs, under the Convergence objective, for achieving the priorities of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF derived from the National Development Plan 2007 – 2013 (NDP, which aims to strengthen the strategic focus of the Economic and Social Cohesion policies across Romania, and to make the correct and appropriate linkages to the European policies and the Lisbon Strategy for growth and job creation. SOP IEC was elaborated under the coordination of the Managing Authority for SOP IEC -Ministry of Economy and Finance (MEF, and is the result of the partnership consultations both with the strategic partners (ACIS within MEF, other MAs–ministries coordinating other OPs, institutions designated as Intermediate Bodies, other line ministries, and agencies, social partners, civil society organizations, potential beneficiaries, other stakeholders involved in this field.

  3. Konaklama İşletmelerinde İşe Alıştırma Eğitiminin Örgütsel Bağlılığa Etkisi(The Effect of Orientation Programme on Organisational Commitment in Hospitality Establishments

    Edip ÖRÜCÜ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Organisational commitment is one of the most important variable to determine of emplyee’s behavior. Morover organisational commitment is a major predictor of employees behaviors such as e,g. turnover intention, job loyalty, job performance and motivation. On the other hand orientation rogramme is a crucial process to develop an uniform organisational culture. Orientation programme has inversely relationship with turnover behaviour. For this reason the purpose of this study is to examine relationships between orientation and organisational commitment. In six hotel establishments where is in Balıkesir was examined a questionarrrie to determinate the effect of orientation programme on organisational commitment and the benefits of orientation programme on 53 hotel employees. According to the result of analysis it was exposed that content of orientation programme and benefits of orientation programme has highly lineer correlation.

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning

  5. Fellows, Associates & Students Programmes

    2005-01-01

    The present document reviews the CERN Fellows, Associates and Students Programmes emphasizing the developments since 2000, when the previous review was presented to the Scientific Policy Committee, Finance Committee and Council (CERN/2325), and makes proposals for the coming five years. In summary, it is proposed to â?¢ Simplify the payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme, which will no longer depend on candidateâ??s home support and age; â?¢ Broaden the scope of the Fellowship Programme, in order to facilitate the recruitment of young graduates in computing and engineering. Age-related eligibility conditions and payment levels will be replaced with experience-based criteria; â?¢ Modify subsistence rates for the Doctoral and Technical Student Programme in order to harmonize CERNâ??s payment levels with those offered by other research establishments. This document is presented for discussion and recommendation by the Scientific Policy Committee and approval by the Council. Additiona...

  6. Emotional competencies of the sport coach: A qualitative approach within a physical activity programme for multiple sclerosis patients. A case study

    Mouton, Alexandre; Defossa, Clément; Cloes, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The main purposes of this study were to describe the intervention and to link emotional competencies and behaviors of the coach in a physical activity programme for MS patients. We wanted also to close this study proposing recommendations to improve MS patient physical activity management.

  7. Establishment of experimental system for 99Mo/99mTc production by neutron activation method

    The research and development (R and D) on the production of 99Mo/99mTc by neutron activation method ((n, γ) method) using JMTR has been carried out in the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center. The specific radioactivity of 99Mo by (n, γ) method is extremely low compared with that by fission method ((n,f) method), and as a result, the radioactive concentration of the obtained 99mTc solution is also low. Focusing on the solvent extraction method with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) as the recovery method of 99mTc from 99Mo produced by (n, γ) method to solve the problem, we have developed the 99Mo/99mTc separation/extraction/concentration devices, and we have carried out the performance tests with the devices. In this report, in order to establish an experimental system for 99Mo/99mTc production, the R and D results of the system are summarized on the improvement of the devices for high-recovery rate of 99mTc, on the dissolution of the pellets, which is the high-density molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) pellets irradiated in Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), on the production of 99mTc, and on the inspection of the recovered 99mTc solutions. (author)

  8. Risoe activity within the CEC SOFC programme: Measurement of internal stresses by neutron diffraction

    The objective was to design, fabricate and test a neutron diffraction equipment for measurements of internal stresses in SOFC components with high spatial resolution, and use the best suited equipment to measure internal stresses in SOFC components from other participants in the programme. Two different geometries and two different materials (Al2Ox and YSZ) were examined in order to investigate: the diffracted intensity as related to the diffracting volume, the diffracted intensity as related to the position of the sample relative to the slit arrangement, and the accuracy of the strain measurement. It was found that the beam collimation by two pairs of double slits increases and the diffraction efficiency decreases with decreased slit width, the diffracting volume is fairly well defined by the two pairs of double slits, and the accuracy in the determination of the internal stresses is adequate. With the equipment for high spatial resolution it is possible to measure lattice spacing in volumes of YSZ down to 1-10 mm3. Residual strains were measured for NiO, LSM and YSZ of a planar Risoe 3-layer cell (anode NiO/YSZ, electrode YSZ, cathode LMS/YSZ). Each layer was 42 by 42 by 0.1 mm. Slit widths from 10 to 20 mm were used. The best suited equipment was a combination of Soller slits (thin, neutron absorbing, parallel plates) and a double slit for both the incident and the diffracted beam. The measured residual strains for the components of the cell are: 300x10-6 (tension) for NiO, 700x10-6 (tension) for LSM and less than 450x10-6 (compression) for YSZ. (AB)

  9. Summary of nuclear model calculations for the IAEA coordinated research programme on activation cross sections for fusion reactor technology

    We describe research performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Programme on activation cross sections for fusion reactor technology. Using the GNASH nuclear modeling code, we have investigated: (1) production cross sections of isomeric states, and isomer ratios, for the reactions 94Mo(n,p)94Nb, 109Ag(n,2n)108mAg, 151Eu(n,2n)150m Eu, 153Eu(n,2n)152g+m2Eu, 159Tb(n,2n)158Tb, 187Re(n,2n)186mRe, 179Hf(n,2n)178m2Hf, 193Ir(n,2n)192m2Ir; (2) systematical dependence of isomeric ratios on isomer spin and incident-energy; (3) preequilibrium spin effects on calculated isomer production; and (4) intercomparison and evaluation of nuclear model excitation functions of isomer production cross sections. (author). 16 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  10. Joint Research Centre. Ispra establishment-Italy

    A comprehensive review of the work carried out during 1974 and 1975 in the Ispra establishment of the Joint Research Centre is presented. A description of the activity carried out within the context of the running programmes is given. Some of the most relevant scientific and technical achievement are described from the viewpoints of the Scientific Departments of the Centre. The technical and administrative support activities are also presented. A list of publications issued by the Ispra Scientific staff is given

  11. Co-ordination and methodological guidance of information activities in the Czechoslovak nuclear programme in building the branch information system

    The work of the control unit is described which secures the optimal operation of the system, its internal functions and its linkage with other systems. The aim of coordination and methodological activity is to strengthen working and organizational links within the framework of the construction and operation of sector information systems, the establishment of cooperation relations and the elimination of duplicity. (M.D.)

  12. Turkey's Basic Education Programme

    A. Remzi Sezgin

    2000-01-01

    In August 1997, the Government of Turkey greatly increased its efforts to implement eight-year obligatory education, through parliamentary approval of Law No. 4306 for Basic Education. The law mobilises significant resources for a major investment in school facilities through earmarked taxes, establishes a timetable for the Basic Education Programme and streamlines procedures to allow for swift action and implementation.

  13. The Durham Micro-Optics Programme

    Schmoll, J.; Dubbeldam, C. M.; Robertson, D. J.; Yao, J

    2005-01-01

    The Durham Micro-optics Programme was established to develop key components to be used for integral field spectrographs for upcoming instrumentation projects, focussing on currently existing telescopes as well as on the next generation of ELTs. These activities include monolithic multi-optics machining and grinding, optical surface improvement using various post-polishing techniques and replication of micro-optical components. While these developments have mostly slicer-type IFUs in mind, als...

  14. Establishment and activity of medical societies in Lower Styria - a review.

    Pivec, Gregor; Borko, Elko; Turk, Zmago

    2014-01-01

    In the 1860s, the medical societies in Habsburg Monarchy, undertook a part of the medical postgraduate training. Doctors and wound surgeons from Ljubljana established medical association in October 1861 («Ärztlicher Leseverein in Laibach»). At a meeting in October 1862 they decided to include all the doctors and wound surgeons from the Carniola region. Following the organization was renamed Medical Association in Carniola («Verein der Ärzte in Krain»). A similar provincial association was founded by the Styrian doctors in Graz as early as in May 1862 («Verein der Ärzte in Steiermark»). Similar medical associations were also established in the Lower Styria in the 1870s. The most important medical association was established in Maribor in 1876. Another medical association was established in Celje in 1877 and one in the Ptuj-Ljutomer region in 1877. As the associations were mostly communicating in German, this might have been the reason for the establishment of the Slovene medical society in Celje in 1906. The Slovenian national consciousness began to strengthen across the territory of today's Slovenia. Already after the First World War in 1918, they managed to achieve the establishment of the Slovene Medical Society. Due to the events during the Second World War, a uniform Slovene medical association was established in 1947. PMID:25310616

  15. Developing the necessary infrastructure. Chapter 1; IAEA activities in support of countries considering embarking on Nuclear Power Programme

    The IAEA supports in a variety of ways in establishing an appropriate infra-structure necessary to secure safe and reliable operation and still maintaining the international safeguards regime, especially in developing countries which are considering introduction of nuclear power programme. The TC projects to support introduction of nuclear power has been formulated and its number increased significantly recently. Various guidance documents have been published by the IAEA recently to enable progressive development of national infrastructure. The IAEA guidance documents constitute a basis of advises to newcomer countries. The recently formulated important mission is INIR mission to review the status of national infrastructure in the context of measuring the distance to the expected milestone. Finally, it is expected that the newcomers would make informed decision-making on going to nuclear power by fully understanding the necessary obligations and national long-term commitment, by confirming viability of nuclear power options in the country's energy plan through Energy Planning and long-term strategic assessment using IAEA guidance and tools

  16. An novel analog programmable power supply for active gain control of the Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC)

    Li, Zhengwei; Xu, Yupeng; Yan, Bo; Li, Yanguo; Lu, Xuefeng; Li, Xufang; Zhang, Shuo; Chang, Zhi; Li, Jicheng; Zhang, Yifei; Zhao, Jianling

    2016-01-01

    Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPM) are regarded as novel photo-detector to replace conventional Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMTs). However, the breakdown voltage dependence on the ambient temperature results in a gain variation of $\\sim$3$\\% /^{\\circ} \\mathrm C$. This can severely limit the application of this device in experiments with wide range of operating temperature, especially in space telescope. An experimental setup in dark condition was established to investigate the temperature and bias voltage dependence of gain for the Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), one type of the SiPM developed by Hamamatsu. The gain and breakdown voltage dependence on operating temperature of an MPPC can be approximated by a linear function, which is similar to the behavior of a zener diode. The measured temperature coefficient of the breakdown voltage is $(59.4 \\pm 0.4$ mV)$/^{\\circ} \\mathrm C$. According to this fact, a programmable power supply based on two zener diodes and an operational amplifier was designed with a positiv...

  17. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    2010-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  18. A special evaluation: The ARCAL programme

    The Regional Co-operative Arrangements for the Promotion of Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin America, ARCAL, came into being in 1983. At a meeting held in Vienna in September 1984, ten Latin American countries agreed to participate in the programme, the Guidelines setting up the structure of the programme were approved and nine areas of development were identified to initiate project activities. The programme, which is now in its second phase and in its ninth year of implementation, has 17 Member States and includes fifteen projects. Total disbursements under the ARCAL programme during the period 1983 - 1991 amounted to $8.5 million, including $5.4 million from the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (TACF), $2.2 million from extrabudgetary sources, and some $0.9 million in the form of in-kind contributions. As of September 1992, equipment totaling $3.5 million, 385 man-months of expert services, and 108 fellowships for approximately 150 man-months of training had been provided to ARCAL Member States within the context of fifteen ARCAL projects. In addition, 1844 Latin Americans were trained in 194 ARCAL training courses. The evaluation concluded that, as a result of the ARCAL programme, there is now better knowledge in participating countries about nuclear techniques and technology, as well as greater awareness at most levels of the importance of radiological safety and of the need to implement radiation protection measures, both a the national and at the regional level. The programme has contributed to developing and/or improving capabilities in the region in various applications of nuclear techniques through training activities. The programme has further allowed the establishment of regional collaborative links, particularly between countries with similar interests, in important fields of application, such as agriculture and nuclear medicine. Figs and tabs

  19. Changes in muscle activity after performing the FIFA 11+ programme part 2 for 4 weeks.

    Takata, Yasushi; Nakase, Junsuke; Inaki, Anri; Mochizuki, Takafumi; Numata, Hitoaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Kinuya, Seigo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Changes in muscle activity were evaluated by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) after performing part 2 of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association's 11+ programme (11+) for 4 weeks. Eleven males performed part 2 of the 11+ for 20 min before and after 37 MBq of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was injected intravenously. PET-CT images were obtained 50 min after FDG injection. The participants were then instructed to perform part 2 of the 11+ 3 times per week for 4 consecutive weeks, after which another set of PET-CT images was obtained following the same procedure. Regions of interest were defined within 30 muscles. The standardised uptake value (SUV) of FDG by muscle tissue per unit volume was calculated, and FDG accumulation was compared between pre- and post-training PET-CT results. Performing part 2 of the 11+ for 4 weeks increased mean SUV in the sartorius, semimembranosus, biceps femoris, abductor hallucis, and flexor hallucis brevis muscles (P < 0.05). In conclusion, routinely performing part 2 of the 11+ for 4 weeks increased glucose uptake related to muscle activity in the hamstrings and hallux muscles. We speculate that there is some possibility of this change of muscle activity contributing to a decrease in sports-related injuries. PMID:26911842

  20. Effect of the Great Activity Programme on healthy lifestyle behaviours in 7-11 year olds.

    Morris, John G; Gorely, Trish; Sedgwick, Matthew J; Nevill, Alan; Nevill, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of a school-based healthy lifestyles intervention on physical activity and dietary variables. In total 378 children (177 intervention, 201 control; age 9.75 ± 0.82 years (mean ± s)) took part in the 7-month intervention comprising: preparation for and participation in 3 highlight events (a dance festival, a walking event and a running event); an interactive website for pupils, teachers and parents; and vacation activity planners. Primary outcome measures were objectively measured physical activity (pedometers and accelerometers), endurance fitness and dietary variables. Multi-level modelling was employed for data analysis. The increase in physical activity was greater in the intervention group than the control group (steps: 1049 vs 632 daily steps each month; moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) total: 4.6 min · day(-1) · month(-1) vs 1.3 min · day(-1) · month(-1); MVPA bouts: 5.4 min · day(-1) · month(-1) vs 2.6 min · day(-1) · month(-1); all P children. PMID:23656302

  1. European Identity through Space Space Activities and Programmes as a Tool to Reinvigorate the European Identity

    Baranes, Blandina

    2013-01-01

    Space activities are one particularly visible area, where Europe can shape its identity. This publication investigates the effect space activities have already had on building a European “spirit” (e.g. through European missions or European astronauts). It also looks into the effects that activities labelled “national” have on the emergence of a European identity. Based on this analysis, the book's intention is to identify creative ways and means for how to further use space for shaping the European identity. For this purpose the focus is not only on policy analysis but also on expertise from the fields of cultural science and the arts in order to tap their creative potential and also their theoretical approaches to the topic. Selecting this theme provides ESPI with another opportunity to develop its trans-disciplinary approach.

  2. New Euratom research programme 2002-2006

    Mustonen, R. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2003-06-01

    The European Union funded research is carried out under two distinct programmes; the European Community Framework Programme (EC Programme) covering research, technological development and demonstration activities; and the Euratom Framework Programme covering research and training activities in the nuclear sector. The contents, funding and timetable of the sixth Euratom Framework Programme (FP6) are shortly reviewed in this paper. The European Union (EU) FP6 for the years 2002 - 2006 starts at the beginning of the year 2003.

  3. Recruitment of a mast-fruiting, bird-dispersed tree: Bridging frugivore activity and seedling establishment

    HERRERA, CARLOS M.; Jordano, Pedro; López-Soria, L.; Amat, Juan A.

    1994-01-01

    The recruitment of Phillyrea latifolia L. (Oleaceae), a bird-dispersed tree of Mediterranean forest, is described. Fruit removal by birds, seed rain, post-dispersal seed predation, seed germination, and seedling emergence, survival, and establishment were studied. The main objective was testing whether seed dispersal by birds produced a predictable seedling shadow as a result of coupled patterns of seed rain, seedling emergence, and seedling establishment. P. latifolia is a mast-fruiting spec...

  4. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    Jeffery Alexander Powell; Krishnan Venkatakrishnan; Bo Tan

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plu...

  5. Design of a process evaluation of the implementation of a physical activity and sports stimulation programme in Dutch rehabilitation setting : ReSpAct

    Hoekstra, Femke; Alingh, Roelina A.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Hettinga, Florentina J.; Duijf, Marjo; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a growing interest to study the transfer of evidence-based information into daily practice. The evidence-based programme Rehabilitation, Sports and Exercise (RSE) that aims to stimulate an active lifestyle during and after a rehabilitation period in people with a disability and/

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of a Long-Term Internet-Delivered Worksite Health Promotion Programme on Physical Activity and Nutrition: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Robroek, Suzan J. W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Bredt, Folef J.; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the unit of randomization. The intervention was compared with a…

  7. Greek Teachers Programme 2015

    Hoch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The 3rd edition of this year's Greek Teachers Programme was co-organized by CERN Education Group and the Hellenic Physical Society and took place from 8 to 12 November 2015. The programme targets physics high-school teachers from all over Greece. It aims to help teachers inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers by motivating their students to understand and appreciate how science works at the world's largest physics laboratory, whereby increasing their interest in pursuing studies in STEM fields in secondary and post-secondary education. 33 teachers took part in this programme which comprised lectures by Greek members of the CERN scientific community, with visits to experimental facilities, hands-on activities and dedicated sessions on effective and creative ways through which participants may bring physics, particle physics and CERN closer to their school classroom. In 2015, more than 100 teachers took part in the three editions of the Greek Teachers Programme.

  8. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  9. Applications of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for geological samples in AMD for uranium exploration programme

    Full text: Non-destructive Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis has been used over last three decades in AMD for analysis of geological samples for estimation of Na, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Br, Zr, Ag, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Tm, Ho, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Au, Th and U. The estimation has been done using various international standards. The irradiation of samples has been done in Cirus/Apsara Reactor in BARC, Mumbai. The measurement of desired gamma emission are carried out by Huge detector. The various geological samples from different parts of India are: 1. granites 2. charnokites 3. Basalts 4. Carbonatites 5. Xenotime 6. Monazite 7. Core samples 8. Black slabs. The efficiency modelling of HPGe detector was done using different sources and mathematical and statistical techniques. (author)

  10. Generative Adaptation and Reuse of Competence Development Programmes

    Dodero, Juan Manuel; Zarraonandia, Telmo; Fernandez, Camino; Diez, David

    2007-01-01

    Instructional engineering provides methods to conduct the design and adaptation of competence development programmes by the combination of diverse learning components (i.e. units of learning, learning activities, learning resources and learning services). It occurs through an established process workflow in which models with diverse levels of…

  11. External Mobility Programme

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Every year, a significant number of highly-skilled staff members leave the Organization and offer their talents on the European job market. CERN is launching a programme aiming to help staff members to whom the Organization cannot offer an indefinite contract in the transition towards their next employment. The programme, which is based on the establishment of a number of partnerships with potential employers in the private sector, will run on a voluntary basis. Staff members who have received confirmation that they will not be offered an indefinite contract and who are interested in availing themselves of the opportunities offered by the programme, are invited to enrol by following the procedure described at: https://ert.cern.ch/browse_intranet/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=5841 Applications will be processed in the strictest confidence by the Human Resources Department and eligible profiles will then be made available to partner companies for recruitment purposes. Any subsequent ...

  12. Activating welfare recipients with health complaints: Reasons for failure of a cognitive training programme

    Inge Bramsen

    2011-03-01

    Een groeiende nadruk op de activering van uitkeringsgerechtigden heeft in veel Westerse verzorgingsstaten geleid tot de ontwikkeling van interventies die gericht zijn op uitkeringsgerechtigden met gezondheidsklachten. Vormen van dwang, zoals verplichte participatie, worden meer en meer toegepast binnen dit activeringsbeleid. Een voorbeeld hiervan is het Nederlandse project “Gezond aan de Slag”, dat een interventie ontwikkelde en evalueerde waarin een fysiek trainingsprogramma gecombineerd wordt met cognitieve training. Hoewel HtW als “best practice” gold, liet een randomized trial geen positieve effecten van de interventie zien. Omdat het cognitieve trainingsprogramma, gebaseerd op rationeel-emotieve therapie, niet eerder afzonderlijk werd bestudeerd, werd een diepgaande kwalitatieve studie uitgevoerd. Getracht werd om de oorzaken van het falen van het programma in kaart te brengen. Zes, gericht geselecteerde, trainers werden geïnterviewd. De resultaten lieten zien dat de trainers problemen hadden met de heterogeniteit van de deelnemersgroep en op andere problemen, verwachtingen en arbeidsmarktobstakels stuitten dan vooraf verwacht. De verplichte aard van HtW had een negatief effect op de motivatie van zowel deelnemers als trainers. In de discussieparagraaf van dit artikel worden vraagtekens geplaatst bij de veronderstelling dat de coping stijl en cognities van uitkeringsgerechtigden met gezondheidsproblemen de belangrijkste hindernissen zijn voor het vinden van werk, en worden vraagtekens geplaatst bij het beleid om fysieke beperkingen van deelnemers te negeren. De auteurs suggereren dat met betrekking tot dit complexe praktijkprobleem, verbetering kan worden bereikt door aanpassen en leren van de interventie gedurende de toepassing daarvan toe te staan, en door expliciet te reflecteren op de normatieve aspecten van de interventie, en de perspectieven van de uitkeringsgerechtigden zelf.

  13. Review of fast reactor physics activities relevant to LMFBR programme in PNC, Japan, June 1976 - May 1977

    Fast reactor physics activities performed during a year from June, 1976, to May, 1977, along with the programme in PNC are reviewed. The first topic is the start up of JOYO which attained the criticality on April 24, 1977. Present status of the design of MONJU and the design study of the demonstration fast breeder reactor are briefly reviewed in the second part. The rest of this report presents the results of more specific studies as follows. (1) Mockup experiment in FCA and analysis to support MONJU design. (2) Parameter study on the breeding characteristics of a 1000 MWe class LMFBR. (3) Evaluation of actinide nuclear data. (4) Detailed analysis of sodium void experiments. (5) The improvement of LSQ program for sensitivity analysis. (6) Effect of size of the critical mockup on the extrapolation errors in predicting neutronic properties of a 1000 MWe core. (7) Research on the two-dimensional calculational method for shielding, and application to MONJU design and to the evaluation of neutrons streaming through a primary sodium duct of JOYO. (Aoki, K.)

  14. Evaluation of beta spectrometry for environmental monitoring of undeclared nuclear activities. Report on task FIN A846 on the Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards

    The IAEA (the Agency) is considering environmental monitoring as a possible method to detect the presence of undeclared nuclear activities in a country covered by a comprehensive safeguards agreement. The Finnish support program (FINSP), implemented by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), is supporting the Agency in this new programme. This Agency Task FIN A 846, addresses the possibility of using beta-emitting nuclides as indicators for covert nuclear fuel reprocessing activities. (90 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.)

  15. Multinational Design Evaluation Programme. Annual Report - April 2014-April 2015

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) is a multinational initiative to leverage the resources and knowledge of national regulatory authorities who are, or will shortly be, undertaking the review of new reactor power plant designs. MDEP incorporates a broad range of activities including enhancing multilateral co-operation within existing regulatory frameworks, and increasing multinational convergence of codes, standards, guides and safety goals. A key concept throughout the work of MDEP is that national regulators retain sovereign authority for all licensing and regulatory decisions. Working groups are implementing the activities in accordance with programme plans with specific activities and goals, and have established the necessary interfaces both within and outside of MDEP. This report provides a status of the programme after its seventh year of implementation. Content: Executive summary; 1. Introduction; 2. Programme goals and outcomes; 3. Programme implementation (Membership, Organisational structure, MDEP Library, Common positions); 4. Interactions with other organisations; 5. Current activities (EPR Working Group (EPRWG), AP1000 Working Group (AP1000WG), APR1400 Working Group (APR1400WG), VVER Working Group (VVERWG), AVBWR Working Group (ABWRWG), Vendor Inspection Co-operation Working Group (VICWG), Codes and Standards Working Group (CSWG), Digital Instrumentation and Controls Working Group (DICWG)); 6. Interim results; 7. Next steps - Future of the programme; Appendix 1 - List of abbreviations and acronyms; Appendix 2 - Revised documents and publications; Appendix 3 - Photographs of reactors considered within MDEP

  16. Elemental activation analysis with decay and prompt gamma ray techniques, using isotopic neutron sources and a nuclear research reactor. Part of a coordinated programme on nuclear-based techniques in geology and mineral prospecting

    This is to review the research activities carried out through the IAEA research Project 1697/RB ''Elemental activation analysis with decay and prompt gamma ray techniques, using isotopic neutron sources and the nuclear research reactor. The programme of work includes: a) Development of decay and prompt gamma ray activation techniques for mineral exploration. b) Development of epithermal NAA in addition to thermal NAA especially for gold ore. c) Development of non-destructive insitu elemental analysis with decay and prompt gamma ray techniques using isotopic neutron sources. A joint programme has been established with the Egyptian Geological Surrey and Mining Authority for using nuclear techniques in evaluating gold prospects of several ancient gold mines and investigating several tin-tantalum deposits, which were discovered over the last few years. Two sources of neutrons were used for irradiation, one of the dry channels of the two megawatts research reactor, ET-RR-1 for laboratory studies, and a Pu-Be neutron source in paraffin assembly for possible insitu work

  17. Intervention dose estimation in health promotion programmes: a framework and a tool. Application to the diet and physical activity promotion PRALIMAP trial

    Legrand Karine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the outcomes of health promotion and prevention programmes may depend on the level of intervention, studies and trials often fail to take it into account. The objective of this work was to develop a framework within which to consider the implementation of interventions, and to propose a tool with which to measure the quantity and the quality of activities, whether planned or not, relevant to the intervention under investigation. The framework and the tool were applied to data from the diet and physical activity promotion PRALIMAP trial. Methods A framework allowing for calculation of an intervention dose in any health promotion programme was developed. A literature reviews revealed several relevant concepts that were considered in greater detail by a multidisciplinary working group. A method was devised with which to calculate the dose of intervention planned and that is actually received (programme-driven activities dose, as well as the amount of non-planned intervention (non-programme-driven activities dose. Results Indicators cover the roles of all those involved (supervisors, anchor personnel as receivers and providers, targets, in each intervention-related groups (IRG: basic setting in which a given intervention is planned by the programme and may differ in implementation level and for every intervention period. All indicators are described according to two domains (delivery, participation in two declensions (quantity and quality. Application to PRALIMAP data revealed important inter- and intra-IRG variability in intervention dose. Conclusions A literature analysis shows that the terminology in this area is not yet consolidated and that research is ongoing. The present work provides a methodological framework by specifying concepts, by defining new constructs and by developing multiple information synthesis methods which must be introduced from the programme's conception. Application to PRALIMAP underlined the

  18. VIP in construction: systematic development and evaluation of a multifaceted health programme aiming to improve physical activity levels and dietary patterns among construction workers

    Viester Laura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of both overweight and musculoskeletal disorders (MSD in the construction industry is high. Many interventions in the occupational setting aim at the prevention and reduction of these health problems, but it is still unclear how these programmes should be designed. To determine the effectiveness of interventions on these health outcomes randomised controlled trials (RCTs are needed. The aim of this study is to systematically develop a tailored intervention for prevention and reduction of overweight and MSD among construction workers and to describe the evaluation study regarding its (cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design The Intervention Mapping (IM protocol was applied to develop and implement a tailored programme aimed at the prevention and reduction of overweight and MSD. The (cost- effectiveness of the intervention programme will be evaluated using an RCT. Furthermore, a process evaluation will be conducted. The research population will consist of blue collar workers of a large construction company in the Netherlands. Intervention The intervention programme will be aimed at improving (vigorous physical activity levels and healthy dietary behaviour and will consist of tailored information, face-to-face and telephone counselling, training instruction (a fitness "card" to be used for exercises, and materials designed for the intervention (overview of the company health promoting facilities, waist circumference measuring tape, pedometer, BMI card, calorie guide, recipes, and knowledge test. Main study parameters/endpoints The intervention effect on body weight and waist circumference (primary outcome measures, as well as on lifestyle behaviour, MSD, fitness, CVD risk indicators, and work-related outcomes (i.e. productivity, sick leave (secondary outcome measures will be assessed. Discussion The development of the VIP in construction intervention led to a health programme tailored to the needs of construction

  19. FFUSION research programme 1993-1998. Final report of the Finnish fusion research programme

    Karttunen, S.; Heikkinen, J.; Korhonen, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the Fusion Energy Research Programme, FFUSION, during the period 1993-1998. After the planning phase the programme started in 1994, and later in March 1995 the FFUSION Programme was integrated into the EU Fusion Programme and the Association Euratom-Tekes was established. Research areas in the FFUSION Programme are (1) fusion physics and plasma engineering, (2) fusion reactor materials and (3) remote handling systems. In all research areas industry is involved. Recently, a project on environmental aspects of fusion and other future energy systems started as a part of the socio-economic research (SERF) in the Euratom Fusion Programme. A crucial component of the FFUSION programme is the close collaboration between VTT Research Institutes, universities and Finnish industry. This collaboration has guaranteed dynamic and versatile research teams, which are large enough to tackle challenging research and development projects. Regarding industrial fusion R and D activities, the major step was the membership of Imatran Voima Oy in the EFET Consortium (European Fusion Engineering and Technology), which further strengthened the position of industry in the engineering design activities of ITER. The number of FFUSION research projects was 66. In addition, there were 32 industrial R and D projects. The total cost of the FFUSION Programme in 1993-1998 amounted to FIM 54 million in research at VTT and universities and an additional FIM 21 million for R and D in Finnish industry. The main part of the funding was provided by Tekes, 36%. Since 1995, yearly Euratom funding has exceeded 25%. The FFUSION research teams have played an active role in the European Programme, receiving excellent recognition from the European partners. Theoretical and computational fusion physics has been at a high scientific level and the group collaborates with the leading experimental laboratories in Europe. Fusion technology is focused on reactor materials, joining

  20. FFUSION research programme 1993-1998. Final report of the Finnish fusion research programme

    This report summarizes the results of the Fusion Energy Research Programme, FFUSION, during the period 1993-1998. After the planning phase the programme started in 1994, and later in March 1995 the FFUSION Programme was integrated into the EU Fusion Programme and the Association Euratom-Tekes was established. Research areas in the FFUSION Programme are (1) fusion physics and plasma engineering, (2) fusion reactor materials and (3) remote handling systems. In all research areas industry is involved. Recently, a project on environmental aspects of fusion and other future energy systems started as a part of the socio-economic research (SERF) in the Euratom Fusion Programme. A crucial component of the FFUSION programme is the close collaboration between VTT Research Institutes, universities and Finnish industry. This collaboration has guaranteed dynamic and versatile research teams, which are large enough to tackle challenging research and development projects. Regarding industrial fusion R and D activities, the major step was the membership of Imatran Voima Oy in the EFET Consortium (European Fusion Engineering and Technology), which further strengthened the position of industry in the engineering design activities of ITER. The number of FFUSION research projects was 66. In addition, there were 32 industrial R and D projects. The total cost of the FFUSION Programme in 1993-1998 amounted to FIM 54 million in research at VTT and universities and an additional FIM 21 million for R and D in Finnish industry. The main part of the funding was provided by Tekes, 36%. Since 1995, yearly Euratom funding has exceeded 25%. The FFUSION research teams have played an active role in the European Programme, receiving excellent recognition from the European partners. Theoretical and computational fusion physics has been at a high scientific level and the group collaborates with the leading experimental laboratories in Europe. Fusion technology is focused on reactor materials, joining

  1. ADS National Programmes: Japan

    In Japan, the research and development (R&D) activities on partitioning and transmutation (P&T) technology had been promoted under the OMEGA programme since 1988. The main institutes involved in these activities were the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI). Among these institutes, JAERI had mainly conducted the R&D on ADS. In 1999 and 2000, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) of Japan implemented the check and review (C&R) on the P&T technology, and the ADS was considered as one of candidates for transmutation systems together with fast reactors. In 2005, JAERI and JNC were merged and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established. In JAEA, the R&D activities on both ADS and fast reactors have been continued. In August, 2008, the AEC of Japan launched the Technical Subcommittee on P&T Technology under the Advisory Committee on R&D, and conducted the discussion about the current state of the art concerning P&T technology in Japan and the future R&D programme. The Subcommittee issued the final report in April, 2009. The final report covered the impact of the P&T technology, the state of the art of the technology, evaluation on the progress of the R&D, and the recommendations of the future R&D. As the basic policy on the P&T technology, the report stated that the R&D should not aim at only the improvement of the P&T performance, but at the achievement of the requirements for whole performance of nuclear power generation. This means that the performance of the Double strata fuel cycle concept should be evaluated from viewpoints of safety, economy, environmental friendliness, saving resource, and non-proliferation of the first stratum as well as those of the second stratum. The Double strata concept, therefore, should be studied as a part of the whole nuclear system both in the transient phase of LWR to FBR and the equilibrium

  2. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS

  3. Monitoring programme

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution's 1992 report on its programme of monitoring radioactive substances is presented. Site operators' returns are verified and the report provides independent data on the environmental impact of authorized disposal of radioactive wastes. Radiation doses which may have been received by members of the public, fall well below the International Commission for Radiological Protection's (ICRP) recommended annual doses. (UK)

  4. Establishment of national emission measurement activity in neighbouring areas of Finland

    Aunela, L.; Larjava, K.; Jormanainen, P. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Environmental Technology; Muurinen, M. [Enemi Ltd, Lahti (Finland); Hietamaeki, M. [Ministry of the Environment, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (the Baltic countries) and the Republic State of Carelia, Russia belong to the so-called nearby areas of Finland. All being part of the former Soviet Union, they are now undergoing the establishment of their own environment- managing systems. Finland has shown a great amount of interest in supporting the efforts of these areas to solve their environmental problems. In 1993 VTT started, at the request of the East European Project of the Finnish Ministry of the Environment, a four year project aiming at the establishment of national atmospheric emission measurement systems in the Baltic countries and the Republic state of Carelia (later: the counterpart countries). Proper national emission measurement systems were regarded important in order to provide reliable data on the emission situation for national and international use. The main target of the work is to raise the level of the emission measurements in the counterpart countries to the international level. Two aspects were considered to be required to achieve this goal; (1) delivery of proper emission measurement equipment, (2) training of the emission measurement personnel. It was estimated that within three to four years these counterpart countries could join the Finnish quality assurance system in emission measurements if desired. (author)

  5. Establishment and evaluation of a multi-system chain transitional care programme for postpartum pelvic floor training%产后盆底功能训练的延续护理模式构建及效果评价

    霍然; 王惠珍; 石兰萍; 张巍颖; 吴震云; 陈学丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To build a multi-system chain transitional care programme for postpartum pelvic floor training and test its effect.Methods By a prospective randomized controlled trial,the study group (n=60) received a multi-system chain transitional care programme which consisted of ward nurse,home visiting doctor,post-natal care clinic doctor,pelvic floor doctor and pelvic floor nurse.The control group(n=60) received routine care.The pelvic floor muscle strength,sexual function and patient satisfaction of baseline,on the 42th days,3rd months and 6th months were compared between two groups by short-term follow-up.Results There was no difference in baseline consisting of age,gestational weeks,birth weight and so on between groups.Participants in the study group had significantly better improvement and score in pelvic floor muscle strength,sexual thoughts,sexual arousal,sexual psychopathy and problems affecting sexual function.There was no difference in score of sexual pleasure and ejaculation time between two groups.Conclusions This study was an original effort to establish and evaluate a multi-system chain transitional care program for postpartum pelvic floor training.Results demonstrated that this transitional care was effective in improving pelvic floor function.%目的 构建产后盆底功能训练的延续护理模式并检验其效果.方法 采用前瞻性随机对照实验,延续护理60例接受病房责任护士-家庭访视医生-产后保健门诊医生-盆底诊疗中心医生-盆底诊疗中心护士构成的延续护理服务,对照组60例接受传统护理服务.随访和比较2组的基线情况,42 d、3个月和6个月盆底肌肌力、性功能和患者满意度.结果 2组在年龄、孕周、新生儿体质量等基线情况上比较差异无统计学意义.延续护理组在盆底肌肌力改善、性欲、性唤起、性心理和性行为异常症状上得分,以及患者满意度均优于对照组,差异有统计学意义.2组在性高潮和性

  6. The problem about the possibility of establishing an interrelation between the activity of the sun and that of mud volcanos

    Mekhtiyev, Sh.F.; Khalilov, E.N.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the mud volcanos of Eastern Azerbaydzhan showed that periods of weakening in the mud volcano activity correspond to periods of increased solar activity and the opposite. A graph which characterizes the change in the mud volcano activity in time is built to establish the association between solar activity and the activity of the mud volcanos. Data from 300 eruptions of mud volcanos of the world were used. All the world's mud volcanos are located in zones of high seismic activity. These zones are characterized by the presence of deeply focused (subcrust) earthquakes. All the mud volcanos are located along seismic strips of the earth, which reflect zones of subduction or the Zavaritskiy Benioff zones. The mud volcanos are associated with global geodynamic processes, while their activity characterizes the activity of the subduction zones. The activity of the subduction zones rises in periods of increased solar activity. Building a rectilinear trend of the Gauss capacity showed that the activation of the world's mud volcanos is increased in time at a speed of 0.02 eruptions per year. The activation of the subduction zones also rises in time. These studies are one of the first attempts to analyze data about the eruptions of the world's mud volcanos with consideration of the new global tectonics and certain cosmic processes.

  7. Reasearch Activities for the Establishment of The Center for Sustainable Energy

    Dr. Michael Seliger

    2005-08-08

    In 2003, Bronx Community College received a grant of $481,000 through the United States Department of Energy for the purpose of conducting research- related activities leading to the creation of the Center for Sustainable Energy at Bronx Community College. The award, which was administered on behalf of Bronx Community College by the Research Foundation of the City University of New York, was initially for one year, from October 2003 through September 30, 2004. It received a no-cost extension to June 30, 2005. This report presents a summary of the activities and accomplishments attributable to the award.

  8. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory.

    Butcher, Adrian J; Bradley, Sophie J; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M; Bottrill, Andrew R; Challiss, R A John; Broad, Lisa M; Felder, Christian C; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-22

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser(228)) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser(228) These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser(228) was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser(228) on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser(228) phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser(228) not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  9. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory*♦

    Butcher, Adrian J.; Bradley, Sophie J.; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M.; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Challiss, R. A. John; Broad, Lisa M.; Felder, Christian C.; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo. Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser228) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser228. These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser228 was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser228 on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser228 phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser228 not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  10. The establishment of a portable high sensitivity exhaled thoron activity measurement system

    A portable system, using electrostatic collection, for the measurement of exhaled thoron activity in humans is described, together with the basic theory, equipment, calibration procedures, measurement and the preliminary use. The portable system built on experience at the Argonne National Laboratory to achieve a reduction in measurement time from 30 hours to 200 minutes, and to increase the total efficiency of the system from 50%(ANL) to 55% with a minimum detection limit decreased to 0.007 Bq (zero activity± σ). The total standard error of this system is 47% for a thorium lung burden of 0.22 Bq. The average background of this scintillation detector was 0.003 counts/min. (author)

  11. Establishing a definition of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) health: a guide to research and management activities.

    Patyk, Kelly A; Duncan, Colleen; Nol, Pauline; Sonne, Christian; Laidre, Kristin; Obbard, Martyn; Wiig, Øystein; Aars, Jon; Regehr, Eric; Gustafson, Lori L; Atwood, Todd

    2015-05-01

    The meaning of health for wildlife and perspectives on how to assess and measure health, are not well characterized. For wildlife at risk, such as some polar bear (Ursus maritimus) subpopulations, establishing comprehensive monitoring programs that include health status is an emerging need. Environmental changes, especially loss of sea ice habitat, have raised concern about polar bear health. Effective and consistent monitoring of polar bear health requires an unambiguous definition of health. We used the Delphi method of soliciting and interpreting expert knowledge to propose a working definition of polar bear health and to identify current concerns regarding health, challenges in measuring health, and important metrics for monitoring health. The expert opinion elicited through the exercise agreed that polar bear health is defined by characteristics and knowledge at the individual, population, and ecosystem level. The most important threats identified were in decreasing order: climate change, increased nutritional stress, chronic physiological stress, harvest management, increased exposure to contaminants, increased frequency of human interaction, diseases and parasites, and increased exposure to competitors. Fifteen metrics were identified to monitor polar bear health. Of these, indicators of body condition, disease and parasite exposure, contaminant exposure, and reproductive success were ranked as most important. We suggest that a cumulative effects approach to research and monitoring will improve the ability to assess the biological, ecological, and social determinants of polar bear health and provide measurable objectives for conservation goals and priorities and to evaluate progress. PMID:25679818

  12. Established liked versus disliked brands: Brain activity, implicit associations and explicit responses

    Shannon S. Bosshard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Consumers’ attitudes towards established brands were tested using implicit and explicit measures. In particular, late positive potential (LPP effects were assessed as an implicit neurophysiological measure of motivational significance. The Implicit Association Test (IAT was used as an implicit behavioural measure of valence-related aspects (affective content of brand attitude. We constructed individualised stimulus lists of liked and disliked brand types from participants’ subjective pre-assessment. Participants then re-rated these visually presented brands whilst brain potential changes were recorded via electroencephalography (EEG. First, self-report measures during the test confirmed pre-assessed attitudes underlining consistent explicit rating performance. Second, liked brands elicited significantly more positive going waveforms (LPPs than disliked brands over right parietal cortical areas starting at about 800 ms post stimulus onset (reaching statistical significance at around 1,000 ms and lasting until the end of the recording epoch (2,000 ms. In accordance to the literature, this finding is interpreted as reflecting positive affect-related motivational aspects of liked brands. Finally, the IAT revealed that both liked and disliked brands indeed are associated with affect-related valence. The increased levels of motivation associated with liked brands is interpreted as potentially reflecting increased purchasing intention, but this is of course only speculation at this stage.

  13. Effects of 6-month soccer and traditional physical activity programmes on body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory, oxidative stress markers and cardiorespiratory fitness in obese boys.

    Seabra, André; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Carvalho, Maria José; Seabra, Ana; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel; Abreu, Sandra; Vale, Susana; Póvoas, Susana; Nascimento, Henrique; Belo, Luís; Torres, Sandra; Oliveira, José; Mota, Jorge; Santos-Silva, Alice; Rêgo, Carla; Malina, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity is important in obesity prevention, but the effectiveness of different physical activity modalities remains to be determined among children. The main purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a 6-month soccer programme and a traditional physical activity programme on changes in body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers, cardiorespiratory fitness and perceived psychological status in obese boys. Eighty-eight boys (8-12 years; BMI > +2 standard deviations of WHO reference values) participated in one of three groups: soccer, traditional activity and control. Soccer and traditional activity programmes involved 3 sessions per week for 60-90 min at an average intensity of 70-80% of maximal heart rate. Control group participated in activities of normal daily living. All boys participated in school physical education, two sessions per week of 45-90-min. Measurements were taken at baseline and after 6 months, and included body size and composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers, cardiorespiratory fitness and perceived psychological status. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed before and immediately following the intervention. The three groups had similar characteristics at baseline. After 6 months, both intervention groups had significantly lower relative fatness (% fat), waist circumference and total cholesterol, and higher cardiorespiratory fitness, self-esteem, perceived physical competence and attraction to physical activity compared with control group. In conclusion, physical activity interventions over 6 months positively influenced several indicators of health status among obese boys. The results also suggested that soccer has the potential as an effective tool for the prevention and reduction of childhood obesity and associated consequences. PMID:26890580

  14. ADS National Programmes: France

    Studies related to nuclear reactors and radioactive waste started at the French National Centre for Scientific research, CNRS, as a result of the French law on radioactive waste that was published in 1991. They were initially organized around the programme PACE (Physique pour l’Aval du Cycle Electronucléaire = physics of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle), which became PACEN (Physique pour l’Aval du Cycle et production d’Energie Nucléaire = Physics of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and production of nuclear energy) in 2006. Research on accelerator driven systems was from the beginning part of this programme. This research is mainly funded by the National Institute for Nuclear end Particle Physics (IN2P3) of CNRS and within the EURATOM European programmes (FP5, 6 and 7). The programme took place in several stages, and covered various scientific fields, benefitting from expertise of CNRS in the field. More specifically, it aimed and still aims to: – Test and verify the feasibility and design of the ADS concept, in terms of neutronics, physics of materials, design of the accelerator and tests of its prototypical components that have been built (or are at present under construction); – Measure and-or improve nuclear data related to radioactive waste transmutation. Today, most of the activities in support to ADS development carried out by CNRS focus on accelerator developments, GUINEVERE (Generator of Uninterrupted Intense NEutron at the lead VEnus REactor) experiment, ADS core studies, deployment scenarios and nuclear data measurements. The CEA R&D programmes on ADS are mainly focused on the European project EUROTRANS of the 6th Framework programme (2005–2010) and continued in the FREYA project of the 7th Framework Programme

  15. SET-Routes programme

    Marietta Schupp, EMBL Photolab

    2008-01-01

    Dr Sabine Hentze, specialist in human genetics, giving an Insight Lecture entitled "Human Genetics – Diagnostics, Indications and Ethical Issues" on 23 September 2008 at EMBL Heidelberg. Activities in a achool in Budapest during a visit of Angela Bekesi, Ambassadors for the SET-Routes programme.

  16. Evaluation of an individualised programme to promote self-care in sleep-activity in patients with coronary artery disease - a randomised intervention study

    Johansson, Anna; Adamson, Anita; Ejdeback, Jan; Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of an individualised programme to promote self-care in sleep-activity in patients with coronary artery disease. Background. Recent scientific findings have shown that low physical exercise and stress interfere with coronary artery disease patients sleep quality and sleep efficiency independent of gender, age and co-morbidity. Design. A randomised pretest-post-test control design. Methods. Forty-seven patients who had undergone a coronary reva...

  17. Policies to Accelerate Fuel, Technology andBehavioural Change in Transport - Results and Success of the Austrian Climate: Active Mobile Programme after the First Seven Years

    There is plenty of concepts and strategies on almost all administrative levels to reduce carbon emissions and boost energy efficiency in transport. But it usually takes a long time to adapt national and regional legislation to these strategies with considerable loss of valuable time. Furthermore some of the defined measures will never find the necessary ''political will'' for implementation. To bridge this gap Austria's Environmental ministry supported by the Austrian Energy Agency, got into action 2005 and set up an action programme, condensing all so called ''soft'' and ''voluntary'' measures in transport (''mobility management''), that do not necessarily need to wait for legislation or specific administrative framework conditions. In its comprehensive approach - not only transport is targeted, but also buildings, renewables and energy saving - and also in its effects regarding the reduction of GHG emissions, Climate:active and especially climate:active mobile seems to be one-of-a-kind in Europe. Climate-active mobile set-up: free-of-charge consulting programmes addressing specific target groups (companies, cites andmunicipalities, real estate developers, schools andyouth, tourism); a financial support programme with 51 Mio Euro since 2007 for mobility management measures, fleet conversions to low-carbon technologies, work travel plans etc.; an EcoDriving training programme with up to now 20,000 trainees and educating all novice drivers in Austria in a smart driving style; a broad awareness raising campaign; about 2,900 klima:aktiv mobil partners among the target groups implementing sustainable transport measures and therewith reduces more than 530,000 tons of CO2 emissions every year, created or saved 4300 ''green jobs'' in transport and induced ''green'' investments by companies and administrations 7 to 8 times higher as the funding. Climate-active mobile is one of the main drivers in Austria to accelerate fuel, technology andbehavioural change in transport and

  18. The effect of a ten month physical activity intervention programme on body composition of 9-13 year-old boys

    Malan, Dawid Daniel Jacobus; Monyeki, Makama Andries; Toriola, Abel; Van Ridder, Johannes Hendrik; Du Preez, Susanna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Excessive body fat is one of the main contributing factors in many health related health debilitating diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension and coronary arterioscleroses. The objective of this study was to determine whether a ten month physical activity intervention (PAI) programme could alter the body composition of 9-13 year old boys. A total of 322 (173=experimental group (EG) and 149=control group (CG)) from two primary schools in Gauteng province of South Africa were studied....

  19. Feasibility and acceptability of a midwife-led intervention programme called 'Eat Well Keep Active' to encourage a healthy lifestyle in pregnancy

    Warren Lucie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating a diet that is high in fat and sugar and having a sedentary lifestyle during pregnancy is understood to increase the risk of excessive gestational weight gain and obesity following the birth of the baby. However, there are no clinical guidelines in the UK on what is considered to be appropriate gestational weight gain. Indeed, clinical recommendations discourage the routine re-weighing of pregnant women, stating instead that women should be advised regarding their diet and activity levels, in order to prevent excessive weight gain. Pregnancy is seen as a time when many women may have an increased motivation to improve their lifestyle behaviours for the benefit of the fetus. However, it is evident that many women have difficulty in both maintaining a healthy balanced diet and remaining active through pregnancy. It would seem that midwives may be ideally placed to assist women to make and maintain healthier lifestyle choices during pregnancy. Methods/design This study will look at the feasibility and acceptability of a newly devised intervention programme called 'Eat Well Keep Active'. Participants will complete a questionnaire prior to the programme to obtain baseline data on food frequency, physical activity and to gauge their perception of personal ability to improve/maintain healthy lifestyle. The programme comprises client centred techniques; motivational interviewing and goal setting delivered early in pregnancy (12-16 weeks with the aim of supporting a healthy well balanced diet and either continuing or commencing appropriate levels of physical activity. Participants will then be followed up six weeks following the intervention with a one-to-one interview, and a further brief questionnaire. The interview will provide preliminary data regarding perceived effectiveness and acceptability of the 'Eat Well Keep Active' programme whilst the questionnaire will provide data regarding changes in the confidence of

  20. Establishing bounding internal dose estimates for thorium activities at Rocky Flats.

    Ulsh, Brant A; Rich, Bryce L; Chew, Melton H; Morris, Robert L; Sharfi, Mutty; Rolfes, Mark R

    2008-07-01

    As part of an evaluation of a Special Exposure Cohort petition filed on behalf of workers at the Rocky Flats Plant, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was required to demonstrate that bounding values could be established for radiation doses due to the potential intake of all radionuclides present at the facility. The main radioactive elements of interest at Rocky Flats were plutonium and uranium, but much smaller quantities of several other elements, including thorium, were occasionally handled at the site. Bounding potential doses from thorium has proven challenging at other sites due to the early historical difficulty in detecting this element through urinalysis methods and the relatively high internal dose delivered per unit intake. This paper reports the results of NIOSH's investigation of the uses of thorium at Rocky Flats and provides bounding dose reconstructions for these operations. During this investigation, NIOSH reviewed unclassified reports, unclassified extracts of classified materials, material balance and inventory ledgers, monthly progress reports from various groups, and health physics field logbooks, and conducted interviews with former Rocky Flats workers. Thorium operations included: (1) an experimental metal forming project with 240 kg of thorium in 1960; (2) the use of pre-formed parts in weapons mockups; (3) the removal of Th from U; (4) numerous analytical procedures involving trace quantities of thorium; and (5) the possible experimental use of thorium as a mold coating compound. The thorium handling operations at Rocky Flats were limited in scope, well-monitored and documented, and potential doses can be bounded. PMID:18545032

  1. Establishment and analysis of in vitro biomass from Salvia corrugata Vahl. and evaluation of antimicrobial activity.

    Bisio, Angela; Fraternale, Daniele; Schito, Anna Maria; Parricchi, Anita; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Ricci, Donata; Giacomini, Mauro; Ruffoni, Barbara; De Tommasi, Nunziatina

    2016-02-01

    Demethylfruticuline A and fruticuline A, the most abundant compounds from the surface extract of Salvia corrugata Vahl., have shown antibacterial, antitumor and cytotoxic activities. In order to obtain these icetexane diterpenes from in vitro cultures of S. corrugata, protocols were developed for callus production, micropropagation and shoot regeneration. Analysis of the regenerated shoots showed the presence of both icetexanes, micropropagated plants contained only fruticuline A, while the callus contained trace amounts of both diterpenes. The yield of fruticuline A was higher in the methanolic extract of regenerated shoots than in those of fresh leaves and fresh shoot tips. In addition to these diterpenes, the regenerated shoot and micropropagated plant extracts afforded seven other diterpenes, one icetexane and six abietanes, identified by UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR and HR-MS analysis. Five compounds (19-acetoxy-7α-hydroxyroyleanone, 7β,20-epoxy-11,12,19-trihydroxyabieta-8,11,13-triene, 7,20-dihydrofruticuline A, 7β-acetoxy-20-hydroxy-19,20-epoxyroyleanone, 7β-ethoxy-6β,20:19,20-diepoxyroyleanone) were previously undescribed. Although the crude plant surface extract did not possess any antibacterial activity, methanolic extracts of in vitro tissues and two compounds, namely 7β-acetoxy-20-hydroxy-19,20-epoxyroyleanone and 7β-ethoxy-6β,20:19,20-diepoxyroyleanone, isolated in suitable amounts, were active in varying degrees against multidrug resistant clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, displaying MIC values ranging from 32, 64 to 128μg/mL. PMID:26753532

  2. Analysis of preparation of future trainer-teacher to professional activity in higher educational establishments

    Svatyev A.V.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The system of pedagogical, didactic and psychological procedures of co-operation of teacher and students is considered. Questionnaires are conducted with participation of 408 students. The ways of perfection of process of preparation of future trainer-teacher are certain to professional activity. Directions optimization of the process of professional preparation of specialists are indicated. It is set that the terms of high-quality preparation must be directing effort specialists on forming and development for students professionally important knowledge, abilities, skills, qualities.

  3. Study on the establishment of efficient plan for regulatory activities at NPPs

    In-operation regulatory activities at sites are very important and it should be improved to cope with accidents efficiently and quickly. In case of site survey and safety regulatory inspection regulatory system based on not regulatory headquarter but site regional office should be constructed. In other words, safety assurance and pending problem management considering site situation are needed. In this study, regulatory system at Nuclear Power Plant sites all over the world were reviewed and effective regulatory system of Korea are suggested to maximize the efficiency of license and regulatory manpower and consider the interest of local government and residents

  4. IDIOPATHIC THORACO SCOLIOSIS TREATMENT USING A COMBINATION OF DOCUMENTATION BASED CARE (DBC BACK ACTIVE RECONDITIONING PROGRAMME AND SCHROTH METHODS: A PROSPECTIVE CASE STUDY

    Ganesan Kathiresan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available reconditioning programme and Schroth methods to lessen the curvature allied with idiopathic Thoracicscoliosis.ResearchDesign: Sampling-An 18 years old female, single case study,Setting-DBC Kuching Active rehabilitationcentre, Malaysia.Duration of the study-20 weeks,Outcome measures-A base line and follow-up outcomemeasures includes Borg pain scale, Functional Rating Index, Balance test, and Radiographic analysis.Interventions-Document Based Care (DBC Back active reconditioning programme and Schroth methodsConclusion-The combination of the Document Based Care (DBC Back active reconditioning programme andSchroth methods seemed to be effective at reducing a Thoracic dextroscoliosis by about 14° (50% andLumbarLevoscoliosis by about 7° (25%, Short form (SF-36 showed improvement inQuality of life,balance time on theBalance board improved to 52 seconds and Borg pain scale rated 8/10 at the onset of care, dropped to a 1/10after 20 weeks, in this single case study. The positive outcomes of this practice validate a policyof offeringconservative treatment as an alternative to Thoracic scoliosis patients, including those for whom surgery isdiscussed

  5. ADS National Programmes: Germany

    The German R&D programme for ADS development is related to the partitioning and transmutation of spent fuel. This programme is implemented mainly by the three national research centres belonging to the Helmholtz Association, i.e. Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ) in cooperation with the Technical University of Aachen (RWTH Aachen) and the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR). The main purpose of this R&D programme is the prospect to manage the high level radioactive waste such as to reduce the burden on a final repository. P&T does not eliminate the need for a final repository whatever the strategy, but it allows the reduction of the radio-toxicity associated with radioactive waste, the increase of the repository capacity as a consequence of the reduction of masses to be stored and their associated residual heat load. Different fuel cycle scenarios to implement P&T can be envisaged. These scenarios have been evaluated to identify the impact of P&T on the characteristics, number and deployment pace of the installations of the fuel cycle (reprocessing, fuel fabrication, storage etc). Almost all activities conducted in the R&D programme are embedded in European and international projects and initiatives. In the following more details on the relevant components of the R&D programme are summarized

  6. Development and implementation of a lifestyle intervention to promote physical activity and healthy diet in the Dutch general practice setting: the BeweegKuur programme

    de Vries Nanne K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of patients with diabetes is increasing. BeweegKuur (Dutch for 'Exercise Therapy' is a Dutch lifestyle intervention which aims to effectively and feasibly promote physical activity and better dietary behaviour in primary health care to prevent diabetes. Methods The goal of this paper is to present the development process and the contents of the intervention, using a model of systematic health promotion planning. The intervention consists of a 1-year programme for diabetic and prediabetic patients. Patients are referred by their general practitioner (GP to a lifestyle advisor (LSA, usually the practice nurse or a physiotherapist. Based on specific inclusion criteria and in close collaboration with the patient, an individual exercise programme is designed and supervised by the LSA. This programme can be attended at existing local exercise facilities or (temporarily under the supervision of a specialized exercise coach or physiotherapist. All participants are also referred to a dietician and receive diet-related group education. In the first pilot year (2008, the BeweegKuur programme was implemented in 7 regions in the Netherlands (19 GP practices and health centres, while 14 regions (41 GP practices and health centres participated during the second year. The aim is to implement BeweegKuur in all regions of the Netherlands by 2012. Discussion The BeweegKuur programme was systematically developed in an evidence- and practice-based process. Formative monitoring studies and (controlled effectiveness studies are needed to examine the diffusion process and the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention.

  7. Identification of active Plasmodium falciparum calpain to establish screening system for Pf-calpain-based drug development

    Soh Byoung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing resistance of malaria parasites to available drugs, there is an urgent demand to develop new anti-malarial drugs. Calpain inhibitor, ALLN, is proposed to inhibit parasite proliferation by suppressing haemoglobin degradation. This provides Plasmodium calpain as a potential target for drug development. Pf-calpain, a cysteine protease of Plasmodium falciparum, belongs to calpain-7 family, which is an atypical calpain not harboring Ca2+-binding regulatory motifs. In this present study, in order to establish the screening system for Pf-calpain specific inhibitors, the active form of Pf-calpain was first identified. Methods Recombinant Pf-calpain including catalytic subdomain IIa (rPfcal-IIa was heterologously expressed and purified. Enzymatic activity was determined by both fluorogenic substrate assay and gelatin zymography. Molecular homology modeling was carried out to address the activation mode of Pf-calpain in the aspect of structural moiety. Results Based on the measurement of enzymatic activity and protease inhibitor assay, it was found that the active form of Pf-calpain only contains the catalytic subdomain IIa, suggesting that Pf-calpain may function as a monomeric form. The sequence prediction indicates that the catalytic subdomain IIa contains all amino acid residues necessary for catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asn formation. Molecular modeling suggests that the Pf-calpain subdomain IIa makes an active site, holding the catalytic triad residues in their appropriate orientation for catalysis. The mutation analysis further supports that those amino acid residues are functional and have enzymatic activity. Conclusion The identified active form of Pf-calpain could be utilized to establish high-throughput screening system for Pf-calpain inhibitors. Due to its unique monomeric structural property, Pf-calpain could be served as a novel anti-malarial drug target, which has a high specificity for malaria parasite

  8. Establishment of Scenarios for a Hybrid SIT operation with an Active System

    After the Fukushima accident, passive nuclear safety was strengthened to prevent the recurrence of a severe accident. A hybrid safety injection tank (H-SIT) is suggested as one of the passive systems used to prevent a severe accident. Therefore, the development of an operation strategy for a H-SIT with an active system is required for increasing the level of safety. In this study, a master logic diagram, difference analysis, matching process, and accident case classification are performed to determine the proper parameters. Then, the conditions that require the use of a H-SIT are determined using a decision process. The operation strategy analysis indicates that a H-SIT can mitigate five failures, namely, the safety injection pump (SIP), passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS), depressurization system, shutdown cooling pump (SCP) and recirculation system failures and this strategy also indicates that each scenario has its own pressure range in which the H-SIT can be used

  9. Establishment of Scenarios for a Hybrid SIT operation with an Active System

    Jeon, In Seop; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    After the Fukushima accident, passive nuclear safety was strengthened to prevent the recurrence of a severe accident. A hybrid safety injection tank (H-SIT) is suggested as one of the passive systems used to prevent a severe accident. Therefore, the development of an operation strategy for a H-SIT with an active system is required for increasing the level of safety. In this study, a master logic diagram, difference analysis, matching process, and accident case classification are performed to determine the proper parameters. Then, the conditions that require the use of a H-SIT are determined using a decision process. The operation strategy analysis indicates that a H-SIT can mitigate five failures, namely, the safety injection pump (SIP), passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS), depressurization system, shutdown cooling pump (SCP) and recirculation system failures and this strategy also indicates that each scenario has its own pressure range in which the H-SIT can be used.

  10. Surface activity distribution measurements and establishment of a dose rate map inside the destroyed Chernobyl reactor

    A Gamma Locator designed for contamination survey inside the reactor hall of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NNP has been developed. The device consists of a detector head and a remote control computer connected by a 150 m long cable. The detector head (dimensions: 500 mm by 500 mm by 400 mm; weight: about 40 kg) is a collimated scintillation gamma detector (the collimation angle is 10 deg.). It is installed on a scanning unit and was placed inside the reactor hall. The Gamma Locator scans all surfaces of the reactor hall with angular steps (≤ 1 deg. vertically as well as horizontally) and the particle fluence from the corresponding direction is recorded. The distance between the device head and the measured surface is instantaneously registered by a laser distance gauge. Inside the collimator there is a small CCD camera which makes it possible to obtain a visible image of the measured surface. The effective surface activity levels are presented in colour on the screen of the control computer. The gamma detector essentially consists of a CsI(TI) scintillator crystal (φ 8 mm in diameter, 2.5 mm in thickness) and a Si photodiode. The detector energy resolution is about 8% for radiation from 137Cs. The exposure dose rate distribution in the reactor hall is estimated from the measured effective surface activities /137Cs is the main gamma emitting isotope inside the reactor hall). The results of dose rate calculations are presented in colour superposed on a drawing of the reactor hall. (au)

  11. Surface activity distribution measurements and establishment of a dose rate map inside the destroyed Chernobyl reactor

    Chesnokov, A.V.; Fedin, V.I.; Gulyaev, A.A. [RECOM Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1999-02-01

    A Gamma Locator designed for contamination survey inside the reactor hall of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NNP has been developed. The device consists of a detector head and a remote control computer connected by a 150 m long cable. The detector head (dimensions: 500 mm by 500 mm by 400 mm; weight: about 40 kg) is a collimated scintillation gamma detector (the collimation angle is 10 deg.). It is installed on a scanning unit and was placed inside the reactor hall. The Gamma Locator scans all surfaces of the reactor hall with angular steps ({<=} 1 deg. vertically as well as horizontally) and the particle fluence from the corresponding direction is recorded. The distance between the device head and the measured surface is instantaneously registered by a laser distance gauge. Inside the collimator there is a small CCD camera which makes it possible to obtain a visible image of the measured surface. The effective surface activity levels are presented in colour on the screen of the control computer. The gamma detector essentially consists of a CsI(TI) scintillator crystal ({phi} 8 mm in diameter, 2.5 mm in thickness) and a Si photodiode. The detector energy resolution is about 8% for radiation from {sup 137}Cs. The exposure dose rate distribution in the reactor hall is estimated from the measured effective surface activities ({sup 137}Cs is the main gamma emitting isotope inside the reactor hall). The results of dose rate calculations are presented in colour superposed on a drawing of the reactor hall. (au) 1 tab., 28 ills., 16 refs.

  12. Project Energize: whole-region primary school nutrition and physical activity programme; evaluation of body size and fitness 5 years after the randomised controlled trial.

    Rush, Elaine; McLennan, Stephanie; Obolonkin, Victor; Vandal, Alain C; Hamlin, Michael; Simmons, David; Graham, David

    2014-01-28

    Project Energize, a region-wide whole-school nutrition and physical activity programme, commenced as a randomised controlled trial (RCT) in the period 2004-6 in 124 schools in Waikato, New Zealand. In 2007, sixty-two control schools were engaged in the programme, and by 2011, all but two of the 235 schools in the region were engaged. Energizers (trained nutrition and physical activity specialists) work with eight to twelve schools each to achieve the goals of the programme, which are based on healthier eating and enhanced physical activity. In 2011, indices of obesity and physical fitness of 2474 younger (7·58 (sd 0·57) years) and 2330 older (10·30 (sd 0·51) years) children attending 193 of the 235 primary schools were compared with historical measurements. After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, socio-economic status (SES) and school cluster effects, the combined prevalence of obesity and overweight among younger and older children in 2011 was lower by 31 and 15 %, respectively, than that among 'unEnergized' children in the 2004 to 2006 RCT. Similarly, BMI was lower by 3·0 % (95 % CI - 5·8, - 1·3) and 2·4 % (95 % CI - 4·3, - 0·5). Physical fitness (time taken to complete a 550 m run) was significantly higher in the Energized children (13·7 and 11·3 %, respectively) than in a group of similarly aged children from another region. These effects were observed for boys and girls, both indigenous Māori and non-Māori children, and across SES. The long-term regional commitment to the Energize programme in schools may potentially lead to a secular reduction in the prevalence of overweight and obesity and gains in physical fitness, which may reduce the risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23867069

  13. Breast and cervical cancer screening programme implementation in 16 countries

    Dowling, Emily C; Klabunde, Carrie; Patnick, Julietta;

    2010-01-01

    There is a continuing need to monitor and evaluate the impact of organized screening programmes on cancer incidence and mortality. We report results from a programme assessment conducted within the International Cancer Screening Network (ICSN) to understand the characteristics of cervical screening...... programmes within countries that have established population-based breast cancer screening programmes....

  14. READINESS OF TEACHERS FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES OF STUDENTS AT HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENT OF ECONOMICS

    L. V. Vishnevetskaja

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of the article, its theoretical and practical importance are caused by the existing contradiction between the state order for the formation of socially active person and lack of scientifically-practical workings out in the field of pedagogical support of the organization of extracurricular socially useful activity of the students. The settlement of the contradiction is possible in the presence of teachers specially prepared for the given process.Purpose. The purpose of the article is the theoretical substantiation and experimental estimation of teachers’ readiness for the organization of extracurricular activities of students in higher education establishments of economics.Methodology, Results. Complex application of theoretical (element and the structural analysis, comparison, generalization and empirical (questioning, testing, the expert estimation, included pedagogical supervision methods has allowed to define the essence of investigated concept as integrative personal formation, to develop criteria and its indicators of its formation and experimentally estimate the level of readiness of teaching staff for the organization of students’ extracurricular activities in higher education establishments of economics.Practical implications. The results of the research can be widely used in the work of curators of academic groups, tutors, teachers-organizers, in the system of training and advanced training of teaching staff.

  15. Quality control programme for radiotherapy

    A 3 years pilot programme started in January 2000 with 33 philanthropic cancer institutions that provides medical services to 60% of the patients from the national social security system. Brazil has today 161 radiotherapy services (144 operating with megavoltage equipment). These 33 institutions are distributed over 19 Brazilian states. The aim of this programme is: To create conditions to allow the participants to apply the radiotherapy with quality and efficacy; To promote up dating courses for the physicians, physicists and technicians of these 33 Institutions. With the following objectives: To recommend dosimetric and radiological protection procedures in order to guarantee the tumor prescribed dose and safe working conditions; To help in establishing and implementing these procedures. The main activities are: local quality control evaluations, postal TLD audits in reference conditions, postal TLD audits in off axis conditions and training. The local quality control program has already evaluated 22 institutions with 43 machines (25 Co-60 and 18 linear accelerators). In these visits we perform dosimetric, electrical, mechanical and safety tests. As foreseen, we found more problems among the old Co-60 machines i.e., field flatness, size, symmetry and relative output factors; lasers positioning system alignment; optical distance indicator; radiation and light field coincidence; optical and mechanical distance indicators agreement, than among the linear accelerators i.e., field flatness and size; lasers positioning system alignment; tray interlocking and wedge filter factors

  16. IAEA research reactors activities - small research reactors, their role as first step in nuclear technology programme, and cooperation to maximize utilization

    A large number of the existing research reactors in the world are currently under utilized, in many cases because of an overly narrow assessment on the need for the research reactors at the time they were acquired, and an absence of mechanisms to ensure sustainability. On the other hand, operating and utilizing research reactor is often taken as a first step in the preparation for nuclear power program, as both the former and the latter require personnel with similar skills sets and the support of the same/similar infrastructure including regulatory body. This presentation summarizes activities conducted by member states under IAEA's Research Reactor programmes, with more focused discussion on three areas: Reduction in the use of HEU in research reactors;The role of low power critical facilities and small research reactor as a a first step in the development of nuclear energy programmes; and The need for international and regional cooperation to maximize utilization of existing research reactor facilities.

  17. Neutron radiography in Indian space programme

    Viswanathan, K

    1999-01-01

    Pyrotechnic devices are indispensable in any space programme to perform such critical operations as ignition, stage separation, solar panel deployment, etc. The nature of design and configuration of different types of pyrotechnic devices, and the type of materials that are put in their construction make the inspection of them with thermal neutrons more favourable than any other non destructive testing methods. Although many types of neutron sources are available for use, generally the radiographic quality/exposure duration and cost of source run in opposite directions even after four decades of research and development. But in the area of space activity, by suitably combining the X-ray and neutron radiographic requirements, the inspection of the components can be made economically viable. This is demonstrated in the Indian space programme by establishing a 15 MeV linear accelerator based neutron generator facility to inspect medium to giant solid propellant boosters by X-ray inspection and all types of critic...

  18. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors establish CD8(+) T cell identity through intrinsic HDAC activity.

    Xing, Shaojun; Li, Fengyin; Zeng, Zhouhao; Zhao, Yunjie; Yu, Shuyang; Shan, Qiang; Li, Yalan; Phillips, Farrah C; Maina, Peterson K; Qi, Hank H; Liu, Chengyu; Zhu, Jun; Pope, R Marshall; Musselman, Catherine A; Zeng, Chen; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell dichotomy is essential for effective cellular immunity. How individual T cell identity is established remains poorly understood. Here we show that the high-mobility group (HMG) transcription factors Tcf1 and Lef1 are essential for repressing CD4(+) lineage-associated genes including Cd4, Foxp3 and Rorc in CD8(+) T cells. Tcf1- and Lef1-deficient CD8(+) T cells exhibit histone hyperacetylation, which can be ascribed to intrinsic histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in Tcf1 and Lef1. Mutation of five conserved amino acids in the Tcf1 HDAC domain diminishes HDAC activity and the ability to suppress CD4(+) lineage genes in CD8(+) T cells. These findings reveal that sequence-specific transcription factors can utilize intrinsic HDAC activity to guard cell identity by repressing lineage-inappropriate genes. PMID:27111144

  19. The effects of a home-based arm ergometry exercise programme on physical fitness, fatigue and activity in polio survivors: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Murray Deirdre

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Polio survivors have reduced mobility, pain and fatigue, which make access to conventional forms of aerobic exercise difficult. Inactivity leads to increased risk of health problems, many of which are prevalent among Polio survivors. Aerobic exercise programmes in Polio survivors should utilise stable muscle groups and should be designed to minimise exacerbation of pain and fatigue. A home-based arm ergometry aerobic exercise programme may represent an affordable and accessible exercise modality, incorporating exercise prescription principles in this group. Methods/design This is a prospective, single blinded, randomised controlled trial. There are two arms; exercise intervention using arm ergometers and control. Polio survivors meeting eligibility criteria will be recruited and randomly allocated to intervention or control groups. Participants allocated to the intervention group will receive a small arm ergometer and a polar heart rate monitor. They will carry out a home-based moderate intensity (50-70% HRMax aerobic exercise programme for eight weeks, following instruction by the treating physiotherapist. Assessments will occur at baseline and after eight weeks and will include tests of physical fitness, activity, energy cost of walking, fatigue and quality of life. Clinically feasible assessment tools including the Six Minute Arm Test, the Physical Activity Scale for People with Physical Disabilities questionnaire, the Physiological Cost Index, Fatigue Severity Scale and the SF-36v2 will be utilised. Discussion The efficacy of a home-based arm ergometry programme in Polio survivors will be examined. No previous trial has examined such a programme using a wide range of outcome measures pertinent to Polio survivors. This study will provide new information on the impact of arm ergometry on physical fitness, activity, body composition, fatigue, pain, muscle strength, and health related quality of life. Also, the study

  20. Radon programme in the Czech Republic

    The framework of the Radon programme in the Czech republic includes both precautionary measures and interventions. The programme informally started in early eighties has been now incorporated in national legislation (Atomic Act, Radiation Protection Decree, etc.). Aim of precautionary measures is to avert construction of building above natural radiation guidance levels (200 Bq/m3 for indoor radon concentration and 0.5 Sv/h for gamma dose rate) by protection of new buildings against soil radon ingress, by regulation of natural radioactivity in building materials and supplied water. Aim of interventions is to identify buildings affected by enhanced natural radioactivity and help owners to put into effect reasonable remedial measures. Two sets of intervention levels for indoor natural exposure were established: guidance intervention levels 400 Bq/m3 (indoor radon), 1.0 Sv/h (indoor gamma dose rate) and limit values 4000 Bq/m3 and 10 Sv/h. The radon programme is based both on governmental and private activities. The governmental activities include representative and targeted indoor radon survey, subsidy for radon mitigation, mitigation test measurements and public information on radon issue. The private activities include radon measurement (radon index of building site, indoor measurements, radon diagnosis) and remedial measures. More than 100 commercial companies were authorised by Radiation Protection Authority (SUJB) to provide these measurements

  1. EURATOM Research Framework Programme on Reactor Systems

    The activities of the European Commission (EC) in the field of nuclear energy are governed by the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The research activities of the European Union (EU) are designed as multi-annual Framework Programmes (FP). The EURATOM 6. Framework Programme (EURATOM FP -6), covering the period 2002-2006, is funded with a budget of 1, 230 million Euros and managed by the European Commission. Beyond the general strategic goal of the EURATOM Framework Programmes to help exploit the potential of nuclear energy, in a safe and sustainable manner, FP -6 is designed to contribute also to the development of the 'European Research Area' (ERA), a concept described in the Commission's Communication COM(2000)6, of January 2000. Moreover EURATOM FP-6 contributes to the creation of the conditions for sharing the same nuclear safety culture throughout the EU-25 and the Candidate Countries, fostering the acceptance of nuclear power as an element of the energy mix. This paper gives an overview of the research activities undertaken through EURATOM FP-6 in the area of Reactor Systems, covering the safety of present reactors, the development of future safe reactors, and the needs in terms of research infrastructures and education and training. The actions under FP-6 are presented in their continuity of actions under FP-5. The perspectives under FP -7 are also provided. Other parts of the EURATOM FP, covering Waste Handling and Radiation Protection, as well as Fusion Energy, are not detailed in this paper. (authors)

  2. IAEA occupational radiation protection programme: current status

    As stated in Art.III.A.6 of its Statute, the International Atomic Energy Agency (commonly referred to as the Agency) is authorized to establish or adopt, in consultation and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned, standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property (including such standards for labour conditions), and to provide for the application of these standards to its own operation as well as to the operations making use of materials, services, equipment, facilities, and information made available by the Agency or at its request or under its control or supervision. The Agency s Occupational Radiation Protection Programme aims at harmonizing infrastructures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and for optimizing radiation protection in situation s of exposures due to external radiation and intakes of radionuclides from both artificial and natural sources of radiation. Under its regular and technical cooperation programmes, the Agency has been assigning high priority to both the establishment of safety standards for labour conditions and for the application of these standards through, Interalia, direct assistance under its technical cooperation (TC) programme, the rendering of services, the promotion of education and training, the fostering of information exchange and the coordination of research and development. The purpose of this paper is to present the current status and future IAEA activities in support of occupational radiation protection. (authors)

  3. Computer Programme Library at Ispra: Service to IAEA Member States

    In 1964, in view of the increasingly important role of computers in atomic energy, the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development established a Computer Programme Library (CPL) at Ispra, Italy. The original purpose of this Library, then consisting chiefly of programmes for reactor calculations, was to improve communication between the originators of the computer programmes and the scientists and engineers in Member States of the OECD who used them, thus furthering the efficient and economic use of the many large and expensive computers in the countries concerned. During the first few years of the Library's operation, a growing interest in its activities became evident in countries which were not members of the OECD. The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, aware that such countries which were Member States of the IAEA could benefit from the Library's services, concluded an agreement with the Nuclear Energy Agency in 1967 to the effect that these services would be extended to all IAEA Member States. In March 1968, the Director General announced by circular letter that these services were available, and requested the governments of Member States that were not members of OECD to nominate establishments to participate in the activities of the Computer Programme Library. By August 1973, 32 such establishments were regularly using the services of the CPL

  4. Donor transplant programme

    The transplantation of organs and tissues from one human to another human has become an essential and well established form of therapy for many types of organ and tissue failure. In Malaysia, kidney, cornea and bone marrow transplantation are well established. Recently, liver, bone and heart transplanation have been performed. Unfortunately, because of the lack of cadaveric organ donation, only a limited number of solid organ transplantation have been performed. The cadaveric organ donor rate in Malaysia is low at less than one per million population. The first tissue transplanted in Malaysia was the cornea which was performed in the early 1970s. At that time and even now the majority of corneas came from Sri Lanka. The first kidney transplant was performed in 1975 from a live related donor. The majority of the 629 kidney transplants done at Hospital Kuala Lumpur to date have been from live related donors. Only 35 were from cadaver donors. Similarly, the liver transplantation programme which started in 1995 are from live related donors. A more concerted effort has been made recently to increase the awareness of the public and the health professionals on organ and tissue donation. This national effort to promote organ and tissue donation seems to have gathered momentum in 1997 with the first heart transplant successfully performed at the National Heart Institute. The rate of cadaveric donors has also increased from a previous average of I to 2 per year to 6 per year in the last one year. These developments are most encouraging and may signal the coming of age of our transplantati on programme. The Ministry of Health in conjunction with various institutions, organizations and professional groups, have taken a number of proactive measures to facilitate the development of the cadaveric organ donation programme. Efforts to increase public awareness and to overcome the negative cultural attitude towards organ donation have been intensified. Equally important are efforts

  5. Teaching outdoor and adventure activities: describing, analysing and understanding a primary school physical education professional development programme

    Coulter, Maura

    2012-01-01

    Background: Primary schools need well informed and highly motivated teachers to meet the evolving demands of the education system. Professional development is essential to equip primary school teachers to change practice to meet these challenges (Guskey, 2003; Villegas-Reimers, 2003). The purpose of this study was to describe, analyse and understand teachers’ and children’s experiences of a contextualised, whole school professional development programme (PDP) in primary physical education. ...

  6. A theory evaluation of an induction programme

    Kenrick Hendricks

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: An induction programme is commonly used to help new employees understand their job within the organisation. Research purpose: The main aim of this study was to examine whether or not the programme theory of an induction programme was plausible and would lead to the intended outcomes as described by the programme manager.Motivation for the study: Induction training is one of the most common training programmes in an organisation. However, there is little research to evaluate whether or not the activities of an induction programme will lead to the intended outcomes of such a programme.Research design, approach and method: This theory evaluation used a descriptive design. One hundred and thirteen employees of a media company completed a ten-item, five-point Likert scale which measured their perceptions of the programme’s outcome, identification with the organisation and intentions to stay with the organisation.Main findings: From this theory evaluation it was apparent that an induction programme based on an implausible programme theory could be problematic. An implausible programme theory affects the design of the programme activities and unsuitable activities may not deliver the desired outcomes.Practical/managerial implications: The intention of the evaluation is to guide human resource managers through a process of replacing an implausible programme theory with one that is plausible, and which ensures better alignment of programme activities and outcomes.Contribution/value-add: The evaluators showed how a plausible programme theory could improve programme design. This redesigned induction programme may lead to benefits, such as staff retention and company identification, rather than the vague assumption that it has been conforming to a legal obligation.

  7. The Durham Micro-optics Programme

    Schmoll, J.; Dubbeldam, C. M.; Robertson, D. J.; Yao, J.

    2006-06-01

    The Durham Micro-optics Programme was established to develop key components to be used for integral field spectrographs for upcoming instrumentation projects, focussing on currently existing telescopes as well as on the next generation of ELTs. These activities include monolithic multi-optics machining and grinding, optical surface improvement using various post-polishing techniques and replication of micro-optical components. While these developments have mostly slicer-type IFUs in mind, also new types of microlens arrays are in development for fiber based high contrast IFU systems.

  8. Guidance for establishment and implementation of field sample management programs in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    The role of the National Sample Management Program (NSMP) proposed by the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to be a resource for EM programs and for local Field Sample Management Programs (FSMPs). It will be a source of information on sample analysis and data collection within the DOE complex. The purpose of this document is to establish the suggested scope of the FSMP activities to be performed under each Operations Office, list the drivers under which the program will operate, define terms and list references. This guidance will apply only to EM sampling and analysis activities associated with project planning, contracting, laboratory selection, sample collection, sample transportation, laboratory analysis and data management

  9. ISOLDE PROGRAMME

    Fedosseev, V; Lynch, K M; Grob, L K; Herfurth, F; Scheidenberger, C; Geppert, C; Gorges, C; Ratajczyk, T; Vogel, S; Munch, M K; Nieminen, P; Pakarinen, J J A; Lecesne, N; Bouzomita, H; Grinyer, J; Marques moreno, F M; Parlog, M; Blank, B A; Pedroza, J; Ghetta, V; Guillemaud mueller, D S; Cottereau, E; Cheikh mhamed, M; Tusseau nenez, S; Tungate, G; Walker, P M; Smith, A G; Fitzpatrick, C; Dominik, W M; Karny, M; Ciemny, A A; Nyman, G H; Thies, R M A; Lindberg, S K G; Langouche, G F; Delaure, B J P; Mayet, P; Ory, G T; Kesteloot, N J K; Papuga, J; Dehairs, M H R; Callens, M; Domnanich, K A; Richter, D; Lutter, R J; Wiehr, S; Tengblad, O; Nacher gonzalez, E; Jungclaus, A; Ribeiro jimenez, G; Marroquin alonso, I; Cal gonzalez, J; Paziy, V; Salsac, M; Murphy, C; Podolyak, Z F; Bajoga, A D; Butler, P; Pritchard, A; Steer, A N; Fox, S P; Wadsworth, B A; Truesdale, V L; Al monthery, M; Hass, M; Guttormsen, M S; Badea, M N; Calinescu, S; Cederkall, J A; Zemlyanoy, S; Golovkov, M; Wu, C; Harrichunder, S; Ncube, M; Gerten, R F; Lehnert, J; Gladnishki, K A; Pospisil, S; Datta pramanik, U; Benzoni, G; Fedorov, D; Molkanov, P; Pfeiffer, B; Griesel, T; Wehner, L W; Mikkelsen, M; Recchia, F; Smith, J F; Kelly, C M; De melo bandeira tavares, P M; Vieira, J M; Martins da silva, M A; Lima lopes, A M; Mader, J; Kessler, P; Schweikhard, L C; Marx, G H; Kulczycka, E; Komorowska, M; Da silva, M F; Goncalves marques, C P; Baptista peres, M A; Welander, J E; Coeck, S; Ryssens, W A M; Knoops, G; Vanbuel, J; Reiter, P; Miller, C; Martin sanchez-cano, D; Wiens, A; Blazhev, A A; Braun, N; Cappellazzo, M V; Birkenbach, B; Gerst, R; Dannhoff, M F; Sithole, M J; Bilgier, B; Nardelli, S; Vetter, U; Araujo mendes, C M; Valencia marin, E; Pantea, E; Hessberger, F P; Leduc, A J; Mitsuoka, S; Carbonari, A W; Buchegger, F J; Garzon camacho, A; Stachura, M K; Stora, T; Marsh, B A; Thiboud, J A; Antalic, S; Stahl, C; Bauer, C; Thurauf, M; Maass, B; Sturm, S; Boehm, C; Wolf, N R; Ways, M; Riisager, K; Ruotsalainen, P A; Bastin, B; Duval, F T; Penessot, G; Flechard, X D; Desrues, P; Giovinazzo, J; Kurtukian nieto, T; Ascher, P E L; Roccia, S; Matea, I; Croizet, H A G; Bonnin, C M; Morfouace, P; Smith, A J; Guin, R; Banerjee, D; Ohtsubo, T; Zhukov, M V; Tengborn, E A; Dessagne, P; Juscamaita vivanco, Y; De rydt, M A E; Vermaelen, P; Monten, R; Yang, X; De coster, A; Kruecken, R; Muecher, D; Nowak, A K; Cano ott, D; Murphy, A S J; Shand, C M; Regan, P H; Jones, G D; Herzberg, R; Ikin, P; Davies, P J; Napoli, D R; Scarel, G; Larsen, A; Tornyi, T G; Pascu, S G; Stroe, L; Toma, S; Jansson, K; Dronjak fahlander, M; Krupko, S; Hurst, A M; Veskovic, M; Nikolov, J; Sibanda, W N; Rocchini, M; Deicher, M; Wichert, T; Wolf, E; Kronenberg, J; Helmke, A; Meliani, Z; Ivanov, V S; Kuti, I; Halasz, Z; Henry, M O; Bras de sequeira amaral, V; Espirito santo, F; Carvalho teixeira, R C; Rosendahl, S; Speidel, K; Agarwal, I; Faul, T; Kownacki, J M; Martins correia, J G; Lorenz, K; Costa miranda, S M; Granadeiro costa, A R; Keupers, M; Stukken, R; Wursten, E J; Kotthaus, T; Pfeiffer, M; Stegemann, S T; Gironi, L; Cakirli, R B; Jensen, A; Romstedt, F; Constantino silva furtado, I; Heredia cardona, J A; Jordan martin, M D; Montaner piza, A; Plewinski, F; Mesli, A; Pichard, A; Fallis starhunter, J P; Voulot, D; Mrazek, J; Ugryumov, V; Savreux, R P; Kojouharov, I M; Stegmann, R; Fitting, J; Lauer, M; Kirsebom, O S; Jensen, K L; Jokinen, A; Rahkila, P J; Hager, U D K; Dubois, M; Orr, N A; Fabian, X; Huikari, J E; Goigoux, T; Magron, C; Zakari, A A; Maietta, M; Bachelet, C E M; Roussiere, B; Li, R; Mertzimekis, T; Gislason, H P; Shayestehaminzadeh, S; Qi, B; Mukai, M; Watanabe, Y; Willmann, L; Kurcewicz, W; Wimmer, K; Meisel, Z P; Lievens, P; Neyens, G; Darby, I G; Descamps, B O; Bunka, M; Vermeulen, C; Podadera aliseda, I; Alcorta moreno, M; Pesudo fortes, V; Algora, A; Zielinska, M; Korten, W; Wang, C H; Lotay, G J; Mason, P; Rice, S J; Willenegger, L M; Judson, D S; Revill, J P; Andreev, A; Yavuzkanat, N; Kumar, V; Zamfir, N - V; Deleanu, D; Golubev, P I; Jeppesen, H B; Pain, S D; Stracener, D W; Matousek, V; Venhart, M; Birova, M; Li, X; Stuchbery, A E; Lellep, G M; Poves paredes, A; Chakraborty, S; Leoni, S; Chupp, T; Yilmaz, C; Severin, G; Garcia ramos, J E; Hadinia, B; Mc glynn, E; Monteiro de sena silvares de carvalho, I; Friedag, P; Koos, V; Meot, V H; Pauwels, D B; Jancso, A; Srebrny, J; Alves, E J; David bosne, E; Dexters, W M M; Velten, P; Kalkuehler, M; Albers, M; Bharuth-ram, K; Akkus, B; Hemmingsen, L B S; Pedersen, J T; Dos santos redondo, L M; Rubio barroso, B; Kozlov, V; Mokhles gerami, A; Bernardo da silva, E; Unzueta solozabal, I; Schell, J; Szybowicz, M; Lassen, J; Johnston, K; Miyazaki, A; Macko, M; Coquard, L; Bloch, T P; Bonig, E S; Ignatov, A

    2002-01-01

    The experiments aim at a broad exploration of the properties of atomic nuclei far away from the region of beta stability. Furthermore, the unique radioactive beams of over 60~elements produced at the on-line isotope separators ISOLDE-2 and ISOLDE-3 are used in a wide programme of atomic, solid state and surface physics. Around 300 scientists are involved in the project, coming from about 70 laboratories. \\\\ \\\\ The electromagnetic isotope separators are connected on-line with their production targets in the extracted 600 MeV proton or 910~MeV Helium-3 beam of the Synchro-Cyclotron. Secondary beams of radioactive isotopes are available at the facility in intensities of 10$^1

  10. ADS National Programmes: Italy

    Following a preliminary design developed in 1998, based on the Energy Amplifier concept proposed by CERN, a first configuration of a lead-bismuth Eutectic cooled Experimental ADS (LBE-XADS) was worked out in the period 1999–2001, under the aegis of MURST, by a group of Italian organizations led by Ansado Nucleare, with the aim of assessing the feasibility of a small sized (80 MWth) ADS. At the end of 1997 a joint effort of ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) and INFN (National Institute for Nuclear Physics) led to the approval of a national programme by MURST (Minister for University and Scientific and Technological Research) named TRASCO (TRAsmutazione SCOrie) aiming at the study of physics and technologies needed to design an ADS for radioactive waste transmutation. The programme consisted of research subprogrammes on accelerator, neutronics, thermalhydraulics analysis, beam window technology, and material technology and compatibility with Pb and Pb-Bi. At now, most of the activities in support to the ADS development carried out at national level are part of EU-funded Projects. These activities are complemented by the programme agreement (AdP -Accordo di programma), signed between ENEA and the Ministry of Economic Development, which provides in general a range of activities aimed at the development of sustainable nuclear fission systems. Several universities and the national industry are involved, besides ENEA, in the activities

  11. Fusion technology programme

    KfK is involved in the European Fusion Programme predominantly in the NET and Fusion Technology part. The following fields of activity are covered: Studies for NET, alternative confinement concepts, and needs and issues of integral testing. Research on structural materials. Development of superconducting magnets. Gyrotron development (part of the Physics Programme). Nuclear technology (breeding materials, blanket design, tritium technology, safety and environmental aspects of fusion, remote maintenance). Reported here are status and results of work under contracts with the CEC within the NET and Technology Programme. The aim of the major part of this R and D work is the support of NET, some areas (e.g. materials, safety and environmental impact, blanket design) have a wider scope and address problems of a demonstration reactor. In the current working period, several new proposals have been elaborated to be implemented into the 85/89 Euratom Fusion Programme. New KfK contributions relate to materials research (dual beam and fast reactor irradiations, ferritic steels), to blanket engineering (MHD-effects) and to safety studies (e.g. magnet safety). (orig./GG)

  12. Establishment of an international reference data library of nuclear activation cross sections. Summary report of the first research co-ordination meeting held in Debrecen, Hungary, from 4 to 7 October 1994

    The report contains the Summary of the First IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of the new Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Establishment of an International Reference Data Library of Nuclear Activation Cross Sections''. The meeting was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section with co-operation and assistance of local organizers from the Institute of Experimental Physics and held in Debrecen, Hungary, from 4 to 7 October 1994. The purpose of the RCM was to discuss the scope and goals of the CRP, to report and evaluate the first results of the research carried out by each participating laboratory, to review the current tasks, identify further actions of participants and agree on the coordination of work under this CRP. The detailed agenda, the list of participants, conclusions and recommendations of the meeting are presented in the summary report. (author)

  13. A radiochemical technique for the establishment of a solvent-independent scale of ion activities in amphiprotic solvents

    The radiochemical determination of solubilities of hardly soluble compounds of silver (Ph4BAg, AgCl), by means of Ag-110m in amphiprotic solutions is used for setting-up a solvent-independent scale of ion activities based on the concept of the media effect. The media effects of the salts are calculated from the solubility data of the Ag compounds in question. The splitting into the media effects of single ions takes place with the extrathermodynamic assumption of the same media effects for large ions, such as Ph4B- = Ph4As-. A standardized ion activity scale in connection with the activity coefficients for the solvent in question can be established with water as the basic state of the chemical potential. As the sum of the media effects of the single ions gives the media effect of the salt concerned, which is easily obtained from data which are experimentally accessible (solubility, vapour pressure, ion exchange ect.), this method leads to single ion activities of a large number of ions in a multitude of solvents. (orig./LH)

  14. CASINDO Programme Summary Report

    Van der Linden, N.; Smekens, K.; Bole-Rentel, T.; Saidi, R. [Unit ECN Policy Studies, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kamphuis, E. [ETC Netherlands, Leusden (Netherlands); Winarno, Oetomo Tri [Institute of Technology, Bandung (Indonesia); Permana, Iman [Technical Education Development Centre, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2012-06-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. CASINDO stands for Capacity development and strenghtening for energy policy formulation adn implementation of sustainable energy projects in Indonesia.

  15. Research and training programmes

    Daksha Patel

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Research is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as “a systematic investigation and study of materials and sources in order to establish facts and reach new conclusions.”Research is embedded in the curricula of most postgraduate training programmes; students are expected to complete some form of original work towards a dissertation. This often evokes a range of reactions: “What is the purpose of this exercise? Why do I have to do research when I just want to do a job? Shouldn’t research rather be left to experts? I can’t do the course; I have no research background!”

  16. Research and training programmes

    Daksha Patel

    2007-01-01

    Research is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as “a systematic investigation and study of materials and sources in order to establish facts and reach new conclusions.”Research is embedded in the curricula of most postgraduate training programmes; students are expected to complete some form of original work towards a dissertation. This often evokes a range of reactions: “What is the purpose of this exercise? Why do I have to do research when I just want to do a job? Shouldn’t research r...

  17. Programme budget 1981

    There are 11 main fields of KfK R + D activities which are connected with one or more of the research goals of a) assurance of nuclear fuel supply, b) nuclear waste management, c) safety of nuclear facilities, d) basic research and research on new technologies. The scientific and technical tasks connected with these goals in 1981 and on a medium-term basis as well as the financial requirements are presented in the programme budget. (orig.)

  18. Multilateral Interoperability Programme

    Burita, L.

    2009-01-01

    The Multilateral Interoperability Programme (MIP) is a voluntary and independent activity in NATO environment by the participating nations and organizations. The MIP concept is based on data exchange in form of common exchange data model to achieve the international interoperability in command and control information systems (C2IS) of the tactical units. The article describes the basis of the MIP organizations, structure, planning and testing processes. The core of the MIP solution is the Inf...

  19. Efficacy of Tailored Physical Activity or Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme on return to work for sick-listed citizens

    Andersen, Lotte Nygaard; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Sørensen, Thomas Lund;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity' (TPA) and a 'Chronic Pain Self-management Programme' (CPSMP) compared with a reference group (REF) on return to work after 3 months as sick-listed citizens with pain related to the back or the upper body. METHODS...... the municipality and the co-primary endpoint was duration of the sickness absence period. Secondary outcomes consisted of pain, body mass index, aerobic capacity, grip strength, work ability and kinesiophobia. The trial was conducted in Sonderborg Municipality from March 2011 to October 2013. RESULTS...

  20. The Back 2 Activity Trial: education and advice versus education and advice plus a structured walking programme for chronic low back pain

    Bradbury Ian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current evidence supports the use of exercise-based treatment for chronic low back pain that encourages the patient to assume an active role in their recovery. Walking has been shown it to be an acceptable type of exercise with a low risk of injury. However, it is not known whether structured physical activity programmes are any more effective than giving advice to remain active. Methods/Design The proposed study will test the feasibility of using a pedometer-driven walking programme, as an adjunct to a standard education and advice session in participants with chronic low back pain. Fifty adult participants will be recruited via a number of different sources. Baseline outcome measures including self reported function; objective physical activity levels; fear-avoidance beliefs and health-related quality of life will be recorded. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated under strict, double blind conditions to one of two treatments groups. Participants in group A will receive a single education and advice session with a physiotherapist based on the content of the 'Back Book'. Participants in group B will receive the same education and advice session. In addition, they will also receive a graded pedometer-driven walking programme prescribed by the physiotherapist. Follow up outcomes will be recorded by the same researcher, who will remain blinded to group allocation, at eight weeks and six months post randomisation. A qualitative exploration of participants' perception of walking will also be examined by use of focus groups at the end of the intervention. As a feasibility study, treatment effects will be represented by point estimates and confidence intervals. The assessment of participant satisfaction will be tabulated, as will adherence levels and any recorded difficulties or adverse events experienced by the participants or therapists. This information will be used to modify the planned interventions to be used in a

  1. ADS National Programmes: China

    In China the conceptual study of an ADS concept which lasted for about five years ended in 1999. As one project of the National Basic Research Programme of China (973 Programme) in energy domain, which is sponsored by the China Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), a five year programme of fundamental research of ADS physics and related technology was launched in 2000 and passed national review at the end of 2005. From 2007, another five year 973 Programme Key Technology Research of Accelerator Driven Subcritical System for Nuclear waste Transmutation started. The research activities were focused on HPPA physics and technology, reactor physics of external source driven subcritical assembly, nuclear data base and material study. For HPPA, a high current injector consisting of an ECR ion source, LEBT and an RFQ accelerating structure of 3.5 MeV has been built and were being improved. In reactor physics study, a series of neutron multiplication experimental study has been carrying out. The VENUS I facility has been constructed as the basic experimental platform for neutronics study in ADS blanket. VENUS I a zero power subcritical neutron multiplying assembly driven by external neutron produced by a pulsed neutron generator or 252Cf neutron source. The theoretical, experimental and simulation studies on nuclear data, material properties and nuclear fuel circulation related to ADS are carried out in order to provide the database for ADS system analysis. China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) and other Chinese institutes carried out the MOST project together. Besides CIAE, China Academy of Science (CAS) pays more and more attention to Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles (ANFC). A large programme of ANFC, including ADS and Th based nuclear fuel cycle, has been launched by CAS

  2. Effects of ageing on US university research programmes

    The history of University Research Reactor (URR) programmes in the United States is analyzed from the 1954 Atoms for Peace program until today. Of the 72 URRs commissioned only 34 remain in operation. The ageing process has had a minimal impact on physical structures and components. The greater impact of ageing has been on the programmes conducted at URRs. After initial construction with substantial federal support, a severe lack of funding existed for normal operating expenses, conducting active research programmes, and maintaining facilities in a state-of-the-art condition. Some facilities funded improvements by selling services to purchase new equipment and support the staff. Improvements also resulted form a recent $4 million federal upgrade program. Efforts are underway to establish a rational program of support to equip the network of URRs as contemporary research centers more committed to their educational and research missions and less driven by the need to perform service work to support their existence. (orig.)

  3. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    Two years ago the World Health Assembly approved the establishment of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA). The Programme, set up under the auspices of WHO, provides support to the health authorities in Belarus, the Russian Federation and the Ukraine in dealing with the aftermath of the accident, and is intended to serve as a unifying framework for all international health-related activities arising from the accident carried out in the three countries. This document outlines the Programme's objectives, structure, accomplishments and future plans. As a background, it also provides a brief overview of the accident and of its current and potential impact on health in the three countries. 5 figs, 1 tab

  4. Technical proposal for including health in the procedures for assessing the environmental impact of policies, plans, programmes, projects and activities

    Almudena García Nieto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Health was an element of general licensing procedures until Spain joined the EU in 1986, when the health report became diluted. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of this topic’s current regulatory framework and to try to briefly describe health priorities and the channels for feasibly integrating the health variable in the environmental assessment of plans, programmes and projects from the public and private sectors. The current existence of the Environmental Assessment Act and the Public Health Act may help to achieve this.When preparing a strategic environmental study and an environmental impact study, the health impact assessment should be considered an essential step in these environmental procedures and have the same legal treatment as the “compulsory and determinant reports” of said procedures.Thus, it is concluded that the regulatory development of the aspects relating to the assessment of the health impact of the plans, programmes and projects envisaged in the Environmental Assessment Act is essential, the health impact assessment being the tool for doing so.

  5. Nuclear waste management programme 1996

    Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT) founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Management Programme 1995, an account of the nuclear waste management measures of IVO and TVO is given as required by the sections 74 and 75 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. At first, the nuclear waste management situation and the programme of activities are reported. The nuclear waste management research programme for the year 1996 and more generally for the years 1997-2000 is presented. (1 fig., 1 tab.)

  6. Nuclear Waste Management Programme 1993

    Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT), founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Management Programme 1993, an account of the nuclear waste management measures of IVO and TVO is given as required by the sections 74 and 75 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. At first, the nuclear waste management situation and the programme of activities are reported. Then the nuclear waste management research programme for the year 1993 and more generally for the years 1994-1997 is presented

  7. Nuclear waste management programme 1994

    Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT), founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Management Programme 1994, an account of the nuclear waste management measures of IVO and TVO is given as required by the sections 74 and 75 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. At first, the nuclear waste management situation and the programme of activities are reported. The the nuclear waste management research programme for the year 1994 and more generally for the years 1995-1997 is presented. (2 figs., 1 tab.)

  8. Nuclear Waste Management Programme 1992

    Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT), founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Management Programme 1992, an account of the nuclear waste management measures of IVO and TVO is given as required by the Sections 74 and 75 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. At first, the nuclear waste management situation and the programme of activities are reported. Then the nuclear waste management research programme for the year 1992 and more generally for the years 1993 - 1996 is presented. (author)

  9. A Statistical Programme Assignment Model

    Rosholm, Michael; Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael

    When treatment effects of active labour market programmes are heterogeneous in an observable way  across the population, the allocation of the unemployed into different programmes becomes a particularly  important issue. In this paper, we present a statistical model designed to improve the present...... duration of unemployment spells may result if a statistical programme assignment model is introduced. We discuss several issues regarding the  plementation of such a system, especially the interplay between the statistical model and  case workers....

  10. Integrated photonics with programmable non-volatile memory

    Jun-Feng Song; Xian-Shu Luo; Andy Eu-Jin Lim; Chao Li; Qing Fang; Tsung-Yang Liow; Lian-Xi Jia; Xiao-Guang Tu; Ying Huang; Hai-Feng Zhou; Guo-Qiang Lo

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics integrated circuits (Si-PIC) with well-established active and passive building elements are progressing towards large-scale commercialization in optical communications and high speed optical interconnects applications. However, current Si-PICs do not have memory capabilities, in particular, the non-volatile memory functionality for energy efficient data storage. Here, we propose an electrically programmable, multi-level non-volatile photonics memory cell (PMC) fabricated by ...

  11. Bioergia Research Programme

    Asplund, D.

    1997-12-31

    The main objectives of Finland`s Bioenergia Research Programme are (1) To develop new methods of producing biofuels which can compete with imported fuels, demonstrating the most promising production methods through pilot schemes, (2) To develop and demonstrate 3 - 4 new pieces of equipment or methods connected with handling and using bioenergy, (3) To produce basic information on conversion techniques and evaluate the quality, usability and environmental impacts of the products as well as the overall economy of the entire production chain and to create 2-3 conversion methods for follow-up development by industry. The principle research areas are (1) Development of production technology for wood-derived fuels, (2) Peat production, (3) The use of bioenergy and (4) Biomass conversion. This conference paper discusses the results obtained so far and reviews in some detail the activities of the programme. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Bioergia Research Programme

    The main objectives of Finland's Bioenergia Research Programme are (1) To develop new methods of producing biofuels which can compete with imported fuels, demonstrating the most promising production methods through pilot schemes, (2) To develop and demonstrate 3 - 4 new pieces of equipment or methods connected with handling and using bioenergy, (3) To produce basic information on conversion techniques and evaluate the quality, usability and environmental impacts of the products as well as the overall economy of the entire production chain and to create 2-3 conversion methods for follow-up development by industry. The principle research areas are (1) Development of production technology for wood-derived fuels, (2) Peat production, (3) The use of bioenergy and (4) Biomass conversion. This conference paper discusses the results obtained so far and reviews in some detail the activities of the programme. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  13. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs. PMID:27163839

  14. Nuclear programme in Indonesia

    Implementation of the energy policy covers several aspects such as issuance of regulations, standards, energy pricing incentives and disincentives, and the application of appropriate technologies. The policies and implementation of the technologies can fully be supported by the use of nuclear technology, especially toward the now popular issue concerning the environment. In view of these policies and the need to implement these policies. i.e. for the diversification of energy and environmental concern, the Department of Mines and Energy has established an Indonesian Energy Coordination Board (BAKOREN). This board has realised the importance of considering nuclear as a source of energy, which has led to a decision in September 1989, for The National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) to conduct a feasibility study to introduce nuclear power plants in Indonesia. The establishment of an authority for the construction and operation of Nuclear Power Plants in Indonesia, which is primarily related to the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants, must also be prepared. This authority is still under considerations by the Indonesian Government. In implementing the Indonesia Nuclear Programme, it is important that cooperation exists among countries of the world, Korea, in this respect, as learning from experiences of other countries are very necessary to plan for a successful Nuclear Programme

  15. Survey of radiation protection programmes for transport

    The survey of radiation protection programmes for transport has been jointly performed by three scientific organisations I.P.S.N. (France), G.R.S. ( Germany), and N.R.P.B. (United kingdom) on behalf of the European Commission and the pertaining documentation summarises the findings and conclusions of the work that was undertaken with the principal objectives to provide guidance on the establishment, implementation and application of radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials by operators and the assessment and evaluation of such programmes by the competent authority and to review currently existing radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  16. LIMK1 activity is required for MTOC localization and spindle bipolarity establishment during meiosis in mouse oocytes

    Liu Xiaoyun; Li Xin; Ma Wei

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploid embryo generally leads to infertility, spontaneous abortion and birth defects, mainly resulting from abnormal chromosome segregation during maternal oocytes meiosis. Chromosome division is conducted by bipolar spindle which formed through an acentrosomal way, dependent on a unique microtubule organizing center ( MTOC) in mammalian oocytes, however, the molecular composition and functional regulation of MTOC is still not fully ex-plored. LIM kinases 1 (LIMK1) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase, a major regulator of actin and microtubule dynamics, involved in microtubule stability and spindle positioning during mitosis. So far little is known about LIMK1 protein expression and its roles in oocytes during meiosis. We reported here the protein expression and sub-cellular distribution of LIMK1 in mouse oocytes during meiosis. Western blot procedure detected high and stable expression of LIMK1 in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle ( GV) stage to metaphase II ( MII) . In contrast, acti-vated LIMK1 ( phosphorylated at Thr508 , pLIMK1 Thr508 ) was only observed after germinal vesicle breakdown ( GVBD) , and gradually increased with peak levels at metaphase I ( MI) and MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that LIMK1 was co-localized with microtubules on the whole spindle structure, while pLIMK1Thr508 was con- centrated with key components of MTOC,pericentrin and -Tubulin, on spindle poles in mouse oocytes. Inhibition of LIMK1 activity by BMS3, a specific ATPase competitive inhibitor, distroyed the formation of bipolar spindle structure, disturbed MTOC integrity and MTOC proteins recruitment to spindle poles. Moreover, LIMK1 inhibition caused chromosome misalignment and meiotic progression arrest at MI stage. Therefore, LIMK1 activity is required for formation and maintenance of bipolar spindle in mouse oocytes,importantly, pLIMK1T508 is MTOC-associated protein,involved in establishment and positioning of MTOC.

  17. The (cost-effectiveness of an individually tailored long-term worksite health promotion programme on physical activity and nutrition: design of a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    Burdorf Alex

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disability and mortality in most Western countries. The prevalence of several risk factors, most notably low physical activity and poor nutrition, is very high. Therefore, lifestyle behaviour changes are of great importance. The worksite offers an efficient structure to reach large groups and to make use of a natural social network. This study investigates a worksite health promotion programme with individually tailored advice in physical activity and nutrition and individual counselling to increase compliance with lifestyle recommendations and sustainability of a healthy lifestyle. Methods/Design The study is a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial with the worksite as the unit of randomisation. All workers will receive a standard worksite health promotion program. Additionally, the intervention group will receive access to an individual Health Portal consisting of four critical features: a computer-tailored advice, a monitoring function, a personal coach, and opportunities to contact professionals at request. Participants are employees working for companies in the Netherlands, being literate enough to read and understand simple Internet-based messages in the Dutch language. A questionnaire to assess primary outcomes (compliance with national recommendations on physical activity and on fruit and vegetable intake will take place at baseline and after 12 and 24 months. This questionnaire also assesses secondary outcomes including fat intake, self-efficacy and self-perceived barriers on physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake. Other secondary outcomes, including a cardiovascular risk profile and physical fitness, will be measured at baseline and after 24 months. Apart from the effect evaluation, a process evaluation will be carried out to gain insight into participation and adherence to the worksite health promotion programme. A cost-effectiveness analysis and

  18. An environmental monitoring programme to assess and control the effects of liquid effluent discharges of low radio-activity to an inland lake

    The 400 MW(e) twin gas-cooled reactor power station at Trawsfynydd in North Wales is unique in the UK in that it uses water extracted from an inland lake, Lake Trawsfynydd, for cooling the turbine-generator steam condensers. The radio-active liquid effluent is discharged into this lake with the returning cooling water flow. The lake is 200m above sea level and is fed from mountain streams in an area of relatively high rainfall. The principal outflow of lake water is to a small hydroelectric power plant which discharges its water into the sea. Consumption of trout taken from this lake provides the critical radiological pathway for exposure to the public. The critical radionuclide is caesium-137 which is concentrated in the flesh of the fish. The monitoring programme used to assess the impact of the low-level liquid effluent discharges on the lake environment is described. This involves sampling water, bed sediments, flora and fauna, not only from the lake but also from the outfall stream. The methods of sampling, sample preparation and counting for assay of the radionuclides of interest are described. The results from this programme are described and they demonstrate that the lake bed provides a varying adsorption term in the balance equation for radionuclides discharged into this environment. Furthermore, it is found that the effects of these discharges are critically dependent on meteorological conditions and the management of the lake water volume. (author)

  19. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in

  20. Programmable hardware for reconfigurable computing systems

    Smith, Stephen

    1996-10-01

    In 1945 the work of J. von Neumann and H. Goldstein created the principal architecture for electronic computation that has now lasted fifty years. Nevertheless alternative architectures have been created that have computational capability, for special tasks, far beyond that feasible with von Neumann machines. The emergence of high capacity programmable logic devices has made the realization of these architectures practical. The original ENIAC and EDVAC machines were conceived to solve special mathematical problems that were far from today's concept of 'killer applications.' In a similar vein programmable hardware computation is being used today to solve unique mathematical problems. Our programmable hardware activity is focused on the research and development of novel computational systems based upon the reconfigurability of our programmable logic devices. We explore our programmable logic architectures and their implications for programmable hardware. One programmable hardware board implementation is detailed.

  1. Review of reactor physics activities relevant to FBR and ATR programmes in PNC, Japan, June 1977 to October 1978

    Reactor physics works in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) are carried out in support of the FBR and ATR development programmes. The works are in progress with high efficiency, in cooperation of other related organizations in Japan and also overseas. The experimental fast reactor ''Joyo'' reached its full power of 50 MWt, being operated now to obtain technical data and experiences. The prototype fast breeder reactor ''Monju'' is nearing completion of its final design, and the surveys on its proposed site have been finished. The advanced thermal reactor ''Fugen'', a heavy water-moderated and boiling light water-cooled, reactor reached the criticality, and the power generation was successfully achieved. The data to be obtained are used for the development of a large demonstration reactor. After describing on these types of reactors briefly, the works on reactor physics are described as follows: for fast reactors, mockup experiment and analysis, evaluation of actinide nuclear data, development of core analytical method, and research on shielding; and for ATR, research with a deuterium critical assembly. (Mori, K.)

  2. Expanded Programme on Immunization in Iran: Last 3 Decades Achievements from 1979 to 2008

    MM Gouya

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nExpanded Programme on Immunization (EPI in I.R.Iran began in 1984 after establishing of health network for PHC all over the country and reached to high & accepted coverage rates for active immunization of infants against vaccine prevent­able diseases including Diphteria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Measles, Poliomyelitis and Tuberculosis.

  3. Expanded Programme on Immunization in Iran: Last 3 Decades Achievements from 1979 to 2008

    MM Gouya

    2009-01-01

    "nExpanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) in I.R.Iran began in 1984 after establishing of health network for PHC all over the country and reached to high & accepted coverage rates for active immunization of infants against vaccine prevent­able diseases including Diphteria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Measles, Poliomyelitis and Tuberculosis.

  4. One of the most well-established age-related changes in neural activity disappears after controlling for visual acuity.

    Porto, Fábio H G; Tusch, Erich S; Fox, Anne M; Alperin, Brittany R; Holcomb, Phillip J; Daffner, Kirk R

    2016-04-15

    Numerous studies using a variety of imaging techniques have reported age-related differences in neural activity while subjects carry out cognitive tasks. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to the potential impact of age-associated changes in sensory acuity on these findings. Studies in the visual modality frequently report that their subjects had "normal or corrected- to-normal vision." However, in most cases, there is no indication that visual acuity was actually measured, and it is likely that the investigators relied largely on self-reported visual status of subjects, which is often inaccurate. We investigated whether differences in visual acuity influence one of the most commonly observed findings in the event-related potentials literature on cognitive aging, a reduction in posterior P3b amplitude, which is an index of cognitive decision-making/updating. Well-matched young (n=26) and old adults (n=29) participated in a visual oddball task. Measured visual acuity with corrective lenses was worse in old than young adults. Results demonstrated that the robust age-related decline in P3b amplitude to visual targets disappeared after controlling for visual acuity, but was unaffected by accounting for auditory acuity. Path analysis confirmed that the relationship between age and diminished P3b to visual targets was mediated by visual acuity, suggesting that conveyance of suboptimal sensory data due to peripheral, rather than central, deficits may undermine subsequent neural processing. We conclude that until the relationship between age-associated differences in visual acuity and neural activity during experimental tasks is clearly established, investigators should exercise caution attributing results to differences in cognitive processing. PMID:26825439

  5. On the establishment and early activity of the Soviet consulate in Königsberg (1923—1925

    Kostyashov Yu. V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the reasons behind the restoration of diplomatic relations between Russia and Germany after World War I, as well as the fundamental differences in the performance of Russian imperial and Soviet consular missions in East Prussia. On the basis of the earlier unknown documents from the Central Russian archives and the Political archive of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Germany, the author describes the establishment of the Soviet Consulate in Königsberg in 1923 and the contribution of the first Consul of the USSR in East Prussia, Yulian Boshkovich, to the development of bilateral relations in 1923—1925. The author considers the adverse political conditions under which Soviet diplomats were compelled to operate in Germany. The conclusion is that the principal line of Yu. S. Boshkovich’s activity concerned preparations for the opening of the USSR trade mission in Königsberg, as well as ensuring strong representation of Soviet foreign trade associations at the Eastern Fair.

  6. Multinational design evaluation programme - 2009 annual report

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) was established in 2006 as a multinational initiative to develop innovative approaches to leverage the resources and knowledge of the national regulatory authorities who are currently or will be tasked with the review of new reactor power plant designs. MDEP comprises 13 countries' nuclear regulatory authorities and is structured under 3 design-specific working groups and 3 issue-specific working groups which meet several times a year. The OECD/NEA facilitates MDEP's activities by acting as technical secretariat for the programme. The MDEP Policy Group (PG) and the Steering Technical Committee (STC) oversee the programme. MDEP's main objectives can be defined as follows: - to enhance multilateral co-operation within existing regulatory frameworks; - to encourage multinational convergence of codes, standards and safety goals; - to implement the MDEP products in order to facilitate the licensing of new reactors, including those being developed by the Generation IV International Forum. To carry out the work, two main lines of activity have been implemented: - the exploration of opportunities for harmonisation of regulatory practices; - the cooperation on the safety reviews of specific reactor designs. MDEP engages with key stakeholders involved in ensuring the safety of new reactor designs, manufacturing, construction and operation. At this time, these stakeholders include other national regulatory authorities and international organisations involved in ensuring nuclear safety including the IAEA, Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA), NEA Committees on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), the various reactor vendors, nuclear component manufacturers, mechanical and electrical standards development organisations, reactor operators and licensees and key industry representatives such as World Nuclear Association (WNA). To this end, the MDEP has organised a

  7. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  9. Multilateral Interoperability Programme

    L. Burita

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Multilateral Interoperability Programme (MIP is a voluntary and independent activity in NATO environment by the participating nations and organizations. The MIP concept is based on data exchange in form of common exchange data model to achieve the international interoperability in command and control information systems (C2IS of the tactical units. The article describes the basis of the MIP organizations, structure, planning and testing processes. The core of the MIP solution is the Information Exchange Data Model (IEDM. The Czech Armed Forces (CAF MIP process implementation is mentioned. The MIP example is a part of university education process.

  10. Proficiency tests in the determination of activity of radionuclides in radiopharmaceutical products measured by nuclear medicine services in 8 years of comparison programmes in Brazil.

    Tauhata, Luiz; Iwahara, Akira; de Oliveira, Antonio E; Rezende, Eduarda Alexandre; Delgado, José Ubiratan; da Silva, Carlos José; Dos Santos, Joyra A; Nícoli, Ieda G; Alabarse, Frederico G; Xavier, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    Proficiency tests were applied to assess the performance of 74 nuclear medicine services in activity measurements of (131)I, (123)I, (99)Tc(m), (67)Ga and (201)Tl. These tests produced 913 data sets from comparison programmes promoted by the National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI) from 1999 to 2006. The data were evaluated against acceptance criteria for accuracy and precision and assigned as Acceptable or Not acceptable accordingly. In addition, three other statistical parameters were used as complementary information for performance evaluation which related to normative requirements and to radionuclide calibrators. The results have shown a necessity to improve quality control procedures and unsatisfactory performances of radionuclide calibrators, which incorporate Geiger-Müller detectors. PMID:18346902

  11. Proficiency tests in the determination of activity of radionuclides in radiopharmaceutical products measured by nuclear medicine services in 8 years of comparison programmes in Brazil

    Tauhata, Luiz [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: tauhata@ird.gov.br; Iwahara, Akira; Oliveira, Antonio E. de [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rezende, Eduarda Alexandre [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Quimica de Nilopolis, Nilopolis (Brazil); Ubiratan Delgado, Jose; Silva, Carlos Jose da [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Santos, Joyra A. dos [CORAD, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nicoli, Ieda G. [DIPLAN, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Brasilia (Brazil); Alabarse, Frederico G.; Xavier, Ana Maria [ESPOA, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2008-06-15

    Proficiency tests were applied to assess the performance of 74 nuclear medicine services in activity measurements of {sup 131}I, {sup 123}I, {sup 99}Tc{sup m}, {sup 67}Ga and {sup 201}Tl. These tests produced 913 data sets from comparison programmes promoted by the National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI) from 1999 to 2006. The data were evaluated against acceptance criteria for accuracy and precision and assigned as Acceptable or Not acceptable accordingly. In addition, three other statistical parameters were used as complementary information for performance evaluation which related to normative requirements and to radionuclide calibrators. The results have shown a necessity to improve quality control procedures and unsatisfactory performances of radionuclide calibrators, which incorporate Geiger-Mueller detectors.

  12. Proficiency tests in the determination of activity of radionuclides in radiopharmaceutical products measured by nuclear medicine services in 8 years of comparison programmes in Brazil

    Proficiency tests were applied to assess the performance of 74 nuclear medicine services in activity measurements of 131I, 123I, 99Tcm, 67Ga and 201Tl. These tests produced 913 data sets from comparison programmes promoted by the National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI) from 1999 to 2006. The data were evaluated against acceptance criteria for accuracy and precision and assigned as Acceptable or Not acceptable accordingly. In addition, three other statistical parameters were used as complementary information for performance evaluation which related to normative requirements and to radionuclide calibrators. The results have shown a necessity to improve quality control procedures and unsatisfactory performances of radionuclide calibrators, which incorporate Geiger-Mueller detectors

  13. Comparison of activation cross section measurements and experimental techniques for fusion reactor technology. Summary report of the IAEA specialists' meeting held at the Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, Japan, 15 to 17 November 1993

    The present report contains the Summary of the IAEA Specialists' Meeting (SPM) on ''Comparison of Activation Cross Section Measurements and Experimental Techniques for Fusion Reactor Technology'', held at the Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, Japan, from 15 to 17 November 1993. This SPM was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) with the co-operation and assistance of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The purpose of the Specialists' Meeting was to form an international programme of the comparison of activation cross section measurements and experimental techniques useful in reactor technology. It was agreed that new activation measurements be performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source Facility (FNS) of JAERI, neutron source facilities of the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia, and in the Institute of Experimental Physics, Debrecen, Hungary. A list of the most important reactions has been prepared. Fourteen experts from seven Member States attended the meeting. The conclusions and recommendations are presented on the basis of discussions held by meeting participants. (author). 4 tabs

  14. Self-reported care activities in a home-based intervention programme for families with multiple problems

    Tausendfreund, Tim; Metselaar, Janneke; Conradie, Jelte; de Groot, Maria Helena; Schipaanboord, Nicolien; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana; Grietens, Hans; Knorth, Erik J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and application of the KIPP-list of care activities. The acronym KIPP stands for Knowledge and Insight into Primary Processes. The instrument is intended as a tool for family coaches to systematically report care activities conducted in the Du

  15. Country programme review Bangladesh

    A five-expert mission was organized from 21-26 August 1993 and this document reflects the findings and recommendations of the team. Intensive contacts with heads of institutions, scientists and decision making persons in various sectors in the country were co-ordinated by the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission. The terms of reference of the mission were: To assess the on-going TC projects; to assist the Bangladesh nationals to finalize the formulation of the new requests for 1995-96 TC programme and to establish priority areas with regard to the introduction of national projects involving accelerated technological transfer in order to catalyze national development plans in specific areas; to examine institutional framework suitable for the introduction of these priority nuclear techniques

  16. Status report of IOC Regional Activities

    IOC for UNESCO

    2011-01-01

    The IOC’s Regional Subsidiary Bodies play an important role in the implementation of the Commission’s programmes in the regions. These efforts are complemented by other IOC decentralized offices, and regional networks established by the IOC’s global programmes. The report provides an overview of the status of IOC Regional Activities.

  17. Exploring shared leadership in a UK public sector programme

    Bates, Simon

    2010-01-01

    This thesis considers shared leadership in a UK public sector programme. Many UK public sector change initiatives are delivered through programmes. In recent years, the practice and academic domain of programme management have developed from within the established discipline of project management. The leadership of projects has been widely studied, both conceptually and empirically, but programmes are substantively different. Shared leadership is a relatively new conceptuali...

  18. Radiation research within the framework programmes of the European Commission

    Karaoglou, A.; Kelly, G.N.; Desmet, G.; Menzel, H.G.; Schibilla, H.; Olast, M.; Gasperini, F.; Chadwick, K.H.; Sinnave, J. [European Commission Directorate General science, Brussels (Belgium). Research and Development, Radiation Protection Research Action

    1997-09-01

    The background to the radiation protection research and training programme of the European Commission is described in the presentation. The objectives and achievements of the third framework programme are summarised together with a description of how the achievements led to the establishment of the priorities for the fourth framework programme. Indications on the preliminary prospects for the fifth framework programme, 1998-2002 are also given. (6 refs.).

  19. Why some do but most don't. Barriers and enablers to engaging low-income groups in physical activity programmes: a mixed methods study

    Fox Kenneth R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beneficial effect of physical activity for the prevention of a range of chronic diseases is widely acknowledged. These chronic conditions are most pronounced in economically disadvantaged groups where physical activity levels are consistently lower, yet this group is particularly difficult to recruit and retain in physical activity programmes. This study examined the perceptions of participants, non-participants, and exercise leaders in a low-income area regarding barriers, motives, and enabling factors for organised physical activity with a view to improving recruitment and retention. Methods A mixed methods research approach was adopted to guide data collection and analysis. A survey, incorporating the Motivation for Physical Activity Measure - Revised (MPAM-R, was used to assess the motivations of 152 physical activity session participants in a highly deprived suburban neighbourhood. The MPAM-R data were analysed using t tests, analyses of variance to estimate age, body mass index, and activity mode differences and Pearson's correlation coefficient to address associations. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with 33 local residents who did not participate in activity sessions and with 14 activity session leaders. All interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an inductive thematic approach. Results Participants reported cost, childcare, lack of time and low awareness as barriers to joining activity classes. The need for support, confidence and competence in order to take up activity was widely expressed, particularly among women. Once people are active, high levels of social interaction, interest and enjoyment are associated with improved levels of retention, with different types of physical activity scoring differently on these factors. Conclusions This study suggests that some factors such as cost, the fear of 'walking in alone', accessibility of facilities, and appropriate

  20. The diabetic phenotype is conserved in myotubes established from diabetic subjects: evidence for primary defects in glucose transport and glycogen synthase activity

    Gaster, Michael; Petersen, Ingrid; Højlund, Kurt;

    2002-01-01

    (GS) activity; the content of glucose-6-phosphate, glucose, and glycogen; and the glucose transport in satellite cell cultures established from diabetic and control subjects. Myotubes were precultured in increasing insulin concentrations for 4 days and subsequently stimulated acutely by insulin. The...... present study shows that the basal glucose uptake as well as insulin-stimulated GS activity is reduced in satellite cell cultures established from patients with type 2 diabetes. Moreover, increasing insulin concentrations could compensate for the reduced GS activity to a certain extent, whereas chronic...

  1. Can lay-led walking programmes increase physical activity in middle aged adults? A randomised controlled trial

    Lamb, S.; Bartlett, H; Ashley, A; W. Bird

    2002-01-01

    Design: Randomised controlled trial with one year follow up. Physical activity was measured by questionnaire. Other measures included attitudes to exercise, body mass index, cholesterol, aerobic capacity, and blood pressure.

  2. Strengthening radiopharmacy related quality programmes by the IAEA

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is actively involved in all activities related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy, amongst others in nuclear medicine. Following recruitment of a specialist radiopharmacologist with extensive hospital based radiopharmacy experiences in March 2003, the Nuclear Medicine Section of the IAEA has accelerated efforts to strengthen all aspects of quality programmes related to clinical practice. These include all inclusive guidelines and programme referred to as 'NUMQUM' that will play a vital role for self appraisal in improving QA/QC in clinical practice. However this paper will focus on quality programmes specific to hospital radiopharmacy. The overall aim has been to address Member State needs by improving practices in 'hot laboratories' and support the growing need for qualified staff for laboratories supporting hospital based PET and molecular imaging programmes. With the assistance of various international consultants, a new set of operational guidelines has been created which include the following: - Operational guidance on hospital radiopharmacy- A safe and effective approach; - Establishing norms and standards for clinical application of radiolabelled biological proteins, peptides, and antibodies; - Criteria for parametric acceptance of PET tracers for clinical applications. These provide guidance at an international level in many aspects of hospital radiopharmacy practice including training, facilities, equipment, operations and quality systems. They take into consideration the skill mix, busy nature and limitations applicable at clinical practice level. These publications are not intended to override local guidance or provide comprehensive advice on all aspects of radiopharmacy practice

  3. Positive affect as coercive strategy: conditionality, activation and the role of psychology in UK government workfare programmes

    Friedli, Lynne; Stearn, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Eligibility for social security benefits in many advanced economies is dependent on unemployed and underemployed people carrying out an expanding range of job search, training and work preparation activities, as well as mandatory unpaid labour (workfare). Increasingly, these activities include interventions intended to modify attitudes, beliefs and personality, notably through the imposition of positive affect. Labour on the self in order to achieve characteristics said to increase employabil...

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2

  5. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many

  6. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period

  7. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is

  8. Gfi1, a transcriptional repressor, inhibits the induction of the T helper type 1 programme in activated CD4 T cells.

    Suzuki, Junpei; Maruyama, Saho; Tamauchi, Hidekazu; Kuwahara, Makoto; Horiuchi, Mika; Mizuki, Masumi; Ochi, Mizuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Zhu, Jinfang; Yasukawa, Masaki; Yamashita, Masakatsu

    2016-04-01

    A transcriptional repressor Gfi1 promotes T helper type 2 (Th2) cell development and inhibits Th17 and inducible regulatory T-cell differentiation. However, the role of Gfi1 in regulating Th1 cell differentiation and the Th1-type immune response remains to be investigated. We herein demonstrate that Gfi1 inhibits the induction of the Th1 programme in activated CD4 T cells. The activated Gfi1-deficient CD4 T cells spontaneously develop into Th1 cells in an interleukin-12- and interferon-γ-independent manner. The increase of Th1-type immune responses was confirmed in vivo in Gfi1-deficient mice using a murine model of nickel allergy and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). The expression levels of Th1-related transcription factors were found to increase in Gfi1-deficient activated CD4 T cells. Tbx21, Eomes and Runx2 were identified as possible direct targets of Gfi1. Gfi1 binds to the Tbx21, Eomes and Runx2 gene loci and reduces the histone H3K4 methylation levels in part by modulating Lsd1 recruitment. Together, these findings demonstrate a novel regulatory role of Gfi1 in the regulation of the Th1-type immune response. PMID:26749286

  9. MDEP Conference on New Reactor Design Activities - Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) Conference Proceedings, Paris, France, 10-11 September 2009

    The MDEP is a unique ten-nation initiative being undertaken by national regulatory authorities from Canada, China, Finland, France, Japan, Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States with the purposes of co-operating on safety design reviews of new reactors and identifying opportunities to harmonise and converge on safety licensing review practices and requirements. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has been chosen to provide the technical secretariat support. The International Atomic Energy Agency participates in many of the MDEP activities. Started in 2007 with co-operation on various pilot project issues, the MDEP's expected outcomes are: (1) improved effectiveness and efficiency of regulatory safety design reviews, (2) increased quality of safety assessments, and (3) and identified areas for the convergence of regulatory requirements and practices. Making each regulator stronger in its ability to make sovereign safety decisions is a key objective that cuts across all MDEP activities. In 2008, the top regulators from each national authority met as the MDEP Policy Group and adopted the present structure and programme of work for the MDEP, including the pursuit of co-operation on specific safety design reviews and pursuing closer co-ordination on harmonisation and convergence issues such as digital instrumentation and control, mechanical codes and standards, and vendor inspections. The MDEP is currently a long-term programme that focuses in near term and interim results to share within MDEP and with other stakeholders. With effective communications in mind, the MDEP Policy Group directed the NEA to co-ordinate the Conference on New Reactor Design Activities with the purpose of communicating to a wide spectrum of stakeholders worldwide as to the program of work and accomplishments of the MDEP, and soliciting feedback and input from these stakeholders regarding recommendations on how to co-operate more efficiently

  10. EURATOM research framework programmes on reactor systems

    Deffrennes, M.; Hugon, M.; Manolatos, P.; Van Goethem, G.; Webster, S. [European Commission, DG Research J2 Nuclear Fission and Radiation Protection CDMA 1/55, Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-07-01

    The activities of the European Commission (EC) in the field of nuclear energy are governed by the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The research activities of the European Union (EU) are designed as multi-annual Framework Programmes (FP) managed by the European Commission. The EURATOM Research and Training Programmes cover both nuclear Fusion and Fission. EURATOM-FP6 supports the following projects: -) NULIFE project: Nuclear Plant Life Prediction; -) COVERS project: VVER Safety Research; -) PERFECT project: Prediction of Irradiation Damage Effects on Reactor Components; -) NURESIM project: European Platform for Nuclear Reactor Simulations; -)EC-SARNET project: Sustainable Integration of European Research on Severe Accident Phenomenology; -) RAPHAEL project: Reactor for Process Heat, Hydrogen and Electricity Generation; -)GCFR project: Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor; -) EUROTRANS project: Transmutation of HLW in ADS; -) JHR-CA project: Jules Horowitz Reactor Co-ordination Action; and NEPTUNO project: Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organisations. Other parts of the EURATOM FP, covering Waste Management and Radiation Protection, as well as Fusion Energy, are not detailed in this paper.

  11. EURATOM research framework programmes on reactor systems

    The activities of the European Commission (EC) in the field of nuclear energy are governed by the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The research activities of the European Union (EU) are designed as multi-annual Framework Programmes (FP) managed by the European Commission. The EURATOM Research and Training Programmes cover both nuclear Fusion and Fission. EURATOM-FP6 supports the following projects: -) NULIFE project: Nuclear Plant Life Prediction; -) COVERS project: VVER Safety Research; -) PERFECT project: Prediction of Irradiation Damage Effects on Reactor Components; -) NURESIM project: European Platform for Nuclear Reactor Simulations; -)EC-SARNET project: Sustainable Integration of European Research on Severe Accident Phenomenology; -) RAPHAEL project: Reactor for Process Heat, Hydrogen and Electricity Generation; -)GCFR project: Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor; -) EUROTRANS project: Transmutation of HLW in ADS; -) JHR-CA project: Jules Horowitz Reactor Co-ordination Action; and NEPTUNO project: Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organisations. Other parts of the EURATOM FP, covering Waste Management and Radiation Protection, as well as Fusion Energy, are not detailed in this paper

  12. Programmable Grit-Blasting System

    Burley, Richard K.

    1988-01-01

    In programmable grit-blasting system undergoing design, controller moves blasting head to precise positions to shape or remove welding defects from parts. Controller holds head in position for preset dwell time and moves head to new position along predetermined path. Position of articulated head established by pair of servomotors according to programmed signals from controller. Head similar to video borescope. Used to remove welding defects in blind holes. Suited for repetitive production operations in grit-blast box.

  13. Attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus expressing oncofetal antigen (tumor-associated antigen) 5T4 induces active therapy of established tumors.

    Mulryan, Kate; Ryan, Matthew G; Myers, Kevin A; Shaw, David; Wang, Who; Kingsman, Susan M; Stern, Peter L; Carroll, Miles W

    2002-10-01

    The human oncofetal antigen 5T4 (h5T4) is a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by a wide spectrum of cancers, including colorectal, ovarian, and gastric, but with a limited normal tissue expression. Such properties make 5T4 an excellent putative target for cancer immunotherapy. The murine homologue of 5T4 (m5T4) has been cloned and characterized, which allows for the evaluation of immune intervention strategies in "self-antigen" in vivo tumor models. We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses based on the highly attenuated and modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA strain), expressing h5T4 (MVA-h5T4), m5T4 (MVA-m5T4), and Escherichia coli LacZ (MVA-LacZ). Immunization of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with MVA-h5T4 and MVA-m5T4 constructs induced antibody responses to human and mouse 5T4, respectively. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice vaccinated with MVA-h5T4 were challenged with syngeneic tumor line transfectants, B16 melanoma, and CT26 colorectal cells that express h5T4. MVA-h5T4-vaccinated mice showed significant tumor retardation compared with mice vaccinated with MVA-LacZ or PBS. In active treatment studies, inoculation with MVA-h5T4 was able to treat established CT26-h5T4 lung tumor and to a lesser extent B16.h5T4 s.c. tumors. Additionally, when C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 were challenged with B16 cells expressing m5T4, resulting growth of the tumors was significantly retarded compared with control animals. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 showed no signs of autoimmune toxicity. These data support the use of MVA-5T4 for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:12481437

  14. Olympic Partner Programme

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Olympic Partner Programme (TOP) is an international Olympic marketing programme created by the International Olympic Committee (IOC),which includes the Organising Committees of the Games,the National Olympic Committees and the TOP Partners.

  15. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the

  16. Implementation of a metrology programme to provide traceability for radionuclides activity measurements in the CNEN Radiopharmaceuticals Producers Centers

    The commercialization and use of radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil are regulated by Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria (ANVISA) which require Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) certification for Radiopharmaceuticals Producer Centers. Quality Assurance Program should implement the GMP standards to ensure radiopharmaceuticals have requirements quality to proving its efficiency. Several aspects should be controlled within the Quality Assurance Programs, and one of them is the traceability of the Radionuclides Activity Measurement in radiopharmaceuticals doses. The quality assurance of activity measurements is fundamental to maintain both the efficiency of the nuclear medicine procedures and patient and exposed occupationally individuals safety. The radiation doses received by patients, during the nuclear medicine procedures, is estimated according to administered radiopharmaceuticals quantity. Therefore it is very important either the activity measurements performed in radiopharmaceuticals producer centers (RPC) as the measurements performed in nuclear medicine services are traceable to national standards. This paper aims to present an implementation program to provide traceability to radionuclides activity measurements performed in the dose calibrators(well type ionization chambers) used in Radiopharmaceuticals Producer Center placed in different states in Brazil. The proposed program is based on the principles of GM Pand ISO 17025 standards. According to dose calibrator performance, the RPC will be able to provide consistent, safe and effective radioactivity measurement to the nuclear medicine services. (author)

  17. Active Agents of Health Promotion? The School's Role in Supporting the HPV Vaccination Programme

    Spratt, Jennifer; Shucksmith, Janet; Philip, Kate; McNaughton, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    By providing a place in which children can be accessed, the school has long been a site for population-level health initiatives. Recent policy shifts towards health-promoting schools have however re-cast the school from passive host to active collaborator in public health. This paper examines secondary school teachers' views of their roles as…

  18. Implementation of a metrology programme to provide traceability for radionuclides activity measurements in the CNEN Radiopharmaceuticals Producers Centers

    Andrade, Erica A.L. de; Braghirolli, Ana M.S.; Tauhata, Luiz; Gomes, Regio S.; Silva, Carlos J., E-mail: erica@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Delgado, Jose U.; Oliveira, Antonio E.; Iwahara, Akira, E-mail: ealima@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The commercialization and use of radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil are regulated by Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria (ANVISA) which require Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) certification for Radiopharmaceuticals Producer Centers. Quality Assurance Program should implement the GMP standards to ensure radiopharmaceuticals have requirements quality to proving its efficiency. Several aspects should be controlled within the Quality Assurance Programs, and one of them is the traceability of the Radionuclides Activity Measurement in radiopharmaceuticals doses. The quality assurance of activity measurements is fundamental to maintain both the efficiency of the nuclear medicine procedures and patient and exposed occupationally individuals safety. The radiation doses received by patients, during the nuclear medicine procedures, is estimated according to administered radiopharmaceuticals quantity. Therefore it is very important either the activity measurements performed in radiopharmaceuticals producer centers (RPC) as the measurements performed in nuclear medicine services are traceable to national standards. This paper aims to present an implementation program to provide traceability to radionuclides activity measurements performed in the dose calibrators(well type ionization chambers) used in Radiopharmaceuticals Producer Center placed in different states in Brazil. The proposed program is based on the principles of GM Pand ISO 17025 standards. According to dose calibrator performance, the RPC will be able to provide consistent, safe and effective radioactivity measurement to the nuclear medicine services. (author)

  19. The Winfrith DSN programme

    The programme, which is written in the Fortran language, solves the Carlson discrete Sn approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation in cylindrical geometry. This report describes the input and output facilities of the WINFRITH DSN programme and the associated editing programme WED. (author)

  20. A reappraisal of the virtues of private sector employment programmes

    Graversen, Brian Krogh; Jensen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the employment effects of active labour market programmes for Danish welfare benefit recipients, focusing on private sector employment (PSE) programmes. Using a latent variable model that allows for heterogeneous treatment effects among observationally identical persons, we...

  1. Factors affecting 210Po and 210Pb activity concentrations in mussels and implications for environmental bio-monitoring programmes

    The activity of 210Po and 210Pb was determined in mussels of the same size (3.5-4.0 cm shell length) sampled monthly over a 17-month period at the Atlantic coast of Portugal. Average radionuclide concentration values in mussels were 759 ± 277 Bq kg-1 for 210Po (range 460-1470 Bq kg-1 dry weight), and 45 ± 19 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb (range 23-96 Bq kg-1 dry weight). Environmental parameters and mussel biometric parameters were monitored during the same period. Although there was no seasonal variation of radionuclide concentrations in sea water during the study period, the concentration of radionuclide activity in mussels varied seasonally displaying peaks of high concentrations in winter and low concentrations in summer. Analysis of radionuclide data in relation to the physiological Condition Index of mussels revealed that 210Po and 210Pb activities in the mussel (average activity per individual) remained nearly constant during the investigation period, while mussel body weight fluctuated due to fat storage/expenditure in the soft tissues. Similar variation of radionuclide concentrations was observed in mussels transplanted from the sea coast into the Tejo Estuary. However, under estuarine environmental conditions and with higher food availability throughout the year, transplanted mussel Condition Index was higher than in coastal mussels and average radionuclide concentrations were 210 ± 75 Bq kg-1 (dry weight) for 210Po and 10 ± 4 Bq kg-1 (dry weight) for 210Pb, therefore lower than in coastal mussels with similar shell length. It is concluded that the apparent seasonal fluctuation and inter-site difference of radionuclide concentrations were mostly caused by mussel body weight fluctuation and not by radionuclide body burden fluctuation. This interpretation can be extended to the apparent seasonal fluctuation in concentrations of lipophilic and lipophobic contaminants in mussels, and provides an explanation for occasional high concentrations of 210Po and man

  2. VTT Energy launches new ALWR programme

    VTT Energy and other Finnish organisations have carried out development activities on various advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for some time. To broaden cooperation between different partners and make participation in international research programmes in this field easier, VTT Energy launched a four-year ALWR research programme in January 1998

  3. ADS National Programmes: Belgium

    The Belgian activities in the field of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are mainly related to the MYRRHA project development. MYRRHA is an accelerator driven, multi purpose fast neutron spectrum facility for R&D, cooled by a lead-bismuth eutectic. SCK•CEN has started the MYRRHA project as a national programme with several national & international bilateral collaboration agreements; the project has now evolved as an European integrated project in the frame of the IPEUROTRANS (European Commission, Sixth Framework Programme). The MYRRHA ‘Draft-2’ predesign file (completed in the early 2005) has been proposed to the partners as a basis for the XT-ADS machine. After a detailed investigation of potential alternatives, the MYRRHA concept (for the subcritical core, the primary coolant system, the accommodation of experimental rigs, the reactor vessel and the spallation target) has been kept with some modifications to achieve the XT-ADS objectives. The most recent version of the XT-ADS design was presented in the 2007 TWG meeting

  4. Expert validation of fit-for-purpose guidelines for designing programmes of assessment.

    Dijkstra, J.; Galbraith, R.; Hodges, B.D.; McAvoy, P.A.; McCrorie, P.; Southgate, L.J.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Wass, V.; Schuwirth, L.W.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An assessment programme, a purposeful mix of assessment activities, is necessary to achieve a complete picture of assessee competence. High quality assessment programmes exist, however, design requirements for such programmes are still unclear. We developed guidelines for desig

  5. Two new competing pathways establish the threshold for cyclin-B-Cdk1 activation at the meiotic G2/M transition.

    Hiraoka, Daisaku; Aono, Ryota; Hanada, Shin-Ichiro; Okumura, Eiichi; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2016-08-15

    Extracellular ligands control biological phenomena. Cells distinguish physiological stimuli from weak noise stimuli by establishing a ligand-concentration threshold. Hormonal control of the meiotic G2/M transition in oocytes is essential for reproduction. However, the mechanism for threshold establishment is unclear. In starfish oocytes, maturation-inducing hormones activate the PI3K-Akt pathway through the Gβγ complex of heterotrimeric G-proteins. Akt directly phosphorylates both Cdc25 phosphatase and Myt1 kinase, resulting in activation of cyclin-B-Cdk1, which then induces meiotic G2/M transition. Here, we show that cyclin-B-Cdk1 is partially activated after subthreshold hormonal stimuli, but this triggers negative feedback, resulting in dephosphorylation of Akt sites on Cdc25 and Myt1, thereby canceling the signal. We also identified phosphatase activity towards Akt substrates that exists independent of stimuli. In contrast to these negative regulatory activities, an atypical Gβγ-dependent pathway enhances PI3K-Akt-dependent phosphorylation. Based on these findings, we propose a model for threshold establishment in which hormonal dose-dependent competition between these new pathways establishes a threshold; the atypical Gβγ-pathway becomes predominant over Cdk-dependent negative feedback when the stimulus exceeds this threshold. Our findings provide a regulatory connection between cell cycle and signal transduction machineries. PMID:27390173

  6. Uptake of Space Technologies - An Educational Programme

    Bacai, Hina; Zolotikova, Svetlana; Young, Mandy; Cowsill, Rhys; Wells, Alan; Monks, Paul; Archibald, Alexandra; Smith, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Earth Observation data and remote sensing technologies have been maturing into useful tools that can be utilised by local authorities and businesses to aid in activates such as monitoring climate change trends and managing agricultural land and water uses. The European Earth observation programme Copernicus, previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), provides the means to collect and process multi-source EO and environmental data that supports policy developments at the European level. At the regional and local level, the Copernicus programme has been initiated through Regional Contact Office (RCO), which provide knowledge, training, and access to expertise both locally and at a European level through the network of RCOs established across Europe in the DORIS_Net (Downstream Observatory organised by Regions active In Space - Network) project (Grant Agreement No. 262789 Coordination and support action (Coordinating) FP7 SPA.2010.1.1-07 "Fostering downstream activities and links with regions"). In the East Midlands UK RCO, educational and training workshops and modules have been organised to highlight the wider range of tools and application available to businesses and local authorities in the region. Engagement with businesses and LRA highlighted the need to have a tiered system of training to build awareness prior to investigating innovative solutions and space technology uses for societal benefits. In this paper we outline education and training programmes which have been developed at G-STEP (GMES - Science and Technology Education Partnership), University of Leicester, UK to open up the Copernicus programme through the Regional Contact Office to downstream users such as local businesses and LRAs. Innovative methods to introduce the operational uses of Space technologies in real cases through e-learning modules and web-based tools will be described and examples of good practice for educational training in these sectors will be

  7. Evaluation of the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Programme

    1995-01-01

    This report provides an evaluation of AMT Ireland - one of the oldest of the Programmes in Advanced Technology. AMT Ireland was established in 1988 as a programme intended to promote industrial development by transferring Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) capabilities from university-based centres into Irish-based industry. The evaluation concludes that AMT Ireland performs an important role in national industrial development by providing technology transfer and consultancy services in ...

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme 1995- 1999

    Haekkinen, R.J.; Hirsch, C.; Krause, E.; Kytoemaa, H.K. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The report is a mid-term evaluation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme started by Technology Development Centre Finland (TEKES) in 1995 as a five-year initiative to be concluded in 1999. The main goal of the programme is to increase the know-how and application of CFD in Finnish industry, to coordinate and thus provide a better basis for co-operation between national CFD activities and encouraging research laboratories and industry to establish co-operation with the international CFD community. The projects of the programme focus on the following areas: (1) studies of modeling the physics and dynamics of the behaviour of fluid material, (2) expressing the physical models in a numerical mode and developing a computer codes, (3) evaluating and testing current physical models and developing new ones, (4) developing new numerical algorithms, solvers, and pre- and post-processing software, and (5) applying the new computational tools to problems relevant to their ultimate industrial use. The report consists of two sections. The first considers issues concerning the whole programme and the second reviews each project

  9. ICRP publication 26. Its applicability in a nuclear power programme

    Ontario Hydro is a major Canadian provincial utility with more than 5 GW(e) installed nuclear electricity generating capacity and with a planned commitment to an additional 8.5 GW(e), all units being of the CANDU pressurized heavy-water type. The radiation protection programme, in addition to complying with Canadian Federal regulations, has been consistent with the philosophy and intent of ICRP recommendations and is frequently reviewed to ensure compliance with these recommendations, the most recent of which is ICRP-26. The application of the ALARA principle in this power reactor programme is described. A set of general guidelines has been established, the main features of which are: (a) achieving a dose consumption per unit of electricity generated which is low compared with reactors of a similar type; (b) ensuring that stations are operable with the dose equivalent of their labour-dictated manpower; (c) ensuring that the risk to atomic radiation workers is compatible with a corporate fatality rate standard of 8 man-hours worked. Achievement of these guidelines has necessitated implementing a continued dose-management programme. This programme is described generally. The cost applied to justify a dose reduction of 1 man.Sv is given, and a comparison is made with the equivalent life costs this implies and the costs used by safety agencies for other risk-reduction activities. Finally, some practical problems associated with some of the recommendations of ICRP-26 are discussed. (author)

  10. Remediation programme in the North Bohemia region

    The Bohemian Massif belongs to a very important uranium province where mining activities started in 1840. Since the end of World War II large mining operations have taken place resulting in a large accumulation of waste dumps and tailings. In 1969, the Straz sandstone type uranium deposits were exploited by in situ leaching methods. 3.8 million tonnes of H2SO4, 270,000 tonnes of HNO3 and 103,000 tonnes of NH4 were injected into the Cenomanian aquifer. It affects 188 million cubic metres of water and 28 km2. The problem is compounded by the presence of an underground mine next to the Straz deposit. The paper describes the environmental remediation programme established by the government. The present estimation of the time necessary for the decontamination of the Straz deposit lies between 50 and 70 years. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  11. Positive affect as coercive strategy: conditionality, activation and the role of psychology in UK government workfare programmes.

    Friedli, Lynne; Stearn, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Eligibility for social security benefits in many advanced economies is dependent on unemployed and underemployed people carrying out an expanding range of job search, training and work preparation activities, as well as mandatory unpaid labour (workfare). Increasingly, these activities include interventions intended to modify attitudes, beliefs and personality, notably through the imposition of positive affect. Labour on the self in order to achieve characteristics said to increase employability is now widely promoted. This work and the discourse on it are central to the experience of many claimants and contribute to the view that unemployment is evidence of both personal failure and psychological deficit. The use of psychology in the delivery of workfare functions to erase the experience and effects of social and economic inequalities, to construct a psychological ideal that links unemployment to psychological deficit, and so to authorise the extension of state-and state-contracted-surveillance to psychological characteristics. This paper describes the coercive and punitive nature of many psycho-policy interventions and considers the implications of psycho-policy for the disadvantaged and excluded populations who are its primary targets. We draw on personal testimonies of people experiencing workfare, policy analysis and social media records of campaigns opposed to workfare in order to explore the extent of psycho-compulsion in workfare. This is an area that has received little attention in the academic literature but that raises issues of ethics and professional accountability and challenges the field of medical humanities to reflect more critically on its relationship to psychology. PMID:26052120

  12. Progress of the decommissioning programme – completion of the construction of the Dry Spent Fuel Storage Facility and progress of the establishment of the decommissioning and waste management infrastructure at the Kozloduy site

    All of the Infrastructure Projects associated with Decommissioning have been identified. All the major projects are either in Contract or have the Tender Packages prepared and are being managed/implemented through the EBRD Procurement Process. We find that it is most important and strategically significant to maximally increase the active dismantling in: •Turbine hall of units 3 and 4 (dismantling of equipment and systems category) before the defueling of the reactors ponds and receiving a decommissioning license; •The reactor compartments of units 1-4 – since the beginning of 2014 after commissioning of the repository for contaminated equipment and materials (transitional RAW). We also take a significant challenge to reduce the deadlines for decommissioning of units 1-4 with five years and finalize the process in 2030 (instead of 2035). We rely on additional financial support which would contribute to creating the conditions that guarantee the success of our efforts

  13. B Lineage–specific Regulation of V(D)J Recombinase Activity Is Established in Common Lymphoid Progenitors

    Borghesi, Lisa; Hsu, Lih-Yun; Miller, Juli P; Anderson, Michael; Herzenberg, Leonard; Herzenberg, Leonore; Schlissel, Mark S.; Allman, David; Gerstein, Rachel M.

    2004-01-01

    Expression of V(D)J recombinase activity in developing lymphocytes is absolutely required for initiation of V(D)J recombination at antigen receptor loci. However, little is known about when during hematopoietic development the V(D)J recombinase is first active, nor is it known what elements activate the recombinase in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. Using mice that express a fluorescent transgenic V(D)J recombination reporter, we show that the V(D)J recombinase is active as early as co...

  14. Stopping Tumor Necrosis Factor-inhibitors in Patients with Established Rheumatoid Arthritis in Remission or Stable Low Disease Activity: A Pragmatic Randomized Multicenter Open-Label Controlled Trial

    Ghiti Moghadam, M.; Vonkeman, H.E.; Klooster, ten P.M.; Tekstra, J.; Schaardenburg, van Dirk-Jan; Starmans-Kool, M.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Bos, Reinhard; Lems, Willem F.; Colin, Edgar M.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Meek, Inger L.; Landewe, R.; Bernelot Moens, Hein J.; Riel, van Piet L.C.M.; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.; Jansen, Tim L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: TNF-inhibiting biologicals (TNFi) are effective treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is unclear if patients in remission or in stable low disease activity need to continue TNFi or can stop this treatment. This study was undertaken to assess whether established RA patients in remi

  15. Neutron radiography in Indian space programme

    Pyrotechnic devices are indispensable in any space programme to perform such critical operations as ignition, stage separation, solar panel deployment, etc. The nature of design and configuration of different types of pyrotechnic devices, and the type of materials that are put in their construction make the inspection of them with thermal neutrons more favourable than any other non destructive testing methods. Although many types of neutron sources are available for use, generally the radiographic quality/exposure duration and cost of source run in opposite directions even after four decades of research and development. But in the area of space activity, by suitably combining the X-ray and neutron radiographic requirements, the inspection of the components can be made economically viable. This is demonstrated in the Indian space programme by establishing a 15 MeV linear accelerator based neutron generator facility to inspect medium to giant solid propellant boosters by X-ray inspection and all types of critical pyro and some electronic components by neutron radiography. Since the beam contains unacceptable gamma, transfer imaging technique has been evolved and the various parameters have been optimised to get a good quality image

  16. Blood Establishment Registration Database

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This application provides information for active, inactive, and pre-registered firms. Query options are by FEI, Applicant Name, Establishment Name, Other Names,...

  17. Evaluating an in-home multicomponent cognitive behavioural programme to manage concerns about falls and associated activity avoidance in frail community-dwelling older people: Design of a randomised control trial [NCT01358032

    van Rossum Erik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns about falls are frequently reported by older people. These concerns can have serious consequences such as an increased risk of falls and the subsequent avoidance of activities. Previous studies have shown the effectiveness of a multicomponent group programme to reduce concerns about falls. However, owing to health problems older people may not be able to attend a group programme. Therefore, we adapted the group approach to an individual in-home programme. Methods/Design A two-group randomised controlled trial has been developed to evaluate the in-home multicomponent cognitive behavioural programme to manage concerns about falls and associated activity avoidance in frail older people living in the community. Persons were eligible for study if they were 70 years of age or over, perceived their general health as fair or poor, had at least some concerns about falls and associated avoidance of activity. After screening for eligibility in a random sample of older people, eligible persons received a baseline assessment and were subsequently allocated to the intervention or control group. Persons assigned to the intervention group were invited to participate in the programme, while those assigned to the control group received care as usual. The programme consists of seven sessions, comprising three home visits and four telephone contacts. The sessions are aimed at instilling adaptive and realistic views about falls, as well as increasing activity and safe behaviour. An effect evaluation, a process evaluation and an economic evaluation are conducted. Follow-up measurements for the effect evaluation are carried out 5 and 12 months after the baseline measurement. The primary outcomes of the effect evaluation are concerns about falls and avoidance of activity as a result of these concerns. Other outcomes are disability and falls. The process evaluation measures: the population characteristics reached; protocol adherence by

  18. Photovoltaic programme - edition 2003

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This publication issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy's Photovoltaics (PV) Programme presents an overview (in English) of activities and projects in the photovoltaics research and pilot and demonstration area in Switzerland. Progress in the area of future solar cell technologies, modules and building integration, system technologies, planning and operating aids is summarised. Also, PV for applications in developing countries, thermo-photovoltaics and international co-operation are commented on. In the area of pilot and demonstration projects, component development, PV integration in sloping roofs, on flat roofs and noise barriers as well as further PV plant are looked at. Also, measurement campaigns, studies, statistics and further PV-related topics are summarised. This volume also presents the abstracts of reports made by the project managers of 73 research and pilot and demonstration projects in these areas for 2002.

  19. INDUSTRIAL RISK Programme development

    INC-DTCI ICIS Rm. Valcea conducts basic and applied research among which there is the INDUSTRIAL RISK Programme that comprises studies of risk analysis and evaluation at objectives and activities in zones were risk factors are in operation, factors leading potentially to natural or technological disasters. The risk analysis and evaluation methodology proposed is a follow-up of the action plan for risk reduction in industry. The risk management refers to risk and its components assessment and identification of places where improvements are to be introduced. The risk analysis and evaluation model was developed for installations in chemical industry and are also applicable for the installations of heavy water production by H2O-H2S isotopic exchange. The risk studies supply information necessary in making decisions, aiming at preventing the operation incidence and reducing their consequences

  20. Security of material. The changing context of the IAEA's programme

    When the IAEA established its programme on the Security of Material about five years ago, the prospect that nuclear or other radioactive materials could fall into the wrong hands was a main concern. Among the major driving forces behind the Agency's action then was an alarming increase in reported cases of illicit nuclear trafficking in the early and mid-1990s, and the recognition that States needed better and more coordinated assistance in their efforts to combat the problem. Today, the dimensions and perceptions of nuclear security are being shaped by additional driving forces, specifically the spectre of nuclear terrorism. The terrorist attacks on the United States in September 2001 have elevated issues of security to unprecedented heights of international concern and they have prompted a broad-based global response. The attacks made it clear that terrorism has new and far-reaching international dimensions and that its aim of inflicting mass casualties is a serious threat for all States. In the nuclear sphere, the IAEA has taken a leading role in international efforts directed at combating nuclear terrorism. Initiatives taken by the Agency aim to upgrade levels of security for nuclear facilities and the protection of nuclear and other radioactive materials. Toward these ends, the IAEA Board of Governors is considering proposed measures for strengthening the Agency's activities relevant to preventing nuclear terrorism. In this new and challenging context, it is worth reviewing some fundamental aspects of the IAEA programme on Security of Material as it has been developed over the years. The programme is part of a wider framework of Agency activities related to nuclear security, safety, and safeguards. In reviewing the programme's evolution, this article principally focuses on the major components and elements of the planned 2002-2003 programme, while pointing to directions ahead in light of additional measures being considered for prevention of nuclear terrorism

  1. A Randomised Control Trial of the Impact of a Computer-Based Activity Programme upon the Fitness of Children with Autism

    Kathleen Dickinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The poor levels of fitness in children with autism are prompting concern for the children’s future health. This study looked to assess if a computer-based activity programme could improve fitness levels (as reflected in cardiopulmonary function of these children, and achieve a reduction in their body mass index. In a randomised controlled trial, 50 children with autism (of which 33 were under the age of 11 years and 39 were boys were allocated to an intervention group which encouraged them to use the Nintendo Wii and the software package “Mario and Sonics at the Olympics” in addition to their routine physical education classes. 50 children with autism (34 under the age of 11 years and 40 being boys acted as controls. At the end of one year, analysis of the changes in scores using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA on the Eurofit fitness tests showed that the intervention group had made statistically significant improvement on all tests other than flexibility. These improvements were also significantly better than controls. This type of intervention appears to be an effective addition to standard fitness training in order to help children with autism improve their fitness levels.

  2. Effect of an education and activation programme on functional limitations and patient-perceived recovery in acute and sub-acute shoulder complaints – a randomised clinical trial

    Goossens Marielle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The education and activation programme (EAP aims at coping with psychosocial determinants to prevent the development of chronic shoulder complaints (SCs. The effect of the EAP on functional limitations and patient-perceived recovery after 6 and 26 weeks is evaluated in a randomised clinical trial. Methods Patients with SCs present at rest or elicited by movement and lasting no longer than 3 months were allocated at random to either EAP as an addition to usual care (UC, or to UC only. Measurements were taken at baseline and after 6 and 26 weeks and were analysed by means of multilevel analysis for the group effect. EAP was administered by GPs or by an ambulant therapist (CDB. Patients in the UC group were given UC by their own GP. Results Multilevel analysis failed to show a significant effect of the EAP on either functional limitations or patient-perceived recovery. Analysis showed coincidentally a relation between catastrophising at baseline and functional limitations. Conclusion The EAP has no significant effect on the outcome of SCs after 6 and 26 weeks. The relation between catastrophising at baseline and functional limitations suggests that an intervention focusing specifically on catastrophising may be more successful in reducing functional limitations in the long term. Further research is however needed to evaluate the effect of catastrophising at baseline on the course of SCs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71777817

  3. Act No 85 of 18 March 1982 granting the Comitato Nazionale per l'Energia Nucleare a State contribution of 2,890 milliard lire to the 5-year activity programme 1980-1984

    This Act came into force on 23 March 1982. It provides for the financing of the ENEA's (formerly CNEN) programme of work for the period 1980-1984. It further provides that within one year of its entry into force, the Directorate for Nuclear Safety and Health Protection - DISP (formerly within CNEN) will be set up as an independent, autonomous body, with tasks involving control over activities entailing major risks, including nuclear activities. (NEA)

  4. Establishment of a non-invasive mouse reporter model for monitoring in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity.

    Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Kaneto, Hideaki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Kato, Ken; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kawashima, Ayaha; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Fujitani, Yoshio

    2007-09-28

    It is well known that pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in beta-cell differentiation, and maintaining mature beta-cell function. Thus, it is important to understand how pdx-1 gene is regulated under various pathophysiological conditions in vivo. In this study, to non-invasively and quantitatively monitor pdx-1 promoter activity in vivo, we constructed a pdx-1 promoter-SEAP-IRES-GFP reporter plasmid. In this construct, the -4.6kb pdx-1 promoter region sufficient for driving beta-cell-selective PDX-1 expression was inserted to the upstream of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. It is noted here that the pdx-1 promoter-mediated SEAP activity can be distinguished from endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity. First, we transfected the construct in mouse beta-cell line MIN6 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. SEAP activity was readily detected in the media of MIN6 cells, but not in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that this construct specifically reports beta-cell-specific pdx-1 promoter activity in a cell culture system. Based on these in vitro findings, we next generated transgenic mice using the same construct. SEAP activity was readily detected in serum of the transgenic mice, but not in their littermate mice. Furthermore, SEAP activity was detected in protein extract from the transgenic pancreas and slightly from the transgenic duodenum, but not from the liver, and brain. These results indicate that serum SEAP activity likely represents in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity. This transgenic mouse model would be useful to non-invasively monitor in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity and to screen new molecules which regulate PDX-1 expression. PMID:17678877

  5. Evaluation of the high-temperature materials programme of the Joint Research Centre (1980-85)

    This report covers the findings of the external panel of experts set up to evaluate the results of the Community's programme in the field of high-temperature materials (1980-85), carried out at the Petten establishment of the Joint Research Centre. The evaluation covers the quality and relevance of the research, the usefulness of the results and the role played by the JRC in this field at the European level. The report describes and gives comments on the content, structure and management of the five projects constituting the current programme, outlines the methods and procedures used during the evaluation and gives a number of recommendations pertinent to future activities

  6. Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Thailand.

    Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Warakamin, Busaba; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    As part of a series of case studies on the interactions between programmes supported by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and health systems, we assessed the extent of integration of national HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria programmes with the general health system, the integration of the Global Fund-portfolios within the national disease programmes, and system-wide effects on the health system in Thailand. The study relied on a literature review and 34 interviews with key stakeholders using the Systemic Rapid Assessment Toolkit and thematic analysis. In Thailand, the HIV, TB and malaria programmes' structures and functions are well established in the general health care system, with the Department for Disease Control and the Ministry of Public Health's network of health providers at sub-national levels as the main responsible organizations for stewardship and governance, service delivery, monitoring and evaluation, planning, and to some extent, demand generation. Civil society groups are active in certain areas, particularly in demand generation for HIV/AIDS. Overall, the Global Fund-supported programmes were almost fully integrated and coordinated with the general health system. The extent of integration varied across disease portfolios because of different number of actors and the nature of programme activities. There were also specific requirements by Global Fund that limit integration for some health system functions namely financing and monitoring and evaluation. From the view of stakeholders in Thailand, the Global Fund has contributed significantly to the three diseases, particularly HIV/AIDS. Financial support from the early Global Fund rounds was particularly helpful to the disease programmes during the time of major structural change in the MoPH. It also promoted collaborative networks of stakeholders, especially civil societies. However, the impacts on the overall health system, which is relatively well developed, are seen as

  7. Influence of motive activity on forming of proof skills of healthy way of life of students of higher educational establishments.

    Trotsenko V.V.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The estimation and the analysis of impellent activity of students is considered. The importance of impellent activity in forming a healthy way of life of students is shown. In research the data of questionnaire of students are used. sports priorities of students are revealed should to undertake in attention by development of the program of physical training. The wide spectrum of the reasons which interfere with exercises is revealed. These reasons should be considered during individual work with each student. It is proved, that impellent activity influences forming of proof skills of a healthy way of life of students.

  8. The IAEA programme on research reactor safety - An update

    There are close to 270 operating research reactors (RR) worldwide. Only four of these reactors are new (i.e., commissioned in 1995 or later), while 23 reactors have been shutdown in this period. Technical and safety problems, lack of strong utilization programmes and of adequate budgets and concern about ageing are the primary causes for this situation. Indeed, over 50% of the operating RRs are over 30 years old, and 25% are between 20-30 years old. On this background, decommissioning programmes gain increasing importance beside plans for refurbishment of old reactors. The IAEA's programme on RR Safety entails three major projects: (1) The development of guidance documents on research reactor safety, covering both general aspects and special topics of current concern; 2) rendering advisory other services related to RR safety to Member States, such as safety review missions, training courses, and other technical assistance through Technical Co-operation Projects; and 3) promotion of the sharing and exchange of information on RR safety through the organization of conferences and topical seminars and of coordinated research programmes and through the establishment and maintenance of an Incident Reporting System for RRs (IRSRR). Essentially, the actual programme is constantly modified to reflect current needs and concerns. Thus, among the new documents developed are guidelines for the determination of source terms for RR safety analyses and emergency planning a guide on RR core and fuel handling, and another guide on extended shutdowns and mothballing of RRs. Among the new services envisaged are extension of the NPP ASSET service (Assessment of Safety Significant Events Teams) to RRs, conducting trainings on self assessments, and providing specific assistance to regulatory bodies. An expansion of the number and types of technical assistance regional and country projects and training courses is also planned. The new Incident Reporting System for RRs launched last year

  9. Microbial inoculants and organic amendment improves the establishment of autochtonous shrub species and microbial activity recovery in a semiarid soil

    Mengual, Carmen; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Azcon, Rosario; Torres, Pilar; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Roldan, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The re-establishment of autochthonous shrub species is an essential strategy for recovering degraded soils under semiarid Mediterranean conditions. A field assay was carried out to determine the combined effects of the inoculation with native rhizobacteria (B. megaterium, Enterobacter sp, B. thuringiensis and Bacillus sp) and the addition of composted sugar beet (SB) residue on physicochemical soil properties and Lavandula dentata L. establishment. One year after planting, Bacillus sp. and B. megaterium+SB were the most effective treatments for increasing shoot dry biomass (by 5-fold with respect to control) and Enterobacter sp+SB was the most effective treatments for increasing dry root biomass. All the treatments evaluated significantly increased the foliar nutrient content (NPK) compared to control values (except B. thuringiensis+SB). The organic amendment had significantly increased available phosphorus content in rhizosphere soil by 29% respect to the control. Enterobacter sp combined with sugar beet residue improved total N content in soil (by 46% respect to the control) as well as microbiological and biochemical properties. The selection of the most efficient rhizobacteria strains and their combined effect with organic residue seems to be a critical point that drives the effectiveness of using these biotechnological tools for the revegetation and rehabilitation of degraded soils under semiarid conditions.

  10. QA programme documentation

    The present paper deals with the following topics: The need for a documented Q.A. program; Establishing a Q.A. program; Q.A. activities; Fundamental policies; Q.A. policies; Quality objectives Q.A. manual. (orig./RW)

  11. En Note om Programmering

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Denne note er en introduktion til programmering. Formålet er at give dig et indblik i hvad programmering egentlig er for noget. Jeg vil vise at programmering kan foregå på forskellige måder, og at der er mange forskellige udfordringer forbundet med at programmere. Noten vil ikke knytte sig til et...... bestemt programmeringssprog. Noten vil kunne supplere et egentlig undervisningsmateriale, der støtter dig i en bestemt form for programmering i et udvalgt programmeringssprog....

  12. The BGAN extension programme

    Rivera, Juan J.; Trachtman, Eyal; Richharia, Madhavendra

    2005-11-01

    Mobile satellite telecommunications systems have undergone an enormous evolution in the last decades, with the interest in having advanced telecommunications services available on demand, anywhere and at any time, leading to incredible advances. The demand for braodband data is therefore rapidly gathering pace, but current solutions are finding it increasingly difficult to combine large bandwidth with ubiquitous coverage, reliability and portability. The BGAN (Broadband Global Area Network) system, designed to operate with the Inmarsat-4 satellites, provides breakthrough services that meet all of these requirements. It will enable broadband connection on the move, delivering all the key tools of the modern office. Recognising the great impact that Inmarsat's BGAN system will have on the European satellite communications industry, and the benefits that it will bring to a wide range of European industries, in 2003 ESA initiated the "BGAN Extension" project. Its primary goals are to provide the full range of BGAN services to truly mobile platforms, operating in aeronautical, vehicular and maritime environments, and to introduce a multicast service capability. The project is supported by the ARTES Programme which establishes a collaboration agreement between ESA, Inmarsat and a group of key industrial and academic institutions which includes EMS, Logica, Nera and the University of Surrey (UK).

  13. Patient Experiences of Structured Heart Failure Programmes

    Nuala E. Tully

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Patient experiences of structured heart failure rehabilitation and their views on the important components of heart failure services were examined. Methods. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen participants (men, =12 attending one of two heart failure rehabilitation programmes. Sessions were guided by a semistructured interview schedule covering participants' experiences of the programme, maintenance, and GP role. Focus group transcripts were analysed qualitatively. Results. Participants indicated that rehabilitation programmes substantially met their needs. Supervised exercise sessions increased confidence to resume physical activity, while peer-group interaction and supportive medical staff improved morale. However, once the programme ended, some participants' self-care motivation lapsed, especially maintenance of an exercise routine. Patients doubted their GPs' ability to help them manage their condition. Conclusion. Structured rehabilitation programmes are effective in enabling patients to develop lifestyle skills to live with heart failure. However, postrehabilitation maintenance interventions are necessary to sustain patients' confidence in disease self-management.

  14. Establishing a Nuclear Power Programme: IAEA Recommended approach

    IAEA Recommended approach: All newcomers are working closely with the IAEA, using IAEA guidance and hosting international peer review missions. Newcomers’ Top Issues: • How do I start? • Is there public support? • Do I have the people? • Can I find the money? • What am I going to do with the waste? • Is it safe? Can I manage if there is an accident? A pre-feasibility study should provide high level answers to all these questions and allow a knowledgeable decision

  15. Proposal for a coordination research programme (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on stable isotope tracer techniques for studies on protein-energy interactions

    This Report provides a rationale and justification for the initiation of a Coordinated Research programme to support studies using stable isotopic tracer techniques to address priority areas of human protein-energy interactions with special emphasis on the problems of human nutrition in developing countries. The Report suggests a modus for establishing such a practically oriented Coordinated Research Programme under the aegis of the International Atomic Energy Agency with concrete suggestions for its organization and the identification of probable participants in such a programme. The likely sources of additional funding to sustain such an activity viable for a period of 4 to 5 years are also indicated. 8 refs

  16. Decommissioning policy and programme progress BNFL

    British Nuclear Fuels Ltd (BNFL) reviewed decommissioning liabilities in 1988 and established a revised policy covering the technical and financial provisioning requirements for the next 100 years. At the Sellafield site the work programme has been steadily expanded over the past ten years and now includes all shutdown facilities. Of 26 projects identified, four have been completed and substantial progress made on the remainder. Approximately 35M pounds has been spent to date and a further 54M pounds financially sanctioned against the 390M pounds estimated for the programme. Project needs are leading a supporting development programme targeted at cost reduction and towards improving the quality of long-term estimates. The policy, programme and some of the projects are briefly described and an outline is given of some of the enhanced capabilities which have matured the capability for safe and cost effective decommissioning of fuel cycle facilities. (author) 8 refs.; 2 tabs

  17. Establishment and application of a highly sensitive coupled luminescent method (CLM) to study natural killer cell cytolytic activity

    Ogbomo, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are white blood lymphocytes of the innate immune system that have diverse biological functions, including recognition and destruction of certain microbial infections and neoplasms [1]. NK cells comprise ~ 10% of all circulating lymphocytes and are also found in peripheral tissues including the liver, peritoneal cavity and placenta. Resting NK cells circulate in the blood, but, following activation by cytokines, they are capable of extravasation and infiltration into ...

  18. Preventive medical programmes to personnel exposed to ionizing radiation

    The increasing use of ionizing radiation in the medical field as well as in industry and research grants has special importance to the security aspects related to the individual as well as his surroundings, reason for which the implementation of effective Occupational Radiation Protection Programmes constitutes a priority. Presently, in Guatemala, an Occupational Medicine Programme, directed to the Radiosanitary watch over of occupationally exposed personnel does not exist. It is the goal in this project to organize and establish such programme, based on protective and training actions focused toward the employee as the main entity, his specific activities and his work surroundings. Medical watch over together with Radiation Protection will permit the reduction of the occurrence probability of accidents or incidents, as well as the limitation of stochastic effects to the undermost values. The application scope of the present project is, in the first place, directed to the occupationally exposed personnel of the Direcci[n General de Energ[a Nuclear, as regulatory entity of these activities, and afterwards, its application in the different institutions which work with ionizing radiations. All the previously exposed is based on the Nuclear Legislation prevailing in Guatemala as well as the recommendations of international organizations. (author)

  19. Swiss breeder research programme

    A new initiative for a Swiss Fast Breeder Research Program has been started during 1991. This was partly the consequence of a vote in Fall 1990, when the Swiss public voted for maintaining nuclear reactors in operation, but also for a moratorium of 10 years, within which period no new reactor project should be proposed. On the other hand the Swiss government decided to keep the option 'atomic reactors' open and therefore it was essential to have programmes which guaranteed that the knowledge of reactor technology could be maintained in the industry and the relevant research organisations. There is also motivation to support a Swiss Breeder Research Program on the part of the utilities, the licensing authorities and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The utilities recognise the breeder reactor as an advanced reactor system which has to be developed further and might be a candidate, somewhere in the future, for electricity production. In so far they have great interest that a know-how base is maintained in our country, with easy access for technical questions and close attention to the development of this reactor type. The licensing authorities have a legitimate interest that an adequate knowledge of the breeder reactor type and its functions is kept at their disposal. PSI and the former EIR have had for many years a very successful basic research programme concerning breeder reactors, and were in close cooperation with EFR. The activities within this programme had to be terminated owing to limitations in personnel and financial resources. The new PSI research programme is based upon two main areas, reactor physics and reactor thermal hydraulics. In both areas relatively small but valuable basic research tasks, the results of which are of interest to the breeder community, will be carried out. The lack of support of the former Breeder Programme led to capacity problems and finally to a total termination. Therefore one of the problems which had to be solved first was

  20. HISTORICAL FRAGMENTS OF ESTABLISHMENT OF "MAGARACH" SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTE OF GRAPES AND WINE AND THE ELEMENTS OF ITS SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY

    Klimova-Donchouk L. B.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents historical information about the stages of gradual transformation of the first non-large wine-making institution of Crimea, organized in 1828 under the initiative of Prince M.S. Vorontsov in the natural boundary called Magarach near the Imperial Nikitsky botanical garden in the world famous Institute of Grape and Wine "Magarach" - once the chief coordinator of the research work in the field of viticulture and winemaking republics of the USSR and the main forge of scientific staff in this direction. Among the directors of the institute of the last century, there were such talented organizers as A.G. Globa, T.G. Kataryan, P.Y. Golodriga. The Institute operated a network of regional branches, created enotec with a settled in 1836 wine Muscat pink Magarach (World rarity is reflected in the Guinness book of records, the world ampelographic collection (fourth in number of samples, scientists developed area-standard assortment for production, issued 11 Volumes of "Ampelography of USSR" (awarded by OIV, designed a lot of outstanding for yield and stability varieties (Pervenets Magaracha, Ranniy Magaracha, Citron Magaracha et al. and clones (Muscat white of Red Stone, Pinot Noir yields and others. grapes. There was a significant contribution in the sphere of research and development of viticulture and winemaking of world, the institute was given an international prestige and this led to establishing the base of the General Assembly of the OIV - International Organization of Grape and Wine, the International Symposium on the selection of wine-town, several international wine tasting competitions and International finest examples of table grapes

  1. Regulatory inspection of the implementation of quality assurance programmes

    This manual provides guidance to Member States in the organization and performance of their regulatory inspection functions regarding the implementation of nuclear power plant quality assurance programmes. It addresses the interface between, and is consistent with, the IAEA Nuclear Safety Standards (NUSS programme) documents on quality assurance and governmental organization. The manual offers a practical model and examples for performing regulatory inspections to ensure that the quality assurance programme is operating satisfactorily in the siting, design, manufacturing, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The primary objective is to confirm that the licensee has the capability to manage and control the effective performance of all quality assurance responsibilities during all phases of a nuclear power project. The guidance provided through this manual for proper establishment and execution of the regulatory inspections helps to enforce the effective implementation of the quality assurance programme as a management control system that the nuclear industry should establish and use in attaining the safety and reliability objectives for nuclear installations. This enforcement action by national regulatory bodies and the emphasis on the purposes and advantages of quality assurance as an important management tool integrated within the total project task have been recommended by the IAEA International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG). The primary intended users of this manual are the management personnel and high level staff from regulatory bodies but it will also be helpful to management personnel from nuclear utilities and vendors. They all are inevitable partners in a nuclear power project and this document offers all of them valuable information on the better accomplishment of quality assurance activities to ensure the common objective of safe and reliable nuclear power production

  2. Regulatory inspection of the implementation of quality assurance programmes

    This Manual provides guidance to Member States in the organization and performance of their regulatory inspection functions regarding the implementation of nuclear power plant quality assurance programmes. It addresses the interface between, and is consistent with, the IAEA Nuclear Safety Standards (NUSS programme) documents on quality assurance and governmental organization. The Manual offers a practical model and examples for performing regulatory inspections to ensure that the quality assurance programme is operating satisfactorily in the siting, design, manufacturing, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The primary objective is to confirm that the licensee has the capability to manage and control the effective performance of all quality assurance responsibilities during all phases of a nuclear power project. The guidance provided through this Manual for proper establishment and execution of the regulatory inspections helps to enforce the effective implementation of the quality assurance programme as a management control system that the nuclear industry should establish and use in attaining the safety and reliability objectives for nuclear installations. This enforcement action by national regulatory bodies and the emphasis on the purposes and advantages of quality assurance as an important management tool integrated within the total project task have been recommended by the IAEA International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG). The primary intended users of this Manual are the management personnel and high level staff from regulatory bodies but it will also be helpful to management personnel from nuclear utilities and vendors. They all are inevitable partners in a nuclear power project and this document offers all of them valuable information on the better accomplishment of quality assurance activities to ensure the common objective of safe and reliable nuclear power production

  3. Fusion technology programme

    KfK participates to the Fusion Technology Programme of the European Community. Most of the work in progress addresses the Next European Torus (NET) and the long term technology aspects as defined in the 82/86 programme. A minor part serves to preparation of future contributions and to design studies on fusion concepts in a wider perspective. The Fusion Technology Programme of Euratom covers mainly aspects of nuclear engineering. Plasma engineering, heating, refueling and vacuum technology are at present part of the Physics Programme. In view of NET, integration of the different areas of work will be mandatory. KfK is therefore prepared to address technical aspects beyond the actual scope of the physics experiments. The technology tasks are reported project wise under title and code of the Euratom programme. Most of the projects described here are shared with other European fusion laboratories as indicated in the table annexed to this report. (orig./GG)

  4. Preliminary Screening of Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities and Establishment of an Efficient Callus Induction in Curculigo latifolia Dryand (Lemba

    Reza Farzinebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf, seed, and tuber explants of C. latifolia were inoculated on MS medium supplemented with various concentrations of BAP and IBA, alone or in combinations, to achieve in vitro plant regeneration. Subsequently, antioxidant and antibacterial activities were determined from in vitro and in vivo plant developed. No response was observed from seed culture on MS media with various concentrations of PGRs. The highest percentage of callus was observed on tuber explants (94% and leaf explants (89% when cultured on MS media supplemented with IBA in combination with BAP. A maximum of 88% shoots per tuber explant, with a mean number of shoots (8.8±1.0, were obtained on MS medium supplemented with combinations of BAP and IBA (2.5 mg L−1. The best root induction (92% and mean number (7.6±0.5 from tuber explants were recorded on 2.5 mg L−1 IBA alone supplemented to MS medium. The higher antioxidant content (80% was observed from in vivo tuber. However, tuber part from the intact plant showed higher inhibition zone in antibacterial activity compared to other in vitro and in vivo tested parts.

  5. Anti-tumor efficacy of lymphokine-activated killer cells and recombinant interleukin 2 in vivo: direct correlation between reduction of established metastases and cytolytic activity of lymphokine-activated killer cells

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the incubation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes or murine splenocytes in recombinant interleukin 2 (RIL 2) resulted in the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells capable of lysing a broad spectrum of fresh tumors in short-term chromium-release assays. Moreover, injections of LAK cells plus RIL 2 were highly effective in eliminating established 3 day metastases in the lung and liver. We have examined several parameters to define whether or not the cytolytic activity of LAK cells as measured in vitro correlated directly with the in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of adoptively transferred LAK cells. LAK cells plus RIL 2 could mediate marked reductions of established pulmonary metastases in mice rendered T cell deficient by adult thymectomy and lethal, total body irradiation followed by reconstitution with T cell-depleted bone marrow and spleen cells. Thus there was no requirement for additional T lymphocytes of host origin for successful therapy with adoptively transferred LAK cells plus RIL 2. Fresh splenocytes depleted of T cells by anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody plus complement generated LAK cells that were as highly lytic to fresh tumor in vitro and were as effective in reducing established pulmonary metastases as those generated from untreated or complement-treated splenocytes. Thus, the precursor to LAK cells with anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo did not express the Thy-1 antigenic marker. In contrast, treatment of LAK effector cells (those generated from a 3-day incubation of fresh, normal splenocytes in RIL 2) with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement reduced or abolished their in vitro cytolytic activity

  6. Establishment of a luciferase assay-based screening system: Fumitremorgin C selectively inhibits cellular proliferation of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT

    The AKT pathway is frequently activated in glioblastoma, and as such, inhibitors of this pathway could prove very useful as anti-glioblastoma therapies. Here we established immortalized astrocytes expressing Renilla luciferase as well as those expressing both an active form of AKT and firefly luciferase. Since both luciferase activities represent the numbers of corresponding cell lines, novel inhibitors of the AKT pathway can be identified by treating co-cultures containing the two types of luciferase-expressing cells with individual compounds. Indeed, such a screening system succeeded in identifying fumitremorgin C as an efficient inhibitor of the AKT pathway, which was further confirmed by the ability of fumitremorgin C to selectively inhibit the growth of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT. The present study proposes a broadly applicable approach for identifying therapeutic agents that target the pathways and/or molecules responsible for cancer development

  7. The FAO/IAEA external quality assurance programme for disease diagnosis

    As part of the programme of support to scientists in developing countries, the Animal Production and Health Subprogramme of the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme has developed and distributed standardized and validated enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. These kits are used in epidemiological studies, in vaccination monitoring programmes and in control and eradication programmes. In order to assure that the test results from a laboratory using FAO/IAEA ELISA kits are valid and reliable an external quality assurance programme (EQAP) was implemented. The EQAP consists of three equally important elements: a questionnaire to provide evidence of routine use of internal quality control practices and satisfactory infrastructure services, the monitoring of the internal quality control (IQC) data as produced for each ELISA plate and an external quality control test panel of 'unknown' samples. At present, the EQAP is operational for the following FAO/IAEA ELISA kits: the rinderpest competitive ELISA, the brucella indirect ELISA, the trypanosomosis direct sandwich ELISA, the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) indirect sandwich ELISA and the FMDV liquid phase blocking ELISA. The results clearly indicate that the EQAP is a valuable tool in the assessment of both the results derived from and use of the ELISA kits provided through the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme. Furthermore, the EQAP can assist counterpart scientists to establish and implement quality control/quality assurance (QC/QA) procedures for conducting the FAO/IAEA ELISA and to advise on the implementation of similar QC/QA procedures in other laboratory activities. In the long term, it is envisaged that the FAO/IAEA EQAP would provide a model for an internationally accepted veterinary laboratory accreditation system. This type of system will be essential to veterinary authorities in developing countries to establish credibility in their animal disease reporting schemes and, thus, in their ability to engage in the

  8. Auditing as method of QA programme evaluation

    The status and adequacy of a quality assurance programme should be regularly reviewed by the cognizant management. The programme audit is an independent review to determine the compliance with respective quality assurance requirements and to determine the effectiveness of that programme. This lecture gives an introduction of the method to perform audits under the following topics: 1. Definition and purpose of quality audits. 2. Organization of the quality audit function. 3. Unique requirements for auditors. 4. Audit preparation and planning. 5. Conduct of the audit. 6. Reporting the audit results. 7. Follow-up activities. (RW)

  9. Country programme review Republic of Cameroon

    A multi-disciplinary country programme review and programming mission was undertaken to the Republic of Cameroon, from 21 to 25 June 1993. This report reflects the findings and recommendations of the mission and falls into four sections. The first section describes the country profile and includes information about its economy and its development plans and policies. The second reviews the Agency's past and present technical co-operation programmes in Cameroon. The third section deals with a sectoral programme and institutional review, and the fourth section presents possible future technical co-operation activities

  10. Establish Techniques for Small Scale Indigenous Molybdenum-99 Production Using LEU Fission or Neutron Activation [Country report: Pakistan

    Low enriched uranium foil (19.99% 235U) may be used as target material for the production of fission molybdenum-99 (99Mo) in the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1). LEU foil annular targets or LEU foil plate targets can be irradiated in PARR-1 for the production of >100 Ci of 99Mo at the end of irradiation. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis for the fission 99Mo production at PARR-1 has been performed. Power levels in the foil targets and their corresponding irradiation time durations were initially determined by neutronic analysis to have the required neutron fluence. Finally the thermal hydraulic analysis has been carried out for the proposed designs of the target holders using LEU foil for fission 99Mo production at PARR-1. Data shows that LEU foil targets can be safely irradiated in PARR-1 for production of desired amount of fission 99Mo. Although Pakistan is producing 99Mo by the irradiation of HEU uranium alloy plates with aluminium clad targets in PARR-1 to meet the demands of 99Mo/99mTc generators in the country, it intends to use LEU aluminide targets in coming years. In this perspective, R&D work on fabrication of LEU target for 99Mo using natural uranium has been initiated at PINSTECH. Preliminary results of LEU target plate manufactured indigenously at PINSTECH show quite good separation of 99Mo from target matrix activity. (author)

  11. Establishment of a novel experimental protocol for drug-induced seizure liability screening based on a locomotor activity assay in zebrafish.

    Koseki, Naoteru; Deguchi, Jiro; Yamashita, Akihito; Miyawaki, Izuru; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    As drug-induced seizures have severe impact on drug development, evaluating seizure induction potential of candidate drugs at the early stages of drug discovery is important. A novel assay system using zebrafish has attracted interest as a high throughput toxicological in vivo assay system, and we tried to establish an experimental method for drug-induced seizure liability on the basis of locomotor activity in zebrafish. We monitored locomotor activity at high-speed movement (> 20 mm/sec) for 60 min immediately after exposure, and assessed seizure liability potential in some drugs using locomotor activity. However this experimental procedure was not sufficient for predicting seizures because the potential of several drugs with demonstrated seizure potential in mammals was not detected. We, therefore, added other parameters for locomotor activity such as extending exposure time or conducting flashlight stimulation (10 Hz) which is a known seizure induction stimulus, and these additional parameters improved seizure potential detection in some drugs. The validation study using the improved methodology was used to assess 52 commercially available drugs, and the prediction rate was approximately 70%. The experimental protocol established in this present study is considered useful for seizure potential screening during early stages of drug discovery. PMID:25056783

  12. The Caribbean amblyomma eradication programme: Success or failure?

    five-year period 2004-2009. USDA/APHIS continued to request increased funding through Fiscal Years 2004-2006, although to date no increase has been approved by US Congress. Thus the programme may be terminated before it has attained its goal of regional eradication of the TBT. There are four major conclusions that can be drawn at this critical stage: 1. Overall harmonisation of the implementation of the programme through the umbrella of the Amblyomma Programme Council (APC) was effective, albeit informal. It should have been given a legal mandate under a multi-institutional agreement, rather than a series of potentially conflicting and incompatible agreements. 2. The technical design and methodology proposed in the original project document was flawed. It can be concluded that the revised approach, using public information and communications to facilitate and support the active participation of all livestock owners was cost effective and generally sustainable. 3. During the course of implementation, it was also recognized that the original technical conceptualisation of the TBT eradication model, established from simulation scenarios from experiences of TBT eradication in Puerto Rico, was based on two defective assumptions. The model had adopted unsound scientific criteria as livestock husbandry methods practised by small scale livestock owners in small Caribbean islands are quite dissimilar to those adopted by commercial farmers in Puerto Rico. 4. An urgent decision must be made as to the future of the programme if additional funding is not available within a few months to continue and conclude eradication activities. It is recommended that a TBT management strategy is adopted on all infested islands, with full cost recovery for acaricides, and a stronger application of the existing legislation to minimise any further spread. (author)

  13. United States Atomic Energy Commission Radiation Processing of Foods Programme

    The current progress of the United States Atomic Energy Commission's Radiation Processing of Food Programme, with emphasis on the clearance of such foods for general human consumption, product development, facility design, process conditions and economics, and commercial aspects are discussed. Semi-production processing for a number of products has now become feasible. The goal is to test laboratory data under near-commercial-scale process conditions, and to obtain cost data. Either completed, or nearing completion are semi-production facilities capable of processing various foods in quantities of thousands of pounds per hour. Among them are the Marine Products Development Irradiator, the Mobile Gamma Irradiator and the Grain Products Irradiator, for bulk and packaged grain. Plans for a Hawaiian Development Irradiator are also discussed. Activities in the United States, which are related to the commercialization of radiation processing of foods, including the use of radiation for processing fresh fish and fruits, sterilized meats and other food products, are discussed. For example, a project is under way in which several agencies of the United States Government are attempting to establish a co-operative programme with industry, aimed at the development of a pilot-plant meat irradiator. These efforts are directed towards the establishment of a large facility operated by industry which would: (a) provide necessary radiation-sterilized meats for the armed services; (b) establish process conditions and economics; and (c) introduce some of the product into the civilian economy, for commercial purposes. (author)

  14. Development of a training programme for home health care workers to promote preventive activities focused on a healthy lifestyle : an intervention mapping approach

    Walters, Maaike E.; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lifestyle is an important aspect in maintaining good health in older adults, and home health care (HHC) workers can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle. However, there is limited evidence in the literature regarding how to develop an effective training programme to im

  15. Technical, environmental and regulatory aspects of waste management and their reflection in the IAEA programme

    Within the IAEA training course on waste management this paper is intended to overview technological, radiological, encironmental, regulatory and institutional aspects of importance in establishing a waste management policy for nuclear power programmes; the objectives and results of IAEA activities in this field; and some current issues from a national and international perspective with special consideration on the needs of countries embarking on nuclear power. (orig./RW)

  16. Living PSA programme. A support framework for a risk-based decision making

    Risk (safety) management is understood as an important part of operational decision making policy in NPP Dukovany, located in the Czech Republic and equipped with four VVER 440/V213 reactors. Probabilistic Safety Assessment is playing a key role in risk management and that because a Living PSA programme, which has been established as a framework for all activities related to risk assessment with aim to support risk based decision-making in power plant Dukovany, will be introduced in this paper. (author)

  17. Specification for a total quality assurance programme for nuclear power plants

    This British Standard specifies principles for the establishment and implementation of quality assurance programmes during all phases of design, procurement, fabrication, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants. These principles apply to activities affecting the quality of items, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling, modifying and, eventually decommissioning. (author)

  18. The European Fusion Programme

    The European Fusion Programme is coordinated by Euratom and represents a long term cooperative project of Member States of the European Communities in the field of fusion, designed to lead to the joint construction of prototypes. The main lines of the programme proposed for 1982 to 1986 are: (1) the continuation of a strong effort on tokamaks with emphasis on JET construction, operation and upgrading, (2) conceptual design of NET and development of the related technology, and (3) further work on two alternative magnetic confinement systems. The current status and future plans for this programme are discussed in the paper. (author)

  19. Proposal of a programme for leisure education

    Urban, Jindřich

    2013-01-01

    The submitted bachelor thesis with the title of Proposal of a programme for leisure education reacts on urgent needs in the area of meaningful spending of young people's leisure time. By its practical focus, it represents selected ways for possible management of leisure time activity oriented on sport fishing. The main aim of the thesis is to propose programme for a fishing club, i.e. presentation of thirteen elaborated thematic areas that are considered as fundamental in fishing sport. E...

  20. The QUENCH programme at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK)

    The QUENCH programme at FZK was launched to investigate the hydrogen source term during reflood of an overheated reactor core. It consists of large scale bundle experiments, separate-effects tests, modelling activities and application and validation of severe fuel damage (SFD) code systems. The paper describes the experimental part of the programme, namely the experimental facilities and test rigs as well as selected results obtained during the recent years. (author)

  1. An in Situ method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort

  2. Annual report 1981. Joint Research Centre Petten Establishment

    In this 1981 report, the first chapter introduces the Establishment's activities during the year, followed by brief accounts of the three major programmes assigned to Petten. The scientific work is then described in Chapters II and IV with selected topics being presented in Chapters III and V. The remainder of the report contains charts and tables concerned with staff and budgetary matters and finally a list of technical publications and contributions to conferences made during the year. The year has seen heavy demands being made on the facilities, both the High Flux Reactor and Materials Research installations being fully occupied for most of the time, important results being obtained in both these fields

  3. Photovoltaic programme, edition 2004

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This comprehensive publication issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy's Photovoltaics (PV) Programme presents an overview (in English) of activities and projects in the photovoltaics research and pilot and demonstration areas in Switzerland for the year 2003. Progress in future solar cell technologies as well as in the area of modules, building integration and system technologies is summarised. Also, national and international co-operation and multi-national pilot and demonstration projects are commented on. Associated projects such as eco-balances for PV systems, forecasting and modelling tools as well as system monitoring tools are discussed. In the area of pilot and demonstration projects, component development, PV integration in sloping roofs, on flat roofs and on facades as well as further PV plant are looked at. Also, measurement campaigns, studies, statistics and other PV-related topics are summarised. This volume presents a list of 92 projects in the PV area including the appropriate Internet links and is completed with a collection of project abstracts.

  4. Screening of preschool and school children for cystic fibrosis with the chloride electrode and neutron activation analysis. Part of a coordinated programme on medical applications of activation analysis

    A screening study was performed on 9,685 infants and children between 0 and 7 years of age living in the city of Istanbul. 2,511 of the subjects (''normals'') were kindergarten and school children and the remainder were children who had been brought to the casualty outpatient departments of two large hospitals. The purposes of the investigation were twofold, first to determine the prevalence of cystic fibrosis in a normal versus a sick population of children, and second to compare sweat-chloride vis-a-vis nail-sodium as indicators of the disease. Sweat-chloride was determined in all subjects by the use of a chloride specific electrode; nail sodium was determined in 1122 subjects by neutron activation analysis. These measurements led to the identification of seven cystic fibrosis cases in the outpatient group (frequency = 0.1%) and none in the kindergarten/school group. Sweat-chloride gave 0.7% false positives and no false negatives; nailsodium gave 14.7% false positives and 0.1% false negatives. It is concluded that nail-sodium is a much less effective indicator of cystic fibrosis than sweat-chloride and its use can probably not be justified except in certain special circumstances. Furthermore it would appear that the screening of outpatient cases rather than the whole population of children is a more cost-effective method for the detection of cystic fibrosis

  5. Experience from the Inspection of Licensees' Outage Activities, Including Fire Protection Programmes, Event Response Inspections, and the Impact of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident on Inspection Programmes. Workshop Proceedings, Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States, 7-10 April 2014 - Appendix: Compilation of Survey Responses

    This appendix provides the complete compilation of responses received to the questionnaire issued in conjunction with the workshop announcements. The responses are provided as received, with changes made only to the formatting. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) sponsored the 12. International Workshop on Nuclear Regulatory Inspection Activities. The workshop was hosted by the U.S. NRC, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States of America on 7 -10 April 2014. The three workshop topics that were addressed were as follows: - Inspection of Outage Activities Including Fire Protection Programmes. - Event Response Inspections. - The Impact of Inspection Programmes of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident. Each of the respondents was given the following instructions in relation to their response: - Only one response per country is required. If more than one person from your country is participating, please co-ordinate the responses accordingly. - Please provide responses on separate sheet and clearly identify the questionnaire part and topic. For preparation of the workshop, participants are invited to supply their national inspection approaches used in inspection of events and incidents according to the surveys. Actual issues that were discussed during the workshop were generated by the topic leaders based on the responses submitted by participants with their registration forms. This formats helps to ensure that issues considered most important by the workshop participants are covered during the group discussions. (authors)

  6. The European Framework Programme under way

    2007-01-01

    The new European Framework Programme - FP7 - has recently started and will offer various possibilities for CERN to participate in EU co-funded projects for research and technological development. In December 2006, the Council of the European Union (EU) formally adopted the 7th European Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration activities (FP7). FP7 started on 1 January 2007 and will cover the period 2007 to 2013. With a total budget of 50.5 B-Euros, FP7 is the largest Framework Programme in the history of the EU. FP7 consists of four major sub-programmes, referred to as 'Specific Programmes'. 'Cooperation' is focused on collaborative research and is divided into 10 research themes. 'Ideas' is a new EU programme for funding of frontier research in all fields of science. 'Capacities' aims at strengthening the research capacities in Europe. Finally, 'People' succeeds the previous Marie Curie Programmes and targets the development of Europe's human potential. On 22 December...

  7. The European Framework Programme under way

    2007-01-01

    The new European Framework Programme - FP7 - has recently started and will offer various possibilities for CERN to participate in EU co-funded projects for research and technological development. In December 2006, the Council of the European Union (EU) formally adopted the 7th European Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration activities (FP7). FP7 started on 1st January 2007 and will cover the period 2007 to 2013. With a total budget of 50.5 billion euros, FP7 is the largest Framework Programme in the history of the EU. FP7 consists of four major sub-programmes, referred to as 'Specific Programmes'. 'Cooperation' is focused on collaborative research and is divided into 10 research themes. 'Ideas' is a new EU programme for funding frontier research in all fields of science. 'Capacities' aims at strengthening the research capacities in Europe. Finally, 'People' succeeds the previous Marie Curie Programmes and targets the development of Europe's human potential. On 22 Decem...

  8. [Experimental testing of centrally authorised medicinal products. The CAP programme].

    Giess, S

    2014-10-01

    In addition to marketing authorisation, inspection and pharmacovigilance the experimental testing within the CAP programme provides another important instrument of assessing and testing centrally authorised medicinal products. Coordinated activities in European member states and institutions--including planning, sampling, lab testing, reporting and assessment of results--allow us to establish an effective quality control system for this group of innovative medicinal products. By means of using existing networks and national structures, unnecessary parallel sampling and testing can be avoided, and limited resources can be used in a better way. The CAP programme is an independent test and surveillance programme, which demonstrates the high quality of centrally authorised medicinal products in the EU/EEA. That way, it strengthens the confidence of patients and the public in these innovative medicinal products. Furthermore, it enables OMCLs to gain experience with new sensitive analytical methods, which can also be used in other areas, for example for the identification of counterfeits or the assessment of biosimilars and generics. PMID:25159224

  9. Developing industrial infrastructures to support a programme of nuclear power

    This Guidebook is intended to offer assistance in the many considerations and decisions involved in preparing the national industry for participation in a nuclear power programme. The heavy financial investment, the setting up of certain infrastructures many years ahead of plant construction, plus the high level of technology involved require early and systematic planning. A further purpose of this Guidebook is to serve particularly those decision makers and planners in the various governmental authorities, the technological institutions and in the industries likely to be involved in a nuclear project. These industries include the services of the national engineering resources, the domestic design and manufacturing groups as well as the civil construction companies. These will be responsible for plant erection, testing and commissioning and most of all for the establishment of a framework for quality assurance. All of these are the components of an essential infrastructure necessary to raise the standards of the national industry and to displace increasingly foreign suppliers to the extent possible. In addition, this Guidebook should help to show some of the implications, consequences and options involved in a nuclear power programme. It does not consider the basic decisions for going nuclear, nor does it review the choice of the technology or nuclear process selected for the programme. Instead, it limits itself to a consideration of the nuclear power plant and its essential cycle activities. Figs and tabs

  10. Network virtualization and programmability

    Colle, Didier; Jooris, Bart; Gurzi, Pasquale; Pickavet, Mario; Demeester, Piet

    2010-01-01

    We present network virtualization (building virtual or logical networks over a physical infrastructure) and network programmability (allowing the network operator to at least control the network but more fundamentally to define its behavior) concepts.

  11. Elukestva õppe programm : Erasmus+

    2014-01-01

    Erasmus+ programm liidab senised koostööprogrammid „Euroopa elukestva õppe programm“, „Euroopa Noored“ ning Euroopa komisjoni rahvusvahelised kõrgharidusprogrammid. Elukestva õppe programmi 2013 kokkuvõte

  12. The Gold Standard Programme

    Neumann, Tim; Rasmussen, Mette; Ghith, Nermin;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates.......To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates....

  13. Stay Safe Programme

    MacIntyre, Deirdre; Carr, Alan.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. This child abuse prevention study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Stay Safe Programme in training unscreened 7 and 10 year old children in personal safety skills. Subsidiary aims were to evaluate the programme's impact on children's self-esteem and parents' and teachers' knowledge and attitudes of relevance to child abuse and protection. Method. Changes in safety knowledge and skills and self-esteem of 339 children who participated in the Stay Safe Program...

  14. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    George Korir; Manu Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external component...

  15. National programme for prevention of burn injuries

    Gupta J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The estimated annual burn incidence in India is approximately 6-7 million per year. The high incidence is attributed to illiteracy, poverty and low level safety consciousness in the population. The situation becomes further grim due to the absence of organized burn care at primary and secondary health care level. But the silver lining is that 90% of burn injuries are preventable. An initiative at national level is need of the hour to reduce incidence so as to galvanize the available resources for more effective and standardized treatment delivery. The National Programme for Prevention of Burn Injuries is the endeavor in this line. The goal of National programme for prevention of burn injuries (NPPBI would be to ensure prevention and capacity building of infrastructure and manpower at all levels of health care delivery system in order to reduce incidence, provide timely and adequate treatment to burn patients to reduce mortality, complications and provide effective rehabilitation to the survivors. Another objective of the programme will be to establish a central burn registry. The programme will be launched in the current Five Year Plan in Medical colleges and their adjoining district hospitals in few states. Subsequently, in the next five year plan it will be rolled out in all the medical colleges and districts hospitals of the country so that burn care is provided as close to the site of accident as possible and patients need not to travel to big cities for burn care. The programme would essentially have three components i.e. Preventive programme, Burn injury management programme and Burn injury rehabilitation programme.

  16. The Relation between Neighboring, Tolerance of Diversity and Life Satisfaction, The importance of Recreative Activities for Establishing and Strengthening These Relations

    Faik Ardahan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relation between neighboring, Tolerance of Diversity and Life Satisfaction and to examine if recreative activities would be helpful for establishing and/or strengthening these relations. This was a descriptive study and sampling group consists of 197 males (age= 37.56±11.82) and 213 females (age= 34.92±11.17), totally 410 (age= 36.19±11.55) volunteer participants who live in Antalya city centre.In this study, the items “Neighboring” and “Tolerance...

  17. A Compact, Waveguide Based Programmable Optical Comb Generator Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I STTR effort will establish the feasibility of developing a compact broadband near to mid-IR programmable optical comb for use in laser based...

  18. The 1964 programme of help in atomic development

    will take greater interest in these new centres and establish closer relations with them. One method of achieving this could be through 'sister laboratory' arrangements, - whereby two centres join forces - at first in order to assist the newly established one, but eventually for mutual benefit completed under bilateral arrangements which are normally limited to the period of construction. Most of these new centres then require some form of assistance in their programmes of research and training. The programme outlined below forms a part only of the Agency's work in the field of technical assistance, which includes a number of other closely related activities, such as exchange of visiting professors, provision of fellowships, and organization of regional training courses - the latter often involving the provision of equipment. All these matters are now being administered by the Agency's Department of Technical Assistance. The projects approved by the Board for this year cover a fairly wide range of topics - from raw materials prospecting and treatment to reactor construction, and from use of radioisotopes in fisheries research to their use in medicine.

  19. Sustainable practice change: Professionals' experiences with a multisectoral child health promotion programme in Sweden

    Mogren Ingrid

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New methods for prevention and health promotion and are constantly evolving; however, positive outcomes will only emerge if these methods are fully adopted and sustainable in practice. To date, limited attention has been given to sustainability of health promotion efforts. This study aimed to explore facilitators, barriers, and requirements for sustainability as experienced by professionals two years after finalizing the development and implementation of a multisectoral child health promotion programme in Sweden (the Salut programme. Initiated in 2005, the programme uses a 'Salutogenesis' approach to support health-promoting activities in health care, social services, and schools. Methods All professionals involved in the Salut Programme's pilot areas were interviewed between May and September 2009, approximately two years after the intervention package was established and implemented. Participants (n = 23 were midwives, child health nurses, dental hygienists/dental nurses, and pre-school teachers. Transcribed data underwent qualitative content analysis to illuminate perceived facilitators, barriers, and requirements for programme sustainability. Results The programme was described as sustainable at most sites, except in child health care. The perception of facilitators, barriers, and requirements were largely shared across sectors. Facilitators included being actively involved in intervention development and small-scale testing, personal values corresponding to programme intentions, regular meetings, working close with collaborators, using manuals and a clear programme branding. Existing or potential barriers included insufficient managerial involvement and support and perceived constraints regarding time and resources. In dental health care, barriers also included conflicting incentives for performance. Many facilitators and barriers identified by participants also reflected their perceptions of more general and forthcoming

  20. Effectiveness of a universal parental support programme to promote healthy dietary habits and physical activity and to prevent overweight and obesity in 6-year-old children: the Healthy School Start Study, a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Gisela Nyberg

    Full Text Available To develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a parental support programme to promote healthy dietary and physical activity habits and to prevent overweight and obesity in Swedish children.A cluster-randomised controlled trial was carried out in areas with low to medium socio-economic status. Participants were six-year-old children (n = 243 and their parents. Fourteen pre-school classes were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 7 and control groups (n = 7. The intervention lasted for 6 months and included: 1 Health information for parents, 2 Motivational Interviewing with parents and 3 Teacher-led classroom activities with children. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry, dietary and physical activity habits and parental self-efficacy through a questionnaire. Body weight and height were measured and BMI standard deviation score was calculated. Measurements were conducted at baseline, post-intervention and at 6-months follow-up. Group differences were examined using analysis of covariance and Poisson regression, adjusted for gender and baseline values.There was no significant intervention effect in the primary outcome physical activity. Sub-group analyses showed a significant gender-group interaction in total physical activity (TPA, with girls in the intervention group demonstrating higher TPA during weekends (p = 0.04, as well as in sedentary time, with boys showing more sedentary time in the intervention group (p = 0.03. There was a significantly higher vegetable intake (0.26 servings in the intervention group compared to the control group (p = 0.003. At follow-up, sub-group analyses showed a sustained effect for boys. The intervention did not affect the prevalence of overweight or obesity.It is possible to influence vegetable intake in children and girls' physical activity through a parental support programme. The programme needs to be intensified in order to increase effectiveness and sustain the effects long-term. These findings

  1. Radiological safety programme for the health departments in Parana, Brazil

    As a result of Brazil's centralized administration in the past, various parts of the public service were somewhat inefficient. Another reason was the size of the country. To improve the situation in the health sector, it was decided to transfer administrative responsibility to the municipal authorities. Accordingly, the public health system is now defined under the appropriate legislation as the 'Unified Health System' (SUS), comprising federal, state and municipal levels. This system promotes decentralization of therapeutic or preventive services (including the Radiation Facility Health Inspectorate) and proposes any additional legislation required. In Parana the Radiation Facility Health Inspectorate has 3600 organizations listed, employing ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and research, which need to be regularly inspected for licensing and control. In 1994, 50% of the annual inspection target in the state was attained. The Radiation Safety Programme for the Health Departments in Parana directs these activities in this State. Its strategies are: (1) to establish implementation phases for activities planned for each area; (2) to take advantage of the SUS structure to introduce or expand operational services at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels with appropriate equipment. The tertiary level involves co-ordination of the Programme and complementary executive functions, as well as maintaining an information system with other related organizations. The other levels include licensing, control and emergency response. As the Programme develops, indicators will be established to help identify progress achieved and correct operating strategy where necessary. Thus, the services provided to the public will be enhanced in quality and the radiation doses reduced. In addition, in emergency situations, the time elapsing between the event and its notification to the authorities will be reduced, minimizing the consequences of any accidents. (author)

  2. Collecting Safeguards Relevant Trade Information: The IAEA Procurement Outreach Programme

    The increasing awareness of activities of transnational procurement networks to covertly acquire sensitive nuclear related dual use equipment prompted an evolution of safeguards methodologies. One of the responses to this challenge by the Department of Safeguards in the IAEA was to establish the Trade and Technology Unit (TTA) in November 2004 to analyse and report on these covert nuclear related trade activities. To obtain information relevant to this analysis, TTA is engaging States that might be willing to provide this information to the Secretariat on a voluntary basis. This paper will give an overview of current activities, sum up the results achieved and discuss suggestions to further improve this programme made by Member States. (author)

  3. Survey of radiation protection programmes for transport; Etude des programmes de radioprotection pour les transports de matieres radioactives

    Lizot, M.T.; Perrin, M.L.; Sert, G. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 (France); Lange, F.; Schwarz, G.; Feet, H.J.; Christ, R. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen-und Reaktorsicherheit, GRS, mbH, Cologne (Germany); Shaw, K.B.; Hughes, J.S.; Gelder, R. [National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), Oxon, OX (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The survey of radiation protection programmes for transport has been jointly performed by three scientific organisations I.P.S.N. (France), G.R.S. ( Germany), and N.R.P.B. (United kingdom) on behalf of the European Commission and the pertaining documentation summarises the findings and conclusions of the work that was undertaken with the principal objectives to provide guidance on the establishment, implementation and application of radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials by operators and the assessment and evaluation of such programmes by the competent authority and to review currently existing radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  4. A 12-week after-school physical activity programme improves endothelial cell function in overweight and obese children: a randomised controlled study

    Park Jong-Hwan; Miyashita Masashi; Kwon Yoo-Chan; Park Hyun-Tae; Kim Eun-Hee; Park Jin-Kee; Park Ki-Beam; Yoon Suk-Ran; Chung Jin-Woong; Nakamura Yoshio; Park Sang-Kab

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Endothelial dysfunction is associated with childhood obesity and is closely linked to the amount and function of endothelial progenitor cells. However, it remains unclear whether endothelial progenitor cells increase with after-school exercise in overweight and obese children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an after-school exercise programme on endothelial cell function in overweight and obese children. Methods A total of 29 overweight/obese ch...

  5. Educational Programme in Nuclear Security

    The potential of a malicious act involving nuclear or other radioactive material is a continuing worldwide threat. Available data indicate circumstances in which nuclear and other radioactive material are vulnerable to theft, are uncontrolled, or are in unauthorized circulation. States must establish sustainable security measures to prevent such acts and to protect society from nuclear terrorism. Appropriate training and education at all levels and in all relevant organizations and facilities can play a major role in this process. There is increased interest in nuclear applications. Many States have expressed interest in expanding or introducing nuclear power in their country as a result of their own assessment of their energy supply needs, because of climate change, and development requirements. The projected increase in the demand for nuclear energy will increase the number of nuclear reactors worldwide and, consequently, the amount of nuclear material in use. Possible malicious acts involving nuclear or other radioactive material are a real threat. These developments are mirrored by an increase in the use of nuclear techniques in non-power applications. As a result, the need for experts in the area of nuclear security has become of great importance, and both universities and students have shown an increasing interest in nuclear security specialities. In September 2005, the Board of Governors approved a Nuclear Security Plan covering the period 2006-2009. This emphasized, inter alia, the importance of human resource development to assist States in building capacity to establish and maintain appropriate nuclear security to prevent, detect and respond to malicious acts involving nuclear and other radioactive material. The Nuclear Security Plan envisages the development of guidance for an educational programme in nuclear security that could be used by all States. In pursuit of this goal, this publication has been developed to provide advice and assistance to

  6. Challenges new entrant countries face in establishing a nuclear program

    Brister, J. [CH2M Hill, Engelwood, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Challenges new entrant countries face in establishing a nuclear programme are distilled into four major categories: human resource development, financing, infrastructure and process. In implementing a successful nuclear programme role of the government is key to success. It requires clear and sustained policy support, international and bilateral agreements, developing the depth required of technical skills and infrastructure, proven delivery programme, management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, decommissioning and electricity market regulation.

  7. Challenges new entrant countries face in establishing a nuclear program

    Challenges new entrant countries face in establishing a nuclear programme are distilled into four major categories: human resource development, financing, infrastructure and process. In implementing a successful nuclear programme role of the government is key to success. It requires clear and sustained policy support, international and bilateral agreements, developing the depth required of technical skills and infrastructure, proven delivery programme, management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, decommissioning and electricity market regulation.

  8. Status of national gas cooled reactor programmes

    This report has been compiled as a central source of summary-level information on the present status of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) programmes in the world and on future plans for the continued development and deployment of HTGRs. Most of the information concerns the programmes in the United States, Germany, Japan and the Soviet Union, countries that have had large programmes related to HTGR technology for several years. Summary-level information is also provided in the report on HTGR-related activities in several other countries who either have an increasing interest in the technology and/or who are performing some development efforts related to HTGR technology. The report contains a summary-level update on the MAGNOX and AGR programmes. This is the twelfth issue of the document, the first of which was issued in March, 1979. The report has been prepared in the IAEA Nuclear Power Technology Development Section. Figs and tabs

  9. Status of national programmes on fast reactors

    Based on the International Working Group on Fast reactors (IWGFR) members' request, the IAEA organized a special meeting on Fast Reactor Development and the Role of the IAEA in May 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the status and recent development, to present major changes in fast reactor programmes and to recommend future activities on fast reactors. The IWGFR took note that in some Member States large prototypes have been built or are under construction. However, some countries, due to their current budget constraints, have reduced the level of funding for research and development programmes on fast reactors. The IWGFR noted that in this situation the international exchange of information and cooperation on the development of fast reactors is highly desirable and stressed the importance of the IAEA's programme on fast reactors. These proceedings contain important and useful information on national programmes and new developments in sodium cooled fast reactors in Member States. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. IAEA programme on research reactor safety

    This paper describes the IAEA programme on research reactor safety and includes the safety related areas of conversions to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The program is based on the IAEA statutory responsibilities as they apply to the requirements of over 320 research reactors operating around the world. The programme covers four major areas: (a) the development of safety documents; (b) safety missions to research reactor facilities; (c) support of research programmes on research reactor safety; (d) support of Technical Cooperation projects on research reactor safety issues. The demand for these activities by the IAEA member states has increased substantially in recent years especially in developing countries with increasing emphasis being placed on LEU conversion matters. In response to this demand, the IAEA has undertaken an extensive programme for each of the four areas above. (author)

  11. The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’:

    Larsen, Britt Østergaard; Bendix Kleif, Helle; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    with NR organizations to districts without NR organizations. The results show no difference in the crime rates between Danish postcode districts with and without the NR programme. Hence, we cannot identify positive effects of situational crime prevention when evaluating this Scandinavian volunteer......The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’ (NR) was founded in Sweden in 1987 and has, over the years, developed into a Scandinavian concept covering large areas of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. The NR programme is a crime prevention initiative with adults walking the...... streets at night in identifiable ‘uniforms’ in areas with high activity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the NR programme in Denmark based on a volunteer set-up with a less intrusive approach to situational crime prevention than, for instance, hot spot policing. The analyses are...

  12. Experiences from TVO's Communication Programme

    In parallel with the field investigations of three sites, TVO has a specific information project aiming at public acceptance of HLW disposal in Finland. The site or final disposal will be selected by the year 2000. Prerequisites are that the local council accepts the facility, and that there is political acceptance of final disposal in the government and in Parliament TVO's experience with communications programmes concerning the siting of the spent fuel disposal facility is discussed. Much experience was gained from the 1987-92 information programme. Another programme was organised for the period 1993-96 to back up site investigations, development of technology and safety studies, and to pave the way for information activities in the years 1997-2000. The results of a study carried out a Jysaeskylae University on TVO's waste information in the candidate areas will provide useful information on attitudes about nuclear waste management in Finland. The issue of communication with local opponents, and strategies to assist in lessening their impact is discussed. It should be noted that in 1995 an amendment to the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act became effective that prohibits the transformation of Loviisa spent fuel from Finland to Russia after 1996, and thus reinforces the moral argument. (authors)

  13. Development of a Regulatory Inspection Programme for a New Nuclear Power Plant Project

    With the recent interest in nuclear energy, many States have expressed an interest in developing nuclear programmes or expanding existing ones. Some of them have formally declared their intent to introduce nuclear power; others have even signed contracts to build nuclear power plants. The IAEA identifies seven main stages in licensing within the lifetime of a nuclear facility: siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation, decommissioning and release from regulatory control. This Safety Report focuses on the development of a regulatory inspection programme for siting through to commissioning. In addition, it considers the transition to operation. The regulatory inspection programme provides a high level of assurance that licensed activities are conducted in accordance with regulatory requirements and in conformity with general safety objectives (e.g. the as-built configuration of structures, systems and components is in conformity with the licensing basis). Construction and regulatory inspection of new construction projects are areas for which there are a limited number of requirements established in IAEA safety standards. Furthermore, the related IAEA Safety Guides address general regulatory functions, with limited emphasis on new construction projects or considerations for development of the inspection programme. This Safety Report identifies safety aspects from these requirements and recommendations, as well as key issues associated with initial programme development, and provides several examples from Member States

  14. Working toward a sustainable laboratory quality improvement programme through country ownership: Mozambique’s SLMTA story

    Jessina Masamha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Launched in 2009, the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA programme has emerged as an innovative approach for the improvement of laboratory quality. In order to ensure sustainability, Mozambique embedded the SLMTA programme within the existing Ministry of Health (MOH laboratory structure.Objective: This article outlines the steps followed to establish a national framework for quality improvement and embed the SLMTA programme within existing MOH laboratory systems.Methods: The MOH adopted SLMTA as the national laboratory quality improvement strategy, hired a dedicated coordinator and established a national laboratory quality technical working group comprising mostly personnel from key MOH departments. The working group developed an implementation framework for advocacy, training, mentorship, supervision and audits. Emphasis was placed on building local capacity for programme activities. After receiving training, a team of 25 implementers (18 from the MOH and sevenfrom partner organisations conducted baseline audits (using the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation [SLIPTA] checklist, workshops and site visits in six reference and two central hospital laboratories. Exit audits were conducted in six of the eight laboratories and their results are presented.Results: The six laboratories demonstrated substantial improvement in SLIPTA checklistscores; median scores increased from 35% at baseline to 57% at exit. It has been recommended that the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory apply for international accreditation.Conclusion: Successful implementation of SLMTA requires partnership between programme implementers, whilst effectiveness and long-term viability depend on country leadership, ownership and commitment. Integration of SLMTA into the existing MOH laboratory system will ensure durability beyond initial investments. The Mozambican model holds great promise that

  15. Outcomes-based planning and implementation led to the success of the Hawaii fruit fly suppression programme: Implications to adoption of area-wide programmes

    Full text: A critical component of successful area-wide pest management (AWPM) programmes are organised, coordinated and comprehensive outreach educational programmes. The Hawaii area-wide fruit fly pest management (HAW-FLYPM) programme's educational programme, a part of a USDA AWPM programme in Hawaii, utilised the 'logic model' approach to organise, plan, execute and evaluate farmer and community educational programmes statewide. The logic model approach was an outcome-driven rather than activity based method that employed a linear sequence that developed relationships between programme inputs, outputs and outcomes. This model was utilised extensively to transfer sustainable, science-based technologies to suppress tephritid fruit fly pests. HAW-FLYPM's educational programme targeted growers and community door yard growers, three teaching curricula aimed at elementary through high school students, and a statewide awareness programme for the public at large. Additional key components of the HAW-FLYPM education programme was the development of implementation schedules used to track programme progress, a comprehensive media matrix developed to ensure educational materials met the needs of target audience groups, and a sustainability calculator to assess the likelihood of programme sustainability after the initial five year funding cycle. The model served as a 'blue print' for ensuring programme elements were planned, delivered and executed on a timely basis. Utilisation of the logic model to organise efforts and manage diverse, multi agency programmes such as the HAW-FLYPM programme has shown to be a successful method of programme advancement and outcome achievement. (author)

  16. Swedish support programme on nuclear non-proliferation in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia

    convinced understanding and opinion of the Swedish Support Programme Management that the States in question are seriously motivated and are carrying out an ambitious work to develop and improve their national non-proliferation regimes, in spite of their shortcomings concerning financial and human resources. For those States, with which Sweden has established support and co-operation programmes with 'full-scope' non-proliferation objectives, it is judged that the goals reached, up till now, are very satisfactory, and that the States in question have come a long way towards the fulfilment of international requirements. The Programme is now entering a third phase and the future Programme plans are currently under consideration. A broad outlook of the future activities is made in chapter D of this report

  17. Multinational design evaluation programme - Annual report March 2013-March 2014

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) is a multinational initiative to leverage the resources and knowledge of national regulatory authorities who are, or will shortly be, undertaking the review of new reactor power plant designs. MDEP incorporates a broad range of activities including enhancing multilateral cooperation within existing regulatory frameworks, and increasing multinational convergence of codes, standards, guides, and safety goals. A key concept throughout the work of MDEP is that national regulators retain sovereign authority for all licensing and regulatory decisions. Working groups are implementing the activities in accordance with programme plans with specific activities and goals, and have established the necessary interfaces both within and outside of the MDEP members. In the past year, MDEP has expanded to include cooperation on the VVER and ABWR designs and additional members have begun participating in the programme to share their experiences on these design reviews. This report provides the current status of the programme. Significant progress is being made on the overall MDEP goals of increased cooperation and enhanced convergence of requirements and practices. In addition, the lessons learnt from the 11 March 2011, events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are being incorporated into MDEP activities through the programme plans of design-specific working groups (DSWG). On this topic, the EPR Working Group has issued a common position which will be supplemented by five technical appendices by the end of 2014. Other DSWG are in the process of drafting such common positions. Several DSWGs' are facilitating the MDEP programme goal of enhanced cooperation: the EPRWG, the Vendor Inspection Cooperation Working Group (VICWG), the Digital Instrumentation and Controls Working Group (DICWG), the Codes and Standards Working Group (CSWG). Accomplishments to date provide confidence that the MDEP membership, structure and processes

  18. The impact of four family support programmes for people with a disability in Ireland.

    Daly, Louise

    2015-03-01

    This article reports on an evaluation of four family support programmes in Ireland for families of people with a physical or an intellectual disability or autism. The focus of the evaluation, which took place within a year of the programmes\\' completion, was on establishing whether the programmes had an impact on families\\' capacity to effectively support their family member.

  19. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, carrying the activating mutation D849N, accelerates the establishment of B16 melanoma

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-β are mainly expressed in the developing vasculature, where PDGF-BB is produced by endothelial cells and PDGFR-β is expressed by mural cells, including pericytes. PDGF-BB is produced by most types of solid tumors, and PDGF receptor signaling participates in various processes, including autocrine stimulation of tumor cell growth, recruitment of tumor stroma fibroblasts, and stimulation of tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, PDGF-BB-producing tumors are characterized by increased pericyte abundance and accelerated tumor growth. Thus, there is a growing interest in the development of tumor treatment strategies by blocking PDGF/PDGFR function. We have recently generated a mouse model carrying an activated PDGFR-β by replacing the highly conserved aspartic acid residue (D) 849 in the activating loop with asparagine (N). This allowed us to investigate, in an orthotopic tumor model, the role of increased stromal PDGFR-β signaling in tumor-stroma interactions. B16 melanoma cells lacking PDGFR-β expression and either mock-transfected or engineered to express PDGF-BB, were injected alone or in combination with matrigel into mice carrying the activated PDGFR-β (D849N) and into wild type mice. The tumor growth rate was followed and the vessel status of tumors, i.e. total vessel area/tumor, average vessel surface and pericyte density of vessels, was analyzed after resection. Tumors grown in mice carrying an activated PDGFR-β were established earlier than those in wild-type mice. In this early phase, the total vessel area and the average vessel surface were higher in tumors grown in mice carrying the activated PDGFR-β (D849N) compared to wild-type mice, whereas we did not find a significant difference in the number of tumor vessels and the pericyte abundance around tumor vessels between wild type and mutant mice. At later phases of tumor progression, no significant difference in tumor growth rate was

  20. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, carrying the activating mutation D849N, accelerates the establishment of B16 melanoma

    Suzuki Shioto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB and PDGF receptor (PDGFR-β are mainly expressed in the developing vasculature, where PDGF-BB is produced by endothelial cells and PDGFR-β is expressed by mural cells, including pericytes. PDGF-BB is produced by most types of solid tumors, and PDGF receptor signaling participates in various processes, including autocrine stimulation of tumor cell growth, recruitment of tumor stroma fibroblasts, and stimulation of tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, PDGF-BB-producing tumors are characterized by increased pericyte abundance and accelerated tumor growth. Thus, there is a growing interest in the development of tumor treatment strategies by blocking PDGF/PDGFR function. We have recently generated a mouse model carrying an activated PDGFR-β by replacing the highly conserved aspartic acid residue (D 849 in the activating loop with asparagine (N. This allowed us to investigate, in an orthotopic tumor model, the role of increased stromal PDGFR-β signaling in tumor-stroma interactions. Methods B16 melanoma cells lacking PDGFR-β expression and either mock-transfected or engineered to express PDGF-BB, were injected alone or in combination with matrigel into mice carrying the activated PDGFR-β (D849N and into wild type mice. The tumor growth rate was followed and the vessel status of tumors, i.e. total vessel area/tumor, average vessel surface and pericyte density of vessels, was analyzed after resection. Results Tumors grown in mice carrying an activated PDGFR-β were established earlier than those in wild-type mice. In this early phase, the total vessel area and the average vessel surface were higher in tumors grown in mice carrying the activated PDGFR-β (D849N compared to wild-type mice, whereas we did not find a significant difference in the number of tumor vessels and the pericyte abundance around tumor vessels between wild type and mutant mice. At later phases of tumor progression, no

  1. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    Korir, George

    2014-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes a series of operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series ...

  2. The French nuclear programme

    EDF has long been interested in the use of nuclear energy for thermal power generation. After a period of apprenticeship and experiments, EDF launched a major PWR plant programme so as to reduce France's energy dependence and master generation costs. This programme, based on standardization, has achieved the desired results. It must now be adapted to suit the needs of the 21st century. For this programme, all those involved (Governmental authorities, EDF, manufacturers) were mobilized to an unprecedented extent and rigorous working methods were imposed. Experience feedback has been used to make improvements both to the installations themselves and to procedures. Results have proved satisfactory as regards nuclear safety but vigilance must be maintained. Public opinion on nuclear power is reserved we are sentenced to achieving a 'fault-free' track record, all the while mastering costs, so as to ensure the continuing use of nuclear energy. (author)

  3. The Tunisian standards and labelling programme

    Tunisia has recently implemented a standards and labelling programme for household appliances and other energy using equipment. This programme, which is the fruit of six years labour supported by the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) and executed by l'Agence Nationale pour la Maitrise de l'Energie (ANME), led to the issue of energy labelling and minimum energy efficiency standards regulations for refrigerators in 2004. This paper reports on the design and implementation of the programme that not only serves as a role model for how such programmes can be conducted in developing countries, but also matches or exceeds the design and implementation of similar programmes in developed countries. Findings are presented on the following elements: consumer research used to design the Tunisian energy label, the establishment and accreditation of national test facilities, the energy performance certification, verification and compliance process, the development of refrigerator energy efficiency and labelling criteria, public communications and outreach strategy projected programme impacts Results are also presented from a detailed and sophisticated refrigerator techno-economic energy engineering analysis that provided much of the analytical basis for the choice of labelling and efficiency standards thresholds. As a result of its careful design and implementation it is forecast that by 2030 the programme will have saved 3.4 Mt of CO2 emissions at a cost to the GEF of just 20 USc/tonne. The cost of conserved electricity for Tunisian consumers is projected to be less than 1 USc/kWh, which compares very favourably with the current tariff of 7.4 USc/kWh

  4. Evaluating the effectiveness of a schools-based programme to promote exercise self-efficacy in children and young people with risk factors for obesity: Steps to active kids (STAK

    Yang Min

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of physical activity in children have been linked to an increased risk of obesity, but many children lack confidence in relation to exercise (exercise self-efficacy. Factors which can impact on confidence include a chronic health condition such as asthma, poor motor skills and being overweight. Increasing levels of physical activity have obvious benefits for children with asthma and children who are overweight, but few activity interventions with children specifically target children with low exercise self-efficacy (ESE. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a schools-based activity programme suitable for children with risk factors for adult obesity, including asthma, overweight and low exercise self-efficacy. Methods/Design A clustered (at the level of school RCT will be used to compare a targeted, 10 week, stepped activity programme (activity diary, dance DVD, circuit-training and motivational interviewing designed to promote ESE. We will recruit 20 primary schools to participate in the intervention and 9-11 year old children will be screened for low levels of ESE, asthma and overweight. In order to provide sufficient power to detect a difference in primary outcomes (Body Mass Index-BMI & ESE at 12 month follow-up between children in the intervention schools and control schools, the target sample size is 396. Assessments of BMI, ESE, waist circumference, peak flow, activity levels and emotional and behavioural difficulties will be made at baseline, 4 months and 12 month follow-up. Discussion We aim to increase ESE and levels of physical activity in children with risk factors for adult obesity. The outcomes of this study will inform policy makers about the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of delivering targeted health interventions within a school setting. Trial Registration ISRCTN Register no. ISRCTN12650001

  5. Electron accelerators programme at BARC

    Electron beams have established themselves as potential tools in the field of basic sciences. They have been employed as probes for unfolding the secrets of nature in the field of physics, chemistry, biology, metallurgy, agriculture etc. The applied sciences also have been immensely influenced by their vast potential. Even the industry could not remain isolated from their impact. It is evident from the processing of the materials which has gone through a dramatic change. To quote a few example's, the curing of coatings and adhesives, coloring of diamonds, irradiation of food, cross linking of cables, sterilization of medical products, treatment of pathogenic germs etc. have gone through a radical transformation. Similarly, the electron generated photon beams are finding vast applications in the field of radiography, radiation therapy and the strategic areas like defense. Free electron lasers have found a good berth in medicines and material sciences. BARC had long back realized the enormous potential of these beams and chalked out an elaborate programme for developing these accelerators. A brief account of the programme is given

  6. A 12-week after-school physical activity programme improves endothelial cell function in overweight and obese children: a randomised controlled study

    Park Jong-Hwan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial dysfunction is associated with childhood obesity and is closely linked to the amount and function of endothelial progenitor cells. However, it remains unclear whether endothelial progenitor cells increase with after-school exercise in overweight and obese children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an after-school exercise programme on endothelial cell function in overweight and obese children. Methods A total of 29 overweight/obese children (12.2 ± 0.1 years were randomly divided into control (i.e. no after-school exercise, n = 14 and after-school exercise (n = 15 groups. The 12-week after-school exercise intervention consisted of 3 days of combined aerobic and resistance exercise per week. Each 80-minute exercise programme included 10 minutes of warm-up and 10 minutes of cool-down after school. CD34+ (a cell surface marker on hematopoietic stem cells, CD133+ (a cell surface marker on hematopoietic progenitor cells and CD34+/CD133+ (considered as endothelial progenitor cells were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks using flow cytometry. Results Increased percentages of CD34+, CD133+ and CD34+/CD133+ cells were observed in the after-school exercise group (p = 0.018; p = 0.001; p = 0.002, respectively compared with the control group. Carotid intima-media thickness decreased after 12 weeks in the after-school exercise group (p = 0.020 compared with the control group. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence that a combined after-school exercise programme may represent an effective intervention strategy for improving vascular repair and endothelial cell function, leading to improved cardiovascular health in overweight and obese children. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN19037201

  7. Framework Programmable Platform for the Advanced Software Development Workstation (FPP/ASDW). Demonstration framework document. Volume 1: Concepts and activity descriptions

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Dewitte, Paul S.; Crump, John W.; Ackley, Keith A.

    1992-01-01

    The Framework Programmable Software Development Platform (FPP) is a project aimed at effectively combining tool and data integration mechanisms with a model of the software development process to provide an intelligent integrated software development environment. Guided by the model, this system development framework will take advantage of an integrated operating environment to automate effectively the management of the software development process so that costly mistakes during the development phase can be eliminated. The Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) program is conducting research into development of advanced technologies for Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE).

  8. The Relation between Neighboring, Tolerance of Diversity and Life Satisfaction, The importance of Recreative Activities for Establishing and Strengthening These Relations

    Faik Ardahan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the relation between neighboring, Tolerance of Diversity and Life Satisfaction and to examine if recreative activities would be helpful for establishing and/or strengthening these relations. This was a descriptive study and sampling group consists of 197 males (age= 37.56±11.82 and 213 females (age= 34.92±11.17, totally 410 (age= 36.19±11.55 volunteer participants who live in Antalya city centre.In this study, the items “Neighboring” and “Tolerance of Diversity” in Social Capital scales’ developed by Onxy and Bullen (2000 and Turkish adaptation by Ardahan (2012a and Life Satisfaction (LS Scale which was developed by Diener et al. (1985 have been used. The data collected by a face to face between the dates between 01st January -30th April 2012, in the process of assessing data, the descriptive statistic means such as frequency (f, percentage (%, average (M, standard deviation (SS, and to examine the correlation between LS and activities in relation to some demographic variables Pearson Correlation test; to examine the differences between marital status and activities Independent Samples T-Test, One-Way ANOVA test and Pearson Correlation Test to examine the difference between activity groups Tukey-b test were performed. Results have been assessed according to significant level 0.01 and 0.05.As a result of this study; it was found that the participants have had medium level of neighboring, tolerance of diversity and LS. When women compared with men, married participants with singles, participants who live in rural areas compared with participants living in rural areas and older participants comparing with younger ones had higher means in neighboring sub items. Besides this, as education level and urbanizing increases, tolerance of diversity increases, too. As neighboring increases, LS increases too. It can be claimed that recreational activities can be used for establishing and strengthening

  9. Funktionell Programmering : En framtidsprognos

    Holmer, Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Trenden inom systemutveckling och programutveckling går mot ett mer användande av multi programmeringsparadigmer. Funktionell programmering har fått mer uppmärksamhet på senare tid och utvecklingen tycks över lag gå än mer åt det deklarativa hållet där programmeraren fokuserar mer på vad som skall utföras och inte lika mycket på hur. Under en tid har det objektorienterade paradigmet varit dominerande, kommer det vara så i framtiden? Funktionell programmering skiljer sig från imperativ program...

  10. A programmer's geometry

    Bowyer, Adrian

    1983-01-01

    A Programmer's Geometry provides a guide in programming geometric shapes. The book presents formulas and examples of computer representation and coding of geometry. Each of the nine chapters of the text deals with the representation and solution of a specific geometrical problem, such as areas, vectors, and volumes. The last chapter provides a brief discussion on generating image through a computer. The codes presented in the book are written in FORTRAN 77. The text will be of great use to programmers who are working on projects that involve geometric calculations.

  11. Computer mathematics for programmers

    Abney, Darrell H; Sibrel, Donald W

    1985-01-01

    Computer Mathematics for Programmers presents the Mathematics that is essential to the computer programmer.The book is comprised of 10 chapters. The first chapter introduces several computer number systems. Chapter 2 shows how to perform arithmetic operations using the number systems introduced in Chapter 1. The third chapter covers the way numbers are stored in computers, how the computer performs arithmetic on real numbers and integers, and how round-off errors are generated in computer programs. Chapter 4 details the use of algorithms and flowcharting as problem-solving tools for computer p

  12. Radiation protection training programmes Spanish approach

    Radiation Protection Programmes are being considered the best way to promote safety culture and to spread and propagate European basic safety standards. It is widely accepted that training is an important tool to upgrade competence for radiation exposed workers. The Spanish Radiation Protection Education and Training Programmes provide a solid and integrated educational model, which takes into account the variety of applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international tendencies. The needs for a specialised training on Radiation Protection (RP) for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. National initial training programmes are well established since 1972. Individual certifications, based on personal licences are required for exposed workers. The Spanish regulation also includes continuous and on the job RP training. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving. CIEMAT plays an important role in RP Spanish training, improving and modifying the previous RP courses and developing new programmes in order to complete the RP training levels. To achieve Radiation Protection objectives, new technological media for educational methods and material are taking into account. Nevertheless, Spanish RP education and training model has to be improved in some aspects. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the situation and the future needs to be considered in order to complete the RP training processes

  13. International Programmes on ADS: IAEA

    The IAEA recognizes that there are four major challenges facing the long term development of nuclear energy as a part of the world’s energy mix: improvement of the economic competitiveness, meeting increasingly stringent safety requirements, adhering to the criteria of sustainable development, and public acceptance. Meeting the sustainability criteria is the driving force behind IAEA’s activity in the area of innovative transmutation reactor technology development and, in particular, Accelerator Driven Systems. The framework for all the IAEA activities in the ADS area is the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). In response to strong common R&D needs in the Member States, the TWG-FR acts as a catalyst for international information exchange and collaborative R&D. It provides a forum for exchange of non-commercial scientific and technical information, and a forum for international cooperation on generic research and development programmes on advances in fast reactors and fast spectrum accelerator driven systems. Its present members are the following 15 IAEA Member States: Belarus, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and United States of America, as well as 3 international organizations: ISTC, OECD-NEA, and EU (EC). As observers, the TWG-FR has welcomed Argentina and Belgium. Last but not least, the IAEA is providing the ADS Research and Development Database. It contains information about ADS related R&D programmes, existing and planned experimental facilities as well as programmes, methods and data development efforts, design studies, and so forth

  14. Advanced energy systems and technologies research in Finland. NEMO-2 Programme Annual Report 1996-1997

    Advanced energy technologies were linked to the national energy research in the beginning of 1988 when energy research was reorganised in Finland. The Ministry of Trade and Industry established several energy research programmes and NEMO was one of them. Major objectives of the programme were to assess the potential of new energy systems for the national energy supply system and to promote industrial activities. Within the NEMO 2 programme for the years 1993-1998, research was focused on a few promising technological solutions. In the beginning of 1995, the national energy research activities were passed on to the Technology Development Centre TEKES. The NEMO 2 programme is directed towards those areas that have particular potential for commercial exploitation or development. Emphasis is placed particularly on solar and wind energy, as well as supporting technologies, such as energy storage and hydrogen technology. Resources have been focused on three specific areas: arctic wind technology, wind turbine components, and the integration of solar energy into applications (including thin film solar cells). In Finland, the growth of the new energy technology industry is concentrated on these areas. The turnover of the Finnish industry has been growing considerably due to the national research activities and support of technology development. The sales have increased more than 10 times compared with the year 1987 and is now over 300 million FIM. The support to industries and their involvement in the program has grown considerably. In this report, the essential research projects of the programme during 1996-1997 are described. The total funding for these projects was about 30 million FIM per year, of which the TEKES's share was about 40 per cent. The programme consists of 10 research projects, some 15 joint development projects, and 9 EU projects. In case the research projects and joint development projects are acting very closely, the description of the project is

  15. Advanced energy systems and technologies research in Finland. NEMO-2 Programme Annual Report 1996-1997

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    Advanced energy technologies were linked to the national energy research in the beginning of 1988 when energy research was reorganised in Finland. The Ministry of Trade and Industry established several energy research programmes and NEMO was one of them. Major objectives of the programme were to assess the potential of new energy systems for the national energy supply system and to promote industrial activities. Within the NEMO 2 programme for the years 1993-1998, research was focused on a few promising technological solutions. In the beginning of 1995, the national energy research activities were passed on to the Technology Development Centre TEKES. The NEMO 2 programme is directed towards those areas that have particular potential for commercial exploitation or development. Emphasis is placed particularly on solar and wind energy, as well as supporting technologies, such as energy storage and hydrogen technology. Resources have been focused on three specific areas: arctic wind technology, wind turbine components, and the integration of solar energy into applications (including thin film solar cells). In Finland, the growth of the new energy technology industry is concentrated on these areas. The turnover of the Finnish industry has been growing considerably due to the national research activities and support of technology development. The sales have increased more than 10 times compared with the year 1987 and is now over 300 million FIM. The support to industries and their involvement in the program has grown considerably. In this report, the essential research projects of the programme during 1996-1997 are described. The total funding for these projects was about 30 million FIM per year, of which the TEKES`s share was about 40 per cent. The programme consists of 10 research projects, some 15 joint development projects, and 9 EU projects. In case the research projects and joint development projects are acting very closely, the description of the project is

  16. Supporting mothers: issues in a Community Mothers Programme

    O'Connor, Pat

    2001-01-01

    peer-reviewed This article describes a community support programme which implicitly challenges the assumption that the existence of a partner and local kin obviates the need to support women when they come home from hospital with a new baby. Implicit in the programme is the idea that support by mothers, of mothers, validates the activity of child care and is one way of facilitating the child's development. This programme was successful in terms of its perceived impact on both the providers...

  17. Importance of outcomes Measurement of CSR programmes - Case Nokia

    Talvitie-Sirén, Reeta

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Objectives of the Thesis The objective of the thesis was to find out how companies measure the societal and business outcomes of their CSR activities as well as to find out the reasons why outcomes measurement is considered important. The focus was on the societal aspect of CSR, and all programmes studied were community related CSR programmes. The programmes studied were categorised according to a framework of CSR action types modified from Halme and Laurila (2009). A fourth cate...

  18. Mexican medfly programme

    This film tells the story of the fight against and final extinction of the Mediterranean fruit-fly (Ceratitis capitata) in Mexico. By producing billions of high quality sterile flies in the Medfly reproduction and sterilization laboratory in the province of Chiapas and releasing them over infested areas, the Moscamed Programme succeeded in eradicating this pest from Mexico in 1982

  19. Kulturalistische Unternehmensethik : ein Programm

    Hanekamp, Gerd

    2001-01-01

    "Das Programm einer kulturalistischen Unternehmensethik wird vorgestellt. Es gründet auf einem philosophischen Ansatz, der sich als instrumentalistisch, kontextualistisch, transsubjektivistisch und individualistisch charakterisieren lässt. Hinsichtlich der ethischen Grundlagen werden starke Thesen durch den Rekurs auf eine kontextualistisch-normative Anthropologie vermieden." (Autorenreferat)

  20. Air Quality Monitoring Programme

    Kemp, K.; Palmgren, F.

    The Danish Air Quality Monitoring Programme (LMP IV) has been revised in accordance with the Framework Directive and the first three daughter directives of SO2, NOx/NO2, PM10, lead, benzene, CO and ozone. PM10 samplers are under installation and the installation will be completed during 2002...

  1. En model for programmer

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Dette undervisningsmateriale beskriver en model for, hvordan programmer er opbygget. Materialet er skrevet til brug i det gymnasiale forsøgsfag Informationsteknologi. Seneste version af dette undervisningsmateriale kan findes på http:// www.imhotep.dk. Tak til Elisabeth Husum for en kritisk...

  2. Fast reactor programme

    This progress report summarises the fast reactor research carried out at the Netherlands Energy Research Centre during the year 1981. The neutron and fission product cross sections of various isotopes have been evaluated. In the fuel performance programme, some preliminary results are given and irradiation facilities described. Creep experiments on various stainless steel components are reported

  3. The Productive Programmer

    Ford, Neal

    2009-01-01

    Anyone who develops software for a living needs a proven way to produce it better, faster, and cheaper. The Productive Programmer offers critical timesaving and productivity tools that you can adopt right away, no matter what platform you use. Master developer Neal Ford details ten valuable practices that will help you elude common traps, improve your code, and become more valuable to your team.

  4. The European Programme Manager

    Larson, Anne; Bergman, E.; Ehlers, S.;

    The publication is a result of a cooperation between organisations in six European countries with the aim to develop a common European education for programme managers. It contains of a description of the different elements of the education together with a number of case-studies from the counties...... involved in the cooperation (Finland, Denmark, Portugal, Iceland, United Kingdom and Austria)....

  5. Lessons learned from area-wide insect pest management programmes with an SIT component: an FAO/IAEA perspective

    Full text: The area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) approach, which entails the integration of various control tactics addressing an entire insect pest population within a circumscribed geographical area, is undoubtedly the most rational control strategy available against major insect pests of agricultural and medical/veterinary importance. The concept of interfering with the reproductive capacity of major insect pests (i.e. the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)) has considerably evolved since its original description by Knipling in the in the 1950's. To date, the SIT, which relies on the sequential release of sterile male insects in the target area, is increasingly being considered as one of many complementary methods to be integrated in an AW-IPM approach. Four major strategic options of area-wide IPM programmes with an SIT component can be distinguished and have been implemented successfully worldwide, leading to: (i) the eradication of the insect pest (e.g. the New World screwworm (NWS) in Libya; the Mediterranean fruit fly in Chile and in the Patagonia region of Argentina), (ii) its containment (e.g. the Mediterranean fruit fly containment programme in Guatemala and Mexico) and (iii) its prevention (e.g. the Mediterranean fruit fly preventative programme in California and Florida) or (iv) its suppression (e.g. the codling moth suppression programme in British Columbia, Canada or the suppression of the Mediterranean fruit fly in the Arava/Araba Valley of Israel/Jordan and in the Hex River Valley of the Western Cape, South Africa). These programmes have directly or indirectly benefited from support by the IAEA and the FAO through i.) Technical Cooperation projects with its Member States, ii.) the implementation of coordinated research and development (R and D) efforts, iii.) 'problem-solving' research and iv.) normative activities. This support often includes the development of local technical capacity for the economic assessment, the rearing of flies

  6. Three years of an intensive Programme

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Lopez, Jose Manuel Guterrez Lopez; Kirikova, Marite; Zabludowski, Lukasz; Comellas, Jaume

    This paper summarizes valuable experiences and learning points from three years of the Erasmus funded Intensive Programme on “Implementing Europe’s Future Broadband Infrastructure”. The programme consisted of a course held each year 2012-2014 during two weeks of July, where 30-35 students and 10......-12 teachers from the 4 participating universities would meet in the location of one of the partner institutions. During the three years, the programme was each year adjusted according to the observations and evaluations from the previous year. The course was organized as a week of course modules, followed by...... encourage (or enforce) the students to mix and work together throughout the course activities. Finally, we found that the model of combining course modules and projects worked well, especially if active learning approaches were used in the course modules. Keywords: Problem Based Learning...

  7. Planning environmental sanitation programmes in emergencies.

    Harvey, Peter A; Reed, Robert A

    2005-06-01

    Environmental sanitation programmes are vital for tackling environmental-related disease and ensuring human dignity in emergency situations. If they are to have maximum impact they must be planned in a rapid but systematic manner. An appropriate planning process comprises five key stages: rapid assessment and priority setting; outline programme design; immediate action; detailed programme design; and implementation. The assessment should be based on carefully selected data, which are analysed via comparison with suitable minimum objectives. How the intervention should be prioritised is determined through objective ranking of different environmental sanitation sector needs. Next, a programme design outline is produced to identify immediate and longer-term intervention activities and to guarantee that apposite resources are made available. Immediate action is taken to meet acute emergency needs while the detailed programme design takes shape. This entails in-depth consultation with the affected community and comprehensive planning of activities and resource requirements. Implementation can then begin, which should involve pertinent management and monitoring strategies. PMID:15910646

  8. Nuc-ErbB3 regulates H3K27me3 levels and HMT activity to establish epigenetic repression during peripheral myelination.

    Ness, Jennifer K; Skiles, Amanda A; Yap, Eng-Hui; Fajardo, Eduardo J; Fiser, Andras; Tapinos, Nikos

    2016-06-01

    Nuc-ErbB3 an alternative transcript from the ErbB3 locus binds to a specific DNA motif and associates with Schwann cell chromatin. Here we generated a nuc-ErbB3 knockin mouse that lacks nuc-ErbB3 expression in the nucleus without affecting the neuregulin-ErbB3 receptor signaling. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit hypermyelination and aberrant myelination at the paranodal region. This phenotype is attributed to de-repression of myelination associated gene transcription following loss of nuc-ErbB3 and histone H3K27me3 promoter occupancy. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit reduced association of H3K27me3 with myelination-associated gene promoters and increased RNA Pol-II rate of transcription of these genes. In addition, nuc-ErbB3 directly regulates levels of H3K27me3 in Schwann cells. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit significant decrease of histone H3K27me3 methyltransferase (HMT) activity and reduced levels of H3K27me3. Collectively, nuc-ErbB3 is a master transcriptional repressor, which regulates HMT activity to establish a repressive chromatin landscape on promoters of genes during peripheral myelination. GLIA 2016;64:977-992. PMID:27017927

  9. Examples from Member State Inspection Programmes: Pakistan. Appendix V

    The legal framework (PNRA Ordinance) provides legal power to the Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) to conduct inspections and take enforcement actions as required. The licensing regulations provide a more detailed framework for regulatory inspections during all licensing stages, including provisions for obtaining services of consultants for inspections. The PNRA performs regulatory inspections according to its inspection programme, which is also made available for the licensees. The programme is supplemented by detailed inspection plans, management and technical procedures, checklists and inspection guidelines. Detailed criteria have been established for inspectors' qualifications, and all inspections are conducted by PNRA inspectors. The PNRA performs management system inspections as well as inspections of technical areas. In addition, the PNRA performs general surveillances during all stages of the licensing process. The licensees are required to provide the necessary documentation and information about the schedule of their activities in advance to facilitate regulatory inspections. The main features of PNRA inspection activities during various licensing stages are described in the following subsections

  10. Quality assurance programme and quality control

    The paper analyses the requirements for the quality assurance and control in nuclear power plant projects which are needed to achieve safe, reliable and economic plants. The author describes the structure for the establishment of a nuclear programme at the national level and the participation of the different bodies involved in a nuclear power plant project. The paper ends with the study of a specific case in Spain. (NEA)

  11. Mammographic screening programmes in Europe

    Giordano, Livia; von Karsa, Lawrence; Tomatis, Mariano; Majek, Ondrej; de Wolf, Chris; Lancucki, Lesz; Hofvind, Solveig; Nyström, Lennarth; Segnan, Nereo; Ponti, Antonio; Van Hal, G; Martens, P; Májek, O; Danes, J; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Aasmaa, A; Anttila, A; Becker, N; Péntek, Z; Budai, A; Mádai, S; Fitzpatrick, P; Mooney, T; Zappa, M; Ventura, L; Scharpantgen, A; Hofvind, S; Seroczynski, P; Morais, A; Rodrigues, V; Bento, M J; Gomes de Carvalho, J; Natal, C; Prieto, M; Sánchez-Contador Escudero, C; Zubizarreta Alberti, R; Fernández Llanes, S B; Ascunce, N; Ederra Sanza, M; Sarriugarte Irigoien, G; Salas Trejo, D; Ibáñez Cabanell, J; Wiege, M; Ohlsson, G; Törnberg, S; Korzeniewska, M; de Wolf, C; Fracheboud, J; Patnick J, J; Lancucki, L; Ducarroz, S; Suonio, E

    To summarize participation and coverage rates in population mammographic screening programmes for breast cancer in Europe.......To summarize participation and coverage rates in population mammographic screening programmes for breast cancer in Europe....

  12. Development of human resources for Indian nuclear power programme

    The continuing research and development on nuclear technology by research establishments in the country and maturing of Indian industry have brought the nuclear energy programme in India to a stage where it is poised to take a quantum leap forward. The vision of expansion of nuclear power also requires a well-structured specialized human resource development programme. This paper discusses the requirements of the human resource development programme for nuclear energy, the challenges in the way of its realization, its national and international status and traces the history of nuclear education in the country. It brings out the linkage of human resource development programme with the nuclear energy programme in the country. It also describes the initiatives by the university system in the area of nuclear education and support provided by the Department of Atomic Energy to the university system by way of extra-mural funding and by providing access to research facilities. (author)

  13. Development of human resources for Indian nuclear power programme

    R B Grover; R R Puri

    2013-10-01

    The continuing research and development on nuclear technology by research establishments in the country and maturing of Indian industry have brought the nuclear energy programme in India to a stage where it is poised to take a quantum leap forward. The vision of expansion of nuclear power also requires a wellstructured specialized human resource development programme. This paper discusses the requirements of the human resource development programme for nuclear energy, the challenges in the way of its realization, its national and international status and traces the history of nuclear education in the country. It brings out the linkage of human resource development programme with the nuclear energy programme in the country. It also describes the initiatives by the university system in the area of nuclear education and support provided by the Department of Atomic Energy to the university system by way of extra-mural funding and by providing access to research facilities.

  14. International Cooperative Programme for Assessment and Monitoring of Acidification of Rivers and Lakes. Programme Manual

    Bowman, J.; Forsius, M.; Jeffries, D. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The International Cooperative Programme for Assessment of Acidification of Rivers and lakes (ICP Waters) was established in 1985 by the UN/ECE Executive Body for the Convention of Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. Achieving the programme objectives requires that both the temporally intensive and regionally extensive data are collected on a continuing basis. To guide the development and harmonization of the various national contributions, a manual was worked out. The present report is an expanded and consolidated revision of that manual. 33 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Lund, Niels; Schonfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements of the...

  16. A review of the UK PWR structural integrity and materials programme

    Water Reactor related work has been pursued in the UK for many years, and this has resulted in the development of comprehensive facilities and expertise to undertake a wide range of R and D. A notable contribution to the light water reactor scene was what became known as the ''Marshall Study Group Report on LWR Pressure Vessel Integrity''. The application to build the first UK PWR at Sizewell led to a Public Inquiry which provided the opportunity to present the full range of world work and knowledge on structural integrity and materials issues. The deliberations of the Study Group and the papers required for the enquiry had a significant influence on the UK materials R and D programme. The many generic programmes previously pursued were modified to be more plant specific and provide essential back up to the design, safety and operation of Sizewell 'B'. The work in support of Sizewell 'B' is represented by well established programmes. The CEGB has in-house activities and the work within the UKAEA ranges from being fully supported by CEGB to fully supported by the Department of Energy. Although the work fully supported by CEGB is very plant specific there is an appreciable percentage of other work which is generic with a long term interest. Attention is now turning to work which may be required for Hinkley 'C' and other stations of the future. In this paper there is no attempt to cover all the topics in the programme. Those chosen are considered to be advancing scientific understanding as well as answering specific questions on plant. The facilities and expertise available are sufficient to tackle unforeseen operational problems as well as the wide range of topics deemed to be desirable in support of the design, construction and commissioning of the plant. The paper comprises the strategy and goals of the programme, a general review, comments on the forward programme and some technical highlights

  17. Establishment of IAEA knowledge of integrity of the geological repository boundaries and disposed spent fuel assemblies in the context of the Finnish geological repository. Experts' Group meeting Report on Task JNT/C 1204 of the Member States' Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards

    The Geological Repository Safeguards Experts Group (Member State Support Programme tasks JNT/C1204 and C1226), agreed that annual meetings should be held to address interface issues between IAEA safeguards and radioactive waste management and to explore the use of safety and operational information to make International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards more effective and efficient for geological repository facilities. It has also been recognised that the safeguards measures for geological repositories are to be developed site-specifically. To address these issues to the planned Olkiluoto repository in Finland a meeting of experts in safety, geological repository operations,and safeguards from 6 States, European Commission, and IAEA was held in Olkiluoto and Rauma, Finland, during September 29 - October 4, 2003. The pre-operational phase of the Olkiluoto repository should be efficiently used by the parties involved in safeguards. The applicability and reliability of the potential new techniques and the efficient practices must be developed and proven before their implementation as safeguards measures to be applied at the subsequent stages of the repository development. The visit to the location of the proposed Olkiluoto repository and neighbouring areas and subsequent presentations enabled the working groups to discuss the various issues with reference to actual site conditions. The working groups were thus able to identify potential measurement and monitoring techniques and research and development requirements for consideration by the Finnish authorities, in addition to making recommendations to the IAEA on planned activities for carrying out before and during the early investigation phase of the proposed Olkiluoto repository. It was understood that all parties shall take good care of the implementation of the planned activities to ensure that proven means, approaches and the required verified information is at hand at the time the projected facility will

  18. Fusion technology programme

    The KfK-Association has continued work on 17 R and D contracts of the Fusion Technology Programme. An effort of 94 manyears per year is at present contributed by 10 KfK departments, covering all aereas defined in the Fusion Technology Programme. The dominant part of the work is directed towards the need of the NET design or supporting experiments. Some additional effort addresses long term technological issues and system studies relevant to DEMO or confinement schemes alternative to tokamaks. Direct contribution to the NET team has increased by augmentation of NET study contracts and delegation of personnel, three KfK delegates being at present members of the NET team. In reverse, specifications and design guidelines worked out by NET have started to have an impact on the current R and D-work in the laboratory. (orig./GG)

  19. Pharmacovigilance programme of India

    Kalaiselvan Vivekanandan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring and reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs through pharmacovigilance is vital to patient safety and rational prescribing. In India, Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO initiated Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI to report ADRs through ADRs monitoring centres in India. Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission (IPC is functioning as National Coordination Centre (NCC for PvPI. The ADRs are reported to NCC through VigiFlow by various centres are evaluated and committed to Uppsala Monitoring Centre, Sweden. The potential benefit of the PvPI is aimed to reducing or eliminating a harm of medicine. Continuous efforts of the healthcare professionals and the patients are expected to make this as one of the most successful and effective programmes. The present article updates the status and future plan of PvPI.

  20. VTT Energy`s new gasification and pyrolysis technology programme

    Kurkela, E. [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)

    1997-12-31

    The publicly funded gasification and pyrolysis research activities of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) have been integrated into three-year programme, known as PROGAS, to promote Finnish gasification and pyrolysis R and D and improve contacts with companies that utilize these technologies. The programme will focus on applied technical research and on process and equipment development carried out with industry

  1. Economic viability of new launched school lunch programmes

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Smed, Sinne; Mørkbak, Morten Raun;

    2013-01-01

    activities related to the schools’ support and the users’ feeling of ownership, as well as internal professionalism and leadership in the implementation of the school lunch programme are important for the viability of the programme. Strong performance on the latter factors might to some extent compensate for...... the gap between cost and users’ willingness to pay for school lunches....

  2. Key United States programmes for the security of radioactive sources

    The paper discusses key US programme activities related to the security of radioactive sources, including both domestic and international programmes; the US Department of Energy-Nuclear Regulatory Commission joint report and findings; and critical partnerships for future efforts to preclude terrorist attacks using radioactive sources. (author)

  3. IAEA education and training programme in nuclear safety

    This paper presents the IAEA education and training (E and T) programme in nuclear safety. A strategic planning for the programme implementation is described in terms of objectives, outputs and activities. A framework based on areas of competency and the level of depth of the training is presented as well as the main achievements to date. (author)

  4. The Italian hydrogen programme

    Hydrogen could become an important option in the new millennium. It provides the potential for a sustainable energy system as it can be used to meet most energy needs without harming the environment. In fact, hydrogen has the potential for contributing to the reduction of climate-changing emissions and other air pollutants as it exhibits clean combustion with no carbon or sulphur oxide emissions and very low nitrogen oxide emissions. Furthermore, it is capable of direct conversion to electricity in systems such as fuel cells without generating pollution. However, widespread use of hydrogen is not feasible today because of economic and technological barriers. In Italy, there is an ongoing national programme to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier. This programme aims to promote, in an organic frame, a series of actions regarding the whole hydrogen cycle. It foresees the development of technologies in the areas of production, storage, transport and utilisation. Research addresses the development of technologies for separation and sequestration of CO2, The programme is shared by public organisations (research institutions and universities) and national industry (oil companies, electric and gas utilities and research institutions). Hydrogen can be used as a fuel, with significant advantages, both for electric energy generation/ co-generation (thermo-dynamic cycles and fuel cells) and transportation (internal combustion engine and fuel cells). One focus of research will be the development of fuel cell technologies. Fuel cells possess all necessary characteristics to be a key technology in a future economy based on hydrogen. During the initial phase of the project, hydrogen will be derived from fossil sources (natural gas), and in the second phase it will be generated from renewable electricity or nuclear energy. The presentation will provide a review of the hydrogen programme and highlight future goals. (author)

  5. Neural Programmer-Interpreters

    Reed, Scott; De Freitas, Nando

    2015-01-01

    We propose the neural programmer-interpreter (NPI): a recurrent and compositional neural network that learns to represent and execute programs. NPI has three learnable components: a task-agnostic recurrent core, a persistent key-value program memory, and domain-specific encoders that enable a single NPI to operate in multiple perceptually diverse environments with distinct affordances. By learning to compose lower-level programs to express higher-level programs, NPI reduces sample complexity ...

  6. The Mathematica programmer

    Maeder, Roman E

    1994-01-01

    The Mathematica Programmer covers the fundamental programming paradigms and applications of programming languages. This book is organized into two parts encompassing 10 chapters. Part 1 begins with an overview of the programming paradigms. This part also treats abstract data types, polymorphism and message passing, object-oriented programming, and relational databases. Part 2 looks into the practical aspects of programming languages, including in lists and power series, fractal curves, and minimal surfaces.This book will prove useful to mathematicians and computer scientists.

  7. GMES Space Component: Programme overview

    Aschbacher, J.; Milagro-Perez, M. P.

    2012-04-01

    The European Union (EU) and the European Space Agency (ESA) have developed the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme as Europe's answer to the vital need for joined-up data about our climate, environment and security. Through a unique combination of satellite, atmospheric and Earth-based monitoring systems, the initiative will provide new insight into the state of the land, sea and air, providing policymakers, scientists, businesses and the public with accurate and timely information. GMES capabilities include monitoring and forecasting of climatic change, flood risks, soil and coastal erosion, crop and fish resources, air pollution, greenhouse gases, iceberg distribution and snow cover, among others. To accomplish this, GMES has been divided into three main components: Space, In-situ and Services. The Space Component, led by ESA, comprises five types of new satellites called Sentinels that are being developed by ESA specifically to meet the needs of GMES, the first of which to be launched in 2013. These missions carry a range of technologies, such as radar and multi-spectral imaging instruments for land, ocean and atmospheric monitoring. In addition, access to data from the so-called Contributing Missions guarantees that European space infrastructure is fully used for GMES. An integrated Ground Segment ensures access to Sentinels and Contributing Missions data. The in-situ component, under the coordination of the European Environment Agency (EEA), is composed of atmospheric and Earth based monitoring systems, and based on established networks and programmes at European and international levels. The European Commission is in charge of implementing the services component of GMES and of leading GMES overall. GMES services, fed with data from the Space and In-situ components, will provide essential information in five main domains, atmosphere, ocean and land monitoring as well as emergency response and security. Climate change has been added

  8. Introducing, Researching, and Disseminating the Incredible Years Programmes in Wales

    Judy Hutchings

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A case study reviewing the establishment of the evidence-based Incredible Years programme in Wales, describing the rationale for selecting the programme, the outcomes achieved in Wales, and the influence on policy leading to a Wales-wide dissemination strategy. The UK context features a growing trend towards evidence-based anti-violence services and significant increases in funding for early intervention. Factors that contributed to the success of this project includedcareful selection of a programme with evidence, establishing a local evidence base for it, ensuring that information was disseminated to government and service providers, and the need to build in a sustainability plan. The biggest challenge, lack of leader time and resources to deliver the programme effectively,is explored and solutions from Wales, including leader feedback surveys and manager training days are described.

  9. Programmable matter by folding

    Hawkes, E.; An, B.; Benbernou, N. M.; Tanaka, H.; Kim, S.; Demaine, E. D.; Rus, D.; Wood, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to meet the goal. This paper considers achieving programmable sheets that can form themselves in different shapes autonomously by folding. Past approaches to creating transforming machines have been limited by the small feature sizes, the large number of components, and the associated complexity of communication among the units. We seek to mitigate these difficulties through the unique concept of self-folding origami with universal crease patterns. This approach exploits a single sheet composed of interconnected triangular sections. The sheet is able to fold into a set of predetermined shapes using embedded actuation. To implement this self-folding origami concept, we have developed a scalable end-to-end planning and fabrication process. Given a set of desired objects, the system computes an optimized design for a single sheet and multiple controllers to achieve each of the desired objects. The material, called programmable matter by folding, is an example of a system capable of achieving multiple shapes for multiple functions. PMID:20616049

  10. Programmable Quantitative DNA Nanothermometers.

    Gareau, David; Desrosiers, Arnaud; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2016-07-13

    Developing molecules, switches, probes or nanomaterials that are able to respond to specific temperature changes should prove of utility for several applications in nanotechnology. Here, we describe bioinspired strategies to design DNA thermoswitches with programmable linear response ranges that can provide either a precise ultrasensitive response over a desired, small temperature interval (±0.05 °C) or an extended linear response over a wide temperature range (e.g., from 25 to 90 °C). Using structural modifications or inexpensive DNA stabilizers, we show that we can tune the transition midpoints of DNA thermometers from 30 to 85 °C. Using multimeric switch architectures, we are able to create ultrasensitive thermometers that display large quantitative fluorescence gains within small temperature variation (e.g., > 700% over 10 °C). Using a combination of thermoswitches of different stabilities or a mix of stabilizers of various strengths, we can create extended thermometers that respond linearly up to 50 °C in temperature range. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility, robustness, and efficiency of these programmable DNA thermometers by monitoring temperature change inside individual wells during polymerase chain reactions. We discuss the potential applications of these programmable DNA thermoswitches in various nanotechnology fields including cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedecine, nanoelectronics, nanomaterial, and synthetic biology. PMID:27058370

  11. A new video programme

    CERN video productions

    2011-01-01

    "What's new @ CERN?", a new monthly video programme, will be broadcast on the Monday of every month on webcast.cern.ch. Aimed at the general public, the programme will cover the latest CERN news, with guests and explanatory features. Tune in on Monday 3 October at 4 pm (CET) to see the programme in English, and then at 4:20 pm (CET) for the French version.   var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-129/CERN-MOVIE-2011-129-0753-kbps-640x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-129/CERN-MOVIE-2011-129-Multirate-200-to-753-kbps-640x360-25-fps.wmv', 'false', 480, 360, 'https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-129/CERN-MOVIE-2011-129-posterframe-640x360-at-10-percent.jpg', '1383406', true, 'Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-129/CERN-MOVIE-2011-129-0600-kbps-maxH-360-25-fps-...

  12. 2001 - 2002 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    1ST TERM 1ST OCTOBER - 23 NOVEMBER 2001 LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS The Autumn term of the Academic Training Programme is about to start. As usual, the first term includes lectures primarily dedicated to Post-graduate students. These are meant to help students complement the courses available from their home Universities with lectures on topics close to CERN activities. The lectures are nevertheless open to all CERN staff, and in particular to young Fellows. This year's series include courses on Accelerator Physics, on Field Theory, and on Symmetry Breaking Phenomena in Physics. The course on Accelerators by Dr. Wilson has been a regular feature on the Academic Training programme for many previous editions. This year, the course will be updated to include new sections on Colliders and on future facilities such as the Neutrino Factory. A good introduction to this very successful course can be found in the previous version of these lectures, available from the Web Lecture Archive Project: http://w...

  13. Establishing biomass heating in the UK: phase 2

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The Biomass Heat Working Group, first set up in 1995, was taken on by British BioGen in 1996. Over the summer of 1996 British BioGen, supported by DTI, worked with the group to produce 'A Strategy to Develop the UK Market for Biomass Heating Installations'. In the spring of 1997 British BioGen agreed a two-year programme with ETSU (for the DTI) to 'Establish Biomass Heating in the UK'. The DTI's New and Renewable Energy Programme has supported this two-year programme which aims to bring together industry stakeholders and assist in the development of a significant biomass heat market in the UK. Overall we believe the project has been successful in its aim to increase the volume of biomass heating enquiries and enable greater use of the industry 'knowledge base'. Throughout the duration of the project a number of new biomass heating systems have been installed, including Shenstone Lodge School, Boughton Pumping Station and Elvendon Priory. In addition, an efficient system of information exchange has been established for customers and industry. British BioGen believe that the benefits of this system will be a crucial factor in achieving bioenergy industry targets of 2MWt for domestic heating, 2MWt for industrial and commercial heating and 2MWt for CHP by the end of 2001. The remainder of this summary offers highlights of the activities undertaken within the project, outlines the conclusions of the project and makes brief recommendations for further actions to assist the further deployment of biomass heating in the UK. (author)

  14. Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned

    Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

    2003-02-24

    The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

  15. Establishment of T Cell Activation Models In Vitro%T 细胞体外活化模型的建立

    杨继乐; 张莉; 茹晓荣

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较并建立 T 细胞体外活化的条件,为后续功能及机制相关实验奠定基础。方法以 Jur-kat 细胞为模型,选择 T 细胞早期活化的指标 CD69分子作为评价指标,通过比较不同刺激条件下 CD69分子的表达量的差别,来判定合适的体外刺激条件,并通过增殖实验、抑制性信号表达量以及 PBMC 细胞进行验证。结果多克隆刺激剂 PMA 和 ionomycin 在剂量分别为20和500 ng/ml 时, Jurkat 细胞活化效率较高;单克隆刺激剂 anti-CD3包被和 anti-CD28游离,且剂量在5μg/ml 和1.5μg/ml 时 Jurkat 细胞活化效率较高;作用48 h 检测多克隆刺激剂活化效率略高于单克隆刺激剂,细胞发生了增殖、抑制性分子 CTLA-4的表达增加。结论建立了 Jurkat 及 PBMC 细胞的稳定的体外刺激条件,为后续研究 T 细胞的功能等奠定了实验基础。%Objective To compare the efficacy of different stimuli in T cell activation in vitro in order to facilitate T cell function studies.Methods Jurkat cells were chosen as a cell model, and CD69 as the early activation marker.A suitable stimulus condition was determined in vitro by comparing the expression difference of CD69 in different stimulus settings.The optimal condition was then confirmed by cell proliferation, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression and PBMC activation.Results Jurkat cells were conspicuously activated when stimulated with 20 ng/mL PMA and 500 ng/mL ionomycin.They were greatly activated when treated with coated anti -hu-man CD3 at 5 μg/mL and free anti-human CD28 at 1.5 μg/mL.Forty-eight hours after stimulation, the activation efficacy with PMA and ionomycin was higher than that with anti -CD3 and -CD28, as evidenced by increased cell proliferation and over -expression of CTLA-4.Conclusion A stable T cell activation condition was established in vitro , which provides a solid foundation for T cell func -tion studies.

  16. Evaluation of the NHS R & D implementation methods programme

    Hanney, S; Soper, B; Buxton, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 1: Background and introduction • Concern with research implementation was a major factor behind the creation of the NHS R&D Programme in 1991. In 1994 an Advisory Group was established to identify research priorities in this field. The Implementation Methods Programme (IMP) flowed from this and its Commissioning Group funded 36 projects. Funding for the IMP was capped before the second round of commissioning. The Commissioning Group was disbanded and eventually responsibility for t...

  17. Programme on spent fuel management in India

    The Indian Atomic Energy Programme aims at harnessing the natural resources in the most optimal manner. To achieve this end, a three phase Nuclear Power Programme was devised in the early days of establishment of the Department of Atomic Energy. It envisages the utilization of the modest uranium reserves and rich thorium deposits in the country. The limited natural reserves of fuel materials have prompted India to pay increased attention to the back end of the fuel cycle, which consists of Reprocessing and Waste Management. The spent fuel is valued in India as a source for fuel and is treated accordingly, to recover the important fissile materials. Thus, the route of reprocessing of spent fuel in order to recycle uranium and plutonium in future reactors was opted for. Today, India possesses the capability and facilities, catering to the entire fuel cycle, i.e., starting from the mining of the ore, through fabrication of fuel and its application in reactors, to reprocessing of the spent fuel and appropriate waste management. With the third Reprocessing Plant almost ready for commissioning and second and third waste Immobilization Plants under constructions, the Spent Fuel Management Programme has come of age in India. This paper presents an overview of the status of the spent fuel management programme and its future perspective. (author)

  18. The Brazilian nuclear power manpower development programme

    Since the early stages of decision making, manpower availability has been recognized to be a key factor for the implementation of Brazil's nuclear power programme. Though care has been given to securing an industrial base and financial resources, the consequences of a lack of sufficient qualified manpower could be critical for the success of the whole programme. The broad scope of the Brazilian nuclear power programme which, as a main concept, aimed at establishing in the country a complete fuel cycle industry together with the construction of nuclear power plants, added another burden to the already complex task of providing appropriate human resources when advanced technologies are introduced in a developing country. Thus, not only the work-force required for nuclear power plant operation but also that needed for plant design, component manufacture, fuel cycle plant design and operation, had to be made available in number and qualification in accordance with the standards of the nuclear industry. The feasibility of the Brazilian programme depended on a complete transfer of technology, essentially achieved through personnel training. Again, the process of manpower preparation for an efficient know-how transfer required careful planning, and the great difficulty in its implementation was the lack of reliable experience at the time. (author)

  19. Building infrastructure for new nuclear power programmes

    In recent years, more than sixty countries have indicated that they are considering or launching nuclear power programmes. It has been more than a decade since a country commissioned its first nuclear power plant. In meantime, the global nuclear community has faced greater concerns about safety, security and non-proliferation, resulting in increased international obligations and a greater expectation for transparency and openness regarding nuclear power programmes. Many of these 'nuclear newcomers' are turning to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to understand the implications of the nuclear power option and to receive advice about how to proceed with implementing a national programme. In response to growing demand for assistance, the IAEA developed a comprehensive, phased approach to establishing the infrastructure necessary to support a national nuclear power programme. This 'Milestones' approach is described in Nuclear Energy Series Guide NG-G-3.1 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' (2007). From establishing the national position and legal framework to nuclear safety, security and safeguards, the Milestones covers 19 issues that need to be addressed. This approach also places special emphasis on the need for involvement of the Government, utility, industry, academic, and other stakeholders in a national decision-making process. The IAEA is also helping 'newcomers' to better understand its Safety Standards, which were written from the perspective of operating nuclear power programmes. A new safety guide is in development which provides a Road-map to the safety standards and identifies the standards that are relevant for each phase consistent with the Milestones. Several countries in the Europe region are working with the IAEA to understand the issues associated with a nuclear power programme in preparation for making a knowledgeable commitment. The starting points and approaches vary widely: some are European

  20. Competences and life management programmes

    Full text: The nuclear industry is, at present, at a crucial juncture, where it has to decide about the future of the first generation of nuclear plants, which are approaching the end of their licensed service life. At the same time, long term experience and new advances have established that it is possible to extend the life of nuclear plants beyond their initially licensed life by another 20-30 years. Extending the operating life of existing nuclear plants will help to reduce the short term need for new generating capacity - without new capital costs. However, these extensions must take place in the context of careful safety analysis and monitoring of equipment ageing concerns. A nuclear power plant must be managed in a safe and efficient manner throughout all the life cycle stages from design through decommissioning. The consequences of management decisions about nuclear power plants can have profound economic impacts for the nuclear power plant owner, and possibly for the national economy. In addition, the consequence of a major failure or accident can have catastrophic national socio-economic effects that may be felt internationally. The safe and effective management of a nuclear power plant therefore requires dramatically different perspectives in time from the majority of other industries. The impact of some decisions extends beyond the normal strategic perspective of both owners and governments. The integration of activities for ageing management, safety management and business management of a nuclear power plant are an essential element of 'life cycle management'. The loss of information at any stage of a nuclear power plants life deprives people, at later stages, of knowledge that could be important to safe, economic completion of work or which could aid the analysis of problems and options. It is costly to go through the learning process again, with a risk of potential events or incidents, programme delays, physical injury and increased regulatory

  1. Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (KYT). Framework Programme for 2002-2005

    The new Finnish research programme on nuclear waste management (KYT) will be conducted in 2002 - 2005. This framework programme describes the starting point, the basic aims and the organisation of the research programme. The starting point of the KYT programme is derived from the present state and future challenges of Finnish nuclear waste management. The research programme is funded mainly by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Posiva Oy, Fortum Oyj, Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), and the National Technology Agency (Tekes). As both regulators and implementors are involved, the research programme concentrates on neutral research topics that must be studied in any case. Methods and tools for experimental and theoretical studies fall in this category. State of the art -reviews on relevant topics also create national know-how. Topics that directly belong to licensing activities of nuclear waste management are excluded from the research programme. KYT carries out technical studies that increase national know-how in the area of nuclear waste management. The aim is to maintain and develop basic expertise needed in the operations derived from the national nuclear waste management plan. The studies have been divided into strategic studies and studies enhancing the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Strategic studies support the overall feasibility of Finnish nuclear waste management. These studies include basic options and overall safety principles related to nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear waste management. In addition, general cost estimates as well as general safety considerations related to transportations, low- and medium level wastes, and decommissioning are included in strategic studies. Studies supporting the long-term safety of spent fuel disposal include issues related to performance assessment methodology, release of radionuclides from the repository, behaviour of bedrock and groundwater

  2. Participation of CASSIOPEE in the EU technical assistance programmes to Eastern countries

    CASSIOPEE, established in 1993, is a European Economic Interest Group formed by ANDRA (France), COVRA (the Netherlands), DBE (Germany), ENRESA (Spain), NIREX (United Kingdom) and ONDRAF/NIRAS (Belgium). CASSIOPEE provides assistance to the Central and Eastern European countries and to the New Independent States through the EU Programmes in two different ways: developing radioactive waste management strategies and advising on the implementation of adequate engineering resources.The advisory role of CASSIOPEE in the EU assistance programmes and main projects defined and/or developed by CASSIOPEE are presented. The activities in the area of low and intermediate level waste related to safety assessment of existing repositories, site selection, waste acceptance criteria ect. are given

  3. Role of the national INIS centre in the knowledge preservation programme

    Possible ways of involvement of a small INIS Centre (on the example of the Bulgarian Centre) in the IAEA Knowledge Preservation Programme are discussed. The specific of the INIS activities, experience, and established access to scientific resources in the country present a good base for the extension of the Centre's functions towards nuclear knowledge accumulation and providing information about research and training programmes, as well as access to factual information in the nuclear field. Approaches for organising of the resources identification and developing of tools for management of information not included in the INIS database are suggested. As a first step, Bulgarian INIS Centre has identified some of the areas with accumulated knowledge as well as universities and institutes with valuable ongoing research. A local database for technical and scientific documentation is under development. (authors)

  4. An examination of factors that influence long-term adherence to structured exercise in individuals with established heart disease

    Martin, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Background: Long-term adherence to physical activity (PA) following a cardiac event is uncommon. Interventions aiming to address this issue must take into account the influences and motivations of successful long-term adherers and strive to utilise available resources to ensure cost-effectiveness and sustainability. The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing sustained adherence to an established Phase IV community-based cardiac rehabilitation programme: HeartSmart. This ...

  5. Accident prevention programme

    This study by the Steel Industry Safety and Health Commission was made within the context of the application by undertakings of the principles of accident and disease prevention previously adopted by the said Commission. It puts forward recommendations for the effective and gradual implementation of a programme of action on occupational health and safety in the various departments of an undertaking and in the undertaking as a whole. The methods proposed in this study are likely to be of interest to all undertakings in the metallurgical industry and other industrial sectors

  6. Fusion technology programme

    In the current Fusion Technology Programme of the European Community the KfK association is working at present on 16 R and D contracts. Most of the work is strongly oriented towards the Next European Torus. Direct support to NET is given by three KfK delegates being member of the NET study group. In addition to the R and D contracts the association is working on 11 NET study contracts. Though KfK contributes to all areas defined in fusion technology, the main emphasis is put on superconducting magnet and breeding blanket development. Other important fields are tritium technology, materials research, and remote handling. (orig./GG)

  7. Programmable ferroelectric tunnel memristor

    Andy eQuindeau; Dietrich eHesse; Marin eAlexe

    2014-01-01

    We report an analogously programmable memristor based on genuine electronic resistive switching combining ferroelectric switching and electron tunneling. The tunnel current through an 8 unit cell thick epitaxial Pb(Zr[0.2]Ti[0.8])O[3] film sandwiched between La[0.7]Sr[0.3]MnO[3] and cobalt electrodes obeys the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model for bidimensional growth with a characteristic switching time in the order of 10^-7 seconds. The analytical description of switching kinetics allows us...

  8. The community programme revisited

    Anne Gray

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the lessons for the New Deal era of some older strands in UK and European labour market measures; the Community Programme of the 1980s and the experience of “entreprises d'insertion in France, Spain and the Netherlands. It considers whether the institutional infrastructure of the New Deal is appropriate for the realisation of "intermediate labour marketsâ€. This raises some further questions; whether ILMs are about creating employment or merely redistributing it, and whe...

  9. Progress in Programmable Logic

    Jozef Cuntala

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmable logic devices (PLD are situated on important place among microelectronic components thanks to the continuing technological development of semiconductor components, due to new architectures and new approaches to digital systems design. Software design of various complicated digital systems becomes advantageous article of many firms. The Department of Electronics and Electrotechnology pays pemanent attention to mentioned components in application field. The collective of authors wants in this article point out on possibilities of design of digital system using the PLD. The paper plan contains the following basic parts: Technological aspects that influence development of configurable logic devices, Methodology od design and implementation and Flexibility of PLD interface.

  10. A programmable Fortran preprocessor

    Rosing, M.

    1995-06-01

    A programmable Fortran preprocessor is described. It allows users to define compile time operations that can examine and modify the source tree before it is compiled with a traditional compiler. This intermediate step allows the definition of routines and operations that adapt to the context in which they are used. Context sensitive operations increase the flexibility of abstractions that can be built without degrading efficiency, as compared to using traditional run time based abstractions such as libraries or objects. The preprocessor is described briefly along with an example of how it is used to add CMFortran array operations to Fortran77. Other preprocessors that have been implemented are also briefly described.

  11. Programme Biology - Health protection

    The scientific results for 1975, of the five-year Biology-Health Protection programme adopted in 1971, are presented in two volumes. In volume one, Research in Radiation Protection are developed exclusively, including the following topics: measurement and interpretation of radiation (dosimetry); transfer of radioactive nuclides in the constituents of the environment; hereditary effects of radiation; short-term effects (acute irradiation syndrome and its treatment); long-term effects and toxicology of radioactive elements. In volume, two Research on applications in Agriculture and Medicine are developed. It includes: mutagenesis; soil-plant relations; radiation analysis; food conservation; cell culture; radioentomology. Research on applications in Medicine include: Nuclear Medicine and Neutron Dosimetry

  12. AWRE: Atomic Weapons Research Establishment

    This reviews the work of AWRE at Aldermaston and Foulness. The main programme is nuclear and is concerned with the design and development of warheads for strategic and tactical nuclear weapons for the British nuclear deterrent, including those for the Royal Navy's missile carrying submarine fleet. The work is described grouped as design physics, development and materials. Services to these groups and to the whole establishment are provided by Engineering, Safety and Administration. The work ranges from long-term fundamental research, the development of technology, design, prototype development to the environmental testing of engineered products. In materials research the emphasis is on plutonium, uranium and beryllium, on high explosives and a wide range of inorganic and organic materials. The physics of the earth's crust is studied to aid detection of underground nuclear explosions. Reactor research facilities include the two reactors, Herald and Viper. (U.K.)

  13. Implication of p16 inactivation in tumorigenic activity of respiratory epithelial cell lines and adenocarcinoma cell line established from plutonium-induced lung tumor in rat

    To investigate whether p16 inactivation is involved in the development of rat pulmonary tumors, we compared the p16 status and tumorigenicity of cell lines which indicated different p16 status. The tumor cell line (PuD2) was established from lung adenocarcinoma induced in plutonium dioxide-inhaled rat in this study. The virus-immortalized SV40T2 cells, benzo[a]pyrene-induced BP cells, BP-derived BP(P)Tu cells, and gamma ray-transformed RTiv3 cells were utilized as the respiratory epithelial cell lines. A tumorigenicity assay-inoculating cells into nude mice revealed that PuD2, BP, and BP(P)Tu cells were tumorigenic, but SV40T2 and RTiv3 cells were not. Methylation-specific PCR of the p16 promoter region revealed that SV40T2 cells were unmethylated, BP cells displayed heterogeneous methylation, and BP(P)Tu and RTiv3 cells were completely methylated. Methylation-specific PCR and PCR of genomic DNA in the p16 region did not amplify product in PuD2 cells, indicating deletion of p16. Banded karyotypes prepared from PuD2 cells exhibited trisomy of chromosome 4, inversion in chromosome 11, and partial deletion of chromosomes 4 and 5. The de-methylating agent 5Aza2dC partially demethylated the p16 promoter region of BP(P)Tu, BP and RTiv3 cells, increasing expression of the p16 transcript and decreasing growth of the cells. These results indicate that hyper-methylation of the p16 promoter region occurs early in neoplastic transformation before acquisition of tumorigenicity in rat respiratory epithelium. Loss of genes located on chromosomes 4 and 5 may be important for tumor progression and acquisition of high tumorigenic activity in the Pu-induced rat lung tumor. (authors)

  14. The Transparency Programme of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste. A Status Report

    In this paper the activities of the Transparency Programme of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste have been explored. Comparisons have been made with other activities using the same transparency approach and observations made from different reports that deal with the programme or parts of it have been taken into account. Obviously, to make firm conclusions to what extent the aims of the Transparency Programme have been achieved a formal review should be done. It seems evident however that the programme has vitalized the overall dialogue about the Swedish nuclear waste management programme and that the hearings held have raised the awareness about issues that have been dealt with such as value-laden aspects of disposals methods, feasibility of certain alternatives, the need for clarification of how regulatory criteria can be applied and the use of research on governance processes. Stakeholders seem to have appreciated the overall organization and the stretching that took place during the hearings held. For possible future activities, the observations made about the antagonism between certain parties which has existed since a long time ago and the common language and culture need to be taken into account. The core problem, however, is to reach out to the political decision makers at the national level, especially since the time distance between hearings held so far and critical government decisions is at least six years which put a high demand on the reporting system. Taking the experiences from other transparency projects into account, the Council might consider the possibility to establish a reference group with participation from different stakeholders and politicians who could have a role for conveying results to wider groups. One observer has concluded that the reporting from the Transparency Programme should be open in the sense that it should not make conclusions on the issues as such (e.g. if a certain disposal method is to prefer or not). Instead

  15. The Transparency Programme of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste. A Status Report

    Andersson, Kjell (Karita Research AB, Taeby (Sweden)), E-Mail: kjell.andersson@karita.se

    2009-12-15

    In this paper the activities of the Transparency Programme of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste have been explored. Comparisons have been made with other activities using the same transparency approach and observations made from different reports that deal with the programme or parts of it have been taken into account. Obviously, to make firm conclusions to what extent the aims of the Transparency Programme have been achieved a formal review should be done. It seems evident however that the programme has vitalized the overall dialogue about the Swedish nuclear waste management programme and that the hearings held have raised the awareness about issues that have been dealt with such as value-laden aspects of disposals methods, feasibility of certain alternatives, the need for clarification of how regulatory criteria can be applied and the use of research on governance processes. Stakeholders seem to have appreciated the overall organization and the stretching that took place during the hearings held. For possible future activities, the observations made about the antagonism between certain parties which has existed since a long time ago and the common language and culture need to be taken into account. The core problem, however, is to reach out to the political decision makers at the national level, especially since the time distance between hearings held so far and critical government decisions is at least six years which put a high demand on the reporting system. Taking the experiences from other transparency projects into account, the Council might consider the possibility to establish a reference group with participation from different stakeholders and politicians who could have a role for conveying results to wider groups. One observer has concluded that the reporting from the Transparency Programme should be open in the sense that it should not make conclusions on the issues as such (e.g. if a certain disposal method is to prefer or not). Instead

  16. The Transparency Programme of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste. A Status Report

    Andersson, Kjell [Karita Research AB, Taeby (Sweden)], E-Mail: kjell.andersson@karita.se

    2009-12-15

    In this paper the activities of the Transparency Programme of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste have been explored. Comparisons have been made with other activities using the same transparency approach and observations made from different reports that deal with the programme or parts of it have been taken into account. Obviously, to make firm conclusions to what extent the aims of the Transparency Programme have been achieved a formal review should be done. It seems evident however that the programme has vitalized the overall dialogue about the Swedish nuclear waste management programme and that the hearings held have raised the awareness about issues that have been dealt with such as value-laden aspects of disposals methods, feasibility of certain alternatives, the need for clarification of how regulatory criteria can be applied and the use of research on governance processes. Stakeholders seem to have appreciated the overall organization and the stretching that took place during the hearings held. For possible future activities, the observations made about the antagonism between certain parties which has existed since a long time ago and the common language and culture need to be taken into account. The core problem, however, is to reach out to the political decision makers at the national level, especially since the time distance between hearings held so far and critical government decisions is at least six years which put a high demand on the reporting system. Taking the experiences from other transparency projects into account, the Council might consider the possibility to establish a reference group with participation from different stakeholders and politicians who could have a role for conveying results to wider groups. One observer has concluded that the reporting from the Transparency Programme should be open in the sense that it should not make conclusions on the issues as such (e.g. if a certain disposal method is to prefer or not). Instead

  17. Personal goals, group performance and ‘social’ networks: participants’ negotiation of virtual and embodied relationships in the ‘Workplace Challenge’ physical activity programme

    Evans, Adam Brian; Carter, Alice; Middleton, Geoff;

    2016-01-01

    encourage workplace-based teams to engage in physical activity by self-recording their activity over an eight-week period. Points were awarded for activity completed and a peer-challenge facility was promoted via online league tables, prizes and the opportunity to ‘challenge’ other users. Semi...... professional I–We identities, whereas virtual networks sometimes highlighted participants’ isolation. Moreover, emphasis upon competition within and between teams caused some participants to question their performance. Often, competition motivated engagement. For less active participants, constant comparison...

  18. Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Papua New Guinea.

    Rudge, James W; Phuanakoonon, Suparat; Nema, K Henry; Mounier-Jack, Sandra; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    In Papua New Guinea, investment by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund) has played an important role in scaling up the response to HIV and tuberculosis (TB). As part of a series of case studies on how Global Fund-supported programmes interact with national health systems, we assessed the nature and extent of integration of the Global Fund portfolios within the national HIV and TB programmes, the integration of the HIV and TB programmes within the general health system, and system-wide effects of Global Fund support in Papua New Guinea. The study relied on a literature review and 30 interviews with key stakeholders using the Systemic Rapid Assessment Toolkit and thematic analysis. Global Fund-supported activities were found to be largely integrated, or at least coordinated, with the national HIV and TB programmes. However, this has reinforced the vertical nature of these programmes with respect to the general health system, with parallel systems established to meet the demands of programme scale-up and the performance-based nature of Global Fund investment in the weak health system context of Papua New Guinea. The more parallel functions include monitoring and evaluation, and procurement and supply chain systems, while human resources and infrastructure for service delivery are increasingly integrated at more local levels. Positive synergies of Global Fund support include engagement of civil-society partners, and a reliable supply of high-quality drugs which may have increased patient confidence in the health system. However, the severely limited and overburdened pool of human resources has been skewed towards the three diseases, both at management and service delivery levels. There is also concern surrounding the sustainability of the disease programmes, given their dependence on donors. Increasing Global Fund attention towards health system strengthening was viewed positively, but should acknowledge that system changes are slow

  19. Nuclear power programme planning: An integrated approach

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has published material on different policy considerations in the introduction of nuclear power, primarily addressed to top level decision makers in government and industry in Member States. Several Member States and experts recommended to the IAEA to address the aspects of an integrated approach to nuclear power programme planning and to serve as guidance to those countries wishing to embark on a nuclear power programme. As a follow-up, the present publication is primarily intended to serve as guidance for executives and managers in Member States in planning for possible introduction of nuclear power plants in their electricity generating systems. Nuclear power programme planning, as dealt with in this publication, includes all activities that need to be carried out up to a well-founded decision to proceed with a project feasibility study. Project implementation beyond this decision is not in the scope of this publication. Although it is possible to use nuclear energy as a heat source for industrial processes, desalination and other heat applications, it is assumed in this publication that the planning is aimed towards nuclear power for electricity generation. Much of the information given would, however, also be relevant for planning of nuclear reactors for heat production. The publication was prepared within the framework of the IAEA programme on nuclear power planning, implementation and performance as a joint activity of the Nuclear Power Engineering Section and the Planning and Economic Studies Section (Division of Nuclear Power)

  20. RDandD Programme 2010. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste

    2010-09-15

    RDandD Programme 2010 presents SKB's plans for research, development and demonstration during the period 2011-2016. SKB's activities are divided into two main areas: the programme for low- and intermediate-level waste (the LILW Programme) and the Nuclear Fuel Programme. Operation of the existing facilities takes place within the Operational Process. RDandD Programme 2010 consists of five parts: Part I Overall plan of action Part II The LILW Programme Part III The Nuclear Fuel Programme Part IV Research for assessment of long-term safety Part V Social science research RDandD Programme 2007 was mainly focused on development of technology to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The efforts described were aimed at gaining a greater knowledge of long-term safety and compiling technical supporting documentation for applications under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel and under the Environmental Code for the final repository system. Many important results from these efforts are reported in this programme. The integrated account of the results will be presented in applications submitted in early 2011. The regulatory review of RDandD Programme 2007 and its supplement called for clarifications of plans and programmes for the final repository for short-lived radioactive waste, SFR, and the final repository for long-lived waste, SFL. This RDandD Programme describes these plans more clearly