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Sample records for activity improves glioblastoma

  1. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  2. Glioblastoma

    ... these tumors to contain cystic mineral, calcium deposits, blood vessels, or a mixed grade of cells. Glioblastomas are usually highly malignant—a large number of tumor cells are reproducing at any given time, and they are nourished by an ample blood supply. Dead cells may also be seen, especially ...

  3. Successful Treatment of Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts With a Monoamine Oxidase B-Activated Pro-Drug

    Martyn A. Sharpe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The last major advance in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM was the introduction of temozolomide in 1999. Treatment with temozolomide following surgical debulking extends survival rate compared to radiotherapy and debulking alone. However, virtually all glioblastoma patients experience disease progression within 7 to 10 months. Although many salvage treatments, including bevacizumab, rechallenge with temozolomide, and other alkylating agents, have been evaluated, none of these clearly improves survival. Monoamine oxidase B (MAOB is highly expressed in glioblastoma cell mitochondria, and mitochondrial function is intimately tied to treatment-resistant glioblastoma progression. These glioblastoma properties provide a strong rationale for pursuing a MAOB-selective pro-drug treatment approach that, upon drug activation, targets glioblastoma mitochondria, especially mitochondrial DNA. MP-MUS is the lead compound in a family of pro-drugs designed to treat GBM that is converted into the mature, mitochondria-targeting drug, P+-MUS, by MAOB. We show that MP-MUS can successfully kill primary gliomas in vitro and in vivo mouse xenograft models.

  4. Effect of alternative temozolomide schedules on glioblastoma O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity and survival

    Robinson, C G; Palomo, J M; Rahmathulla, G; McGraw, M; Donze, J; L. Liu; Vogelbaum, M A

    2010-01-01

    Background: O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression in glioblastoma correlates with temozolomide resistance. Dose-intense temozolomide schedules deplete MGMT activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells; however, no published data exist evaluating the effect of temozolomide schedules on intracranial tumour MGMT activity. Methods: Human glioblastoma cells (GBM43) with an unmethylated MGMT promoter were implanted intracranially in immunodeficient rodents. Three weeks later, ...

  5. Bevacizumab Improves Quality of Life in Patients with Recurrent Glioblastoma

    Seema Nagpal; Griffith Harsh; Lawrence Recht

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the benefits in survival and quality of life in patients receiving bevacizumab (BEV) for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Methods. This is a retrospective study of 40 adult patients with recurrent GBM treated between 2005 and 2009 at a single institution. All patients had initial treatment with surge...

  6. Invasive Glioblastoma Cells Acquire Stemness and Increased Akt Activation

    Jennifer R. Molina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most aggressive brain tumor in adults. The dismal prognosis is due to postsurgery recurrences arising from escaped invasive tumor cells. The signaling pathways activated in invasive cells are under investigation, and models are currently designed in search for therapeutic targets. We developed here an in vivo model of human invasive GBM in mouse brain from a GBM cell line with moderate tumorigenicity that allowed simultaneous primary tumor growth and dispersal of tumor cells in the brain parenchyma. This strategy allowed for the first time the isolation and characterization of matched sets of tumor mass (Core and invasive (Inv cells. Both cell populations, but more markedly Inv cells, acquired stem cell markers, neurosphere renewal ability, and resistance to rapamycin-induced apoptosis relative to parental cells. The comparative phenotypic analysis between Inv and Core cells showed significantly increased tumorigenicity in vivo and increased invasion with decreased proliferation in vitro for Inv cells. Examination of a large array of signaling pathways revealed extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk down-modulation and Akt activation in Inv cells and an opposite profile in Core cells. Akt activation correlated with the increased tumorigenicity, stemness, and invasiveness, whereas Erk activation correlated with the proliferation of the cells. These results underscore complementary roles of the Erk and Akt pathways for GBM proliferation and dispersal and raise important implications for a concurrent inhibitory therapy.

  7. Antisense epidermal growth factor receptor RNA transfection in human glioblastoma cells down-regulates telomerase activity and telomere length

    Tian, X-X; Pang, JC-S; J. Zheng; Chen, J; To, S S T; Ng, H-K

    2002-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor is overexpressed and/or amplified in up to 50% of glioblastomas, suggesting an important role of this gene in glial tumorigenesis and progression. In the present study we demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in regulation of telomerase activity in glioblastoma. Antisense-epidermal growth factor receptor approach was used to inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor expression of glioblastoma U87MG cells. Telomerase activity in antisens...

  8. Bevacizumab Improves Quality of Life in Patients with Recurrent Glioblastoma

    Seema Nagpal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To quantify the benefits in survival and quality of life in patients receiving bevacizumab (BEV for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM. Methods. This is a retrospective study of 40 adult patients with recurrent GBM treated between 2005 and 2009 at a single institution. All patients had initial treatment with surgery, radiation, and concurrent temozolomide, then monthly temozolomide. Over 250 charts were screened. Sufficient data was available for 20 patients treated with BEV and 20 patients who did not receive BEV at the time of recurrence. The independent living score (ILS, designed to reward long-term independent survival, was calculated for each patient. Results. The mean ILS was nearly double in the BEV group compared to the No-BEV group (15.0 versus 8.2, =0.002, t-test. Two months after initiation of therapy, the median steroid dose dropped by over 90% in patients treated with BEV, but doubled in the NoBEV group. Median survival from the time of recurrence was significantly affected: 10.6 months in the BEV group versus 4.2 months (<0.001, log rank survival in the NoBEV group. Conclusions. BEV increases independent living and lengthens overall survival after GBM recurrence. Reduction in steroid dose may contribute to prolonged independence.

  9. Evaluation Of Lenalidomide Activity On Glioblastoma Cell Lines In Vitro

    Mut, Melike; Gregory POLAR; Carpenter, Joan E.; Gerard REDPATH; Larner, James; Schiff, David; Shaffrey, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Thalidomide analog, Lenalidomide (Revlimid®) is a chemotherapeutic agent. In this study, lenalidomide was used in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines to determine its pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative and radiosensitizing properties. Methods: The GBM cells were treated with lenalidomide [0, 1, 5, 30, 60 µM] before ultravioletB (UVB) [0, 50, 100 mj] or γ -irradiation [0, 5, 20 Gy], and kept in drug for 5 days. Viable cell numbers were determined by trypan blue exclusion. Th...

  10. Cytotoxic activity of interferon alpha induced dendritic cells as a biomarker of glioblastoma

    Mishinov, S. V.; Stupak, V. V.; Tyrinova, T. V.; Leplina, O. Yu.; Ostanin, A. A.; Chernykh, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells that can play direct role in anti-tumor immune response as killer cells. DC tumoricidal activity can be stimulated greatly by type I IFN (IFNα and IFNβ). In the present study, we examined cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of monocyte-derived IFNα-induced DCs generated from patients with brain glioma and evaluated the potential use of these parameters in diagnostics of high-grade gliomas. Herein, we demonstrated that patient DCs do not possess the ability to inhibit the growth of tumor HEp-2 cell line but low-grade and high-grade glioma patients do not differ significantly in DC cytostatic activity. However, glioma patient DCs are characterized by reduced cytotoxic activity against HEp-2 cells. The impairment of DC cytotoxic function is observed mainly in glioblastoma patients. The cytotoxic activity of DCs against HEp-2 cells below 9% is an informative marker for glioblastomas.

  11. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: Improving target volume delineation

    Unkelbach, Jan; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma are known to infiltrate the brain parenchyma instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In clinical practice, a uniform margin is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth: Anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain...

  12. New insights into the anticancer activity of carnosol: p53 reactivation in the U87MG human glioblastoma cell line.

    Giacomelli, Chiara; Natali, Letizia; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Daniele, Simona; Bertoli, Alessandra; Flamini, Guido; Braca, Alessandra; Martini, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumour with high resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. As such, increasing attention has focused on developing new therapeutic strategies to improve treatment responses. Recently, attention has been shifted to natural compounds that are able to halt tumour development. Among them, carnosol (CAR), a phenolic diterpene present in rosemary, has become a promising molecule that is able to prevent certain types of solid cancer. However, no data are available on the effects of CAR in GBM. Here, CAR activity decreased the proliferation of different human glioblastoma cell lines, particularly cells that express wild type p53. The p53 pathway is involved in the control of apoptosis and is often impaired in GBM. Notably, CAR, through the dissociation of p53 from its endogenous inhibitor MDM2, was able to increase the intracellular p53 levels in GBM cells. Accordingly, functional reactivation of p53 was demonstrated by the stimulation of p53 target genes' transcription, the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle blockade. Most importantly, CAR produced synergistic effects with temozolomide (TMZ) and reduced the restoration of the tumour cells' proliferation after drug removal. Thus, for the first time, these data highlighted the potential use of the diterpene in the sensitization of GBM cells to chemotherapy through a direct re-activation of p53 pathway. Furthermore, progress has been made in delineating the biochemical mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effects of this molecule. PMID:26939786

  13. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  14. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher–Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  15. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation.

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  16. STAT3 Activation in Glioblastoma: Biochemical and Therapeutic Implications

    Kim, Jennifer E.; Patel, Mira; Ruzevick, Jacob; Jackson, Christopher M.; Lim, Michael, E-mail: mlim3@jhmi.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., Phipps Building Rm 123, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a potent regulator of gliomagenesis through its induction of angiogenesis, host immunosuppression, and tumor invasion. Gain of function mutations result in constitutive activation of STAT3 in glioma cells, making STAT3 an attractive target for inhibition in cancer therapy. Nevertheless, some studies show that STAT3 also participates in terminal differentiation and apoptosis of various cell lines and in glioma with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-deficient genetic backgrounds. In light of these findings, the utility of STAT3 as a prognostic indicator and as a target of drug therapies will be contingent on a more nuanced understanding of its pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects.

  17. Inhibition of Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Amanda eTivnan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1 in high grade glioma, and it’s role in BBB active transport, highlights this member of the ABC transporter family as a target for improving drug responses in GBM. In this study we show that small molecule inhibitors and gene silencing of MRP1 had a significant effect on GBM cell response to temozolomide (150µM, vincristine (100nM and etoposide (2µM. Pre-treatment with Reversan (inhibitor of MRP1 and P-glycoprotein led to a significantly improved response to cell death in the presence of all three chemotherapeutics, in both primary and recurrent GBM cells. The presence of MK571 (inhibitor of MRP1 and Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4 led to an enhanced effect of vincristine and etoposide in reducing cell viability over a 72 hour period. Specific MRP1 inhibition led to a significant increase in vincristine and etoposide-induced cell death in all three cell lines assessed. Treatment with MK571, or specific MRP1 knockdown, did not have any effect on temozolomide drug response in these cells. These findings have significant implications in providing researchers an opportunity to improve currently used chemotherapeutics for the initial treatment of primary GBM, and improved treatment for recurrent GBM patients.

  18. Inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Tivnan, Amanda; Zakaria, Zaitun; O'Leary, Caitrín; Kögel, Donat; Pokorny, Jenny L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it's role in BBB active transport, highlights this member of the ABC transporter family as a target for improving drug responses in GBM. In this study we show that small molecule inhibitors and gene silencing of MRP1 had a significant effect on GBM cell response to temozolomide (150 μM), vincristine (100 nM), and etoposide (2 μM). Pre-treatment with Reversan (inhibitor of MRP1 and P-glycoprotein) led to a significantly improved response to cell death in the presence of all three chemotherapeutics, in both primary and recurrent GBM cells. The presence of MK571 (inhibitor of MRP1 and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) led to an enhanced effect of vincristine and etoposide in reducing cell viability over a 72 h period. Specific MRP1 inhibition led to a significant increase in vincristine and etoposide-induced cell death in all three cell lines assessed. Treatment with MK571, or specific MRP1 knockdown, did not have any effect on temozolomide drug response in these cells. These findings have significant implications in providing researchers an opportunity to improve currently used chemotherapeutics for the initial treatment of primary GBM, and improved treatment for recurrent GBM patients. PMID:26136652

  19. Anti-tumor activities of luteolin and silibinin in glioblastoma cells: overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented luteolin and silibinin to inhibit autophagy and induce apoptosis in glioblastoma in vivo.

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. High systemic toxicity of conventional chemotherapies prompted the search for natural compounds for controlling glioblastoma. The natural flavonoids luteolin (LUT) and silibinin (SIL) have anti-tumor activities. LUT inhibits autophagy, cell proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis and induces apoptosis; while SIL activates caspase-8 cascades to induce apoptosis. However, synergistic anti-tumor effects of LUT and SIL in glioblastoma remain unknown. Overexpression of tumor suppressor microRNA (miR) could enhance the anti-tumor effects of LUT and SIL. Here, we showed that 20 µM LUT and 50 µM SIL worked synergistically for inhibiting growth of two different human glioblastoma U87MG (wild-type p53) and T98G (mutant p53) cell lines and natural combination therapy was more effective than conventional chemotherapy (10 µM BCNU or 100 µM TMZ). Combination of LUT and SIL caused inhibition of growth of glioblastoma cells due to induction of significant amounts of apoptosis and complete inhibition of invasion and migration. Further, combination of LUT and SIL inhibited rapamycin (RAPA)-induced autophagy, a survival mechanism, with suppression of PKCα and promotion of apoptosis through down regulation of iNOS and significant increase in expression of the tumor suppressor miR-7-1-3p in glioblastoma cells. Our in vivo studies confirmed that overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented anti-tumor activities of LUT and SIL in RAPA pre-treated both U87MG and T98G tumors. In conclusion, our results clearly demonstrated that overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented the anti-tumor activities of LUT and SIL to inhibit autophagy and induce apoptosis for controlling growth of different human glioblastomas in vivo. PMID:26573275

  20. Valproic Acid Use During Radiation Therapy for Glioblastoma Associated With Improved Survival

    Purpose: Valproic acid (VA) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor taken by patients with glioblastoma (GB) to manage seizures, and it can modulate the biologic effects of radiation therapy (RT). We investigated whether VA use during RT for GB was associated with overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 544 adults with GB were retrospectively reviewed. Analyses were performed to determine the association of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RTOG RPA) class, seizure history, and concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) and AED use during RT with OS. Results: Seizures before the end of RT were noted in 217 (40%) patients, and 403 (74%) were taking an AED during RT; 29 (7%) were taking VA. Median OS in patients taking VA was 16.9 months (vs 13.6 months taking another AED, P=.16). Among patients taking an AED during RT, OS was associated with VA (P=.047; hazard ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27-1.07), and RTOG RPA class (P<.0001; HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.37-1.61). Of the 5 most common AEDs, only VA was associated with OS. Median OS of patients receiving VA and TMZ during RT was 23.9 months (vs 15.2 months for patients taking another AED, P=.26). When the analysis was restricted to patients who received concurrent TMZ, VA use was marginally associated with OS (P=.057; HR, 0.54; 95% CI, −0.09 to 1.17), independently of RTOG RPA class and seizure history. Conclusions: VA use during RT for GB was associated with improved OS, independently of RTOG RPA, seizure history, and concurrent TMZ use. Further studies of treatment that combines HDAC inhibitors and RT are warranted

  1. Targeting and killing of glioblastoma with activated T cells armed with bispecific antibodies

    Since most glioblastomas express both wild-type EGFR and EGFRvIII as well as HER2/neu, they are excellent targets for activated T cells (ATC) armed with bispecific antibodies (BiAbs) that target EGFR and HER2. ATC were generated from PBMC activated for 14 days with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody in the presence of interleukin-2 and armed with chemically heteroconjugated anti-CD3×anti-HER2/neu (HER2Bi) and/or anti-CD3×anti-EGFR (EGFRBi). HER2Bi- and/or EGFRBi-armed ATC were examined for in vitro cytotoxicity using MTT and 51Cr-release assays against malignant glioma lines (U87MG, U118MG, and U251MG) and primary glioblastoma lines. EGFRBi-armed ATC killed up to 85% of U87, U118, and U251 targets at effector:target ratios (E:T) ranging from 1:1 to 25:1. Engagement of tumor by EGFRBi-armed ATC induced Th1 and Th2 cytokine secretion by armed ATC. HER2Bi-armed ATC exhibited comparable cytotoxicity against U118 and U251, but did not kill HER2-negative U87 cells. HER2Bi- or EGFRBi-armed ATC exhibited 50—80% cytotoxicity against four primary glioblastoma lines as well as a temozolomide (TMZ)-resistant variant of U251. Both CD133– and CD133+ subpopulations were killed by armed ATC. Targeting both HER2Bi and EGFRBi simultaneously showed enhanced efficacy than arming with a single BiAb. Armed ATC maintained effectiveness after irradiation and in the presence of TMZ at a therapeutic concentration and were capable of killing multiple targets. High-grade gliomas are suitable for specific targeting by armed ATC. These data, together with additional animal studies, may provide the preclinical support for the use of armed ATC as a valuable addition to current treatment regimens

  2. Radiation-induced Akt activation modulates radioresistance in human glioblastoma cells

    Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is a primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a common and devastating brain tumor in humans. IR has been shown to induce PI3K-Akt activation in many cell types, and activation of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway has been correlated with radioresistance. Initially, the effects of IR on Akt activation were assessed in multiple human GBM cell lines. Next, to evaluate a potential causative role of IR-induced Akt activation on radiosensitivity, Akt activation was inhibited during IR with several complementary genetic and pharmacological approaches, and radiosensitivity measured using clonogenic survival assays. Three of the eight cell lines tested demonstrated IR-induced Akt activation. Further studies revealed that IR-induced Akt activation was dependent upon the presence of a serum factor, and could be inhibited by the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Inhibition of PI3K activation with LY294002, or with inducible wild-type PTEN, inhibition of EGFR, as well as direct inhibition of Akt with two Akt inhibitors during irradiation increased the radiosensitivity of U87MG cells. These results suggest that Akt may be a central player in a feedback loop whereby activation of Akt induced by IR increases radioresistance of GBM cells. Targeting the Akt signaling pathway may have important therapeutic implications when used in combination with IR in the treatment of a subset of brain tumor patients

  3. CDBG Public Improvements Activity

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to public improvements, including senior centers, youth centers, parks, street improvements, water/sewer improvements, child care centers,...

  4. BI-33BEVACIZUMAB-INDUCED HYPERTENSION IS A PREDICTIVE MARKER FOR IMPROVED OUTCOMES IN RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA

    Zhong, Jim; Ali, Arif; Voloschin, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; Curran, Walter; Crocker, Ian; Shu, Hui-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) approved for treatment of recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Previous studies have demonstrated differential outcomes for patients treated with this agent for other tumors based on whether hypertension developed as a side effect. We conducted a single-institutional retrospective study analyzing survival outcomes for patients with recurrent GBM treated with bevacizumab based on whether patients develop...

  5. BCL-2 activation by ionizing radiation in a glioblastoma cell line

    Purpose: p53 is known to be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. Alterations of the p53 gene also represent the most common changes found in cancer cells. In order to investigate specific gene expression changes following ionizing radiation of p53-deficient cells we have used as a model system a highly radioresistant glioblastoma cell line with inducible p53 Materials and Methods: Human glioblastoma T98G cells growing either exponentially or after release from G0/G1 synchrony were irradiated and the expression level of Bcl-2 and related cell survival factors were evaluated after different doses of ionizing radiation. A derivative of the T98G cell line, harboring a dexamethasone-inducible wild-type p53 was also used to investigate the role of p53 in Bcl-2 induction. Western analyses were mainly used to analyze expression levels of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-X, and cyclins. In our search for differentially-induced genes which might mediate activation of Bcl-2 we have used the RNA arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (RAP-PCR). Differentially expressed gene products were gel-purified, cloned, sequenced and their expression tested by Northern analyses. Results: We have found an increase in Bcl-2, Mcl-1, and Bcl-x protein levels after irradiation of T98G cells. The induction was maximal in synchronized cells, when irradiation was done 16 hrs following exit from Go/G1. A 3-fold Bcl-2 induction and 4-fold Mcl-1 increase was observed starting 4 hr after 4 Gy irradiation. This increase was maintained for at least 24 hrs for both proteins, although the peak of Mcl-1 induction was reached after 8 hrs. The induction coincided with cyclin A accumulation, suggesting that the cells were irradiated in G1 and the increase of Bcl-2 protein levels happened when the cells reached S-phase. GM47.23 cells showed a similar induction in the absence, but not presence of Dex, the inducer used to activate wild-type p53. Cells treated with Dex produced wild-type p53 protein, which

  6. Downregulation of RND3/RhoE in glioblastoma patients promotes tumorigenesis through augmentation of notch transcriptional complex activity

    Activation of Notch signaling contributes to glioblastoma multiform (GBM) tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanism that promotes the Notch signaling augmentation during GBM genesis remains largely unknown. Identification of new factors that regulate Notch signaling is critical for tumor treatment. The expression levels of RND3 and its clinical implication were analyzed in GBM patients. Identification of RND3 as a novel factor in GBM genesis was demonstrated in vitro by cell experiments and in vivo by a GBM xenograft model. We found that RND3 expression was significantly decreased in human glioblastoma. The levels of RND3 expression were inversely correlated with Notch activity, tumor size, and tumor cell proliferation, and positively correlated with patient survival time. We demonstrated that RND3 functioned as an endogenous repressor of the Notch transcriptional complex. RND3 physically interacted with NICD, CSL, and MAML1, the Notch transcriptional complex factors, promoted NICD ubiquitination, and facilitated the degradation of these cofactor proteins. We further revealed that RND3 facilitated the binding of NICD to FBW7, a ubiquitin ligase, and consequently enhanced NICD protein degradation. Therefore, Notch transcriptional activity was inhibited. Forced expression of RND3 repressed Notch signaling, which led to the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in the xenograft mice in vivo. Downregulation of RND3, however, enhanced Notch signaling activity, and subsequently promoted glioma cell proliferation. Inhibition of Notch activity abolished RND3 deficiency-mediated GBM cell proliferation. We conclude that downregulation of RND3 is responsible for the enhancement of Notch activity that promotes glioblastoma genesis

  7. Tectal glioblastoma Glioblastoma tetal

    Feres Chaddad Neto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem gliomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising mostly in paediatric patients. Tectal plate gliomas represent a particular type of brain stem tumours usually with a benign, indolent clinical course, presenting with signs of raised intracranial hipertension due to supra-tentorialhydrocephalous caused by aqueductal stenosis. Seldom high-grade lesions arise in this location with tremendous therapeutic implications. When a malignant tumour is clinically and radiographically suspected a biopsy should be performed to obtain histhological confirmation. Treatment is then planned in a case-by-case basis. We present the case of a glioblastoma of the tectal plate in a 22 years-old woman operated upon by a supracerebellar-infratentorial approach.Os gliomas do tronco cerebral são um grupo heterogêneo de neoplasias que acometem habitualmente crianças. Os gliomas da placa quadrigeminal representam um tipo particular de tumores do tronco cerebral, habitualmente com um curso benigno e indolente, surgindo com sinais de hipertensão intracraniana devido a hidrocefalia supra-tentorial provocada por compressão do aqueduto cerebral. Raramente surgem lesões de alto grau nesta região, mas as implicações terapêuticas são tremendas. Quando existe suspeita clínica e imagiológica de que se trata de lesão maligna, esta deve ser biopsada para se obter confirmação histológica. O tratamento deve então ser planejado caso a caso. Apresentamos o caso de glioblastoma da placa quadrigeminal em uma paciente de 22 anos intervencionado por via supracerebelar-infratentorial.

  8. Cervical metastatic glioblastoma multiforme

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most malignant primary brain tumour in adults. In spite of the hostile nature of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), extracranial spread is not a common event. With improving management choices and survival times, reports of extracranial occurrence of GBM have increased. Most commonly these metastases are to the lungs, lymph nodes, neck, skull, scalp, liver, and bones; may be evident on routine follow-up images of the original lesion. Head and neck metastasis of GBM can be debilitating. We present a case of cervical metastasis of GBM and discuss possible mechanisms of extraneural spread of this tumour. (author)

  9. Improved tumor oxygenation and survival in glioblastoma patients who show increased blood perfusion after cediranib and chemoradiation

    Batchelor, Tracy T.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Emblem, Kyrre E; Dan G Duda; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Snuderl, Matija; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Polaskova, Pavlina; Pinho, Marco C.; Jennings, Dominique; Plotkin, Scott R.; Chi, Andrew S.; Eichler, April F.; Dietrich, Jorg; Hochberg, Fred H.

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates that antiangiogenic therapy increases tumor blood perfusion in a subset of newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients, and that it is these patients who survive longer when this expensive and potentially toxic therapy is combined with standard radiation and chemotherapy. This study provides fresh insights into the selection of glioblastoma patients most likely to benefit from antiangiogenic treatments.

  10. Menthol increases human glioblastoma intracellular Ca2+, BK channel activity and cell migration

    Bartley Jeremy W

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined the effect of menthol, an agonist for transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8 ion channels, to increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, in human glioblastoma cells (DBTRG cells, which resulted in activation of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ membrane ion channels (BK channels. Voltage ramps applied over 300 ms from -100 to 100 mV resulted in membrane currents with marked inwardly- and outwardly-rectifying components. Paxilline (2 μM abolished the outwardly-rectifying current. Outwardly-rectifying on-cell patch currents were increased markedly by menthol (100 μM added to the bath. The estimated on-cell conductance of these channels was 253 pS. Kinetic analysis showed that added menthol increased channel open probability and mean open frequency after 5 min. In a similar time course menthol increased [Ca2+]i, and this increase was abolished either by added paxilline, tetraethylammonium ion or by Ca2+-free external solution. Finally, menthol stimulated the rate of DBTRG cell migration into scratch wounds made in confluent cells, and this also was inhibited by paxilline or by tetraethylammonium ion. We conclude that menthol, a TRPM8 agonist, increases DBTRG cell [Ca2+]i that in turn activates membrane BK ion channels. Inhibition of BK channels by paxilline reverses menthol-stimulated increase of [Ca2+]i and of cell migration. Thus, BK channels function to maintain elevations in [Ca2+]i needed to sustain increases in DBTRG cell migration.

  11. High IFIT1 expression predicts improved clinical outcome, and IFIT1 along with MGMT more accurately predicts prognosis in newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Chen, Yao; Lin, Guo-Shi; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Tang, Wen-Long; Huang, Jian-Huang; Chen, Jin-Shou; Wang, Xing-Fu; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeat 1 (IFIT1) plays a key role in growth suppression and apoptosis promotion in cancer cells. Interferon was reported to induce the expression of IFIT1 and inhibit the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT).This study aimed to investigate the expression of IFIT1, the correlation between IFIT1 and MGMT, and their impact on the clinical outcome in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The expression of IFIT1 and MGMT and their correlation were investigated in the tumor tissues from 70 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The effects on progression-free survival and overall survival were evaluated. Of 70 cases, 57 (81.4%) tissue samples showed high expression of IFIT1 by immunostaining. The χ(2) test indicated that the expression of IFIT1 and MGMT was negatively correlated (r = -0.288, P = .016). Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed high IFIT1 expression as a favorable prognostic indicator for progression-free survival (P = .005 and .017) and overall survival (P = .001 and .001), respectively. Patients with 2 favorable factors (high IFIT1 and low MGMT) had an improved prognosis as compared with others. The results demonstrated significantly increased expression of IFIT1 in newly diagnosed glioblastoma tissue. The negative correlation between IFIT1 and MGMT expression may be triggered by interferon. High IFIT1 can be a predictive biomarker of favorable clinical outcome, and IFIT1 along with MGMT more accurately predicts prognosis in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. PMID:26980050

  12. Mutations in glioblastoma oncosuppressive pathways pave the way for oncomodulatory activity of cytomegalovirus

    Hollon, Todd C; Price, Richard L.; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been suggested to promote the development of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Recent evidence demonstrates that CMV contributes to the progression of GBM in the context of oncosuppressor gene mutations. This finding provides further insights into the mechanisms whereby CMV exacerbates the malignancy of GBM.

  13. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor as a Potential PET Biomarker in Glioblastoma

    Persson, Morten; Nedergaard, Mette K; Brandt-Larsen, Malene;

    2016-01-01

    an orthotopic xenograft model of glioblastoma. Tumor growth was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Five to six weeks after inoculation, all mice were scanned with small-animal PET/CT using two new uPAR PET ligands ((64)Cu-NOTA-AE105 and (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105) and, for comparison, O-(2-(18)F...

  14. Level of Notch activation determines the effect on growth and stem cell-like features in glioblastoma multiforme neurosphere cultures

    Kristoffersen, Karina; Villingshøj, Mette; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) are cancer cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties found in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and they are assigned a central role in tumor initiation, progression and relapse. The Notch pathway is important for maintenance and cell fate decisions in the...... normal NSC population. Notch signaling is often deregulated in GBM and recent results suggest that this pathway plays a significant role in bCSC as well. We therefore wished to further elucidate the role of Notch activation in GBM-derived bCSC....

  15. Potential applications of image-guided radiotherapy for brain metastases and glioblastoma to improve patient quality of life

    NamPhongNguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and brain metastasis remains a challenge because of the poor survival and the potential for brain damage following radiation. Despite concurrent chemotherapy and radiation dose escalation, local recurrence remains the predominant pattern of failure in GBM most likely secondary to repopulation of cancer stem cells. Even though radiotherapy is highly effective for local control of radio-resistant tumors such as melanoma and renal cell cancer, systemic disease progression is the cause of death in most patients with brain metastasis. Preservation of quality of life of cancer survivors is the main issue for patients with brain metastasis. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT by virtue of precise radiation dose delivery may reduce treatment time of patients with GBM without excessive toxicity and potentially improve neurocognitive function with preservation of local control in patients with brain metastasis. Future prospective trials for primary brain tumors or brain metastasis should include IGRT to assess its efficacy to improve patient quality of life.

  16. Long-Term Survival and Improved Quality of Life following Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Larson, Erik W.; Peterson, Halloran E.; Fairbanks, Robert K; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Call, Jason A.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    The management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is in most cases complex and must be specifically tailored to the needs of the patient with the goals of extended survival and improved quality of life. Despite advancements in therapy, treatment outcomes remain almost universally poor. Salvage treatment options for the recurrence of the disease is an area of intense study. The following case highlights the utility of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) as a salvage treatment. In this clinical situa...

  17. Neuronal Activity, Mitogens, and mTOR: Overcoming the Hurdles for the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other malignant gliomas are considered to be the most prevalent of primary malignant brain tumors. The incidence of these tumors per year is reported as 4.13 per 100,000 individuals per year. The median survival time following the diagnosis of GBM is approximately fifteen months in the setting of providing presently available treatments with surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapy. Given these statistics, new strategies for the treatment of GBM and ot...

  18. Temozolomide suppresses MYC via activation of TAp63 to inhibit progression of human glioblastoma

    Yamaki, Tomohiro; Suenaga, Yusuke; Iuchi, Toshihiko; Alagu, Jennifer; Takatori, Atsushi; Itami, Makiko; Araki, Akinobu; Ohira, Miki; Inoue, Masahiro; Kageyama, Hajime; Yokoi, Sana; Saeki, Naokatsu; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive and chemoradioresistant brain malignancy. Temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA-alkylating agent, is effective against GBM and has become the standard first-line drug. However, the mechanism by which TMZ regulates the progression of GBM remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that TMZ targets TAp63, a p53 family member, inducing its expression to suppress the progression of human GBM. High levels of TAp63 expression in GBM tissues after TMZ treatment was a...

  19. NG2 expression in glioblastoma identifies an actively proliferating population with an aggressive molecular signature

    Al-Mayhani, M. Talal F.; Grenfell, Richard; Narita, Masashi; Piccirillo, Sara; Kenney-Herbert, Emma; Fawcett, James W.; Collins, V. Peter; Ichimura, Koichi; Watts, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common type of primary brain tumor and a highly malignant and heterogeneous cancer. Current conventional therapies fail to eradicate or curb GBM cell growth. Hence, exploring the cellular and molecular basis of GBM cell growth is vital to develop novel therapeutic approaches. Neuroglia (NG)-2 is a transmembrane proteoglycan expressed by NG2+ progenitors and is strongly linked to cell proliferation in the normal brain. By using NG2 as a biomarker we id...

  20. Does adding FDG-PET to MRI improve the differentiation between primary cerebral lymphoma and glioblastoma? Observer performance study

    It is sometimes difficult to distinguish between primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the addition of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) to conventional MRI improves diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing between PCNSL and GBM with similar MRI findings. We used conventional- and diffusion-weighted MRI and FDG-PET scans of 21 patients with histologically confirmed brain tumors exhibiting similar MRI findings (PCNSL, n=14, GBM, n=7) in our observer performance study that consisted of 3 interpretation sessions. ADC and maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of the tumors were calculated. Three radiologists first interpreted conventional MRI (1st session), then they read images to which the ADC value had been added (2nd session), and finally they interpreted images supplemented with SUVmax (3rd session). Observer performance was evaluated using κ statistic and receiver operating characteristics analyses. The addition of ADC values to conventional MRI failed to improve the differentiation between PCNSL and GBM. The addition of SUVmax at the third session improved the diagnostic accuracy of all 3 readers and resulted in higher interobserver agreement; mean accuracy was 95% (range 93-100%). In one observer the accuracy of tumor differentiation was significantly improved at the third compared to the second session (p=0.017). In a selected group of PCNSL and GBM with similar MRI findings, the addition of quantitative FDG-PET to MRI may improve their differentiation. ADC measurement did not allow further discrimination. (author)

  1. Glioblastoma familiar

    Walter O. Arruda

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a family with three members affected by glioblastoma. The proband patient, a 7 year-old girl, developed a rare complication, a pulmonary metastasis. Chromosomal analysis of her peripheral blood lymphocytes showed a normal karyotype (46, XX, without structural abnormalities. Cytogenetic study of the tumor cells disclosed several abnormalities: 46, XX, 7q - / 46, XX, -2, 4p-, 7p-, +15/ 46, XX. Some aspects about genetics of glial neoplasms are discussed.

  2. Cell survival of glioblastoma grown in medium containing hydrogen peroxide and/or nitrite, or in plasma-activated medium.

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kondo, Takashi; Sekine, Makoto; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas generate a high electron density (on the order of 10(16) electrons per cm(-3)) using Ar gas. Culture medium in air at room temperature was plasma-irradiated for several hundred seconds. Tens of micromolar hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and millimolar levels of nitrous ion (NO2(-)) were detected in the plasma-irradiated culture medium (plasma activated medium; PAM) and selectively induced the apoptotic death of glioblastoma tumor cells, but did not kill normal mammary epithelial cells. A similar antitumor effect was induced by spiking the medium with comparable concentrations of H2O2 and NO2(-). The PAM remained still a somewhat difference that it should also be assessed for understanding other latent mechanisms. PMID:26820218

  3. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity is associated with response to alkylating agent therapy and with MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma and anaplastic glioma

    Bobola, Michael S.; Alnoor, Mohammad; Chen, John Y.-S.; Kolstoe, Douglas D.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Blank, A.; Chamberlain, Marc C.; Silber, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background CpG methylation in the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is associated with better outcome following alkylating agent chemotherapy in glioblastoma (GBM) and anaplastic glioma (AG). To what extent improved response reflects low or absent MGMT activity in glioma tissue has not been unequivocally assessed. This information is central to developing anti-resistance therapies. Methods We examined the relationship of MGMT activity in 91 GBMs and 84 AGs with progression-free survival (PFS) following alkylator therapy and with promoter methylation status determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Results Cox regression analysis revealed that GBMs with high activity had a significantly greater risk for progression in dichotomous (P ≤ 0.001) and continuous (P ≤ 0.003) models, an association observed for different alkylator regimens, including concurrent chemo-radiation with temozolomide. Analysis of MGMT promoter methylation status in 47 of the GBMs revealed that methylated tumors had significantly lower activity (P ≤ 0.005) and longer PFS (P ≤ 0.036) compared to unmethylated tumors, despite overlapping activities. PFS was also significantly greater in methylated vs. unmethylated GBMs with comparable activity (P ≤ 0.005), and among unmethylated tumors with less than median activity (P ≤ 0.026), suggesting that mechanisms in addition to MGMT promote alkylator resistance. Similar associations of MGMT activity with PFS and promoter methylation status were observed for AGs. Conclusions Our results provide strong support for the hypotheses that MGMT activity promotes alkylator resistance and reflects promoter methylation status in malignant gliomas. General significance MGMT activity is an attractive target for anti-resistance therapy regardless of methylation status. PMID:25558448

  4. AT-12PHASE 1/2 STUDY OF TH-302, INVESTIGATIONAL HYPOXIA-ACTIVATED PRODRUG, AND BEVACIZUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH BEVACIZUMAB-REFRACTORY RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA

    Brenner, Andrew; Floyd, John (S.I.), 1572-1649; Eng, Clarence; Kroll, Stew; Fichtel, Lisa; Gruslova, Aleksandra; Lodi, Alessia; Tiziani, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia is implicated in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and greater hypoxic burden is associated with poorer outcomes in GBM. Treatment with bevacizumab (BEV) may increase intratumoral hypoxia. An ongoing phase 1/2 study (NCT01403610) investigates safety and activity of TH-302, an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug, combined with BEV in patients with BEV-refractory GBM. METHODS: Single center, dose-escalation, prospective study with 2:1 randomization to ...

  5. Mesenchymal Migration as a Therapeutic Target in Glioblastoma

    Jessie Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive infiltration of the surrounding healthy brain tissue is a cardinal feature of glioblastomas, highly lethal brain tumors. Deep infiltration by the glioblastoma cells renders complete surgical excision difficult and contemporary adjuvant therapies have had little impact on long-term survival. Thus, deep infiltration and resistance to irradiation and chemotherapy remain a major cause of patient mortality. Modern therapies specifically targeted to this unique aspect of glioblastoma cell biology hold significant promise to substantially improve survival rates for glioblastoma patients. In the present paper, we focus on the role of adhesion signaling molecules and the actin cytoskeleton in the mesenchymal mode of motility that characterizes invading glioblastoma cells. We then review current approaches to targeting these elements of the glioblastoma cell migration machinery and discuss other aspects of cell migration that may improve the treatment of infiltrating glioblastoma.

  6. Inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Tivnan, Amanda; Zakaria, Zaitun; O'Leary, Caitrín; Kögel, Donat; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30–40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10–20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it's role in BBB ...

  7. Inhibition of Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Amanda eTivnan; Zaitun eZakaria; Caitrin eO'Leary; Donat eKogel; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it’s role in BB...

  8. Metabolic modulation of glioblastoma with dichloroacetate.

    Michelakis, E D; Sutendra, G; Dromparis, P; Webster, L; Haromy, A; Niven, E; Maguire, C; Gammer, T-L; Mackey, J R; Fulton, D; Abdulkarim, B; McMurtry, M S; Petruk, K C

    2010-05-12

    Solid tumors, including the aggressive primary brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme, develop resistance to cell death, in part as a result of a switch from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to cytoplasmic glycolysis. This metabolic remodeling is accompanied by mitochondrial hyperpolarization. We tested whether the small-molecule and orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA) can reverse this cancer-specific metabolic and mitochondrial remodeling in glioblastoma. Freshly isolated glioblastomas from 49 patients showed mitochondrial hyperpolarization, which was rapidly reversed by DCA. In a separate experiment with five patients who had glioblastoma, we prospectively secured baseline and serial tumor tissue, developed patient-specific cell lines of glioblastoma and putative glioblastoma stem cells (CD133(+), nestin(+) cells), and treated each patient with oral DCA for up to 15 months. DCA depolarized mitochondria, increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and induced apoptosis in GBM cells, as well as in putative GBM stem cells, both in vitro and in vivo. DCA therapy also inhibited the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, promoted p53 activation, and suppressed angiogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The dose-limiting toxicity was a dose-dependent, reversible peripheral neuropathy, and there was no hematologic, hepatic, renal, or cardiac toxicity. Indications of clinical efficacy were present at a dose that did not cause peripheral neuropathy and at serum concentrations of DCA sufficient to inhibit the target enzyme of DCA, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase II, which was highly expressed in all glioblastomas. Metabolic modulation may be a viable therapeutic approach in the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:20463368

  9. Piperlongumine selectively kills glioblastoma multiforme cells via reactive oxygen species accumulation dependent JNK and p38 activation.

    Liu, Ju Mei; Pan, Feng; Li, Li; Liu, Qian Rong; Chen, Yong; Xiong, Xin Xin; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Shang Bin; Shi, Zhi; Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2013-07-19

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, may have anti-cancer properties. It selectively targets and kills cancer cells but leaves normal cells intact. Here, we reported that PL selectively killed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells via accumulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) to activate JNK and p38. PL at 20μM could induce severe cell death in three GBM cell lines (LN229, U87 and 8MG) but not astrocytes in cultures. PL elevated ROS prominently and reduced glutathione levels in LN229 and U87 cells. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely reversed PL-induced ROS accumulation and prevented cell death in LN229 and U87 cells. In LN229 and U87 cells, PL-treatment activated JNK and p38 but not Erk and Akt, in a dosage-dependent manner. These activations could be blocked by NAC pre-treatment. JNK and p38 specific inhibitors, SB203580 and SP600125 respectively, significantly blocked the cytotoxic effects of PL in LN229 and U87 cells. Our data first suggests that PL may have therapeutic potential for one of the most malignant and refractory tumors GBM. PMID:23796709

  10. Piperlongumine inhibits migration of glioblastoma cells via activation of ROS-dependent p38 and JNK signaling pathways.

    Liu, Qian Rong; Liu, Ju Mei; Chen, Yong; Xie, Xiao Qiang; Xiong, Xin Xin; Qiu, Xin Yao; Pan, Feng; Liu, Di; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2014-01-01

    Piperlongumine (PL) is recently found to kill cancer cells selectively and effectively via targeting reactive oxygen species (ROS) responses. To further explore the therapeutic effects of PL in cancers, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PL in cancer cell migration. PL effectively inhibited the migration of human glioma (LN229 or U87 MG) cells but not normal astrocytes in the scratch-wound culture model. PL did not alter EdU(+)-cells and cdc2, cdc25c, or cyclin D1 expression in our model. PL increased ROS (measured by DCFH-DA), reduced glutathione, activated p38 and JNK, increased IκBα, and suppressed NFκB in LN229 cells after scratching. All the biological effects of PL in scratched LN229 cells were completely abolished by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Pharmacological administration of specific p38 (SB203580) or JNK (SP600125) inhibitors significantly reduced the inhibitory effects of PL on LN229 cell migration and NF κ B activity in scratch-wound and/or transwell models. PL prevented the deformation of migrated LN229 cells while NAC, SB203580, or SP600125 reversed PL-induced morphological changes of migrated cells. These results suggest potential therapeutic effects of PL in the treatment and prevention of highly malignant tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in the brain by suppressing tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:24967005

  11. Piperlongumine Inhibits Migration of Glioblastoma Cells via Activation of ROS-Dependent p38 and JNK Signaling Pathways

    Qian Rong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Piperlongumine (PL is recently found to kill cancer cells selectively and effectively via targeting reactive oxygen species (ROS responses. To further explore the therapeutic effects of PL in cancers, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PL in cancer cell migration. PL effectively inhibited the migration of human glioma (LN229 or U87 MG cells but not normal astrocytes in the scratch-wound culture model. PL did not alter EdU+-cells and cdc2, cdc25c, or cyclin D1 expression in our model. PL increased ROS (measured by DCFH-DA, reduced glutathione, activated p38 and JNK, increased IκBα, and suppressed NFκB in LN229 cells after scratching. All the biological effects of PL in scratched LN229 cells were completely abolished by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC. Pharmacological administration of specific p38 (SB203580 or JNK (SP600125 inhibitors significantly reduced the inhibitory effects of PL on LN229 cell migration and NFκB activity in scratch-wound and/or transwell models. PL prevented the deformation of migrated LN229 cells while NAC, SB203580, or SP600125 reversed PL-induced morphological changes of migrated cells. These results suggest potential therapeutic effects of PL in the treatment and prevention of highly malignant tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM in the brain by suppressing tumor invasion and metastasis.

  12. Activation of Multiple ERBB Family Receptors Mediates Glioblastoma Cancer Stem-like Cell Resistance to EGFR-Targeted Inhibition

    Paul A. Clark

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling is strongly implicated in glioblastoma (GBM tumorigenesis. However, molecular agents targeting EGFR have demonstrated minimal efficacy in clinical trials, suggesting the existence of GBM resistance mechanisms. GBM cells with stem-like properties (CSCs are highly efficient at tumor initiation and exhibit therapeutic resistance. In this study, GBMCSC lines showed sphere-forming and tumor initiation capacity after EGF withdrawal from cell culture media, compared with normal neural stem cells that rapidly perished after EGF withdrawal. Compensatory activation of related ERBB family receptors (ERBB2 and ERBB3 was observed in GBM CSCs deprived of EGFR signal (EGF deprivation or cetuximab inhibition, suggesting an intrinsic GBM resistance mechanism for EGFR-targeted therapy. Dual inhibition of EGFR and ERBB2 with lapatinib significantly reduced GBM proliferation in colony formation assays compared to cetuximab-mediated EGFR-specific inhibition. Phosphorylation of downstream ERBB signaling components (AKT, ERK1/2 and GBM CSC proliferation were inhibited by lapatinib. Collectively, these findings show that GBM therapeutic resistance to EGFR inhibitors may be explained by compensatory activation of EGFR-related family members (ERBB2, ERBB3 enabling GBM CSC proliferation, and therefore simultaneous blockade of multiple ERBB family members may be required for more efficacious GBM therapy.

  13. In vivo glioblastoma growth is reduced by apyrase activity in a rat glioma model

    ATP is an important signalling molecule in the peripheral and central nervous system. Both glioma growth and tumor resection induces cell death, thus liberating nucleotides to the extracellular medium. Nucleotides are hydrolyzed very slowly by gliomas when compared with astrocytes and induce neuronal cell death and glioma proliferation. The objective of the present study was to test the involvement of extracellular ATP in glioblastoma growth in a rat glioma model. To deplete the extracellular ATP, the enzyme apyrase was tested on the treatment of gliomas implanted in the rats CNS. One million glioma C6 cells in 3 microliters of DMEM/FCS were injected in the right striata of male Wistar rats, 250–270 g. After 20 days, the rats were decapitated and the brain sectioning and stained with hematoxylin and eosine. We performed immunohistochemical experiments with Ki67, CD31 and VEGF. Total RNA was isolated from cultured glioma C6 cells and the cDNA was analyzed by Real Time-PCR with primers for the NTPDase family. C6 glioma cells effectively have a low expression of all NTPDases investigated, in comparison with normal astrocytes. The implanted glioma co-injected with apyrase had a significant reduction in the tumor size (p < 0.05) when compared with the rats injected only with gliomas or with gliomas plus inactivated apyrase. According to the pathological analysis, the malignant gliomas induced by C6 injection and co-injected with apyrase presented a significant reduction in the mitotic index and other histological characteristics that indicate a less invasive/proliferative tumor. Reduction of proliferation induced by apyrase co-injection was confirmed by counting the percentage of Ki67 positive glioma cell nuclei. According to counts with CD31, vessel density and neoformation was higher in the C6 group 20 days after implantation. Confirming this observation, rats treated with apyrase presented less VEGF staining in comparison to the control group. These results

  14. Bevacizumab for the Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma

    Chamberlain, Marc C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in upfront therapy, the prognosis in the great majority of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) is poor as almost all recur and result in disease-related death. Glioblastoma are highly vascularized cancers with elevated expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the dominant mediator of angiogenesis. A compelling biologic rationale, a need for improved therapy, and positive results from studies of bevacizumab in other cancers led to the evaluation of bevacizu...

  15. Antitumor activity of F90,an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor,on glioblastoma cell line SHG-44

    LIU Fang-jun; GUI Song-bai; LI Chu-zhong; SUN Ze-lin; ZHANG Ya-zhuo

    2008-01-01

    Background Over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is thought to be related to cell proliferation,invasion,metastasis,resistance to chemoradiotherapy and poor prognosis of various human cancers.Forty percent to fifty percent of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) possess deregulated EGFR,which may contribute to the aggressive and refractory course of GBM.Therefore,blockade of EGFR signal transduction may be a promising treatment strategy for GBM.Methods MIT assay,cell growth curve assay and tumor xenograft model were used to evaluate the antitumor activity of F90 against SHG-44 in vitro and in vivo.Western blot assay was applied to evaluate the expression of p-EGFR,p-ERK1,p-JNK,p-P38,Bcl2 and P53 proteins.Results F90 inhibited the cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in vitro.The growth of SHG-44 tumor xenografts was suppressed by F90 at a high dose level (100 mg.kg-1.d-1).Phosphorylation of EGFR and activated downstream signaling proteins,such as ERK1,JNK and P38,were found to be depressed after incubation with F90 for 48 hours in vitro.Down-regulated Bcl2 protein and up-regulated P53 protein were also observed.Conclueions The results demonstrate that F90 is effective in inhibiting the proliferation of SHG-44 cells in vitro and tumor growth in vivo,suggesting that F90 may be a new therapeutic option for treatment of GBM.

  16. Morphine modulates doxorubicin uptake and improves efficacy of chemotherapy in an intracranial xenograft model of human glioblastoma

    da Ros, Martina; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Consolante, Dario; Cardile, Francesco; Muratori, Monica; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Guidi, Milena; Pisano, Claudio; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    Morphine may alter the permeability of Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB), enhancing the access of molecules normally unable to cross it, as Doxorubicin (Dox). In addition, morphine seems to mediate the uptake of Dox into the brain by its reduced efflux mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). We evaluated the antitumor efficacy of Dox plus morphine treatment by an orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft model. Foxn1 mice were injected with U87MG-luc cells in the left lobe of the brain and treated with Dox (5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg, weekly) with or without morphine pretreatment (10 mg/kg, weekly). Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was used to monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy. Additionally, we investigated the role of morphine on the uptake of Dox by MDCKII cells transfected with human MDR1 gene encoding for P-gp. The data demonstrate that only Dox 5 mg/kg determined a significant tumor regression while the lower dose (2.5 mg/kg) was not effective. However, if combined with morphine, the group treated with Dox 2.5 mg/kg showed a decreasing tumor growth. The average BLI for Dox 2.5 mg/kg plus morphine was 5 fold lower than Dox 2.5 mg/kg alone (P=0.0053) and 8 fold lower than vehicle (P=0.0004). Additionally, Dox increased in MDCKII-P-gp transfected cells only in the presence of morphine with a significantly higher level comparing control group (3.84) vs Dox plus morphine group (12.29, P<0.05). Our results indicate that Dox alone and in combination with morphine appear to be effective in controlling the growth of glioblastoma in a xenograft mouse model. PMID:27152241

  17. Targeting EGFR induced oxidative stress by PARP1 inhibition in glioblastoma therapy.

    Masayuki Nitta

    Full Text Available Despite the critical role of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR in glioblastoma pathogenesis, EGFR targeted therapies have achieved limited clinical efficacy. Here we propose an alternate therapeutic strategy based on the conceptual framework of non-oncogene addiction. A directed RNAi screen revealed that glioblastoma cells over-expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogenic variant of EGFR, become hyper-dependent on a variety of DNA repair genes. Among these, there was an enrichment of Base Excision Repair (BER genes required for the repair of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS-induced DNA damage, including poly-ADP ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1. Subsequent studies revealed that EGFRvIII over-expression in glioblastoma cells caused increased levels of ROS, DNA strand break accumulation, and genome instability. In a panel of primary glioblastoma lines, sensitivity to PARP1 inhibition correlated with the levels of EGFR activation and oxidative stress. Gene expression analysis indicated that reduced expression of BER genes in glioblastomas with high EGFR expression correlated with improved patient survival. These observations suggest that oxidative stress secondary to EGFR hyper-activation necessitates increased cellular reliance on PARP1 mediated BER, and offer critical insights into clinical trial design.

  18. Involvement of Akt/NF-κB pathway in antitumor effects of parthenolide on glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Glioblastoma is the most common and most aggressive form of malignant glioma and is very difficult to treat. Controlling tumour cell invasion and angiogenesis is essential to improve the prognosis of glioblastoma patients. Since constitutive activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is necessary for tumour progression, NF-κB may be an important pharmacological target for this disease. Our study aimed to evaluate the antitumour effects of parthenolide, a NF-κB inhibitor, in two human glioblastoma cell lines (U87MG and U373) and in glioblastoma xenografts. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. The anti-invasive and anti-angiogenic effects of parthenolide were analysed using in vitro invasion and angiogenesis assays. Parthenolide-induced growth inhibition of glioblastoma cells in vitro was determined using the MTT (methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium) assay. In addition, the effect of parthenolide on orthotropic implantation in vivo was evaluated using an intracerebral human glioblastoma xenograft model. We found that parthenolide suppresses proliferation, invasion, and tumour- induced angiogenesis of glioblastoma cells. Molecular studies demonstrated that parthenolide suppresses gene and protein expression of angiogenic factors. Furthermore, parthenolide reduced Akt phosphorylation and activated mitochondrial signalling, suggesting that the antitumour function of parthenolide may be mediated not only by the inhibition of NF-κB but also by the inhibition of Akt signalling and the activation of apoptotic proteins. Parthenolide suppressed neovascularity and tumour growth in glioblastoma xenografts. The present study identified parthenolide as a new therapeutic agent for glioblastomas

  19. Unique anti-glioblastoma activities of hypericin are at the crossroad of biochemical and epigenetic events and culminate in tumor cell differentiation.

    Naama Dror

    Full Text Available Failure of conventional therapies to alleviate glioblastoma (GBM fosters search for novel therapeutic strategies. These include epigenetic modulators as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi, which relax abnormally compact tumor cell chromatin organization, enabling cells to overcome blockage in differentiation. However, in clinical settings, HDACi efficacy is confined to subsets of hematologic malignancies. We reasoned that molecules targeting multiple epigenetic mechanisms may exhibit superior anti-cancer activities. We focused on the redox perylene-quinone Hypericin (HYP and showed that HYP targets Hsp90 for polyubiquitination, degradation and inactivation. Hsp90 is implicated in mediating inheritable epigenetic modifications transferable to progeny. We therefore examined if HYP can induce epigenetic alterations in GBM cells and show here that HYP indeed, targets multiple mechanisms in human glioblastoma tumor cell lines via unique manners. These elicit major epigenetic signature changes in key developmentally regulated genes. HYP induces neuroglial tumor cell differentiation modulating the cytoarchitecture, neuroglial differentiation antigen expression and causes exit from cell proliferation cycles. Such activities characterize HDACi however HYP is not an HDAC inhibitor. Instead, HYP effectively down-regulates expression of Class-I HDACs, creating marked deficiencies in HDACs cellular contents, leading to histones H3 and H4 hyperacetylation. Expression of EZH2, the Polycomb repressor complex-2 catalytic subunit, which trimethylates histone H3K27 is also suppressed. The resulting histone hyperacetylation and diminished H3K27-trimethylation relax chromatin structure, activating gene transcription including differentiation-promoting genes. DNMT profiles are also modulated increasing global DNA methylation. HYP induces unique epigenetic down-regulations of HDACs, EZH2 and DNMTs, remodeling chromatin structure and culminating in tumor cell

  20. Lentivirus-Mediated Nox4 shRNA Invasion and Angiogenesis and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Glioblastoma

    Yongsheng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioresistance remains a significant therapeutic obstacle in glioblastoma. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with multiple cellular functions such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. Nox4 NADPH oxidase is abundantly expressed and has proven to be a major source of ROS production in glioblastoma. Here we investigated the effects of Nox4 on GBM tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis, and radiosensitivity. A lentiviral shRNA vector was utilized to stably knockdown Nox4 in U87MG and U251 glioblastoma cells. ROS production was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA. Radiosensitivity was evaluated by clonogenic assay and survival curve was generated. Cell proliferation activity was assessed by a cell counting proliferation assay and invasion/migration potential by Matrigel invasion assay. Tube-like structure formation assay was used to evaluate angiogenesis ability in vitro and VEGF expression was assessed by MTT assay. Nox4 knockdown reduced ROS production significantly and suppressed glioblastoma cells proliferation and invasion and tumor associated angiogenesis and increased their radiosensitivity in vitro. Our results indicate that Nox4 may play a crucial role in tumor invasion, angiogenesis, and radioresistance in glioblastoma. Inhibition of Nox4 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA could be a strategy to overcome radioresistance and then improve its therapeutic efficacy for glioblastoma.

  1. Long-Term Survival and Improved Quality of Life following Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Erik W. Larson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is in most cases complex and must be specifically tailored to the needs of the patient with the goals of extended survival and improved quality of life. Despite advancements in therapy, treatment outcomes remain almost universally poor. Salvage treatment options for the recurrence of the disease is an area of intense study. The following case highlights the utility of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS as a salvage treatment. In this clinical situation, three sequential GKRS treatments led to prolonged survival (beyond four years after diagnosis and improved quality of life in a patient who was unable to receive further chemotherapy regimens and was unwilling to undergo further aggressive resection. To date, there have been few reports of three or more sequential GKRS treatment sessions utilized as salvage therapy for recurrent GBM in patients who can no longer tolerate chemotherapy. This report provides evidence that aggressive local treatment with GKRS at the time of recurrence may be appropriate, depending on a patient’s individual clinical situation, and can lead to prolonged survival and improved quality of life.

  2. Activation of Multiple ERBB Family Receptors Mediates Glioblastoma Cancer Stem-like Cell Resistance to EGFR-Targeted Inhibition12

    Clark, Paul A.; Iida, Mari; Daniel M. Treisman; Kalluri, Haviryaji; Ezhilan, Sathyapriya; Zorniak, Michael; Deric L. Wheeler; Kuo, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is strongly implicated in glioblastoma (GBM) tumorigenesis. However, molecular agents targeting EGFR have demonstrated minimal efficacy in clinical trials, suggesting the existence of GBM resistance mechanisms. GBM cells with stem-like properties (CSCs) are highly efficient at tumor initiation and exhibit therapeutic resistance. In this study, GBMCSC lines showed sphere-forming and tumor initiation capacity after EGF withdrawal from cell cultu...

  3. Planned activities to improve safety

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 6 of the document contains some details about the planed activities to safety improvements

  4. Multiple extraneural metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme

    J. Undabeitia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most frequent primary tumor in the brain. Despite improvements in its surgical, chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment, prognosis remains poor. Extracranial metastases of glioblastoma are a rare complication in this disease. Its appearance has been described in lung, liver, bone or lymph nodes. Case report. We describe the case of a 20 year-old patient who complained of a subacute-onset headache. In the MRI an enhancing right temporal lesion was detected suggesting a high grade glioma as first diagnosis. Surgery was performed, obtaining a gross total resection of the lesion. Our patient underwent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment, according to our hospital´s protocol. Five months after initial surgery our patient complained of chest pain and a hacking cough. A thoracic-abdominal-pelvic CT scan was obtained, which showed bilateral lung infiltrates with pleural effusion, a pancreatic nodule and several vertebral lytic lesions. The lung lesions were biopsied. The pathologic diagnosis was metastatic glioblastoma multiforme. The patient died eight months after initial diagnosis. Conclusion. Extracranial metastases of glioblastoma remain a rare event although its incidence is increasing, probably due to the improvement in survival among these patients and better imaging techniques. The mechanisms for extracranial dissemination of glioblastoma are not entirely known, as several theories exist in this regard. Physicians must be aware of this complication and keep it in mind as a differential diagnosis to improve the quality of life of our patients.

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Glioblastoma.

    Redmond, Kristin J; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the most aggressive of all human cancers. GBM tumors are highly infiltrative and relatively resistant to conventional therapies. Aggressive management of GBM using a combination of surgical resection, followed by fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival; however, GBM tumors recur in the majority of patients and the disease is most often fatal. There is a need to develop new treatment regimens and technological innovations to improve the overall survival of GBM patients. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of GBM has been explored and is controversial. SRS utilizes highly precise radiation techniques to allow dose escalation and delivery of ablative radiation doses to the tumor while minimizing dose to the adjacent normal structures. In some studies, SRS with concurrent chemotherapy has shown improved local control with acceptable toxicities in select GBM patients. However, because GBM is a highly infiltrative disease, skeptics argue that local therapies, such as SRS, do not improve overall survival. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding SRS in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM, to describe SRS techniques, potential eligible SRS candidates, and treatment-related toxicities. In addition, this article will propose promising areas for future research for SRS in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26848407

  6. Is surgery at progression a prognostic marker for improved 6-month progression-free survival or overall survival for patients with recurrent glioblastoma?

    Clarke, Jennifer L; Ennis, Michele M; Yung, W K Alfred; Chang, Susan M; Wen, Patrick Y; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Deangelis, Lisa M; Robins, H Ian; Lieberman, Frank S; Fine, Howard A; Abrey, Lauren; Gilbert, Mark R; Mehta, Minesh; Kuhn, John G; Aldape, Kenneth D; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Prados, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    Historically, the North American Brain Tumor Consortium used 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) as the primary outcome for recurrent glioma phase II clinical trials. In some trials, a subset of patients received the trial treatment before surgery to assess tumor uptake and biological activity. We compared PFS6 and overall survival (OS) for patients with glioblastoma undergoing surgery at progression to results for those without surgery to evaluate the impact of surgical intervention on these outcomes. Two data sets were analyzed. The first included 511 patients enrolled during the period 1998-2005, 105 of whom had surgery (excluding biopsies) during the study or ≤ 30 days prior to registration. Analysis was stratified on the basis of whether temozolomide was part of the protocol treatment regimen. The second data set included 247 patients enrolled during 2005-2008, 103 of whom underwent surgery during the clinical trial or immediately prior to study registration. A combined data set consisting of all patients who did not receive temozolomide was also compiled. No statistically significant difference in PFS6 or OS was found between the surgery and nonsurgery groups in either data set alone or in the combined data set (P > .45). We conclude that PFS6 and OS results for patients with and without surgical intervention at the time of progression are similar, allowing data from these patients to be combined in assessing the benefit of new treatments without the need for stratification or other statistical adjustment. PMID:21813511

  7. Results of stereotactic brachytherapy used in the initial management of patients with glioblastoma

    Recent studies have shown a survival benefit for patients with recurrent glioblastomas treated with stereotactic brachytherapy. On the basis of these encouraging results, we began a prospective study in 1987 to evaluate the use of brachytherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Patients were considered eligible for this study if they met the following criteria: Karnofsky performance status 70% or greater; tumor size not greater than 5 cm in any dimension; a radiographically well delineated, supratentorial lesion not involving the ependymal surfaces; and pathologically confirmed glioblastoma. We treated 35 such patients between 1987 and 1990 with stereotactic brachytherapy as part of their initial therapy. The treatment protocol involved surgery, partial brain external-beam radiotherapy, and stereotactic brachytherapy with temporary high-activity iodine 125 sources giving an additional 50 Gy to the tumor bed. Chemotherapy was not used in the initial management of these 35 patients. To compare our results with those obtained in a matched control group, we identified 40 patients with glioblastoma treated with surgery and external radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, between 1977 and 1986 at our institution. These patients had clinical and radiographic characteristics that would have made them eligible for the brachytherapy protocol. Survival rates at 1 and 2 years after diagnosis were 87% and 57%, respectively, for patients receiving brachytherapy versus 40% and 12.5%, respectively, for the controls (P less than .001). We conclude that stereotactic brachytherapy improves the survival of patients with glioblastoma when it can be incorporated into the initial treatment approach. Unfortunately, only about one in four patients with glioblastoma are suitable candidates for brachytherapy at the time of initial presentation

  8. Improved Active Vibration Isolation Systems

    2007-01-01

    The control force, feedback gain, and actuator stroke of several active vibration isolation systems were analyzed based on a single-layer active vibration isolation system. The analysis shows that the feedback gain and actuator stroke cannot be selected independently and the active isolation system design must make a compromise between the feedback gain and actuator stroke. The performance of active isolation systems can be improved by the joint vibration reduction using an active vibration isolation system with an adaptive dynamic vibration absorber. The results show that the joint vibration reduction method can successfully avoid the compromise between the feedback gain and actuator stroke. The control force and the object vibration amplitude are also greatly reduced.

  9. Direct effect of bevacizumab on glioblastoma cell lines in vitro.

    Simon, Thomas; Coquerel, Bérénice; Petit, Alexandre; Kassim, Yusra; Demange, Elise; Le Cerf, Didier; Perrot, Valérie; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the pro-angiogenic factor vascular and endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) used in the treatment of glioblastomas. Although most patients respond initially to this treatment, studies have shown that glioblastomas eventually recur. Several non-mutually exclusive theories based on the anti-angiogenic effect of bevacizumab have been proposed to explain these mechanisms of resistance. In this report, we studied whether bevacizumab can act directly on malignant glioblastoma cells. We observe changes in the expression profiles of components of the VEGF/VEGF-R pathway and in the response to a VEGF-A stimulus following bevacizumab treatment. In addition, we show that bevacizumab itself acts on glioblastoma cells by activating the Akt and Erks survival signaling pathways. Bevacizumab also enhances proliferation and invasiveness of glioblastoma cells in hyaluronic acid hydrogel. We propose that the paradoxical effect of bevacizumab on glioblastoma cells could be due to changes in the VEGF-A-dependent autocrine loop as well as in the intracellular survival pathways, leading to the enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. Investigation of how bevacizumab interacts with glioblastoma cells and the resulting downstream signaling pathways will help targeting populations of resistant glioblastoma cells. PMID:25113866

  10. Cytomegalovirus and glioblastoma; controversies and opportunities.

    Lawler, Sean E

    2015-07-01

    One of the more polarized ongoing debates in the brain tumor field over recent years has centered on the association of cytomegalovirus (CMV) with glioblastoma. Several laboratories have reported the presence of CMV antigens in glioblastoma patient specimens, whereas others have failed to detect them. CMV genomic DNA and mRNAs have been detected by PCR, but not in next-generation sequencing studies. CMV promotes high grade glioma progression in a mouse genetic model, and many CMV proteins promote cancer hallmarks in vitro, but actively replicating virus has not been isolated from tumor samples. A consensus is gradually emerging in which the presence of CMV antigens in glioblastoma is increasingly accepted. However, it remains challenging to understand this mechanistically due to the low levels of CMV nucleic acids and the absence of viral replication observed in tumors thus far. Nonetheless, these observations have inspired the development of novel therapeutic approaches based on anti-viral drugs and immunotherapy. The potential benefit of valganciclovir in glioblastoma has generated great interest, but efficacy remains to be established in a randomized trial. Also, early stage immunotherapy trials targeting CMV have shown promise. In the near future we will know more answers to these questions, and although areas of controversy may remain, and the mechanisms and roles of CMV in tumor growth are yet to be clearly defined, this widespread virus may have created important new therapeutic concepts and opportunities for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:25682092

  11. Emerging Biomarkers in Glioblastoma

    McNamara, Mairéad G.; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Mason, Warren P., E-mail: warren.mason@uhn.ca [Pencer Brain Tumor Centre, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2013-08-22

    Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor, has few available therapies providing significant improvement in survival. Molecular signatures associated with tumor aggressiveness as well as with disease progression and their relation to differences in signaling pathways implicated in gliomagenesis have recently been described. A number of biomarkers which have potential in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy have been identified and along with imaging modalities could contribute to the clinical management of GBM. Molecular biomarkers including O(6)-methlyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomes 1p and 19q, loss of heterozygosity 10q, isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1 (ELTD1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor suppressor protein p53, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), p16INK4a gene, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), phospholipid metabolites, telomerase messenger expression (hTERT messenger ribonucleic acid [mRNA]), microRNAs (miRNAs), cancer stem cell markers and imaging modalities as potential biomarkers are discussed. Inclusion of emerging biomarkers in prospective clinical trials is warranted in an effort for more effective personalized therapy in the future.

  12. P04.16THE BIOMARKER POTENTIAL OF MGMT PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN GLIOBLASTOMA IS IMPROVED BY EXCLUSION OF NON-TUMOR CELLS

    Klitkou, J.; Dahlrot, R.H.; Hansen, S.; Kristensen, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Methylation of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter is predictive of benefit from temozolomide (TMZ) in glioblastoma (GBM). Non-tumor cells are numerous in GBMs and a potential source of bias in attempts to determine MGMT status by immunohistochemistry. The aim of the present study was to explore the prognostic potential of MGMT protein expression excluding these cells. METHOD: Immunofluorescence multiplexing and automated analysis were combined to quantify MGMT (green fluorescence) in tumor cell nuclei using image analysis algorithms. Microglia/macrophages, lymfocytes and vascular structures (red fluorescence) known to express MGMT were excluded from the analysis. The study included paraffin sections from 173 primary GBM's. RESULTS: High area fraction of tumor cell nuclei expressing MGMT was associated with poor prognosis (HR = 1.59, p = 0.005). Prognostic value of MGMT expression was particularly strong in patients treated with TMZ as first line therapy (HR = 2.31, p = 0.0003). The 2-year survival in this group was 44 % versus 7 % for patients with low and high expression respectively. Non-tumor cell nuclei often showed higher MGMT expression than adjacent tumor cells. Exclusion of these cells was shown to improve the prognostic value of MGMT expression. CONCLUSION: MGMT protein expression in tumor cell nuclei holds prognostic potential in GBM. Exclusion of non-tumor cells from the analysis is crucial to avoid false positives. The path to possible clinical implementation will require further testing in independent patient cohorts as well as development of a highly robust multiplexing assay with not yet defined cut-off levels.

  13. Why Is There a Lack of Consensus on Molecular Subgroups of Glioblastoma? Understanding the Nature of Biological and Statistical Variability in Glioblastoma Expression Data

    Nicholas F. Marko; Quackenbush, John; Weil, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Gene expression patterns characterizing clinically-relevant molecular subgroups of glioblastoma are difficult to reproduce. We suspect a combination of biological and analytic factors confounds interpretation of glioblastoma expression data. We seek to clarify the nature and relative contributions of these factors, to focus additional investigations, and to improve the accuracy and consistency of translational glioblastoma analyses. Methods We analyzed gene expression and clinica...

  14. Dendrosomal curcumin nanoformulation downregulates pluripotency genes via miR-145 activation in U87MG glioblastoma cells

    Tahmasebi Mirgani M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maryam Tahmasebi Mirgani,1 Benedetta Isacchi,2 Majid Sadeghizadeh,1,* Fabio Marra,3 Anna Rita Bilia,2,* Seyed Javad Mowla,1 Farhood Najafi,4 Esmael Babaei51Department of Genetics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran; 2Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy; 3Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Italy; 4Department of Resin and Additives, Institute for Color Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Biology, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Glioblastoma is an invasive tumor of the central nervous system. Tumor recurrence resulting from ineffective current treatments, mainly due to the blood–brain barrier, highlights the need for innovative therapeutic alternatives. The recent availability of nanotechnology represents a novel targeted strategy in cancer therapy. Natural products have received considerable attention for cancer therapy because of general lower side effects. Curcumin is a new candidate for anticancer treatment, but its low bioavailability and water solubility represent the main disadvantages of its use. Here, curcumin was efficiently encapsulated in a nontoxic nanocarrier, termed dendrosome, to overcome these problems. Dendrosomal curcumin was prepared as 142 nm spherical structures with constant physical and chemical stability. The inhibitory role of dendrosomal curcumin on the proliferation of U87MG cells, a cellular model of glioblastoma, was evaluated by considering master genes of pluripotency and regulatory miRNA (microribonucleic acid. Methylthiazol tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the antiproliferative effects of dendrosomal curcumin. Annexin-V-FLUOS and caspase assay were used to quantify apoptosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the expression of OCT4 (octamer binding protein 4 gene variants (OCT4A, OCT4B, and OCT4B1, SOX-2 (SRY

  15. Cilengitide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma: biomarker expression and outcome

    Weller, Michael; Nabors, Louis Burt; Gorlia, Thierry; Leske, Henning; Rushing, Elisabeth; Bady, Pierre; Hicking, Christine; Perry, James; Hong, Yong-Kil; Roth, Patrick; Wick, Wolfgang; Goodman, Simon L.; Hegi, Monika E.; Picard, Martin; Moch, Holger; Straub, Josef; Stupp, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 regulate angiogenesis and invasiveness in cancer, potentially by modulating activation of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway. The randomized phase III CENTRIC and phase II CORE trials explored the integrin inhibitor cilengitide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma with versus without O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation. These trials failed to meet their primary endpoints. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the levels of the target integrins of cilengitide, αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, of αvβ8 and of their putative target, phosphorylation of SMAD2, in tumor tissues from CENTRIC (n=274) and CORE (n=224). αvβ3 and αvβ5 expression correlated well in tumor and endothelial cells, but showed little association with αvβ8 or pSMAD2 levels. In CENTRIC, there was no interaction between the biomarkers and treatment for prediction of outcome. In CORE, higher αvβ3 levels in tumor cells were associated with improved progression-free survival by central review and with improved overall survival in patients treated with cilengitide. Integrins αvβ3, αvβ5 and αvβ8 are differentially expressed in glioblastoma. Integrin levels do not correlate with the activation level of the canonical TGF-β pathway. αvβ3 integrin expression may predict benefit from integrin inhibition in patients with glioblastoma lacking MGMT promoter methylation. PMID:26918452

  16. Dendrosomal curcumin nanoformulation downregulates pluripotency genes via miR-145 activation in U87MG glioblastoma cells.

    Tahmasebi Mirgani, Maryam; Isacchi, Benedetta; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Marra, Fabio; Bilia, Anna Rita; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Najafi, Farhood; Babaei, Esmael

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an invasive tumor of the central nervous system. Tumor recurrence resulting from ineffective current treatments, mainly due to the blood-brain barrier, highlights the need for innovative therapeutic alternatives. The recent availability of nanotechnology represents a novel targeted strategy in cancer therapy. Natural products have received considerable attention for cancer therapy because of general lower side effects. Curcumin is a new candidate for anticancer treatment, but its low bioavailability and water solubility represent the main disadvantages of its use. Here, curcumin was efficiently encapsulated in a nontoxic nanocarrier, termed dendrosome, to overcome these problems. Dendrosomal curcumin was prepared as 142 nm spherical structures with constant physical and chemical stability. The inhibitory role of dendrosomal curcumin on the proliferation of U87MG cells, a cellular model of glioblastoma, was evaluated by considering master genes of pluripotency and regulatory miRNA (microribonucleic acid). Methylthiazol tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the antiproliferative effects of dendrosomal curcumin. Annexin-V-FLUOS and caspase assay were used to quantify apoptosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the expression of OCT4 (octamer binding protein 4) gene variants (OCT4A, OCT4B, and OCT4B1), SOX-2 (SRY [sex determining region Y]-box 2), Nanog, and miR-145. Dendrosomal curcumin efficiently suppresses U87MG cells growth with no cytotoxicity related to dendrosome. Additionally, the accumulation of cells in the SubG1 phase was observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as higher rates of apoptosis after dendrosomal curcumin treatment. Conversely, nonneoplastic cells were not affected by this formulation. Dendrosomal curcumin significantly decreased the relative expression of OCT4A, OCT4B1, SOX-2, and Nanog along with noticeable overexpression of miR-145 as the upstream regulator. This suggests

  17. Coordination of glioblastoma cell motility by PKCι

    Baldwin R Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, in part because of its highly invasive nature. The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently mutated in glioblastoma and is known to contribute to the invasive phenotype. However the downstream events that promote invasion are not fully understood. PTEN loss leads to activation of the atypical protein kinase C, PKCι. We have previously shown that PKCι is required for glioblastoma cell invasion, primarily by enhancing cell motility. Here we have used time-lapse videomicroscopy to more precisely define the role of PKCι in glioblastoma. Results Glioblastoma cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically were unable to coordinate the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod. Instead, some cells generated multiple small, short-lived protrusions while others generated a diffuse leading edge that formed around the entire circumference of the cell. Confocal microscopy showed that this behavior was associated with altered behavior of the cytoskeletal protein Lgl, which is known to be inactivated by PKCι phosphorylation. Lgl in control cells localized to the lamellipod leading edge and did not associate with its binding partner non-muscle myosin II, consistent with it being in an inactive state. In PKCι-depleted cells, Lgl was concentrated at multiple sites at the periphery of the cell and remained in association with non-muscle myosin II. Videomicroscopy also identified a novel role for PKCι in the cell cycle. Cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically entered mitosis normally, but showed marked delays in completing mitosis. Conclusions PKCι promotes glioblastoma motility by coordinating the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod and has a role in remodeling the cytoskeleton at the lamellipod leading edge, promoting the dissociation of Lgl from non-muscle myosin II. In addition PKCι is required

  18. Irinotecan and Bevacizumab in Glioblastoma-A Review

    1M. T. Shahid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a common brain tumor having comparatively poor prognosis. Bevacizumab and irinotecan are found to be effective in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. The present review covers investigations made on the mentioned drugs in the past decade. As compared to other chemotherapeutic agents, the drugs have shown greater activity and overall survival when used as monotherapeutic agents or in combination with other drugs. Still some work needs to be done in establishing clear role of both the drugs in newly diagnosed glioblastoma, especially, role of irinotecan needs clarity.

  19. P04.16THE BIOMARKER POTENTIAL OF MGMT PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN GLIOBLASTOMA IS IMPROVED BY EXCLUSION OF NON-TUMOR CELLS

    Klitkou, J.; Dahlrot, R.H.; Hansen, S; Kristensen, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Methylation of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter is predictive of benefit from temozolomide (TMZ) in glioblastoma (GBM). Non-tumor cells are numerous in GBMs and a potential source of bias in attempts to determine MGMT status by immunohistochemistry. The aim of the present study was to explore the prognostic potential of MGMT protein expression excluding these cells. METHOD: Immunofluorescence multiplexing and automated analysis w...

  20. Bidirectional Contrast agent leakage correction of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI improves cerebral blood volume estimation and survival prediction in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab.

    Ab, KL; Boxerman, JL; Lai, A.; Nghiemphu, PL; Pope, WB; Cloughesy, TF; Ellingson, BM

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate a leakage correction algorithm for T1 and T2* artifacts arising from contrast agent extravasation in dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) that accounts for bidirectional contrast agent flux and compare relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) estimates and overall survival (OS) stratification from this model to those made with the unidirectional and uncorrected models in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM).We determined median rCBV within contras...

  1. Inhibition of CXCL12/CXCR4 autocrine/paracrine loop reduces viability of human glioblastoma stem-like cells affecting self-renewal activity

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells (TICs) drive glioblastoma (GBM) development, invasiveness and drug resistance. Distinct molecular pathways might regulate CSC biology as compared to cells in the bulk tumor mass, representing potential therapeutic targets. Chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 control proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in GBM cell lines and primary cultures, but little is known about their activity in GBM CSCs. We demonstrate that CSCs, isolated from five human GBMs, express CXCR4 and release CXCL12 in vitro, although different levels of expression and secretion were observed in individual cultures, as expected for the heterogeneity of GBMs. CXCL12 treatment induced Akt-mediated significant pro-survival and self-renewal activities, while proliferation was induced at low extent. The role of CXCR4 signaling in CSC survival and self-renewal was further demonstrated using the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 that reduced self-renewal and survival with greater efficacy in the cultures that released higher CXCL12 amounts. The specificity of CXCL12 in sustaining CSC survival was demonstrated by the lack of AMD3100-dependent inhibition of viability in differentiated cells derived from the same GBMs. These findings, although performed on a limited number of tumor samples, suggest that the CXCL12/CXCR4 interaction mediates survival and self-renewal in GBM CSCs with high selectivity, thus emerging as a candidate system responsible for maintenance of cancer progenitors, and providing survival benefits to the tumor

  2. BC3EE2,9B, a synthetic carbazole derivative, upregulates autophagy and synergistically sensitizes human GBM8901 glioblastoma cells to temozolomide

    CHEN, CHIEN-MIN; SYU, JHIH-PU; WAY, TZONG-DER; HUANG, LI-JIAU; KUO, SHENG-CHU; LIN, CHUNG-TIEN; LIN, CHIH-LI

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most fatal form of human brain cancer. Although temozolomide (TMZ), an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, improves the survival rate, the prognosis of patients with GBM remains poor. Naturally occurring carbazole alkaloids isolated from curry leaves (Murraya koenigii Spreng.) have been shown to possess a wide range of anticancer properties. However, the effects of carbazole derivatives on glioblastoma cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, anti-glioblastoma profiles of a series of synthetic carbazole derivatives were evaluated in vitro. The most promising derivative in this series was BC3EE2,9B, which showed significant anti-proliferative effects in GBM8401 and GBM8901 cells. BC3EE2,9B also triggered cell-cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1 stage, and suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion and migration. Furthermore, BC3EE2,9B induced autophagy-mediated cell death and synergistically sensitized GBM cells to TMZ cytotoxicity. The possible mechanism underlying BC3EE2,9B-induced autophagy may involve activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the attenuation of the Akt and mammalian target of the rapamycin downstream signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results provide molecular evidence for the mode of action governing the ability of BC3EE2,9B to sensitize drug-resistant glioblastoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent TMZ. PMID:26329365

  3. Biological Rationale for the Use of PPARγ Agonists in Glioblastoma

    Hayley Patricia Ellis; Kathreena Mary Kurian

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary intrinsic central nervous system tumor and has an extremely poor overall survival with only 10% patients being alive after 5 years. There has been interesting preliminary evidence suggesting that diabetic patients receiving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists, a group of anti-diabetic, thiazolidinedione drugs, have an increased median survival for glioblastoma. Although thiazolidinediones are effective oral...

  4. Immunological Evasion in Glioblastoma

    Roxana Magaña-Maldonado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive tumor in Central Nervous System in adults. Among its features, modulation of immune system stands out. Although immune system is capable of detecting and eliminating tumor cells mainly by cytotoxic T and NK cells, tumor microenvironment suppresses an effective response through recruitment of modulator cells such as regulatory T cells, monocyte-derived suppressor cells, M2 macrophages, and microglia as well as secretion of immunomodulators including IL-6, IL-10, CSF-1, TGF-β, and CCL2. Other mechanisms that induce immunosuppression include enzymes as indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase. For this reason it is important to develop new therapies that avoid this immune evasion to promote an effective response against glioblastoma.

  5. Immunological Evasion in Glioblastoma

    Magaña-Maldonado, Roxana; Chávez-Cortez, Elda Georgina; Olascoaga-Arellano, Nora Karen; López-Mejía, Mariana; Maldonado-Leal, Fernando Manuel; Sotelo, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive tumor in Central Nervous System in adults. Among its features, modulation of immune system stands out. Although immune system is capable of detecting and eliminating tumor cells mainly by cytotoxic T and NK cells, tumor microenvironment suppresses an effective response through recruitment of modulator cells such as regulatory T cells, monocyte-derived suppressor cells, M2 macrophages, and microglia as well as secretion of immunomodulators including IL-6, IL-10, CSF-1, TGF-β, and CCL2. Other mechanisms that induce immunosuppression include enzymes as indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase. For this reason it is important to develop new therapies that avoid this immune evasion to promote an effective response against glioblastoma. PMID:27294132

  6. Dexamethasone protected human glioblastoma U87MG cells from temozolomide induced apoptosis by maintaining Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and preventing proteolytic activities

    Patel Sunil J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is the deadliest and most prevalent brain tumor. Dexamethasone (DXM is a commonly used steroid for treating glioblastoma patients for alleviation of vasogenic edema and pain prior to treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Temozolomide (TMZ, an alkylating agent, has recently been introduced in clinical trials for treating glioblastoma. Here, we evaluated the modulatory effect of DXM on TMZ induced apoptosis in human glioblastoma U87MG cells. Results Freshly grown cells were treated with different doses of DXM or TMZ for 6 h followed by incubation in a drug-free medium for 48 h. Wright staining and ApopTag assay showed no apoptosis in cells treated with 40 μM DXM but considerable amounts of apoptosis in cells treated with 100 μM TMZ. Apoptosis in TMZ treated cells was associated with an increase in intracellular free [Ca2+], as determined by fura-2 assay. Western blot analyses showed alternations in the levels of Bax (pro-apoptotic and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic proteins resulting in increased Bax:Bcl-2 ratio in TMZ treated cells. Western blot analyses also detected overexpression of calpain and caspase-3, which cleaved 270 kD α-spectrin at specific sites for generation of 145 and 120 kD spectrin break down products (SBDPs, respectively. However, 1-h pretreatment of cells with 40 μM DXM dramatically decreased TMZ induced apoptosis, decreasing Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and SBDPs. Conclusion Our results revealed an antagonistic effect of DXM on TMZ induced apoptosis in human glioblastoma U87MG cells, implying that treatment of glioblastoma patients with DXM prior to chemotherapy with TMZ might result in an undesirable clinical outcome.

  7. CXCL12 MODULATION OF CXCR4 AND CXCR7 ACTIVITY IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA STEM-LIKE CELLS AND REGULATION OF THE TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

    Roberto eWurth

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells.Glioblastoma (GBM is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascribed to high growth rate, invasiveness to normal brain, marked angiogenesis, ability to escape the immune system and resistance to standard of care therapies. Tumor molecular and cellular heterogeneity severely hinders GBM therapeutic improvement. In particular, a subpopulation of chemo- and radio-therapy resistant tumorigenic cancer stem–like cells (CSCs is believed to be the main responsible for tumor cell dissemination to the brain.GBM cells display heterogeneous expression levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7 that are overexpressed in CSCs, representing a molecular correlate for the invasive potential of GBM. The microenvironment contribution in GBM development is increasingly emphasized. An interplay exists between CSCs, differentiated GBM cells, and the microenvironment, mainly through secreted chemokines (e.g. CXCL12 causing recruitment of fibroblasts, endothelial, mesenchymal and inflammatory cells to the tumor, via specific receptors such as CXCR4.This review covers recent developments on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 networks in GBM progression and the potential translational impact of their targeting. The biological and molecular understanding of the heterogeneous GBM cell behavior, phenotype and signaling is still limited. Progress in the identification of chemokine-dependent mechanisms that affect GBM cell survival, trafficking and chemo-attractive functions, opens new perspectives for development of more specific therapeutic approaches that include

  8. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothe- sis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consis...

  9. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    Lizarte, F.S. Neto; Tirapelli, D.P.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, S.R. [Universidade de Franca, Núcleo de Pesquisa em Ciências e Tecnologia, Franca, SP (Brazil); Tirapelli, C.R. [Universidade de São Paulo, Laboratório de Farmacologia, Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, F.M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Novais, P.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Peria, F.M.; Oliveira, H.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Carlotti, C.G. Junior; Tirapelli, L.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-01-11

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  10. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors

  11. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches

    Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma can prolong survival, but it is not curative. For patients with disease progression after frontline therapy, there is no standard of care, although further surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy may be used. Antiangiogenic therapies may be appropriate for treating glioblastomas because angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth. In a large, noncomparative phase II trial, bevacizumab was evaluated alone and with irinotecan in patients with recurrent glioblastoma; combination treatment was associated with an estimated 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 50.3%, a median overall survival of 8.9 months, and a response rate of 37.8%. Single-agent bevacizumab also exceeded the predetermined threshold of activity for salvage chemotherapy (6-month PFS rate, 15%), achieving a 6-month PFS rate of 42.6% (p < 0.0001). On the basis of these results and those from another phase II trial, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval of single-agent bevacizumab for the treatment of glioblastoma that has progressed following prior therapy. Potential antiangiogenic agents-such as cilengitide and XL184-also show evidence of single-agent activity in recurrent glioblastoma. Moreover, the use of antiangiogenic agents with radiation at disease progression may improve the therapeutic ratio of single-modality approaches. Overall, these agents appear to be well tolerated, with adverse event profiles similar to those reported in studies of other solid tumors. Further research is needed to determine the role of antiangiogenic therapy in frontline treatment and to identify the optimal schedule and partnering agents for use in combination therapy

  12. IMPROVING CAUSE DETECTION SYSTEMS WITH ACTIVE LEARNING

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IMPROVING CAUSE DETECTION SYSTEMS WITH ACTIVE LEARNING ISAAC PERSING AND VINCENT NG Abstract. Active learning has been successfully applied to many natural language...

  13. How I treat glioblastoma in older patients.

    Mohile, Nimish A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma, a WHO grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. It is characterized by molecular heterogeneity and aggressive behavior. Glioblastoma is almost always incurable and most older patients survive less than 6 months. Supportive care with steroids and anti-epileptic drugs is critical to improving and maintain quality of life. Young age, good performance status and methylation of the methyl guanyl methyl transferase promoter are important positive prognostic factors. Several recent clinical trials suggest that there is a subset of the elderly with prolonged survival that is comparable to younger patients. Treatment of glioblastoma in older patients includes maximal safe resection followed by either radiation, chemotherapy or combined modality therapy. Recent advances suggest that some patients can avoid radiation entirely and be treated with chemotherapy alone. Decisions about therapy are individual and based on a patient's performance status, family support and molecular features. Future work needs to better determine the role for comprehensive geriatric assessments in this patient population to better identify patients who may most benefit from aggressive therapies. PMID:26725536

  14. DD-02PHARMACODYNAMIC BIOMARKER ASSESSMENTS IN A PHASE I/II TRIAL OF THE HYPOXIA-ACTIVATED PRODRUG TH-302 AND BEVACIZUMAB IN BEVACIZUMAB-REFRACTORY RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA

    Cavazos, David; Gruslova, Aleksandra; Sun, J.; Floyd, John R.; Fichtel, Lisa; Tadi, Surendar; Lodi, Alessia; Tiziani, Stefano; van der Hart, C.P.; Eng, Clarence; Brenner, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma (GBM) remains an incurable malignancy with rapid progression and poor survival. GBM exhibits a hypoxic nature, and treatment with bevacizumab (BEV) may increase intratumoral hypoxia. TH-302 is an investigational prodrug that selectively releases the DNA cross-linker (Br-IPM) under hypoxic conditions. A phase I/II trial (NCT01403610) is evaluating the safety and efficacy of combined TH-302 and BEV treatment in patients with BEV-refractory GBM and investigating pharmaco...

  15. CXCL12 modulation of CXCR4 and CXCR7 activity in human glioblastoma stem-like cells and regulation of the tumor microenvironment

    Würth, Roberto; Bajetto, Adriana; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascr...

  16. CXCL12 MODULATION OF CXCR4 AND CXCR7 ACTIVITY IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA STEM-LIKE CELLS AND REGULATION OF THE TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

    Roberto eWurth; Adriana eBajetto; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Federica eBarbieri; Tullio eFlorio

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells.Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascri...

  17. Dopamine signaling: target in glioblastoma

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2014), 1116-1117. ISSN 1949-2553 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Dopamine signaling * glioblastoma * MAPK Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.359, year: 2014

  18. Lactate levels with glioblastoma multiforme

    Kahlon, Arunpreet Singh; Alexander, Mariam; Kahlon, Arundeep; Wright, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman with known glioblastoma multiforme was admitted for treatment of new deep vein thrombosis. Anion gap and plasma lactate levels were found to be elevated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a stable, advanced glioblastoma multiforme. All causes of lactic acidosis, including infections and medications, were ruled out. Aggressive tumors have been shown to produce lactate levels in minute quantities in their microenvironment, which helps them metastasize and evade ...

  19. Lactate levels with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Kahlon, Arunpreet Singh; Alexander, Mariam; Kahlon, Arundeep; Wright, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    A 37-year-old woman with known glioblastoma multiforme was admitted for treatment of new deep vein thrombosis. Anion gap and plasma lactate levels were found to be elevated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a stable, advanced glioblastoma multiforme. All causes of lactic acidosis, including infections and medications, were ruled out. Aggressive tumors have been shown to produce lactate levels in minute quantities in their microenvironment, which helps them metastasize and evade immune response and even radiation. PMID:27365883

  20. Recurrent Glioblastoma: Where we stand

    Sanjoy Roy; Debarshi Lahiri; Tapas Maji; Jaydip Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Current first-line treatment regimens combine surgical resection and chemoradiation for Glioblastoma that provides a slight increase in overall survival. Age on its own should not be used as an exclusion criterion of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment, but performance should be factored heavily into the decision-making process for treatment planning. Despite aggressive initial treatment, most patients develop recurrent diseases which can be treated with re-resection, systemic treatment w...

  1. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neura...

  2. Physical Activity Improves Quality of Life

    ... Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Physical activity improves quality of life Updated:Mar 2,2015 Do you want to ... illnesses and diseases associated with aging and maintains quality of life and independence longer for seniors So why not ...

  3. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates improved

  4. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    Rock, K

    2012-01-03

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates

  5. Rac1+ cells distributed in accordance with CD 133+ cells in glioblastomas and the elevated invasiveness of CD 133+ glioma cells with higher Rac1 activity

    ZHANG Bin; SUN Jian; YU Sheng-ping; CHEN Cong; LIU Bin; LIU Zhi-feng; REN Bing-cheng; MING Hao-lang; YANG Xue-jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that cancer stem cells are one of the major causes for tumor recurrence due to their resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.Although the highly invasive nature of glioblastoma (GBM)cells is also implicated in the failure of current therapies,it is not clear how glioma stem cells (GSCs) are involved in invasiveness.Rac1 activity is necessary for inducing reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and cell movement.In this study,we aimed to investigate the distribution characteristics of CD133+ cells and Rac1+ cells in GBM as well as Rac1 activity in CD133+ GBM cells,and analyze the migration and invasion potential of these cells.Methods A series of 21 patients with GBM were admitted consecutively and received tumor resection in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital during the first half of the year 2011.Tissue specimens were collected both from the peripheral and the central parts for each tumor under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigation guidance.Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the CD133+ cells and Rac1+ cells distribution in GBM specimens.Double-labeling immunofluorescence was further used to analyze CD133 and Rac1 co-expression and the relationship between CD133+ cells distribution and Rac1 expression.Serum-free medium culture and magnetic sorting were used to isolate CD133+ cells from U87 cell line.Rac1 activation assay was conducted to assess the activation of Rac1 in CD133+ and CD133-U87 cells.The migration and invasive ability of CD133+ and CD133-U87 cells were determined by cell migration and invasion assays in vitro.Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used to determine statistical significance in this study.Results In the central parts of GBMs,CD133+ cells were found to cluster around necrosis and occasionally cluster around the vessels under the microscope by immunohistological staining.In the peripheral parts of the tumors,CD133+ cells were lined up along

  6. Supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme with spinal metastases

    Abhidha Shah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. Metastasis of intracranial glioblastoma via the cerebrospinal fluid to the spine is a rare occurrence. We present two cases of glioblastoma multiforme with spinal leptomeningeal spread who presented with back pain and paraparesis.

  7. Software Engineering Improvement Activities/Plan

    2003-01-01

    bd Systems personnel accomplished the technical responsibilities for this reporting period, as planned. A close working relationship was maintained with personnel of the MSFC Avionics Department Software Group (ED14). Work accomplishments included development, evaluation, and enhancement of a software cost model, performing literature search and evaluation of software tools available for code analysis and requirements analysis, and participating in other relevant software engineering activities. Monthly reports were submitted. This support was provided to the Flight Software Group/ED 1 4 in accomplishing the software engineering improvement engineering activities of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Software Engineering Improvement Plan.

  8. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  9. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  10. 5-ALA based photodynamic management of glioblastoma

    Rühm, Adrian; Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Hennig, Georg; Pongratz, Thomas; Sroka, Ronald; Schnell, Oliver; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2014-03-01

    Objective: Improvement of the clinical outcome of glioblastoma (GBM) patients by employment of fluorescence and photosensitization on the basis of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Methods: In this report the focus is laid on the use of tumor selective PpIX fluorescence for stereotactic biopsy sampling and intra-operative treatment monitoring. In addition, our current concept for treatment planning is presented. For stereotactic interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT), radial diffusers were implanted into the contrast enhancing tumor volume. Spectroscopic measurements of laser light transmission and fluorescence between adjacent fibers were performed prior, during and post PDT. Results: PpIX concentrations in primary glioblastoma tissue show high intra- and inter-patient variability, but are usually sufficient for an effective PDT. During individual treatment attempts with 5-ALA based GBM-iPDT, transmission and fluorescence measurements between radial diffusers gave the following results: 1. In some cases, transmission after PDT is considerably reduced compared to the value before PDT, which may be attributable to a depletion of oxygenated hemoglobin and/or diffuse bleeding. 2. PpIX fluorescence is efficiently photobleached during PDT in all cases. Conclusion: iPDT with assessment of PpIX fluorescence and photobleaching is a promising treatment option. Individualization of treatment parameters appears to bear a potential to further improve clinical outcomes.

  11. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  12. Titanocene Difluorides with Improved Cytotoxic Activity

    Eger, Silvia; Immel, Timo; Claffey, James; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Tacke, Matthias; Groth, Ulrich; Huhn, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Titanocene difluorides can be obtained by halide metathesis of the respective titanocene dichlorides with trimethyltin fluoride (Me3SnF), giving access to a new class of cytotoxic active substances. Furthermore, an improved method for the synthesis of diaryl-substituted titanocene dichlorides is presented.

  13. Activities toward PSA quality improvement in Japan

    PSA of adequate quality is indispensable for expanding the field of risk-informed plant management. Activities to construct framework of improving PSA quality in Japan, such as arrangement of PSA standard, adopting parameters based on operational experience of Japanese NPPs, and implementation of PSA peer review, are in progress. (author)

  14. Small-Molecule XIAP Inhibitors Enhance γ-Irradiation-Induced Apoptosis in Glioblastoma

    Sri Hari Krishna Vellanki

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Because evasion of apoptosis can cause radioresistance of glioblastoma, there is a need to design rational strategies that counter apoptosis resistance. In the present study, we investigated the potential of targeting the antiapoptotic protein XIAP for the radiosensitization of glioblastoma. Here, we report that small-molecule XIAP inhibitors significantly enhance γ-irradiation-induced loss of viability and apoptosis and cooperate with γ-irradiation to suppress clonogenic survival of glioblastoma cells. Analysis of molecular mechanisms reveals that XIAP inhibitors act in concert with γ-irradiation to cause mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, caspase activation, and caspasedependent apoptosis. Importantly, XIAP inhibitors also sensitize primary cultured glioblastoma cells derived from surgical specimens as well as glioblastoma-initiating stemlike cancer stem cells for γ-irradiation. In contrast, they do not increase the toxicity of γ-irradiation on some nonmalignant cells of the central nervous system, including rat neurons or glial cells, pointing to some tumor selectivity. In conclusion, by demonstrating for the first time that smallmolecule XIAP inhibitors increase the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma cells while sparing normal cells of the central nervous system, our findings build the rationale for further (preclinical development of XIAP inhibitors in combination with γ-irradiation in glioblastoma.

  15. Combination treatment with fasudil and clioquinol produces synergistic anti-tumor effects in U87 glioblastoma cells by activating apoptosis and autophagy.

    He, Mingliang; Luo, Ming; Liu, Qingyu; Chen, Jingkao; Li, Kaishu; Zheng, Meiguang; Weng, Yinlun; Ouyang, Leping; Liu, Anmin

    2016-04-01

    Survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains poor, and novel treatment methods are urgently needed. In this study, we tested the effects of a combination of fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor, and clioquinol, an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative with antimicrobial properties, on human GBM U87 cells. Combination treatment synergistically inhibited the viability of glioma cells but not mouse normal neuron HT22 cells and significantly induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, the combination was also found to trigger macro-autophagy (henceforth referred to as autophagy) by increasing the expression levels of several proteins involved in the induction of autophagy. Further studies showed that 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ), two autophagy inhibitors, abrogated the cytotoxic effects of the combination treatment as well as the autophagy. Overall, we demonstrated that fasudil and clioquinol show synergistic anti-cancer effects, providing evidence for the further development of combination therapy for GBM. PMID:26725099

  16. Corticosteroids compromise survival in glioblastoma.

    Pitter, Kenneth L; Tamagno, Ilaria; Alikhanyan, Kristina; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Donnola, Shannon; Dai, Charles; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Chang, Maria; Chan, Timothy A; Beal, Kathryn; Bishop, Andrew J; Barker, Christopher A; Jones, Terreia S; Hentschel, Bettina; Gorlia, Thierry; Schlegel, Uwe; Stupp, Roger; Weller, Michael; Holland, Eric C; Hambardzumyan, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumour. Standard of care consists of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and maintenance temozolomide (temozolomide/radiotherapy→temozolomide). Corticosteroids are commonly used perioperatively to control cerebral oedema and are frequently continued throughout subsequent treatment, notably radiotherapy, for amelioration of side effects. The effects of corticosteroids such as dexamethasone on cell growth in glioma models and on patient survival have remained controversial. We performed a retrospective analysis of glioblastoma patient cohorts to determine the prognostic role of steroid administration. A disease-relevant mouse model of glioblastoma was used to characterize the effects of dexamethasone on tumour cell proliferation and death, and to identify gene signatures associated with these effects. A murine anti-VEGFA antibody was used in parallel as an alternative for oedema control. We applied the dexamethasone-induced gene signature to The Cancer Genome Atlas glioblastoma dataset to explore the association of dexamethasone exposure with outcome. Mouse experiments were used to validate the effects of dexamethasone on survival in vivo Retrospective clinical analyses identified corticosteroid use during radiotherapy as an independent indicator of shorter survival in three independent patient cohorts. A dexamethasone-associated gene expression signature correlated with shorter survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas patient dataset. In glioma-bearing mice, dexamethasone pretreatment decreased tumour cell proliferation without affecting tumour cell viability, but reduced survival when combined with radiotherapy. Conversely, anti-VEGFA antibody decreased proliferation and increased tumour cell death, but did not affect survival when combined with radiotherapy. Clinical and mouse experimental data suggest that corticosteroids may decrease the effectiveness of treatment and shorten

  17. Role of bevacizumab therapy in the management of glioblastoma

    Scott J Peak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Scott J Peak, Victor A LevinNeuro-Oncology Program, Department of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience, Kaiser Permanente, Redwood City, CA, USAAbstract: Glioblastoma is one of the most common primary brain tumors and one of the most difficult to treat. In population-based studies only 30% of patients will survive 1 year and in the most efficacious surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy clinical trials approximately 20% will live 2 years. Bevacizumab is a recombinant, antivascular epidermal growth factor receptor (VEGF monoclonal antibody with 6 VEGF-binding residues that binds to VEGF, preventing VEGF from binding to its target, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, on endothelial cells. Through its binding to VEGF ligands bevacizumab reduces tumor angiogenesis and vasogenic brain edema; the consequences are that bevacizumab reduces the rate of glioblastoma tumor growth and its associated tumoral edema, thereby improving quality of life and survival for patients suffering from cerebral glioblastoma. In this review, we will summarize the studies that led to the use of bevacizumab in glioblastoma and the potential side-effects and complications that can be associated with its use and, finally, new opportunities for drug combinations with bevacizumab.Keywords: chemotherapy, VEGF, edema, central nervous system

  18. A paired comparison between glioblastoma "stem cells" and differentiated cells.

    Schneider, Matthias; Ströbele, Stephanie; Nonnenmacher, Lisa; Siegelin, Markus D; Tepper, Melanie; Stroh, Sebastien; Hasslacher, Sebastian; Enzenmüller, Stefanie; Strauss, Gudrun; Baumann, Bernd; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2016-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated to be responsible for the key features of a malignancy and its maintenances, as well as therapy resistance, while differentiated cells are believed to make up the rapidly growing tumour bulk. It is therefore important to understand the characteristics of those two distinct cell populations in order to devise treatment strategies which effectively target both cohorts, in particular with respect to cancers, such as glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumour in adults, with a mean patient survival of 12-15 months. Importantly, therapeutic improvements have not been forthcoming in the last decade. In this study we compare key features of three pairs of glioblastoma cell populations, each pair consisting of stem cell-like and differentiated cells derived from an individual patient. Our data suggest that while growth rates and expression of key survival- and apoptosis-mediating proteins are more similar according to differentiation status than genetic similarity, we found no intrinsic differences in response to standard therapeutic interventions, namely exposure to radiation or the alkylating agent temozolomide. Interestingly, we could demonstrate that both stem cell-like and differentiated cells possess the ability to form stem cell-containing tumours in immunocompromised mice and that differentiated cells could potentially be dedifferentiated to potential stem cells. Taken together our data suggest that the differences between tumour stem cell and differentiated cell are particular fluent in glioblastoma. PMID:26519239

  19. Effectiveness of Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a central role in the definitive treatment of glioblastoma. However, the optimal management of elderly patients with glioblastoma remains controversial, as the relative benefit in this patient population is unclear. To better understand the role that radiation plays in the treatment of glioblastoma in the elderly, we analyzed factors influencing patient survival using a large population-based registry. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,836 patients more than 70 years of age diagnosed with glioblastoma between 1993 and 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Demographic and clinical variables used in the analysis included gender, ethnicity, tumor size, age at diagnosis, surgery, and radiotherapy. Cancer-specific survival and overall survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using Cox regression. Results: Radiotherapy was administered in 64% of these patients, and surgery was performed in 68%. Among 2,836 patients, 46% received surgery and radiotherapy, 22% underwent surgery only, 18% underwent radiotherapy only, and 14% did not undergo either treatment. The median survival for patients who underwent surgery and radiotherapy was 8 months. The median survival for patients who underwent radiotherapy only was 4 months, and for patients who underwent surgery only was 3 months. Those who received neither surgery nor radiotherapy had a median survival of 2 months (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that radiotherapy significantly improved cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.49) after adjusting for surgery, tumor size, gender, ethnicity, and age at diagnosis. Other factors associated with Cancer-specific survival included surgery, tumor size, age at diagnosis, and ethnicity. Analysis using overall survival as the endpoint yielded very similar results. Conclusions: Elderly

  20. Activized Learning: Transforming Passive to Active with Improved Label Complexity

    Hanneke, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We study the theoretical advantages of active learning over passive learning. Specifically, we prove that, in noise-free classifier learning for VC classes, any passive learning algorithm can be transformed into an active learning algorithm with asymptotically strictly superior label complexity for all nontrivial target functions and distributions. We further provide a general characterization of the magnitudes of these improvements in terms of a novel generalization of the disagreement coeff...

  1. Ecological Factors Improving Efficiency of Business Activities

    Kononova G. A.; Tsiganov V. V.

    2015-01-01

    The economic importance of optimizing the environmental situation from the perspective of an entrepreneur are assessed in the article. The classification of administrative decisions taken in the course of the business activities is proposed. The authors identified a group of solutions directly providing optimization of environment external to the enterprise, solutions that have an indirect positive impact on the environment and solutions that improve ecology of industrial premises. The nature...

  2. Irinotecan and bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése;

    2011-01-01

    BVZ and CPT-11 in recurrent GBM. Particular attention is placed on the literature and a discussion on whether treatment with BVZ and CPT-11 improves clinical outcome. Antiangiogenic treatment has led to difficulties when evaluating objective response by the conventional MacDonald criteria. In the......INTRODUCTION: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common high grade primary brain tumor in adults. Despite significant advances in treatment, the prognosis remains poor. Bevacizumab (BVZ) and irinotecan (CPT-11) are currently being investigated in the treatment of GBM patients. Although...... treatment with BVZ and irinotecan provides impressive response rates (RR), it is still uncertain if this treatment translates into improved clinical benefit in GBM patients. AREAS COVERED: This review discusses the clinical efficacy, safety and difficulties regarding response evaluation when treating with...

  3. Targeting EGFR for Treatment of Glioblastoma: Molecular Basis to Overcome Resistance

    Taylor, Tiffany E.; Furnari, Frank B.; Cavenee, Webster K.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (glioblastoma multiforme; GBM; WHO Grade IV) accounts for the majority of primary malignant brain tumors in adults. Amplification and mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene represent signature genetic abnormalities encountered in GBM. A range of potential therapies that target EGFR or its mutant constitutively active form, ΔEGFR, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, and RNA-based agents, are currently in development o...

  4. Sorafenib induces growth arrest and apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells via dephosphorylation of STAT3

    Yang, Fan; Brown, Christine; Buettner, Ralf; HEDVAT, MICHAEL; Starr, Renate; Scuto, Anna; Schroeder, Anne; Jensen, Michael; Jove, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common type of primary brain tumor and is rapidly progressive with few treatment options. Here, we report that sorafenib (≤ 10 μM) inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in two established cell lines (U87, U251) and two primary cultures (PBT015, PBT022) from human glioblastomas. Effects of sorafenib on these tumor cells were associated with inhibiting phosphorylated STAT3 (Tyr705). Expression of a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant partially blocked the...

  5. Label-free microscopic assessment of glioblastoma biopsy specimens prior to biobanking [corrected].

    Georges, Joseph; Zehri, Aqib; Carlson, Elizabeth; Nichols, Joshua; Mooney, Michael A; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Ghaffari, Layla; Kalani, M Yashar S; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Preul, Mark C; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor with a median 12- to 15-month patient survival. Improving patient survival involves better understanding the biological mechanisms of glioblastoma tumorigenesis and seeking targeted molecular therapies. Central to furthering these advances is the collection and storage of surgical biopsies (biobanking) for research. This paper addresses an imaging modality, confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM), for safely screening glioblastoma biopsy samples prior to biobanking to increase the quality of tissue provided for research and clinical trials. These data indicate that CRM can immediately identify cellularity of tissue biopsies from animal models of glioblastoma. When screening fresh human biopsy samples, CRM can differentiate a cellular glioblastoma biopsy from a necrotic biopsy without altering DNA, RNA, or protein expression of sampled tissue. These data illustrate CRM's potential for rapidly and safely screening clinical biopsy samples prior to biobanking, which demonstrates its potential as an effective screening technique that can improve the quality of tissue biobanked for patients with glioblastoma. PMID:24484261

  6. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai [Department of Neurology, Daqing Oilfield General Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang 163001 (China); Chen, Jing [Department of Neurology, Daqing Longnan Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang, 163001 China (China); Zhang, Jinghui [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Hospital of Harbin City, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150026 (China); Sun, Jiahang [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China); Guo, Mian, E-mail: guomian_hyd@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China)

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  7. Ecological Factors Improving Efficiency of Business Activities

    Kononova G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The economic importance of optimizing the environmental situation from the perspective of an entrepreneur are assessed in the article. The classification of administrative decisions taken in the course of the business activities is proposed. The authors identified a group of solutions directly providing optimization of environment external to the enterprise, solutions that have an indirect positive impact on the environment and solutions that improve ecology of industrial premises. The nature of economic effect of resulting solutions of various types is taken into account. Vectors of influence of working conditions on the economic results of business activities are described. The nature and strength of the impact of model management decisions results of business activities are defined. Key performance indicators of entrepreneurial activity are identified: employee productivity, the amount of revenue and profitability, solvency, staff stability, the competitiveness of enterprises. Grouping the costs of ecological parameters optimization of the production environment is proposed. Relationship between level of working conditions and socio-psychological climate in the collective enterprise is disclosed. The methods of motivation of entrepreneurs in solving of environmental, production problems are considered. The role of training entrepreneurs engaged of medium and small businesses are underlined especially. Thus, in the article the relationship between environmental and economic problems of entrepreneurial activity is investigated. Role and opportunities of entrepreneurs in solving these problems are defined and structured.

  8. The Study of Glioblastoma Differentiation Possibility

    Medyanik I.A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to assess the possibility of glioblastoma differentiation using infrared spectroscopy, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry. Materials and Methods. 22 patients with glioblastomas and 21 patients with anaplastic astrocytomas were examined. All the patients underwent infrared spectroscopy of blood serum. 16 patients with glioblastomas were examined preoperatively and postoperatively, and in both cases 7 of them underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of tumors and identical peritumoral areas. All diagnoses were morphologically confirmed, and 10 cases with glioblastomas and 15 cases with anaplastic astrocytomas were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Results. Glioblastoma differentiation (Grade IV into anaplastic astrocytomas (Grade III was revealed postoperatively, in total glioblastoma resection and confirmed by the findings of infrared spectroscopy in blood serum, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of identical peritumoral areas performed preoperatively and postoperatively, as well as by immunohistochemical investigation of peritumoral area. Conclusion. The complex of the techniques applied (infrared spectroscopy, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, immunohistochemistry enables to assess how effective and total the surgery was, and if it promoted glioblastoma differentiation postoperatively, and determine how the tumor will develop after the surgery: as glioblastoma — with early continuous tumor growth, or as anaplastic astrocytoma — with the longer recurrence-free period. The findings are in agreement with tissue theory of tumor genesis; and change the understanding of the role and significance of surgical resection of glioblastomas in tumor differentiation.

  9. Expression of tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand receptor in glioblastoma

    Dongling Gao; Zhongwei Zhao; Hongxin Zhang; Lan Zhang; Kuisheng Chen; Yunhan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Receptors for tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) include death receptor 4, death receptor 5, decoy receptor 1, and decoy receptor 2. Activation of death receptor 4 and 5 selectively kills tumor cells.OBJECTIVE: To detect TRAIL receptor expression in glioblastoma by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR and to compare this expression to that in normal brain tissue.DESIGN: Observational analysis.SETTING: Department of Pathology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University; Henan Tumor Pathology Key Laboratory.PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five patients (17 males and 8 females) who received glioblastoma resection were selected from the Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, between September 2003 to June 2004. All glioblastoma samples were diagnosed pathologically. Twenty patients (12 males and 8 females) with craniocerebral injury who received normal brain tissue resection were selected in the same time period. There were no significant differences in sex and age between glioblastoma patients or between craniocerebral injury patients (P>0.05). All patients and appropriate relatives provided informed consent, and this study was approved by the local research ethics committee.METHODS: Polyclonal antibody against TRAIL receptors and an immunohistochemical kit (batch number: 200502) were purchased from Boster Company, Wuhan. Immunohistochemistry: Expression of death receptor 4, death receptor 5, decoy receptor 1, and decoy receptor 2 were observed in both glioblastoma and normal brain tissue. The experiment was performed according to the kit instructions, and positive staining was brown-yellow. Assessment: There were no positive signals (-); weakly positive signals, positive cells75% (++++). Evaluation: Expression levels of TRAIL receptors were estimated in both normal brain tissue and glioblastoma. Expression of decoy receptor 1 and decoy receptor 2 mRNA in glioblastoma were detected by reverse transcription polymerase

  10. Recurrent Glioblastoma: Where we stand

    Sanjoy Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current first-line treatment regimens combine surgical resection and chemoradiation for Glioblastoma that provides a slight increase in overall survival. Age on its own should not be used as an exclusion criterion of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM treatment, but performance should be factored heavily into the decision-making process for treatment planning. Despite aggressive initial treatment, most patients develop recurrent diseases which can be treated with re-resection, systemic treatment with targeted agents or cytotoxic chemotherapy, reirradiation, or radiosurgery. Research into novel therapies is investigating alternative temozolomide regimens, convection-enhanced delivery, immunotherapy, gene therapy, antiangiogenic agents, poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors, or cancer stem cell signaling pathways. Given the aggressive and resilient nature of GBM, continued efforts to better understand GBM pathophysiology are required to discover novel targets for future therapy.

  11. Recurrent Glioblastoma: Where we stand.

    Roy, Sanjoy; Lahiri, Debarshi; Maji, Tapas; Biswas, Jaydip

    2015-01-01

    Current first-line treatment regimens combine surgical resection and chemoradiation for Glioblastoma that provides a slight increase in overall survival. Age on its own should not be used as an exclusion criterion of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment, but performance should be factored heavily into the decision-making process for treatment planning. Despite aggressive initial treatment, most patients develop recurrent diseases which can be treated with re-resection, systemic treatment with targeted agents or cytotoxic chemotherapy, reirradiation, or radiosurgery. Research into novel therapies is investigating alternative temozolomide regimens, convection-enhanced delivery, immunotherapy, gene therapy, antiangiogenic agents, poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors, or cancer stem cell signaling pathways. Given the aggressive and resilient nature of GBM, continued efforts to better understand GBM pathophysiology are required to discover novel targets for future therapy. PMID:26981507

  12. Epigenetic pathways and glioblastoma treatment

    Clarke, Jennifer; Penas, Clara; Pastori, Chiara; Komotar, Ricardo J.; Bregy, Amade; Shah, Ashish H; Wahlestedt, Claes; Ayad, Nagi G.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant adult brain tumor. Standard GBM treatment includes maximal safe surgical resection with combination radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. Alarmingly, patient survival at five-years is below 10%. This is in part due to the invasive behavior of the tumor and the resulting inability to resect greater than 98% of some tumors. In fact, recurrence after such treatment may be inevitable, even in cases where gross total r...

  13. Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Primary Glioblastoma Genome.

    Kim, Jinkuk; Lee, In-Hee; Cho, Hee Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Jung, Yang-Soon; Kim, Yanghee; Nam, So Hee; Kim, Byung Sup; Johnson, Mark D; Kong, Doo-Sik; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Joo, Kyeung Min; Yoon, Yeup; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Jeongwu; Park, Peter J; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-09-14

    Tumor recurrence following treatment is the major cause of mortality for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Thus, insights on the evolutionary process at recurrence are critical for improved patient care. Here, we describe our genomic analyses of the initial and recurrent tumor specimens from each of 38 GBM patients. A substantial divergence in the landscape of driver alterations was associated with distant appearance of a recurrent tumor from the initial tumor, suggesting that the genomic profile of the initial tumor can mislead targeted therapies for the distally recurred tumor. In addition, in contrast to IDH1-mutated gliomas, IDH1-wild-type primary GBMs rarely developed hypermutation following temozolomide (TMZ) treatment, indicating low risk for TMZ-induced hypermutation for these tumors under the standard regimen. PMID:26373279

  14. Statin use and survival following glioblastoma multiforme

    Gaist, David; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2014-01-01

    glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). METHODS: We identified 1562 patients diagnosed with GBM during 2000-2009 from the Danish Cancer Registry and linked this cohort to Danish nationwide demographic and health registries. Within the GBM cohort, each patient recorded as using statins prior to diagnosis (defined as ≥2......-cause death associated with prediagnostic statin use. RESULTS: A total of 339 GBM patients were included in the analyses. Of these, 325 died during median follow-up of 6.9 months (interquartile range: 3.8-13.4 months). Prediagnostic statin use was associated with a reduced HR of death (0.79; 95% CI: 0......% CI: 0.63-1.01). CONCLUSION: Long-term prediagnostic statin use may improve survival following GBM....

  15. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for recurrent glioblastoma: single institutional experience

    Ciammella, Patrizia; Podgornii, Ala; Galeandro, Maria; D’Abbiero, Nunziata; Pisanello, Anna; Botti, Andrea; Cagni, Elisabetta; Iori, Mauro; Iotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor control and survival have improved with the use of radiotherapy (RT) plus concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy, but the prognosis remain poor. In most cases the recurrence occurs within 7–9 months after primary treatment. Currently, many approaches are available for the salvage treatment of patients with recurrent GBM, including resection, re-irradiation or systemic agents, but no standard of care...

  16. Cases of glioblastoma multiforme metastasizing to spinal cord

    Karaca Metehan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM metastasizing to the leptomeninx or the intramedullary spine are quite rare and prognoses are relatively poor. We present three cases of GBM with spinal metastasis, one of which also had leptomeningeal dissemination. Three patients with GBM were admitted to our clinic for postoperative radiotherapy after surgery. Leptomeningeal metastasis and dissemination were diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. Radiotherapy provided only temporary relief from pain with small improvement in neurological deficit but no survival advantage.

  17. Clonal evolution of glioblastoma under therapy.

    Wang, Jiguang; Cazzato, Emanuela; Ladewig, Erik; Frattini, Veronique; Rosenbloom, Daniel I S; Zairis, Sakellarios; Abate, Francesco; Liu, Zhaoqi; Elliott, Oliver; Shin, Yong-Jae; Lee, Jin-Ku; Lee, In-Hee; Park, Woong-Yang; Eoli, Marica; Blumberg, Andrew J; Lasorella, Anna; Nam, Do-Hyun; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Iavarone, Antonio; Rabadan, Raul

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor. To better understand how GBM evolves, we analyzed longitudinal genomic and transcriptomic data from 114 patients. The analysis shows a highly branched evolutionary pattern in which 63% of patients experience expression-based subtype changes. The branching pattern, together with estimates of evolutionary rate, suggests that relapse-associated clones typically existed years before diagnosis. Fifteen percent of tumors present hypermutation at relapse in highly expressed genes, with a clear mutational signature. We find that 11% of recurrence tumors harbor mutations in LTBP4, which encodes a protein binding to TGF-β. Silencing LTBP4 in GBM cells leads to suppression of TGF-β activity and decreased cell proliferation. In recurrent GBM with wild-type IDH1, high LTBP4 expression is associated with worse prognosis, highlighting the TGF-β pathway as a potential therapeutic target in GBM. PMID:27270107

  18. Amnesia due to bilateral hippocampal glioblastoma

    The authors report a unique case of glioblastoma which caused permanent amnesia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the lesion to be limited to the hippocampal formation bilaterally. Although glioblastoma extends frequently into fiber pathways and expands into the opposite cerebral hemisphere, making a 'butterfly' lesion, it is unusual for it to invade the limbic system selectively to this extent. (orig.)

  19. Glioblastoma Multiforme: Relationship to Subventricular Zone and Recurrence

    Kimura, Margareth; Lee, Yeuh; Miller, Ryan; Castillo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is active in two areas: the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone. Cancer stem cells have been isolated from malignant brain tumors and it is widely believed they arise from transformed endogenous stem cells. We sought to determine if the initial location of glioblastoma (GB) as seen on conventional MRI and its relationship to the subventricular zone (SVZ) predicts the pattern of recurrence. We analyzed t...

  20. Network Modeling Identifies Patient-specific Pathways in Glioblastoma

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Milani, Pamela; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Johnson, Hannah; Sio, Terence T.; Dalin, Simona; Iyekegbe, Dennis O.; White, Forest M.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive type of malignant human brain tumor. Molecular profiling experiments have revealed that these tumors are extremely heterogeneous. This heterogeneity is one of the principal challenges for developing targeted therapies. We hypothesize that despite the diverse molecular profiles, it might still be possible to identify common signaling changes that could be targeted in some or all tumors. Using a network modeling approach, we reconstruct the altered signaling pathways from tumor-specific phosphoproteomic data and known protein-protein interactions. We then develop a network-based strategy for identifying tumor specific proteins and pathways that were predicted by the models but not directly observed in the experiments. Among these hidden targets, we show that the ERK activator kinase1 (MEK1) displays increased phosphorylation in all tumors. By contrast, protein numb homolog (NUMB) is present only in the subset of the tumors that are the most invasive. Additionally, increased S100A4 is associated with only one of the tumors. Overall, our results demonstrate that despite the heterogeneity of the proteomic data, network models can identify common or tumor specific pathway-level changes. These results represent an important proof of principle that can improve the target selection process for tumor specific treatments. PMID:27354287

  1. Current concepts in glioblastoma imaging

    George Alexiou; Spyridon Tsiouris; Haralabos Bougias; Spyridon Voulgaris; Andreas Fotopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM, WHO grade Ⅳ) is the most common and the most malignant primary brain tumor occurring during adulthood, with an annual incidence of 5 cases per 100 000. Treatment involves surgical resection, followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. Despite multimodality treatment, the median survival time is 15 months. Herewith we discuss the value of neuroimaging in differentiating GBM from other types of brain tumors, in guiding tumor biopsy, in making non-invasive assessment of tumor's aggressiveness, in estimating overall prognosis, in differentiating treatment -induced brain necrosis from tumor recurrence and in assessing response to treatment.

  2. Evolving Molecular Genetics of Glioblastoma

    Qiu-Ju Li; Jin-Quan Cai; Cheng-Yin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To summary the recent advances in molecular research of glioblastoma (GBM) and current trends in personalized therapy of this disease. Data Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English up to 2015, with keywords “molecular”, “genetics”, “GBM”, “isocitrate dehydrogenase”, “telomerase reverse transcriptase”, “epidermal growth factor receptor”, “PTPRZ1-MET”, and “clinical treatment”. Study Selection: Articles regarding the morphological pathology of GB...

  3. TSPO Imaging in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Jensen, Per; Feng, Ling; Law, Ian; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte M; Mikkelsen, Jens D; de Nijs, Robin; Larsen, Vibeke A; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Thomsen, Gerda; Fischer, Walter; Guilloteau, Denis; Pinborg, Lars H

    2015-01-01

    -CLINDE is superior to (18)F-FET in predicting progression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at follow-up. METHODS: Three patients with World Health Organization grade IV GBM were scanned with (123)I-CLINDE SPECT, (18)F-FET PET, and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Molecular imaging data were compared with...... follow-up gadolinium-enhanced MR images or contrast-enhanced CT scans. RESULTS: The percentage overlap between volumes of interest (VOIs) of increased (18)F-FET uptake and (123)I-CLINDE binding was variable (12%-42%). The percentage overlap of MR imaging baseline VOIs was greater for (18)F-FET (79...

  4. Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Cell Lines: Implication of MGMT, MMR, P-Glycoprotein and CD133 Expression

    Gloria Perazzoli; Jose Prados; Raul Ortiz; Octavio Caba; Laura Cabeza; Maria Berdasco; Beatriz Gónzalez; Consolación Melguizo

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of temozolomide (TMZ) has improved the prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients. However, TMZ resistance may be one of the main reasons why treatment fails. Although this resistance has frequently been linked to the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) it seems that this enzyme is not the only molecular mechanism that may account for the appearance of drug resistance in glioblastoma multiforme patients as the mismatch repair (MMR) complex, P-gly...

  5. Genetic Alterations in Gliosarcoma and Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    Oh, Ji Eun; Ohta, Takashi; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Satomi, Kaishi; Capper, David; Pierscianek, Daniela; Sure, Ulrich; Vital, Anne; Paulus, Werner; Mittelbronn, Michel; Antonelli, Manila; Kleihues, Paul; Giangaspero, Felice; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The majority of glioblastomas develop rapidly with a short clinical history (primary glioblastoma IDH wild-type), whereas secondary glioblastomas progress from diffuse astrocytoma or anaplastic astrocytoma. IDH mutations are the genetic hallmark of secondary glioblastomas. Gliosarcomas and giant cell glioblastomas are rare histological glioblastoma variants, which usually develop rapidly. We determined the genetic patterns of 36 gliosarcomas and 19 giant cell glioblastomas. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations were absent in all 36 gliosarcomas and in 18 of 19 giant cell glioblastomas analyzed, indicating that they are histological variants of primary glioblastoma. Furthermore, LOH 10q (88%) and TERT promoter mutations (83%) were frequent in gliosarcomas. Copy number profiling using the 450k methylome array in 5 gliosarcomas revealed CDKN2A homozygous deletion (3 cases), trisomy chromosome 7 (2 cases), and monosomy chromosome 10 (2 cases). Giant cell glioblastomas had LOH 10q in 50% and LOH 19q in 42% of cases. ATRX loss was detected immunohistochemically in 19% of giant cell glioblastomas, but absent in 17 gliosarcomas. These and previous results suggest that gliosarcomas are a variant of, and genetically similar to, primary glioblastomas, except for a lack of EGFR amplification, while giant cell glioblastoma occupies a hybrid position between primary and secondary glioblastomas. PMID:26443480

  6. Coibamide A, a natural lariat depsipeptide, inhibits VEGFA/VEGFR2 expression and suppresses tumor growth in glioblastoma xenografts.

    Serrill, Jeffrey D; Wan, Xuemei; Hau, Andrew M; Jang, Hyo Sang; Coleman, Daniel J; Indra, Arup K; Alani, Adam W G; McPhail, Kerry L; Ishmael, Jane E

    2016-02-01

    Coibamide A is a cytotoxic lariat depsipeptide isolated from a rare cyanobacterium found within the marine reserve of Coiba National Park, Panama. Earlier testing of coibamide A in the National Cancer Institute in vitro 60 human tumor cell line panel (NCI-60) revealed potent anti-proliferative activity and a unique selectivity profile, potentially reflecting a new target or mechanism of action. In the present study we evaluated the antitumor activity of coibamide A in several functional cell-based assays and in vivo. U87-MG and SF-295 glioblastoma cells showed reduced migratory and invasive capacity and underwent G1 cell cycle arrest as, likely indirect, consequences of treatment. Coibamide A inhibited extracellular VEGFA secreted from U87-MG glioblastoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with low nM potency, attenuated proliferation and migration of normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and selectively decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). We report that coibamide A retains potent antitumor properties in a nude mouse xenograft model of glioblastoma; established subcutaneous U87-MG tumors failed to grow for up to 28 days in response to 0.3 mg/Kg doses of coibamide A. However, the natural product was also associated with varied patterns of weight loss and thus targeted delivery and/or medicinal chemistry approaches will almost certainly be required to improve the toxicity profile of this unusual macrocycle. Finally, similarities between coibamide A- and apratoxin A-induced changes in cell morphology, decreases in VEGFR2 expression and macroautophagy signaling in HUVECs raise the possibility that both cyanobacterial natural products share a common mechanism of action. PMID:26563191

  7. MicroRNA involvement in glioblastoma pathogenesis

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed regulatory noncoding RNAs. Altered expression levels of several microRNAs have been observed in glioblastomas. Functions and direct mRNA targets for these microRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. According to these data, it is now evident, that impairment of microRNA regulatory network is one of the key mechanisms in glioblastoma pathogenesis. MicroRNA deregulation is involved in processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, invasion, glioma stem cell behavior, and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in glioblastoma with an emphasis on its significance in glioblastoma oncogenic signaling and its potential to serve as a disease biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  8. Saponin 1 Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses NF-κB-Mediated Survival Signaling in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    Li, Juan; Tang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yun; Tang, Chi; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuangang; Gao, Zhenhui; Luo, Peng; Yin, Anan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Guang; Fei, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Saponin 1 is a triterpeniod saponin extracted from Anemone taipaiensis, a traditional Chinese medicine against rheumatism and phlebitis. It has also been shown to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity against human leukemia (HL-60 cells) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-G2 cells). Herein we investigated the effect of saponin 1 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) U251MG and U87MG cells. Saponin 1 induced significant growth inhibition in both glioblastoma cell lines, with a 50% inhi...

  9. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S., E-mail: mviapiano@partners.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy.

  10. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy

  11. Advanced case of glioblastoma multiforme and pregnancy

    Al-Rasheedy, Intisar M.; Al-Hameed, Fahad M.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of the glial tumors. Advanced and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy for many reasons. Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy carries unique challenges to the patient, baby, family, and health care providers. We describe an unusual case of advanced GBM that was treated with maximum doses of chemotherapy and radiations, and she became pregnant and presented at eighteenth weeks of gestation. Her medica...

  12. Current data and strategy in glioblastoma multiforme

    Iacob, G; Dinca, EB

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or astrocytoma grade Ⅳ on WHO classification is the most aggressive and the most frequent of all primary brain tumors. Glioblastoma is multiforme , resistant to therapeutic interventions illustrating the heterogeneity exhibited by this tumor in its every aspect, including clinical presentation, pathology, genetic signature. Current data and treatment strategy in GBM are presented focusing on basic science data and key clinical aspects like surgery, including pers...

  13. Yes and PI3K bind CD95 to signal invasion of glioblastoma.

    Kleber, Susanne; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Wiestler, Benedict; Beisel, Alexandra; Gieffers, Christian; Hill, Oliver; Thiemann, Meinolf; Mueller, Wolf; Sykora, Jaromir; Kuhn, Andreas; Schreglmann, Nina; Letellier, Elisabeth; Zuliani, Cecilia; Klussmann, Stefan; Teodorczyk, Marcin; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Ganten, Tom M; Sültmann, Holger; Tüttenberg, Jochen; von Deimling, Andreas; Regnier-Vigouroux, Anne; Herold-Mende, Christel; Martin-Villalba, Ana

    2008-03-01

    Invasion of surrounding brain tissue by isolated tumor cells represents one of the main obstacles to a curative therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Here we unravel a mechanism regulating glioma infiltration. Tumor interaction with the surrounding brain tissue induces CD95 Ligand expression. Binding of CD95 Ligand to CD95 on glioblastoma cells recruits the Src family member Yes and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to CD95, which signal invasion via the glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta pathway and subsequent expression of matrix metalloproteinases. In a murine syngeneic model of intracranial GBM, neutralization of CD95 activity dramatically reduced the number of invading cells. Our results uncover CD95 as an activator of PI3K and, most importantly, as a crucial trigger of basal invasion of glioblastoma in vivo. PMID:18328427

  14. Developing a Novel Embryo-Larval Zebrafish Xenograft Assay to Prioritize Human Glioblastoma Therapeutics.

    Wehmas, Leah Christine; Tanguay, Robert L; Punnoose, Alex; Greenwood, Juliet A

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive brain cancer requiring improved treatments. Existing methods of drug discovery and development require years before new therapeutics become available to patients. Zebrafish xenograft models hold promise for prioritizing drug development. We have developed an embryo-larval zebrafish xenograft assay in which cancer cells are implanted in a brain microenvironment to discover and prioritize compounds that impact glioblastoma proliferation, migration, and invasion. We illustrate the utility of our assay by evaluating the well-studied, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs), which demonstrate selective cancer cytotoxicity in cell culture, but the in vivo effectiveness has not been established. Exposures of 3.125-6.25 μM LY294002 significantly decreased proliferation up to 34% with concentration-dependent trends. Exposure to 6.25 μM LY294002 significantly inhibited migration/invasion by ∼27% within the glioblastoma cell mass (0-80 μm) and by ∼32% in the next distance region (81-160 μm). Unexpectedly, ZnO enhanced glioblastoma proliferation by ∼19% and migration/invasion by ∼35% at the periphery of the cell mass (161+ μm); however, dissolution of these NPs make it difficult to discern whether this was a nano or ionic effect. These results demonstrate that we have a short, relevant, and sensitive zebrafish-based assay to aid glioblastoma therapeutic development. PMID:27158859

  15. Evaluation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor combinations for glioblastoma therapy.

    Avadhut D Joshi

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common intracranial cancer but despite recent advances in therapy the overall survival remains about 20 months. Whole genome exon sequencing studies implicate mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase pathways (RTK for driving tumor growth in over 80% of GBMs. In spite of various RTKs being mutated or altered in the majority of GBMs, clinical studies have not been able to demonstrate efficacy of molecular targeted therapies using tyrosine kinase inhibitors in GBMs. Activation of multiple downstream signaling pathways has been implicated as a possible means by which inhibition of a single RTK has been ineffective in GBM. In this study, we sought a combination of approved drugs that would inhibit in vitro and in vivo growth of GBM oncospheres. A combination consisting of gefitinib and sunitinib acted synergistically in inhibiting growth of GBM oncospheres in vitro. Sunitinib was the only RTK inhibitor that could induce apoptosis in GBM cells. However, the in vivo efficacy testing of the gefitinib and sunitinib combination in an EGFR amplified/PTEN wild type GBM xenograft model revealed that gefitinib alone could significantly improve survival in animals whereas sunitinib did not show any survival benefit. Subsequent testing of the same drug combination in a different syngeneic glioma model that lacked EGFR amplification but was more susceptible to sunitinib in vitro demonstrated no survival benefit when treated with gefitinib or sunitinib or the gefitinib and sunitinib combination. Although a modest survival benefit was obtained in one of two animal models with EGFR amplification due to gefitinib alone, the addition of sunitinib, to test our best in vitro combination therapy, did not translate to any additional in vivo benefit. Improved targeted therapies, with drug properties favorable to intracranial tumors, are likely required to form effective drug combinations for GBM.

  16. Molecular network profiling of U373MG human glioblastoma cells following induction of apoptosis by novel marine-derived anti-cancer 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids

    Tabunoki Hiroko; Saito Naoki; Suwanborirux Khanit; Charupant Kornvika; Satoh Jun-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Glioblastoma is the most aggressive form of brain tumors showing resistance to treatment with various chemotherapeutic agents. The most effective way to eradicate glioblastoma requires the concurrent inhibition of multiple signaling pathways and target molecules involved in the progression of glioblastoma. Recently, we obtained a series of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids with potent anti-cancer activities, including ecteinascidin-770 (ET-770; the compound 1a) and ...

  17. Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Cell Lines: Implication of MGMT, MMR, P-Glycoprotein and CD133 Expression.

    Gloria Perazzoli

    Full Text Available The use of temozolomide (TMZ has improved the prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients. However, TMZ resistance may be one of the main reasons why treatment fails. Although this resistance has frequently been linked to the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT it seems that this enzyme is not the only molecular mechanism that may account for the appearance of drug resistance in glioblastoma multiforme patients as the mismatch repair (MMR complex, P-glycoprotein, and/or the presence of cancer stem cells may also be implicated.Four nervous system tumor cell lines were used to analyze the modulation of MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation by TMZ treatment. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine was used to demethylate the MGMT promoter and O(6-benzylguanine to block GMT activity. In addition, MMR complex and P-glycoprotein expression were studied before and after TMZ exposure and correlated with MGMT expression. Finally, the effect of TMZ exposure on CD133 expression was analyzed.Our results showed two clearly differentiated groups of tumor cells characterized by low (A172 and LN229 and high (SF268 and SK-N-SH basal MGMT expression. Interestingly, cell lines with no MGMT expression and low TMZ IC50 showed a high MMR complex expression, whereas cell lines with high MGMT expression and high TMZ IC50 did not express the MMR complex. In addition, modulation of MGMT expression in A172 and LN229 cell lines was accompanied by a significant increase in the TMZ IC50, whereas no differences were observed in SF268 and SK-N-SH cell lines. In contrast, P-glycoprotein and CD133 was found to be unrelated to TMZ resistance in these cell lines.These results may be relevant in understanding the phenomenon of TMZ resistance, especially in glioblastoma multiforme patients laking MGMT expression, and may also aid in the design of new therapeutic strategies to improve the efficacy of TMZ in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

  18. Convection-Enhanced Delivery of Carboplatin PLGA Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Glioblastoma.

    Azeem Arshad

    Full Text Available We currently use Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED of the platinum-based drug, carboplatin as a novel treatment strategy for high grade glioblastoma in adults and children. Although initial results show promise, carboplatin is not specifically toxic to tumour cells and has been associated with neurotoxicity at high infused concentrations in pre-clinical studies. Our treatment strategy requires intermittent infusions due to rapid clearance of carboplatin from the brain. In this study, carboplatin was encapsulated in lactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer (PLGA to develop a novel drug delivery system. Neuronal and tumour cytotoxicity were assessed in primary neuronal and glioblastoma cell cultures. Distribution, tissue clearance and toxicity of carboplatin nanoparticles following CED was assessed in rat and porcine models. Carboplatin nanoparticles conferred greater tumour cytotoxicity, reduced neuronal toxicity and prolonged tissue half-life. In conclusion, this drug delivery system has the potential to improve the prognosis for patients with glioblastomas.

  19. Cyclin G2 Promotes Hypoxia- Driven Local Invasion of Glioblastoma by Orchestrating Cytoskeletal Dynamics

    Atsushi Fujimura

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Microenvironmental conditions such as hypoxia potentiate the local invasion of malignant tumors including glioblastomas by modulating signal transduction and protein modification, yet the mechanism by which hypoxia controls cytoskeletal dynamics to promote the local invasion is not well defined. Here, we show that cyclin G2 plays pivotal roles in the cytoskeletal dynamics in hypoxia-driven invasion by glioblastoma cells. Cyclin G2 is a hypoxia-induced and cytoskeleton-associated protein and is required for glioblastoma expansion. Mechanistically, cyclin G2 recruits cortactin to the juxtamembrane through its SH3 domain-binding motif and consequently promotes the restricted tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin in concert with src. Moreover, cyclin G2 interacts with filamentous actin to facilitate the formation of membrane ruffles. In primary glioblastoma, cyclin G2 is abundantly expressed in severely hypoxic regions such as pseudopalisades, which consist of actively migrating glioma cells. Furthermore, we show the effectiveness of dasatinib against hypoxia-driven, cyclin G2-involved invasion in vitro and in vivo. Our findings elucidate the mechanism of cytoskeletal regulation by which severe hypoxia promotes the local invasion and may provide a therapeutic target in glioblastoma.

  20. PINK1 Is a Negative Regulator of Growth and the Warburg Effect in Glioblastoma.

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Huang, Xi; Remke, Marc; Younger, Susan; Cairns, Rob A; Chalil, Alan; Smith, Christian A; Krumholtz, Stacey-Lynn; Mackenzie, Danielle; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taccone, Michael S; Mischel, Paul S; Fuller, Gregory N; Hawkins, Cynthia; Stanford, William L; Taylor, Michael D; Zadeh, Gelareh; Rutka, James T

    2016-08-15

    Proliferating cancer cells are characterized by high rates of glycolysis, lactate production, and altered mitochondrial metabolism. This metabolic reprogramming provides important metabolites for proliferation of tumor cells, including glioblastoma. These biological processes, however, generate oxidative stress that must be balanced through detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using an unbiased retroviral loss-of-function screen in nontransformed human astrocytes, we demonstrate that mitochondrial PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) is a regulator of the Warburg effect and negative regulator of glioblastoma growth. We report that loss of PINK1 contributes to the Warburg effect through ROS-dependent stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1A and reduced pyruvate kinase muscle isozyme 2 activity, both key regulators of aerobic glycolysis. Mechanistically, PINK1 suppresses ROS and tumor growth through FOXO3a, a master regulator of oxidative stress and superoxide dismutase 2. These findings highlight the importance of PINK1 and ROS balance in normal and tumor cells. PINK1 loss was observed in a significant number of human brain tumors including glioblastoma (n > 900) and correlated with poor patient survival. PINK1 overexpression attenuates in vivo glioblastoma growth in orthotopic mouse xenograft models and a transgenic glioblastoma model in Drosophila Cancer Res; 76(16); 4708-19. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325644

  1. Clinical variables serve as prognostic factors in a model for survival from glioblastoma multiforme

    Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Grunnet, Kirsten; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Although implementation of temozolomide (TMZ) as a part of primary therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has resulted in improved patient survival, the disease is still incurable. Previous studies have correlated various parameters to survival, although no single parameter has yet been...

  2. Expression of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A and hypusine forming enzymes in glioblastoma patient samples: implications for new targeted therapies.

    Michael Preukschas

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are highly aggressive brain tumors of adults with poor clinical outcome. Despite a broad range of new and more specific treatment strategies, therapy of glioblastomas remains challenging and tumors relapse in all cases. Recent work demonstrated that the posttranslational hypusine modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A is a crucial regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and an important factor in tumor formation, progression and maintenance. Here we report that eIF-5A as well as the hypusine-forming enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH are highly overexpressed in glioblastoma patient samples. Importantly, targeting eIF-5A and its hypusine modification with GC7, a specific DHS-inhibitor, showed a strong antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines in vitro, while normal human astrocytes were not affected. Furthermore, we identified p53 dependent premature senescence, a permanent cell cycle arrest, as the primary outcome in U87-MG cells after treatment with GC7. Strikingly, combined treatment with clinically relevant alkylating agents and GC7 had an additive antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, stable knockdown of eIF-5A and DHS by short hairpin RNA (shRNA could mimic the antiproliferative effects of GC7. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of eIF-5A may represent a novel concept to treat glioblastomas and may help to substantially improve the clinical course of this tumor entity.

  3. Research reactor management. Safety improvement activities in HANARO

    Safety activities in HANARO have been continuously conducted to enhance its safe operation. Great effort has been placed on a normalization and improvement of the safety attitude of the regular staff and other employees working at the reactor and other experimental facilities. This paper introduces the activities on safety improvement that were performed over the last few years. (author)

  4. Epithelioid/rhabdoid glioblastoma: a highly aggressive subtype of glioblastoma.

    Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Ideguchi, Makoto; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Kajiwara, Koji; Imoto, Hirochika; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Ishii, Aya; Kawano, Hiroo; Ikeda, Eiji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    Epithelioid glioblastoma (GBM) and rhabdoid GBM are rare variants that are morphologically similar, but there is no consensus on the characteristics of each disease. These tumors have aggressive features of early recurrence and leptomeningeal dissemination and tend to develop in younger patients compared to typical GBM. The prognosis is normally worse than typical GBM, even with intensive chemoradiotherapy after surgical resection. Thus, accurate diagnosis and effective therapy for epithelioid/rhabdoid GBM are required. Four consecutive patients aged 16-48 years were diagnosed with epithelioid/rhabdoid GBM by pathological and immunohistochemical analysis at Yamaguchi University Hospital from 2006 to 2012. Two of these patients had relatively long-term survival (19 and 23 months after diagnosis). Two cases had a BRAF V600E mutation, whereas no ATRX mutation was present in any cases. All patients suffered leptomeningeal and/or spinal dissemination that worsened their prognosis. These results illustrate the need for a new therapeutic approach, such as molecular targeted drug therapy like BRAF inhibition, in addition to standard chemoradiotherapy for typical GBM. PMID:26667174

  5. Current activities on safety improvement at Ukrainian NPPs

    This report describes general development status of the national programs on safety improvement of the Ukrainian NPPs, basic approaches adopted for planning and implementation of safety improvement works, and state of implementation of principal technical activities aimed at safety improvement of Ukrainian NPPs. (author)

  6. Cisgenic Barley with Improved Phytase Activity

    Holme, Inger; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    based on the cisgenesis concept. In contrast to transgenesis, cisgenesis implies that the plant is transformed only with its own or very closely related genetic material. Furthermore, all “helper” genes and gene sequences of foreign nature are removed from the transformed plant lines. Cisgenic crops are......-DNA borders in order to promote integration of the two genes at unlinked places in the plant genome. Transformed T0 plants show increases in the phytase activity of mature seeds from 1,400 in wild type to 8,950 FTU/kg in T0 plants. T1 plants of each transformant are currently screened with PCR for extra...... copies of the genomic phytase gene and the selection gene to identify segregation between the two genes. Presently, we have identified two cisgenic T1 plants without vector backbone and selection gene but with an extra copy of the genomic phytase gene....

  7. Correlation of MGMT promoter methylation status with gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma

    Miyuki Uno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: 1 To correlate the methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT promoter to its gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma and 2 to determine the most reliable method for using MGMT to predict the response to adjuvant therapy in patients with glioblastoma. BACKGROUND: The MGMT gene is epigenetically silenced by promoter hypermethylation in gliomas, and this modification has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response. METHODS: Fifty-one cases of glioblastoma were analyzed for MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing, gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MGMT promoter methylation was found in 43.1% of glioblastoma by methylation-specific PCR and 38.8% by pyrosequencing. A low level of MGMT gene expression was correlated with positive MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.001. However, no correlation was found between promoter methylation and MGMT protein expression (p = 0.297. The mean survival time of glioblastoma patients submitted to adjuvant therapy was significantly higher among patients with MGMT promoter methylation (log rank = 0.025 by methylation-specific PCR and 0.004 by pyrosequencing, and methylation was an independent predictive factor that was associated with improved prognosis by multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: MGMT promoter methylation status was a more reliable predictor of susceptibility to adjuvant therapy and prognosis of glioblastoma than were MGMT protein or gene expression levels. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing methods were both sensitive methods for determining MGMT promoter methylation status using DNA extracted from frozen tissue.

  8. Correlation of O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation with clinical outcomes in glioblastoma and clinical strategies to modulate MGMT activity

    Hegi, M E; L. Liu; Herman, J G; Stupp, R; Wick, W.; Weller, M.; Mehta, M P; Gilbert, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to alkylating agents via direct DNA repair by O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) remains a significant barrier to the successful treatment of patients with malignant glioma. The relative expression of MGMT in the tumor may determine response to alkylating agents, and epigenetic silencing of the MGMT gene by promoter methylation plays an important role in regulating MGMT expression in gliomas. MGMT promoter methylation is correlated with improved progression-free and overal...

  9. Synthetic analogs of anoplin show improved antimicrobial activities

    Munk, Jens; Uggerhøj, Lars Erik; Poulsen, Tanja Juul;

    2013-01-01

    We present the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of the decapeptide anoplin and 19 analogs thereof tested against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 33591 (MRSA), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ATCC...... that increasing the charge and/or hydrophobicity improves antimicrobial activity and increases hemolytic activity. For each strain tested, we identify at least six anoplin analogs with an improved therapeutic index compared with anoplin, the only exception being Enterococcus faecium, against which only...

  10. Extraneural Glioblastoma Multiforme Vertebral Metastasis

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Liang, Lydia; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Hdeib, Alia; Elder, Benjamin D.; Kosztowski, Thomas; Bettegowda, Chetan; Laterra, John; Burger, Peter; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor; however, extraneural metastasis is uncommon. Of those that metastasize extraneurally, metastases to the vertebral bodies represent a significant proportion. We present a review of 28 cases from the published literature of GBM metastasis to the vertebra. The mean age at presentation was 38.4 years with an average overall survival of 26 months. Patients were either asymptomatic with metastasis discovered at autopsy or presented with varying degrees of pain, weakness of the extremities, or other neurologic deficits. Of the cases that included the time to spinal metastasis, the average time was 26.4 months with a reported survival of 10 months after diagnosis of vertebral metastasis. A significant number of patients had no treatments for their spinal metastasis, although the intracranial lesions were treated extensively with surgery and/or adjuvant therapy. With increasing incremental gains in the survival of patients with GBM, clinicians will encounter patients with extracranial metastasis. As such, this review presents timely information concerning the presentation and outcomes of patients with vertebral metastasis. PMID:26704201

  11. Evolving Molecular Genetics of Glioblastoma

    Qiu-Ju Li; Jin-Quan Cai; Cheng-Yin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To summary the recent advances in molecular research of glioblastoma (GBM) and current trends in personalized therapy of this disease.Data Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English up to 2015, with keywords "molecular", "genetics", "GBM", "isocitrate dehydrogenase", "telomerase reverse transcriptase", "epidermal growth factor receptor", "PTPRZ1-MET", and "clinical treatment".Study Selection: Articles regarding the morphological pathology of GBM, the epidemiology of GBM, genetic alteration of GBM, and the development of treatment for GBM patients were identified, retrieved, and reviewed.Results: There is a large amount of data supporting the view that these recurrent genetic aberrations occur in a specific context of cellular origin, co-oncogenic hits and are present in distinct patient populations.Primary and secondary GBMs are distinct disease entities that affect different age groups of patients and develop through distinct genetic aberrations.These differences are important, especially because they may affect sensitivity to radio-and chemo-therapy and should thus be considered in the identification of targets for novel therapeutic approaches.Conclusion: This review highlights the molecular and genetic alterations of GBM, indicating that they are of potential value in the diagnosis and treatment for patients with GBM.

  12. Management of glioblastoma multiforme in pregnancy.

    Jayasekera, Bodiabaduge A P; Bacon, Andrew D; Whitfield, Peter C

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy presents unique challenges to the clinician. In planning treatment, potential benefits to the mother must be balanced against the risks to the fetus. In addition, evidence relating to timing of surgery and the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in pregnancy is limited. Management of peritumoral edema and seizures in pregnancy is also complicated by the potential for drug-related teratogenic effects and adverse neonatal outcomes on the fetus. The general anesthetic used for surgery must factor obstetric and neurosurgical considerations. In this review article, the authors seek to examine the role, safety, and timing of therapies for glioblastoma in the context of pregnancy. This covers the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, timing of surgery, postoperative care, anesthetic considerations, and use of anticonvulsant medications and steroids. The authors hope that this will provide a framework for clinicians treating pregnant patients with glioblastomas. PMID:22404670

  13. Toward a noncytotoxic glioblastoma therapy: blocking MCP-1 with the MTZ Regimen

    Salacz ME

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Salacz,1,2 Richard E Kast,3 Najmaldin Saki,4 Ansgar Brüning,5 Georg Karpel-Massler,6 Marc-Eric Halatsch6 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS, USA; 3IIAIGC Study Center, Burlington, VT, USA; 4Health Research Institute, Research Center of Thalassemia and Hemoglobinopathy, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran; 5Molecular Biology Laboratory, University Hospital Munich, Munich, Germany; 6Department of Neurosurgery, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany Abstract: To improve the prognosis of glioblastoma, we developed an adjuvant treatment directed to a neglected aspect of glioblastoma growth, the contribution of nonmalignant monocyte lineage cells (MLCs (monocyte, macrophage, microglia, dendritic cells that infiltrated a main tumor mass. These nonmalignant cells contribute to glioblastoma growth and tumor homeostasis. MLCs comprise of approximately 10%–30% of glioblastoma by volume. After integration into the tumor mass, these become polarized toward an M2 immunosuppressive, pro-angiogenic phenotype that promotes continued tumor growth. Glioblastoma cells initiate and promote this process by synthesizing 13 kDa MCP-1 that attracts circulating monocytes to the tumor. Infiltrating monocytes, after polarizing toward an M2 phenotype, synthesize more MCP-1, forming an amplification loop. Three noncytotoxic drugs, an antibiotic – minocycline, an antihypertensive drug – telmisartan, and a bisphosphonate – zoledronic acid, have ancillary attributes of MCP-1 synthesis inhibition and could be re-purposed, singly or in combination, to inhibit or reverse MLC-mediated immunosuppression, angiogenesis, and other growth-enhancing aspects. Minocycline, telmisartan, and zoledronic acid – the MTZ Regimen – have low-toxicity profiles and could be added to standard radiotherapy and temozolomide. Re-purposing older drugs has advantages of established safety and low

  14. Immobilization of activated sludge using improved polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel

    2007-01-01

    The microbial immobilization method using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel as an immobilizing material was improved and used for entrapment of activated sludge. The OUR (oxygen uptake rate) was used to characterize the biological activity of immobilized activated sludge. Three kinds of PVA-immobilized particles of activated sludge, that is, PVA-boric acid beads, PVA-sodium nitrate beads and PVA-orthophosphate beads was prepared, and their biological activity was compared by measuring the OUR value. The bioactivity of both autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms of activated sludge was determined using different synthetic wastewater media (containing 250 mg/L COD and 25 mg/L NH4+-N). The experimental results showed that the bioactivity and stability of the three kinds of immobilized activated sludge was greatly improved after activation. With respect of the bioactivity and the mechanical stability, the PVA-orthophosphate method may be a promising and economical technique for microbial immobilization.

  15. Nutrient activation of Trichoderma fungal spores for improved biocontrol activity

    Linda Gordon Hjeljord; Arne Tronsmo

    2004-01-01

    @@ The effect of preliminary nutrient activation on the ability of conidia of the antagonist Trichoderma harzianum P1 (ThP1) to suppress Botrytis cinerea was investigated in laboratory, greenhouse and field trials. Preliminary nutrient activation at 21 ℃ accelerated subsequent germination of the antagonist at temperatures from 9 ℃ to 21 ℃; at ≥ 18 ℃ the germination time of preactivated ThP1conidia did not differ significantly from that of B. cinerea. When coinoculated with B. cinerea,concentrated inocula of preactivated but ungerminated ThP1 conidia reduced in vitro germination of the pathogen by ≥ 87 % at 12 ℃ to 25 ℃; initially-quiescent conidia achieved this level of suppression only at 25 ℃. Application of quiescent ThP1 conidia to detached strawberry flowers in moist chambers reduced infection by B. cinerea by ≥85 % at 24 ℃ , but only by 35 % at 12 ℃. Preactivated conidia reduced infection by ≥60% at 12 ℃. Both quiescent and preactivated conidia significantly reduced latent infection in greenhouse-grown strawberries at a mean temperture of 19 ℃, while only preactivated conidia were effective in the field at a mean temperature of 14 ℃ on the day of treatment application.

  16. Benefits of Improved HP Turbine Active Clearance Control

    Ruiz, Rafael; Albers, Bob; Sak, Wojciech; Seitzer, Ken; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the NASA Propulsion 21 program, GE Aircraft Engines was contracted to develop an improved high pressure turbine(HPT) active clearance control (ACC) system. The system is envisioned to minimize blade tip clearances to improve HPT efficiency throughout the engine operation range simultaneously reducing fuel consumption and emissions.

  17. Do Active-Learning Strategies Improve Students' Critical Thinking?

    Nelson, Larry P.; Crow, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Improving students' ability to recognize work-related problems and apply effective strategies and solutions to fundamental challenges in the field is at the crux of a good college preparation. This paper attempts to investigate if active-learning strategies improve students' critical thinking ability in this regard. Participants were pre-service…

  18. Biological Rationale for the Use of PPARγ Agonists in Glioblastoma

    Hayley Patricia Ellis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is the most common primary intrinsic CNS tumour and has an extremely poor overall survival, despite advances in neurosurgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There has been interesting preliminary evidence suggesting that patients receiving the group of anti-diabetic drugs known as PPARγ (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists have a lower incidence of glioma. The nuclear hormone receptor PPARγ has been found to be expressed in high grade gliomas, and its activation has been shown to have several antineoplastic effects on human and rat glioma cell lines, and in some instances an additional protective increase in antioxidant enzymes has been observed in normal astrocytes. At present, no clinical trials are underway with regards to treating glioma patients using PPARγ agonists, as Pioglitazone and Rosiglitazone are only FDA-approved for use in treatment of type-2 diabetes. This review presents the case for evaluating the potential of PPARγ agonists as novel adjuvants in the treatment of high grade glioma. We introduce the PPARγ pathway, PPARγ gene and its products and examine recent research in glioblastoma.

  19. Wnt inhibitory factor-1 regulates glioblastoma cell cycle and proliferation.

    Wu, Jun; Fang, Jiasheng; Yang, Zhuanyi; Chen, Fenghua; Liu, Jingfang; Wang, Yanjin

    2012-10-01

    Wnt proteins are powerful regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, and activation of the Wnt signalling pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of several types of human tumours. Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) acts as a Wnt antagonist and tumour suppressor. Previous studies have shown that reducing expression of the WIF-1 gene aberrantly activates Wnt signalling and induces the development of certain types of cancers. In the present study, we examined the expression of WIF-1 in human primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumours. Studies using semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that WIF-1 expression is lower in human GBM than in normal brain tissue. To clarify the role of WIF-1, we transfected U251 human glioblastoma-derived cells, which do not express WIF-1, with the pcDNA3.1-WIF1 vector to restore WIF-1 expression. The results of cell proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis assays, as well as flow cytometry, indicate that exogenous WIF-1 has no effect on U251 cell apoptosis, but does arrest cells at the G(0)/G(1) phase and inhibit cell growth. Collectively, our data suggest that WIF-1 is a potent inhibitor of GBM growth. PMID:22901505

  20. Current Studies of Immunotherapy on Glioblastoma.

    Agrawal, Neena Stephanie; Miller, Rickey; Lal, Richa; Mahanti, Harshini; Dixon-Mah, Yaenette N; DeCandio, Michele L; Vandergrift, W Alex; Varma, Abhay K; Patel, Sunil J; Banik, Naren L; Lindhorst, Scott M; Giglio, Pierre; Das, Arabinda

    2014-04-01

    Glioblastoma is a form of brain tumor with a very high morbidity and mortality. Despite decades of research, the best treatments currently in clinical practice only extend survival by a number of months. A promising alternative to conventional treatment for glioblastomas is immunotherapy. Although proposed over a century ago, the field of cancer immunotherapy has historically struggled to translate it into effective clinical treatments. Better understanding is needed of the various regulatory and co-stimulatory factors in the glioblastoma patient for more efficient immunotherapy treatments. The tumor microenvironment is anatomically shielded from normal immune-surveillance by the blood-brain barrier, irregular lymphatic drainage system, and it's in a potently immunosuppressive environment. Immunotherapy can potentially manipulate these forces effectively to enhance anti-tumor immune response and clinical benefit. New treatments utilizing the immune system show promise in terms of targeting and efficacy. This review article attempts to discuss current practices in glioblastoma treatment, the theory behind immunotherapy, and current research into various clinical trials. PMID:25346943

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery for glioblastoma: retrospective analysis

    This retrospective study was done to better understand the conditions for which stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for glioblastoma may be efficacious. Between 2000 and 2007, 33 patients with a pathological diagnosis of glioblastoma received SRS with the Novalis® Shaped Beam Radiosurgery system. Eighteen patients (54%) underwent salvage SRS for recurrence while 15 (45%) patients received upfront SRS following standard fractionated RT for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. There were no RTOG grade >2 acute side effects. The median survival after SRS was 6.7 months (range 1.4 – 74.7). There was no significant difference in overall survival (from the time of initial diagnosis) with respect to the timing of SRS (p = 0.2). There was significantly better progression free survival in patients treated with SRS as consolidation versus at the time of recurrence (p = 0.04). The majority of patients failed within or at the margin of the SRS treatment volume (21/26 evaluable for recurrence). SRS is well tolerated in the treatment of glioblastoma. As there was no difference in survival whether SRS is delivered upfront or at recurrence, the treatment for each patient should be individualized. Future studies are needed to identify patients most likely to respond to SRS

  2. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H;

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  3. Glioblastoma multiforme in the very elderly.

    Connon, Felicity V; Rosenthal, Mark A; Drummond, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant and most common primary brain tumour and is treated with resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, a significant amount of patients are older than 80 years, and such an approach may not be appropriate. Data on patients aged 80 or older with glioblastoma from two hospitals was collected using the CNS Tumour Database on the Australian Comprehensive Cancer Outcomes and Research Database (ACCORD) system operated by BioGrid. Between 2008 and July 2011, 40 patients aged 80 years or older were diagnosed with glioblastoma. The median ECOG PS was 2 and the ASA score was 3. All 40 patients underwent surgery and 33% had a gross total resection. Only six patients (15%) had either post-operative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The overall median survival was 4 months (range 0-18 months) and 28% of patients lived between 6 and 24 months. This is the largest reported cohort of very elderly patients with glioblastoma. Patients tolerated surgery but few went on to receive post-operative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This patient population requires special attention and in particular would benefit from participation in suitable clinical trials to determine the best care regime. PMID:26208944

  4. Immunological targeting of cytomegalovirus for glioblastoma therapy

    Nair, Smita K.; Sampson, John H.; Mitchell, Duane A.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is purportedly present in glioblastoma (GBM) while absent from the normal brain, making CMV antigens potentially ideal immunological anti-GBM targets. We recently demonstrated that patient-derived CMV pp65-specific T cells are capable of recognizing and killing autologous GBM tumor cells. This data supports CMV antigen-directed immunotherapies against GBM.

  5. MGMT modulates glioblastoma angiogenesis and response to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib

    Chahal, Manik; Xu, Yaoxian; Lesniak, David; Graham, Kathryn; Famulski, Konrad; Christensen, James G.; Aghi, Manish; Jacques, Amanda; Murray, David; Sabri, Siham; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors, such as sunitinib, represent a promising strategy to improve glioblastoma (GBM) tumor response. In this study, we used the O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT)-negative GBM cell line U87MG stably transfected with MGMT (U87/MGMT) to assess whether MGMT expression affects the response to sunitinib. We showed that the addition of sunitinib to standard therapy (temozolomide [TMZ] and radiation therapy [RT]) significantly improved the response of MGMT-positive but not...

  6. Quercetin abrogates IL-6/STAT3 signaling and inhibits glioblastoma cell line growth and migration

    Michaud-Levesque, Jonathan; Bousquet-Gagnon, Nathalie; Beliveau, Richard, E-mail: oncomol@nobel.si.uqam.ca

    2012-05-01

    Evidence has suggested that STAT3 functions as an oncogene in gliomagenesis. As a consequence, changes in the inflammatory microenvironment are thought to promote tumor development. Regardless of its origin, cancer-related inflammation has many tumor-promoting effects, such as the promotion of cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell survival. Given that IL-6, a major cancer-related inflammatory cytokine, regulates STAT3 activation and is upregulated in glioblastoma, we sought to investigate the inhibitory effects of the chemopreventive flavonoid quercetin on glioblastoma cell proliferation and migration triggered by IL-6, and to determine the underlying mechanisms of action. In this study, we show that quercetin is a potent inhibitor of the IL-6-induced STAT3 signaling pathway in T98G and U87 glioblastoma cells. Exposure to quercetin resulted in the reduction of GP130, JAK1 and STAT3 activation by IL-6, as well as a marked decrease of the proliferative and migratory properties of glioblastoma cells induced by IL-6. Interestingly, quercetin also modulated the expression of two target genes regulated by STAT3, i.e. cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, quercetin reduced the recruitment of STAT3 at the cyclin D1 promoter and inhibited Rb phosphorylation in the presence of IL-6. Overall, these results provide new insight into the role of quercetin as a blocker of the STAT3 activation pathway stimulated by IL-6, with a potential role in the prevention and treatment of glioblastoma.

  7. Quercetin abrogates IL-6/STAT3 signaling and inhibits glioblastoma cell line growth and migration

    Evidence has suggested that STAT3 functions as an oncogene in gliomagenesis. As a consequence, changes in the inflammatory microenvironment are thought to promote tumor development. Regardless of its origin, cancer-related inflammation has many tumor-promoting effects, such as the promotion of cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell survival. Given that IL-6, a major cancer-related inflammatory cytokine, regulates STAT3 activation and is upregulated in glioblastoma, we sought to investigate the inhibitory effects of the chemopreventive flavonoid quercetin on glioblastoma cell proliferation and migration triggered by IL-6, and to determine the underlying mechanisms of action. In this study, we show that quercetin is a potent inhibitor of the IL-6-induced STAT3 signaling pathway in T98G and U87 glioblastoma cells. Exposure to quercetin resulted in the reduction of GP130, JAK1 and STAT3 activation by IL-6, as well as a marked decrease of the proliferative and migratory properties of glioblastoma cells induced by IL-6. Interestingly, quercetin also modulated the expression of two target genes regulated by STAT3, i.e. cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, quercetin reduced the recruitment of STAT3 at the cyclin D1 promoter and inhibited Rb phosphorylation in the presence of IL-6. Overall, these results provide new insight into the role of quercetin as a blocker of the STAT3 activation pathway stimulated by IL-6, with a potential role in the prevention and treatment of glioblastoma.

  8. Active Listening Improve Your Ability to Listen and Lead

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership

    2011-01-01

    Active listening is a person's willingness and ability to hear and understand. At its core, active listening is a state of mind that involves paying full and careful attention to the other person, avoiding premature judgment, reflecting understanding, clarifying information, summarizing, and sharing. By learning and committing to the skills and behaviors of active listening, leaders can become more effective listeners and, over time, improve their ability to lead.

  9. Active filter to improve the energetic efficiency in electric installations.

    Amarís Duarte, Hortensia; Robles Muñoz, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Electrical Engineering of the University Carlos III of Madrid has developed a prototype of active filter to compensate the disturbances that a nonlinear load produces. The active filters appears like the dynamic solution that best fits to the needs of compensation of electrical disturbances in industrial facilities. This active filter allows correcting the power factor of the installation. With this improvement, electrical consumes are reduced, which results in significa...

  10. Wogonoside induces autophagy-related apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Handong; Cong, Zixiang; Xu, Jianguo; Zhu, Jianhong; Ji, Xiangjun; Ding, Ke

    2014-09-01

    Wogonoside, a bioactive flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has shown preclinical anticancer efficacy in various cancer models. However, the effects of wogonoside on glioblastoma cells remain unclear. In the present study, we found that wogonoside exhibited a cytotoxic effect on human glioblastoma cells. The suppression of cell viability was due to the induction of mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, the presence of autophagic hallmarks, including an increase in punctate microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) dots, changes in cellular morphology and increased levels of autophagy-related proteins were observed in the wogonoside-treated cells. Wogonoside treatment also enhanced autophagic flux as reflected by the increased acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation, p62 degradation and LC3 turnover. Notably, blockade of autophagy by a chemical inhibitor or RNA interference decreased the anticancer effect of wogonoside. In addition, the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6 kinase (PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K) signaling pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) participated in wogonoside-induced autophagy and apoptosis. These findings support the initiation of further studies of wogonoside as a candidate for the treatment of human malignant glioma. PMID:24970553

  11. Customized cooking method improves total antioxidant activity in selected vegetables.

    Ng, Zhi-Xiang; Chai, Jen-Wai; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2011-03-01

    The present study compares water-soluble phenolic content (WPC) and antioxidant activities in Chinese long bean (Vigna unguiculata), bitter gourd (Momordica charantia), water convolvulus (Ipomoea aquatica) and broccoli (Brassica olearacea) prior to and after subjecting to boiling, microwaving and pressure cooking. The total antioxidant activity was increased in cooked water convolvulus, broccoli and bitter gourd, estimated based on the ferric reducing antioxidant power, the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging activity. Pressure cooking did not cause any significant decline in the antioxidant property. Boiling generally improved the overall antioxidant activity in all the vegetables. Correlation analysis suggests that WPC contributed to significant antioxidant activities in these vegetables. Thus, prudence in selecting an appropriate cooking method for different vegetables may improve or preserve their nutritional value. PMID:21250903

  12. Saponins: the potential chemotherapeutic agents in pursuing new anti-glioblastoma drugs.

    Tian, Xiangrong; Tang, Haifeng; Lin, Houwen; Cheng, Guang; Wang, Siwang; Zhang, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Saponins are natural glycosides consisting of a triterpene or steroid aglycone with a range of pharmacological properties such as significant anti-tumor activity. In this article, we review our recent progress in the studies of the saponins possessing anticancer effects, especially anti-glioblastoma effects from twelve species of marine organisms and terrestrial plants. The anti-glioblastoma active saponins discovered by other researchers in recent decades are also reviewed and compared. Systematic extraction, isolation and structural elucidation on the saponin constituents from three species of starfishes, five species of sea cucumbers and four species of medicinal plants led to the identification of more than 129 saponins, among which 76 saponins are new compounds. Most of the new compounds were found to possess relatively rare structural features showing in vitro cytotoxicity against tumor cells, especially glioblastoma cells. Several saponins exhibited significant anti-glioblastoma effects in vivo by in situ administration (interstitial chemotherapy) and their haemolytic side effects were avoided in the tests. Multiple mechanisms of action, such as interfering with cell cycle progression, inducing apoptosis, promoting stabilization of microtubule, as well as several signal transduction pathways, were involved in their anticancer effects. The review provided valuable leads for pursuing new anti-glioblastoma drugs, and established a new viewpoint for further development of these marine and terrestrial organisms. The successful approach to administrate saponins in situ conquered the bottleneck in the development of saponins as new drugs- haemolytic effects. It means that saponins may be developed as potential chemotherapeutic agents in pursuing new antiglioblastoma drugs. PMID:24032516

  13. Liposomal n-butylidenephthalide protects the drug from oxidation and enhances its antitumor effects in glioblastoma multiforme

    Lin YL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Ling Lin,1,2,* Kai-Fu Chang,3,* Xiao-Fan Huang,3 Che-Lun Hung,4 Shyh-Chang Chen,5 Wan-Ru Chao,6,7 Kuang-Wen Liao,1,8 Nu-Man Tsai3,9 1College of Biological Science and Technology, 2Center for Bioinformatics Research, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 3School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, 4Department of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Providence University, 5Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 6Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, 7Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University and Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, 8Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 9Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The natural compound n-butylidenephthalide (BP can pass through the blood–brain barrier to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. However, BP has an unstable structure that reduces its antitumor activity and half-life in vivo.Objective: The aim of this study is to design a drug delivery system to encapsulate BP to enhance its efficacy by improving its protection and delivery.Methods: To protect its structural stability against protein-rich and peroxide solutions, BP was encapsulated into a lipo-PEG-PEI complex (LPPC. Then, the cytotoxicity of BP/LPPC following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions was analyzed by MTT. Cell uptake of BP/LPPC was also measured by confocal microscopy. The therapeutic effects of BP/LPPC were analyzed in xenograft mice following intratumoral and intravenous injections.Results: When BP was encapsulated in LPPC, its cytotoxicity was maintained following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions. The cytotoxic activity of encapsulated BP was higher than

  14. Improving aerobic capacity through active videogames: A randomized controlled trial

    Jorge Luiz de Brito-Gomes; Raphael José Perrier-Melo; Erik Anders Wikstrom; Manoel da Cunha Costa

    2015-01-01

    AbstractThe rate of peak workload improvement between different types of Active Video Games (AVG) in young sedentary adults was investigated. Aerobic capacity improvement after a 6-week intervention between AVG types was also compared. Twenty participants, after baseline assessments, were randomized into one of three parallel groups: structured AVG (n= 6), unstructured AVG (n= 7) and a control group (n= 7). Participants played their respective AVG 3 times a week for 6-weeks (30 minutes-sessio...

  15. Does glioblastoma cyst fluid promote sciatic nerve regeneration?

    Rafet Özay; Abit Aktas; Mevlüt Özgür Taskapilioglu; Bora Gürer; Bülent Erdogan; Yusuf Sükrü Çaglar

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma cyst fluid contains growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins which are known as neurotrophic and neurite-promoting agents. Therefore, we hypothesized that glioblastoma cyst fluid can promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. To validate this hypothesis, we transected rat sciatic nerve, performed epineural anastomosis, and wrapped the injured sciatic nerve with glioblastoma cyst fluid- or saline-soaked gelatin sponges. Neurological function and histomorphologi...

  16. The tumor suppressive role of WIF1 in glioblastoma

    Vassallo I.

    2013-01-01

    Expression based prediction of gene alterations identified WNT inhibitory factor I (WIF1) as a new candidate tumor suppressor gene involved in glioblastoma. WIF1 encodes a secreted WNT antagonist and it is strongly down-regulated in most glioblastoma as compared to normal brain both by genomic deletion and WIF1 promoter hypermethylation. WIF1 expression in glioblastoma cell lines inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo and strongly reduced migration capability. Interestingly, WIF1 e...

  17. Detection of MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma using pyrosequencing

    Xie, Hao; Tubbs, Raymond; Yang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical trials on patients with glioblastoma revealed that O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status significantly predicts patient’s response to alkylating agents. In this study, we sought to develop and validate a quantitative MGMT methylation assay using pyrosequencing on glioblastoma. We quantified promoter methylation of MGMT using pyrosequencing on paraffin-embedded fine needle aspiration biopsy tissues from 43 glioblastoma. Using a 10% cutoff, MGMT methyl...

  18. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma

  19. Cross inhibition improves activity selection when switching incurs time costs

    James A.R.MARSHALL; Angélique FAVREAU-PEIGN(E); Lutz FROMHAGE; John M.MCNAMARA; Lianne F.S.MEAH; Alasdair I.HOUSTON

    2015-01-01

    We consider a behavioural model of an animal choosing between two activities,based on positive feedback,and examine the effect of introducing cross inhibition between the motivations for the two activities.While cross-inhibition has previously been included in models of decision making,the question of what benefit it may provide to an animal's activity selection behaviour has not previously been studied.In neuroscience and in collective behaviour cross-inhibition,and other equivalent means of coupling evidence-accumulating pathways,have been shown to approximate statistically-optimal decision-making and to adaptively break deadlock,thereby improving decision performance.Switching between activities is an ongoing decision process yet here we also find that cross-inhibition robustly improves its efficiency,by reducing the frequency of costly switches between behaviours [Current Zoology 61 (2):242-250,2015].

  20. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-JunS73 phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  1. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); DeVaney, Trevor [Institute of Biophysics, Medical University of Graz (Austria); Zimmer, Andreas [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Karl-Franzens University, Graz (Austria); Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Christopher [Cancer Research Technology Ltd, London (United Kingdom); Sattler, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.sattler@medunigraz.at [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria)

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-Jun{sup S73} phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  2. BI-14GENOMIC PROFILING OF A PREDICTIVE SIGNATURE FOR MET-TARGETED THERAPY IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    Johnson, Jennifer; Ascierto, Maria Libera; Newsome, David; Mittal, Sandeep; Kang, Liang; Briggs, Michael; Tanner, Kirk; Michael E. Berens; Marincola, Francesco M.; Vande Woude, George F.; Xie, Qian

    2014-01-01

    The success of molecular targeted therapy against cancer depends on discovering the tumor driver genes and the molecular determinants that control the pathway activity. Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most devastating cancers due to its highly infiltrating nature, and MET pathway activation is a major cause of invasion in both primary and recurrent tumors. Because MET inhibitors are in clinical trials against GBM, there may be clinical utility from developing more effective patient enrollmen...

  3. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM's cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  4. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology.

  5. Active video gaming to improve balance in the elderly

    Lamoth, C.J.; Caljouw, S.R.; Postema, K.

    2011-01-01

    The combination of active video gaming and exercise (exergaming) is suggested to improve elderly people's balance, thereby decreasing fall risk. Exergaming has been shown to increase motivation during exercise therapy, due to the enjoyable and challenging nature, which could support long-term adhere

  6. p53-Dependent G1 arrest and p53-independent apoptosis influence the radio biologic response of glioblastoma

    Purpose: Loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene has been associated with tumor progression, disease relapse, poor response to antineoplastic therapy, and poor prognosis in many malignancies. We have investigated the contribution of p53-mediated radiation-induced apoptosis and G1 arrest to the well described radiation resistance of glioblastoma multiforme (GM) cells. Methods and Materials: Radiation survival in vitro was quantitated using linear quadratic and repair-saturation mathematical models. Isogenic derivatives of glioblastoma cells differing only in their p53 status were generated using a retroviral vector expressing a dominant negative mutant of p53. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assayed by Flourescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase labeling technique, and chromatin morphology. Cells were synchronized in early G1 phase and mitotic and labeling indices were measured. Results: Radiation-induced apoptosis of GM cells was independent of functional wild-type p53 (wt p53). Decreased susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis was associated with lower α values characterizing the shoulder of the clonogenic radiation survival curve. Using isogenic GM cells differing only in their p53 activity, we found that a p53-mediated function, radiation-induced G1 arrest, could also influence the value of α and clonogenic radiation resistance. Inactivation of wt p53 function by a dominant negative mutant of p53 resulted in a significantly diminished α value with no alteration in cellular susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis. The clonal derivative U87-LUX.8 expressing a functional wt p53 had an α (Gy-1) value of 0.609, whereas the isogenic clonal derivative U87-175.4 lacking wt p53 function had an α (Gy-1) value of 0.175. Conclusion: We conclude that two distinct cellular responses to radiation, p53-independent apoptosis and p53-dependent G1-arrest, influence radiobiological parameters that characterize the

  7. Detection of primary cilia in human glioblastoma

    Sarkisian, Matthew R.; Siebzehnrubl, Dorit; Hoang-Minh, Lan; Deleyrolle, Loic; Silver, Daniel J.; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A.; Guadiana, Sarah M.; Srivinasan, Gayathri; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Steindler, Dennis A.; Brent A Reynolds

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant adult brain tumor and carries a poor prognosis due to primary and acquired resistance. While many cellular features of GBM have been documented, it is unclear if cells within these tumors extend a primary cilium, an organelle whose associated signaling pathways may regulate proliferation, migration, and survival of neural precursor and tumor cells. Using immunohistochemical and electron microscopy (EM) techniques, we screened human GBM tumor bio...

  8. Bevacizumab for the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    Gil-Gil, Miguel J.; Carlos Mesia; Montserrat Rey; Jordi Bruna

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) or grade IV glioma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Standard treatment median overall survival (OS) is only 14–15 months and less than 10% of patients will survive 5 years after diagnosis. There is no standard treatment in recurrent GBM and OS ranges from 3 to 9 months. GBM is 1 of the most vascularized human tumors and GBM cells produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, has demonstrated ac...

  9. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is ...

  10. Patterns of Failure for Pediatric Glioblastoma Multiforme Following Radiation Therapy.

    Shabason, Jacob E; Sutton, David; Kenton, Owen; Guttmann, David M; Lustig, Robert A; Hill-Kayser, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Despite aggressive multimodal therapy for pediatric glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), patient survival remains poor. This retrospective review of patients with GBM aims to evaluate the patterns of failure after radiation therapy (RT). The study included 14 pediatric patients treated with RT at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from 2007 to 2015. With a median follow-up of 16.9 months, 13 (92.9%) developed recurrent disease. Of recurrences, nine (69.2%) were in-field, three (23.1%) were marginal, and one (7.7%) was distant. The majority of patients treated with adjuvant radiation failed in the region of high-dose RT, indicating the need for improvements in local therapy. PMID:27128519

  11. Development of targeted therapies in treatment of glioblastoma

    Yuan-Yuan Xu; Pei Gao; Ying Sun; You-Rong Duan

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a type of tumor that is highly lethal despite maximal therapy. Standard therapeutic approaches provide modest improvement in progression-free and overall survival, necessitating the investigation of novel therapies. Oncologic therapy has recently experienced a rapid evolution toward “targeted therapy”, with drugs directed against speciifc targets which play essential roles in the proliferation, survival, and invasiveness of GBM cells, including numerous molecules involved in signal transduction pathways. Inhibitors of these molecules have already entered or are undergoing clinical trials. However, signiifcant challenges in their development remain because several preclinical and clinical studies present conlficting results. In this article, we will provide an up-to-date review of the current targeted therapies in GBM.

  12. The challenges associated with molecular targeted therapies for glioblastoma.

    Jue, Toni Rose; McDonald, Kerrie L

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive malignant brain tumor in adults. Improvements in the treatment of GBM have remained static since the advent of the standard therapy which includes radiation with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide treatment. Developing treatment and diagnostic or companion biomarker combinations is transforming the way we treat numerous cancers. However, can this emerging paradigm be also effective for GBM? Can GBM be treated the same way as other cancers? Here we review the challenges for a personalized molecular targeted therapeutic approach in GBM. The specific challenges for establishing a personalized molecular targeted medicine program for GBM patients include overcoming the blood brain barrier, unravelling the intra- and inter-heterogeneity that exists and the importance of developing more relevant animal models that recapitulate a patient's GBM tumor. PMID:26900075

  13. Aplastic anemia with concurrent temozolomide treatment in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme

    J. Oh; Kutas, G.J.; Davey, P.; Morrison, M; Perry, J R

    2010-01-01

    Temozolomide (tmz) is an oral alkylating agent used during concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Temozolomide is generally well tolerated and improves survival; however, severe adverse events have occasionally been reported. Here, we report the case of a patient who developed aplastic anemia with related complications in the setting of concurrent tmz treatment with radiotherapy. This case illustrates that aplastic anemia is a rare side effect of tmz...

  14. Positron emission tomography-guided conformal fast neutron therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Stelzer, Keith J.; Douglas, James G.; Mankoff, David A.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Laramore, George E.; Spence, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to be a difficult therapeutic challenge. Our study was conducted to determine whether improved survival and tumor control could be achieved with modern delivery of fast neutron radiation using three-dimensional treatment planning. Ten patients were enrolled. Eligibility criteria included pathologic diagnosis of GBM, age ≥ 18 years, and KPS ≥60. Patients underwent MRI and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG PET) as part of initial three-dimensional treatment...

  15. Reirradiation for recurrent glioblastoma by cyberknife

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the outcomes of recurrent, previously irradiated glioblastoma treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy using the CyberKnife (CK). 48 patients (20 male and 28 female, ages 21-78 years, median 61 years) with recurrent glioblastoma were analyzed. The period from conventional radiotherapy to CK treatment was 4 to 216 months (median 7 months). The dose of conventional radiotherapy was 40-70 Gy, median 65 Gy. Tumor volume ranged from 1.3 to 257 ml (median 45 ml). The marginal dose (D95) was 17-35 Gy (median 30 Gy) delivered in one to 7 sessions. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 17 months (median 7 months). Median survival from CK treatment was 7 months. No patient survived more than 17 months. CK retreatment for recurrent glioblastoma was palliative, contributing to the maintainenance of quality of life (QOL). A multidisciplinary approach for recurrent GBM, including a molecular targeting regimen and re-irradiation, is expected to prolong the performance status of patient. (author)

  16. Orphan drugs in glioblastoma multiforme: a review

    Lassen U

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ulrik Lassen, Morten Mau-Sørensen, Hans Skovgaard Poulsen Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and deadly brain tumor in adults. The incidence of GBM in the USA and Europe is 2–3 per 100,000. By definition, an orphan disease affects up to 200,000 persons in the USA (one in every 1,500. A search was made in the US Food and Drug Administration orphan drug listing. In addition, a PubMed search of orphan drugs designated for GBM or high-grade glioma was performed, followed by a search for clinical studies in GBM with orphan drugs designated for other indications. This included cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted agents. Thirteen drugs with orphan designation for the treatment of glioblastoma, high-grade glioma, or primary malignant brain tumors were identified. In addition, 16 drugs with orphan designation for other indications were identified to have been evaluated in clinical studies of GBM. The efficacy data from the clinical studies is presented. A few agents have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of high-grade gliomas following orphan drug designation, but most have failed to reach the market. However, a few patients may have benefited from receiving developmental agents within clinical trials. Biomarkers for selection of these patients may result in more success in the field of personalized medicine. Keywords: orphan drugs, glioblastoma multiforme, brain tumor, targeted therapy, cytotoxic therapy

  17. Cerebral Blood Flow Changes in Glioblastoma Patients Undergoing Bevacizumab Treatment Are Seen in Both Tumor and Normal Brain

    Andre, Jalal B; Nagpal, Seema; Hippe, Daniel S; Ravanpay, Ali C.; Schmiedeskamp, Heiko; Bammer, Roland; Palagallo, Gerald J; Recht, Lawrence; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab (BEV) is increasingly used to treat recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) with some reported improvement in neurocognitive function despite potential neurotoxicities. We examined the effects of BEV on cerebral blood flow (CBF) within recurrent GBM tumor and in the contralateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory.

  18. Current activities of safety improvements at Ukrainian NPPs

    The basic idea leading the program of safety improvements at Ukrainian NPPs is further development of nuclear power required to ensure at least 40% of country's energy supply. Activities concerning safety improvements of Ukrainian NPPs involved four reactor types: WWER-1000 (V-5) large series, WWER-1000 (V-302, V-338) small series, WWER-400 (V-213) and RBMK (second generation). Most significant safety improvements covered reactor core integrity, reactor components and cooling systems integrity, instrumentation and control system, power supply, internal hazards. Additional measures related to WWER-440 were concerned with feedwater supply, instrumentation and control systems, and containment. Improvements related to Chernobylsk NPP unit 3 involved supervision, control and protection systems; safety assessment and supporting systems; fire safety. The role of quality assurance and training is emphasised when operational safety is concerned. Planned safety upgrading measures are mentioned

  19. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches

    Gutin Philip H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma can prolong survival, but it is not curative. For patients with disease progression after frontline therapy, there is no standard of care, although further surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy may be used. Antiangiogenic therapies may be appropriate for treating glioblastomas because angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth. In a large, noncomparative phase II trial, bevacizumab was evaluated alone and with irinotecan in patients with recurrent glioblastoma; combination treatment was associated with an estimated 6-month progression-free survival (PFS rate of 50.3%, a median overall survival of 8.9 months, and a response rate of 37.8%. Single-agent bevacizumab also exceeded the predetermined threshold of activity for salvage chemotherapy (6-month PFS rate, 15%, achieving a 6-month PFS rate of 42.6% (p

  20. Bortezomib sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to induction of apoptosis by type I interferons through NOXA expression and Mcl-1 cleavage.

    Wang, Ruishan; Davidoff, Andrew M; Pfeffer, Lawrence M

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastomas are highly invasive and aggressive primary brain tumors. Type I interferons have significant, pleiotropic anticancer activity. However, through various pathways many cancers become interferon-resistant, limiting interferon's clinical utility. In this study, we demonstrated that the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib sensitized human glioblastoma cells to the antiproliferative action of interferons, which involved the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis but not necroptosis. We found that death ligands such as TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) were not involved in interferon/bortezomib-induced apoptosis, although interferon induced TRAIL expression. However, apoptosis was induced through an intrinsic pathway involving increased NOXA expression and Mcl-1 cleavage. Our findings may provide an important rationale for combining type I interferons with bortezomib for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:27450810

  1. Survivin inhibition and DNA double-strand break repair: A molecular mechanism to overcome radioresistance in glioblastoma

    Background and purpose: Gliomas display prime examples of ionizing radiation (IR) resistant tumors. The IAP Survivin is reported to be critically involved in radiation resistance by anti-apoptotic and by caspase-independent mechanisms. The present study aimed to elucidate an interrelationship between Survivin’s cellular localization and DNA damage repair in glioma cells. Material and methods: Cellular distribution and nuclear complex formation were assayed by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence staining and co-immunoprecipitation of Survivin bound proteins in LN229 glioblastoma cells. Apoptosis induction, survival and DNA repair following IR were assayed by means of caspase3/7 activity, clonogenic assay, γ-H2AX/53BP1 foci formation, single cell gel electrophoresis assay, and DNA-PKcs kinase assay in the presence of Survivin siRNA or over expression of Survivin-GFP. Results: Following irradiation, we observed a nuclear accumulation and a direct interrelationship between Survivin, MDC1, γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and DNA-PKcs, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence co-localization. Survivin downregulation by siRNA resulted in an increased apoptotic fraction, decreased clonogenic survival and increased DNA-damage, as demonstrated by higher amount of DNA breaks and an increased amount of γ-H2AX/53BP1 foci post irradiation. Furthermore, we detected in Survivin-depleted LN229 cells a hampered S2056 (auto)phosphorylation and a significantly decreased DNA-PKcs kinase activity. Conclusion: Nuclear accumulation of Survivin and interaction with components of the DNA-double-strand break (DSB) repair machinery indicates Survivin to regulate DSB damage repair that leads to a significant improvement of survival of LN229 glioblastoma cells.

  2. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  3. Improving aerobic capacity through active videogames: A randomized controlled trial

    Jorge Luiz de Brito-Gomes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe rate of peak workload improvement between different types of Active Video Games (AVG in young sedentary adults was investigated. Aerobic capacity improvement after a 6-week intervention between AVG types was also compared. Twenty participants, after baseline assessments, were randomized into one of three parallel groups: structured AVG (n= 6, unstructured AVG (n= 7 and a control group (n= 7. Participants played their respective AVG 3 times a week for 6-weeks (30 minutes-session. The control group maintained normal activities. Both structured and unstructured AVG improved peak workload after four weeks but only the structured group maintained this improvement through week five and six. Aerobic capacity improved in the unstructured (Pre: 36.0 ± 5.2ml.kg.min-¹,Post: 39.7 ± 4.9ml.kg.min-¹, p = .038 and structured AVG (Pre: 39.0 ± 5.9ml.kg.min-¹,Post: 47.8 ± 4.3ml.kg.min-¹, p = .006 groups. Structured AVG provide greater health benefits to aerobic capacity and peak workload in young sedentary but otherwise healthy males relative to unstructured AVG.

  4. IMPROVING QUALITY OF LIFE AT EDERLY PEOPLE, THROUGH GIMN ACTIVITIES

    Ganciu Mihaela

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In light of permanent education, physical education and sports activities should be integrated throughout life. The objective of the research is to improve the quality of life of older people to the initiation of maintenance programs by simple methods, reliable and inexpensive. Therapeutic strategies will be adapted practitioners age, associated diseases, profession. The sample under investigation comprised 30 elderly people who participated in two gymnastics lessons a week and a society dance lesson. Inspection methods that I used: bibliographic study, experimental method, survey method and statistical method - mathematical and graphical representation. Quality of life assessment was done by assessing exercise capacity, the survey method and the call routed. Through a sustained program and rhythmic exercise improves cardiovascular activity, as evidenced by increased exercise capacity by lowering resting heart rate, a major component of cardiovascular disease prevention. Decrease abdominal fat and increased muscle tone abdominal favorable effects on biomechanics of the lumbar spine dynamics can thus be considered to be the prevention of back pain. In summary the study conducted, in order to highlight the benefits of the sport for optimal physical condition and fight aging, it can be concluded that physical activity has a beneficial role for the body, both physically and mentally. Survey conducted among people aged III revealed the following: Practicing the sport of gymnastics in a systematic, consistent results in improving health and fitness as well as comfort, good mood, optimism, improving intellectual activity. In short, we can say that these people the sport of gymnastics has improved quality of life.

  5. Improvement of activity and stability of chloroperoxidase by chemical modification

    Wang Min

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes show relative instability in solvents or at elevated temperature and lower activity in organic solvent than in water. These limit the industrial applications of enzymes. Results In order to improve the activity and stability of chloroperoxidase, chloroperoxidase was modified by citraconic anhydride, maleic anhydride or phthalic anhydride. The catalytic activities, thermostabilities and organic solvent tolerances of native and modified enzymes were compared. In aqueous buffer, modified chloroperoxidases showed similar Km values and greater catalytic efficiencies kcat/Km for both sulfoxidation and oxidation of phenol compared to native chloroperoxidase. Of these modified chloroperoxidases, citraconic anhydride-modified chloroperoxidase showed the greatest catalytic efficiency in aqueous buffer. These modifications of chloroperoxidase increased their catalytic efficiencies for sulfoxidation by 12%~26% and catalytic efficiencies for phenol oxidation by 7%~53% in aqueous buffer. However, in organic solvent (DMF, modified chloroperoxidases had lower Km values and higher catalytic efficiencies kcat/Km than native chloroperoxidase. These modifications also improved their thermostabilities by 1~2-fold and solvent tolerances of DMF. CD studies show that these modifications did not change the secondary structure of chloroperoxidase. Fluorescence spectra proved that these modifications changed the environment of tryptophan. Conclusion Chemical modification of epsilon-amino groups of lysine residues of chloroperoxidase using citraconic anhydride, maleic anhydride or phthalic anhydride is a simple and powerful method to enhance catalytic properties of enzyme. The improvements of the activity and stability of chloroperoxidase are related to side chain reorientations of aromatics upon both modifications.

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β sustains invasion of glioblastoma via the focal adhesion kinase, Rac1, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated pathway.

    Chikano, Yuri; Domoto, Takahiro; Furuta, Takuya; Sabit, Hemragul; Kitano-Tamura, Ayako; Pyko, Ilya V; Takino, Takahisa; Sai, Yoshimichi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Sato, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2015-02-01

    The failure of current treatment options for glioblastoma stems from their inability to control tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Biologically targeted therapies offer great hope and one promising target is glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), implicated in various diseases, including cancer. We previously reported that inhibition of GSK3β compromises the survival and proliferation of glioblastoma cells, induces their apoptosis, and sensitizes them to temozolomide and radiation. Here, we explore whether GSK3β also contributes to the highly invasive nature of glioblastoma. The effects of GSK3β inhibition on migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells were examined by wound-healing and Transwell assays, as well as in a mouse model of glioblastoma. We also investigated changes in cellular microarchitectures, cytoskeletal components, and proteins responsible for cell motility and invasion. Inhibition of GSK3β attenuated the migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells in vitro and that of tumor cells in a mouse model of glioblastoma. These effects were associated with suppression of the molecular axis involving focal adhesion kinase, guanine nucleotide exchange factors/Rac1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Changes in cellular phenotypes responsible for cell motility and invasion were also observed, including decreased formation of lamellipodia and invadopodium-like microstructures and alterations in the subcellular localization, and activity of Rac1 and F-actin. These changes coincided with decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Our results confirm the potential of GSK3β as an attractive therapeutic target against glioblastoma invasion, thus highlighting a second role in this tumor type in addition to its involvement in chemo- and radioresistance. PMID:25504636

  7. A 16-Gene Signature Distinguishes Anaplastic Astrocytoma from Glioblastoma

    Soumya Alige Mahabala Rao; Sujaya Srinivasan; Irene Rosita Pia Patric; Alangar Sathyaranjandas Hegde; Bangalore Ashwathnarayanara Chandramouli; Arivazhagan Arimappamagan; Vani Santosh; Paturu Kondaiah; Manchanahalli R Sathyanarayana Rao; Kumaravel Somasundaram

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA; Grade III) and glioblastoma (GBM; Grade IV) are diffusely infiltrating tumors and are called malignant astrocytomas. The treatment regimen and prognosis are distinctly different between anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma patients. Although histopathology based current grading system is well accepted and largely reproducible, intratumoral histologic variations often lead to difficulties in classification of malignant astrocytoma samples. In order to obtain a mo...

  8. Amnesia due to bilateral hippocampal glioblastoma. MRI finding

    Shimauchi, M.; Wakisaka, S.; Kinoshita, K. (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1989-11-01

    The authors report a unique case of glioblastoma which caused permanent amnesia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the lesion to be limited to the hippocampal formation bilaterally. Although glioblastoma extends frequently into fiber pathways and expands into the opposite cerebral hemisphere, making a 'butterfly' lesion, it is unusual for it to invade the limbic system selectively to this extent. (orig.).

  9. Structure-activity relationship and properties optimization of a series of quinazoline-2,4-diones as inhibitors of the canonical Wnt pathway.

    Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Quinn, Joanna M; Salerno, Massimiliano; Tunici, Patrizia; De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Mennillo, Federica; Rossi, Marco; Bakker, Annette; Benicchi, Tiziana; Cappelli, Federico; Turlizzi, Elisa; Nibbio, Martina; Caradonna, Nicola P; Zanelli, Ugo; Andreini, Matteo; Magnani, Matteo; Varrone, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Wnt signaling pathway plays a critical role in numerous cellular processes, including tumor initiation, proliferation, invasion/infiltration, metastasis formation and resistance to chemotherapy. In a drug discovery project aimed at the identification of inhibitors of the canonical Wnt pathway, we selected a series of quinazoline 2,4-diones as starting point for the therapeutic treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. Despite of poor physico-chemical properties of hit compound 1, our medicinal chemistry effort allowed the discovery and characterization of lead compound 33 (SEN461), with improved ADME profile, good bioavailability and active in vitro and in vivo in glioblastoma, gastric and sarcoma tumors. PMID:25847770

  10. Memory suppression is an active process that improves over childhood

    Pedro M Paz-Alonso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We all have memories that we prefer not to think about. The ability to suppress retrieval of unwanted memories has been documented in behavioral and neuroimaging research using the Think/No-Think (TNT paradigm with adults. Attempts to stop memory retrieval are associated with increased activation of lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC and concomitant reduced activation in medial temporal lobe (MTL structures. However, the extent to which children have the ability to actively suppress their memories is unknown. This study investigated memory suppression in middle childhood using the TNT paradigm. Forty children aged 8 to 12 and 30 young adults were instructed either to remember (Think or suppress (No-Think the memory of the second word of previously studied word-pairs, when presented with the first member as a reminder. They then performed two different cued recall tasks, testing their memory for the second word in each pair after the Think/No-Think phase using the same first studied word within the pair as a cue (intra-list cue and also an independent cue (extra-list cue. Children exhibited age-related improvements in memory suppression from age 8 to 12 in both memory tests, against a backdrop of overall improvements in declarative memory over this age range. These findings suggest that memory suppression is an active process that develops during late childhood, likely due to an age-related refinement in the ability to engage PFC to down-regulate activity in areas involved in episodic retrieval.

  11. Resveratrol Inhibits the Invasion of Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells via Down-Regulation of the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Yuming Jiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasion and metastasis of glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs are thought to be responsible for the progression and recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. A safe drug that can be applied during the rest period of temozolomide (TMZ maintenance cycles would greatly improve the prognosis of GBM patients by inhibiting GIC invasion. Resveratrol (RES is a natural compound that exhibits anti-invasion properties in multiple tumor cell lines. The current study aimed to evaluate whether RES can inhibit GIC invasion in vitro and in vivo. GICs were identified using CD133 and Nestin immunofluorescence staining and tumorigenesis in non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mice. Invasive behaviors, including the adhesion, invasion and migration of GICs, were determined by tumor invasive assays in vitro and in vivo. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs was measured by the gelatin zymography assay. Western blotting analysis and immunofluorescence staining were used to determine the expression of signaling effectors in GICs. We demonstrated that RES suppressed the adhesion, invasion and migration of GICs in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we proved that RES inhibited the invasion of GICs via the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signal transduction and the subsequent suppression of MMP-2 expression.

  12. Identification and characterization of a small molecule inhibitor of WNT signaling in glioblastoma cells

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tunici, Patrizia; Verani, Margherita; De Rosa, Antonella; Giordano, Cinzia; Varrone, Maurizio; Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Benicchi, Tiziana; Bakker, Annette; Hill, Jeffrey; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and prognostically unfavorable form of brain tumor. The aggressive and highly invasive phenotype of these tumors makes them among the most anatomically damaging human cancers with a median survival of less than one year. Although canonical WNT pathway activation in cancers has been historically linked to the presence of mutations involving key components of the pathway (APC, β-CATENIN or AXIN proteins), an increasing number of studies suggest t...

  13. 13-cis-Retinoic acid in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    See, Siew-Ju; Levin, Victor A.; Yung, W.-K. Alfred; Hess, Kenneth R.; Groves, Morris D.

    2004-01-01

    Basic science and clinical investigations have demonstrated that 13-cis-retinoic acid (cRA) has activity against malignant gliomas. To assess its effectiveness in the setting of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we performed a retrospective analysis of the medical records and neuroimaging results of patients with recurrent GBM who were treated with cRA. The toxicity profile of cRA, response, and effect on progression-free survival from initiation of treatment were end points of our ana...

  14. Response as a predictor of survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab

    Prados, Michael; Cloughesy, Timothy; Samant, Meghna; Fang, Liang; Wen, Patrick Y.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Schiff, David; Abrey, Lauren E; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Paleologos, Nina; Nicholas, Martin K.; Jensen, Randy; Vredenburgh, James; Das, Asha; Friedman, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Development of effective therapies for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and reliable, timely evaluation of their benefit are needed. Understanding the relationship between objective response (OR) and survival is important for determining whether OR can provide an early signal of treatment activity in clinical trials. We performed a landmark analysis to evaluate the association between OR and survival at 9, 18, and 26 weeks for 167 patients with recurrent GBM who participated in BRAIN, ...

  15. Phase II study of bevacizumab and temsirolimus combination therapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Lassen, Ulrik; Sorensen, Morten; Gaziel, Tine Bernhardtsen;

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy has recently shown promising efficacy in recurrent high-grade glioma. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients causes abnormally high activity of the pathways of Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Protein...... been investigated, but with the hypothesis that temsirolimus might provide complimentary therapeutic benefit in combination with bevacizumab, we included patients with progressive GBM after bevacizumab in an open phase II study....

  16. Inhibition of Notch Signaling Blocks Growth of Glioblastoma Cell Lines and Tumor Neurospheres

    Chen, Jie; Kesari, Santosh; Rooney, Christine; Strack, Peter R.; Chen, Jihua; Shen, Huangxuan; Wu, Lizi; Griffin, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor that is characterized by high proliferative rate and invasiveness. Since dysregulation of Notch signaling is implicated in the pathogenesis of many human cancers, here we investigated the role of Notch signaling in GBM. We found that there is aberrant activation of Notch signaling in GBM cell lines and human GBM-derived neurospheres. Inhibition of Notch signaling via the expression of a dominant negative form of the Notch coactivator...

  17. Novel anti-glioblastoma agents and therapeutic combinations identified from a collection of FDA approved drugs

    Jiang, Pengfei; Mukthavavam, Rajesh; Chao, Ying; Bharati, Ila Sri; Fogal, Valentina; Pastorino, Sandra; Cong, Xiuli; Nomura, Natsuko; Gallagher, Matt; Abbasi, Taher; Vali, Shireen; Pingle, Sandeep C; Makale, Milan; Kesari, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) is a therapeutic challenge, associated with high mortality. More effective GBM therapeutic options are urgently needed. Hence, we screened a large multi-class drug panel comprising the NIH clinical collection (NCC) that includes 446 FDA-approved drugs, with the goal of identifying new GBM therapeutics for rapid entry into clinical trials for GBM. Methods Screens using human GBM cell lines revealed 22 drugs with potent anti-GBM activity, including serotonergic blo...

  18. Characterization and immunotherapeutic potential of γδ T-cells in patients with glioblastoma

    Bryant, Nichole L.; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Markert, James M.; Nabors, L. Burt; Meleth, Sreelatha; Lopez, Richard D.; Lamb, Lawrence S.

    2009-01-01

    Classical immunotherapeutic approaches to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have shown mixed results, and therapies focused on innate lymphocyte activity against GBM have not been rigorously evaluated. We examined peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype, γδ T-cell number, mitogenic response, and cytotoxicity against GBM cell lines and primary tumor explants from GBM patients at selected time points prior to and during GBM therapy. Healthy volunteers served as controls and were grouped by age. T-cel...

  19. Specificity Protein 1 Expression Contributes to Bcl-w-Induced Aggressiveness in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Lee, Woo Sang; Kwon, Junhye; Yun, Dong Ho; Lee, Young Nam; Woo, Eun Young; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Jae-Seon; Han, Young-Hoon; Bae, In Hwa

    2014-01-01

    We already had reported that Bcl-w promotes invasion or migration in gastric cancer cells and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by activating matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) via specificity protein 1 (Sp1) or β-cateinin, respectively. High expression of Bcl-w also has been reported in GBM which is the most common malignant brain tumor and exhibits aggressive and invasive behavior. These reports propose that Bcl-w-induced signaling is strongly associated with aggressive characteristic of GBM. W...

  20. The Prognostic Value of Pyrosequencing-Detected MGMT Promoter Hypermethylation in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Glioblastoma

    Villani, Veronica; Casini, Beatrice; Pace, Andrea; Prosperini, Luca; Carapella, Carmine M.; Vidiri, Antonello; Fabi, Alessandra; Carosi, Mariantonia

    2015-01-01

    O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response and good prognosis in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Transcriptionally active MGMT rapidly removes the alkyl adducts, preventing the formation of cross-links and thereby causing resistance to alkylating drugs. Studies with pyrosequencing (PSQ) showed that this technique has a higher reproducibility and sensitivity than other techniques. However, the definition of a prognostically relev...

  1. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  2. Improving the Dynamics of Suspension Bridges using Active Control Systems

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Improving the dynamics of suspension bridge using active control is discussed in this paper. The main dynamic problem with long suspension bridges is the aeroelastic phenomenon called flutter. Flutter oscillations of a bridge girder is a stability problem and the oscillations are perpendicular to...... the direction of the wind and occur when the bridge is exposed to wind velocity above critical value called the flutter wind velocity Ucr....

  3. Genetically enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant activity improves muscle function in aging

    Umanskaya, Alisa; Santulli, Gaetano; Xie, Wenjun; Andersson, Daniel C; Reiken, Steven R.; Marks, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related muscle weakness has major adverse consequences on quality of life, increasing the risk of falls, fractures, and movement impairments. Albeit an increased oxidative state has been shown to contribute to age-dependent reduction in skeletal muscle function, little is known about the mechanisms connecting oxidation and muscle weakness. We show here that genetically enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant activity causes improved skeletal muscle function and voluntary exercise in aged mice...

  4. Active robotic training improves locomotor function in a stroke survivor

    Krishnan Chandramouli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. One key factor responsible for this is the use of control strategies that provide substantial guidance. This strategy not only leads to a reduction in volitional physical effort, but also interferes with motor relearning. Methods We tested the feasibility of a novel training approach (active robotic training using a powered gait orthosis (Lokomat in mitigating post-stroke gait impairments of a 52-year-old male stroke survivor. This gait training paradigm combined patient-cooperative robot-aided walking with a target-tracking task. The training lasted for 4-weeks (12 visits, 3 × per week. The subject’s neuromotor performance and recovery were evaluated using biomechanical, neuromuscular and clinical measures recorded at various time-points (pre-training, post-training, and 6-weeks after training. Results Active robotic training resulted in considerable increase in target-tracking accuracy and reduction in the kinematic variability of ankle trajectory during robot-aided treadmill walking. These improvements also transferred to overground walking as characterized by larger propulsive forces and more symmetric ground reaction forces (GRFs. Training also resulted in improvements in muscle coordination, which resembled patterns observed in healthy controls. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in motor cortical excitability (MCE of the vastus medialis, medial hamstrings, and gluteus medius muscles during treadmill walking. Importantly, active robotic training resulted in substantial improvements in several standard clinical and functional parameters. These improvements persisted during the follow-up evaluation at 6 weeks. Conclusions The results indicate that active robotic training appears to be a promising way of facilitating gait and physical function in moderately impaired stroke survivors.

  5. Aptamer-conjugated dendrimer-modified quantum dots for glioblastoma cells imaging

    Li Zhiming; Huang Peng; He Rong; Bao Chenchen; Cui Daxiang [National Key Laboratory of Nano/Micro Fabrication Technology, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of Ministry of Education, Institute of Micro-Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang Xiaomin; Ren Qiushi [Institute for Laser Medicine and Biophotonics, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: qsren@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: dxcui@sjtu.edu.cn

    2009-09-01

    Targeted quantum dots have shown potential as a platform for development of cancer imaging. Aptamers have recently been demonstrated as ideal candidates for molecular targeting applications. In present work, polyamidoamine dendrimers were used to modify surface of quantum dots and improve their solubility in water solution. Then, dendrimer-modified quantum dots were conjugated with DNA aptamer, GBI-10, can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. The dendrimer-modified quantum dots exhibit water-soluble, high quantum yield, and good biocompatibility. Aptamer-conjugated quantum dots can specifically target U251 human glioblastoma cells. High-performance aptamer-conjugated dendrimers modified quantum dot-based nanoprobes have great potential in application such as cancer imaging.

  6. Apparent diffusion coefficient parametric response mapping MRI for follow-up of glioblastoma

    Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seo-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Sung; Hong, Gil Sun; Kim, Sang Joon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yoon [Bundang Jesaeng Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To determine the diagnostic superiority of parametric response mapping of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCPR) for predicting glioblastoma treatment response, compared to single time point measurement. Fifty post-treatment glioblastoma patients were enrolled. ADCPR was calculated from serial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps acquired before and at the time of first detection of an enlarged contrast-enhancing lesion on voxel-by-voxel basis. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR and tenth percentile histogram cutoff value of ADC (ADC10) were compared at subsequent 3-month and 1-year follow-ups. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR was significantly higher in the progression group (mean = 33.2-38.3 %) than in the stable-response group (mean = 9.7 %) at 3 months follow-up (corrected p < 0.001 for both readers). ADCPR significantly improved area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.67 to 0.88 (corrected p = 0.037) and from 0.70 to 0.92 (corrected p = 0.020) for both readers, respectively, compared to ADC10 at 3-month follow-up, but did not significantly improve at 1-year follow-up. The inter-reader agreement was higher for ADCPR than ADC10 (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.93 versus 0.86). Voxel-based ADCPR appears to be a superior imaging biomarker than ADC, particularly for predicting early tumour progression in patients with glioblastoma. (orig.)

  7. Apparent diffusion coefficient parametric response mapping MRI for follow-up of glioblastoma

    To determine the diagnostic superiority of parametric response mapping of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCPR) for predicting glioblastoma treatment response, compared to single time point measurement. Fifty post-treatment glioblastoma patients were enrolled. ADCPR was calculated from serial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps acquired before and at the time of first detection of an enlarged contrast-enhancing lesion on voxel-by-voxel basis. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR and tenth percentile histogram cutoff value of ADC (ADC10) were compared at subsequent 3-month and 1-year follow-ups. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR was significantly higher in the progression group (mean = 33.2-38.3 %) than in the stable-response group (mean = 9.7 %) at 3 months follow-up (corrected p < 0.001 for both readers). ADCPR significantly improved area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.67 to 0.88 (corrected p = 0.037) and from 0.70 to 0.92 (corrected p = 0.020) for both readers, respectively, compared to ADC10 at 3-month follow-up, but did not significantly improve at 1-year follow-up. The inter-reader agreement was higher for ADCPR than ADC10 (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.93 versus 0.86). Voxel-based ADCPR appears to be a superior imaging biomarker than ADC, particularly for predicting early tumour progression in patients with glioblastoma. (orig.)

  8. Active video gaming to improve balance in the elderly.

    Lamoth, Claudine J C; Caljouw, Simone R; Postema, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    The combination of active video gaming and exercise (exergaming) is suggested to improve elderly people's balance, thereby decreasing fall risk. Exergaming has been shown to increase motivation during exercise therapy, due to the enjoyable and challenging nature, which could support long-term adherence for exercising balance. However, scarce evidence is available of the direct effects of exergaming on postural control. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the effect of a six-week videogame-based exercise program aimed at improving balance in elderly people. Task performance and postural control were examined using an interrupted time series design. Results of multilevel analyses showed that performance on the dot task improved within the first two weeks of training. Postural control improved during the intervention. After the intervention period task performance and balance were better than before the intervention. Results of this study show that healthy elderly can benefit from a videogame-based exercise program to improve balance and that all subjects were highly motivated to exercise balance because they found gaming challenging and enjoyable. PMID:21685660

  9. RNOP-09: Pegylated liposomal doxorubicine and prolonged temozolomide in addition to radiotherapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma - a phase II study

    Proescholdt Martin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Temozolomide is effective against glioblastoma, the prognosis remains dismal and new regimens with synergistic activity are sought for. Methods In this phase-I/II trial, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Caelyx™, PEG-Dox and prolonged administration of Temozolomide in addition to radiotherapy was investigated in 63 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. In phase-I, PEG-Dox was administered in a 3-by-3 dose-escalation regimen. In phase-II, 20 mg/m2 PEG-Dox was given once prior to radiotherapy and on days 1 and 15 of each 28-day cycle starting 4 weeks after radiotherapy. Temozolomide was given in a dose of 75 mg/m2 daily during radiotherapy (60 Gy and 150-200 mg/m2 on days 1-5 of each 28-day cycle for 12 cycles or until disease progression. Results The toxicity of the combination of PEG-Dox, prolonged administration of Temozolomide, and radiotherapy was tolerable. The progression free survival after 12 months (PFS-12 was 30.2%, the median overall survival was 17.6 months in all patients including the ones from Phase-I. None of the endpoints differed significantly from the EORTC26981/NCIC-CE.3 data in a post-hoc statistical comparison. Conclusion Together, the investigated combination is tolerable and feasible. Neither the addition of PEG-Dox nor the prolonged administration of Temozolomide resulted in a meaningful improvement of the patient's outcome as compared to the EORTC26981/NCIC-CE.3 data Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00944801.

  10. RNOP-09: Pegylated liposomal doxorubicine and prolonged temozolomide in addition to radiotherapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma - a phase II study

    Although Temozolomide is effective against glioblastoma, the prognosis remains dismal and new regimens with synergistic activity are sought for. In this phase-I/II trial, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Caelyx™, PEG-Dox) and prolonged administration of Temozolomide in addition to radiotherapy was investigated in 63 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. In phase-I, PEG-Dox was administered in a 3-by-3 dose-escalation regimen. In phase-II, 20 mg/m2 PEG-Dox was given once prior to radiotherapy and on days 1 and 15 of each 28-day cycle starting 4 weeks after radiotherapy. Temozolomide was given in a dose of 75 mg/m2 daily during radiotherapy (60 Gy) and 150-200 mg/m2 on days 1-5 of each 28-day cycle for 12 cycles or until disease progression. The toxicity of the combination of PEG-Dox, prolonged administration of Temozolomide, and radiotherapy was tolerable. The progression free survival after 12 months (PFS-12) was 30.2%, the median overall survival was 17.6 months in all patients including the ones from Phase-I. None of the endpoints differed significantly from the EORTC26981/NCIC-CE.3 data in a post-hoc statistical comparison. Together, the investigated combination is tolerable and feasible. Neither the addition of PEG-Dox nor the prolonged administration of Temozolomide resulted in a meaningful improvement of the patient's outcome as compared to the EORTC26981/NCIC-CE.3 data clinicaltrials.gov NCT00944801