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Sample records for active plant oils

  1. In vitro antibacterial activity of some plant essential oils

    Ignacimuthu Savarimuthu

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 21 plant essential oils against six bacterial species. Methods: The selected essential oils were screened against four gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and two gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus at four different concentrations (1:1, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20 using disc diffusion method. The MIC of the active essential oils were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 25.6 mg/ml. Results: Out of 21 essential oils tested, 19 oils showed antibacterial activity against one or more strains. Cinnamon, clove, geranium, lemon, lime, orange and rosemary oils exhibited significant inhibitory effect. Cinnamon oil showed promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, whereas aniseed, eucalyptus and camphor oils were least active against the tested bacteria. In general, B. subtilis was the most susceptible. On the other hand, K. pneumoniae exhibited low degree of sensitivity. Conclusion: Majority of the oils showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. However Cinnamon, clove and lime oils were found to be inhibiting both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Cinnamon oil can be a good source of antibacterial agents.

  2. [Peculicidal activity of plant essential oils and their based preparations].

    Lopatina, Iu V; Eremina, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The peculicidal activity of eight plant essential oils in 75% isopropyl alcohol was in vitro investigated. Of them, the substances that were most active against lice were tea tree (Melaleuca), eucalyptus, neem, citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), and clove (Syzygium aromaticum) oils; KT50 was not more than 3 minutes on average; KT95 was 4 minutes. After evaporating the solvent, only five (tea tree, cassia, clove, anise (Anisum vulgare), and Japanese star anise (Illicium anisatum) oils) of the eight test botanical substances were active against lice. At the same time, KT50 and KT95 showed 1.5-5-fold increases. Citronella and anise oils had incomplete ovicidal activity. Since the lice were permethrin-resistant, the efficacy of preparations based on essential oils was much higher than permethrin. PMID:25296426

  3. Screening of Antibacterial Activities of Essential Oils from Selected Medicinal Plants

    Essential oils were extracted from the five medicinal plants (Syzygium aromaticum Linn, Cinnamoum tamala. Nees, Piper betle. Linn, Ocimum sanctum, Clausena exacavata Burn) by steam distillation method and percolation method with petroleum ether. These plants do not contain cyanogenic glycosides according to phytochemical tests. Essential oils from these plants were also tested on antimicrobial activity by agar well diffusion method. It was observed that essential oils extracted from these five plants have various effects on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungus. Among them, essential oils of Syzygium aromaticum possess the highest antimicrobial activity aganist all test organisms. B. pumalis and Calbican are the most susceptible to the five plants.

  4. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF PLANTS BELONGING TO LAMIACEAE JUSS. FAMILY

    Shanayda M.I.; Pokryshko O.V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. One of the important sources of therapeutic and prophylactic agents of modern medicines are essential oils of medicinal plants. Essential oils are the main group of biologically active substances of a number of plants belonging to Lamiaceae Juss. Family. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plants belonging to Lamiaceae Family many scientists associated with containing of essential oils. In this regard, considerable interest presents the comparative analysis of the antimicrobial ...

  5. Antibacterial activity and Chemical Composition of Essential Oils of Ten Aromatic Plants against selected Bacteria

    Pooja Bharti; Sheema Bai; Leena Seasotiya; Anupma Malik; Sunita Dalal

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of essential oils from ten aromatic plants Thymus vulgaris, Melaleuca alternifolia, Zanthoxylum rhetsa, Coriandrum sativum, Nardostachys jatamansi, Eucalyptus globules, Cyperus scariosus, Cinnamomum cecidodaphne, Olea europea, Foeniculum vulgare have been determined against nine selected bacteria. Essential oils from Thymus vulgaris, Melaleuca alternifolia and Eucalyptus globulus were found to possess maximum antibacterial activity. The GC-MS analyses of these oils ...

  6. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF PLANTS BELONGING TO LAMIACEAE JUSS. FAMILY

    Shanayda M.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the important sources of therapeutic and prophylactic agents of modern medicines are essential oils of medicinal plants. Essential oils are the main group of biologically active substances of a number of plants belonging to Lamiaceae Juss. Family. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plants belonging to Lamiaceae Family many scientists associated with containing of essential oils. In this regard, considerable interest presents the comparative analysis of the antimicrobial properties of essential oils of Lamiaceae Family representatives. Material and methods.The antimicrobial activity of essential oils of investigated plants was studied with using in vitro condition. The essential oils derived from the aerial parts of cultivated plants of Ocimum, Hyssopus, Dracocephalum, Lophanthus, Monarda and Satureja genus harvested during flowering period (in terms of Ternopil region. The antimicrobial activity of essential oils studied plants was studied by serial dilution method and disk diffusion assay. It has been applied on standard microorganism test strains: Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 and Candida albicans ATCC 885-653. Results and discussion. It was conducted a comparative study of the influence of some essential oils of cultivated plants belonging to Lamiaceae family on microorganisms in conditions in vitro. It was found that essential oils of the studied plants were most effective in the maximum concentration (1:10. Gram-positive cocci S. aureus and yeast C. albicans were the most sensitive to influence of investigated essential oils. It was analyzed the relationship of the biological activity with the component composition of essential oils of plants. Essential oils of L. anisatus, M. fistulosa and S. hortensis characterized by the dominance of aromatic compounds and had shown stronger antimicrobial activity than essential oils of

  7. Research Concerning Antimicrobial Activities of Some Essential Oils Extracted from Plants

    ADRIANA DALILA CRISTE; Mihaela Giuburunca; Octavian Negrea; Nicodim Fit

    2014-01-01

    The principal components of some essential oils extracted from plants have been found to have microbial activity. Depending on the concentration, the members of this class are known to be bactericide or bacteriostatic. Their action mechanism is unclear, but some studies suggest that the compounds penetrate the cell, where they interfere with cellular metabolism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of 5 essential oils extracted from plants on Escherichia coli, ...

  8. In vitro antifungal activity of essential oils obtained from officinal plants against dermatophytes.

    Lima, E O; Gompertz, O F; Giesbrecht, A M; Paulo, M Q

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen essential oils were isolated from officinal plants and tested in vitro against dermatophyte strains isolated from patients with dermatophytosis. Of the tested oils, those obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Eugenia uniflora and Alpinia speciosa were found to be the most active, inhibiting 80% of the dermatophyte strains tested and producing inhibition zones more than 10 mm in diameter. PMID:8015567

  9. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of essential oil and different plant extracts of Psidium cattleianum Sabine.

    Scur, M C; Pinto, F G S; Pandini, J A; Costa, W F; Leite, C W; Temponi, L G

    2016-02-01

    The goals of the study were to determinethe antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of essential oil and plant extracts aqueous and ethanolic of Psidium cattleianum Sabine; the chemical composition of the essential oil of P. cattleianum; and the phytochemical screening of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the same plant. Regarding the antimicrobial activity, the ethanolic extract exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity with respect to bacteria K. pneumoniae and S. epidermidis, whereas, regarding other microorganisms, it showed activity considered weak. The aqueous extract and the essential oil showed activity considered weak, although they inhibited the growth of microorganisms. About the antioxidant potential, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts exhibited a scavenging index exceeding 90%, while the essential oil didn´t show significant antioxidant activity. Regarding the phytochemical composition, the largest class of volatile compounds identified in the essential oil of P. cattleianum included the following terpenic hydrocarbons: α-copaene (22%); eucalyptol (15%), δ-cadinene (9.63%) and α-selinene (6.5%). The phytochemical screening of extracts showed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, and triterpenoids for aqueous and ethanolic extracts. The extracts and essential oils inhibit the growth of microrganisms and plant extracts showed significant antioxidant activity. Also, the phytochemical characterization of the essential oil showed the presence of compounds interest commercial, as well as extracts showed the presence of important classes and compounds with biological activities. PMID:26871744

  10. Antifungal activity of six plant essential oils from Serbia against Trichoderma aggressivum f. europaeum

    Rada Đurović-Pejčev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Six essential oils (EOs extracted from plants originating in Serbia were assayed for inhibitory and fungicidal activity against a major fungal pathogen of button mushroom causing green mould disease, Trichoderma agressivum f. europaeum. The strongest activity was demonstrated by the oils of basil (Ocimum basilicum L. and peppermint (Mentha piperita L.. Medium antifungal activity of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L. and walnut [Juglans regia (F] oils was also recorded. Oils extracted from yarrow (Achillea millepholium L. and juniper (Juniperus communis L. exhibited the lowest activity. Peppermint oil showed fungicidal effect on the pathogen, having a minimum fungicidal concentration of 0.64 μl ml-1. The main components of peppermint essential oil were menthone (37.02%, menthol (29.57% and isomenthone (9.06%.

  11. Short communication: an in vitro assessment of the antibacterial activity of plant-derived oils.

    Mullen, K A E; Lee, A R; Lyman, R L; Mason, S E; Washburn, S P; Anderson, K L

    2014-09-01

    Nonantibiotic treatments for mastitis are needed in organic dairy herds. Plant-derived oils may be useful but efficacy and potential mechanisms of action of such oils in mastitis therapy have not been well documented. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the plant-derived oil components of Phyto-Mast (Bovinity Health LLC, Narvon, PA), an herbal intramammary product, against 3 mastitis-causing pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus chromogenes, and Streptococcus uberis. Plant-derived oils evaluated were Thymus vulgaris (thyme), Gaultheria procumbens (wintergreen), Glycyrrhiza uralensis (Chinese licorice), Angelica sinensis, and Angelica dahurica. Broth dilution testing according to standard protocol was performed using ultrapasteurized whole milk instead of broth. Controls included milk only (negative control), milk + bacteria (positive control), and milk + bacteria + penicillin-streptomycin (antibiotic control, at 1 and 5% concentrations). Essential oil of thyme was tested by itself and not in combination with other oils because of its known antibacterial activity. The other plant-derived oils were tested alone and in combination for a total of 15 treatments, each replicated 3 times and tested at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4% to simulate concentrations potentially achievable in the milk within the pre-dry-off udder quarter. Thyme oil at concentrations ≥2% completely inhibited bacterial growth in all replications. Other plant-derived oils tested alone or in various combinations were not consistently antibacterial and did not show typical dose-response effects. Only thyme essential oil had consistent antibacterial activity against the 3 mastitis-causing organisms tested in vitro. Further evaluation of physiological effects of thyme oil in various preparations on mammary tissue is recommended to determine potential suitability for mastitis therapy. PMID:25022682

  12. Antifungal activity of six plant essential oils from Serbia against Trichoderma aggressivum f. europaeum

    Rada Đurović-Pejčev; Ivana Potočnik; Svetlana Milijašević-Marčić; Biljana Todorović; Emil Rekanović; Miloš Stepanović

    2014-01-01

    Six essential oils (EOs) extracted from plants originating in Serbia were assayed for inhibitory and fungicidal activity against a major fungal pathogen of button mushroom causing green mould disease, Trichoderma agressivum f. europaeum. The strongest activity was demonstrated by the oils of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and peppermint (Mentha piperita L.). Medium antifungal activity of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) and walnut [Juglans regia (F)] ...

  13. In-vitro antibacterial activity of essential oils extracted from locally available medicinal plants

    Extraction of essential oils from locally available species of four plants, Nigella sativa, Syzygium aromaticum, Cinnamomum tenuis and Curcuma aromatica was carried out using steam distillation followed by ether extraction. Dried and purified extracted oils were screened for their antibacterial activity against three bacterial strains namely, Bacillus lichaniformis (Gram +ve), Micrococcus leutus (Gram +ve) and Salmonella Typhimurium (Gram -ve) using Mc. Cartney's method. Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC) values of these oils were also determined. It was observed that the oils extracted from Nigella sativa and Cinnamomum tenuis were found to be more potent as compared to other two species. With the exception of Nigella sativa, all the other oils showed bacterial inhibition at 50 mmol concentration. These results support that these plant oils can be used to cure bacterial infections and may also have role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. (author)

  14. Larvicidal activity of Brazilian plant essential oils against Coenagrionidae larvae.

    Silva, D T; Silva, L L; Amaral, L P; Pinheiro, C G; Pires, M M; Schindler, B; Garlet, Q I; Benovit, S C; Baldisserotto, B; Longhi, S J; Kotzian, C B; Heinzmann, B M

    2014-08-01

    Odonate larvae can be serious pests that attack fish larvae, postlarvae, and fingerlings in fish culture tanks, causing significant loss in the supply and production of juveniles. This study reports a screen of the essential oils (EOs) of Nectandra megapotamica (Sprengel) Mez, Nectandra grandiflora Nees, Hesperozygis ringens (Bentham) Epling, Ocimum gratissimum L., Aloysia gratissima (Gillies & Hooker) Troncoso, and Lippia sidoides Chamisso against Coenagrionidae larvae. In addition, the most effective EO and its 50% lethal concentration (LC50) and chemical analysis are described. The larvae of Acanthagrion Selys, Homeoura Kennedy, Ischnura Charpentier, and Oxyagrion Selys were used to assess the EO effects. EO obtained from H. ringens, O. gratissimum, and L. sidoides showed the highest larvicidal effects at 19 h of treatment. The major constituents of the EO of H. ringens include pulegone and limonene, while eugenol and Z-beta-ocimene predominate in the EO of O. gratissimum, and carvacrol and rho-cymene were the major compounds of the EO of L. sidoides. Leaf EOs from H. ringens, O. gratissimum, and L. sidoides showed activity against Coenagrionidae larvae at similar concentrations with LC50s of 62.92, 75.05, and 51.65 microl liter(-1), respectively, and these were considered the most promising treatments. PMID:25195467

  15. Insecticidal Activity of Plant Essential Oils Against the Vine Mealybug, Planococcus ficus

    Karamaouna, Filitsa; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Michaelakis, Αntonios; Papachristos, Dimitrios; Polissiou, Moschos; Papatsakona, Panagiota; Tsora, Eleanna

    2013-01-01

    The vine mealybug, Planococcus ficus (Signoret) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), is a pest in grape vine growing areas worldwide. The essential oils from the following aromatic plants were tested for their insecticidal activity against P. ficus: peppermint, Mentha piperita L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), thyme-leaved savory, Satureja thymbra L., lavender, Lavandula angustifolia Mill, and basil, Ocimum basilicum L. Essential oils from peels of the following fruits were also tested: lemon, Citrus limon L...

  16. Antifungal Activity of Plant Essential Oils Against Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium italicum and Penicillium digitatum

    Andrew VITORATOS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant essential oils have the potential to replace the synthetic fungicides in the management of postharvest diseases of fruit and vegetables.The aim of this study was to access the in vitro and in vivo activity of essential oil obtained from oregano (Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum, thyme (Thymus vulgaris L. and lemon (Citrus limon L. plants, against some important postharvest pathogens (Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium italicum and P. digitatum. In vitro experiments indicated that P. italicum did not show any mycelium growth in presence of thyme essential oils at concentration of 0.13 μl/ml. Moreover, B. cinerea did not show any mycelium growth in presence of lemon and oregano essential oils at concentration of 17 μl/ml and 0.02 μl/ml, respectively. Moreover, the essential oils from three species were effective in reducing the spore germination. The in vivo experiments confirmed the strong efficacy shown in vitro by essential oils. These oregano and lemon oils were very effective in controlling disease severity of infected fruit by B. cinera in tomatoes, strawberries and cucumbers. In tomatoes, grey mould due to B. cinerea was completed inhibited by oregano essential oils at 0.30 μl/ml. Moreover, lemon essential oils induced a significant reduction of grey mould disease severity. In strawberries, grey mould was completed inhibited by lemon essential oils at 0.05 μl/ml. In addition, lemon essential oils at 0.05 μl/ml showed 39% reduction of infected cucumber fruits by B. cinerea. These results indicate that essential oils after suitable formulation could be used for the control of postharvest diseases caused by Botrytis and Penicillium pathogens.

  17. Antibacterial and Anticandidal Activity of Essential Oils of some Medicinal Plants in Saudi Arabia

    The antibacterial and anticandidal properties of essential oils obtained from 7 plant species used in traditional medicine in Saudi Arabia and other Middle East countries were evaluated for activity against test bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans using an agar dilution method. Our results showed that oils from Azadirachta indica, Ziziphus spine, Matricaria chamomilla, Agrimonia eupatoria and Lupinus albus, even at the highest concentration did not inhibit any of the tested organisms. The essential oil extracted from Juniperus communis and Lavandula hybrida plants did not show any antibacterial activities. However, essential oil extracts from Juniperus communis and Lavandula hybrida exhibited varying degrees of growth inhibition of Candida albicans. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were 2.0%( v/v) of Juniper oil and 0.5% (v/v) for Lavender oil against Candida albicans. Our results suggest that the anticandidal properties of Juniper and Lavender oils may be further investigated to explore the possibility of using them in the treatment of candidal infections. (author)

  18. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Several Plant Extracts and Oils against Some Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Ayman Al-Mariri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants are considered new resources for producing agents that could act as alternatives to antibiotics in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of 28 plant extracts and oils against four Gram-negative bacterial species. Methods: Experimental, in vitro, evaluation of the activities of 28 plant extracts and oils as well as some antibiotics against E. coli O157:H7, Yersinia enterocolitica O9, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella pneumoniae was performed. The activity against 15 isolates of each bacterium was determined by disc diffusion method at a concentration of 5%. Microdilution susceptibility assay was used in order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the plant extracts, oils, and antibiotics. Results: Among the evaluated herbs, only Origanum syriacum L., Thymus syriacus Boiss., Syzygium aromaticum L., Juniperus foetidissima Wild, Allium sativum L., Myristica fragrans Houtt, and Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. essential oils and Laurus nobilis L. plant extract showed anti-bacterial activity. The MIC50 values of these products against the Gram-negative organisms varied from 1.5 (Proteus spp. and K. pneumoniae( and 6.25 µl/ml (Yersinia enterocolitica O9 to 12.5 µl/ml (E. coli O:157. Conclusion: Among the studied essential oils, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. essential oils were the most effective. Moreover, Cephalosporin and Ciprofloxacin were the most effective antibiotics against almost all the studied bacteria. Therefore, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. could act as bactericidal agents against Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants against several foodborne and spoilage bacteria.

    Silva, Nuno; Alves, Sofia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Amaral, Joana S; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of essential oils extracted from a variety of aromatic plants, often used in the Portuguese gastronomy was studied in vitro by the agar diffusion method. The essential oils of thyme, oregano, rosemary, verbena, basil, peppermint, pennyroyal and mint were tested against Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative strains (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). For most essential oils examined, S. aureus, was the most susceptible bacteria, while P. aeruginosa showed, in general, least susceptibility. Among the eight essential oils evaluated, thyme, oregano and pennyroyal oils showed the greatest antimicrobial activity, followed by rosemary, peppermint and verbena, while basil and mint showed the weakest antimicrobial activity. Most of the essential oils considered in this study exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. Thyme oil showed a promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, thus revealing its potential as a natural preservative in food products against several causal agents of foodborne diseases and food spoilage. In general, the results demonstrate that, besides flavoring the food, the use of aromatic herbs in gastronomy can also contribute to a bacteriostatic effect against pathogens. PMID:23444311

  20. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Tajikistan

    Farukh Sharopov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oils of 18 plant species from Tajikistan (Central Asia were investigated. The essential oil of Origanum tyttanthum showed a strong antibacterial activity with both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values of 312.5 µg/mL for E. coli, 625 µg/mL (MIC and 1250 µg/mL (MBC for MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. The essential oil of Galagania fragrantissima was highly active against MRSA at concentrations as low as 39.1 µg/mL and 78.2 µg/mL for MIC and MBC, respectively. Origanum tyttanthum essential oil showed the highest antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 0.12 mg/mL for ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid and 0.28 mg/mL for DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. Galagania fragrantissima and Origanum tyttanthum essential oils showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity; IC50 values of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX inhibition were 7.34 and 14.78 µg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, essential oils of Origanum tyttanthum and Galagania fragrantissima exhibit substantial antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. They are interesting candidates in phytotherapy.

  1. Research Concerning Antimicrobial Activities of Some Essential Oils Extracted from Plants

    ADRIANA DALILA CRISTE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The principal components of some essential oils extracted from plants have been found to have microbial activity. Depending on the concentration, the members of this class are known to be bactericide or bacteriostatic. Their action mechanism is unclear, but some studies suggest that the compounds penetrate the cell, where they interfere with cellular metabolism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of 5 essential oils extracted from plants on Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus and to determinate how different amount of the used oils can influence the results of inhibition tests. These results showed that mainly all the natural extracts presented an antimicrobial effect. Thereby, some extracts were more efficient than another and the order is: Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus, Mentha piperita (mint, Lavandula angustifolia (lavender, Matricaria chamomilla (chamomile, Calendula officinalis (calendula.

  2. Insecticidal activity of plant essential oils against the vine mealybug, Planococcus ficus.

    Karamaouna, Filitsa; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Michaelakis, Alphantonios; Papachristos, Dimitrios; Polissiou, Moschos; Papatsakona, Panagiota; Tsora, Eleanna

    2013-01-01

    The vine mealybug, Planococcus ficus (Signoret) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), is a pest in grape vine growing areas worldwide. The essential oils from the following aromatic plants were tested for their insecticidal activity against P. ficus: peppermint, Mentha piperita L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), thyme-leaved savory, Satureja thymbra L., lavender, Lavandula angustifolia Mill, and basil, Ocimum basilicum L. Essential oils from peels of the following fruits were also tested: lemon, Citrus limon L. (Sapindales: Rutaceae), and orange, C. sinensis L. The reference product was paraffin oil. Bioassays were conducted in the laboratory by using spray applications on grape leaves bearing clusters of P. ficus of one size class, which mainly represented either 3rd instar nymphs or pre-ovipositing adult females. The LC50 values for each essential oil varied depending on the P. ficus life stage but did not significantly differ between 3(rd) instar nymphs and adult females. The LC50 values of the citrus, peppermint, and thyme-leaved savory essential oils ranged from 2.7 to 8.1 mg/mL, and the LC50 values of lavender and basil oil ranged from 19.8 to 22.5 and 44.1 to 46.8 mg/mL, respectively. The essential oils from citrus, peppermint and thymeleaved savory were more or equally toxic compared to the reference product, whereas the lavender and basil essential oils were less toxic than the paraffin oil. No phytotoxic symptoms were observed on grape leaves treated with the citrus essential oils, and low phytotoxicity was caused by the essential oils of lavender, thyme-leaved savory, and mint, whereas the highest phytotoxicity was observed when basil oil was used. PMID:24766523

  3. Activity of Six Essential Oils Extracted from Tunisian Plants against Legionella pneumophila.

    Chaftar, Naouel; Girardot, Marion; Quellard, Nathalie; Labanowski, Jérôme; Ghrairi, Tawfik; Hani, Khaled; Frère, Jacques; Imbert, Christine

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of six essential oils extracted from Tunisian plants, i.e., Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, Juniperus phoenicea L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta graveolens L., and Thymus vulgaris L., and to evaluate their activity against Legionella pneumophila (microdilution assays). Eight Legionella pneumophila strains were studied, including the two well-known serogroup 1 Lens and Paris strains as controls and six environmental strains isolated from Tunisian spas belonging to serogroups 1, 4, 5, 6, and 8. The essential oils were generally active against L. pneumophila. The activities of the A. herba-alba, C. sinensis, and R. officinalis essential oils were strain-dependent, whereas those of the J. phoenicea and T. vulgaris oils, showing the highest anti-Legionella activities, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) lower than 0.03 and lower than or equal to 0.07 mg/ml, respectively, were independent of the strains' serogroup. Moreover, the microorganisms treated with T. vulgaris essential oil were shorter, swollen, and less electron-dense compared to the untreated controls. Isoborneol (20.91%), (1S)-α-pinene (18.30%) β-phellandrene (8.08%), α-campholenal (7.91%), and α-phellandrene (7.58%) were the major components isolated from the J. phoenicea oil, while carvacrol (88.50%) was the main compound of the T. vulgaris oil, followed by p-cymene (7.86%). This study highlighted the potential interest of some essential oils extracted from Tunisian plants as biocides to prevent the Legionella risk. PMID:26460561

  4. Trypanocidal and cytotoxic activities of essential oils from medicinal plants of Northeast of Brazil.

    Borges, Andrezza Raposo; Aires, Juliana Ramos de Albuquerque; Higino, Taciana Mirely Maciel; de Medeiros, Maria das Graças Freire; Citó, Antonia Maria das Graças Lopes; Lopes, José Arimatéia Dantas; de Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz

    2012-10-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in Latin America. There are no vaccines available, the chemotherapy used to treat this illness has serious side effects and its efficacy on the chronic phase of disease is still a matter of debate. In a search for alternative treatment for Chagas disease, essential oils extracted from traditional medicinal plants Lippia sidoides, Lippia origanoides, Chenopodium ambrosioides, Ocimum gratissimum, Justicia pectorales and Vitex agnus-castus were investigated in vitro for trypanocidal and cytotoxic activities. Essential Oils were extracted by hydrodistillation and submitted to chemical analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The concentration of essential oils necessary to inhibit 50% of the epimastigotes or amastigotes growth (IC(50)) and to kill 50% of trypomastigote forms (LC(50)) was estimated. The most prevalent chemical constituents of these essential oils were monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. All essential oils tested demonstrated an inhibitory effect on the parasite growth and survival. L. sidoides and L. origanoides essential oils were the most effective against trypomastigote and amastigote forms respectively. No significant cytotoxic effects were observed in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with essential oils which were more selective against the parasites than mammalian cells. Taken together, our results point towards the use of these essential oils as potential chemotherapeutic agent against T. cruzi. PMID:22771867

  5. Virucidal activity and chemical composition of essential oils from aromatic plants of central west Argentina.

    García, Cybele C; Acosta, Eliana G; Carro, Ana C; Fernández Belmonte, María C; Bomben, Renata; Duschatzky, Claudia B; Perotti, Marina; Schuff, Carola; Damonte, Elsa B

    2010-08-01

    The essential oils of seven aromatic plants from central west Argentina were isolated by steam distillation and analyzed by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The oils were screened for cytotoxicity and in vitro inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) and Junin virus (JUNV). The oils showed a variable virucidal action according to the virus. JUNV was the least susceptible virus in comparison with HSV-1 and DENV-2. The better relationship between cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity was observed for the essential oil of Lantana grisebachiii (Seckt.) var. grisebachii against DENV-2 and HSV-1 with IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50%) values of 21.1 and 26.1 ppm, respectively. This effect was specific since the selectivity indices (ratio cytotoxicity/virucidal activity) were > 23.7 and > 19.1 for DENV-2 and HSV-1, respectively. Furthermore, the oil from L. grisebachii was also an effective inhibitor of HSV-2 and acyclovir resistant variants of herpes virus. This study demonstrates the effective and selective inhibitory activity of the essential oil from Lantana grisebachii against HSV and DENV by direct virus inactivation. PMID:20839642

  6. Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils from Some Medicinal Plants of Iran against Alternaria alternate

    I. Hadizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Increasing public concern over the level of pesticide residues in food especially fresh produce has built up adequate pressure for scientists to look for less hazardous and environmentally safer compounds for controlling post harvest diseases. Essential oils as registered food grade materials have the potential to be applied as alternative anti-fungal treatments for fresh fruits and vegetables. Approach: We present in this study, the identification of the essential oils with antifungal activity from some medicinal plants of Iran (nettle (Urtica dioica L., thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp., Rue (Ruta graveolens L. and common yarrow (Achillea millefolium L., and their potential application as "generally regarded as safe" antifungal compounds against Alternaria alternate on tomato as a model pathosystem. Results: Both the nettle and the thyme oils exhibited antifungal activity against A. alternata. The thyme oil exhibited a lower degree of inhibition 68.5 and 74.8% at 1500 and 2000 ppm, respectively. Spore germination and germ tube elongation of the pathogens in potato dextrose broth was strongly reduced in the presence of 1500 ppm of the nettle oil. The same concentration of this oil reduced the percentage of decayed tomatoes. The experiments on reducing the development of natural tomato rot gave similar results. Conclusions: Application of essential oils for postharvest disease control of fresh produce, as a novel emerging alternative to hazardous anti-fungal treatments will allow a safer and environmentally more acceptable management of postharvest diseases.

  7. Antioxidant activity of various plant extracts under ambient and accelerated storage of sunflower oil

    Munir A. Sheikh; Iqbal, Shahid; Jamil, Amer; Anwar, Farooq

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the antioxidant potential of 11 medicinally or economically important plant materials indigenous to Pakistan. The materials were extracted with 80% methanol and examined  for their antioxidant activity under different storage conditions using sunflower and soybean oils as oxidation substrates. Preliminary antioxidant activity assessment among the extracts was conducted with the TLC-test and by measuring percent inhibition of linoleic acid pe...

  8. Antibacterial activity chemical composition relationship of the essential oils from cultivated plants from Serbia

    Stanković Nemanja S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial effects of essential oils from Serbian cultivated plants, Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiace and Lavandula angustifolia L. (Lamiace on different bacteria were investigated, with an emphasis on an antibacterial activity-chemical composition relationship. Essential oil was obtained from airdried aerial parts of the plants by hydrodistillation for 3 h using a Clevenger-type apparatus. The essential oil analyses were performed simultaneously by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS systems. The main constituents of thyme oil were thymol (59.95% and p-cymene (18.34%. Linalyl acetate (38.23% and linalool (35.01% were main compounds in lavender oil. The antibacterial activity of the essential oils samples was tested towards 5 different bacteria: laboratory control strain obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and clinical isolates from different pathogenic media. Gram negative bacteria were represented by Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 43895 and Salmonella enteretidis ATCC 9027 while researched Gram positive strains were Bacillus cereus ATCC 8739 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. A broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC. Essential oils from thyme have been found to have antimicrobial activity against all microorganisms tested, with a range of MIC values from 0.025 to 0.10 l/ml and MBC values from 0.05 to 0.78 l/ml. Lavender oils demonstrated MIC values from 0.025 to 0.20 l/ml and MBC values from 0.05 and 0.78 l/ml. Reference antibiotic tetracycline was active in concentrations between 0.025 and 0.05 l/ml. The Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to the essential oil of thyme, while Gram-negative bacteria were more sensitive to the essential oil of lavender. Essential oils from thyme and lavender may be used at low concentrations for prevention and treatment of

  9. Virucidal activity of essential oils from aromatic plants of San Luis, Argentina.

    García, C C; Talarico, L; Almeida, N; Colombres, S; Duschatzky, C; Damonte, E B

    2003-11-01

    Essential oils obtained from eight aromatic plants of San Luis Province, Argentina, were screened for virucidal activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Junin virus (JUNV) and dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2). The most potent inhibition was observed with the essential oil of Lippia junelliana and Lippia turbinata against JUNV with virucidal concentration 50% (VC(50)) values in the range 14-20 ppm, whereas Aloysia gratissima, Heterotheca latifolia and Tessaria absinthioides inhibited JUNV in the range 52-90 ppm. The virucidal activity was time- and temperature-dependent. The essential oils of A. gratissima, Artemisia douglasiana, Eupatorium patens and T. absinthioides inactivated HSV-1 at 65-125 ppm. However, only A. douglasiana and E. patens had any discernible effect on DEN-2 infectivity with VC(50) values of 60 and 150 ppm, respectively. PMID:14595590

  10. Antibacterial activities of essential oils from eight Greek aromatic plants against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Alexopoulos, A; Kimbaris, A C; Plessas, S; Mantzourani, I; Theodoridou, I; Stavropoulou, E; Polissiou, M G; Bezirtzoglou, E

    2011-12-01

    Aromatic plants have been used widely to extend the shelf life of foods but at the same time research is undergoes for their properties as antibacterial agents in clinical use. Although there are promising results for the antimicrobial properties of various essential oils against environmental or food-isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus, limited work has been done concerning these properties against clinical isolates of this pathogen. S. aureus is responsible for an increase number of nosocomial infections and at the same time exhibits increased resistance to synthetic agents. In this study, essential oils from eight aromatic plants common in Greece were isolated by hydrodistillation, analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for their chemical components and tested for their antimicrobial activities against 24 clinical isolates of S. aureus. The methods used were disk diffusion and broth dilution in order to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). Our results showed that essential oils from Origanum vulgare and Origanum dictamnus were active against S. aureus when tested by disk diffusion, but exhibited increased MIC values (>256 mg/L) with the dilution method. In contrast, the reference strain NCTC 6571 showed to be extremely sensitive in most of the oils tested (MICs 0.25-32.0 mg/L) and resistant only to the essential oil from Ocimum basilicum. Therefore, there is no evidence of a potential clinical use for those essential oils and further research is needed in order to determine if they could substitute efficiently synthetic antibiotics or, perhaps be used in combination. PMID:21521657

  11. Antibacterial activities of plant-derived compounds and essential oils toward Cronobacter sakazakii and Cronobacter malonaticus.

    Fraňková, Adéla; Marounek, Milan; Mozrová, Věra; Weber, Jaroslav; Klouček, Pavel; Lukešová, Daniela

    2014-10-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii and C. malonaticus are opportunistic pathogens that cause infections in children and immunocompromised adults. In the present study, the antibacterial activity of 19 plant-derived compounds, 5 essential oils, and an extract of propolis were assessed against C. sakazakii and C. malonaticus. The effects of most of these antimicrobials have not been reported previously. Both strains were susceptible to thymol, carvacrol, thymoquinone, p-cymene, linalool, camphor, citral, eugenol, and trans-cinnamaldehyde as well as cinnamon, lemongrass, oregano, clove, and laurel essential oils; their minimum inhibitory concentrations varied between 0.1 and 2.0 mg/mL. As an alternative treatment method, vapors of the volatiles were tested as an indirect treatment. Vapors of trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, oregano, and cinnamon essential oils inhibited both tested strains, while vapors of linalool were only active against C. sakazakii. To our knowledge, this study is the first time that the inhibitory activity of the vapors of these compounds and essential oils has been reported against Cronobacter spp. PMID:25062020

  12. Anti-quorum sensing activity of essential oils from Colombian plants.

    Jaramillo-Colorado, Beatriz; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Stashenko, Elena E; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Kunze, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils from Colombian plants were characterised by GC-MS, and assayed for anti-quorum sensing activity in bacteria sensor strains. Two major chemotypes were found for Lippia alba, the limonene-carvone and the citral (geranial-neral). For other species, the main components included α-pinene (Ocotea sp.), β-pinene (Swinglea glutinosa), cineol (Elettaria cardamomun), α-zingiberene (Zingiber officinale) and pulegone (Minthostachys mollis). Several essential oils presented promising inhibitory properties for the short chain AHL quorum sensing (QS) system, in Escherichia coli containing the biosensor plasmid pJBA132, in particular Lippia alba. Moderate activity as anti-QS using the same plasmid, were also found for selected constituents of essential oils studied here, such as citral, carvone and α-pinene, although solely at the highest tested concentration (250 µg mL(-1)). Only citral presented some activity for the long chain AHL QS system, in Pseudomonas putida containing the plasmid pRK-C12. In short, essential oils from Colombian flora have promising properties as QS modulators. PMID:21936639

  13. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of plant essential oils from Benin against Anopheles gambiae (Giles)

    2013-01-01

    highly susceptible to all the other essential oils at the diagnostic dose. Conclusions C. citratus, E. tereticornis, E. citriodora, C. ambrosioides and C. schoenanthus are potential promising plant sources for alternative compounds to pyrethroids, for the control of the Anopheles malaria vector in Benin. The efficacy of their essential oils is possibly based on their chemical compositions in which major and/or minor compounds have reported insecticidal activities on various pests and disease vectors such as Anopheles. PMID:24298981

  14. Antibacterial activity of commercially available plant-derived essential oils against oral pathogenic bacteria.

    Bardají, D K R; Reis, E B; Medeiros, T C T; Lucarini, R; Crotti, A E M; Martins, C H G

    2016-05-01

    This work investigated the antibacterial activity of 15 commercially available plant-derived essential oils (EOs) against a panel of oral pathogens. The broth microdilution method afforded the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the assayed EOs. The EO obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Lauraceae) (CZ-EO) displayed moderate activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Actinomyces naeslundii (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Prevotella nigrescens (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL) and Streptococcus mutans (MIC = 200 μg/mL; MBC = 400 μg/mL). (Z)-isosafrole (85.3%) was the main chemical component of this oil. We did not detect cinnamaldehyde, previously described as the major constituent of CZ-EO, in specimens collected in other countries. PMID:26165725

  15. Fumigant activity of plant essential oils and components from garlic (Allium sativum) and clove bud (Eugenia caryophyllata) oils against the Japanese termite (Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe).

    Park, Il-Kwon; Shin, Sang-Chul

    2005-06-01

    Plant essential oils from 29 plant species were tested for their insecticidal activities against the Japanese termite, Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe, using a fumigation bioassay. Responses varied with plant material, exposure time, and concentration. Good insecticidal activity against the Japanese termite was achived with essential oils of Melaleuca dissitiflora, Melaleuca uncinata, Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus polybractea, Eucalyptus radiata, Eucalyptus dives, Eucalyptus globulus, Orixa japonica, Cinnamomum cassia, Allium cepa, Illicium verum, Evodia officinalis, Schizonepeta tenuifolia, Cacalia roborowskii, Juniperus chinensis var. horizontalis, Juniperus chinensis var. kaizuka, clove bud, and garlic applied at 7.6 microL/L of air. Over 90% mortality after 3 days was achieved with O. japonica essential oil at 3.5 microL/L of air. E. citriodora, C. cassia, A. cepa, I. verum, S. tenuifolia, C. roborowskii, clove bud, and garlic oils at 3.5 microL/L of air were highly toxic 1 day after treatment. At 2.0 microL/L of air concentration, essential oils of I. verum, C. roborowskik, S. tenuifolia, A. cepa, clove bud, and garlic gave 100% mortality within 2 days of treatment. Clove bud and garlic oils showed the most potent antitermitic activity among the plant essential oils. Garlic and clove bud oils produced 100% mortality at 0.5 microL/L of air, but this decreased to 42 and 67% after 3 days of treatment at 0.25 microL/L of air, respectively. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry led to the identification of three major compounds from garlic oil and two from clove bud oils. These five compounds from two essential oils were tested individually for their insecticidal activities against Japanese termites. Responses varied with compound and dose. Diallyl trisulfide was the most toxic, followed by diallyl disulfide, eugenol, diallyl sulfide, and beta-caryophyllene. The essential oils described herein merit further study as potential fumigants for termite

  16. Fatty acids and sterols composition, and antioxidant activity of oils extracted from plant seeds.

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Gruczyńska, Eliza; Ścibisz, Iwona; Rudzińska, Magdalena

    2016-12-15

    This study determined and compared the contents of bioactive components in plant seed oils extracted with n-hexane (Soxhlet method) and chloroform/methanol (Folch method) from coriander, caraway, anise, nutmeg and white mustard seeds. Oleic acid dominated among unsaturated fatty acids in nutmeg and anise seed oils while petroselinic acid was present in coriander and caraway oils. Concerning sterols, β-sitosterol was the main component in seed oils extracted with both methods. The content of total phenolics in nutmeg, white mustard and coriander seed oils extracted with chloroform/methanol was higher than in their counterparts prepared with n-hexane. The seed oil samples extracted according to the Folch method exhibited a higher ability to scavenge DPPH radicals compared to the oil samples prepared with the Soxhlet method. DPPH values of the methanolic extracts derived from oils produced with the Folch method were also higher than in the oils extracted with n-hexane. PMID:27451203

  17. "Singing in the Tube"--audiovisual assay of plant oil repellent activity against mosquitoes (Culex pipiens).

    Adams, Temitope F; Wongchai, Chatchawal; Chaidee, Anchalee; Pfeiffer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Plant essential oils have been suggested as a promising alternative to the established mosquito repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). Searching for an assay with generally available equipment, we designed a new audiovisual assay of repellent activity against mosquitoes "Singing in the Tube," testing single mosquitoes in Drosophila cultivation tubes. Statistics with regression analysis should compensate for limitations of simple hardware. The assay was established with female Culex pipiens mosquitoes in 60 experiments, 120-h audio recording, and 2580 estimations of the distance between mosquito sitting position and the chemical. Correlations between parameters of sitting position, flight activity pattern, and flight tone spectrum were analyzed. Regression analysis of psycho-acoustic data of audio files (dB[A]) used a squared and modified sinus function determining wing beat frequency WBF ± SD (357 ± 47 Hz). Application of logistic regression defined the repelling velocity constant. The repelling velocity constant showed a decreasing order of efficiency of plant essential oils: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), lemon (Citrus limon), patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), DEET, cedar wood (Cedrus atlantica). In conclusion, we suggest (1) disease vector control (e.g., impregnation of bed nets) by eight plant essential oils with repelling velocity superior to DEET, (2) simple mosquito repellency testing in Drosophila cultivation tubes, (3) automated approaches and room surveillance by generally available audio equipment (dB[A]: ISO standard 226), and (4) quantification of repellent activity by parameters of the audiovisual assay defined by correlation and regression analyses. PMID:26412058

  18. [Repellent activity of plant essential oils against bites of Lutzomyia migonei (Diptera: Psychodidae)].

    Nieves, Elsa; Fernández Méndez, Janett; Lias, José; Rondón, Maritza; Briceño, Benito

    2010-12-01

    Natural repellents from plant extracts have demonstrated good efficacy against bites of some insect species. The present study evaluated the repellent effect of essential oils extracted from 8 plants species against bites of Lutzomyia migonei, the Leishmania vector. The essential oils were extracted by steam destillation in Clevenger chamber, from the following plants: Hyptis suaveolens, Pimenta racemosa, Piper marginatum, Monticalia imbricatifolia, Pseudognaphalium caeruleocanum, Espeletia shultzii, Plecthranthus amboinicus and Cinnamomun zeylanicum. Repellency tests were performed under laboratory conditions by the human hand method in cage assays, using female colonies of L. migonei. The more effective oils were tested at variable concentrations on different volunteers. The protection percentage and time were calculated. The results showed what oils of P. caeruleocanum and C. zeylanicum were the most effective. Although P. amboinicus oil also had repellent effect showed an irritant effect. The oils P. marginatum, H. suaveolens and P. racemosa showed no repellent effect, while the rest of oil extracts showed significant repellency in variable degrees. P. caeruleocanum and C. zeylanicum oils provided the 95% protection against bites of L. migonei for 3 h. The P. caeruleocanum oil showed the greatest protection time, with a mean over 4h and 3h at concentrations of 50% and 10% respectively. The results suggest that the P. caeruleocanum oil could represent a potential natural repellent against Leishmania vectors. PMID:21250485

  19. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants.

    Silva, N C C; Barbosa, L; Seito, L N; Fernandes, A

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to establish a phytochemical analysis of the crude extracts and performed GC-MS of the essential oils (EOs) of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) and Asteraceae species Baccharis dracunculifolia DC, Matricaria chamomilla L. and Vernonia polyanthes Less, as well as determining their antimicrobial activity. Establishment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts and EOs against 16 Staphylococcus aureus and 16 Escherichia coli strains from human specimens was carried out using the dilution method in Mueller-Hinton agar. Some phenolic compounds with antimicrobial properties were established, and all EOs had a higher antimicrobial activity than the extracts. Matricaria chamomilla extract and E. uniflora EO were efficient against S. aureus strains, while E. uniflora and V. polyanthes extracts and V. polyanthes EO showed the best antimicrobial activity against E. coli strains. Staphylococcus aureus strains were more susceptible to the tested plant products than E. coli, but all natural products promoted antimicrobial growth inhibition. PMID:22007687

  20. Repellent activities of some Labiatae plant essential oils against the saltmarsh mosquito Ochlerotatus caspius (Pallas, 1771) (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Koc, Samed; Oz, Emre; Cetin, Huseyin

    2012-06-01

    The repellent activities of the essential oils of two Thymus (Thymus sipyleus Boiss. subsp. sipyleus and Thymus revolutus Celak) and two Mentha (Mentha spicata L. subsp. spicata and Mentha longifolia L.) species against Ochlerotatus caspius (Pallas, 1771) (Diptera: Culicidae) are presented. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the aerial parts of the plants in flowering period and repellency tests were done with a Y-tube olfactometer. All essential oils showed repellency in varying degrees and exhibited no significant time-dependent repellent activities. When all test oils compared for repellent activities there was no significant activity detected within 15 min exposure period. Mentha essential oils had better activity than Thymus essential oils, producing high repellency (73.8-84.2%) at 30th min on Oc. caspius. Mentha longifolia has the best mosquito repellent activity among the plants tested at the 25th min. Th. sipyleus subsp. sipyleus essential oil produced >85% repellent activity at the 15th min, but the effect decreased noticeably to 63.1% and 68% at 25th and 30th min, respectively. PMID:22179264

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils of some Medicinal Plants from Saudi Arabia

    Antibacterial and anticandidal activities of essential oils obtained from of dill (Anethum graveolens) and fennel (Feoniculum vulgare) were studied by agar dilution technique. Test organisms were inoculated by radial streaking onto agar plates and incubated for 16-20 hours at 35 degree C. Antibacterial activity of dill and fennel was evaluated against Mycobacterium spp, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. Our results showed that the volatile oils extracted by steam distillation method from roots, stem and leaves of dill and fennel plants did not show antibacterial or anticandidal activities. However, seed extracts from both dill and fennel exhibited varying degrees of growth inhibition of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C.glabrata. Extracts of dill and fennel seeds prepared by simple solvent extraction method, using acetone, petroleum ether, methanol and chloroform, did not show any antimicrobial activity against common bacterial or fungal pathogens. On the other hand, growth of some Mycobacterium species was inhibited by the seed extracts of both fennel and dill. Our results suggest that the anticandidal and antimycobacterial properties of these two herbs may be further investigated to explore the possibility of using them in the treatment of candidal or mycobacterial infections. (author)

  2. Antifungal activity of essential oil and its constituents from Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana Florin leaf against plant pathogenic fungi.

    Chang, Hui-Ting; Cheng, Ying-Hung; Wu, Chi-Lin; Chang, Shang-Tzen; Chang, Tun-Tschu; Su, Yu-Chang

    2008-09-01

    Resistance to conventional fungicides causes the poor disease control of agriculture. Natural products from plants have great potential as novel fungicide sources for controlling pathogenic fungi. In this study antipathogenic activity of the leaf essential oil and its constituents from Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana Florin were evaluated in vitro against six plant pathogenic fungi. Chemical analysis of leaf oil by GC/MS allowed identification of alpha-pinene (44.2%), limonene (21.6%), beta-myrcene (8.9%), beta-caryophyllene (8.2%), caryophyllene oxide (2.4%), alpha-cadinol (1.6%), beta-pinene (1.2%), and T-muurolol (1.1%) as main components. Sesquiterpenoid components of the oil were more effective than monoterpenoid components of the oil. In particular, T-muurolol and alpha-cadinol strongly inhibited the growth of Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum, with the IC(50) values control of fungal diseases in plants. PMID:18206367

  3. Fumigant activity of plant essential oils and components from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), anise (Pimpinella anisum) and garlic (Allium sativum) oils against Lycoriella ingenua (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    Park, Ii-Kwon; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Do-Hyung; Choi, In-Ho; Kim, Lee-Sun; Bak, Won-Chull; Choi, Joon-Weon; Shin, Sang-Chul

    2006-08-01

    Plant essential oils from 40 plant species were tested for their insecticidal activities against larvae of Lycoriella ingénue (Dufour) using a fumigation bioassay. Good insecticidal activity against larvae of L. ingenua was achieved with essential oils of Chenopodium ambrosioides L., Eucalyptus globulus Labill, Eucalyptus smithii RT Baker, horseradish, anise and garlic at 10 and 5 microL L(-1) air. Horseradish, anise and garlic oils showed the most potent insecticidal activities among the plant essential oils. At 1.25 microL L(-1), horseradish, anise and garlic oils caused 100, 93.3 and 13.3% mortality, but at 0.625 microL L(-1) air this decreased to 3.3, 0 and 0% respectively. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry led to the identification of one major compound from horseradish, and three each from anise and garlic oils. These seven compounds and m-anisaldehyde and o-anisaldehyde, two positional isomers of p-anisaldehyde, were tested individually for their insecticidal activities against larvae of L. ingenua. Allyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic, followed by trans-anethole, diallyl disulfide and p-anisaldehyde with LC(50) values of 0.15, 0.20, 0.87 and 1.47 microL L(-1) respectively. PMID:16786497

  4. Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Essential Oils from Wild Growing Aromatic Plant Species of Skimmia laureola and Juniperus macropoda from Western Himalaya.

    Stappen, Iris; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Ali, Abbas; Wedge, David E; Wanner, Jürgen; Kaul, Vijay K; Lal, Brij; Jaitak, Vikas; Gochev, Velizar K; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2015-06-01

    The Himalayan region is very rich in a great variety of medicinal plants. In this investigation the essential oils of two selected species are described for their antimicrobial and larvicidal as well as biting deterrent activities. Additionally, the odors are characterized. Analyzed by simultaneous GC-MS and GC-FID, the essential oils' chemical compositions are given. The main components of Skimmia laureola oil were linalool and linalyl acetate whereas sabinene was found as the main compound for Juniperus macropoda essential oil. Antibacterial testing by agar dilution assay revealed highest activity of S. laureola oil against all tested bacteria, followed by J. macropoda oil. Antifungal activity was evaluated against the strawberry anthracnose causing plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae and C. gloeosporioides. Juniperus macropoda essential oil indicated higher antifungal activity against all three pathogens than S. laureola oil. Both essential oils showed biting deterrent activity above solvent control but low larvicidal activity. PMID:26197554

  5. Antioxidant, Anti-5-lipoxygenase and Antiacetylcholinesterase Activities of Essential Oils and Decoction Waters of Some Aromatic Plants

    Sílvia M. Albano; A. Sofia Lima; M. Graça Miguel; Luis G. Pedro; Barroso, José G.; A. Cristina Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    The scavenging of free radicals and superoxide anion, the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase and the antiacetylcholinesterase activities of essential oils and decoction waters of eight aromatic plants (Dittrichia viscosa, Foeniculum vulgare, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis, Thymbra capitata, Thymus camphoratus, Thymus carnosus and Thymus mastichina) were studied. The essential oils were dominated by 1,8-cineole in S. officinalis (59%), T. mastichina (49%) and T. camphoratus (21%); borneol (20%...

  6. Antifungal activity of essential oils from Iranian plants against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida albicans

    Sharifzadeh, Aghil; Shokri, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assay the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants against both fluconazole (FLU)-resistant and FLU-susceptible C. albicans strains isolated from HIV positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). Materials and Methods: The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation method from Myrtus communis (My. communis), Zingiber officinale roscoe (Z. officinale roscoe), Matricaria chamomilla (Ma. chamomilla), Trachysp...

  7. Impact of Plant Oils as Antifungal Activity Against Fungal Pathogens of Cinnamomum Zeylanicum (Cinnamon)

    Aisha Mohammed homod alrajhi

    2014-01-01

    Eleven fungal species were isolated from cinnamon plant, and two fungal genera could not be identified because they failed to sponulate in pure cultures. The identified species of fungi belonged to the genera Curvularia, Helminthosporium, Pestalotiopsis, Aspergillus, Rhizopus, Cladosporium, Nigrospora and Trichoderma.The effects of plant oils and synthetic fungicides were studied in a series of experiments against fungal pathogens of Cinnamon. The present results indicated a range of plant oi...

  8. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activity of Essential Oils of Twelve Spice Plants

    Politeo, Olivera; Jukić, Mila; Miloš, Mladen

    2006-01-01

    Chemical compositions and related total antioxidant capacities of twelve spice essential oils were analyzed. To enable a comparison of their relative antioxidant potentials, essential oils were extracted by hydrodistillation from selected spice plants and their chemical compositions were determined by the GC-MS system on two fused-silica capillary columns of different polarity. Antioxidant effectiveness was examined by four different methods: the 2,2'-diphenyl- 1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical...

  9. Allelopathic activity of medicinal plant essential oils on seed germination and vigor of lettuce achenes

    Cíntia Alvarenga Santos Fraga de Miranda; Maria das Graças Cardoso; Maria Laene Moreira de Carvalho; Samisia Maria Fernandes Machado; Marcos de Souza Gomes; Juliana de Andrade; Maria Luisa Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, essential oils have gained commercial interest in the agricultural area, mainly for their allelopathic, insecticidal, antifungal, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, and, also for their natural compounds, which have generally displayed low toxicity, relatively low cost and rapid degradation in the environment. Medicinal plants have emerged as potential suppliers of essential oils because of their ethnopharmacological utility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the al...

  10. Evaluation of antibacterial activity and synergistic effect between antibiotic and the essential oils of some medicinal plants

    Fadila Moussaoui; Tajelmolk Alaoui

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the in vitro antibacterial properties of five essential oils against ten bacterial strains and study the synergistic effect of the combination of essential oils with standard antibiotics. Methods: Origanum compactum, Chrysanthemum coronarium, Thymus willdenowii Boiss, Melissa officinalis and Origanum majorana L. were used alone and combined used with standard antibiotics to evaluate their antimicrobial activities. The disk diffusion method was employed. Results: The results showed that the combined application of the essential oils of the plants with antibiotics led to a synergistic effect in some cases, but antagonistic effect was also observed in some bacteria. Conclusions: This study shows that the combination of essential oils of the five plants with antibiotics may be useful in the fight against emerging microbial drug resistance.

  11. Antibacterial activity of aromatic plants essential oils from Serbia against the Listeria monocytogenes

    Klaus Anita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of the growth and survival of pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112 and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115, which are of significant importance in food hygiene. Essential oils extracted from Salvia officinalis L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Majorana hortensis Moench., Thymus vulgaris L., Carum carvi L., Pimpinella anisum L. and Coriandrum sativum L. were evaluated. Antibacterial activity was done by the disk diffusion method in the presence of pure essential oils and four suspensions in alcohol. The best results obtained with Thymus vulgaris and Majorana hortensis essential oils, which were acting microbicidaly on both observed strains of Listeria monocytogenes, even in the small concentration. Because some of the essential oils were highly inhibitory even in small quantities to selected pathogenic bacteria, they may provide alternatives to conventional antimicrobial additives in foods. .

  12. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    Lixandru, Brînduşa-Elena; Drăcea, Nicoleta Olguţa; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Drăgulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Luminiţa; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species. PMID:21462837

  13. Allelopathic activity of medicinal plant essential oils on seed germination and vigor of lettuce achenes

    Cíntia Alvarenga Santos Fraga de Miranda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, essential oils have gained commercial interest in the agricultural area, mainly for their allelopathic, insecticidal, antifungal, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, and, also for their natural compounds, which have generally displayed low toxicity, relatively low cost and rapid degradation in the environment. Medicinal plants have emerged as potential suppliers of essential oils because of their ethnopharmacological utility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the allelopathic potential of essential oils extracted from fresh leaves of lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus, wild basil (Ocimum gratissimum L. and sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. with regard to their major constituents (citral, eugenol and cineol, respectively in different application forms (direct contact and the effect of volatile constituents on the germination and vigor of lettuce seeds (cultivar Regina SF 3500. The effects of the oils and their major components were evaluated with regard to the variables: first germination count, total germination, GVI (germination velocity index, seedling dry weight and average lengths of shoots and lettuce roots. The essential oils from lemon grass and basil displayed allelopathic potentials on seed germination and vigor of lettuce achenes that can be assigned to their respective major constituents citral and eugenol. On the other hand, the allelopathic effect of the essential oil from basil was a consequence of the combined effect of all the components, regardless the application method.

  14. Antioxidant activity of various plant extracts under ambient and accelerated storage of sunflower oil

    Sheikh, Munir A.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the antioxidant potential of 11 medicinally or economically important plant materials indigenous to Pakistan. The materials were extracted with 80% methanol and examined  for their antioxidant activity under different storage conditions using sunflower and soybean oils as oxidation substrates. Preliminary antioxidant activity assessment among the extracts was conducted with the TLC-test and by measuring percent inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation. The rhizome of Iris germanica, leaves of Lawsonia alba, and M. oleifera, coffee (Coffee arabica beans, rice (Oryza sativa bran, wheat bran and oats (Avenis sativa groats and hull, which showed higher antioxidant activity among the extracts, were further evaluated using soybean and sunflower oils as oxidation substrates. The vegetable oils were stabilized with extracts at a dosage of 0.12% (w/w, and individually subjected to accelerated (65 oC, 15 days and ambient (6 months storage. The oxidative deterioration level was monitored for the measurement of antioxidant activity index (AI, peroxide value (PV, conjugated dienes and trienes contents. Overall, the extracts of coffee beans, oat groats and hull, Iris germanica and M. oleifera leaves were found to be the most effective in extending oxidative stability, and retarding PV, primary and secondary oxidation products of soybean and sunflower oils. The order of efficiency of the plant extracts for stabilization of the subject oils was as follows: oat groats and hull > coffee beans > M. oleifera leaves > Lawsonia alba > Iris germanica > rice bran > wheat bran. Significant differences in the antioxidant potential of some of the extracts for stabilization of substrate oils were observed under ambient and accelerated storage conditions and thus demonstrated a variable antioxidant prospective of the extracts under different analytical protocols.El presente trabajo se ha realizado para investigar la capacidad

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Rosmarinus eriocalyx essential oil and polyphenols: An endemic medicinal plant from Algeria

    Fethi Benbelaïd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial potency of Rosmarinus eriocalyx (R. eriocalyx essential oil and total polyphenols against pathogenic microorganisms. Methods: Antimicrobial activity of R. eriocalyx extracts was assessed by disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentrations determination. Essential oil obtained from endemic rosemary by hydrodistillation was analysed by gas chromatograph/retention index and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Results: An interesting antimicrobial activity was shown by R. eriocalyx extracts. Polyphenols, constituted mainly by flavonoids, were the most effective extract with very low minimum inhibitory concentrations values, ranged between 0.06 and 8.00 mg/mL, while essential oil was less efficient. It should be noted that antimicrobial activities of both R. eriocalyx extracts were more directed against fungi and Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative ones, in which Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans were the most sensitive strains. Concerning chemical composition of R. eriocalyx essential oil, camphor (37.8%, 1,8- cineole (17.4%, camphene (13.3%, and α-pinene (10.9% were the major compounds. Conclusions: The findings of the present study indicate that R. eriocalyx extracts possess significant bactericidal and fungicidal activities. Because of its richness in essential oil, and especially flavonoids, R. eriocalyx may be a source for effective and safe antimicrobial agents.

  16. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of plant essential oils from Benin against Anopheles gambiae (Giles)

    Bossou, Annick; Mangelinckx, Sven; Yedomonhan, Hounnankpon; Boko, Pelagie M; Akogbeto, Martin C; De Kimpe, Norbert; Avlessi, Felicien; Sohounhloue, Dominique CK

    2013-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance in sub-Saharan Africa and especially in Benin is a major public health issue hindering the control of the malaria vectors. Each Anopheles species has developed a resistance to one or several classes of the insecticides currently in use in the field. Therefore, it is urgent to find alternative compounds to conquer the vector. In this study, the efficacies of essential oils of nine plant species, which are traditionally used to avoid mosquito bites in Benin, we...

  17. Extraction of essential oils from native plants and algae from the coast of Peniche (Portugal: antimicrobial and antioxidant activity.

    Clélia Neves Afonso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas are highly complex and dynamic ecosystem of interface between land, sea and atmosphere, which also suffer biotic influences. These areas play several important ecological functions, and here we can find an enormous biodiversity. The coastline of Portugal features a high number of endemic flora and vegetation with the potential to provide functional compounds that may provide physiological benefits at nutritional and therapeutic levels, as sources of bioactive substances with antimicrobial, antioxidant, antifungal, antitumalr and anti-inflammatory activity. Among these compounds, we find essential oils, also known as volatile oils, which are a result of secondary metabolism of aromatic plants, containing a large number of substances with varied chemical composition that can be obtained by different methods of extraction. The aim of this study was to extract essential oils of native plants and seaweeds from the coast of Peniche by hydrodistillation in Clevenger apparatus, with optimization of the purification process. Extracted essential oils were tested as to their ability as antibacterial and antifungal agents, and also as antioxidants. The plants studied for this purpose were Inula chritmoides L., Juniperus phoenicea subsp. turbinata (Guss. Nyman, Daucus carota spp. halophilus and the seaweeds Fucus spiralis L., Codium tomentosum Stackhouse, Stypocaulon scoparium (Linnaeus Kützing and Plocamium cartilagineum (Linnaeus P.S.Dixon. The antimicrobial ability was tested in two bacteria species, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli and in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using standard procedures. The antioxidant potential was evaluated and from the results obtained, we can conclude that the essential oils extracted by the hydrodistillation method of plants and algae contain bioactive compounds present in its constitution with interesting bio-activity that can offer significant benefits and biotechnological relevance.

  18. Antioxidant, Anti-5-lipoxygenase and Antiacetylcholinesterase Activities of Essential Oils and Decoction Waters of Some Aromatic Plants

    Sílvia M. Albano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The scavenging of free radicals and superoxide anion, the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase and the antiacetylcholinesterase activities of essential oils and decoction waters of eight aromatic plants (Dittrichia viscosa , Foeniculum vulgare, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis, Thymbra capitata , Thymus camphoratus, Thymus carnosus and Thymus mastichina were studied. The essential oils were dominated by 1,8-cineole in S. officinalis (59%, T. mastichina (49% and T. camphoratus (21%; borneol (20% in T. carnosus; carvacrol in Thymbra capitata (68%; γ -terpinene (49% in O. vulgare; α -pinene (26% in F. vulgare; and trans-nerolidol (8% + β -oplopenone (7% in D. viscosa. O. vulgare decoction waters had the highest amount of phenols (4 5 ± 3 mg GAE/mL while F. vulgare only had 5 ± 0 mg GAE/mL. The decoction waters showed higher radical scavenging activity than the essential oils. O. vulgare decoction water showed the best antioxidant activity (IC 50= 3 ± 0 m g/mL, while the most effective essential oils were those of Thymbra capitata (IC 50=61 ± 2 m g/mL and O. vulgare (IC 50=15 6 ± 5 m g/mL. Thymbra capitata (IC 50= 6 ± 0 m g/mL decoction water showed the best superoxide anion scavenging activity. F. vulgare decoction water and essential oil revealed the best 5-lipoxygenase inhibition capacity (IC 50=2 7 ± 1 m g/mL and IC 50=6 8 ± 2 m g/mL, respectively. T. mastichina (IC 50=4 6 ± 4 m g/mL, S. officinalis (IC 50=5 1 ± 4 m g/mL, Thymbra capitata (IC 50=5 2 ± 1 m g/mL and T. camphoratus (IC 50=13 7 ± 2 m g/mL essential oils showed the best antiacetylcholinesterase activity.

  19. Antifungal activity of essential oils from Iranian plants against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida albicans

    Aghil Sharifzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assay the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants against both fluconazole (FLU-resistant and FLU-susceptible C. albicans strains isolated from HIV positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC. Materials and Methods: The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation method from Myrtus communis (My. communis, Zingiber officinale roscoe (Z. officinale roscoe, Matricaria chamomilla (Ma. chamomilla, Trachyspermum ammi (T. ammi and Origanum vulgare (O. vulgare. The susceptibility test was based on the M27-A2 methodology. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were obtained by gas chromatography- mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Results: In GC-MS analysis, thymol (63.40%, linalool (42%, α-pinene (27.87%, α-pinene (22.10%, and zingiberene (31.79% were found to be the major components of T. ammi, O. vulgare, My. communis, Ma. chamomilla and Z. officinale roscoe, respectively. The results showed that essential oils have different levels of antifungal activity. O. vulgare and T. ammi essential oils were found to be the most efficient (P

  20. Development of an experimental apparatus and protocol for determining antimicrobial activities of gaseous plant essential oils.

    Seo, Hyun-Sun; Beuchat, Larry R; Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2015-12-23

    There is a growing interest in the use of naturally-occurring antimicrobial agents such as plant essential oils (EOs) to inhibit the growth of hazardous and spoilage microorganisms in foods. Gaseous EOs (EO gases) have many potential applications in the food industry, including use as antimicrobial agents in food packaging materials and sanitizing agents for foods and food-contact surfaces, and in food processing environments. Despite the potentially beneficial applications of EO gases, there is no standard method to evaluate their antimicrobial activities. Thus, the present study was aimed at developing an experimental apparatus and protocol to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) of EO gases against microorganisms. A sealed experimental apparatus was constructed for simultaneous evaluation of antimicrobial activities of EO gases at different concentrations without creating concentration gradients. A differential medium was then evaluated in which a color change allowed for the determination of growth of glucose-fermenting microorganisms. Lastly, an experimental protocol for the assessment of MIC and MLC values of EO gases was developed, and these values were determined for 31 EO gases against Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterium. Results showed that cinnamon bark EO gas had the lowest MIC (0.0391 μl/ml), followed by thyme-thymol EO gas (0.0781 μl/ml), oregano EO gas (0.3125 μl/ml), peppermint EO gas (0.6250 μl/ml), and thyme-linalool EO gas (0.6250 μl/ml). The order of the MLC values of the EO gases against the E. coli O157:H7 was thyme-thymol (0.0781 μl/ml)

  1. Mosquito repellent activity of essential oils of aromatic plants growing in Argentina.

    Gillij, Y G; Gleiser, R M; Zygadlo, J A

    2008-05-01

    Mosquitoes are important vectors of diseases and nuisance pests. Repellents minimize contact with mosquitoes. Repellents based on essential oils (EO) are being developed as an alternative to DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-methylbenzamide), an effective compound that has disadvantages including toxic reactions, and damage to plastic and synthetic fabric. This work evaluated the repellency against Aedes aegypti of EO from aromatic plants that grow in Argentina: Acantholippia seriphioides, Achyrocline satureioides, Aloysia citriodora, Anemia tomentosa, Baccharis spartioides, Chenopodium ambrosioides, Eucalyptus saligna, Hyptis mutabilis, Minthostachys mollis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Tagetes minuta and Tagetes pusilla. Most EO were effective. Variations depending on geographic origin of the plant were detected. At a 90% EO concentration, A. satureoides and T. pusilla were the least repellent. At concentrations of 12.5% B. spartioides, R. officinalis and A. citriodora showed the longest repellency times. Comparisons of the principal components of each EO suggest that limonene and camphor were the main components responsible for the repellent effects. PMID:17583499

  2. Larvicidal and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of apiaceae plant essential oils and their constituents against aedes albopictus and formulation development.

    Seo, Seon-Mi; Jung, Chan-Sik; Kang, Jaesoon; Lee, Hyo-Rim; Kim, Sung-Woong; Hyun, Jinho; Park, Il-Kwon

    2015-11-18

    This study evaluated the larvicidal activity of 12 Apiaceae plant essential oils and their components against the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, and the inhibition of acetylcholine esterase with their components. Of the 12 plant essential oils tested, ajowan (Trachyspermum ammi), caraway seed (Carum carvi), carrot seed (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), dill (Anethum graveolens), and parsley (Petroselinum sativum) resulted in >90% larval mortality when used at 0.1 mg/mL. Of the compounds identified, α-phellandrene, α-terpinene, p-cymene, (-)-limonene, (+)-limonene, γ-terpinene, cuminaldehyde, neral, (S)-+-carvone, trans-anethole, thymol, carvacrol, myristicin, apiol, and carotol resulted in >80% larval mortality when used at 0.1 mg/mL. Two days after treatment, 24.69, 3.64, and 12.43% of the original amounts of the celery, cumin, and parsley oils, respectively, remained in the water. Less than 50% of the original amounts of α-phellandrene, 1,8-cineole, terpinen-4-ol, cuminaldehyde, and trans-antheole were detected in the water at 2 days after treatment. Carvacrol, α-pinene, and β-pinene inhibited the activity of Ae. albopictus acetylcholinesterase with IC50 values of 0.057, 0.062, and 0.190 mg/mL, respectively. A spherical microemulsion of parsley essential oil-loaded poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was prepared, and the larvicidal activity of this formulation was shown to be similar to that of parsley oil. PMID:26500081

  3. CRUDE OIL CONTAMINATION AND PLANTS

    Terek, Olga; Laphyna, Olga; Velychko, Oksana; Bunyo, Lyubov; Dovgaiuk-Semeniuk, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the physiological mechanisms of plant adaptation under crude oil contamination of soil. Different plant species used in the study sedge (Carex hirta L.), bean (Faba bona Medic.), alfalfa (Medicago lupulina L.) and clover (Trifolium pratense L.) showed various biochemical and morphological reactions under oil pollution. The effect of crude oil on root elongation, shoot growth and dry matter accumulation of the four species was evaluated. All invest...

  4. Comparative Study of Composition, Antioxidant, and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Balkan Peninsula.

    Stanković, Nemanja; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana; Zlatković, Bojan; Matejić, Jelena; Stankov Jovanović, Vesna; Kocić, Branislava; Čomić, Ljiljana

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study to perform a comparative analysis of the chemical composition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities of the essential oils of plant species Hyssopus officinalis, Achillea grandifolia, Achillea crithmifolia, Tanacetum parthenium, Laserpitium latifolium, and Artemisia absinthium from Balkan Peninsula. The chemical analysis of essential oils was performed by using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Monoterpenes were dominant among the recorded components, with camphor in T. parthenium, A. grandifolia, and A. crithmifolia (51.4, 45.4, and 25.4 %, respectively), 1,8-cineole in H. officinalis, A. grandifolia, and A. crithmifolia (49.1, 16.4, and 14.8 %, respectively), and sabinene in L. latifolium and A. absinthium (47.8 and 21.5 %). The antiradical and antioxidant activities were determined by using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods. The essential oil of A. grandifolia has shown the highest antioxidant activity [IC50 of 33.575 ± 0.069 mg/mL for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2.510 ± 0.036 mg vitamin C/g for the 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) assay]. The antimicrobial activity against 16 multiresistant pathogenic bacteria isolated from human source material was tested by the broth microdilution assay. The resulting minimum inhibitory concentration/minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 4.72 to 93.2 mg/mL. Therefore, the essential oils of the plant species included in this study may be considered to be prospective natural sources of antimicrobial substances, and may contribute as effective agents in the battle against bacterial multiresistance. PMID:26891001

  5. In-vitro antibacterial activities of the essential oils of aromatic plants against Erwinia herbicola (Lohnis) and pseudomonas putida (Kris Hamilton)

    Pandey Abhay K; Singh Pooja; Palni Uma T.; Tripathi N.N.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine in vitro antibacterial activities of essential oils extracted from 53 aromatic plants of Gorakhpur Division (UP, INDIA) for the control of two phytopathogenic bacteria namely Erwinia herbicola and Pseudomonas putida causing several post-harvest diseases in fruits and vegetables. Out of 53 oils screened, 8 oils such as Chenopodium ambrosioides, Citrus aurantium, Clausena pentaphylla, Hyptis suaveolens, Lippia alba, Mentha arvensis, Ocimum sanctum and Vi...

  6. Antifungal activity of plant-derived essential oils on Candida tropicalis planktonic and biofilms cells.

    Souza, Caio Marcelo Cury; Pereira Junior, Silvio Alves; Moraes, Thaís da Silva; Damasceno, Jaqueline Lopes; Amorim Mendes, Suzana; Dias, Herbert Júnior; Stefani, Ricardo; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares; Pires, Regina Helena

    2016-07-01

    Dental prosthesis supports Candida species growth and may predispose the oral cavity to lesions. C. tropicalis has emerged as a colonizer of prosthesis and has shown resistance to clinically used antifungal agents, which has increased the search for new antifungals. This work describes the effectiveness of fifteen essential oils (EOs) against C. tropicalis The EOs were obtained by hydrodistillation and were chemically characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antifungal activities of the EOs were evaluated by the microdilution method and showed that Pelargonium graveolens (Geraniaceae) (PG-EO) was the most effective oil. Geraniol and linalool were the major constituents of PG-EO. The 2,3-Bis-(2-Methoxy-4-Nitro-5-Sulfophenyl)-2H-Tetrazolium-5-Carboxanilide (XTT) assay showed that all the clinical C. tropicalis strains formed viable biofilms. Scanning electron microscopy examination of the biofilms revealed a complex architecture with basal layer of yeast cells and an upper layer of filamentous cells. Treatments with PG-EO, linalool, and geraniol significantly reduced the number of viable biofilm cells and inhibited biofilm formation after exposure for 48 h. PG-EO, geraniol, and linalool were not toxic to normal human lung fibroblasts (GM07492A) at the concentrations they were active against C. tropicalis Together, our results indicated that C. tropicalis is susceptible to treatment with PG-EO, geraniol, and linalool, which could become options to prevent or treat this infection. PMID:26868902

  7. Chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of essential oils of plants from Burkina Faso.

    Bagora Bayala

    Full Text Available This research highlights the chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of essential oils from leaves of Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum americanum, Hyptis spicigera, Lippia multiflora, Ageratum conyzoides, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Zingiber officinale. Essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Major constituents were α-terpineol (59.78% and β-caryophyllene (10.54% for Ocimum basilicum; 1, 8-cineol (31.22%, camphor (12.730%, α-pinene (6.87% and trans α-bergamotene (5.32% for Ocimum americanum; β-caryophyllene (21%, α-pinene (20.11%, sabinene (10.26%, β-pinene (9.22% and α-phellandrene (7.03% for Hyptis spicigera; p-cymene (25.27%, β-caryophyllene (12.70%, thymol (11.88, γ-terpinene (9.17% and thymyle acetate (7.64% for Lippia multiflora; precocene (82.10%for Ageratum conyzoides; eucalyptol (59.55%, α-pinene (9.17% and limonene (8.76% for Eucalyptus camaldulensis; arcurcumene (16.67%, camphene (12.70%, zingiberene (8.40%, β-bisabolene (7.83% and β-sesquiphellandrène (5.34% for Zingiber officinale. Antioxidant activities were examined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS methods. O. basilicum and L. multiflora exhibited the highest antioxidant activity in DPPH and ABTS tests, respectively. Anti-inflammatory properties were evaluated by measuring the inhibition of lipoxygenase activity and essential oil of Z. officinale was the most active. Anti-proliferative effect was assayed by the measurement of MTT on LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, and SF-763 and SF-767 glioblastoma cell lines. Essential oils from A. conyzoides and L. multiflora were the most active on LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines, respectively. The SF-767 glioblastoma cell line was the most sensitive to O. basilicum and L. multiflora EOs while essential oil of A. conyzoides showed the

  8. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Proliferative Activities of Essential Oils of Plants from Burkina Faso

    Bayala, Bagora; Bassole, Imaël Henri Nestor; Gnoula, Charlemagne; Nebie, Roger; Yonli, Albert; Morel, Laurent; Figueredo, Gilles; Nikiema, Jean-Baptiste; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A.; Simpore, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    This research highlights the chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of essential oils from leaves of Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum americanum, Hyptis spicigera, Lippia multiflora, Ageratum conyzoides, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Zingiber officinale. Essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and gas chromatography–flame ionization detector. Major constituents were α-terpineol (59.78%) and β-caryophyllene (10.54%) for Ocimum basilicum; 1, 8-cineol (31.22%), camphor (12.730%), α-pinene (6.87%) and trans α-bergamotene (5.32%) for Ocimum americanum; β-caryophyllene (21%), α-pinene (20.11%), sabinene (10.26%), β-pinene (9.22%) and α-phellandrene (7.03%) for Hyptis spicigera; p-cymene (25.27%), β-caryophyllene (12.70%), thymol (11.88), γ-terpinene (9.17%) and thymyle acetate (7.64%) for Lippia multiflora; precocene (82.10%)for Ageratum conyzoides; eucalyptol (59.55%), α-pinene (9.17%) and limonene (8.76%) for Eucalyptus camaldulensis; arcurcumene (16.67%), camphene (12.70%), zingiberene (8.40%), β-bisabolene (7.83%) and β-sesquiphellandrène (5.34%) for Zingiber officinale. Antioxidant activities were examined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) methods. O. basilicum and L. multiflora exhibited the highest antioxidant activity in DPPH and ABTS tests, respectively. Anti-inflammatory properties were evaluated by measuring the inhibition of lipoxygenase activity and essential oil of Z. officinale was the most active. Anti-proliferative effect was assayed by the measurement of MTT on LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, and SF-763 and SF-767 glioblastoma cell lines. Essential oils from A. conyzoides and L. multiflora were the most active on LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines, respectively. The SF-767 glioblastoma cell line was the most sensitive to O. basilicum and L. multiflora EOs while essential oil of A. conyzoides

  9. Evidence for synergistic activity of plant-derived essential oils against fungal pathogens of food.

    Hossain, Farah; Follett, Peter; Dang Vu, Khang; Harich, Mehdi; Salmieri, Stephane; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-02-01

    The antifungal activities of eight essential oils (EOs) namely basil, cinnamon, eucalyptus, mandarin, oregano, peppermint, tea tree and thyme were evaluated for their ability to inhibit growth of Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus and Penicillium chrysogenum. The antifungal activity of the EOs was assessed by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using 96-well microplate analysis. The interactions between different EO combinations were done by the checkerboard technique. The highest antifungal activity was exhibited by oregano and thyme which showed lower MIC values amongst all the tested fungi. The antifungal activity of the other EOs could be appropriately ranked in a descending sequence of cinnamon, peppermint, tea tree and basil. Eucalyptus and mandarin showed the least efficiency as they could not inhibit any of the fungal growth at 10,000 ppm. The interaction between these two EOs also showed no interaction on the tested species. A combined formulation of oregano and thyme resulted in a synergistic effect, showing enhanced efficiency against A. flavus and A. parasiticus and P. chrysogenum. Mixtures of peppermint and tea tree produced synergistic effect against A. niger. Application of a modified Gompertz model considering fungal growth parameters like maximum colony diameter, maximum growth rate and lag time periods, under the various EO treatment scenarios, showed that the model could adequately describe and predict the growth of the tested fungi under these conditions. PMID:26678126

  10. Repellent Activities of Essential Oils of Some Plants Used Traditionally to Control the Brown Ear Tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus

    Wanzala, W.W.; Hassanali, A.; Mukabana, W.R.; Takken, W.

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils of eight plants, selected after an ethnobotanical survey conducted in Bukusu community in Bungoma County, western Kenya (Tagetes minuta, Tithonia diversifolia, Juniperus procera, Solanecio mannii, Senna didymobotrya, Lantana camara, Securidaca longepedunculata, and Hoslundia opposita)

  11. In Vitro Activity of Twenty Commercially Available, Plant-Derived Essential Oils against Selected Dermatophyte Species.

    Nardoni, Simona; Giovanelli, Silvia; Pistelli, Luisa; Mugnaini, Linda; Profili, Greta; Pisseri, Francesca; Mancianti, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    The in vitro activity of twenty chemically defined essential oils (EOs) obtained from Boswellia sacra, Citrus bergamia, C. limon, C. medica, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Eucalyptus globulus, Foeniculum vulgare, Helichrysum italicum, Illicium verum, Litsea cubeba, Mentha spicata, Myrtus communis, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum majorana, O. vulgare, Pelargonium graveolens, Rosmarinus officinalis, Santalum album, Satureja montana, and Thymus serpyllum was assayed against clinical animal isolates of Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. erinacei, T. terrestre and Microsporum gypseum, main causative agents of zoonotic and/or environmental dermatophytoses in humans. Single main components present in high amounts in such EOs were also tested. Different dermatophyte species showed remarkable differences in sensitivity. In general, more effective EOs were T. serpyllum (MIC range 0.025%-0.25%), O. vulgare (MIC range 0.025%-0.5%) and L. cubeba (MIC range 0.025%-1.5%). F. vulgare showed a moderate efficacy against geophilic species such as M gypseum and T terrestre. Among single main components tested, neral was the most active (MIC and MFC values 5 0.25%). The results of the present study seem to be promising for an in vivo use of some assayed EOs. PMID:26434145

  12. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from plants used as spices against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp.

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Scheid, Liliane Alves; Spader, Tatiana Borba; Atayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants used as spices was evaluated against both fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp. The Candida species studied were Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. For comparison purposes, they were arranged in groups as C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans. The essential oils were obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Breyn, Lippia graveolens HBK, Ocimum basilicum L., Origanum vulgare L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Thymus vulgaris L., and Zingiber officinale. The susceptibility tests were based on the M27-A2 methodology. The chemical composition of the essential oils was obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and by retention indices. The results showed that cinnamon, Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils have different levels of antifungal activity. Oregano and ginger essential oils were found to be the most and the least efficient, respectively. The main finding was that the susceptibilities of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans to Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils were higher than those of the fluconazole-susceptible yeasts (Pcinnamon essential oil than their fluconazole-susceptible counterparts (P<0.05). A relationship between the yeasts' susceptibilities and the chemical composition of the essential oils studied was apparent when these 2 parameters were compared. Finally, basil, rosemary, and sage essential oils did not show antifungal activity against Candida isolates at the tested concentrations. PMID:18997851

  13. Synergistic repellent activity of plant essential oils against Aedes aegypti on rabbit Skin

    Koech Peter Kiplang'at

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases are the major causes of mortality particularly in tropics. Due to drug and insecticide resistance, personal protection by use of skin repellents has become a common approach of control. The purpose of the study is to determine if synergy exists between Ocimum basilicum, Azadirachta indica and Eucalyptus citriodora oils. Kinga Mosquito repelling Wax® and Vaseline Pure Petroleum Jelly® were included as positive and negative test control respectively. The results showed that Chrysanthemum cinerariefolium extract had no paralytic effect at 0.002% and 0.005% with mean repellency of 81.58 and 85.94 respectively. Similar observation was shown by 10% Azadirachta indica oil and Kinga with a mean repellency 85.79 and 80.53 respectively. Azadirachta indica oil was then reinforced by addition of Sweet basil oil and Lemon eucalyptus oil. A combination that provides complete protection and displayed mosquito paralysis was obtained. The developed formulation can replace Kinga® and alternative to Chrysanthemum cinerariefolium extract.

  14. Evaluating plant and plant oil repellency against the sweetpotato whitefly

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci is a major insect pest of vegetables world-wide. We evaluated the effect of commercial plant oils – garlic oil, hot pepper wax, and mustard oil against B. tabaci. Cucumber plants served as the control. Additional treatments included no plants or oil (clear ai...

  15. Chemical Composition and Larvicidal Activity of Essential Oils Extracted from Brazilian Legal Amazon Plants against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) is the major vector of dengue and chikungunya fever. The lack of effective therapies and vaccines for these diseases highlights the need for alternative strategies to control the spread of virus. Therefore, this study investigated the larvicidal potential of essential oils from common plant species obtained from the Chapada das Mesas National Park, Brazil, against third instar A. aegypti larvae. The chemical composition of these oils was dete...

  16. Report and recommendations of the task force on tree and shrub planting on active oil sands tailings dams

    NONE

    2011-02-15

    In oil sands reclamation operations in Canada there is a conflict between dam safety and the planting of trees and woody shrubs. Indeed, tree planting is being restricted on the downstream slopes of dams to avoid damage to drains and to ensure the integrity of visual and instrumentation monitoring conflicting thus with progressive reclamation. Alberta Environment hired the Oil Sands Research and Information Network (OSRIN), an independent organization which analyzes and interprets available knowledge on soil and water reclamation in the oil sands mining sector, to address this issue and make recommendations. The organization appointed a Task Force which presented its final report in March 2011. The Task Force recommended that the Engineer of Record should be responsible for determining the tree and shrub planting zones and that he should submit his plans to Alberta Environment for approval.

  17. Correlation between chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils of some aromatic medicinal plants growing in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Cimanga, K; Kambu, K; Tona, L; Apers, S; De Bruyne, T; Hermans, N; Totté, J; Pieters, L; Vlietinck, A J

    2002-02-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils from 15 aromatic medicinal plant species growing in the Democratic Republic of Congo have been studied. More than 15 constituents in an amount higher than 0.1% were identified in each essential oil. 1,8-cineole, alpha and beta-pinene, p-cymene, myrcene, gamma-terpinene, alpha-terpineol and limonene were prevalent constituents in almost more than 10 selected plant species. Results from the antibacterial testing by the diffusion method indicate that all essential oils (5 microl per disc) inhibited the growth of selected bacteria at different extents. The most active antibacterial essential oils were those of the leaves of Eucalyptus camadulensis and Eucalyptus terticornis (12-30 mm zone diameter of inhibition). They showed particularly a most potent inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth (15-16 mm), followed by Eucalyptus robusta (12 mm). Essential oils from the leaves of Eucalyptus alba, Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus deglupta, Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus saligna, Eucalyptus robusta, Aframomum stipulatum, Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum americanum and that of the seeds of Monodora myristica showed also a good antibacterial activity (10-18 mm). Eucalyptus propinqua, Eucalyptus urophylla and Ocimum gratissimum essential oils were the less active samples against the selected bacteria. No correlation between the amount of major constituents such as 1,8-cineol, alpha-pinene, p-cymene, cryptone or thymol and the antibacterial activity was observed. PMID:11801384

  18. Repellent Activities of Essential Oils of Some Plants Used Traditionally to Control the Brown Ear Tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus

    Wycliffe Wanzala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils of eight plants, selected after an ethnobotanical survey conducted in Bukusu community in Bungoma County, western Kenya (Tagetes minuta, Tithonia diversifolia, Juniperus procera, Solanecio mannii, Senna didymobotrya, Lantana camara, Securidaca longepedunculata, and Hoslundia opposita, were initially screened (at two doses for their repellence against brown ear tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, using a dual-choice climbing assay. The oils of T. minuta and T. diversifolia were then selected for more detailed study. Dose-response evaluations of these oils showed that T. minuta oil was more repellent (RD50 = 0.0021 mg than that of T. diversifolia (RD50 = 0.263 mg. Gas chromatography-linked mass spectrometric (GC-MS analyses showed different compositions of the two oils. T. minuta oil is comprised mainly of cis-ocimene (43.78%, dihydrotagetone (16.71%, piperitenone (10.15%, trans-tagetone (8.67%, 3,9-epoxy-p-mentha-1,8(10diene (6.47%, β-ocimene (3.25%, and cis-tagetone (1.95%, whereas T. diversifolia oil is comprised mainly of α-pinene (63.64%, β-pinene (15.00%, isocaryophyllene (7.62%, nerolidol (3.70%, 1-tridecanol (1.75%, limonene (1.52%, and sabinene (1.00%. The results provide scientific rationale for traditional use of raw products of these plants in controlling livestock ticks by the Bukusu community and lay down some groundwork for exploiting partially refined products such as essential oils of these plants in protecting cattle against infestations with R. appendiculatus.

  19. Repellent Activities of Essential Oils of Some Plants Used Traditionally to Control the Brown Ear Tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus.

    Wanzala, Wycliffe; Hassanali, Ahmed; Mukabana, Wolfgang Richard; Takken, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils of eight plants, selected after an ethnobotanical survey conducted in Bukusu community in Bungoma County, western Kenya (Tagetes minuta, Tithonia diversifolia, Juniperus procera, Solanecio mannii, Senna didymobotrya, Lantana camara, Securidaca longepedunculata, and Hoslundia opposita), were initially screened (at two doses) for their repellence against brown ear tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, using a dual-choice climbing assay. The oils of T. minuta and T. diversifolia were then selected for more detailed study. Dose-response evaluations of these oils showed that T. minuta oil was more repellent (RD50 = 0.0021 mg) than that of T. diversifolia (RD50 = 0.263 mg). Gas chromatography-linked mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analyses showed different compositions of the two oils. T. minuta oil is comprised mainly of cis-ocimene (43.78%), dihydrotagetone (16.71%), piperitenone (10.15%), trans-tagetone (8.67%), 3,9-epoxy-p-mentha-1,8(10)diene (6.47%), β -ocimene (3.25%), and cis-tagetone (1.95%), whereas T. diversifolia oil is comprised mainly of α -pinene (63.64%), β -pinene (15.00%), isocaryophyllene (7.62%), nerolidol (3.70%), 1-tridecanol (1.75%), limonene (1.52%), and sabinene (1.00%). The results provide scientific rationale for traditional use of raw products of these plants in controlling livestock ticks by the Bukusu community and lay down some groundwork for exploiting partially refined products such as essential oils of these plants in protecting cattle against infestations with R. appendiculatus. PMID:24693417

  20. Synergistic repellent activity of plant essential oils against Aedes aegypti on rabbit Skin

    Koech Peter Kiplang'at; Richard W. Mwangi

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are the major causes of mortality particularly in tropics. Due to drug and insecticide resistance, personal protection by use of skin repellents has become a common approach of control. The purpose of the study is to determine if synergy exists between Ocimum basilicum, Azadirachta indica and Eucalyptus citriodora oils. Kinga Mosquito repelling Wax® and Vaseline Pure Petroleum Jelly® were included as positive and negative test control respectively. The results showed t...

  1. Antibacterial activity of water extracts and essential oils of various aromatic plants against Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American Foulbrood.

    González, M J; Marioli, J M

    2010-07-01

    Vegetal water extracts, namely the water remaining after hydro-distillation and decoctions, and essential oils of 10 plant species were tested as inhibitors for the growth of Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American Foulbrood. Achyrocline satureioides, Chenopodium ambrosioide, Eucalyptus cinerea, Gnaphalium gaudichaudianum, Lippia turbinata, Marrubium vulgare,Minthostachys verticillata, Origanum vulgare, Tagetes minuta and Thymus vulgaris were included in the study. The water remaining after hydro-distillation showed the highest antibacterial activities, the growth of almost all the P. larvae strains tested was inhibited by these extracts. Regarding the plants tested, E. cinerea and M. verticillata were the plant species with the highest biological activity with 100% efficacy (all its extracts inhibited the growth of all P. larvae strains). Essential oils were less active for the inhibition of P. larvae growth. PMID:20398671

  2. Comparison of antimicrobial activity of essential oils, plant extracts and methylparaben in cosmetic emulsions: 2 months study.

    Herman, Anna

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the preservative effectiveness of plant extracts (Matricaria chamomilla, Aloe vera, Calendula officinalis) and essential oils (Lavandulla officinalis, Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum zeylanicum) with methylparaben in cosmetic emulsions against skin microflora during 2 months of application by volunteers. Cosmetic emulsions with extracts (2.5 %), essential oils (2.5 %), methylparaben (0.4 %) or placebo were tested by 40 volunteers during 2 months of treatment. In order to determine microbial purity of the emulsions, the samples were taken after 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of application. Throughout the trial period it was revealed that only cinnamon oil completely inhibited the growth of bacteria, yeast and mould, as compared to all other essential oils, plant extracts and methylparaben in the tested emulsions. This result shows that cinnamon oil could successfully replace the use of methylparaben in cosmetics, at the same time ensuring microbiological purity of a cosmetic product under its in-use and storage conditions. PMID:24891745

  3. Chemical Composition and Larvicidal Activity of Essential Oils Extracted from Brazilian Legal Amazon Plants against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Dias, Clarice Noleto; Alves, Luciana Patrícia Lima; Rodrigues, Klinger Antonio da Franca; Brito, Maria Cristiane Aranha; Rosa, Carliane dos Santos; do Amaral, Flavia Maria Mendonça; Monteiro, Odair dos Santos; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Maia, José Guilherme Soares; Moraes, Denise Fernandes Coutinho

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) is the major vector of dengue and chikungunya fever. The lack of effective therapies and vaccines for these diseases highlights the need for alternative strategies to control the spread of virus. Therefore, this study investigated the larvicidal potential of essential oils from common plant species obtained from the Chapada das Mesas National Park, Brazil, against third instar A. aegypti larvae. The chemical composition of these oils was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The essential oils of Eugenia piauhiensis Vellaff., Myrcia erythroxylon O. Berg, Psidium myrsinites DC., and Siparuna camporum (Tul.) A. DC. were observed to be mainly composed of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons. The essential oil of Lippia gracilis Schauer was composed of oxygenated monoterpenes. Four of the five tested oils were effective against the A. aegypti larvae, with the lethal concentration (LC50) ranging from 230 to 292 mg/L after 24 h of exposure. Overall, this work demonstrated the possibility of developing larvicidal products against A. aegypti by using essential oils from the flora of the Brazilian Legal Amazon. This in turn demonstrates the potential of using natural resources for the control of disease vectors. PMID:25949264

  4. Chemical Composition and Larvicidal Activity of Essential Oils Extracted from Brazilian Legal Amazon Plants against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Dias, Clarice Noleto; Alves, Luciana Patrícia Lima; Rodrigues, Klinger Antonio da Franca; Brito, Maria Cristiane Aranha; Rosa, Carliane Dos Santos; do Amaral, Flavia Maria Mendonça; Monteiro, Odair Dos Santos; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Maia, José Guilherme Soares; Moraes, Denise Fernandes Coutinho

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) is the major vector of dengue and chikungunya fever. The lack of effective therapies and vaccines for these diseases highlights the need for alternative strategies to control the spread of virus. Therefore, this study investigated the larvicidal potential of essential oils from common plant species obtained from the Chapada das Mesas National Park, Brazil, against third instar A. aegypti larvae. The chemical composition of these oils was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The essential oils of Eugenia piauhiensis Vellaff., Myrcia erythroxylon O. Berg, Psidium myrsinites DC., and Siparuna camporum (Tul.) A. DC. were observed to be mainly composed of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons. The essential oil of Lippia gracilis Schauer was composed of oxygenated monoterpenes. Four of the five tested oils were effective against the A. aegypti larvae, with the lethal concentration (LC50) ranging from 230 to 292 mg/L after 24 h of exposure. Overall, this work demonstrated the possibility of developing larvicidal products against A. aegypti by using essential oils from the flora of the Brazilian Legal Amazon. This in turn demonstrates the potential of using natural resources for the control of disease vectors. PMID:25949264

  5. Chemical Composition and Larvicidal Activity of Essential Oils Extracted from Brazilian Legal Amazon Plants against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae

    Clarice Noleto Dias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae is the major vector of dengue and chikungunya fever. The lack of effective therapies and vaccines for these diseases highlights the need for alternative strategies to control the spread of virus. Therefore, this study investigated the larvicidal potential of essential oils from common plant species obtained from the Chapada das Mesas National Park, Brazil, against third instar A. aegypti larvae. The chemical composition of these oils was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The essential oils of Eugenia piauhiensis Vellaff., Myrcia erythroxylon O. Berg, Psidium myrsinites DC., and Siparuna camporum (Tul. A. DC. were observed to be mainly composed of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons. The essential oil of Lippia gracilis Schauer was composed of oxygenated monoterpenes. Four of the five tested oils were effective against the A. aegypti larvae, with the lethal concentration (LC50 ranging from 230 to 292 mg/L after 24 h of exposure. Overall, this work demonstrated the possibility of developing larvicidal products against A. aegypti by using essential oils from the flora of the Brazilian Legal Amazon. This in turn demonstrates the potential of using natural resources for the control of disease vectors.

  6. Fungitoxicity of some higher plants and synergistic activity of their essential oils against Sclerotium rolfsii sacc. causing foot-rot disease of barley.

    Singh, R K

    Twenty five plant species were screened for their volatile components against hyphal growth and sclerotia formation of Sclerotium rolfsii causing foot rot disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Leaves of Chenopodium ambrosioides (CA), Lippia alba (LA), Azadirachta indica (AI) and Eucalyptus globulus (EG) were found to be strongly toxic. Their volatile active factors were isolated in the form of essential oils which were tested for toxicity individually and in six combinations (1:1 v/v) viz. CA-LA, LA-AI, CA-AI, CA-EG, and EG-AI. The oil combinations were found to be more fungitoxic than the individual oils. The CA-LA, LA-AI, EG-AI, and CA-EG combinations exhibited a broad fnngitoxic spectrum while CA-AI, LA-EG combinations possessed a narrow range of toxicity. None of the six oil combinations showed phytotoxic behaviour on seed germination, seedling growth and general morphology of Hordeum vulgare. PMID:18697732

  7. 植物精油对烟草甲触杀、熏蒸和驱避作用研究%Contact and fumigant activities of plant essential oils against lasioderma serricorne ( coleptera : anobiidae)

    王秀芳; 任文伟; 王新伟; 周显升; 陈丹

    2011-01-01

    为筛选有效的贮烟用植物精油杀虫物质,利用点滴法,锥形瓶(密闭熏蒸)法,室内测定了9种植物精油(留兰香油、艾叶油、青蒿油、茶树油、丁香油、冬青油、薄荷油、桉叶油、百里香油)对烟草甲的触杀,熏蒸和驱避活性.结果表明:9种植物精油中表现触杀作用较好的是:丁香油、冬青油、茶树油、艾叶油、百里香油;表现熏蒸作用较好的是:留兰香油、茶树油、冬青油、丁香油;表现驱避作用最明显的是青蒿油,其次是艾叶油和丁香油.%Nine plant essential oils including spearmint oil, blumeawere oil, sweet wormwood herb oil, teatree oil, clove oil,wintergreen oil, mint oil, eucalyptus oil, and thyme oil were tested for their insecticidal activities againstlasioderma serricorne ( F.) larvae and adults by direct contact application and fumigation methods to screen more effective plant protective agents.Results showed that clove oil, wintergreen oil, teatree oil, blumeawere oil, and thyme oil were effective in contact activities while spearmint oil, teatree oil, wintergreen oil, and love oil were effective in fumigant activities.Sweet wormwood herb oil showed distinct repellent effects, followed by blumeawere oil and clove oil.

  8. Antimicrobial activity ofRosmarinus eriocalyx essential oil and polyphenols:An endemic medicinal plant from Algeria

    Fethi Benbelad; Abdelmounam Khadir; Mourad Bendahou; Fatima Zenati; Chafika Bellahsene; Alain Muselli; Jean Costa

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antimicrobial potency ofRosmarinus eriocalyx (R. eriocalyx) essential oil and total polyphenols against pathogenic microorganisms. Methods:Antimicrobial activity ofR. eriocalyx extracts was assessed by disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentrations determination. Essential oil obtained from endemic rosemary by hydrodistillation was analysed by gas chromatograph/retention index and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Results:An interesting antimicrobial activity was shown byR. eriocalyx extracts. Polyphenols, constituted mainly by flavonoids, were the most effective extract with very low minimum inhibitory concentrations values, ranged between 0.06 and 8.00 mg/mL, while essential oil was less efficient. It should be noted that antimicrobial activities of bothR. eriocalyx extracts were more directed against fungi and Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative ones, in which Staphylococcus aureus,Enterococcus faecalis, andCandida albicans were the most sensitive strains. Concerning chemical composition ofR. eriocalyx essential oil, camphor (37.8%), 1,8-cineole (17.4%), camphene (13.3%), andα-pinene (10.9%) were the major compounds. Conclusions: The findings of the present study indicate thatR. eriocalyx extracts possess significant bactericidal and fungicidal activities. Because of its richness in essential oil, and especially flavonoids,R. eriocalyx may be a source for effective and safe antimicrobial agents.

  9. In-vitro antibacterial activities of the essential oils of aromatic plants against Erwinia herbicola (Lohnis and pseudomonas putida (Kris Hamilton

    Pandey Abhay K.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine in vitro antibacterial activities of essential oils extracted from 53 aromatic plants of Gorakhpur Division (UP, INDIA for the control of two phytopathogenic bacteria namely Erwinia herbicola and Pseudomonas putida causing several post-harvest diseases in fruits and vegetables. Out of 53 oils screened, 8 oils such as Chenopodium ambrosioides, Citrus aurantium, Clausena pentaphylla, Hyptis suaveolens, Lippia alba, Mentha arvensis, Ocimum sanctum and Vitex negundo completely inhibited the growth of test bacteria. Furthermore MIC & MBC values of C. ambrosioides oil were least for Erw. herbicola (0.25 & 2.0 μl/ml and Ps. putida (0.12 & 1.0 μl/ml respectively than other 7 oils as well as Agromycin and Streptomycin drugs used in current study. GC and GC-MS analysis of Chenopodium oil revealed presence of 125 major and minor compounds, out of them, 14 compounds were recognized. The findings concluded that Chenopodium oil may be regarded as safe antibacterial agent for the management of post-harvest diseases of fruits and vegetables.

  10. Adsorption of paraquat on the physically activated bleaching earth waste from soybean oil processing plant.

    Tsai, W T; Chen, C H; Yang, J M

    2002-09-01

    A series of regeneration experiments with physical activation were carried out on bleaching earth waste from the soybean refining process in a rotary reactor. The influence of activation parameters on the spent clay by varying the holding time of 1 to approximately 4 hours and temperature of 700 to approximately 900 degrees C was determined. The variations of pore properties as well as the change of chemical characteristics in the resulting solids were also studied. Results showed that the resulting samples were type IV with hysteresis loops corresponding to type H3 from nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, indicating slit-shaped mesoporous characteristics. However, the regenerated clays had smaller surface areas (70 to approximately 117 m2/g) than that (245 m2/g) of fresh bleaching earth. Under the physical activation conditions investigated, the holding time of 1 hour and temperature of 700 degrees C were found to be optimal conditions for producing mesoporous clay with physical activation. The adsorption of paraquat on regenerated sample was also evaluated. The isotherm showed that the regenerated sample still had a high affinity for this herbicide. Thus, the regeneration of this agro-industrial waste is one option for utilizing the clay resource, and it may be used for water treatment applications to remove organic contaminants. PMID:12369762

  11. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils using food model media: efficacy, synergistic potential and interaction with food components

    Gutierrez, Jorge; Barry-Ryan, Catherine; Bourke, Paula

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the antimicrobial efficacy of plant essential oils (EOs) for control of Listeria spp. and spoilage bacteria using food model media based on lettuce, meat and milk. The EOs evaluated were lemon balm, marjoram, oregano and thyme and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined against Enterobacter spp., Listeria spp., Lactobacillus spp., and Pseudomonas spp. using the agar dilution method and/or the absorbance based microplate assay. MICs w...

  12. Surface structure and properties of plant seed oil bodies

    1992-01-01

    Storage triacylglycerols (TAG) in plant seeds are present in small discrete intracellular organelles called oil bodies. An oil body has a matrix of TAG, which is surrounded by phospholipids (PL) and alkaline proteins, termed oleosins. Oil bodies isolated from mature maize (Zea mays) embryos maintained their discreteness, but coalesced after treatment with trypsin but not with phospholipase A2 or C. Phospholipase A2 or C exerted its activity on oil bodies only after the exposed portion of oleo...

  13. In vitro total phenolics, flavonoids contents and antioxidant activity of essential oil, various organic extracts from the leaves of tropical medicinal plantTetrastigma from Sabah

    M Amzad Hossain; Muhammad Dawood Shah; Charles Gnanaraj; Muhammad Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To detect the in vitro total phenolics, flavonoids contents and antioxidant activity of essential oil, various organic extracts from the leaves of tropical medicinal plantTetrastigma from Sabah.Methods: The dry powder leaves ofTetrastigma were extracted with different organic solvent such as hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and aqueous methanol. The total phenolic and total flavonoids contents of the essential oil and various organic extracts such as hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and aqueous ethanol were determined by Folin–Ciocalteu method and the assayed antioxidant activity was determined in vitro models such as antioxidant capacity by radical scavenging activity using α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method.Results: The total phenolic contents of the essential oil and different extracts as gallic acid equivalents were found to be highest in methanol extract (386.22 mg/g) followed by ethyl acetate (190.89mg/g), chloroform (175.89 mg/g), hexane (173.44 mg/g), and butanol extract (131.72 mg/g) and the phenolic contents not detected in essential oil. The antioxidant capacity of the essential oil and different extracts as ascorbic acid standard was in the order of methanol extract > ethyl acetate extract >chloroform> butanol > hexane extract also the antioxidant activity was not detected in essential oil.Conclusions:The findings show that the extent of antioxidant activity of the essential oil and all extracts are in accordance with the amount of phenolics present in that extract. Leaves ofTetrastigma being rich in phenolics may provide a good source of antioxidant.

  14. Phytotoxic Activities of Mediterranean Essential Oils

    Luiz Fernando Rolim de Almeida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Twelve essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants were tested for their phytotoxic activity, at different doses, against the germination and the initial radicle growth of seeds of Raphanus sativus, Lactuca sativa and Lepidium sativum. The essential oils were obtained from Hyssopus officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Majorana hortensis, Melissa officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis and Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae, Verbena officinalis (Verbenaceae, Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare and Carum carvi (Apiaceae. The germination and radicle growth of tested seeds were affected in different ways by the oils. Thyme, balm, vervain and caraway essential oils were more active against both germination and radicle elongation.

  15. A study on the total phenols content and antioxidant activity of essential oil and different solvent extracts of endemic plant Merremia borneensis

    M. Amzad Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is planned to determine the antioxidant activity and total phenols content of the essential oil and different solvent extracts of the endemic plant Merremia borneensis. The antioxidant activities of the extracts were examined by three different methods, DPPH, β-carotene and reducing power assays. In all methods, aqueous ethanol extract exhibited a higher activity potential than that of other extracts (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol and the essential oil. As assumed, the amount of total phenolics was very high in this extract. Chloroform extract has been found to be rich in flavonoids. A positive result was observed between the antioxidant activity potential and total flavonoid levels of the extracts.

  16. Oil shale activities in China

    China has abundant oil shale resources, of the Early Silurian to Neogene age, the most important being the Tertiary period. The proved oil shale reserves in Fushun amount to 3.6 billion t, in Maoming 4.1 billion t. In Fushun, oil shale is produced by open-pit mining as a byproduct of coal, in Maoming it is also mined in open pits, but without coal. In China, scale oil has been produced from oil shale for 60 years. Annual production of crude shale oil amounts to about 200 000 t. The production costs of shale oil are lower than the price of crude petroleum on the world market. China has accumulated the experience and technologies of oil shale retorting. The Fushun type retort has been elaborated, in which the latent and sensible heat of shale coke is well utilized. But the capacity of such retort is relatively small, therefore it is suitable for use in small or medium oil plants. China has a policy of steadily developing shale oil industry. China is conducting oil shale research and developing oil shale processing technology. Much attention is being pay ed to the comprehensive utilization of oil shale, shale oil, and to environmental problems. In China, oil shale is mostly used for producing shale by retorting, attention will also be paid to direct combustion for power generation. Great achievements in oil shale research have been made in the eighties, and there will be a further development in the nineties. (author), 12 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Phytochemical Profile and Evaluation of the Biological Activities of Essential Oils Derived from the Greek Aromatic Plant Species Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Pimpinella anisum and Fortunella margarita

    Eleni Fitsiou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural products, known for their medicinal properties since antiquity, are continuously being studied for their biological properties. In the present study, we analyzed the composition of the volatile preparations of essential oils of the Greek plants Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil, Mentha spicata (spearmint, Pimpinella anisum (anise and Fortunella margarita (kumquat. GC/MS analyses revealed that the major components in the essential oil fractions, were carvone (85.4% in spearmint, methyl chavicol (74.9% in sweet basil, trans-anethole (88.1% in anise, and limonene (93.8% in kumquat. We further explored their biological potential by studying their antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. Only the essential oils from spearmint and sweet basil demonstrated cytotoxicity against common foodborne bacteria, while all preparations were active against the fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger. Antioxidant evaluation by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity assays revealed a variable degree of antioxidant potency. Finally, their antiproliferative potential was tested against a panel of human cancer cell lines and evaluated by using the sulforhodamine B (SRB assay. All essential oil preparations exhibited a variable degree of antiproliferative activity, depending on the cancer model used, with the most potent one being sweet basil against an in vitro model of human colon carcinoma.

  18. Phytochemical Profile and Evaluation of the Biological Activities of Essential Oils Derived from the Greek Aromatic Plant Species Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Pimpinella anisum and Fortunella margarita.

    Fitsiou, Eleni; Mitropoulou, Gregoria; Spyridopoulou, Katerina; Tiptiri-Kourpeti, Angeliki; Vamvakias, Manolis; Bardouki, Haido; Panayiotidis, Mihalis Ι; Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Chlichlia, Katerina; Pappa, Aglaia

    2016-01-01

    Natural products, known for their medicinal properties since antiquity, are continuously being studied for their biological properties. In the present study, we analyzed the composition of the volatile preparations of essential oils of the Greek plants Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil), Mentha spicata (spearmint), Pimpinella anisum (anise) and Fortunella margarita (kumquat). GC/MS analyses revealed that the major components in the essential oil fractions, were carvone (85.4%) in spearmint, methyl chavicol (74.9%) in sweet basil, trans-anethole (88.1%) in anise, and limonene (93.8%) in kumquat. We further explored their biological potential by studying their antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. Only the essential oils from spearmint and sweet basil demonstrated cytotoxicity against common foodborne bacteria, while all preparations were active against the fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger. Antioxidant evaluation by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity assays revealed a variable degree of antioxidant potency. Finally, their antiproliferative potential was tested against a panel of human cancer cell lines and evaluated by using the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. All essential oil preparations exhibited a variable degree of antiproliferative activity, depending on the cancer model used, with the most potent one being sweet basil against an in vitro model of human colon carcinoma. PMID:27537869

  19. Assessing the Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils from Brazilian Plants-Eremanthus erythropappus (Asteraceae), Plectrantuns barbatus, and P. amboinicus (Lamiaceae).

    Santos, Nara O Dos; Mariane, Bruna; Lago, João Henrique G; Sartorelli, Patricia; Rosa, Welton; Soares, Marisi G; da Silva, Adalberto M; Lorenzi, Harri; Vallim, Marcelo A; Pascon, Renata C

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils obtained from three Brazilian plant species-leaves and branches of Eremanthus erythropappus (Asteraceae), leaves of Plectranthus barbatus, and leaves of P. amboinicus (Lamiaceae)-were determined. Analysis by GC/MS and determination of Kovats indexes both indicated δ-elemene (leaves-42.61% and branches-23.41%) as well as (-)-α-bisabolol (leaves-24.80% and stem bark-66.16%) as major constituents of E. erythropappus essential oils. The main components of leaves of P. barbatus were identified as (Z)-caryophyllene (17.98%), germacrene D (17.35%), and viridiflorol (14.13%); whereas those of leaves of P. amboinicus were characterized as p-cymene (12.01%), γ-terpinene (14.74%), carvacrol (37.70%), and (Z)-caryophyllene (14.07%). The antimicrobial activity against yeasts and bacteria was assessed in broth microdilution assays to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) necessary to inhibit microbial growth. In addition, the crude oil of branches of E. erythropappus was subjected to chromatographic separation procedures to afford purified (-)-α-bisabolol. This compound displayed biological activity against pathogenic yeasts, thus suggesting that the antimicrobial effect observed with crude oils of E. erythropappus leaves and branches may be related to the occurrence of (-)-α-bisabolol as their main component. Our results showed that crude oils of Brazilian plants, specifically E. erythropappus, P. barbatus, and P. amboinicus and its components, could be used as a tool for the developing novel and more efficacious antimicrobial agents. PMID:25970043

  20. Manitoba oil activity review 2000

    A complete summary of oil activity in Manitoba for year 2000 was presented. This report includes statistical information on oil production, provincial revenues from the oil industry, royalties payable to freehold mineral owners, municipal tax assessments on oilfield equipment and pipelines, oil industry expenditures, geophysical programs, and oil price fluctuations. Manitoba's annual oil production was up about 7 per cent from 1999 production to 621,378 cubic metres. During year 2000, 68 wells were drilled in the province, an increase of 143 per cent from 1999. The value of oil produced was about $163.9 million, an increase of 72 per cent from 1999. tabs., figs

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde and Estragole Extracted from Plant Essential Oils against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit.

    Song, Yu-Rim; Choi, Min-Seon; Choi, Geun-Won; Park, Il-Kwon; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Antibacterial activity of plant essential oils (PEOs) originating from 49 plant species were tested against Psa by a vapor diffusion and a liquid culture assays. The five PEOs from Pimenta racemosa, P. dioica, Melaleuca linariifolia, M. cajuputii, and Cinnamomum cassia efficiently inhibited Psa growth by either assays. Among their major components, estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol showed significant antibacterial activity by only the liquid culture assay, while cinnamaldehyde exhibited antibacterial activity by both assays. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of estragole and cinnamaldehyde by the liquid culture assay were 1,250 and 2,500 ppm, respectively. The MIC of cinnamaldehyde by the vapor diffusion assay was 5,000 ppm. Based on the formation of clear zones or the decrease of optical density caused by these compounds, they might kill the bacterial cells and this feature might be useful for managing the bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. PMID:27493612

  2. 三种植物精油抑菌效果的研究%Study on Antimicrobial Activity of the Three Plant Essential Oils

    米热古丽·伊马木; 余雄; 阿依古丽; 龙宣杞; 王恬

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The antibacterial activities of lavender, rose and grape seed plant essential oils with different concentrations are studied in this paper. [ Method] Essential oils antibacterial activities were investigated by disc diffusion assay method . [ Result] Any concentration of lavender oil and rose oil could inhibit all bacterial species tested in our study, 3 % of lavender oil and rose oil showed the highest antibacterial activity, and activities of grape seed oil were relatively less than those of the others. The antibacterial activity on bacterial species tested in our study of 3% lavender essential oil were Staphylococcus aureus > Bacillus subtilis > Staphylicoccus albus > Lactobacillus plantarum > Escherichia coli > Enterococcus faecalis > Pediococcus pentosaceus, and 3% of rose oil essential oil were Enterococcus faecalis > Pediococcus pertosaceus > Staphylococcus aureus > Staphylicoccus albus > Lnctobacillus plantarum > Escherichia coli > Bacillus subtilis. [Conclusion]The study proved that 3% lavender oil and rose oils had strong antibacterial activities to the bacteria mentioned above and they can be used as natural antibacterial agents.%[目的]研究不同浓度的新疆薰衣草、玫瑰和葡萄籽精油对7种供试菌种的抑菌效果.[方法]采用滤纸片扩散法.[结果]不同浓度的薰衣草、玫瑰和葡萄籽精油对7种供试菌种具有一定的抑菌活性.3%的薰衣草和玫瑰精油对供试菌抑菌效果最好,其中3%薰衣草精油对7种供试菌种抑菌5种菌的活性强度为:金黄色葡萄球菌>枯草芽孢杆菌>白色葡萄球菌>植物乳杆菌>大肠杆菌>粪肠球菌>戊糖片球菌,3%玫瑰精油为:粪肠球菌>戊糖片球菌>金黄色葡萄球菌>白色葡萄球菌>植物乳杆菌>大肠杆菌>枯草芽孢杆菌.葡萄籽精油的抑菌效果相对其它两种精油较弱.[结论]薰衣草和玫瑰精油对上述细菌具有较强的抑菌效果,可作为天然抑菌剂.

  3. Lethal and Inhibitory Activities of Plant-Derived Essential Oils Against Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Biotype B in Tomato.

    Fanela, T L M; Baldin, E L L; Pannuti, L E R; Cruz, P L; Crotti, A E M; Takeara, R; Kato, M J

    2016-04-01

    The silverleaf whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is one of the most severe tomato pests in the world. The damage caused by this insect may compromise up to 100% of crop production, and management of this pest has relied on spraying of synthetic insecticides. However, due to the environmental issues associated with this practice, alternative methods such as the use of botanical pesticides are now used as a strategy of integrated pest management (IPM). We evaluated the effects of essential oils of five plant species on B. tabaci biotype B in tomato and demonstrate that the essential oils (0.5%) of Piper callosum (PC-EO), Adenocalymma alliaceum (AA-EO), Pelargonium graveolens (PG-EO), and Plectranthus neochilus (PN-EO) inhibit the settlement and oviposition of B. tabaci biotype B adults in tomato plants. In fumigation tests, A. alliaceum (AA-EO) at 0.4 μL/L of air after 72 h and 0.1 μL/L of air after 6 h was the most effective against nymphs and adults of B. tabaci biotype B, respectively. The major chemical constituents of PC-EO were identified as being safrole (29.3%), α-pinene (19.2%), and β-pinene (14.3%), whereas diallyl trisulfide (66.9%) and diallyl disulfide (23.3%) were the major compounds identified in AA-EO. This is the first report on the reduction of oviposition by the use of P. callosum (PC-EO) and A. alliaceum (AA-EO). In addition, the fumigant effect of A. alliaceum (AA-EO) on nymphs and adults has also been reported here for the first time. PMID:26712319

  4. Plant oils as feedstock alternatives to petroleum - A short survey of potential oil crop platforms.

    Carlsson, Anders S

    2009-06-01

    Our society is highly depending on petroleum for its activities. About 90% is used as an energy source for transportation and for generation of heat and electricity and the remaining as feedstocks in the chemical industry. However, petroleum is a finite source as well as causing several environmental problems such as rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. Petroleum therefore needs to be replaced by alternative and sustainable sources. Plant oils and oleochemicals derived from them represent such alternative sources, which can deliver a substantial part of what is needed to replace the petroleum used as feedstocks. Plant derived feedstock oils can be provided by two types of oil qualities, multi-purpose and technical oils. Multi-purpose oils represent oil qualities that contain common fatty acids and that can be used for both food and feedstock applications. Technical oil qualities contain unusual fatty acids with special properties gained from their unique molecular structure and these types of oils should only be used for feedstock applications. As a risk mitigation strategy in the selection of crops, technical oil qualities should therefore preferably be produced by oil crop platforms dedicated for industrial usage. This review presents a short survey of oil crop platforms to be considered for either multi-purpose or technical oils production. Included among the former platforms are some of the major oil crops in cultivation such as oil palm, soybean and rapeseed. Among the later are those that could be developed into dedicated industrial platforms such as crambe, flax, cotton and Brassica carinata. The survey finishes off by highlighting the potential of substantial increase in plant oil production by developing metabolic flux platforms, which are starch crops converted into oil crops. PMID:19375482

  5. Chemical variation of leaf essential oil at different stages of plant growth and in vitro antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris Lamiaceae, from Iran

    Azizollah Nezhadali; Marzyeh Nabavi; Majid Rajabian; Mina Akbarpour; Parastoo Pourali; Fatemeh Amini

    2014-01-01

    The essential oil components of the leaves were isolated by hydrodistillation from Thymus vulgaris (T.) Lamiaceae, at different stages of plant growth. The essential oils from T. Lamiaceae leaves were obtained in yields of 0.83–1.39% (w/w). The oils were studied by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and thirty-six components were identified in the oil. The major components in the leaf oils were: thymol (38.23–63.01%), o-cymene (5.56–15.47%), γ-terpinene (4.43–7.17%), borneol (1.72–6...

  6. Plant active components - a resource for antiparasitic agents?

    Anthony, Jean-Paul; Fyfe, Lorna; Smith, Huw

    2005-10-01

    Plant essential oils (and/or active components) can be used as alternatives or adjuncts to current antiparasitic therapies. Garlic oil has broad-spectrum activity against Trypanosoma, Plasmodium, Giardia and Leishmania, and Cochlospermum planchonii and Croton cajucara oils specifically inhibit Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania amazonensis, respectively. Some plant oils have immunomodulatory effects that could modify host-parasite immunobiology, and the lipid solubility of plant oils might offer alternative, transcutaneous delivery routes. The emergence of parasites resistant to current chemotherapies highlights the importance of plant essential oils as novel antiparasitic agents. PMID:16099722

  7. The role of supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation in altering the metabolite profile, essential oil content and composition, and free radical scavenging activities of Coleus forskohlii, an indigenous medicinal plant.

    Takshak, Swabha; Agrawal, S B

    2016-04-01

    The effects of supplemental ultraviolet-B (s-UV-B; 3.6 kJ m(-2) day(-1) above ambient) radiation were investigated on plant metabolite profile, essential oil content and composition, and free radical scavenging capacities of methanolic extracts of Coleus forskohlii (an indigenous medicinal plant) grown under field conditions. Essential oil was isolated using hydrodistillation technique while alterations in metabolite profile and oil composition were determined via gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Leaf and root methanolic extracts were investigated via various in vitro assays for their DPPH radical-, superoxide radical-, hydrogen peroxide-, hydroxyl radical-, and nitric oxide radical scavenging activities, ferrous ion chelating activity, and reducing power. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, anthocyanins, coumarins, flavonoids, glycosides, phenols, saponins, steroids, tannins, and terpenoids. Oil content was found to be reduced (by ∼7 %) in supplemental UV-B (s-UV-B) treated plants; the composition of the plant extracts as well as essential oil was also considerably altered. Methanolic extracts from treated plant organs showed more potency as free radical scavengers (their EC50 values being lower than their respective controls). Anomalies were observed in Fe(2+) chelating activity for both leaves and roots. The present study concludes that s-UV-B adversely affects oil content in C. forskohlii and also alters the composition and contents of metabolites in both plant extracts and oil. The results also denote that s-UV-B treated plant organs might be more effective in safeguarding against oxidative stress, though further studies are required to authenticate these findings. PMID:26681329

  8. Antifungal Effect of Plant Essential Oils on Controlling Phytophthora Species

    Amini, Jahanshir; Farhang, Vahid; Javadi, Taimoor; Nazemi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, antifungal activity of essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum and two fungicides Mancozeb and Metalaxyl-Mancozeb in six different concentrations were investigated for controlling three species of Phytophthora, including P. capsici, P. drechsleri and P. melonis on pepper, cucumber and melon under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, respectively. Under the in vitro condition, the median effective concen- tration (EC50) values (ppm) of plant essential oils and ...

  9. Antimicrobial activity of some Iranian medicinal plants

    Ghasemi Pirbalouti Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The major aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of the extracts of eight plant species which are endemic in Iran. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts of eight Iranian traditional plants, including Hypericum scabrum, Myrtus communis, Pistachia atlantica, Arnebia euchroma, Salvia hydrangea, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus daenensis and Kelussia odoratissima, were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Candida albicans by agar disc diffusion and serial dilution assays. Most of the extracts showed a relatively high antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria and fungi. Of the plants studied, the most active extracts were those obtained from the essential oils of M. communis and T. daenensis. The MIC values for active extract and essential oil ranged between 0.039 and 10 mg/ml. It can be said that the extract and essential oil of some medicinal plants could be used as natural antimicrobial agents in food preservation. .

  10. Chemical variation of leaf essential oil at different stages of plant growth and in vitro antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris Lamiaceae, from Iran

    Azizollah Nezhadali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil components of the leaves were isolated by hydrodistillation from Thymus vulgaris (T. Lamiaceae, at different stages of plant growth. The essential oils from T. Lamiaceae leaves were obtained in yields of 0.83–1.39% (w/w. The oils were studied by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS and thirty-six components were identified in the oil. The major components in the leaf oils were: thymol (38.23–63.01%, o-cymene (5.56–15.47%, γ-terpinene (4.43–7.17%, borneol (1.72–6.65%, 4-terpineol (1.24–5.16% and 1,8-cineole (0.09–1.54%. The results showed that the oil yield and the major constituents' percentage of the leaf were different at different stages of plant growth. The essential oils of T. Lamiaceae leaves were tested against five strains of Gram positive bacteria (g+ and five strains of Gram negative bacteria (g−. The average minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC of essential oils were determined using agar dilution method against the organisms by agar dilution method.

  11. Results of the application project ''Plant oil from Saxony-Anhalt''

    In the context of the search for new, futuristic tasks and markets, the cultivation and use of regenerative raw materials crystallized out in Saxony-Anhalt. The Plant Oil Saxony Anhalt company (IG Plant Oil LSA) was founded to coordinate the activities. This article introduces the structure and aims of this project. Also, the tasks and results of R + D work are introduced. This includes the areas of obtaining plant oils, engine and vehicle testing, the use of plant oil for drying the harvest and the use of the end products from obtaining the oil. (BWI)

  12. Manitoba 2004 oil activity review

    This paper presented data on oil and gas activities in Manitoba during 2004, the busiest year in Manitoba's oil patch since the mid 1980s. Increases in the leasing of Crown and freehold acreage were also noted, with accompanying increases in drilling activity for the latter part of 2004. Details of Crown land sales were presented, with a total of 43,725 hectares of crown oil and gas rights under lease. During 2004, over 15,000 hectares of Crown oil and gas leases were sold, the highest figures since 1997. More wells were licensed and drilled in 2004 than in any year since 1986. Overall drilling success rate was 96.7 per cent. Details of top drillers in Manitoba were presented, with drilling activity focused in Waskada and Daly fields and the Sinclair area. Oil production increased by 0.7 per cent, with 1474 wells in production. Daily oil production statistics were presented, with the total value of Manitoba's oil production being $196 million. Details of the top 5 producers were provided, in addition to details of horizontal well production. Recent developments in Sinclair Field, Pierson L. Amaranth MC 3b A Pool, Waskada L. Amaranth I Pool and Virden Lodgepole D Pool were reviewed. The Manitoba Drilling Incentive Program was discussed with reference to the following enhancements: new well incentives, horizontal well incentives; holiday oil volume accounts; and marginal well major workover programs. Various Oil and Gas Act amendments were reviewed. In addition, the Williston Basin Architecture and Hydrocarbon Potential Project was discussed. 3 figs

  13. Antiprotozoal Activity of Essential Oils

    William N. Setzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present scenario of protozoal infections, new drugs are urgently needed to treat and control infections such as malaria, sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and intestinal infections, which affect millions of people each year. In this review, we are focusing on articles related to antiprotozoal essential oils extracted from plants that have been published during the last 20 years. The data analyzed indicate that essential oils could be promising antiprotozoal agents, opening perspectives to the discovery of more effective drugs of vegetal origin for the treatment of diseases caused by protozoa.

  14. Combined effect of gamma irradiation and plant oils on the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Z)

    1- Susceptibility of Phthorimaea operculella to plant oil and gamma- irradiation. 2- Susceptibility of Phthorimaea operculella to powder of some plants and gamma irradiation.-selection of the suitable concentration of plant oils. - effect on male fertility. -effect on female fecundity. -effect on adult survival. 3- Separate and combined effects of radiation and plant oil on the male mating competitiveness using the sterile dose. 4- Separate and combined effects of radiation and plant oil on the male mating competitiveness using the sub sterile dose. 5- The effects of gamma- irradiation and plant oil on the pest when the potato tubers store for different periods. 6- Some biochemical studies. o Determine the adult total protein content of treated pupae. Determine the effect of plant oils and gamma- irradiation on the activity of some enzymes as proteinase, ATPase, keitenase cholinesterase.

  15. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF GINGER OIL AGAINST FOOD BORN PATHOGENS

    This study was carried out to investigate the antibacterial activity of ginger oil against Food Born pathogens and the effect of heating, microwave heating and gamma irradiation on microbiological quality and antibacterial activity of ginger oil. Growth and survival of A. hydrophila and L. monocytogenes in broth media and carrot juice with different concentrations of ginger oil was also studied. Gram-negative bacteria were more resistant than gram-positive bacteria. Heating at 800C for 10 min did not change the antibacterial activity of ginger oil, whereas heating at 1000C for 5 min and autoclaving at 1210C for 15 min caused slight reduction in antibacterial activity in most microorganisms tested. Heating by microwave of ginger oil destroyed its antibacterial activity against B. cereus although it still works against other microorganisms tested. The dose 6 kGy caused slight reduction in antibacterial activity of ginger oil, whereas the dose 10 kGy caused markedly reduction in antibacterial activity of ginger oil against most microorganisms tested. Ginger oil was more effective on L. monocytogenes as compared with its effect on A. hydrophila in tryptone soya broth at 40C or 250C. Supplementation of ginger oil with carrot juice was more effective on A. hydrophila and L. monocytogenes than in tryptone soya broth and this effect was increased with increasing the time of incubation and the concentration of ginger oil. These results support the notion that plant essential oils may have an important role as pharmaceuticals and food preservatives

  16. Toxicity and antifeedant activity of essential oils from three aromatic plants grown in Colombia against Euprosterna elaeasa and Acharia fusca (Lepidoptera:Limacodidae)

    Ricardo Hernández-Lambraño; Karina Caballero-Gallardo; Jesus Olivero-Verbel

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the biological effects of essential oils (EOs) isolated from Cymbopogon nardus, Cymbopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon martinii grown in Colombia against two Lepidoptera larvae, common pests in the oil palm. Methods:Specimens were captured in the field and the antifeedant activity and dermal contact lethality of EOs were measured against Acharia fusca and Euprosterna elaeasa (Lepidoptera:Limacodidae) at various concentrations 0.002-0.600 μL/cm2 and 0.002-8 μL/g, respectively. Results: All EOs exhibited strong antifeedant and toxicity activity toward Acharia fusca and Euprosterna elaeasa larvae. Cymbopogon martinii oil was the most active against both pest insect species, although all tested EOs were better than the synthetic repellent IR3535 on both insects. Conclusions:Colombian EOs have potential for integrated pest management programs in the oil palm industry.

  17. Toxicity and antifeedant activity of essential oils from three aromatic plants grown in Colombia against Euprosterna elaeasa and Acharia fusca(Lepidoptera:Limacodidae)

    Ricardo; Hernández-Lambrao; Karina; Caballero-Gallardo; Jesus; Olivero-Verbel

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the biological effects of essential oils(EOs) isolated from Cymbopogon iiardus,Cymbopogon Jlexuosus and Cvrnbopogon marlinii grown in Colombia against two Lepidoptera larvae,common pests in the oil palm.Methods:Specimens were captured in the field and the antifeedant activity and dermal contact lethality of EOs were measured against Acharia fusca and Euprosterna elaeasa(Lepidoptera:I.imacodidae) at various concentrations 0.002-0.600 μL/cm~3 and 0.002-8 μL/g,respectively.Results:All EOs exhibited strong antifeedant and toxicity activity toward Acharia fusca and Euprosterna elaeasa larvae.Cymbopogon marlinii oil was llie most active againsl both pest insect species,although all tested EOs were better than the synthetic;repellent IR535 on both insects.Conclusions:Colombian EOs have potential for integrated pest management programs in the oil palm industry.

  18. Antifungal Effect of Plant Essential Oils on Controlling Phytophthora Species.

    Amini, Jahanshir; Farhang, Vahid; Javadi, Taimoor; Nazemi, Javad

    2016-02-01

    In this study, antifungal activity of essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum and two fungicides Mancozeb and Metalaxyl-Mancozeb in six different concentrations were investigated for controlling three species of Phytophthora, including P. capsici, P. drechsleri and P. melonis on pepper, cucumber and melon under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, respectively. Under the in vitro condition, the median effective concen- tration (EC50) values (ppm) of plant essential oils and fungicides were measured. In greenhouse, soil infested with Phytophthora species was treated by adding 50 ml of essential oils and fungicides (100 ppm). Disease severity was determined after 28 days. Among two tested plant essential oils, C. citratus had the lowest EC50 values for inhibition of the mycelial growth of P. capsici (31.473), P. melonis (33.097) and P. drechsleri (69.112), respectively. The mean EC50 values for Metalaxyl-Mancozeb on these pathogens were 20.87, 20.06 and 17.70, respectively. Chemical analysis of plant essential oils by GC-MS showed that, among 42 compounds identified from C. citratus, two compounds β-geranial (α-citral) (39.16%) and z-citral (30.95%) were the most abundant. Under the greenhouse condition, Metalaxyl-Mancozeb caused the greatest reduction in disease severity, 84.2%, 86.8% and 92.1% on melon, cucumber, and pepper, respectively. The C. citratus essential oil reduced disease severity from 47.4% to 60.5% compared to the untreated control (p≤0.05). Essential oils of O. basilicum had the lowest effects on the pathogens under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. These results show that essential oils may contribute to the development of new antifungal agents to protect the crops from Phytophthora diseases. PMID:26889111

  19. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Sfeir, Julien; Lefrançois, Corinne; Baudoux, Dominique; Derbré, Séverine; Licznar, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of tonsillitis. The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of 18 essential oils chemotypes from aromatic medicinal plants against S. pyogenes. Antibacterial activity of essential oils was investigated using disc diffusion method. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of essential oils showing an important antibacterial activity was measured using broth dilution method. Out of 18 essential oils tested, 14 showed antibacterial activity against S. pyogenes. Among them Cinnamomum verum, Cymbopogon citratus, Thymus vulgaris CT thymol, Origanum compactum, and Satureja montana essential oils exhibited significant antibacterial activity. The in vitro results reported here suggest that, for patients suffering from bacterial throat infections, if aromatherapy is used, these essential oils, considered as potential antimicrobial agents, should be preferred. PMID:23662123

  20. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus pyogenes

    Julien Sfeir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of tonsillitis. The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of 18 essential oils chemotypes from aromatic medicinal plants against S. pyogenes. Antibacterial activity of essential oils was investigated using disc diffusion method. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of essential oils showing an important antibacterial activity was measured using broth dilution method. Out of 18 essential oils tested, 14 showed antibacterial activity against S. pyogenes. Among them Cinnamomum verum, Cymbopogon citratus, Thymus vulgaris CT thymol, Origanum compactum, and Satureja montana essential oils exhibited significant antibacterial activity. The in vitro results reported here suggest that, for patients suffering from bacterial throat infections, if aromatherapy is used, these essential oils, considered as potential antimicrobial agents, should be preferred.

  1. Anticonvulsant activity and toxicity of essential oil and methanolic extract of Zhumeria majdae Rech, a unique Iranian plant in mice.

    Mandegary, Ali; Sharififar, Fariba; Abdar, Maryam; Arab-Nozari, Milad

    2012-12-01

    Drug-resistance and adverse effects of current drugs are the most obstacles in the treatment of epilepsy. In a plan for finding new natural anticonvulsant agents, we studied the anticonvulsant effects of essential oil (ZMEO) and methanolic extract (ZMME) of Zhumeria majdae in pentylene tetrazol (PTZ) and maximal electro-shock (MES) models in mice. Mice received different doses of ZMEO and ZMME, 30 min before induction of chemical and electrical convulsions. Neurotoxicity (movement toxicity and sedation) was evaluated using rota-rod test. The mortality was determined after 24 h following injection of different doses of the ZMEO and ZMME. The obtained results show that ZMEO dose-dependently protected mice from tonic convulsions induced by PTZ and MES with effective doses (ED(50)) of 0.26 (0.13-0.39) and 0.27 (0.17-0.37) ml/kg respectively. Toxic doses (TD(50)) in rota-rod test for ZMEO was 0.55 (0.42-0.70) ml/kg. ZMME at dose of 2 g/kg decreased tonic convulsions as much as 40 %. For ZMEO, TD(50) of 0.55 (0.45-0.69) ml/kg was obtained. ZMME significantly decreased the walking time in rota-rod test at dose of 2 g/kg. Lethal dose (LD(50)) of ZMEO was determined as 2.35 (1.98-2.65) ml/kg. ZMME showed about 34 % death of the animals at dose 5 g/kg. The essential oil of Z. majdae could be a good candidate for further anticonvulsive studies. PMID:22890979

  2. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity of Ferula gummosa plant essential oil compared to NaOCl and CHX: a preliminary in vitro study

    Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Gholami, Ahmad; Mirhadi, Hosein; Saliminasab, Mina; Kazemi, Aboozar; Moein, Mahmood Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The usage of medicinal plants as natural antimicrobial agents has grown in many fields including dental medicine. The aim of this in vitro study was three-fold: (i) to determine the chemical compositions of the Ferula gummosa essential oil (FGEO), (ii) to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of the oil with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX), (iii) to assess the toxic behavior of FGEO in different concentrations compared to 5% NaOCl and 0.2% CHX. Materials and Method...

  3. Biological activity of selected essential oils of the Lamiaceae family

    Havlová, Kateřina

    2013-01-01

    The Lamiaceae family (the mints) is one of the large groups of plants. These herbs are important for their biological active substances, such as essential oils, tannins, bitter principles, etc. The properties of selected plants from this family are used in many industries. Many of them have been used long due to their medicinal properties and simultaneously they form an indispensable part of many products used for cosmetic purposes. The important ingredients are first of all essential oils, w...

  4. Characterization of Oxidative Stability of Fish Oil- and Plant Oil-Enriched Skimmed Milk

    Saga, Linda C.; Kristinova, Vera; Kirkhus, Bente;

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the oxidative stability of fish oil blended with crude plant oils rich in naturally occurring antioxidants, camelina oil and oat oil, respectively, in bulk and after supplementation of 1 wt% of oil blends to skimmed milk emulsions. Ability of crude...... oat oil and camelina oil to protect fish oil in bulk and as fish oil-enriched skimmed milk emulsions was evaluated. Results of oxidative stability of bulk oils and blends assessed by the Schaal oven weight gain test and by the rancimat method showed significant increase in oxidative stability when oat...... oil was added to fish oil in only 5 and 10 %, whereas no protective effect of camelina oil was observed when evaluated by these methods. Moreover, fish oil blended with oat oil conferred the lowest PV and lower amounts of volatile compounds during the storage period of 14 days at 4 °C. Surprisingly...

  5. GC/MS Evaluation and In Vitro Antioxidant Activity of Essential Oil and Solvent Extracts of an Endemic Plant Used as Folk Remedy in Turkey: Phlomis bourgaei Boiss.

    Cengiz Sarikurkcu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was outlined to examine the chemical composition of hydrodistilled essential oil and in vitro antioxidant potentials of the essential oil and different solvent extracts of endemic Phlomis bourgaei Boiss. used as folk remedy in Turkey. The chemical composition of the oil was analyzed by GC and GC-MS, and the predominant components in the oil were found to be β-caryophyllene (37.37%, (Z-β-farnesene (15.88%, and germacrene D (10.97%. Antioxidant potentials of the solvent extracts and the oil were determined by four testing systems including β-carotene/linoleic acid, DPPH, reducing power, and chelating effect. In β-carotene/linoleic acid assay, all extracts showed the inhibition of more than 50% at all concentrations. In DPPH, chelating effect, and reducing power test systems, the water extract with 88.68%, 77.45%, and 1.857 (absorbance at 700 nm, respectively, exhibited more excellent activity potential than other extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol and the essential oil at 1.0 mg/mL concentration. The amount of the total phenolics and flavonoids was the highest in this extract (139.50 ± 3.98 μg gallic acid equivalents (GAEs/mg extract and 22.71 ± 0.05 μg quercetin equivalents (QEs/mg extract.

  6. The antimicrobial activity of essential oils and extracts of some medicinal plants grown in Ash-shoubak region - South of Jordan.

    Abu-Darwish, Mohammad Sanad; Al-Ramamneh, Ezz Al-Dein Muhammed; Kyslychenko, Viktoria Sergeevna; Karpiuk, Uliana Vladimirovna

    2012-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of essential oils as well as chloroformic extracts of Thymus vulgaris, Thymus serpyllum, Salvia officinalis and Pimpinella anisum grown in Ash-shoubak region-south of Jordan and their possible individual phytochemical constituents was screened against pathogenic clinical and standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The bioassay employed was the agar well diffusion method. The essential oils and chloroformic extracts of T. vulgaris and T. serpyllum were the most effective against the tested strains of bacteria. Clinical and standard strains of S .aureus and P. aeruginosa were uninhibited by S. officinalis essential oils. P. aeruginosa tested strains were also resistant to P. anisum essential oils. For almost all bacterial strains, the highest antibacterial effect of oils was obtained with the highest tested dose (15 μl). Chlorformic extracts of S. officinalis showed small activity against standard and clinical E. coli strains and were not effective to inhibit strains of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Chloroformic extracts obtained from P. anisum and applied at 300 μg/cm(2) slightly inhibited E. coli, but moderately inhibited S. aureus. It is shown from the results that the antibacterial effects of the individual components varied depending upon their chemical structure, functional groups and configuration as well as doses used. This study showed the beneficial effects of the essential oils of T. serpyllum and T. vulgaris grown in Ash-shoubak in inhibiting the growth of microbes and the implications this could have in pharmacy and food technology. PMID:22186336

  7. Application of Volatile Antifungal Plant Essential Oils for Controlling Pepper Fruit Anthracnose by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    Jeum Kyu Hong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides has been destructive during pepper fruit production in outdoor fields in Korea. In vitro antifungal activities of 15 different plant essential oils or its components were evaluated during conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. In vitro conidial germination was most drastically inhibited by vapour treatments with carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral, p-cymene and linalool. Inhibition of the mycelial growth by indirect vapour treatment with essential oils was also demonstrated compared with untreated control. Carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol were among the most inhibitory plant essential oils by the indirect antifungal efficacies. Plant protection efficacies of the plant essential oils were demonstrated by reduced lesion diameter on the C. gloeosporioides-inoculated immature green pepper fruits compared to the inoculated control fruits without any plant essential oil treatment. In planta test showed that all plant essential oils tested in this study demonstrated plant protection efficacies against pepper fruit anthracnose with similar levels. Thus, application of different plant essential oils can be used for eco-friendly disease management of anthracnose during pepper fruit production.

  8. Application of Volatile Antifungal Plant Essential Oils for Controlling Pepper Fruit Anthracnose by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Yang, Hye Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yoon, Dong June; Sang, Mee Kyung; Jeun, Yong-Chull

    2015-09-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides has been destructive during pepper fruit production in outdoor fields in Korea. In vitro antifungal activities of 15 different plant essential oils or its components were evaluated during conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. In vitro conidial germination was most drastically inhibited by vapour treatments with carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral, p-cymene and linalool. Inhibition of the mycelial growth by indirect vapour treatment with essential oils was also demonstrated compared with untreated control. Carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol were among the most inhibitory plant essential oils by the indirect antifungal efficacies. Plant protection efficacies of the plant essential oils were demonstrated by reduced lesion diameter on the C. gloeosporioides-inoculated immature green pepper fruits compared to the inoculated control fruits without any plant essential oil treatment. In planta test showed that all plant essential oils tested in this study demonstrated plant protection efficacies against pepper fruit anthracnose with similar levels. Thus, application of different plant essential oils can be used for eco-friendly disease management of anthracnose during pepper fruit production. PMID:26361475

  9. Oil plants in Ethiopia, their taxonomy and agricultural significance

    Seegeler, C.J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The book is the fourth in a series on Ethiopian useful plants. It treats 12 oleiferous plants, both from a taxonomic and agricultural standpoint, and 11 in less detail. Special chapters are dedicated to the role of the oil plants in Ethiopian agriculture, and on preparation and use of vegetable oil

  10. The Oil-Fired MHD Power Plant

    It has been shown in an earlier paper what thermal efficiencies can be hoped for from a combined MHD-steam power station for different fuels, seeding, magnetic field strength, etc. However, a large pilot-plant is required to prove the intrinsic reliability of the MHD-power station, and also its probable competitiveness with a conventional power station. In this paper a possible pilot plant, a heavy-fuel-oil-fired MHD-steam power station is described. Residual fuel oil has been steadily increasing in significance in European power station practice over the past few decades. The MHD pilot plant must be as simple as possible in concept, so that the question of its reliability can be answered. The two essential unknowns are the designs of the MHD duct and the large superconducting magnets. Both preheating of the air above about 800°C and oxygen enrichment should be dispensed with for the time being. The combustion chamber should be constructed according to well-proved principles. It is proposed as well-that the seeding problem should be simply handled. In the example discussed, it seems possible that the specific plant costs of the whole power station will be kept to the level prevailing for steam power stations of the same output, while the thermal efficiency, after taking into account all the losses which can at the moment be assessed, is still 15% higher than that of the regular power station. If only the proposed pilot plant is considered, then the enormous development costs for the high temperature preheater and other costly items can be postponed until a later date, when the further development of the open cycle MHD-power station can be fully justified. (author)

  11. Encapsulation of plant oils in porous starch microspheres.

    Glenn, Gregory M; Klamczynski, Artur P; Woods, Delilah F; Chiou, BorSen; Orts, William J; Imam, Syed H

    2010-04-14

    Natural plant products such as essential oils have gained interest for use in pest control in place of synthetic pesticides because of their low environmental impact. Essential oils can be effective in controlling parasitic mites that infest honeybee colonies, but effective encapsulants are needed to provide a sustained and targeted delivery that minimizes the amount of active ingredient used. The present study reports the encapsulation of essential oils in porous microspheres that are within the size range of pollen grains and can be easily dispersed. The microspheres were made by pumping an 8% aqueous high-amylose starch gelatinous melt through an atomizing nozzle. The atomized starch droplets were air-classified into two fractions and collected in ethanol. The size range for each fraction was measured using a particle size analyzer. The mean particle size for the largest fraction was approximately 100 microm with a range from 5 microm to over 300 microm. Part of the reason for the large particle size was attributed to the merging of smaller particles that impinged upon each other before they solidified. The smaller fraction of spheres had a mean particle size of approximately 5 microm. The starch-based porous microspheres were loaded with 16.7% (w/w) essential oils including thymol (5-methyl-2-isopropylphenol), clove, origanum, and camphor white oil. The essential oils appeared to be largely sequestered within the pore structure, since the spheres remained a free-flowing powder and exhibited little if any agglomeration in spite of the high loading rate. Furthermore, SEM micrographs verified that the pore structure was stable, as evidenced by the persistence of pores in spheres that had first been loaded with essential oils and then had the oil removed by solvent extraction. Thermal gravimetric analyses were consistent with a loading rate at predicted levels. PMID:20196603

  12. Air pollution and oil-shale power plants

    Some basic data about the occurrence of pollutants in the flue gases of oil- shale power plants at the present time are given. Future prospects are discussed and specific requirements and recommendations concerning flue gas purification systems of oil-shale power plants are proposed. At the moment two different flue gas desulphurisation systems - a wet and dry one, are being designed, which should be a start up in introducing respective systems for oil-shale power plants. (author)

  13. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of Petroselinum crispum essential oil.

    Linde, G A; Gazim, Z C; Cardoso, B K; Jorge, L F; Tešević, V; Glamoćlija, J; Soković, M; Colauto, N B

    2016-01-01

    Parsley [Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Fuss] is regarded as an aromatic, culinary, and medicinal plant and is used in the cosmetic, food, and pharmaceutical industries. However, few studies with conflicting results have been conducted on the antimicrobial activity of parsley essential oil. In addition, there have been no reports of essential oil obtained from parsley aerial parts, except seeds, as an alternative natural antimicrobial agent. Also, microorganism resistance is still a challenge for health and food production. Based on the demand for natural products to control microorganisms, and the re-evaluation of potential medicinal plants for controlling diseases, the objective of this study was to determine the chemical composition and antibacterial and antifungal activities of parsley essential oil against foodborne diseases and opportunistic pathogens. Seven bacteria and eight fungi were tested. The essential oil major compounds were apiol, myristicin, and b-phellandrene. Parsley essential oil had bacteriostatic activity against all tested bacteria, mainly Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica, at similar or lower concentrations than at least one of the controls, and bactericidal activity against all tested bacteria, mainly S. aureus, at similar or lower concentrations than at least one of the controls. This essential oil also had fungistatic activity against all tested fungi, mainly, Penicillium ochrochloron and Trichoderma viride, at lower concentrations than the ketoconazole control and fungicidal activity against all tested fungi at higher concentrations than the controls. Parsley is used in cooking and medicine, and its essential oil is an effective antimicrobial agent. PMID:27525894

  14. Bio-oil fuelled diesel power plant; Biooeljyllae toimiva dieselvoimala

    Vuorinen, A. [Modigen Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The project mission is to develop a diesel power plant which is capable of using liquid bio-oils as the main fuel of the power plant. The applicable bio-oils are rape seed oils and pyrolysis oils. The project was started in 1994 by installing a 1.5 MW Vasa 4L32 engine in VTT Energy laboratory in Otaniemi. During 1995 the first tests with the rape seed oils were made. The tests show that the rape seed oil can be used in Vasa 32 engines without difficulties. In the second phase of the project during 1996 pyrolysis oil made of wood was tested. Finally a diesel power plant concept with integrated pyrolysis oil, electricity and heat production will be developed

  15. Bio-oil fueled diesel power plant; Biooeljyllae toimiva dieselvoimala

    Vuorinen, A. [Modigen Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    The project mission is to develop a diesel power plant which is capable of using liquid bio-oils as the main fuel of the power plant. The applicable bio-oils are rape seed oils and pyrolysis oils. The project was started in 1994 by installing a 1.5 MW Vasa 4L32 engine in VTT Energy laboratory in Otaniemi. During 1995 the first tests with the rape seed oils were made. The tests show that the rape seed oil can be used in Vasa 32 engines without difficulties. In the second phase of the project during 1996 and 1997 pyrolysis oil made of wood will be tested. Finally a diesel power plant concept with integrated pyrolysis oil, electricity and heat production will be developed

  16. Effect of clove oil on plant pathogenic bacteria and bacterial wilt of tomato and geranium

    We determined the antibacterial activity of clove oil against seven different genera of plant pathogenic bacteria including Gram-negative Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia carotovora pv. carotovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii...

  17. The Essential Oil Constituents of Zornia diphylla (L.) Pers, and Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Activities of the Oil

    Raveendrakurup Arunkumar, , and; Sadasivan Ajikumaran Nair; Koranappallil Bahuleyan Rameshkumar; Appian Subramoniam

    2014-01-01

    The essential oil obtained from hydrodistillation of Zornia diphylla (L.) Pers (whole plant) was analyzed by gas chromatographic techniques. Thirty seven compounds comprising 96.3% of the oil were identified by GC-MS. Monoterpenoids predominated the oil (83.9%) and the major constituent was sabinene (43.1%) followed by terpinene 4-ol (13.2%). The oil was screened for antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. Sabinene was tested for its anti-microbial property. The...

  18. Valorization of essential oils from Moroccan aromatic plants.

    Santana, Omar; Fe Andrés, Maria; Sanz, Jesús; Errahmani, Naima; Abdeslam, Lamiri; González-Coloma, Azucena

    2014-08-01

    The chemical composition and biological activity of cultivated and wild medicinal and aromatic plants from Morocco (Artemisia herba-alba, Lippia citriodora, Mentha pulegium, M. spicata, Myrtus communis, Rosmarinus officinalis, and Thymus satureioides) are described. The essential oils (EOs) of these species have been analyzed by GC-MS. The antifeedant, nematicidal and phytotoxic activities of the EOs were tested on insect pests (Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae and Rhopalosiphum padi), root-knot nematodes (Meloydogine javanica) and plants (Lactuca sativa, Lolium perenne and Lycopersicum esculentum). EOs from A. herba-alba, M. pulegium and R. officinalis were strong antifeedants against S. littoralis, M. persicae and R. padi. EOs from L. citriodora, M. spicata and T. satureioides showed high nematicidal activity. These biological effects are explained by the activity of the major EO components and/or synergistic effects. PMID:25233584

  19. Chemical composition of essential oils and in vitro antioxidant activity of fresh and dry leaves crude extracts of medicinal plant of Lactuca Sativa L. native to Sultanate of Oman

    Rahma Said Salim Al Nomaani; Mohammad Amzad Hossain; Afaf Mohammed Weli; Qasim Al-Riyami; Jamal Nasser Al-Sabahi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and analyse the chemical composition in the essential oils and free radical scavenging activity of different crude extracts from the fresh and dry leaves of vegetable plants of Lactuca sativa L. (L. sativa). Methods: The essential oils and volatile chemical constituents were isolated from the fresh and dry leaves of L. sativa (lettuce) grown in Sultanate of Oman by hydro distillation method. The antioxidant activity of the crude extracts was carried out by well established free radical scavenging activity (DPPH) method. Results: About 20 chemical compounds of different concentration representing 83.07% and 79.88% respectively were isolated and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy in the essential oils isolated from the fresh and dry leaves as α-pinene (5.11% and 4.05%), γ-cymene (2.07% and 1.92%), thymol (11.55%and 10.73%), durenol (52.00% and 49.79%), α-terpinene (1.66% and 1.34%), thymol acetate (0.99%and 0.67%), caryophyllene (2.11% and 1.98%), spathulenol (3.09% and 2.98%), camphene (4.11% and 3.65%), limonene (1.28% and 1.11%) representing these major chemical compounds. However, some other minor chemical constituents were also isolated and identified from the essential oil of lettuce including β-pinene, α-terpinolene, linalool, 4-terpineol, α-terpineol, o-methylthymol, L-alloaromadendrene and viridiflorene. Conclusions: The chemical constituents in the essential oils from the locally grown lettuce were identified in the following classes or groups of chemical compounds such as monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes volatile organic compounds and their oxygenated hydrocarbons. Therefore, the essential oils and the crude extracts from Omani vegetable species of lettuce are active candidates which would be used as antioxidant, antifungal or antimicrobial agents in new drugs preparation for therapy of infectious diseases.

  20. The plants with essence oil are potential radio protectors

    Azerbaijan flora is considered as one of the richest countries according to its genera and species abundance in all over the world. There are 4545 plant species in the Azerbaijan flora the native areal (origin) of many of which is just Azerbaijan. Majority of these plants is used in different fields of the national economy as useful plants. Existance of vertical zonality, abundance of the soil with balanced microelements and etc. Here resulted more amount of biologically active substances in the content of the plants that warrants to use them on the purpose of food, medicine and so on. Also while studying the collection dynamics of biologically active substances in their content quality and quantity index is usually high. Based on our 30 years experience it can be said with certainty: study of bioecological features of basil, melissa and tarragon spread in Azerbaijan Republic area, their use by their biochemical research on the purpose of quality increase of the extracts, ether and fat oils, medicaments of biologically active substances, alcohol-free drinks and food obtained of them is necessary, actual and important for the present time in tinned meat and fish production, in cosmetics and tooth pastes technology working out. In this article it is intended to prepare aerosol, consisted of essence oils and lipid mixtures, for respiratory system treatment in extreme conditions having radiation threat. Flavonoids, carotenoids and antocians along with the activeness of vitamin P and vitamin A possess antiradical, antioxidant, antimutagen, anticanceregenic and antivirus abilities. Besides the medicine they are applied in food, textile, tanning and other industries. The commenced research activities on the purpose of preparation of protector in solders food in an extremal condition, antidote and mithridate against heavy metals, also products against radioactive radiations, preparation of medical aerosols with fragrant aroma against injure of the respiratory system on the

  1. Chemical Composition, Antifungal and Insecticidal Activities of Hedychium Essential Oils

    Kanniah Rajasekaran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial properties of essential oils have been documented, and their use as “biocides” is gaining popularity. The aims of this study were to analyze the chemical composition and assess the biological activities of Hedychium essential oils. Oils from 19 Hedychium species and cultivars were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS techniques. The antifungal and insecticidal activities of these oils were tested against Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae, and C. gloeosporioides, and three insects, the azalea lace bug (Stephanitis pyrioides, the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti, and the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta. Hedychium oils were rich in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, especially 1,8-cineole (0.1%–42%, linalool (<0.1%–56%, a-pinene (3%–17%, b-pinene (4%–31%, and (E-nerolidol (0.1%–20%. Hedychium oils had no antifungal effect on C. gloeosporioides, C. fragariae, and C. acutatum, but most Hedychium oils effectively killed azalea lace bugs. The oils also show promise as an adult mosquito repellent, but they would make rather poor larvicides or adulticides for mosquito control. Hedychium oils acted either as a fire ant repellent or attractant, depending on plant genotype and oil concentration.

  2. Evaluation of the Leishmanicidal and Cytotoxic Potential of Essential Oils Derived from Ten Colombian Plants

    JF Sanchez-Suarez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The leishmanicidal and cytotoxic activity of ten essential oils obtained from ten plant specimens were evaluated.Methods: Essential oils were obtained by the steam distillation of plant leaves without any prior processing. Cytotoxicity was tested on J774 macrophages and leishmanicidal activity was assessed against four species of Leishmania associated with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Results: Seven essential oils exhibited activity against Leishmania parasites, five of which were toxic against J774 macrophages. Selectivity indices of >6 and 13 were calculated for the essential oils of Ocimum basilicum and Origanum vulgare, respectively.Conclusion: The essential oil of Ocimum basilicum was active against promastigotes of Leishmania and innocuous to J774 macrophages at concentrations up to 1600 µg/mL and should be further investi­gated for leishmanicidal activity in others in vitro and in vivo experimental models.

  3. Modelling of an oil refinery wastewater treatment plant.

    Pinzón Pardo, A L; Brdjanovic, D; Moussa, M S; López-Vázquez, C M; Meijer, S C F; Van Straten, H H A; Janssen, A J H; Amy, G; Van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2007-11-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) and Dutch calibration guidelines (STOWA) were evaluated in the modelling of an activated sludge system treating effluents from a large oil refinery. The plant was designed to remove suspended solids, organic matter and nitrogen from wastewater at an average water temperature of 34 degrees C. The plant consists of three tanks in series; the first two tanks operate in on-off aeration mode with pure oxygen for N-removal, whilst extra methanol is added for the denitrification, and the third tank is maintained as constantly aerobic. Calibration was performed based on a simplified influent characterisation and extra batch experiments (nitrification and denitrification). With the adjustment of only four parameters the model proved capable of describing the performance of the plant concerning both the liquid phase and the biomass. The model was further used to analyse possible modifications in the plant layout and optimize operational conditions in order to reduce operating costs. Modelling results indicated reduction in methanol dosage by implementing an idle time between aerobic and anoxic phases. In this way, surplus methanol was prevented from entering during the aerobic period. Moreover, simulations showed that the most cost-effective option regarding the denitrification process was a combined pre-post-denitrification scheme, without the need for enlarging existing basins. It can be concluded that although ASM3 and STOWA guidelines were originally developed for domestic wastewater application at a temperature range of 10 to 20 degrees C, they proved well capable of describing the performance of an oil refinery wastewater treatment plant operating at 34 degrees C. Moreover, the plant model proved useful for optimization of the plant performance regarding operational costs. PMID:18290537

  4. Antitumor Activity of Monoterpenes Found in Essential Oils

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex genetic disease that is a major public health problem worldwide, accounting for about 7 million deaths each year. Many anticancer drugs currently used clinically have been isolated from plant species or are based on such substances. Accumulating data has revealed anticancer activity in plant-derived monoterpenes. In this review the antitumor activity of 37 monoterpenes found in essential oils is discussed. Chemical structures, experimental models, and mechanisms of action ...

  5. In vitro antimicrobial properties of plant essential oils thymus vulgaris, cymbopogon citratus and laurus nobilis against five important foodborne pathogens

    Alessandra Farias Millezi; Danila Soares Caixeta; Diogo Francisco Rossoni; Maria das Graças Cardoso; Roberta Hilsdorf Piccoli

    2012-01-01

    Several essential oils of condiment and medicinal plants possess proven antimicrobial activity and are of important interest for the food industry. Therefore, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) of those oils should be determined for various bacteria. MIC varies according to the oil used, the major compounds, and the physiology of the bacterium under study. In the present study, the essential oils of the plants Thymus vulgaris (time), Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass) and Laurus nobili...

  6. Antiinflammatory activity of Piper longum fruit oil

    Kumar A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, antiinflammatory activity of the Piper longum dried fruit′s oil was studied in rats using the carrageenan-induced right hind paw edema method. The activity was compared with that of standard drug ibuprofen. The dried fruit′s oil inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. The results indicated that the dried fruit′s oil produced significant (p< 0.001 antiinflammatory activity when compared with the standard and untreated control.

  7. Antiprotozoal Activity of Essential Oils

    Lianet Monzote

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} In the present scenario of protozoal infections, new drugs are urgently needed to treat and control infections such as malaria, sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and intestinal infections, which affect millions of people each year. In this review, we are focusing on articles related to antiprotozoal essential oils extracted from plants that have been published during the last 20 years. The data analyzed indicate that essential oils could be promising antiprotozoal agents, opening perspectives to the discovery of more effective drugs of vegetal origin for the treatment of diseases caused by protozoa.

  8. Antimicrobial Effect of Escherichia Coli on Essential Oils Derived from Romanian Aromatic Plants

    Şandru Daniela Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the antimicrobial action of Escherichia coli ATCCR CRM-8739TM on the following essential oils: Teucrium marum, Pinus sylwestris, Thymus vulgaris, Salviae aethedaroleum, Cinnamomum aromaticum, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lavandula angustifolia, Abies alba, Zingiber officinale, Anethum graveolens, Coriandrum sativum, Origanum vulgare, extracted industrialy from romanian plants, using the diffusion disc method. The most intense activity was observed at the essential oil of Cinn...

  9. Modeling the kinetics of essential oil hydrodistillation from plant materials

    Milojević Svetomir Ž.; Radosavljević Dragana B.; Pavićević Vladimir P.; Pejanović Srđan; Veljković Vlada B.

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with modeling the kinetics of essential oils extraction from plant materials by water and steam distillation. The experimental data were obtained by studying the hydrodistillation kinetics of essential oil from juniper berries. The literature data on the kinetics of essential oils hydrodistillation from different plant materials were also included into the modeling. A physical model based on simultaneous washing and diffusion of essen...

  10. Bacterial structure and characterization of plant growth promoting and oil degrading bacteria from the rhizospheres of mangrove plants.

    do Carmo, Flávia Lima; dos Santos, Henrique Fragoso; Martins, Edir Ferreira; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2011-08-01

    Most oil from oceanic spills converges on coastal ecosystems, such as mangrove forests, which are threatened with worldwide disappearance. Particular bacteria that inhabit the rhizosphere of local plant species can stimulate plant development through various mechanisms; it would be advantageous if these would also be capable of degrading oil. Such bacteria may be important in the preservation or recuperation of mangrove forests impacted by oil spills. This study aimed to compare the bacterial structure, isolate and evaluate bacteria able to degrade oil and stimulate plant growth, from the rhizospheres of three mangrove plant species. These features are particularly important taking into account recent policies for mangrove bioreme-diation, implying that oil degradation as well as plant maintenance and health are key targets. Fifty-seven morphotypes were isolated from the mangrove rhizospheres on Bushneil-Haas (BH) medium supplemented with oil as the sole carbon source and tested for plant growth promotion. Of this strains, 60% potentially fixed nitrogen, 16% showed antimicrobial activity, 84% produced siderophores, 51% had the capacity to solubilize phosphate, and 33% produced the indole acetic acid hormone. Using gas chromatography, we evaluated the oil-degrading potential of ten selected strains that had different morphologies and showed Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) features. The ten tested strains showed a promising degradation profile for at least one compound present in the oil. Among degrader strains, 46% had promising PGPR potential, having at least three of the above capacities. These strains might be used as a consortium, allowing the concomitant degradation of oil and stimulation of mangrove plant survival and maintenance. PMID:21887634

  11. Antiaflatoxigenic activity of Carum copticum essential oil

    Kahkha, Mohammad Reza Rezaei; Amanloo, Saeed; Kaykhaii, Massoud

    2013-01-01

    Plants are unique sources of useful metabolites. Plant essential oils display a wide range of antimicrobial effects against various pathogens. Here, we studied the essential oil from the seeds of Carum copticum. We monitored aflatoxin by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results show that Carum copticum essential oil inhibits Asergillus parasiticus growth and prevents aflatoxin production. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is 127.5 μg mL−1 for aflatoxin B1 and 23.22 μg mL...

  12. Efficacy of plant essential oils for the repellents against chiggers (Leptotrombidium imphalum) vector of scrub typhus.

    Rodkvamtook, Wuttikon; Prasartvit, Anchana; Jatisatienr, Chaiwat; Jatisatienr, Araya; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2012-05-01

    Scrub typhus caused by the Orientia tsutsugamushi. Rodents, particularly rats, serve as principal reservoir hosts. Infection in man is transmitted by the, chigger bite. Repellents provide an effective agent of protecting individuals from chigger. In the present study 6 plant essential oils were tested for evaluation of their repellent activity against the chigger, Leptotrombidium imphalum. The results showed that Clove oil was significantly more effective than others with ED50 and EC50 of 0.420 mg and 2.3%, followed by Zingiber oil (8.458 mg and 42.3%), Vetiver oil (19.582 mg and 97.9%), Turmeric oil (24.343 mg and 121.7%), Orange oil (27.310 mg and 136.6%) and Boesenbergia oil (30.486 mg and 152.4%). These results suggested that Clove oil was the most efficient repellent against chigger which is the vector for scrub typhus. PMID:22934454

  13. Application of activated sludge to purify urban soils of Baku city from oil contamination

    Babaev, M. P.; Nadzhafova, S. I.; Ibragimov, A. G.

    2015-07-01

    A biopreparation inducing oil destruction and increasing the biological activity of soils was developed on the basis of activated sludge. Its oxidative activity towards hydrocarbons was studied. The application of this biopreparation to oil-contaminated soil increased the population density of microorganisms, including destroyers of hydrocarbons, and accelerated oil decomposition. The degree of destruction of oil and oil products in the case of a single treatment of the soil with this biopreparation comprised 30 to 50% within 60 days. The presence of cellulose-decomposing microorganisms in this biopreparation also favored an accelerated decomposition of plant substances, including plant litter and sawdust applied to the urban soils as an adsorbent.

  14. Plan for addressing issues relating to oil shale plant siting

    Noridin, J. S.; Donovan, R.; Trudell, L.; Dean, J.; Blevins, A.; Harrington, L. W.; James, R.; Berdan, G.

    1987-09-01

    The Western Research Institute plan for addressing oil shale plant siting methodology calls for identifying the available resources such as oil shale, water, topography and transportation, and human resources. Restrictions on development are addressed: land ownership, land use, water rights, environment, socioeconomics, culture, health and safety, and other institutional restrictions. Descriptions of the technologies for development of oil shale resources are included. The impacts of oil shale development on the environment, socioeconomic structure, water availability, and other conditions are discussed. Finally, the Western Research Institute plan proposes to integrate these topics to develop a flow chart for oil shale plant siting. Western Research Institute has (1) identified relative topics for shale oil plant siting, (2) surveyed both published and unpublished information, and (3) identified data gaps and research needs. 910 refs., 3 figs., 30 tabs.

  15. Essential Oils of Plants as Biocides against Microorganisms Isolated from Cuban and Argentine Documentary Heritage

    Sofía Borrego; Oderlaise Valdés; Isbel Vivar; Paola Lavin; Patricia Guiamet; Patricia Battistoni; Sandra Gómez de Saravia; Pedro Borges

    2012-01-01

    Natural products obtained from plants with biocidal activity represent an alternative and useful source in the control of biodeterioration of documentary heritage, without negative environmental and human impacts. In this work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of seven essential oils against microorganisms associated with the biodeterioration of documentary heritage. The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed using the agar diffusion m...

  16. Antiherpetic activity of the traditionally used complex essential oil Olbas.

    Heidary Navid, M; Reichling, J; Schnitzler, P

    2013-08-01

    Essential oils of medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel drugs for antiherpetic agents, since herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral drugs. The antiviral effect of Olbas, a traditionally used complex essential oil, and of cajuput oil, a major constitutent of Olbas, against HSV type 1 was examined. The antiviral activity of these essential oils was tested in vitro on monkey kidney cells using a plaque reduction assay. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Olbas and cajuput oil for herpes simplex virus plaque formation was determined at 1.8 microg/ml and 7.5 microg/ml, respectively. At noncytotoxic concentrations of these oils, plaque formation was significantly reduced by 99% for Olbas and 66% for cajuput oil. The selectivity index of 150 for Olbas against herpes simplex virus was superior to a rather low selectivity index for cajuput oil. The mode of antiviral action of these essential oils was assessed by time-on-addition assays. Herpesvirus was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with Olbas essential oil prior to infection of cells. These results indicate that Olbas affected the virus before adsorption, but not after penetration into the host cell, thus Olbas exerted a direct antiviral effect on HSV. A clearly time-dependent antiviral activity for Olbas and cajuput oil could be demonstrated. Considering the lipophilic nature of the Olbas complex essential oil mixture, which enables it to penetrate the skin, and a high selectivity index, Olbas might be suitable for topical treatment of herpetic infections. PMID:24020128

  17. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of essential oils isolated from Colombian plants Composição química e atividade antioxidante de óleos essenciais isolados de plantas da Colombia

    Jesús Olivero-Verbel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen essential oils from Colombian plants, obtained by hydrodistillation or microwave-assisted hydrodistillation of total plant, stem, leaves, and flowers were analyzed by gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques. Cytotoxicity of essential oils was assessed using the brine shrimp assay, and their antioxidant activities measuring their effects on the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances on rat liver microsomes induced by Fe2+/H2O2. Five oils showed high cytotoxicity (LC501000 µg/mL.Treze óleos essenciais de plantas da Colômbia, obtido por hidrodestilação ou hidrodestilação assistida por microondas, da planta inteira, caule, folhas e flores, foram analisados por técnicas de espectrometria de massa acoplada a cromatografia gasosa. Foi avaliada a citotoxicidade de óleos essenciais utilizando o ensaio com Artemia salina e suas atividades antioxidantes medindo seus efeitos sobre os níveis de substâncias reativas ao ácido tiobarbitúrico em microssomas de fígado de rato induzida por Fe2+/H2O2. Cinco óleos apresentaram alta citotoxicidade (LC501000 µg/mL.

  18. Comparison of rumen microbial inhibition resulting from various essential oils isolated from relatively unpalatable plant species.

    Oh, H K; Jones, M B; Longhurst, W M

    1968-01-01

    Essential oils were isolated from eight plant species which were relatively unpalatable to sheep and deer. The inhibitory potency of these essential oils upon sheep and deer rumen microorganisms was compared, in terms of total gas and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, by use of an anaerobic manometric technique. Inhibitory effects of oils from the eight plant species may be placed in four groups: (i) essential oils from vinegar weed (Trichostema lanceoletum) and California bay (Umbellularia californica) inhibited rumen microbial activity most; (ii) lesser inhibition was exhibited by rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana) oils, followed by (iii) blue-gum eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) oils; and (iv) oils from Douglas fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii) and Jerusalem oak (chenopodium botrys) resulted in the least inhibition, when 0.3 ml of each oil was used. A highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.98(**)) between total gas and VFA production indicated the validity of either method to measure the activity of rumen microorganisms. Our results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that the selectivity and voluntary consumption of ruminants are related to the characteristic odor and antibacterial action of essential oils isolated from relatively unpalatable plant species. PMID:5636470

  19. Modeling the kinetics of essential oil hydrodistillation from plant materials

    Milojević Svetomir Ž.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with modeling the kinetics of essential oils extraction from plant materials by water and steam distillation. The experimental data were obtained by studying the hydrodistillation kinetics of essential oil from juniper berries. The literature data on the kinetics of essential oils hydrodistillation from different plant materials were also included into the modeling. A physical model based on simultaneous washing and diffusion of essential oil from plant materials were developed to describe the kinetics of essential oils hydrodistillation, and two other simpler models were derived from this physical model assuming either instantaneous washing followed by diffusion or diffusion with no washing (i.e. the first-order kinetics. The main goal was to compare these models and suggest the optimum ones for water and steam distillation and for different plant materials. All three models described well the experimental kinetic data on water distillation irrespective of the type of distillation equipment and its scale, the type of plant materials and the operational conditions. The most applicable one is the model involving simultaneous washing and diffusion of the essential oil. However, this model was generally inapplicable for steam distillation of essential oils, except for juniper berries. For this hydrodistillation technique, the pseudo first-order model was shown to be the best one. In a few cases, a variation of the essential oil yield with time was observed to be sigmoidal and was modeled by the Boltzmann sigmoid function.

  20. Chemical composition, antimicrobial and insecticidal activities of the essential oils of Conyza linifolia and Chenopodium ambrosioides.

    Harraz, Fathalla M; Hammoda, Hala M; El Ghazouly, Maged G; Farag, Mohamed A; El-Aswad, Ahmed F; Bassam, Samar M

    2015-01-01

    Two essential oil-containing plants growing wildly in Egypt: Conyza linifolia (Willd.) Täckh. (Asteraceae) and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Chenopodiaceae) were subjected to essential oil analysis and biological investigation. The essential oils from both plants were prepared by hydrodistillation, and GC/MS was employed for volatiles profiling. This study is the first to perform GC/MS analysis of C. linifolia essential oil growing in Egypt. C. linifolia essential oil contained mainly sesquiterpenes, while that of C. ambrosioides was rich in monoterpenes. Ascaridole, previously identified as the major component of the latter, was found at much lower levels. In addition, the oils were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against two Gram positive and two Gram negative bacteria, and one fungus. The insecticidal activities of both oils, including mosquitocidal and pesticidal potentials, were also evaluated. The results of biological activities encourage further investigation of the two oils as antimicrobial and insecticidal agents of natural origin. PMID:25495783

  1. Radioactive Study of Malagasy medicinal plants and essential oil by gamma spectrometry

    Medicinal plants and essential oil derived from environmental samples such as plants, flowers, bushes or wild trees. Then, it is normal that naturally occuring radionuclides from Thorium and Uranium series on the one hand, K-40, a primordial radionuclide and common for all the samples on the other hand have been identified in such samples. Their activity are very low as it was expected to be, and Pb-210, one of the most radiotoxic among all natural radionuclides was not detected. Particularly, for essential oil, only the light radionuclide K-40 remains in the obtained oil, it is estimated that heavy metals such as Pb-212, identified in plants could not follow the vapour phase during the distillation process. However, detected counts per second of K-40 decrease from plants to oil which are then non-radioactive

  2. Antiphytoviral activity of essential oil from endemic species Teucrium arduini.

    Dunkić, Valerija; Bezić, Nada; Vuko, Elma

    2011-09-01

    The essential oil of Teucrium arduini L. was characterized by a high concentration of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (43.8%) of which beta-caryophyllene (19.9%) being the major compound, followed by oxygenated sesquiterpenes (19.6%) of which caryophyllene-oxide (14.6%) was dominant. When applied to plants of Chenopodium amaranticolor and Ch. quinoa for two successive days prior inoculation, the oil was effective in reducing lesion numbers on plants infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (25.7%) and Cucumber mosaic virus (21.9%). The main components of oil, beta-caryophyllene and caryophyllene oxide showed potent antiviral activity against CMV, but weak activity against TMV infection. PMID:21941920

  3. Plant oil effect on organism antioxidant protection of animals which were kept in the contaminated zone

    An experimental ground of a necessity of addition in ration of the population living on contaminated territories a plant oils with antioxidant action vitamins is given. Inclusion on plant oils in ration of rats (in particular irradiated) reduced their antioxidant status in spite of an increase in the tocopherol content and a rise in the β carotene level in animal liver. An opposite effect is achieved by using flax oil with vitamins of antioxidant effect (the level of lipid peroxidation products is reduced, catalase activity is normalised, the content of non enzymatic antioxidants is sharply increased). It decreases a radio sensitiveness of mammal organism. 15 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Shoreline processes, stranded oil and cleanup activities

    The initial character of stranded oil is a function of a large number of interactive variables that include the volume and character of the oil as it reaches the shore zone, nearshore oceanographic conditions at the time of stranding, and the character of the zone substrate. The fate of stranded oil on the shoreline is a function of weathering processes, natural removal, and of treatment activities. The presentation will review each of the major components described above and will present summary models to describe relative rates of natural change for selected scenarios. The role of coastal processes will be considered and used to illustrate how shoreline dynamics can remove or bury stranded oil. Examples will be provided to show some of the characteristic processes that cause changes in the distribution of stranded oil. Some shoreline treatment activities involve disturbance and relocation or removal of beach substrate; the effects of such activities will be illustrated and evaluated

  5. Plant Essential Oils Synergize and Antagonize Toxicity of Different Conventional Insecticides against Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Nicoletta Faraone; N Kirk Hillier; G Christopher Cutler

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived products can play an important role in pest management programs. Essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) and Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and their main constituents, linalool and thymol, respectively, were evaluated for insecticidal activity and synergistic action in combination with insecticides against green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). The essential oils and their main constituents exerted similar insecticidal activity when aphids wer...

  6. Plant Oils and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: The Role of Genetics.

    Smith, Caren E

    2012-09-01

    More than 25 years have passed since Ancel Keys and others observed that high intake of monounsaturated fatty acids, especially as supplied by plants (eg, olive oil) was associated with lower cardiovascular and overall mortality. About 15 years later, advances in genotyping technologies began to facilitate widespread study of relationships between dietary fats and genetic variants, illuminating the role of genetic variation in modulating human responses to fatty acids. More recently, microarray technologies evaluate the ways in which minor, bioactive compounds in plant oils (including olive, thyme, lemongrass, clove, eucalyptus, and others) alter gene expression to mediate anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Results from a range of diverse technologies and approaches are coalescing to improve understanding of the role of the genome in shaping our responses to plant oils, and to clarify the genetic mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective benefits we derive from a wide range of plant oil constituents. PMID:23001455

  7. Encapsulation of plant oils in porous starch microspheres

    Natural plant products such as essential oils have gained interest for use in pest control in place of synthetic pesticides because of their low environmental impact. Essential oils can be effective in controlling parasitic mites that infest honeybee colonies but effective encapsulants are needed to...

  8. Pilot plant for the radioactive decontamination of spent oils

    In this work the operation parameters obtained in the laboratory of oil storage are presented, as well as the operations which shape the pilot plant, the design criteria and the basic design of the core equipment of the developed process. Finally, the comparative results obtained the decontamination process of oil are given as well as laboratory scale. (Author)

  9. Merchant Plant activity

    Hepple, R.T. [Calpine Corp., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The changes facing the electric power industry in the 1990s have created opportunities to build new power plants. These plants are called Merchant Plants because they will not benefit from long-term power purchase agreements as in the past. Currently in Canada and the United States, about 45 per cent of the generating capacity is provided by plants that are more than 25 years old. These plants have high heat rates (i.e. the cost of generating one kWh of electricity is high) and are a major source of pollution. Nuclear power, which held much promise 30 years ago, has been rejected on both sides of the border, and coal-fired power plants are facing their own set of challenges. Modern natural gas-fired combined-cycle power plants appear to be a feasible, less polluting way to generate electricity. The per kilowatt cost of building a modern combined-cycle power plant averages about $500/kw which is far below the cost of coal or nuclear plants. Costing and siting new merchant plants, configuring a plant in such a way as to achieve the lowest-cost power generation were some of the topics that were highlighted.

  10. Merchant Plant activity

    The changes facing the electric power industry in the 1990s have created opportunities to build new power plants. These plants are called Merchant Plants because they will not benefit from long-term power purchase agreements as in the past. Currently in Canada and the United States, about 45 per cent of the generating capacity is provided by plants that are more than 25 years old. These plants have high heat rates (i.e. the cost of generating one kWh of electricity is high) and are a major source of pollution. Nuclear power, which held much promise 30 years ago, has been rejected on both sides of the border, and coal-fired power plants are facing their own set of challenges. Modern natural gas-fired combined-cycle power plants appear to be a feasible, less polluting way to generate electricity. The per kilowatt cost of building a modern combined-cycle power plant averages about $500/kw which is far below the cost of coal or nuclear plants. Costing and siting new merchant plants, configuring a plant in such a way as to achieve the lowest-cost power generation were some of the topics that were highlighted

  11. Biological Activities of the Essential Oil from Erigeron floribundus

    Riccardo Petrelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Erigeron floribundus (Asteraceae is an herbaceous plant widely used in Cameroonian traditional medicine to treat various diseases of microbial and non-microbial origin. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro biological activities displayed by the essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of E. floribundus, namely the antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities. Moreover, we investigated the inhibitory effects of E. floribundus essential oil on nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NadD, a promising new target for developing novel antibiotics, and Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for Human African trypanosomiasis. The essential oil composition was dominated by spathulenol (12.2%, caryophyllene oxide (12.4% and limonene (8.8%. The E. floribundus oil showed a good activity against Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone diameter, IZD of 14 mm, minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC of 512 µg/mL. Interestingly, it inhibited the NadD enzyme from S. aureus (IC50 of 98 µg/mL, with no effects on mammalian orthologue enzymes. In addition, T. brucei proliferation was inhibited with IC50 values of 33.5 µg/mL with the essential oil and 5.6 µg/mL with the active component limonene. The essential oil exhibited strong cytotoxicity on HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with an IC50 value of 14.89 µg/mL, and remarkable ferric reducing antioxidant power (tocopherol-equivalent antioxidant capacity, TEAC = 411.9 μmol·TE/g.

  12. Local anaesthetic activity of the essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia.

    Ghelardini, C; Galeotti, N; Salvatore, G; Mazzanti, G

    1999-12-01

    In this work we studied the local anaesthetic activity of the essential oil obtained from Lavandula angustifolia Mill., a medicinal plant traditionally used as an antispasmodic. We compared its activity to the essential oils obtained from two citrus fruits, Citrus reticulata Blanco and Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f., which have no medical uses. Biological tests were also performed on the major pure components of L. angustifolia Mill. essential oil: linalol and linalyl acetate as determined by GC and confirmed by GC-MS. Anaesthetic activity was evaluated in vivo in the rabbit conjunctival reflex test, and in vitro in a rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation. The essential oil of L. angustifolia, linalyl acetate and linanol (0.01-10 micrograms/ml) but not the oils of Citrus reticulata and Citrus limon were able to drastically reduce, in a dose-dependent manner, the electrically evoked contractions of rat phrenic-hemidiaphragm. In the rabbit conjunctival reflex test treatment with a solution of essential oil of L. angustifolia, as well as linalyl acetate and linalol (30-2500 micrograms/ml administered in the conjunctival sac) allow a dose-dependent increase in the number of stimuli necessary to provoke the reflex, thus confirming in vivo the local anaesthetic activity observed in vitro. PMID:10630108

  13. Endophytic fungi isolated from oil-seed crop Jatropha curcas produces oil and exhibit antifungal activity.

    Kumar, Susheel; Kaushik, Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L., a perennial plant grown in tropics and subtropics is popularly known for its potential as biofuel. The plant is reported to survive under varying environmental conditions having tolerance to stress and an ability to manage pest and diseases. The plant was explored for its endophytic fungi for use in crop protection. Endophytic fungi were isolated from leaf of Jatropha curcas, collected from New Delhi, India. Four isolates were identified as Colletotrichum truncatum, and other isolates were identified as Nigrospora oryzae, Fusarium proliferatum, Guignardia cammillae, Alternaria destruens, and Chaetomium sp. Dual plate culture bioassays and bioactivity assays of solvent extracts of fungal mycelia showed that isolates of Colletotrichum truncatum were effective against plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Isolate EF13 had highest activity against S. sclerotiorum. Extracts of active endophytic fungi were prepared and tested against S. sclerotiorum. Ethyl acetate and methanol extract of C. truncatum EF10 showed 71.7% and 70% growth inhibition, respectively. Hexane extracts of C. truncatum isolates EF9, EF10, and EF13 yielded oil and the oil from EF10 was similar to oil of the host plant, i.e., J. curcas. PMID:23409154

  14. Composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from aromatic plants used in Brazil Composição e atividade antimicrobiana de óleos essenciais de plantas aromáticas usadas no Brasil

    Adilson Sartoratto; Ana Lúcia M. Machado; Camila Delarmelina; Glyn Mara Figueira; Marta Cristina T. Duarte; Vera Lúcia G. Rehder

    2004-01-01

    Essential oils from aerial parts of Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, O. applii, Aloysia triphylla, Ocimum gratissimum, O. basilicum were obtained by steam destillation using a Clevenger-type system. These oils were screened for antibacterial and anti-Candida albicans activity using bioautographic method. Subsequently, minimal inhibitory concentration from oils was determined by microdilution method. Most essential oil studied were effective against Enterococcus ...

  15. Biological Activities and Composition of Ferulago carduchorum Essential Oil

    Fereshteh Golfakhrabadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ferulago carduchorum Boiss and Hausskn belongs to the Apiaceae family. This plant grows in west part of Iran that local people added it to dairy and oil ghee to delay expiration date and give them a pleasant taste. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant, antimicrobial, acetyl cholinesterase inhibition, cytotoxic, larvicidal activities and composition of essential oil of F. carduchorum.Methods: Acetyl cholinesterase (AChE inhibitory, larvicidal activities and chemical composition of essential oil of F. carduchorum were investigated. Besides, antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of essential oil were tested using DPPH, microdilution method and MTT assay, respectively.Results: The major components of essential oil were (z-β-ocimene (43.3%, α-pinene (18.23% and bornyl acetate (3.98%. Among 43 identified components, monoterpenes were the most compounds (84.63%. The essential oil had noticeable efficiency against Candida albicans (MIC= 2340 μg ml-1 and it was effective against Anophelesstephensi with LC50 and LC90 values of 12.78 and 47.43 ppm, respectively. The essential oil could inhibit AChE (IC50= 23.6 μl ml-1. The essential oil showed high cytotoxicity on T47D, HEP-G2 and HT-29 cell lines (IC50< 2 μg ml-1.Conclusion: The essential oil of F. carduchorum collected from west of Iran had anti-Candida, larvicidal and cytotoxicity effects and should be further investigated in others in vitro and in vivo experimental models.

  16. Essential Oils of Plants as Biocides against Microorganisms Isolated from Cuban and Argentine Documentary Heritage.

    Borrego, Sofía; Valdés, Oderlaise; Vivar, Isbel; Lavin, Paola; Guiamet, Patricia; Battistoni, Patricia; Gómez de Saravia, Sandra; Borges, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Natural products obtained from plants with biocidal activity represent an alternative and useful source in the control of biodeterioration of documentary heritage, without negative environmental and human impacts. In this work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of seven essential oils against microorganisms associated with the biodeterioration of documentary heritage. The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed using the agar diffusion method against 4 strains of fungi and 6 bacterial strains isolated from repositories air and documents of the National Archive of the Republic of Cuba and the Historical Archive of the Museum of La Plata, Argentina. Anise and garlic oils showed the best antifungal activity at all concentrations studied, while oregano oil not only was effective against fungi tested but also prevented sporulation of them all. Orange sweet and laurel oils were ineffective against fungi. Clove, garlic, and oregano oils showed the highest antibacterial activity at 25% against Enterobacter agglomerans and Streptomyces sp., while only clove and oregano oils were effective against Bacillus sp. at all concentrations studied. This study has an important implication for the possible use of the natural products from plants in the control of biodeterioration of documentary heritage. PMID:23762760

  17. Essential oil composition of some plants of family zygophyllaceae and euphorbiaceae

    Our objectives were to find out the chemical constituents of some selected plants of family Zygophyllaceae and Euphorbiaceae collected from Peshawar and Attock Hills during 2009, by GC/MS. The oil obtained from three analysed plants of family Zygophyllaceae showed that oxygenated monoterpenes were the highest (90.99%) in Tribulus terrestris, followed by Fagonia cretica (89.94%) and the lowest (36.01%) found in Peganum harmala. Peganum harmala had maximum esters (11.58%) followed by Tribulus terrestris (5.8%) and Fagonia cretica (5.5%). Monoterpenes hydrocarbons were the highest (1.22%) in Fagonia cretica followed by Peganum harmala and absent in Tribulus terrestris. Sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons were maximum (11.01%) in Peganum harmala and absent in Tribulus terrestris. The analysis of essential oils revealed that Fagonia cretica oils had 17 compounds that constituted 100% of the oil composition. Oxygenated monoterpenes (89.94%), were a major group of compounds. Peganum harmala oil had 18 compounds. There were 10 compounds in Tribulus terrestris oil that consisted 100% of the total oil composition. Eight compounds were identified in Chrozophora tinctoria oils giving complete oil composition. It had oxygenated monoterpenes (86.93%), constituting 2(4H) - Benzofuranone, 5, 6, 7, 7a tetrahydro-4, 4, 7a-trimethy (50.718%). Ricinus communis . oil had 8 compounds with 100% of the oil composition. The present study exhibited that phytochemical attributes and chemical composition of the studied plants have potential uses for food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry in future. Detailed research work on the antioxidant principles and biological activities of the studied plants is further recommended. (author)

  18. Plant Gall Activity.

    Kahn, Jacqueline Gage

    1997-01-01

    Describes a field trip to study, collect, and analyze galls in the field and classroom. Students hypothesize about factors that cause gall formation, develop a basic understanding of the complex and fragile interactions between plants and insects that result in the formation of plant galls, and determine the broader role of galls within the…

  19. Antinociceptive activity of Amazonian Copaiba oils.

    Gomes, Niele Matos; Rezende, Claudia Moraes; Fontes, Silvia Paredes; Matheus, Maria Eline; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2007-02-12

    Copaiba oil resins are extensively commercialized in Brazil as capsules or crude oil and used as anti-inflammatory and anti-septic. Comparative pharmacological studies between different species of Copaiba oils are scarce. In the present work we compared the antinociceptive activity of two Amazonian Copaiba oils (Copaifera multijuga Hayne and Copaifera reticulata Ducke, Fabaceae) administered by oral route using peripheral (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin), spinal (tail flick) and supra-spinal (hot plate) models. Results demonstrated that the Copaiba oils did not develop toxic effects. Doses ranging from 30 to 150 mg/kg were enough to significantly develop peripheral antinociceptive effect. All Copaiba oils demonstrate central activity but with less effect on supra-spinal regions of the brain. Administration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone completely inhibited the antinociceptive effect induced by both Copaiba oils. Our results indicate that Copaiba oils demonstrate peripheral and central antinociceptive effect. This new comprobate effect may be useful in the treatment of algesic disorders. PMID:17029841

  20. Hydrothermal liquefaction of aquatic plants to bio-oils

    Zhou, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S.; Fu, H.; Chen, J. [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of producing bio-oils from aquatic plants by hydrothermal liquefaction using 2 typical aquatic plants as feedstocks, notably Enteromorpha prolifera and water hyacinth which are typical aquatic plants found in seawater and freshwater. Bio-oil production from these 2 feedstocks was studied in a batch reactor at controlled temperatures under an initial partial pressure of 2.0 MPa N2. The effects of temperature and reaction time on the liquefaction products yields were also studied. GC-MS and elemental analysis were carried out to analyze the composition of bio-oils. The bio-oil produced from Enteromorpha prolifera contained mainly fatty acids, esters and quite a few heterocyclic compounds. Phenols and their derivatives were found to be the main compounds in bio-oils produced from water hyacinth. An elemental analysis revealed that bio-oils produced from the 2 aquatic plants have higher energy density. It was concluded that the use of aquatic plants as feedstock for liquid fuel can contribute to environmental protection and sustainable energy development by reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens.

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  2. Essential Oil and its Insecticidal Activity of Medicinal Aromatic Plant Vetiveria zizanioides (L. Against the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst

    S. Sujatha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil of Vetiver has versatile uses particularly as an inexpensive yet effective and eco-friendly tool to compact the essential role of biopesticides as well as insecticidal potentials. Insecticidal activity of the root extract of Vetiveria zizanioides (L. in Petroleum ether, Ethyl acetate, Acetone and methanol against XSM, SMC, SRS and JTC strains of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst was studied. The spongy root mass were dried, powdered and extracted by Steam distillation apparatus with the solvents below 60ºC. Experimental extracts were applied on larvae and adult beetles in film residue methods and mortality was recorded after 24 h. In larval bioassay the highest toxicity was recorded for petroleum ether extract (LD50 = 0.051 :g/cm2 in XSM strain and the low est toxicity has been observed in Methanol extract (LD50 =11.351:g/cm2 in SMC strain. In adults petroleum ether extract accessible highest toxicity (LD50 = 58.69 :g/cm2 in JTC 12 strain and the lowest toxicity (LD50 = 204.710 :g/cm2 also been observed for acetone extract in SRS strain. LD50, 95% confidence limits and regression equations are presented.

  3. Application of Volatile Antifungal Plant Essential Oils for Controlling Pepper Fruit Anthracnose by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Yang, Hye Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yoon, Dong June; Sang, Mee Kyung; Jeun, Yong-Chull

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides has been destructive during pepper fruit production in outdoor fields in Korea. In vitro antifungal activities of 15 different plant essential oils or its components were evaluated during conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. In vitro conidial germination was most drastically inhibited by vapour treatments with carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral, p-cymene and linalool. Inhibition of the mycelial ...

  4. Influence of ethereal oils extracted from Lamiaceae family plants on some pathogen microorganisms

    Klaus Anita S.; Beatović Damir V.; Nikšić Miomir P.; Jelačić Slavica Ć.; Nedović Viktor K.; Petrović Tanja S.

    2008-01-01

    As pathogen microorganisms can be found in different kinds of food, using of natural antimicrobial compounds, like ethereal oils, could be important in the preservation of different groceries. To evaluate antimicrobial activity of ethereal oils extracted from Lamiaceae family plants - Rosmarinus officinalis L., Thymus vulgaris L., Majorana hortensis M o e n c h, and Salvia officinalis L screening of their effects against food borne bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteu...

  5. Cytotoxic activity of the essential oil of Salvia verticillata L.

    N. Khosravi Dehaghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Salvia is one of the largest genera of  Lamiaceae family. Several species of this genus are perfumed and wealthy in essential oils. Some of them are used in industry, pharmacy and aromatherapy. They have shown different biological effects such as antibacterial and antioxidant activity. For the present study, Salvia verticillata L. was collected from Shahrestanak, Mazandaran, Iran. Hydrodistilled essential oil from the aerial parts of this plant was obtained with a Clevenger type  apparatus  and was analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Moreover, the cytotoxic activity of the essential oil was investigated against HT-29 (colon adenocarcinoma, Caco-2 (colorectal adenocarcinoma, T-47D (breast ductal carcinoma and NIH-3T3 (Swiss mouse embryo fibroblast cell lines by MTT test. 59 components were characterized from the oil with trans-caryophyllene (24.40%, β-phellandrene (9.08%, α-humulene (8.61%, bicyclogermacrene (6.32%, spathulenol (5.89% and β-pinene (5.00% as the major constituents. These compounds represented 97.67% of the essential oil and included monoterpenes (34.83% and sesquiterpens (61.84%. The results of the cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the essential oil of S. verticillata showed higher cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell line.

  6. Effects of birch tar oils on soil organisms and plants

    Hagner, Marleena; Pasanen, Tiina; Lindqvist, Bengt; Lindqvist, Isa; Tiilikkala, Kari; Penttinen, Olli-Pekka; Setala, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    The use of birch tar oil (BTO) is a new innovation in plant and animal protection working against various weeds, harmful insects and rodents. Due to its novelty as a biocide/repellent/plant protection product, no comprehensive information on the effects of BTO on non-target soil organisms is available. In this study we examined the impact of BTO on non-target soil organisms (enchytraeids, nematodes and soil microbes) and plants using laboratory toxicity tests and field experiments. In additio...

  7. 五种植物油及其二元混剂对嗜卷书虱的熏蒸活性%Fumigation Activities of Five Plant Oils and Their Binary Mixtures against Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel

    王争艳; 罗琼; 栗婷; 鲁玉杰

    2016-01-01

    Fumigant activities of five plant oils and their binary mixtures were tested against adults and eggs of Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel. After 24 h of exposure, garlic oil exhibited the highest fumigant toxicity against adults of L. bostrychophila, followed by eucalyptus, coriander, attarasa and clove oils, with LC50 values of 0.89, 8.31, 9.93, 19.05 and 36.80 µL/L air, respectively. The highest susceptibility of L. bostrychophila to plant oils was found in adults, followed by 6-, 4-and 2-day eggs. Binary mixtures of eucalyptus/coriander oil and eucalyptus/attarasa oil showed significant synergism with the co-toxicity factor of 126.76 and 135.24, respectively. When mixed at the ratio of 56:44 (v:v), the synergistic combination of eucalyptus/coriander oil possessed the highest toxicity index of 1.77 and the highest co-toxicity coefficient of 160.15. When mixed at the ratio of 50:50 (v:v), the synergistic combination of eucalyptus/attarasa oil possessed the highest toxicity index of 1.74 and the highest co-toxicity coefficient of 227.35.%本文测定了5种植物油及其混剂对嗜卷书虱成虫和卵的熏蒸活性。熏蒸24 h后,5种植物油对嗜卷书虱成虫的熏蒸活性由强到弱依次为大蒜油、桉树油、芫荽油、山苍子油和丁香油,其LC50分别为0.89、8.31、9.93、19.05和36.80µL/L空气。嗜卷书虱不同虫态(龄)对植物油熏蒸的敏感性由低到高依次为2日龄卵、4日龄卵、6日龄卵和成虫。桉树油和芫荽油,桉树油和山苍子油的二元混配对嗜卷书虱成虫表现出明显的熏蒸增效作用,其协同毒力指数分别为126.76和135.24。桉树油和芫荽油混合体积比为56:44时,其毒性比率(1.77)和共毒系数最高(160.15)。桉树油和山苍子油混合体积比为50:50时,其毒性比率(1.74)和共毒系数最高(227.35)。

  8. Utilization of oil shale in power plants and environmental protection

    Estonia n oil shale was first used as a power fuel in 1924 at the Tallinn Power Plant. The first pulverized oil-shale-fired steam boilers were used in the end of forties. A new period in the utilization of the Estonia n oil shale began in the years of 1959-1960, when the first power units were applied at the Baltic Thermal Power Plant. The project capacity of the plant was 1600 MW. In the 1973 the Estonia n thermal Power Plant was put into operation with the capacity of 1610 MW. The output of the electric power generated by oil.shale power plants in 1989, was 17.4 TWh; the maximum output was achieved in 1979 - 19.1 TWh. In 1989, the amount of the Estonia n oil shale consumed to generate electric power was equal to 22.3·106t. On burning oil shale the main atmospheric pollutants are the following: nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and fly ash. The concentration of nitrogen oxide in the oil-shale flue gas leaving the chimney, expressed as nitrogen dioxide by an excess air factor 1.5, is in the range of 0.15-0.20 g/m3. The total emission of nitrogen oxide into the atmosphere is approximately 15-20 thousand ton per year. the concentration of sulphur dioxide in the oil-shale flue gas leaving the boiler by an excess air factor 1.5 in the range of 1.0-1.8 g/m3. the total emission of sulphur dioxide into atmosphere is in range of 140-160 thousand per year. As the oil-shale ash contains a large amount of the components capable of combining with sulphur in furnace and in boiler gas passes, the sulphur binding effect from ash is high, and it is in the range of 0.75-0.85. The boilers in oil-shale power plants are equipped with two-stage ash separation systems: cyclone and electrostatic al precipitators. The fly ash concentration in oil shale flue gas after electrostatic al precipitators by excess air factor 1.5 is 1-2 g/m3. (author)

  9. Effects of Different Plant Oils on the Enzyme Activity and Microbial Activity in vitro%不同植物油脂对体外培养条件下培养液酶活及微生物活力的影响

    王曙; 王梦芝; 卢占军; 董淑红; 张鑫; 王洪荣

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this paper were to determine the effects of different plant oils on the enzyme activity and microbial activity in vitro. Three goats with permanent cannulas were used in a simple factor design. The control group was supplemented with no oil and the experimental groups were supplemented with peanut oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, and soybean oil, respectively. The results showed that the activity of lactate dehy-drogenase (LDH), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase ( GOT), and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase ( GPT) were highest in rapeseed oil group and that in soybean oil group, corn oil group and peanut oil group fell in turn, the activity of LDH, GOT and GPT in the experimental groups were significant higher than that in the control group except for peanut oil group (P 0. 05). However, microbial DNA was generally higher in soybean oil group and corn oil group at all sampling time points, and the changing trend along with time differed from each other. It was further observed that, protozoa to bacteria ratios were much lower in soybean and corn oil. In conclusion, different oils had different effects on microflora and activity of ruminal microorganisms in vitro, while soybean oil and corn oil showed much better effects on promoting microbial activity than the others. [Chinese Journal of Animal Nutrition, 2011, 23(8):1309-1316]%本文旨在研究不同饱和程度的植物油脂对体外培养条件下培养液酶活及微生物活力的影响.试验以3头装有瘤胃瘘管的山羊提供瘤胃液,采用单因子试验设计,对照组不加油脂,试验组分别添加花生油、菜籽油、玉米油和豆油进行体外培养.结果表明:乳酸脱氢酶、谷草转氨酶、谷丙转氨酶3种酶的活性都以菜籽油组最高,豆油组、玉米油组、花生油组依次降低,除花生油组外,其他试验组均显著高于对照组(P<0.05),且试验组间存在显著差异(P<0.05).总脱氢酶以豆油组最高,显著高于对照组(P<0

  10. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils against human pathogenic bacteria

    Sokovic, M.; Marin, P.D.; Brkic, D.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from 10 aromatic plants Matricaria chamommilla, Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Lavandula angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum, Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis, Citrus limon and C. aurantium have been determined. Anti

  11. Oxidative processes in power plant oils

    This paper analyzes the chemical properties differences between thermal-oxidation and radioactive-oxidation in turbine oils in order to estimate the oils' Service Life. The oils were Turbine R type, provided by Repsol-YPF with only few additives such as: anti rust, antioxidant, anticorrosion and without viscosity index improvers. The oils were ISO 32 and ISO 68 grade -with viscosity index 95- and API (American Petroleum Institute) group I, due to its viscosity index (95), the percent of paraffinic component (0.03%). Different samples from the heavy water main pumps were collected with different service times and radiation fields during an Embalse NPP's outage. For comparison purposes oils from feedwater pumps systems that convey light water to the steam generators in the Turbine building -without radiation- were obtained. The properties studied by ASTM standards were: colour (visual inspection), Viscosity Index VI (ASTM D227/93), viscosity at 40 C degrees (ASTM D445/96) and Total Acid Number, TAN (ASTM D974-97). Oxidative degradation of base oils could be described by two successive mechanisms that allow the definition of two stages: Primary and Secondary Oxidation. Primary oxidation begins with the thermal generation of alkylation's reactions and acid products formation. Radiation damage operates by two mechanisms: scission and cross-linking. The first one generates free radicals of low molecular weight while the other one can build-up complex molecular networks with high or low solubility in the base oil. Moreover, radiation damage destroys additives molecules and generates colour centres different from oxidative colour modification. Due to scission and cross-linking alkyl group substitution in the aromatic rings are formed. Then, radiation acts as a precursor of Primary Oxidation. Both, thermal and radioactive, damage mechanisms can act simultaneously making the isolated analysis for each one very difficult. To manage it, a Relative Damage Index (RDI) has been

  12. An Integrated Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Divergent Evolutionary Pattern of Oil Biosynthesis in High- and Low-Oil Plants

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Shi-Bo; Li, Qi-Gang; Song, Jian; Hao, Yu-Qi; Zhou, Ling; Zheng, Huan-Quan; Jim M Dunwell; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Seed oils provide a renewable source of food, biofuel and industrial raw materials that is important for humans. Although many genes and pathways for acyl-lipid metabolism have been identified, little is known about whether there is a specific mechanism for high-oil content in high-oil plants. Based on the distinct differences in seed oil content between four high-oil dicots (20~50%) and three low-oil grasses (

  13. Vegetable oils and protection of plants

    Charlemagne, D. [Societe Robbe, 60 - Compiegne (France)

    1995-09-01

    Vegetable oils are biodegradable, inoffensive for environment and people and flammable. They have a lot of assets to be marketed as additives for weed killers, insecticides and rat-killing. They can be used too as pulverization vectors in insecticides treatments. (O.L.).

  14. Corps makes plant improvements to prevent release of oil into tailrace

    Like most hydroelectric plants designed in the 1960s, the US Army Corps of Engineers 160-MW Truman Power Plant, near Warsaw, MO, was built with a station drainage sump that collects all drainage from the plant. As designed, float switches activate sump pumps that discharge liquids directly into the tailrace. Because the system cannot distinguish between types of liquids, in the event of an oil leak in the hydroelectric plant, oil in the sump could be released into the tailrace. This situation was not environmentally sound and needed to be corrected. The sump system was identified as a problem area in a December 1991 assessment of the plant by a district team that conducted record searches, interviews, and site surveys to determine any areas of environmental non-compliance. To eliminate the potential problem posed by the Truman Power Plant's sump system, the Corps took the initiative to make several improvements. For containment in the event of a spill, the distict installed an oil skimmer for the sump (see the photographs), similar to one used at the Corps Clarence Cannon Dam, also in Missouri. The district also plugged a number of floor drains, and installed speed bumps, similar to those used in parking lots to slow traffic, for spill containment. Additionally, a cartmounted skimmer is available to serve as a mobile spill control unit for spills elsewhere in the plant. Long-term plans call for oil detectors that will automatically turn off the sump's pumps and turn on the skimmer

  15. Database of the Amazon aromatic plants and their essential oils

    José Guilherme S. Maia; Eloísa Helena A. Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The aromatic flora of the Amazon has been inventoried for 30 years. In this sense, were made over 500 field trips to collect over 2500 plants and to obtain more than 2000 essential oils and aroma concentrates, all of them submitted to GC and GC-MS. This work led to the creation of a database for the aromatic plants of the Amazon, which catalogs general information about 1250 specimens. The database has allowed the publication of the chemical composition of the oils and aromas of more than 350...

  16. Interaction hybrid × planting date for oil yield in sunflower

    Balalić Igor M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the effects of hybrids and planting dates as well as their interaction on oil yield in sunflower for three-year experiment (2005, 2006, 2007. Three sunflower hybrids (Miro, Rimi and Pobednik and eight planting dates were included in the experiment. AMMI (Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction analysis is one of the mainly used multiplicative models, which evaluates main effects and also interaction. The interaction was detected by using AMMI1 biplot. Oil yield was predominantly influenced by the year of growing (58.9%, then by planting date (12.9% and by hybrid (10.7%. All interactions were significant as well. AMMI ANOVA showed high significance of both IPC1 and IPC2. The contribution of IPC1 was 77.5%. Hybrids Miro and Pobednik showed no significant differences in the mean values, which were higher than average. However, the hybrid Miro showed the highest stability for oil yield. Hybrid Rimi, with the lowest mean value, was the most unstable for the examined character. Oil yield was higher in earlier than in later planting dates. Graphical presentation of AMMI1 in the form of biplot could facilitate the choice of stable hybrids and planting dates for desired characters in sunflower.

  17. IN VITRO ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS ON GROWTH OF PHYTOPATHOGENIC FUNGI

    Jasenka Ćosić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Eleven essential oils (clove, rosemary, cinnamon leaf, sage, scots pine, neroli, peppermint, aniseed, caraway, lavander, common thyme were tested for in vitro antifungal activity on twelve plant pathogenic fungi (Fusarium graminearum, F. verticillioides, F. subglutinans, F. oxysporum, F. avenaceum, Diaporthe helianthi, Diaporthe phaseolorum var. caulivora, Phomopsis longicolla, P. viticola, Helminthosporium sativum, Colletotrichum coccodes, Thanatephorus cucumeris. The results indicated that all oils except scots pine and neroli had antifungal activity against some or all tested fungi. The best antifungal activity had common thyme, cinnamon leaf, clove and aniseed oils. When compared to control, scots pine, neroli and sage oils stimulated mycelium growth of some investigated fungi.

  18. Composition, mosquito larvicidal, biting deterrent and antifungal activity of essential oils of different plant parts of Cupressus arizonica var. glabra (Carolina Sapphire)

    Essential oils obtained from the hydrodistillation of female cones (FC), male cones (MC), needles-twigs (NT) and wood barks (WB) of ‘Carolina Sapphire’ [Cupressus arizonica var glabra (Sudw.) Little] were analyzed simultaneously by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC...

  19. Using Soxhlet Ethanol Extraction to Produce and Test Plant Material (Essential Oils for Their Antimicrobial Properties

    James Redfern

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available As the issue of antimicrobial resistance continues to grow, there is a renewed interest in deriving antimicrobial products from natural compounds, particularly extracts from plant materials. This paper describes how essential oil can be extracted from the common herb, thyme (Thymus vulgaris in the classroom. Subsequently, the extract can be tested for its antimicrobial activity. A number of variables are suggested.

  20. Plant Essential Oils Synergize and Antagonize Toxicity of Different Conventional Insecticides against Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae.

    Nicoletta Faraone

    Full Text Available Plant-derived products can play an important role in pest management programs. Essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia (lavender and Thymus vulgaris (thyme and their main constituents, linalool and thymol, respectively, were evaluated for insecticidal activity and synergistic action in combination with insecticides against green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer (Hemiptera: Aphididae. The essential oils and their main constituents exerted similar insecticidal activity when aphids were exposed by direct sprays, but were non-toxic by exposure to treated leaf discs. In synergism experiments, the toxicity of imidacloprid was synergized 16- to 20-fold by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, but far less synergism occurred with linalool and thymol, indicating that secondary constituents of the oils were probably responsible for the observed synergism. In contrast to results with imidacloprid, the insecticidal activity of spirotetramat was antagonized by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, and linalool and thymol. Our results demonstrate the potential of plant essential oils as synergists of insecticides, but show that antagonistic action against certain insecticides may occur.

  1. Antifertility activity of medicinal plants.

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of medicinal plants used as antifertility agents in females throughout the world by various tribes and ethnic groups. We undertook an extensive bibliographic review by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, and further consulting well accepted worldwide scientific databases. We performed CENTRAL, Embase, and PubMed searches using terms such as "antifertility", "anti-implantation", "antiovulation", and "antispermatogenic" activity of plants. Plants, including their parts and extracts, that have traditionally been used to facilitate antifertility have been considered as antifertility agents. In this paper, various medicinal plants have been reviewed for thorough studies such as Polygonum hydropiper Linn, Citrus limonum, Piper nigrum Linn, Juniperis communis, Achyanthes aspera, Azadirachta indica, Tinospora cordifolia, and Barleria prionitis. Many of these medicinal plants appear to act through an antizygotic mechanism. This review clearly demonstrates that it is time to expand upon experimental studies to source new potential chemical constituents from medicinal plants; plant extracts and their active constituents should be further investigated for their mechanisms. This review creates a solid foundation upon which to further study the efficacy of plants that are both currently used by women as traditional antifertility medicines, but also could be efficacious as an antifertility agent with additional research and study. PMID:25921562

  2. Lantana montevidensis Essential Oil: Chemical Composition and Mosquito Repellent Activity against Aedes aegypti

    The essential oil (EO) of Lantana montevidensis (Spreng.) Briq. (L. sellowiana Link & Otto) was investigated for its chemical composition and mosquito repellent activity. The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of aerial plant parts was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major constituents we...

  3. Chemical composition and biological activity of the essential oil of rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) smith

    Technical Abstract: The aim was designed to study the biological activity and chemical composition of essential oil of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith. The essential oil extracted from the rhizome of the plant was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and its major components amounting t...

  4. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils from the Aerial Parts of Salvia pinnata L.

    Nehir Unver Somer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Salvia pinnata L. (Labiatae, collected during flowering and fruiting periods, were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. 37 compounds were identified representing 96.1 % of the essential oil obtained from the plant material collected during flowering period. 30 compounds were detected constituting 94.7 % of the essential oil of the plant material collected in fruiting period. The main components of the essential oils were characterized as bornyl acetate, camphor, camphene, bornyl formate, a -pinene and borneol. The oils were screened for antimicrobial activity by the micro-dilution assay against standard bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and yeast (Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Both of the oils showed antimicrobial activity against the tested organisms.

  5. How do oil prices affect oilrig activity? : an empirical investigation

    2004-01-01

    Resume "How do oil prices affect oilrig activity? An empirical investigation" by Guro Børnes Ringlund. Supervisors: Knut Einar Rosendahl and Terje Skjerpen. In this thesis, I analyse the relationship between oilrig activity and oil price changes for several oil-producing regions in the world. Rig activity is a preparation for future production of oil, through exploration for new fields or development of existing fields, and is thus an indicator for the future level of oil production. ...

  6. Effect of oil and oil products on lipase activity in gray forest soil

    Kireeva, N. A.; Tarasenko, E. M.; Shamaeva, A. A.; Novoselova, E. I.

    2006-08-01

    The effect of different rates of oil and oil products on the lipase activity in gray forest soil was studied under field and laboratory conditions. It was found that hydrocarbons activate the lipolytic activity of the soil. Along with the activation of lipolysis, an increase in the number of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms and a decrease in the content of oil products were observed.

  7. Database of the Amazon aromatic plants and their essential oils

    José Guilherme S. Maia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aromatic flora of the Amazon has been inventoried for 30 years. In this sense, were made over 500 field trips to collect over 2500 plants and to obtain more than 2000 essential oils and aroma concentrates, all of them submitted to GC and GC-MS. This work led to the creation of a database for the aromatic plants of the Amazon, which catalogs general information about 1250 specimens. The database has allowed the publication of the chemical composition of the oils and aromas of more than 350 species, associated with a larger number of chemical types. The essential oils of many species offer optimum conditions for economic exploitation and use in national and international market of fragrances, cosmetics, agricultural and household pesticides.

  8. Antioxidant activity of capsaicinoid in canola oil.

    Si, Wenhui; Liang, Yintong; Ma, Ka Ying; Chung, Hau Yin; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2012-06-20

    Interest in replacing synthetic antioxidants, namely, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), with natural antioxidants is increasing. The present study examined the antioxidant activity of capsaicinoid from chili pepper in heated canola oil. The oxidation was conducted at 60, 90, 120, and 180 °C by monitoring oxygen consumption and the decrease in linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid in canola oil. At 60 °C, capsaicinoid was more effective against oxidation of canola oil compared with BHT. At higher temperatures of 90, 120, and 180 °C, capsaicinoid possessed an antioxidant activity similar to or slightly weaker that that of BHT. It was found that capsaicinoid prevented canola oil from oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. To study the structure-antioxidant relationship, it was found that the trimethylsiloxy (TMS) derivatives of capsaicinoid did not exhibit any antioxidant activity, suggesting the hydroxyl moiety was the functional group responsible for the antioxidant activity of capsaicinoid. It was concluded that capsaicinoid had the potential to be further explored as a natural antioxidant in foods, particularly spicy foods. PMID:22642555

  9. Evaluating Sustainability: Soap versus Biodiesel Production from Plant Oils

    Pohl, Nicola L. B.; Streff, Jennifer M.; Brokman, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Herein we describe a series of experiments for the undergraduate organic laboratory curriculum in which various plant oils (soybean, rapeseed, and olive) are subjected to saponification and transesterification reactions to create a set of compounds that can function as soaps or as fuels. The experiments introduce students to and asks them to…

  10. Preparation of biopolymers from plant oils in green media

    Use of plant oils as starting materials to prepare polymers has attracted renewed attention in recent years to replace or augment the traditional petrochemical based polymers and resins. This is because of concern for the environment, waste disposal, and depletion of fossil and non renewable feedsto...

  11. Margarine from organogels of plant wax and soybean oil

    Organogels obtained from plant wax and soybean oil tested for suitability for incorporation into margarine. Sunflower wax, rice bran wax and candelilla wax were evaluated. Candelilla wax showed phase separation after making the emulsion with the formulation used in this study. Rice bran wax showe...

  12. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oil of Cosmos bipinnatus Cav. Leaves from South Africa

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso; Ashafa, Anofi

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils isolated from the leaves of Cosmos bipinnatus and its antibacterial activity were analyzed by GC-MS and microbroth dilution assay respectively. The essential oil extracted from this plant was predominantly composed of monoterpenes (69.62%) and sesquiterpenes (22.73%). The antibacterial assay showed that the oil had significant inhibitory effects against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria isolates. The MIC of Gram-positive strains ranged be...

  13. Antibacterial activity of the three essential oils on Streptococcus mutans- an in-vitro study

    reevidhya. T. M; Geetha. R. V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti bacterial activity of three essential oils Thyme, Peppermint and neem oil on Streptococcus mutans, the potent initiator and leading cause of dental caries world wide. Essential oils are distillates of the volatile compounds of a plant’s secondary metabolism and may act as phytoprotective agents. Their curative effect has been known since antiquity. It is based on a variety of pharmacological properties which are specific for each plant spe...

  14. Evaluation of chemical and antiviral properties of essential oils from South American plants.

    Duschatzky, Claudia B; Possetto, Mirta L; Talarico, Laura B; García, Cybele C; Michis, Fabiana; Almeida, Norma V; de Lampasona, Marina P; Schuff, Carola; Damonte, Elsa B

    2005-01-01

    The essential oils of seven aromatic plants from Córdoba, San Luis and San Juan Provinces (Argentina) were isolated by steam distillation and analysed by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The oils were screened for cytotoxicity and in vitro inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) and Junin virus (JUNV) by a virucidal test. The oils showed a variable virucidal action according to the virus. The better relationship between cytotoxicity and antivirus action was observed with the essential oils of Heterothalamus alienus and Buddleja cordobensis against JUNV, with virucidal concentration 50% (VC50) values of 44.2 and 39.0 ppm and therapeutic indices (cytotoxicity to virucidal activity ratio) of 3.3 and 4.0, respectively. The inhibitory action was exerted by a direct interaction of virions with the oils. Virions inactivated with B. cordobensis and H. alienus essential oil were not affected in their ability to bind to the host cell. The therapeutic indices shown by these essential oils in toto were very modest, but given the complexity of their chemical composition the future identification of the precise active principle may allow the elimination of cytotoxic components and increase the selectivity of the effective compound. PMID:16130522

  15. INFLUENCE OF SURFACE-ACTIVE RHAMNOLIPID BIOCOMPLEX AND ETHYLTHIOSULFANILATE ON GROWTH AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF PLANTS IN THE OIL CONTAMINATED SOIL

    A. R. Banya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to study the influence of rhamnolipid biocomplex and ethylthiosulfanilate on field pea and sorghum plants when growing in petroleum contaminated soil. Plant seeds were treated with solutions of rhamnolipid biocomplex or ethylthiosulfanilate (0.01 g/l before planting and grown in containers with soil artificially contaminated with petroleum (5, 8 and 10%. Effect of rhamnolipid biocomplex and ethylthiosulfanilate was determined by the determination of growth (weight, length plants and biochemical parameters (content of photosynthetic pigments, hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde. The stimulating effect of rhamnolipid biocomplex and ethylthiosulfanilate on growth parameters of field pea was shown: the shoot mass has significantly increased on 39%, root mass – on 26% if compared with the control. For sorghum somewhat smaller increase of growth parameters was observed. Under the influence of rhamnolipid biocomplex and ethylthiosulfanilate the content of photosynthetic pigments in field pea and sorghum has also increased. It was determined that the action rhamnolipid biocomplex and ethylthiosulfanilate promoted the decrease of indicators of plant oxidative reactions if compared with control: the content of hydrogen peroxide – in average on 15% and 16%, malondialdehyde – on 13.5% and 16% respectively. The results of the study testify to the effectiveness of rhamnolipid biocomplex and ethylthiosulfanilate as growth stimulators for field pea and sorghum, as well as improvement of adaptive capability of plants to unfavorable conditions. It creates the prospects of their application as effective and ecologically safe substances for the intensification of contaminated soil phytoremediation.

  16. Transfer of 210Po, 210Pb and 238U from some medicinal plants to their essential oils

    Essential oils were extracted from 35 medicinal plants used by Syrians, organic compounds were determined in these oils and concentrations of 210Po 210Pb and 238U were determined in the original plants and in the essential oils. The results showed that the highest activity concentrations of 210Po and 210Pb were found in leaves with large surfaces and in Sage were as high as 73.5 Bq kg−1 and 73.2 Bq kg−1, respectively. The activity concentration of 238U was as high as 4.26 Bq kg−1 in Aloe. On the other hand, activity concentrations of 210Po ranged between 0.2 and 71.1 Bq kg−1 in extracted essential oils for Rosemary and False yellowhead, respectively. The activity concentration of 210Pb reached 63.7 Bq kg−1 in Aloe oil. The activity concentrations of 238U were very low in all extracted oils; the highest value was 0.31 Bq kg−1 in peel of Orange oil. The transfer of 210Po and 210Pb from plant to its oil was the highest for Eugenia; 7.1% and 5.5% for 210Po and 210Pb, respectively. A linear relationship was found between the transfer factor of radionuclides from plant to its essential oil and the chemical content of this oil. - Highlights: • Natural radionuclides 210Po, 210Pb and 238U were determined in 35 medicinal plants and their essential oils. • The highest activity concentration of 210Po and 210Pb were 73.5 Bq kg−1 and 73.2 Bq kg−1 in Sage, respectively. • The transfer of 210Po and 210Pb from Eugenia plant to its oil was the highest amongst other plants. • The data obtained in this study can be considered the first reported data for medicinal plants and their oils in Syria

  17. Oil Spill!

    Ansberry, Karen Rohrich; Morgan, Emily

    2005-01-01

    An oil spill occurs somewhere in the world almost every day of the year, and the consequences can be devastating. In this month's column, students explore the effects of oil spills on plants, animals, and the environment and investigate oil spill clean-up methods through a simulated oil spill. The activities described in this article give students…

  18. Antimicrobial Effect of Escherichia Coli on Essential Oils Derived from Romanian Aromatic Plants

    Şandru Daniela Maria

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the antimicrobial action of Escherichia coli ATCCR CRM-8739TM on the following essential oils: Teucrium marum, Pinus sylwestris, Thymus vulgaris, Salviae aethedaroleum, Cinnamomum aromaticum, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lavandula angustifolia, Abies alba, Zingiber officinale, Anethum graveolens, Coriandrum sativum, Origanum vulgare, extracted industrialy from romanian plants, using the diffusion disc method. The most intense activity was observed at the essential oil of Cinnamomum aromaticum (cinnamon and the mildest activity was observed at Zingiber officinale (ginger. Many of the essential oils tested exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity, as Teucrium marum, Thymus vulgaris, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lavandula angustifolia,Coriandrum sativum. The lowest antibacterial activity was exhibited on Pinus sylwestris, Salviae aethedaroleum, Zingiber officinale and Anethum graveolens.

  19. Chemical composition, antitumor and antimicrobial activity of Thymus vulgaris and T. algeriensis essential oils

    Nikolic, Milos; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Ricardo C. Calhelha; Perić, Tamara; Marković, Dejan; Giweli, Abdulhamed; Soković, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Plants from genus Thymus are often used in traditional medicine. Some of these species are important medicinal plants that are used in ethnomedicine. In this work, analysis of phytochemicals and bioactivity evaluation of Thymus vulgaris and T. algericnsis essential oils were done. The chemical composition of oils were evaluated using GC/MS; cytotoxic activity was tested against five human tumor cell lines MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer), ...

  20. NORM emissions from heavy oil and natural gas fired power plants in Syria

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have been determined in fly and bottom ash collected from four major Syrian power plants fired by heavy oil and natural gas. 210Pb and 210Po were the main NORM radionuclides detected in the fly and bottom ash. 210Pb activity concentrations have reached 3393 ± 10 Bq kg−1 and 4023 ± 7 Bq kg−1 in fly ash and bottom ash, respectively; lower values of 210Po were observed due to its high volatility. In addition, 210Po and 210Pb annual emissions in bottom ash from mixed (heavy oil and natural gas) fired power plants varied between 2.7 × 109–7.95 × 109 Bq and 3.5 × 109–1010 Bq, respectively; higher emissions of 210Po and 210Pb from gas power plants being observed. However, the present study showed that 210Po and 210Pb emissions from thermal power plants fired by natural gas are much higher than the coal power plants operated in the World. - Highlights: ► NORM have been determined in fly and bottom ash collected from Syrian power plants fired by heavy oil and natural gas. ► 210Pb and 210Po were the main NORM radionuclides detected in the fly and bottom ash. ► 210Po and 210Pb annual emissions from these power plants were estimated.

  1. An advanced nuclear power plant for heavy oil exploitation in the Venezuelan Orinoco oil belt

    The most important characteristics of the Orinoco Oil Belt (OOB) and of its heavy oil content, together with the main requirements for its exploitation, are presented here for analyzing the possibilities of the application of advanced nuclear power as main energy source in the heavy oil exploitation in the OOB. A steamsupply advanced nuclear cogeneration plant based on high temperature reactors is suggested for both the extraction and upgrading of the crude oil. The model consists of a plant for a 100 km2 oil field producing 100.000 barrels per day of refinery ready synthetic oil during 25 years. Three 1200 MW(th) reactors, built successively, supply a great portion of the required process heat, injection steam and electricity. Steam conditions are: for the process heat, a maximum pressure of 10 MPa at a temperature of 500deg C, and, for the injection steam, pressures between 12 and 17 MPa at saturation temperatures. Clear advantages for an advanced nuclear option application in the OOB development are substantiated, and a feasibility study is recommended. (orig.)

  2. Impacts of oil sands process water on fen plants: Implications for plant selection in required reclamation projects

    Fen plant growth in peat contaminated with groundwater discharges of oil sands process water (OSPW) was assessed in a greenhouse over two growing seasons. Three treatments (non-diluted OSPW, diluted OSPW and rainwater) were tested on five vascular plants and four mosses. All vascular plants tested can grow in salinity and naphthenic acids levels currently produced by oil sands activity in northwestern Canada. No stress sign was observed after both seasons. Because of plant characteristics, Carex species (C. atherodes and C. utriculata) and Triglochin maritima would be more useful for rapidly restoring vegetation and creating a new peat-accumulating system. Groundwater discharge of OSPW proved detrimental to mosses under dry conditions and ensuring adequate water levels would be crucial in fen creation following oil sands exploitation. Campylium stellatum would be the best choice to grow in contaminated areas and Bryum pseudotriquetrum might be interesting as it has spontaneously regenerated in all treatments. - Highlights: ► Fen plant growth was assessed under groundwater discharges of oil sands process water. ► Sedge and grass species were not stressed after two growing seasons in greenhouse. ► Carex species and Triglochin maritima would be helpful in created contaminated fens. ► In dry conditions, contaminated groundwater discharge was detrimental for mosses. ► Campylium stellatum would be the best choice in created fens with contaminated water. - Sedges and grasses tolerated the contact with oil sands process water and could probably grow well in contaminated created fens, but mosses were particularly affected under dry conditions.

  3. Antiprotozoal activities of Colombian plants.

    Weniger, B; Robledo, S; Arango, G J; Deharo, E; Aragón, R; Muñoz, V; Callapa, J; Lobstein, A; Anton, R

    2001-12-01

    In our search for therapeutical alternatives for antiprotozoal chemotherapy, we collected a selection of 44 plants from western Colombia upon ethnopharmacological and chemotaxonomic considerations. Polar and apolar extracts of these species were examined for antimalarial activity using in vitro tests with two clones of Plasmodium falciparum. Leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity were determined in vitro using promastigote and amastigote forms of several strains of Leishmania sp. and epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. Among the selected plants, the 15 following species showed good or very good antiprotozoal activity in vitro: Aspidosperma megalocarpon, Campnosperma panamense, Conobea scoparioides, Guarea polymera, Guarea guidonia, Guatteria amplifolia, Huberodendron patinoi, Hygrophila guianensis, Jacaranda caucana, Marila laxiflora, Otoba novogranatensis, Otoba parviflora, Protium amplium, Swinglea glutinosa and Tabernaemontana obliqua. Cytotoxicity was assessed in U-937 cells and the ratio of cytotoxicity to antiprotozoal activity was determined for the active extracts. Ten extracts from eight species showed selectivity indexes > or = 10. Among the extracts that showed leishmanicidal activity, the methylene chloride extract of leaves from C. scoparioides showed a selectivity index in the same range that the one of the Glucantime control. Several of the active leishmanicidal plants are traditionally used against leishmaniasis by the population of the concerned area. PMID:11694364

  4. Screening of some Malay medicated oils for antimicrobial activity

    Khalid Khalisanni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oils from six Malay medicated oils, used traditionally in the treatment of infectious and septic diseases in humans, were tested for their antimicrobial property. The aim was to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of six Malay medicated oils against certain microbial isolates. Locally available Malay medicated oils were checked for their antimicrobial activities using six species of bacteria: E. coli, Salmonella spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus, Bacillus subtilis and 2 fungi with 1 yeast (Aspergillus niger, Penicillum spp. and Candida albicans. Clove oil showed the highest antibacterial activity followed, respectively, by 'bunga merah', cajaput, nutmeg, lemon grass and 'gamat' oil. Clove oil and lemon grass showed anticandidal activity. The Malay medicated oil studies did not show any antifungal activity. The study shows that Malay medicated oils, like antibiotics, have antimicrobial activities against some microorganisms.

  5. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL OF THUJA ORIENTALIS L

    Jain, Rakesh Kumar; Garg, S. C.

    1997-01-01

    The essential oil from seed coats of Thuja orientalis L. (Family cupressaceae) obtained in an yield of 1% has been studied for its antimicrobial activity against 6 bacteria and 5 fungi using filter paper disc agar diffusion technique. The oil has shown good to moderate activity of the oil against all six test bacteria. The activity of the oil against S. typhi has been found remarkable at 1:1000 dilutions. The activity against the fungal organisms at dilutions is moderate.

  6. Domestication of Oenothera as a new oil plant

    Plant oils rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA) have been widely used as essential ingredients of medicines, healing products, cosmetics etc. Although GLA is widely distributed in many plant families, the Oenothera genus has been shown to be the most promising to be used as a new oil plant in the future. In the past, evening primrose was occasionally planted in China as an ornamental, remaining unimproved, without any valuable agronomic characters. In Chongqing municipality in the South of China, the whole growing season of Oenothera spans 320-340 days, which is too long. We collected a number of Oenothera species accessions from China and abroad and irradiated their seeds with 60Co gamma rays. From the resulting induced mutants, we selected and characterized an early-maturing line termed R5-3 that matured 35 days ahead of the control. GLA and oil content in seeds of R5-3 were also higher than those of the control, and its seed yield was 1800 kg/ha. Meanwhile suitable cultural practices were successfully established. Another new line, H8-1, with high density of capsules was obtained by using interspecific hybridization. (author)

  7. Atmospheric emissions from two Estonian power plants using oil shale

    The Estonian thermal power plant and the Baltic thermal power plant in north-east Estonia near the city of Narva represent over 90 % of the installed electricity production capacity in Estonia. The plants use oil shale as a main fuel. The fuel consumption in the two plants was 13 million tons in 1993. Oil shale, a domestic fuel in Estonia, has some characteristics that are unusual compared to many other fuels. It has a high ash content (approx. 47 %), and a low heat value (approx. 8-9 MJ/kg LHV). The volatile matter of the combustible part is high (85-90 %). In combustion, a major part (up to 85 %) of sulphur in the fuel (1.5 %) goes through a sulphating reaction with allelic fuel constituents forming particulate sulphites and sulphates. The atmospheric emissions of the Estonian and the Baltic oil-shale power plants are regarded to have a significant impact on the environment of Estonia and the nearby countries. A lot of research has been done in Estonia on the behaviour of oil shale in the combustion process and the emission of environmental pollutants. In this study, the emission estimates were examined by internationally approved emission measurement technology. The objectives of the study were to provide data based on highest measurement technology for the evaluation of total emissions, study the effects of process operation on pollutant concentration in flue gases, compare the results achieved by local measurement methods, provide data for the estimation of the effects of the emissions in Finland. (orig.)

  8. Genome Sequence of Serratia plymuthica Strain S13, an Endophyte with Germination- and Plant-Growth-Promoting Activity from the Flower of Styrian Oil Pumpkin

    Müller, Henry; Fürnkranz, Michael; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Serratia plymuthica strain S13 was demonstrated to colonize various plant-associated microhabitats and to suppress damping-off diseases. The completed genome sequence has a size of 5.5 Mb, containing 4,957 putative protein-encoding regions, and will be used to identify genetic determinants enabling the bacterium to escort a plant’s entire life cycle.

  9. Effect of Location, Harvest Season and Plant Age on Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils from Rosmarinus officinalis%栽培地区、采收季节和株龄对迷迭香精油成分和抑菌活性的影响

    潘岩; 白红彤; 李慧; 姜闯道; 石雷

    2012-01-01

    采用气相色谱-质谱联用的方法,研究了不同提取部位、栽培地区、采收季节和株龄对迷迭香精油提取率、成分和抑菌活性的影响.结果表明,在贵州栽培的迷迭香叶子中精油的主要成分为α-蒎烯(31.88%-39.09%)、1,8-桉叶素(8.82%-10.97%)和樟脑(7.63%-11.59%);茎中精油的主要成分为龙脑(26.62%-39.05%)、樟脑(11.41%-15.27%)和α-蒎烯(7.23%-17.80%);茎中精油的抑菌活性强于叶中精油.北京地区栽培的迷迭香,其叶子中精油的主要成分为樟脑(27.92%)和L-β-蒎烯(25.28%),抑菌活性强;茎中精油和贵州栽培的成分和活性均相似.对于采收季节,夏季采收的迷迭香精油提取率高,抑菌活性强.而株龄对精油的成分和抑菌活性影响不大.该研究为我国引种迷迭香的合理配置栽培、采收、生产条件和高效开发利用其抑菌活性提供了科学的依据.%We examined the effect of plant part, cultivating location, harvest season and plant age on the oil yield, chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). We analyzed essential oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris. All oil samples showed antibacterial ability against the 4 strains. For Guizhou rosemary, the major compounds of leaf oils were a-pinene (31.88%-39.09%), 1,8-cineole (8.82%-10.97%) and camphor (7.63%-11.59%), whereas those of stem oils were borneol (26.62%-39.05%), camphor (11.41%-15.27%) and a-pinene (7.23%-17.80%). Antibacterial activity was greater for oils from stems than leaves. For oils from Beijing rosemary, the major compounds of leaf oils were camphor (27.92%) and L-β-pinene (25.28%), and the oils showed higher antibacterial activity than those from Guizhou, whereas oils from Beijing plant stems were similar to those from Guizhou

  10. Plant Essential Oils from Apiaceae Family as Alternatives to Conventional Insecticides

    Asgar Ebadollahi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Main method to control insect pest is using synthetic insecticides, but the development of insect resistance to this products, the high operational cost, environmental pollution, toxicity to humans and harmful effect on non-target organisms have created the need for developing alternative approaches to control insect pest. Furthermore, the demand for organic crops, especially vegetables for the fresh market, has greatly increased worldwide. The ideal insecticide should control target pests adequately and should be target-specific, rapidly degradable, and low in toxicity to humans and other mammals. Plant essential oils could be an alternative source for insect pest control because they constitute a rich source of bioactive chemicals and are commonly used as flavoring agents in foods. These materials may be applied to food crops shortly before harvest without leaving excessive residues. Moreover, medically safe of these plant derivatives has emphasized also. For these reasons, much effort has been focused on plant essential oils or their constituents as potential sources of insect control agents. In this context, Apiaceae (Umbelliferae family would rank among the most important families of plants. In the last few years more and more studies on the insecticidal properties of essential oils from Apiaceae family have been published and it seemed worthwhile to compile them. The focus of this review lies on the lethal (ovicidal, larvicidal, pupicidal and adulticidal and sublethal (antifeedant, repellent, oviposition deterrent, Growth inhibitory and progeny production activities of plant essential oils and theirmain components from Apiaceae family. These features indicate that pesticides based on Apiaceae essential oils could be used in a variety of ways to control a large number of pests. It can be concluded that essential oils and phytochemicals isolated from Apiaceae family may be efficacious and safe replacements for conventional synthetic

  11. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of essential oils of Mentha suaveolens.

    Oumzil, H; Ghoulami, S; Rhajaoui, M; Ilidrissi, A; Fkih-Tetouani, S; Faid, M; Benjouad, A

    2002-12-01

    The essential oils (EO) of Mentha suaveolens, a wild Labiatae, which grows in several regions in Morocco, were characterized and their antimicrobial activity assessed. The main aromatic constituents of this plant, as characterized by IR, NMR and MS studies, were pulegone, piperitenone oxide (PEO) and piperitone oxide (PO) occurring in different amounts depending on the subspecies. These constituents as well as a series of other aromatic products such as carvone, limonene and menthone, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against 19 bacteria including Gram-positive and Gram-negative and against three fungi, using solid phase and microtitration assays. Pulegone-rich essential oil inhibited efficiently all the micro-organisms tested with MICs ranging between 0.69 and 2.77 ppm. Among the components from Mentha suaveolens EO, pulegone was the most effective against the tested microorganisms, followed by PEO and PO. The structure-activity relationship is discussed on the basis of the activity of the other aromatic derivatives tested such as carvone, limonene, menthone and the profile of the essential oils of Mentha suaveolens was compared with other Mentha species. PMID:12458474

  12. Medicinal Plants with Antiplatelet Activity.

    El Haouari, Mohammed; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-07-01

    Blood platelets play an essential role in the hemostasis and wound-healing processes. However, platelet hyperactivity is associated to the development and the complications of several cardiovascular diseases. In this sense, the search for potent and safer antiplatelet agents is of great interest. This article provides an overview of experimental studies performed on medicinal plants with antiplatelet activity available through literature with particular emphasis on the bioactive constituents, the parts used, and the various platelet signaling pathways modulated by medicinal plants. From this review, it was suggested that medicinal plants with antiplatelet activity mainly belong to the family of Asteraceae, Rutaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Zygophyllaceae, Rhamnaceae, Liliaceae, and Zingiberaceae. The antiplatelet effect is attributed to the presence of bioactive compounds such as polyphenols, flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, and other substances which correct platelet abnormalities by interfering with different platelet signalization pathways including inhibition of the ADP pathway, suppression of TXA2 formation, reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, and phosphoinositide breakdown, among others. The identification and/or structure modification of the plant constituents and the understanding of their action mechanisms will be helpful in the development of new antiplatelet agents based on medicinal plants which could contribute to the prevention of thromboembolic-related disorders by inhibiting platelet aggregation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27062716

  13. Chemical Composition and in Vitro Antimicrobial and Mutagenic Activities of Seven Lamiaceae Essential Oils

    Laura De Martino

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Deeper knowledge of the potentiality of aromatic plants can provide results of economic importance for food and pharmacological industry. The essential oils of seven Lamiaceae species were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and assayed for their antibacterial, antifungal and mutagenic activities. Monoterpenes in the oils ranged between 82.47% (hyssop oil and 97.48% (thyme oil, being mainly represented by oxygenated compounds. The antibacterial activity was evaluated against six pathogenic and five non-pathogenic bacterial strains. Oregano and thyme oils showed the strongest antibacterial activity against the pathogenic ones. The antifungal activity was evaluated against six fungal strains of agrifood interest: the oils tested exhibited variable degrees of activity. Two Salmonella typhimurium strains were used to assess the possible mutagenic activity. No oil showed mutagenic activity. Data obtained let us hypothesise that the use of essential oils could be a viable and safe way to decrease the utilisation of synthetic food preservatives. Further research is needed to obtain information regarding the practical effectiveness of essential oils to prevent the growth of food borne and spoiling microbes under specific application conditions.

  14. Antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil alone and in combination with other essential oils

    MAHENDRA RAI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kon K, Rai M. 2012. Antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil alone and in combination with other essential oils. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 50-56. Essential oils (EOs from plants represent an alternative approach in combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One of the EOs with proven antibacterial properties is Thymus vulgaris EO. The purpose of the present work was to investigate in vitro antibacterial activity of T. vulgaris EO alone and in combination with other EOs. The activity of T. vulgaris EO was screened in combination with 34 EOs against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by disk diffusion method; then the most effective combinations were evaluated by broth microdilution method. Against S. aureus the synergistic effect was found in combination of T. vulgaris and Cinnamomum zeylonicum EOs with fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index of 0.26; Juniperus communis and Picea abies EOs showed additive effect (FIC indexes were 0.74 and 0.78, respectively. Combination of T. vulgaris EO with Aniba rosaeodora and Melissa officinalis EOs demonstrated synergistic effect against E. coli (FIC indexes were 0.23 and 0.34, respectively; combination of T. vulgaris and Mentha piperita EOs was additive (FIC index 0.55. Therefore, combining T. vulgaris EO with other EOs has potential in further enhancing its antibacterial properties.

  15. Allelopatic effects of some medicinal plant essential oils on plant seeds germination

    ALI SHOKOUHIAN; HASSAN HABIBI; KAYVAN AGAHI

    2016-01-01

    The effect of essential oils from some medicinal plants on seed germination was studied with the aim of assessing their potential use as bioherbicides. The experiment was conducted as factorial based on completely randomized design (CRD) with three replications. Seeds of 3 summer crops including lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pepper (Piper longum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were exposed to essential oils of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), thyme (Thymus vulgaris) and anise (Pimpinella ani...

  16. Antibacterial activity against Clostridium genus and antiradical activity of the essential oils from different origin.

    Kačániová, Miroslava; Vukovič, Nenad; Horská, Elena; Salamon, Ivan; Bobková, Alica; Hleba, Lukáš; Fiskelová, Martina; Vatľák, Alexander; Petrová, Jana; Bobko, Marek

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial and antiradical activities of 15 essential oils were investigated. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using agar disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods against Clostridium genus and antioxidant properties of essential oils by testing their scavenging effect on DPPH radicals activities. We determined the antibacterial activity of Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium hystoliticum, Clostridium intestinale, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium ramosum. We obtained the original commercial essential oils samples of Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus montana, Mentha piperita, Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia montana, Origanum vulgare L. (2 samples), Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abies alba Mill., Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch and Thymus vulgaris L. produced in Slovakia (Calendula a.s., Nova Lubovna, Slovakia). The results of the disk diffusion method showed very high essential oils activity against all tested strains of microorganisms. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Pimpinella anisum, against C. hystoliticum was found at Pinus sylvestris, against C. intestinale was found at Satureia hortensis L., against C. perfringens was found at Origanum vulgare L. and against C. ramosum was found at Pinus sylvestris. The results of broth microdilution assay showed that none of the essential oils was active against C. hystoliticum. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. intestinale was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. perfringens was found at Satureia montana and against C. ramosum was found at Abius alba and Carum carvi. Antioxidant DPPH radical scavenging activity was determined at several solutions of oil samples (50 μL.mL(-1)-0.39 μL.mL(-1)) and the best scavenging effect for the highest concentration (50 μL.mL(-1)) was observed. The antioxidant properties

  17. The enrichment behavior of natural radionuclides in pulverized oil shale-fired power plants.

    Vaasma, Taavi; Kiisk, Madis; Meriste, Tõnis; Tkaczyk, Alan Henry

    2014-12-01

    The oil shale industry is the largest producer of NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) waste in Estonia. Approximately 11-12 million tons of oil shale containing various amounts of natural radionuclides is burned annually in the Narva oil shale-fired power plants, which accounts for approximately 90% of Estonian electricity production. The radionuclide behavior characteristics change during the fuel combustion process, which redistributes the radionuclides between different ash fractions. Out of 24 operational boilers in the power plants, four use circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology and twenty use pulverized fuel (PF) technology. Over the past decade, the PF boilers have been renovated, with the main objective to increase the efficiency of the filter systems. Between 2009 and 2012, electrostatic precipitators (ESP) in four PF energy blocks were replaced with novel integrated desulphurization technology (NID) for the efficient removal of fly ash and SO2 from flue gases. Using gamma spectrometry, activity concentrations and enrichment factors for the (238)U ((238)U, (226)Ra, (210)Pb) and (232)Th ((232)Th, (228)Ra) family radionuclides as well as (40)K were measured and analyzed in different PF boiler ash fractions. The radionuclide activity concentrations in the ash samples increased from the furnace toward the back end of the flue gas duct. The highest values in different PF boiler ash fractions were in the last field of the ESP and in the NID ash, where radionuclide enrichment factors were up to 4.2 and 3.3, respectively. The acquired and analyzed data on radionuclide activity concentrations in different PF boiler ashes (operating with an ESP and a NID system) compared to CFB boiler ashes provides an indication that changes in the fuel (oil shale) composition and boiler working parameters, as well as technological enhancements in Estonian oil shale fired power plants, have had a combined effect on the distribution patterns of natural radionuclides

  18. Antimicrobial activity of peppermint essential oil (Mentha piperita L.)

    Shapoval O.G.; Durnova N.A.; Shub G.M.; Golikov A.G.; Raikova S.V.; Rakhmetova A.Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Рurposе. To study antimicrobial activity of fume of the essential oil of peppermint against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Materials and methods: The screening study of antimicrobial activity of solutions of essential oil by disk-diffusion method and activity of essential oil fume of own preparation and pharmaceutical form of oil according to standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Esсherichia coli and 12 clinical strains of staphylococci (6 methicillin-r...

  19. Plant Oils and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: The Role of Genetics

    Smith, Caren E.

    2012-01-01

    More than 25 years have passed since Ancel Keys and others observed that high intake of monounsaturated fatty acids, especially as supplied by plants (eg, olive oil) was associated with lower cardiovascular and overall mortality. About 15 years later, advances in genotyping technologies began to facilitate widespread study of relationships between dietary fats and genetic variants, illuminating the role of genetic variation in modulating human responses to fatty acids. More recently, microarr...

  20. Modification of Wastewater Treatment Technology at Cottonseed Oil Plant

    Alshabab Mary Shick; Andrianova Maria; Alsalloum Dergham

    2016-01-01

    Wastewaters from cottonseed oil producing plant in Syria were studied in laboratory experiments. Aim of the study was to suggest modification of wastewater treatment technology in order to increase its efficiency. Concentration of pollutants in wastewaters was controlled by measurement of COD. According to the results of experiments it was suggested to decrease significantly (8-20 times) dosages of reagents (acidifier, coagulant, flocculant) in several actual stages of treatment (acidificatio...

  1. Chemical plants: high-value molecules from essential oils.

    Lummiss, Justin A M; Oliveira, Kelley C; Pranckevicius, Alexandre M T; Santos, Alexandra G; dos Santos, Eduardo N; Fogg, Deryn E

    2012-11-21

    As society faces a future of dwindling petrochemical supplies at increasing cost, much attention has been focused on methods to degrade biomass into renewable commodity-chemical building blocks. Reported here is a powerful complementary approach that amplifies the complexity of molecular structures present in plant materials. Essential-oil phenylpropenoids are transformed via acrylate cross-metathesis into potent antioxidants that are widely used in perfumery and cosmetics, and in treating disorders associated with oxidative damage. PMID:23126387

  2. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia

    Soňa Felšöciová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. [i]Lavandula angustifolia[/i], [i]Carum carvi[/i], [i]Pinus mungo var. pulmilio[/i], [i]Mentha piperita[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L.,[i] Pinus sylvestris[/i], [i]Satureia hortensis[/i] L., [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L., [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i], [i]Rosmarinus officinali[/i]s L., [i]Salvia officinalis[/i] L., [i]Abietis albia etheroleum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L. [i]Rausch[/i], [i]Thymus vulgaris[/i] L., [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. for antifungal activity against five [i]Penicillium[/i] species: [i]Penicillium brevicompactum[/i], [i]Penicillium citrinum[/i], [i]Penicillium crustosum[/i], [i]Penicillium expansum[/i] and [i]Penicillium griseofulvum[/i]. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against [i]Penicillium[/i] fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L., [i]Thymus vulgaris[/i], [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. and [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i]. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils [i]Pinus mungo var. pulmilio[/i], [i]Salvia officinalis[/i] L., [i]Abietis albia etheroleum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L.[i] Rausch[/i], [i]Rosmarinus officinalis[/i].

  3. [Study on composition, antibiotic activity and antioxidant activity of volatile oils from uyghur medicine Althaea rosea].

    Munira, Abudukeremu; Muheta'er, Tu'erhong; Resalat, Yimin; Xia, Na

    2015-04-01

    Althaea rosea is a type of mallow plant. Its dry flowers are one of common herb in Uyghur medicines and recorded to have several efficacies such as external application for detumescence, moistening lung and arresting cough, sweating and relieving asthma, diminishing swelling and promoting eruption, soothing the nerves and strengthening heart. However, there are only fewer studies on effective components of A. rosea and no literature about its volatile oil and pharmacological activity. In this paper, the volatile oil of A. rosea was obtained by using the chemical distillation and extraction method. The individual chemical components were separated from the volatile oil and identified by the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer technique (GC-MS). The antioxidant activity against free radicals was detected by the'ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer method. The antibiotic activity was detected by the filter paper diffusion method. The experimental results showed nearly 70 compounds in the volatile oil, with complex chemical components. With a low content, most of the compounds were aromatic and aliphatic compounds and their derivatives. A. rosea had a better antibiotic activity for common microorganisms, with a wide antibacterial spectrum. According to the results, the volatile oil of A. rosea will have a good application value in medicine, food and cosmetic industries, which provided a scientific basis for the development of natural A. rosea resources. PMID:26281609

  4. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of Ocimum canum Sims. and Ocimum selloi Benth.

    Jeferson C. Nascimento; Luiz C. A. Barbosa; Vanderlucia F. Paula; David, Jorge M.; Renato Fontana; Luiz A.M. Silva; Robson S. França

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the volatile oils of Ocimum canum and Ocimum selloi, both occurring in Jequié/BA, northeastern Brazil. The plants were collected in the winter/2005 andsummer/2006, the oils extracted by steam distillation and further analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 30 and 31 compounds was identified from the oils of O. selloi and O. canum, respectively. It was observed that the oil content of O. canum showed variation during the seasons,...

  5. In vitro activity of olive oil polyphenols against Helicobacter pylori.

    Romero, Concepción; Medina, Eduardo; Vargas, Julio; Brenes, Manuel; De Castro, Antonio

    2007-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is linked to a majority of peptic ulcers and to some types of gastric cancer, and resistance of the microorganism to antibiotic treatment is now found worldwide. Virgin olive oil is an unrefined vegetable oil that contains a significant amount of phenolic compounds. Under simulated conditions, we have demonstrated that these substances can diffuse from the oil into the gastric juice and be stable for hours in this acidic environment. In vitro, they exerted a strong bactericidal activity against eight strains of H. pylori, three of them resistant to some antibiotics. Among the phenolic compounds, the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycon showed the strongest bactericidal effect at a concentration as low as 1.3 microg/mL. Although the experimental conditions are different from other reported works, this bactericidal concentration is much lower than those found for phenolic compounds from tea, wine, and plant extracts. These results open the possibility of considering virgin olive oil a chemopreventive agent for peptic ulcer or gastric cancer, but this bioactivity should be confirmed in vivo in the future. PMID:17263460

  6. Trace elements and essential oil composition in chemotypes of the aromatic plant Origanum vulgare

    Trace elements, essential oil yield and its percentage composition were determined by neutron activation analysis, hydrodistillation and gas chromatography in two chemotypes of Origanum vulgare L. cultivated in the same field. Statistical tests such as analysis of variance, correlation coefficient, t-test, and multiple correlation were applied. The results showed that the samples contain the highest recorded oil yield for aromatic plants. Also, there is a statistically significant difference between the chemotypes of the plant not only in the predominant compound but in a number of other components. Iron, chromium and scandium showed a negative significant correlation with carvacrol and a positive one with thymol. Europium shows characteristic correlations with chromium, cobalt, iron and scandium within each chemotype of the plant. These correlations could make probable a role of this element in the biosynthesis of the predominant compounds. (author)

  7. Insecticidal effects of essential oils extracted from aromatic plants on Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) in Lebanon

    Full text: The excessive use of chemical pesticides to control agricultural pests is becoming alarming. The objective of this study is to search for biopesticides of plant origin that could be used to control one of the major pest of fruit production; the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.). A colony of the Lebanese wild strain of this insect was reared under laboratory condition to provide biological material. The insecticidal activity of the essential oils extracted from aromatic plants in Lebanon was assessed. The tested plants are: Foeniculum vulgare, Thymbra spicata, Artemisia herba alba, Origanum syriacum, Ruta chalepensis, Lavandula stoechas, Salvia fruticosa, Mentha microphylla, Juniperus oxycedrus, Rosmarinus officinalis, Myrtus communis, Laurus nobilis and Ocimum gratissimum. Results show that essential oils isolated from F. vulgare, T. spicata, A. herba alba, O. syriacum and R. chalepensis have promising insecticidal potential. (author)

  8. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of selected essential oils and some of their main compounds.

    Wanner, Juergen; Schmidt, Erich; Bail, Stefanie; Jirovetz, Leopold; Buchbauer, Gerhard; Gochev, Velizar; Girova, Tanya; Atanasova, Teodora; Stoyanova, Albena

    2010-09-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils of cabreuva (Myrocarpus fastigiatus Allemao, Fabaceae) from Brazil, cedarwood (Juniperus ashei, Cupressaceae) from Texas, Juniper berries (Juniperus communis L., Cupressaceae) and myrrh (Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl., Burseraceae) were analyzed using GC/FID and GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity of these essential oils and some of their main compounds were tested against eleven different strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by using agar diffusion and agar serial dilution methods. Animal and plant pathogens, food poisoning and spoilage bacteria were selected. The volatile oils exhibited considerable inhibitory effects against all tested organisms, except Pseudomonas, using both test methods. Higher activity was observed against Gram-positive strains in comparison with Gram-negative bacteria. Cabreuva oil from Brazil showed similar results, but in comparison with the other oils tested, only when higher concentrations of oil were used. PMID:20922991

  9. Anticancer activity of essential oils and their chemical components - a review

    Bayala, Bagora; Bassole, Imaël HN; Scifo, Riccardo; Gnoula, Charlemagne; Morel, Laurent; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Simpore, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils are widely used in pharmaceutical, sanitary, cosmetic, agriculture and food industries for their bactericidal, virucidal, fungicidal, antiparasitical and insecticidal properties. Their anticancer activity is well documented. Over a hundred essential oils from more than twenty plant families have been tested on more than twenty types of cancers in last past ten years. This review is focused on the activity of essential oils and their components on various types of cancers. For some of them the mechanisms involved in their anticancer activities have been carried out. PMID:25520854

  10. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils against human pathogenic bacteria

    M. Sokovic; Marin, P.D.; Brkic, D.; Griensven, van, L.J.L.D.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from 10 aromatic plants Matricaria chamommilla, Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Lavandula angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum, Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis, Citrus limon and C. aurantium have been determined. Antibacterial activity of these oils and their components; i.e. linalyl acetate, linalool, limonene, pinene, ß-pinene, 1,8-cineole, camphor, carvacrol, thymol and menthol were assayed against a variety...

  11. Antifungal activity of Piper diospyrifolium Kunth (Piperaceae) essential oil

    Vieira, Silvia Cristina Heredia; de Paulo, Luis Fernando; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivaleti; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Souza, Amanda de; Young, Maria Cláudia Marx; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In vitro activity of the essential oil from Piper diospyrifolium leaves was tested using disk diffusion techniques. The antifungal assay showed significant potencial antifungal activity: the oil was effective against several clinical fungal strains. The majority compounds in the essential oil were identified as sesquiterpenoids by GC-MS and GC-FID techniques.

  12. Acute toxicity of plant essential oils to scarab larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and their analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Ranger, Christopher M; Reding, Michael E; Oliver, Jason B; Moyseenko, James J; Youssef, Nadeer; Krause, Charles R

    2013-02-01

    Larvae of scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) are important contaminant and root-herbivore pests of ornamental crops. To develop alternatives to conventional insecticides, 24 plant-based essential oils were tested for their acute toxicity against third instars of the Japanese beetle Popillia japonica Newman, European chafer Rhizotrogus majalis (Razoumowsky), oriental beetle Anomala orientalis (Waterhouse), and northern masked chafer Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. Diluted solutions were topically applied to the thorax, which allowed for calculating LD50 and LD90 values associated with 1 d after treatment. A wide range in acute toxicity was observed across all four scarab species. Of the 24 oils tested, allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamon leaf, clove, garlic, and red thyme oils exhibited toxicity to all four species. Allyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic oil tested against the European chafer, and among the most toxic against the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, and northern masked chafer. Red thyme was also comparatively toxic to the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer. Interspecific variability in susceptibility to the essential oils was documented, with 12, 11, 8, and 6 of the 24 essential oils being toxic to the oriental beetle, Japanese beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer, respectively. Analysis of the active oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a diverse array of compounds, mostly consisting of mono- and sesquiterpenes. These results will aid in identifying active oils and their constituents for optimizing the development of plant essential oil mixtures for use against scarab larvae. PMID:23448028

  13. Effect of oil spills on coastal power plants, refineries, and desalination plants

    Major oil spills such as those experienced in the Gulf War, in Alaska, and in the Gulf of Mexico have raised concern for the protection of coastal facilities which use seawater for cooling or process purposes such as power stations, refineries, and desalination plants. Because of the availability of large quantities of cooling water, many power stations and refineries are located along the coastline in the United States and throughout the world. In addition, many countries in the Middle East, the Caribbean, and other areas of the world depend on desalination plants located along the coast for the vital supply of drinking water. The objective of this paper is to determine the levels of oil contamination which will adversely affect plant performance or result in damage to specific plant equipment such as condensers, heat exchangers, pumps, screens, water treatment equipment, and other vital water handling mechanisms

  14. Chemical Composition, Antifungal and Insecticidal Activities of Hedychium Essential Oils

    Kanniah Rajasekaran; Jian Chen; BECNEL, JAMES J.; Natasha M. Agramonte; Bernier, Ulrich R.; Maia Tsikolia; Kemal Husnu Can Baser; Betul Demirci; David E. Wedge; Nurhayat Tabanca; Sampson, Blair J.; Hamidou F. Sakhanokho; James M. Spiers

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial properties of essential oils have been documented, and their use as “biocides” is gaining popularity. The aims of this study were to analyze the chemical composition and assess the biological activities of Hedychium essential oils. Oils from 19 Hedychium species and cultivars were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. The antifungal and insecticidal activities of these oils were tested against Colletotrichum acutatum...

  15. Biochemical activities of iranian Cymbopogon olivieri (Boiss) Bor. essential oil

    Mahboubi, M.; Kazempour, N.

    2012-01-01

    Cymbopogon olivieri essential oil from aerial parts was analyzed by gas chromotography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and led to the identification of 38 compounds. Piperitone (72.8%), 4-carene (11.8%) and β-himachalene (7.6%) were found as the major components of the oil. The antimicrobial activity was achieved using disc-diffusion and microbroth dilution assays and microbicidal kinetics of oil was screened against different microorganisms. The possible antioxidant activity of oil ...

  16. Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Essential Oils of Origanum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare L. under Different Growth Conditions

    Enrica De Falco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at investigating the essential oil production, chemical composition and biological activity of a crop of pink flowered oregano (Origanum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare L. under different spatial distribution of the plants (single and binate rows. This plant factor was shown to affect its growth, soil covering, fresh biomass, essential oil amount and composition. In particular, the essential oil percentage was higher for the binate row treatment at the full bloom. The chemical composition of the oils obtained by hydrodistillation was fully characterized by GC and GC-MS. The oil from plants grown in single rows was rich in sabinene, while plants grown in double rows were richer in ocimenes. The essential oils showed antimicrobial action, mainly against Gram-positive pathogens and particularly Bacillus cereus and B. subtilis.

  17. Repellent and anti-feedant activity of 19 plant essential oils against Myllocerinus aurolineatus%十九种植物精油对茶丽纹象甲成虫的驱避和拒食活性

    边文波; 王国昌; 龚一飞; 孙晓玲; 李元喜

    2012-01-01

    In order to find new non-polluting control methods for the tea weevil Myllocerinus aurolineatus Voss, a behavioral bioassay was conducted to test the repellent activity of nineteen plant essential oils on this pest. The results show that allitridi, lavender oil, baicalin, extract of Cantleyt corniculata ( Becc) Howard, Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F. ) Nees, Artemisia argyi Levl. Et Vant, Fallopia multitlora (Thunb. ) Harald, Sophora flavescensn Alt. , Leonurus artemisia Sweet and Lonicera Japonica Thunb. , were repellent to both male and female M. Aurolineatus adults. Of these, allitridi, S. Miltiorrhiza extract, F. Multiflora extract, and extract of S. Flavescensn reduced feeding by adult weevils relative to the control. Extract of C. Corniculata and L. Japonica reduced feeding activity, whereas allitridi and extract of L. Artemisia significantly enhanced the appetite of adult weevils relative to the control. Artemisia argyi extract, lavender oil, and baicalin, although repellent, did not reduce feeding activity relative tothe control. Compared to the control, extract of A. Paniculata was attractive to weevils. Further research on the effects of extracts of C. Corniculata, S. Miltiorrhiza, F. Multiflora, S. Flavescensn, and L.Japonica on tea weevils is required to fully determine the control potential of these compounds.%为了寻找茶丽纹象甲Myllocerinus aurolineatus Voss无公害防治新途径,采用行为生测法测定了19种植物精油对茶丽纹象甲的驱避和拒食活性.结果表明:大蒜油allitridi、芸香(Cantleyt corniculata( Becc) Howard)油、丹参(Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge.)、穿心莲(Andrographis paniculata( Burm.f.)Nees)、艾叶(Artemisia argyi Lev1.et Vant.)、薰衣草(Lavender angustifolia Mill.)、何首乌(Fallopia multiflora( Thunb.)Harald.)、苦参(Sophora flavescens Alt.)、黄岑(Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi)、益母草(Leonurus heterophyllus Sweet)和金银花(Lonicera Japonica Thunb.)

  18. Rhamnolipids Increase the Phytotoxicity of Diesel Oil Towards Four Common Plant Species in a Terrestrial Environment.

    Marecik, Roman; Wojtera-Kwiczor, Joanna; Lawniczak, Lukasz; Cyplik, Paweł; Szulc, Alicja; Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Chrzanowski, Lukasz

    2012-09-01

    The study focused on assessing the influence of rhamnolipids on the phytotoxicity of diesel oil-contaminated soil samples. Tests evaluating the seed germination and growth inhibition of four terrestrial plant species (alfalfa, sorghum, mustard and cuckooflower) were carried out at different rhamnolipid concentrations (ranging from 0 to 1.200 mg/kg of wet soil). The experiments were performed in soil samples with a different diesel oil content (ranging from 0 to 25 ml/kg of wet soil). It was observed that the sole presence of rhamnolipids may be phytotoxic at various levels, which is especially notable for sorghum (the germination index decreased to 41 %). The addition of rhamnolipids to diesel oil-contaminated soil samples contributed to a significant increase of their phytotoxicity. The most toxic effect was observed after a rhamnolipid-supplemented diesel oil biodegradation, carried out with the use of a hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria consortium. The supplemention of rhamnolipids (600 mg/kg of wet soil) resulted in a decrease of seed germination of all studied plant species and an inhibition of microbial activity, which was measured by the 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride tests. These findings indicate that the presence of rhamnolipids may considerably increase the phytotoxicity of diesel oil. Therefore, their use at high concentrations, during in situ bioremediation processes, should be avoided in a terrestrial environment. PMID:22865941

  19. In Vitro Control of Post-Harvest Fruit Rot Fungi by Some Plant Essential Oil Components

    Gian Luigi Rana; Vincenzo De Feo; Emilia Mancini; Luciana Altieri; Laura De Martino; Ippolito Camele

    2012-01-01

    Eight substances that are main components of the essential oils from three Mediterranean aromatic plants (Verbena officinalis, Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare), previously found active against some phytopathogenic Fungi and Stramenopila, have been tested in vitro against five etiological agents of post-harvest fruit decay, Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium italicum, P. expansum, Phytophthora citrophthora and Rhizopus stolonifer. The tested compounds were β-fellandrene, β-pinene, camphene, ca...

  20. Antibacterial activity of the three essential oils on Streptococcus mutans- an in-vitro study

    reevidhya. T. M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti bacterial activity of three essential oils Thyme, Peppermint and neem oil on Streptococcus mutans, the potent initiator and leading cause of dental caries world wide. Essential oils are distillates of the volatile compounds of a plant’s secondary metabolism and may act as phytoprotective agents. Their curative effect has been known since antiquity. It is based on a variety of pharmacological properties which are specific for each plant species. Antibacterial activity of the three essential oils, Thyme, Peppermint and neem oil were screened against Streptococcus mutans, using disc diffusion technique. The results of this study showed that the extracts at different concentrations exhibited anti bacterial activity against the bacterial species tested.

  1. In vitro antimicrobial properties of plant essential oils thymus vulgaris, cymbopogon citratus and laurus nobilis against five important foodborne pathogens

    Alessandra Farias Millezi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Several essential oils of condiment and medicinal plants possess proven antimicrobial activity and are of important interest for the food industry. Therefore, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC of those oils should be determined for various bacteria. MIC varies according to the oil used, the major compounds, and the physiology of the bacterium under study. In the present study, the essential oils of the plants Thymus vulgaris (time, Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass and Laurus nobilis (bay were chemically quantified, and the MIC was determined on the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117, Salmonella enterica Enteritidis S64, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The essential oil of C. citratus demonstrated bacterial activity at all concentrations tested and against all of the bacteria tested. The majority of essential oil compounds were geranial and neral. The major constituent of T. vulgaris was 1.8-cineol and of L. nobilis was linalool, which presented lower antibacterial activity, followed by 1.8-cineol. The Gram-negative bacteria demonstrated higher resistance to the use of the essential oils tested in this study. E. coli was the least sensitive and was inhibited only by the oils of C. citratus and L. nobilis.

  2. The strategic value of upgrading at Suncor's oils sands plant

    The upgrader operated by Suncor's Oil Sands Group (OSG) is a key component of the company's value chain due to its ability to upgrade low value bitumen into high quality petroleum products. This ability is enhanced by the fact that the oil sands plant is an integrated process, with the upgrading facility located at the same site as the bitumen source. The value enhancement achieved across the upgrader is particularly great during periods of high heavy/light oil price spreads. These spreads are currently at high levels, and Suncor believes that this will continue for at least the medium term given domestic supply and environmental factors, with the exception of a local effect as the Bi-Provincial upgrader comes on line. The current inelasticity of the base demand for light, sweet crude will contribute to this effect. The upgrader's potential will also be exploited as part of OSG's strategic plan to significantly expand its product slate. Currently, 94% of the plant's production is a generic light, sweet, resid-free synthetic crude. The upgrader is capable, however, of producing a wide variety of premium products which can be customized to meet the needs of specific customers. Marketing these products will enhance the company's profitability and allow it to better serve its new and existing customers. 5 figs

  3. Pollution control in oil, gas and chemical plants

    Bahadori, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    This unique book covers the fundamental requirements for air, soil, noise and water pollution control in oil and gas refineries, chemical plants, oil terminals, petrochemical plants, and related facilities. Coverage includes design and operational considerations relevant to critical systems such as monitoring of water pollution control, equipment, and engineering techniques as well as engineering/technological methods related to soil, noise and air pollution control. This book also: ·         Covers a diverse list of pollution control strategies important to practitioners, ranging from waste water gathering systems and oil/suspended solids removal to chemical flocculation units, biological treatment, and sludge handling and treatment ·         Provides numerous step-by-step tutorials that orient both entry level and veteran engineers to the essentials of pollution control methods in petroleum and chemical industries ·         Includes a comprehensive glossary providing readers with...

  4. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) Essential Oil Treated by Gamma Radiation

    The essential oil of ginger (Zingiber officinale) was irradiated at doses of 0,5, 10 and 15 kGy. The irradiated as well as non-irradiated oil were tested for their antibacterial activity against one strain of food poisoning bacteria (Bacillus cereus), one strain of the indicator microorganisms (Escherichia coli), two strains of human pathogenic bacteria (Klebsiella pneumonia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), one strain of food spoilage bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) and one strain of plant pathogenic bacteria(Pseudomonas citri). In addition, the studied oils were tested for their antifungal activities against five strains of plant pathogenic fungi (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium oxysporium, Trichoderma viride and Alternaria alternata) to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the antimicrobial activity of the tested oil. The obtained results showed that all tested oils exhibited an inhibition effect for the growth of the microorganisms under investigation. While, Trichoderma viride appeared to be the most resistant fungus with non-irradiated and irradiated ginger essential oil treatments. The ginger essential oil irradiated at dose of 10 kGy appeared to be the best one for inhibition the growth of most tested bacteria and fungi under investigation. Also, changes in chemical constituents of ginger essential oil as affected by gamma radiation were investigated by Gas Chromatography

  5. Evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal activities of olive (Olea europaea essential oil

    R K Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Essential oil Olea europaea was investigated for its antibacterial and antifungal activities. Aim: To evaluate antimicrobial activity of O. europaea essential oil against infectious microbial pathogens. Settings and Design: Seeds of O. europaea were grounded by using domestic mixer and powdered material was hydro-distilled in Clevenger apparatus continuously for 5 hrs to yield essential oil. Essential oil was analysed on Gas-Chromatography-Mass spectrometry (GC-MS from which 24 components were identified, representing total 99.98% of the oil. Extracted oil was evaluated for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. Materials and Methods: Paper disc diffusion and serial micro-dilution assays were performed for the determination of inhibition zone diameters and minimal inhibitory concentration, respectively. Results: The O. europaea essential oil showed the diameter of inhibition zone (DIZ ranging from 19.4 ± 0.07-26.4 ± 0.09 mm at a concentration level of 28 μg/disc (W/V separately in all the ten strains tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration of essential oil against bacterial strains was obtained in a range of 7.0-56.0 μg/ml while in and fungal strains it was in a range of 7.0-28 μg/ml. Statistical analysis: All statistical calculations are expressed as mean ± SE of three replicates. Data were analyzed by one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA to locate significant variations in oil activity in various bacterial and fungal strains followed by the Duncan′s multiple range tests. Conclusions: Antibacterial and antifungal activities of O. europaea essential oil are due to the presence of certain secondary plant metabolites such as terpenoids, steroids and flavonoids, esters, and acids, which were identified in the essential oil. The oil components can be further investigated for their biological activities and study to overcome the problem of drug resistance in microbes.

  6. The enrichment behavior of natural radionuclides in pulverized oil shale-fired power plants

    The oil shale industry is the largest producer of NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) waste in Estonia. Approximately 11–12 million tons of oil shale containing various amounts of natural radionuclides is burned annually in the Narva oil shale-fired power plants, which accounts for approximately 90% of Estonian electricity production. The radionuclide behavior characteristics change during the fuel combustion process, which redistributes the radionuclides between different ash fractions. Out of 24 operational boilers in the power plants, four use circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology and twenty use pulverized fuel (PF) technology. Over the past decade, the PF boilers have been renovated, with the main objective to increase the efficiency of the filter systems. Between 2009 and 2012, electrostatic precipitators (ESP) in four PF energy blocks were replaced with novel integrated desulphurization technology (NID) for the efficient removal of fly ash and SO2 from flue gases. Using gamma spectrometry, activity concentrations and enrichment factors for the 238U (238U, 226Ra, 210Pb) and 232Th (232Th, 228Ra) family radionuclides as well as 40K were measured and analyzed in different PF boiler ash fractions. The radionuclide activity concentrations in the ash samples increased from the furnace toward the back end of the flue gas duct. The highest values in different PF boiler ash fractions were in the last field of the ESP and in the NID ash, where radionuclide enrichment factors were up to 4.2 and 3.3, respectively. The acquired and analyzed data on radionuclide activity concentrations in different PF boiler ashes (operating with an ESP and a NID system) compared to CFB boiler ashes provides an indication that changes in the fuel (oil shale) composition and boiler working parameters, as well as technological enhancements in Estonian oil shale fired power plants, have had a combined effect on the distribution patterns of natural radionuclides in the oil

  7. Activity of essential oils against Bacillus subtilis spores.

    Lawrence, Hayley A; Palombo, Enzo A

    2009-12-01

    Alternative methods for controlling bacterial endospore contamination are desired in a range of industries and applications. Attention has recently turned to natural products, such as essential oils, which have sporicidal activity. In this study, a selection of essential oils was investigated to identify those with activity against Bacillus subtilis spores. Spores were exposed to thirteen essential oils, and surviving spores were enumerated. Cardamom, tea tree, and juniper leaf oils were the most effective, reducing the number of viable spores by 3 logs at concentrations above 1%. Sporicidal activity was enhanced at high temperatures (60 degrees C) or longer exposure times (up to one week). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis identified the components of the active essential oils. However, none of the major oil components exhibited equivalent activity to the whole oils. The fact that oil components, either alone or in combination, did not show the same level of sporicidal activity as the complete oils suggested that minor components may be involved, or that these act synergistically with major components. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine spores after exposure to essential oils and suggested that leakage of spore contents was the likely mode of sporicidal action. Our data have shown that essential oils exert sporicidal activity and may be useful in applications where bacterial spore reduction is desired. PMID:20075624

  8. Chemical composition of the volatile oil from Zanthoxylum avicennae and antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicity

    Yin Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Through literature retrieval, there has been no report on the research of the chemical components in Zanthoxylum avicennae (Lam. DC. This paper extracted and determined the chemical components of the volatile oil in Z. avicennae, and at the same time, measured and evaluated the bioactivity of the volatile oil in Z. avicennae. Materials and Methods: We extract the volatile oil in Z. avicennae by steam distillation method, determined the chemical composition of the volatile oil by GC-MS coupling technique, and adopt the peak area normalization method to measured the relative percentage of each chemical composition in the volatile oil. Meanwhile, we use the Lethal-to-prawn larva bioactivity experiment to screen the cytotoxicity activities of the volatile oil in Z. avicennae, and using the slanting test-tube experiment to determine and evaluate its antibacterial activities in vitro for the eight kinds of plant pathogenic fungi in the volatile oil of the Z. avicennae. Results: The results show that 68 kinds of compounds are determined from the volatile oil of Z. avicennae. The determined part takes up 97.89% of the total peak area. The main ingredients in the volatile oil of Z. avicennae are sesquiterpenoids and monoterpene. The test results show that the volatile oil in Z. avicennae has strong antibacterial activities and cytotoxicity, with the strongest antibacterial activity against the Rhizoctonia solani AG1-1A. Conclusion: This research results will provide reference data for understanding the chemical composition of the volatile oil in the aromatic plant of Z. avicennae and its bioactivity, and for its further development and application.

  9. Process and device for cleaning of water-containing machine oil from nuclear power plants

    The radioactive contaminants produced in water-containing machine oil in plants operated with nuclear power are removed from the contaminated machine oil by adsorption on water-adsorbing material. This document discusses this process. 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Antimicrobial activity of a traditionally used complex essential oil distillate (Olbas(®) Tropfen) in comparison to its individual essential oil ingredients.

    Hamoud, Razan; Sporer, Frank; Reichling, Jürgen; Wink, Michael

    2012-08-15

    Plant extracts and essential oils have been widely studied and used as antimicrobial agents in the last decades. In our study we investigated the antimicrobial activities of Olbas(®) Tropfen (in the following named Olbas), a traditionally used complex essential oil distillate, in comparison to its individual essential oil ingredients. Olbas (10 g) consists of three major components such as peppermint oil (5.3 g), eucalyptus oil (2.1 g), and cajuput oil (2.1 g) and of two minor constituents like juniper berry oil (0.3 g) and wintergreen oil (0.2 g). The composition of Olbas and the five individual essential oils were characterized by GLC-MS. According to GLC-MS analysis 1,8-cineol is the main component of the complex essential oil distillate followed by menthol and menthone. The minimum inhibitory and minimum microbicidal concentrations of Olbas and each of the single essential oils were evaluated in 17 species/strains of bacteria and fungi. Time-kill assay was performed to compare the microbicidal activity of Olbas and peppermint oil during several time intervals. Olbas displayed a high antimicrobial activity against all test strains used in this study, among them antibiotic resistant MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and VRE (vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus). Its antimicrobial activity was comparable to that of peppermint oil which was the most potent one of all individual essential oils tested. In the time kill assay Olbas as well as peppermint oil demonstrated similar microbicidal activities. Based on its wide antimicrobial properties Olbas can be a useful agent for the treatment of uncomplicated infections of skin and respiratory tract. PMID:22739414

  11. Plant oil-based shape memory polymer using acrylic monolith

    T. Tsujimoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the synthesis of a plant oil-based material using acrylic monolith. An acrylic monolith bearing oxirane groups was prepared via simple technique that involved the dissolution of poly(glycidyl methacrylate-comethyl methacrylate (PGMA in ethanolic – aqueous solution by heating and subsequent cooling. The PGMA monolith had topologically porous structure, which was attributed to the phase separation of the polymer solution. The PGMA monolith was impregnated by epoxidized soybean oil (ESO containing thermally-latent catalyst, and the subsequent curing produced a crosslinked material with relatively good transparency. The Young’s modulus and the tensile strength of polyESO/PGMA increased compared with the ESO homopolymer. The strain at break of polyESO/PGMA was larger than that of the ESO homopolymer and crosslinked PGMA. Furthermore, polyESO/PGMA exhibited good shape memory-recovery behavior.

  12. Essential Oils from the Malaysian Citrus (Rutaceae Medicinal Plants

    Siti Nur Atiqah Md Othman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article appraises the extraction methods, compositions, and bioactivities of the essential oils from the Citrus species (family: Rutaceae endemic to Malaysia including C. aurantifolia, C. grandis, C. hystrix, and C. microcarpa. Generally, the fresh peels and leaves of the Citrus species were extracted using different methods such as steam and water distillation, Likens-Nikerson extraction, solvent extraction, and headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME. Most of the Citrus oils were found to be rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons with limonene (1 as the major component identified in the peels of C. aurantifolia (39.3%, C. grandis (81.6%–96.9%, and C. microcarpa (94.0%, while sabinene (19 was the major component in the peels of C. hystrix (36.4%–48.5%. In addition, citronellal (20 (61.7%–72.5%, linalool (18 (56.5%, and hedycaryol (23 (19.0% were identified as the major components in the oil of C. hystrix leaves, C. grandis blossom and C. microcarpa leaves, respectively. The C. hystrix essential oil has been experimentally shown to have antimicrobial and antifeedant activities, while no bioactivity study has been reported on the essential oils of other Malaysian Citrus species.

  13. Detection of plant oil DNA using high resolution melting (HRM) post PCR analysis: a tool for disclosure of olive oil adulteration.

    Vietina, Michelangelo; Agrimonti, Caterina; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-12-15

    Extra virgin olive oil is frequently subjected to adulterations with addition of oils obtained from plants other than olive. DNA analysis is a fast and economic tool to identify plant components in oils. Extraction and amplification of DNA by PCR was tested in olives, in milled seeds and in oils, to investigate its use in olive oil traceability. DNA was extracted from different oils made of hazelnut, maize, sunflower, peanut, sesame, soybean, rice and pumpkin. Comparing the DNA melting profiles in reference plant materials and in the oils, it was possible to identify any plant components in oils and mixtures of oils. Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) platform has been added of the new methodology of high resolution melting (HRM), both were used to analyse olive oils mixed with different percentage of other oils. Results showed HRM a cost effective method for efficient detection of adulterations in olive oils. PMID:23993554

  14. Oil price shocks and stock market activity

    Results from a vector autoregression show that oil prices and oil price volatility both play important roles in affecting real stock returns. There is evidence that oil price dynamics have changed. After 1986, oil price movements explain a larger fraction of the forecast error variance in real stock returns than do interest rates. There is also evidence that oil price volatility shocks have asymmetric effects on the economy. 29 refs

  15. Walnut Staminate Flowers Can Be Explored as a Supplementary Plant Oil Source

    2006-01-01

    Fossil fuel is currently the major energy source driving global socio-economy, but its stock is being heavily depleted due to increasing anthropogenic activities worldwide. There are also concerns regarding the burning of fossil fuels, which contributes to global climate warming and air pollution. As such, the development of biodiesel as a non-toxic, biodegradable, and renewable alternative energy source using oil crops such as soybean and rapeseed has quickly emerged in the West countries. However, the production of oil crops in China is far from sufficient to meet the demands of the country's population of 1.3 billion, and increasing oil crop production is inhibited by a severe shortage of agricultural land, which currently averages 0.2 acre per person and, as such, is less than half the world average. The current national policy in China regarding land use is more towards revering cultivated lands in ravins and hills to forestry, which presents an ideal opportunity to further develop plantations of walnut (Juglans regia L.) trees, a plant that is tolerant to drought and infertile soils and has a high oil content. Study in this paper shows that one ament of walnut staminate flowers produces about 0.168 g dry pollen, and the dry pollen contained 49.67% oil. Based on this discovery, oil yield obtained from staminate flowers is estimated to reach 6.95% of that from walnut nuts. Thus walnut staminate flower is suggested to explore as supplementary plant oil source, and has a great opportunity to utilize as a biodiesel feedstock.

  16. Nematicidal activity of essential oils and volatiles derived from Portuguese aromatic flora against the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    Barbosa, P.; Lima, A.S.; Vieira, P.; Dias, L.S.; Tinoco, M. T.; Barroso, J.G.; Pedro, L. G.; Figueiredo, A. C.; Mota, M.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty seven essential oils, isolated from plants representing 11 families of Portuguese flora, were screened for their nematicidal activity against the pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and the volatiles by distillation-extraction, and both were analysed by GC and GC-MS. High nematicidal activity was achieved with essential oils from Chamaespartium tridentatum, Origanum vulgare, Satureja montana, Thymbra capitata, and T...

  17. Effect of Plant Oils upon Lipase and Citric Acid Production in Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast

    Farshad Darvishi; Iraj Nahvi; Hamid Zarkesh-Esfahani; Fariborz Momenbeik

    2009-01-01

    The nonconventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica degrades very efficiently hydrophobic substrates to produce organic acids, single-cell oil, lipases, and so forth. The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical behavior and simultaneous production of valuable metabolites such as lipase, citric acid (CA), and single-cell protein (SCP) by Yarrowia lipolytica DSM 3286 grown on various plant oils as sole carbon source. Among tested plant oils, olive oil proved to be the best medium for lip...

  18. Activity antifungal of the essential oils; aqueous and ethanol extracts from Citrus aurantium L.

    Metoui, N; Gargouri, S; Amri, I; Fezzani, T; Jamoussi, B; Hamrouni, L

    2015-01-01

    Our study is about the essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. in Tunisia and its plant extract. The yield of this essential oil is 0, 56% but the yield of the extract of plant was 17.1% for the aqueous extract ant 18.3% for the ethanolic extract. The analysis of chemical composition by using GC and GC/MS showed the essential oil of C. aurantium L. species to be rich in monoterpenes such as α-terpineol, lianolyl acetate, linalool and limonene. The antifungal activity of this oil showed us an inhibition of the germination of mushrooms, in the same way we could note that the biologic activities are generally assigned to the chemotypes high content in oxygenated monoterpene. PMID:26207731

  19. Antimicrobial and Antifungal Activity of Pelargonium roseum Essential Oils

    Gâlea Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The volatile oils exhibited considerable inhibitory effects against all the organisms under test, in some cases comparable with those of the reference antibiotics. There were no considerable differences between the antimicrobial activities of the oil obtained by distillation and commercially available Pelargonium oils.

  20. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  1. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  2. Allelopatic effects of some medicinal plant essential oils on plant seeds germination

    ALI SHOKOUHIAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of essential oils from some medicinal plants on seed germination was studied with the aim of assessing their potential use as bioherbicides. The experiment was conducted as factorial based on completely randomized design (CRD with three replications. Seeds of 3 summer crops including lettuce (Lactuca sativa, pepper (Piper longum and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum were exposed to essential oils of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis, thyme (Thymus vulgaris and anise (Pimpinella anisum at 3 different concentrations (25 and 50% diluted and undiluted. Treated seeds were grown in a growth chamber at 25°C for 5 days. The number of germinated seeds in each Petri dish was daily counted. After five days seed germination percentage (Ge was calculated. Biplot analysis was performed using genotype plus genotype environment interaction (GGE method. Results showed that the allelopathic effect on Ge was varied among studied plants, which was mainly due to i differences in the composition of the studied essential oils and ii different allelopathic effects of the studied essential oils on Ge. Accordingly, compared to the individual use, combining several essential oils would have a greater inhibitory effect on Ge of weeds.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of peppermint essential oil (Mentha piperita L.

    Shapoval O.G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Рurposе. To study antimicrobial activity of fume of the essential oil of peppermint against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Materials and methods: The screening study of antimicrobial activity of solutions of essential oil by disk-diffusion method and activity of essential oil fume of own preparation and pharmaceutical form of oil according to standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Esсherichia coli and 12 clinical strains of staphylococci (6 methicillin-resistant and 6 methicillin-sensitive has been carried out. Results: Essential oil of own preparation and pharmaceutical form showed equal antimicrobial activity against strains of staphylococci. Essential oil of own preparation has been determined to reveal higher activity against gram-negative strains. Conclusion: Received data have proved the presence of antimicrobial activity against all strains of microorganisms and mostly against staphy-lococci

  4. Retention Indices for Frequently Reported Compounds of Plant Essential Oils

    Babushok, V. I.; Linstrom, P. J.; Zenkevich, I. G.

    2011-12-01

    Gas chromatographic retention indices were evaluated for 505 frequently reported plant essential oil components using a large retention index database. Retention data are presented for three types of commonly used stationary phases: dimethyl silicone (nonpolar), dimethyl silicone with 5% phenyl groups (slightly polar), and polyethylene glycol (polar) stationary phases. The evaluations are based on the treatment of multiple measurements with the number of data records ranging from about 5 to 800 per compound. Data analysis was limited to temperature programmed conditions. The data reported include the average and median values of retention index with standard deviations and confidence intervals.

  5. Black and White Oils Partial Oxidation on Pilot Plant Unit

    Hanika, Jiří; Lederer, J.; Nečesaný, F.; Nečesaný, F., jr.; Poslední, W.; Tukač, V.; Veselý, Václav

    Prague: Czech Society of Industrial Chemistry, 2014 - (Kalenda, P.; Lubojacký, J.), s. 20-25 ISBN 978-80-86238-64-7. [mezinárodní chemicko-technologická konference /2./. Mikulov (CZ), 07.04.2014-09.04.2014] Grant ostatní: UniCRE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0071 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : hydrocarbon oil * partial oxidation * pilot plant Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.icct.cz

  6. Chemical composition and biological activities of essential oils of Azadirachta indica A. Juss.

    S S El-Hawary

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Essential oils of Neem, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (family Meliaceae leaves and flowers were prepared by hydrodistillation method. The chemical composition of the oil samples was investigated by GC/MS. Hydrocarbon constituted 85.36% of the leaves oil .The major compounds were β-Elemene (33.39%, γ- Elemene (9.89%, Germacrene D (9.72%, Caryophyllene (6.8% and Bicyclogermacrene (5.23% while the percent of the oxygenated compounds were (5.04% mainly attributed to sesquiterpene oxide. On the other hand, flowers oil hydrocarbons constituted 63.22% composed mainly of pentacosane (18.58%, tetracosane (10.65%, β-germacrene (9.73%, β- caryophyllene (5.84% and dodecene (4.54% while the percent of the oxygenated compounds were 28.3% mainly attributed to octadecanol (16.7%, verdiflorol (5.32%, farnesol (1.63% and α– terpineol (1.51%. The antioxidant properties determined by 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assays, antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative, antifungal and larvicidal activities were promising and in relation with the chemical composition of the essential oils. The results indicated that essential oil of flowers could be especially promising as an inexpensive source of effective antioxidant /antimicrobial /larvicidal agents tantamount to fixed oil of the neem seeds.Industrial relevance. The use of medicinal plants is a universal phenomenon. Natural products from plants are rich source to identify, select and process new drugs for medicinal use. Most of research focused on fixed oil of neem seeds but very little was concerned about volatile oils of leaves and flowers. The diverse biological activities of Neem essential oils can be applied on a large scale as antioxidant, antimicrobial and larvicidal agents comprising many important benefits including their volatility, lower level of risk to the environment than with synthetic ones.Keywords. Azadirachta indica; Neem; essential oil; GC/MS; antioxidant

  7. Screening of some Malay medicated oils for antimicrobial activity

    Khalid Khalisanni; Kiong Hung Lee

    2010-01-01

    Oils from six Malay medicated oils, used traditionally in the treatment of infectious and septic diseases in humans, were tested for their antimicrobial property. The aim was to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of six Malay medicated oils against certain microbial isolates. Locally available Malay medicated oils were checked for their antimicrobial activities using six species of bacteria: E. coli, Salmonella spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus, Bacillus sub...

  8. Composition and antifungal activity of the essential oil of Mentha cervina from Portugal

    Gonçalves, M. J.; Vicente, A. M.; C. Cavaleiro; Salgueiro, L.

    2007-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Mentha cervinacollected during the flowering and vegetative phases of the plants were investigated by GC and GC-MS. Quantitative differences were observed in the compositions, particularly in the amounts of pulegone (12.9–79.6%) and isomenthone (8.7–77.0%). Antifungal activity of the oils was evaluated by minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimal lethal concentrations (MLC) against ...

  9. Larvicidal and mosquito repellent activities of Pine (Pinus longifolia, Family: Pinaceae) oil

    M.A. Ansari, P.K. Mittal, R.K. Razdan & U. Sreehari

    2005-01-01

    Background & objectives: Various plant-based products are safe and biodegradable alternatives tosynthetic chemicals for use against mosquitoes. Oil of Pinus longifolia is traditionally used forprotection against mosquitoes in some rural areas but there is no documented report of its use againstmosquitoes. The present study was undertaken to scientifically evaluate the activity of Pine oilagainst mosquitoes.Methods: The oil was procured from the market and its contents were chemically analysed...

  10. Chemical composition, antioxidative and antimicrobial activity of essential oil Ocimum sanctum L.

    Beatović Damir V.; Jelačić Slavica Ć.; Oparnica Čedo D.; Krstić-Milošević Dijana B.; Glamočlija Jasmina M.; Ristić Mihailo S.; Šiljegović Jovana D.

    2013-01-01

    Ocimum sanctum L. (Lamiaceae) sin. Ocimum tenuiflorum L. or Tulsi basil is a plant originating from tropical and subtropical areas of India. It is used in both the traditional and official medicine in India. Tulsi is a type of basil that is insufficiently explored and studied in Europe. The goal of this paper is to determine the chemical composition, antioxidative, and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil Ocimum sanctum L. grown in Serbia. The quantity of essential oil in 100 g o...

  11. Beneficial of activated charcoal on embryo culture of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    Kamnoon Kanchanapoom; Boonsanong Chourkaew; Wisut Patcharapisutsin

    2001-01-01

    Mature embryos of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)variety Tenera were cultured on Eeuwens(1976) or Y3 medium without plant growth regulators and supplemented with 0.05% activated charcoal (AC).Shoots with well-developed roots were produced on the medium. It was found that AC improved growth of seedlings. The effect of AC containing media is discussed. The embryos were fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically. Anatomical study revealed that the morphological organization of oil...

  12. Antimicrobial activity and acute and chronic toxicity of the essential oil of Lippia origanoides

    Viviane A. Andrade; Anna C. Almeida; Dayane S. Souza; Keila G.F. Colen; Macêdo, Auricélio A.; Ernane R Martins; Fonseca, Francine S. A.; Renato L. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is a growing interest in medicinal plants, because of an increased demand for alternate therapies. In this study, the antimicrobial activity and toxicity of the essential oil of Lippia origanoides (L. origanoides) were investigated. The essential oil of L. origanoides was extracted by steam-dragging distillation and its constituents were identified by chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Among the 15 compounds identified, the most abundant were carvacrol (29.00%), o...

  13. Chemical composition and antiprotozoal activities of Colombian Lippia spp essential oils and their major components

    Patricia Escobar; Sandra Milena Leal; Laura Viviana Herrera; Jairo Rene Martinez; Elena Stashenko

    2010-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological activities of 19 essential oils and seven of their major components were tested against free and intracellular forms of Leishmania chagasi and Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as well as Vero and THP-1 mammalian cell lines. The essential oils were obtained from different species of Lippia, a widely distributed genus of Colombian plants. They were extracted by microwave radiation-assisted hydro-distillation and characterised by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major com...

  14. Essential oil composition and antimicrobial activity of Lobelia pyramidalis Wall

    Bishta, Ganga; Devendra, Mishra; Joshi, Shivani; Khetwala, Khadak Singh

    2012-01-01

    The essential oil of Lobelia pyramidalis was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. A total of 21 con-stituents comprising 77.88 % of the total oil were identified. Perilla ketone constituted 25.61 % of the oil followed by camphorquinone (12.16 %), dibutyl phthalate (10.66 %) and allyl nonanoate (8.47 %). The antimicrobial activity of the oil was evaluated using the disc diffusion method and the microdilution technique. The results showed that the oil exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity.

  15. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of the Essence oil of Peppermint (Mentha piperita L

    Z Izadi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Peppermint (Mentha piperita L. is a perennial herbaceous essence oil bearing plant which belongs to the Lamiaceae family. This plant is a valuable and important herb which has many therapeutic properties. Recent investigations have shown its excellent anti-irritable bowel syndrome effects. Other properties of this plant are anti-inflammatory, analgesic, promote menstrual flow, antipyretic, antiseptic and anti-rheumatoid effects. This investigation was conducted to study the antibacterial properties of peppermint essence oil, as well as determining the content and composition of essential oil. Materials & Methods: In order to study the effect of the antibacterial activity of the essence oil of peppermint, this experimental study was conducted in 2009 at Hamedan University of Medical Sciences. The aerial parts of the peppermint were harvested in summer when it was in the full blooming stage of the plant. The collected aerial parts were then dried in the shade. The essence oil of the aerial parts was extracted by hydro-distillation technique using Clevenger apparatus and was analyzed by the capillary GC and GC/MS method. Anti bacterial properties of the essence oil on four pathogenic bacteria were determined by using broth dilution and well diffusion agar methods. The collected data were analyzed by the SPSS version 11.5 software, using the independent t-test. Results: The essence oil of peppermint showed the maximum anti bacterial effect on E. coli and the minimum effect on S. aureus and P. aeuroginosa. The essence oil content of aerial parts was 0.69% (w/w based on dry weight. The amount of menthol which is the main constituent of the oil and as an antiseptic component was 47.9%. Conclusion: Results of this study revealed that the essential oil of peppermint is rich in menthol and can be considered as an anti-bacterial agent in drug and food industries.

  16. Toxicities of oils, dispersants and dispersed oils to algae and aquatic plants: Review and database value to resource sustainability

    Phytotoxicity results are reviewed for oils, dispersants and dispersed oils. The phytotoxicity database consists largely of results from a patchwork of reactive research conducted after oil spills to marine waters. Toxicity information is available for at least 41 crude oils and 56 dispersants. As many as 107 response parameters have been monitored for 85 species of unicellular and multicellular algae, 28 wetland plants, 13 mangroves and 9 seagrasses. Effect concentrations have varied by as much as six orders of magnitude due to experimental diversity. This diversity restricts phytotoxicity predictions and identification of sensitive species, life stages and response parameters. As a result, evidence-based risk assessments for most aquatic plants and petrochemicals and dispersants are not supported by the current toxicity database. A proactive and experimentally-consistent approach is recommended to provide threshold toxic effect concentrations for sensitive life stages of aquatic plants inhabiting diverse ecosystems. -- The phytotoxicity database does not support toxicity predictions for most oils and dispersants

  17. Antimicrobial, antibiofilm and antitumor activities of essential oil of Agastache rugosa from Xinjiang, China

    Gong Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the study, we evaluated chemical composition and antimicrobial, antibiofilm, and antitumor activities of essential oils from dried leaf essential oil of leaf and flower of Agastache rugosa for the first time. Essential oil of leaf and flower was evaluated with GC and GC–MS methods, and the essential oil of flower revealed the presence of 21 components, whose major compounds were pulegone (34.1%, estragole (29.5%, and p-Menthan-3-one (19.2%. 26 components from essential oil of leaf were identified, the major compounds were p-Menthan-3-one (48.8% and estragole (20.8%. At the same time, essential oil of leaf, there is a very effective antimicrobial activity with MIC ranging from 9.4 to 42 μg ml−1 and potential antibiofilm, antitumor activities for essential oils of flower and leaf essential oil of leaf. The study highlighted the diversity in two different parts of A. rugosa grown in Xinjiang region and other places, which have different active constituents. Our results showed that this native plant may be a good candidate for further biological and pharmacological investigations.

  18. Antimicrobial, antibiofilm and antitumor activities of essential oil of Agastache rugosa from Xinjiang, China.

    Haiyan, Gong; Lijuan, He; Shaoyu, Li; Chen, Zhang; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2016-07-01

    In the study, we evaluated chemical composition and antimicrobial, antibiofilm, and antitumor activities of essential oils from dried leaf essential oil of leaf and flower of Agastache rugosa for the first time. Essential oil of leaf and flower was evaluated with GC and GC-MS methods, and the essential oil of flower revealed the presence of 21 components, whose major compounds were pulegone (34.1%), estragole (29.5%), and p-Menthan-3-one (19.2%). 26 components from essential oil of leaf were identified, the major compounds were p-Menthan-3-one (48.8%) and estragole (20.8%). At the same time, essential oil of leaf, there is a very effective antimicrobial activity with MIC ranging from 9.4 to 42 μg ml(-1) and potential antibiofilm, antitumor activities for essential oils of flower and leaf essential oil of leaf. The study highlighted the diversity in two different parts of A. rugosa grown in Xinjiang region and other places, which have different active constituents. Our results showed that this native plant may be a good candidate for further biological and pharmacological investigations. PMID:27298587

  19. In vitro Activity of Celery Essential Oil against Malassezia furfur

    Chee, Hee Youn; Lee, Min Hee

    2009-01-01

    Antifungal activity of celery essential oil against Malassezia furfur was investigated using broth microdilution and vapor contact methods. Potent antifungal activity was evident using both methods. Fungicidal activity was revealed in the vapor contact method.

  20. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Essential Oils: A Short Review

    Maria Graça Miguel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are complex mixtures isolated from aromatic plants which may possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of interest in thye food and cosmetic industries as well as in the human health field. In this work, a review was done on the most recent publications concerning their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. At the same time a survey of the methods generally used for the evaluation of antioxidant activity and some of the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory activities of essential oils are also reported.

  1. Oil Palm Physical and Optical Characteristics from Two Different Planting Materials

    Mohd Hafiz Mohd Hazir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study discovers the uniqueness of physical and optical characteristics of the oil palm Fresh Fruit Bunches (FFB and is based on two different tenera planting materials namely PORIM SERIES 1 (PS 1 and PORIM SERIES 2 (PS 2. Three methods have been done to determine the characteristics which are as follows; 1 manual approach by measuring the weight, length, width and circumference of oil palm FFB, 2 machine vision technique for color information extraction and 3 multi-band portable, active optical sensor system to determine the chlorophyll and anthocyanin content. A total of thirty bunches were standardized into a ripe grade and have been used as samples in this study. The results showed that each planting material produces different physical and optical characteristics. The correlation between the weight and linear dimensions of oil palm FFB was found to be 80%. This study gives very important information in helping researchers on the development of future non-contact and non-destruction oil palm FFB grading equipment and system.

  2. Chemical Composition, Radical Scavenging and Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oils of Thymus boveii and Thymus hyemalis

    Bektas Tepe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil of T. boveii and T. hyemalis. According to the results of GC-EIMS analysis, essential oils were found rich in phenols and hydrocarbons. p-cymene, thymol and carvacrol were mainly found as the major compounds for the essential oils. Both plant species showed remarkable antioxidant activity in all test systems except chelating effect. In the case of antimicrobial activity, the oils showed remarkable growth inhibition against the tested microorganism except K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, L. monocytogenes, P. fluorescens.

  3. Early impact of oil palm planting density on vegetative and oil yield variables in West Africa

    Bonneau Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A range of various different planting distances (from 7.5 to 9.5 m between oil palms were tested using an equilateral triangle design in a plantation density experiment which was settled in an oil palm commercial plantation in Nigeria. Climatic conditions were quite stable, with two seasons and around 2000 mm of annual rainfall. The soil was of desaturated ferralitic type, sandy on the surface, deep and without coarse elements. The early impact of plantation density was analysed at eight years after planting. Some early signs of depressive effect on yields were found for high planting densities (180 and 205 p/ha. Such a negative impact was not severe enough to counteract the effects of a higher number of palms per hectare. As a consequence, a gradient could be observed as yields (in tons of bunches per hectare increased with density. We can anticipate that the competition effect between palms will increase over time with high densities, so that the counteracting point ought to be reached in a few years. A thinning treatment has been included in the protocol. Thinning was carried out at the end of the eight-year period.

  4. Spilled oil and infaunal activity - Modification of burrowing behavior and redistribution of oil

    Clifton, H.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments in Willapa Bay, Washington, indicates the degree to which the presence of spilled oil modifies the burrowing behavior of infauna and the extent to which the animals redistribute oil into intertidal sediment. Small amounts of North Slope crude oil introduced at low tide directly into burrow openings (mostly made by the crustacean Callianassa) resulted in a limited and temporary reduction in the number of burrow openings. In contrast, a layer of oil-saturated sand 1 cm thick buried about 5 cm below the sediment surface sharply reduced the number of burrow openings. After a year, the few new burrows penetrated only the margins of the experimental plot, and bioturbation below the buried oil-saturated sand layer declined dramatically. The experiments suggest that small amounts of oil temporarily stranded by tides in themselves have no long-range effect on burrowing behavior. The fauna, however, are capable of introducing measurable amounts of oil into the subsurface, where it is retained long after the rest of the stranded oil had washed away. A buried layer of oil-saturated sand greatly reduces infaunal activity; the oil presents an effective barrier that can persist for years. The oil incorporated into the sediment from burrow openings showed evidence of degradation after 7 months. In contrast the layer of buried oil remained essentially undergraded after a period of two years, even though oil in lower concentrations above the layer was degraded after a period of one year. This variation in degree of degradation of the buried oil, as well as the heterogeneity of oil distribution wherever the oil has been incorporated from the surface, emphasises the importance of careful sampling in any attempt to locate or monitor the presence of spilled oil in the substrate.In a series of experiments in Willapa Bay, Washington, small amounts of North Slope crude oil introduced at low tide directly into burrow openings resulted in a limited and temporary

  5. Antimicrobial activity of Amazonian oils against Paenibacillus species.

    Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; dos Santos Alves, Camilla Filippi; Schneider, Taiane; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Aurich, Carlos; Giongo, Janice Luehring; Brandelli, Adriano; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo

    2012-03-01

    The Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the primary bacterial pathogen of honeybee brood and the causative agent of American foulbrood disease (AFB). One of the feasible alternative treatments being used for their control of this disease is essential oils. In this study in vitro antimicrobial activity of Andiroba and Copaíba essential oils against Paenibacillus species, including P. larvae was evaluated. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in Mueller-Hinton broth by the microdilution method was assessed. Andiroba registered MIC values of 1.56-25%, while the MICs values obtained for Copaíba oil were of 1.56-12.5%. In order to determine the time-response effect of essential oils on P. larvae, this microorganism was exposed to the oils for up to 48 h. After 24 h treatment with Andiroba oil and after 48 h treatment with Copaíba oil no viable cells of P. larvae ATCC 9545 were observed. The possible toxic effect of essential oils were assessed by the spraying application method of the same concentrations of MICs. Bee mortality was evident only in treatment with Andiroba oil and the Copaíba oil shows no toxic effects after 10 days of observation. Taking together ours results showed for the first time that these oils presented a high activity against Paenibacillus species showing that Copaíba oil may be a candidate for the treatment or prevention of AFB. PMID:22200645

  6. Effect of salt, drought and metal stress on essential oil yield and quality in plants.

    Biswas, Shreyasee; Koul, Monika; Bhatnagar, Ashok Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Essential oil extracted from plants is of high commercial value in medicine, cosmetics and perfumery. Enhancing yield and maintaining the quality of oil is of significant commercial importance. Production of oil in plants is dependent on various biotic and abiotic factors to which the plants are subjected during their growth. Plants are exposed to various degrees of stress on account of natural and human-induced factors. Salinization, drought and presence of heavy metals in the substratum cause substantial effect on the yield and quality of bioactive constituents in the oil. In many plants, the level and kind of stress have detrimental effects on the growth and development. This review provides an account of the studies on some common abiotic stresses to which essential oil plants are exposed during their growth period and their influence on quality and quantity of oil. The yield and quality vary in different plants and so is the response. Enhancing essential oil productivity is an important challenge, and understanding the role played by stress may offer significant advantages to the essential oil farmers and processing industry. Scientific evaluation of the data on many important but unexplored essential oil plants will also help in mitigating, ameliorating and minimizing the harmful effects caused by stress. PMID:22164806

  7. Advanced analytical techniques for the extraction and characterization of plant-derived essential oils by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Waseem, Rabia; Low, Kah Hin

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, essential oils have received a growing interest because of the positive health effects of their novel characteristics such as antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. For the extraction of plant-derived essential oils, there is the need of advanced analytical techniques and innovative methodologies. An exhaustive study of hydrodistillation, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound- and microwave-assisted extraction, solid-phase microextraction, pressurized liquid extraction, pressurized hot water extraction, liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-phase microextraction, matrix solid-phase dispersion, and gas chromatography (one- and two-dimensional) hyphenated with mass spectrometry for the extraction through various plant species and analysis of essential oils has been provided in this review. Essential oils are composed of mainly terpenes and terpenoids with low-molecular-weight aromatic and aliphatic constituents that are particularly important for public health. PMID:25403494

  8. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OIL OF LEONOTIS NEPETAEFOLIA

    Gopal, R. Hamsaveni; Vasanth, Saradha; Vasudevan, S.V.

    1994-01-01

    The essential oil of Leonotis nepetaefolia (Family – Labiatae) was tested for its antibacterial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and found to be moderately active excepting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The essential oil also was found to be inhibitory to dermatophytic fungi and suppressive to other aerial fungi. Hence the oil may be quite useful in skin infection due to dermatophytes even with secondary bacterial infections.

  9. Repellent Activity of Botanical Oils against Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    Kuhns, Emily H; Martini, Xavier; Hoyte, Angel; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the insect vector of the pathogen causing huanglongbing. We selected three botanical oils to evaluate behavioral activity against D. citri. In laboratory olfactometer assays, fir oil was repellent to D. citri females, while litsea and citronella oils elicited no response from D. citri females. In choice settling experiments, D. citri settled almost completely on control plants rather than on plants treated with fir oil at a 9.5 mg/day release rate. Therefore, we conducted field trials to determine if fir oil reduced D. citri densities in citrus groves. We found no repellency of D. citri from sweet orange resets that were treated with fir oil dispensers releasing 10.4 g/day/tree as compared with control plots. However, we found a two-week decrease in populations of D. citri as compared with controls when the deployment rate of these dispensers was doubled. Our results suggest that treatment of citrus with fir oil may have limited activity as a stand-alone management tool for D. citri and would require integration with other management practices. PMID:27429006

  10. Repellent Activity of Botanical Oils against Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae

    Emily H. Kuhns

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the insect vector of the pathogen causing huanglongbing. We selected three botanical oils to evaluate behavioral activity against D. citri. In laboratory olfactometer assays, fir oil was repellent to D. citri females, while litsea and citronella oils elicited no response from D. citri females. In choice settling experiments, D. citri settled almost completely on control plants rather than on plants treated with fir oil at a 9.5 mg/day release rate. Therefore, we conducted field trials to determine if fir oil reduced D. citri densities in citrus groves. We found no repellency of D. citri from sweet orange resets that were treated with fir oil dispensers releasing 10.4 g/day/tree as compared with control plots. However, we found a two-week decrease in populations of D. citri as compared with controls when the deployment rate of these dispensers was doubled. Our results suggest that treatment of citrus with fir oil may have limited activity as a stand-alone management tool for D. citri and would require integration with other management practices.

  11. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from four Ruta species growing in Algeria.

    Haddouchi, Farah; Chaouche, Tarik Mohammed; Zaouali, Yosr; Ksouri, Riadh; Attou, Amina; Benmansour, Abdelhafid

    2013-11-01

    Antimicrobial properties of plants essential oils have been investigated in order to suggest them as potential tools to overcome the microbial drug resistance and the increasing incidence of food borne diseases problems. The aim of this research is to study the antibacterial and antifungal effects of four traditional plants essential oils, Ruta angustifolia, Ruta chalepensis, Ruta graveolens and Ruta tuberculata, against standard bacterial and fungal strains. The chemical compounds of the oils were examined by GC/MS. Results revealed a powerful antifungal activity against filamentous fungi. Aspergillus fumigatus and Cladosporium herbarum are the most sensitive strains to these oils with MIC values less than 3.5 μg ml(-1) for certain oils, reaching 7.8 μg ml(-1) for other. GC/MS essay exhibited ketones as the most abundant constituent of these oils except for R. tuberculata essential oil which has a completely different composition, monoterpenes alcohols being the most abundant. These compositions explain their potential antifungal activity. PMID:23768355

  12. Effect of plant age on fresh rhizome yield and volatile oil composition of Acorus calamus linn

    The effect of plant age on growth, yield and oil content and composition of sweet flag (Acorus calamus) was studied in four populations at four different ages, raised at CIMAP experimental research Farm, India. The plant age had significant effect on total fresh yield and leaves and rhizomes fresh weights. These parameters showed increasing trend with advancement of harvesting age up to 6 years, and age increase to more than 15 years resulted in their decrease . Significantly highest number of shoots per square meter was recorded in more than 15 year old crop, and the lowest number was recorded in the 6 year old crop. The highest oil yield of rhizomes was obtained from the six year old plants. Shoot length, rhizome leaf ratio (R/L) and oil yield of leaves did not show significant differences with the age of the plant. However, 6 year old plants recorded the highest average shoot length, and the three year old plants gave the highest oil yield of leaves. The total fresh yield showed a highly significant positive correlation with rhizomes fresh weight (r = 0.999), leaves fresh weight (r=0.994) and with rhizome: leaf ratio (r = 0.998). Highly significant positive correlations (r = 0.999) were also obtained between rhizomes oil content and rhizomes oil yield and between leaves oil content and leaves oil yield. β-asarone was the most dominant constituent in the oils of both leaves and rhizomes , constituting an average of 84.2% in the leaves and 88.9% in the rhizomes oil. The study indicated that the oil content of fresh rhizomes and leaves is the main contributor to their oil yields, and selection for high oil content will be effective. The constituents of the volatile oil remained the same irrespective of the plant age.(Author)

  13. Persistance of the insecticidal activity of five essential oils on the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais (Motsch.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Ngamo Tinkeu, L S; Goudoum, A; Ngassoum, M B; Mapongmetsem, P M; Kouninki, H; Hance, T

    2004-01-01

    Essential oils of aromatic plants are popularise as protectant with low persistance. The evaluation of this duration of activity was carried out for five aromatic plants: Annona senegalensis (Annonaceae), Eucalyptus citriodora et Ecalyptus saligna (Myrtaceae), Lippia rugosa (Verbenaceae) and Ocimum gratissimum (Lamiaceae). They have significant insecticidal activity on S. Zeamais, on the first day of application, this activity decreases after 2 or 4 days. After 8 more than 50% of the efficacy is lossed for all the plants excepted A. senegalensis. PMID:15759405

  14. Discrimination of plant stress caused by oil pollution and waterlogging using hyperspectral and thermal remote sensing

    Emengini, Ebele Josephine; Blackburn, George Alan; Theobald, Julian Charles

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing of plant stress holds promise for detecting environmental pollution by oil. However, in oil-rich delta regions, waterlogging is a frequent source of plant stress that has similar physiological effects to oil pollution. This study investigated the capabilities of remote sensing for discriminating between these two sources of plant stress. Bean plants were subjected to oil pollution, waterlogging, and combined oil and waterlogging treatments. Canopy physiological, hyperspectral, and thermal measurements were taken every two to three days after treatment to follow the stress responses. For plants treated with oil, spectral and thermal responses were evident six days before symptoms could be observed visually. In waterlogged plants, only spectral responses were observed, but these were present up to eight days before visual symptoms. A narrowband reflectance ratio was efficient in detecting stress caused by oil and waterlogging. Canopy temperature and a thermal index were good indicators of oil and combined oil and waterlogging stress, but insensitive to waterlogging alone. Hence, this study provides evidence that combined hyperspectral and thermal remote sensing of vegetation has potential for monitoring oil pollution in environments that are also subjected to waterlogging.

  15. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity by essential oil from Citrus paradisi.

    Miyazawa, M; Tougo, H; Ishihara, M

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by essential oils of Citrus paradisi (grapefruit pink in USA) was studied. Inhibition of AChE was measured by the colorimetric method. Nootkatone and auraptene were isolated from C. paradisi oil and showed 17-24% inhibition of AChE activity at the concentration of 1.62 microg/mL. PMID:11858553

  16. Influence of phosphorus content of coconut oil on deposit and performance of plant oil pressure stoves

    Kratzeisen, M.; Mueller, J. [Institut fuer Agrartechnik, Universitaet Hohenheim (440e), Garbenstrasse 9, D-70593 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Influence of phosphorus lipids on formation of deposits and performance of plant oil pressure stoves was investigated. Refined coconut oil with an original phosphorous content of 5.9 mg/kg was used as base for fuel blends by adding lecithin to adjust increased phosphorous concentrations of 32.2, 51.6 and 63.0 mg/kg. The fuel blends were analysed for acid value, iodine value, total contamination, ash content and Conradson carbon residue according to standard methods. In burning trials, the specific fuel consumption, the required frequency of nozzle cleaning and the amount of deposits in the vaporizer were measured. Results showed an exponential increase of deposits in the vaporizer when phosphorous content was increased: deposits amounted to 0.12 g/kg of consumed fuel for unblended coconut oil and 0.92 g/kg for the blend with the highest phosphorous content. Furthermore, increased phosphorous content caused higher fuel consumption of 0.375 kg/h compared to 0.316 kg/h for the control. (author)

  17. Using Soxhlet Ethanol Extraction to Produce and Test Plant Material (Essential Oils) for Their Antimicrobial Properties †

    James Redfern; Malcolm Kinninmonth; Dariel Burdass; Joanna Verran

    2014-01-01

    As the issue of antimicrobial resistance continues to grow, there is a renewed interest in deriving antimicrobial products from natural compounds, particularly extracts from plant materials. This paper describes how essential oil can be extracted from the common herb, thyme (Thymus vulgaris) in the classroom. Subsequently, the extract can be tested for its antimicrobial activity. A number of variables are suggested.

  18. Composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from aromatic plants used in Brazil Composição e atividade antimicrobiana de óleos essenciais de plantas aromáticas usadas no Brasil

    Adilson Sartoratto

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils from aerial parts of Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, O. applii, Aloysia triphylla, Ocimum gratissimum, O. basilicum were obtained by steam destillation using a Clevenger-type system. These oils were screened for antibacterial and anti-Candida albicans activity using bioautographic method. Subsequently, minimal inhibitory concentration from oils was determined by microdilution method. Most essential oil studied were effective against Enterococcus faecium and Salmonella cholerasuis. Aloysia triphylla and O. basilicum presented moderate inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus while only A. tryphila and M. piperita were able to control the yeast Candida albicans. The oils were analyzed by GC and GC-MS techniques in order to determine the majoritary compounds.Óleos essenciais foram obtidos a partir das partes aéreas de Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, O. applii, Aloysia triphylla, Ocimum gratissimum e O. basilicum através de arraste de vapor em sistema tipo Clevenger. Os óleos foram avaliados quanto à atividade antimicrobiana contra bactérias e contra a levedura Candida albicans pelo método de bioautografia. A concentração mínima inibitória dos óleos com atividade positiva foi em seguida determinada pelo método da microdiluição. De acordo com os resultados, a maioria dos óleos essenciais estudados foram efetivos contra Enterococcus faecium e Salmonella cholerasuis. A.triphylla e O. basilicum apresentaram inibição moderada contra Staphylococcus aureus enquanto apenas A. tryphila e M. piperita foram capazes de inibir a levedura Candida albicans. Os óleos foram analisados quimicamente por técnicas de CG e CG-EM de modo a determinar os compostos majoritários presentes.

  19. Production and use of plant oil as fuel in developing countries

    The technical possibilities for the production and use of plant oil as fuel are given: cultures supplying interesting seeds containing oil are known, simple and small oil presses for decentralized oil production have been developed and engines which can use plant oil are ready for use. As the plants supplying seeds containing oil are used as protective hedges around gardens and to protect fields to be harvested against animals and the soil against erosion, there is a positive feedback in this case between energy production and agricultural production. The feedback of the pressed cake produced in obtaining the oil as an organic fertiliser is particularly important here. Due to the monetarisation of erosion protection measures, the fight against desertification can receive a great boost, or it can become self-sustaining, from previous experience in the field. (orig.)

  20. Chemotypic variation of essential oils in the medicinal plant, Anemopsis californica.

    Medina-Holguín, Andrea L; Holguín, F Omar; Micheletto, Sandra; Goehle, Sondra; Simon, Julian A; O'Connell, Mary A

    2008-02-01

    Anemopsis californica (Saururaceae) commonly called yerba mansa, is an important medicinal plant in many deserts in the southwestern region of North America. Populations of A. californica, collected throughout New Mexico, were examined for chemical variability in roots and rhizomes for select monocyclic (cymene, limonene, piperitone and thymol) and bicyclic (alpha-pinene, 1,8-cineole and myrtenol) monoterpenoid and phenylpropanoid (methyleugenol, isoeugenol and elemicin) derived essential oil components. Three distinct chemotypes were detected using a hierarchical clustering analysis on the concentration of 10 different analytes in three individuals from each of 17 populations. One chemotype was characterized by high elemicin concentrations, a second chemotype by high methyleugenol concentrations and the third by high piperitone and thymol concentrations. Steam distilled oil was used to screen for anticancer bioactivity. A. californica root oils demonstrated anti-proliferative activity against AN3CA and HeLa cells in vitro but no activity against lung, breast, prostate or colon cancer cells. The IC(50) values for the root oil were 0.056% and 0.052% (v/v) for the AN3CA and HeLa cells, respectively. PMID:18177907

  1. Supercritical fluid extraction in plant essential and volatile oil analysis.

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh

    2007-09-01

    The use of supercritical fluids, especially carbon dioxide, in the extraction of plant volatile components has increased during two last decades due to the expected advantages of the supercritical extraction process. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a rapid, selective and convenient method for sample preparation prior to the analysis of compounds in the volatile product of plant matrices. Also, SFE is a simple, inexpensive, fast, effective and virtually solvent-free sample pretreatment technique. This review provides a detailed and updated discussion of the developments, modes and applications of SFE in the isolation of essential oils from plant matrices. SFE is usually performed with pure or modified carbon dioxide, which facilitates off-line collection of extracts and on-line coupling with other analytical methods such as gas, liquid and supercritical fluid chromatography. In this review, we showed that a number of factors influence extraction yields, these being solubility of the solute in the fluid, diffusion through the matrix and collection process. Finally, SFE has been compared with conventional extraction methods in terms of selectivity, rapidity, cleanliness and possibility of manipulating the composition of the extract. PMID:17624357

  2. The turbine oil fire in the nuclear power plant, Muehleberg

    At 21.15 hours on the evening of the 28th July 1971, a turbine oil fire broke out in the Nuclear Power Plant Muehleberg of the Bernische Kraftwerke AG, resulting in damage amounting to around 20 million Swiss Francs and a delay of some ten months in putting the plant into operation. The plant is equipped with a General Electric boiling water reactor and two BBC saturated steam turbines. Up to the time of the fire, both turbo-sets had already been run singly up to their full capacity of 160 MWe and the initial trials with both sets working parallel were shortly due to be carried out. Following the outbreak of fire, the causes of which are described in the contributions of the authors Hagn, L. and H. Huppmann and Christian, H. and H. Grupp, fire fighting action was immediately taken, in line with the emergency measures laid down in the operating regulations. With the assistance of the Berne City Fire Brigade, the blaze in the roof of the turbine hall was first extinguished and the spreading cable conflagration then fought, using foam and water. (orig.)

  3. CNPC-Active Oil Player Worldwide

    2006-01-01

    @@ China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC),China's largest oil and gas producer, has cumulatively made an investment of 59.6 billion yuan (US$7.39 billion) for its overseas oil and gas business in the past few years. The group has established five oil and natural gas production bases in Africa, central Asia, America, the Asian and Pacific region and the Middle East.

  4. Plant oil as fuel for household cooking stoves; Pflanzenoel als Brennstoff fuer Haushaltskochgeraete

    Kratzeisen, M.; Mueller, J. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Agrartechnik, FB Agrartechnik in den Tropen und Subtropen; Stumpf, E. [Bosch und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbH, Bretten (Germany); Trojer, S. [Bosch und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In developing countries and countries in transition more than 500 kg firewood per person is used for meal preparation on open cooking stoves annually. Firewood utilization results in uncontrolled deforestation and the problems resulting from it. Increasing prices for mineral oil products like kerosene and gas worsen the situation further. A possible solution is plant oil as an energy source for daily meal preparation. Different qualities of plant oils were tested for their suitability as fuel in a newly developed plant oil stove. (orig.)

  5. First international congress on plant oil fuels. Proceedings; Erster Internationaler Kongress zu Pflanzenoel-Kraftstoffen. Tagungsband

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The conference proceedings contain 31 contributions on the following topics: biofuels - status and perspectives; ecological evaluation; plant oils: engineering - production and quality; plant oils: international markets and economy; mobile applications - techniques and emissions; stationary applications: techniques and economy; the renewable energies law (EEG), the biofuel quoting law (BioKraftQuG) and the energy tax law (EnergieStG).

  6. Repellence and toxicity of plant essential oils to the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae

    Munneke, M.E.; Bruin, de A.; Moskal, J.R.; Tol, van R.W.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Several plant essential oils were tested for their effect on behaviour and mortality of M. euphorbiae. Olfactory and contact experiments were performed to study these effects. We found that host plant and formulation of the different oils have a strong influence on repellence and mortality of the ap

  7. Insecticidal activity of some citrus oils against culex quinquefasciatus

    The present study deals with the larvicidal potency of peel oils of grapefruit (Citrus paradise), sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia) on 4''th instar larvae of the mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Orange oil was the most effective followed by grapefruit oil and then lime oil. The toxicity of the oils applied to the 4''th instar larval stage was extended to pupal and adult stages. All oils produced deleterious effects on fecundity of survivors of sublethal doses. By the aid of chemical analysis of oils, the active compound was found to be limonene, a monoterpene compound. The percentages limonene were 97.15%, 92.46% and 32.29% for orange, grapefruit and lime respectively.(Author)

  8. IMMUNOMODULATORY ACTIVITY OF ARGAN OIL (ARGANIA SPINOSA L

    Youcef Necib

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunomodulatory activity of Argan oil was evaluated on phagocytic activity by carbon clearance test. Adult Albinos Wistar rats randomly divided into four groups, were the first was served as a control, while animals of treatment group were given Argan oil at dose of: 2.5, 5 and 10 mL kg-1 by gavage respectively 10 days before injected the carbon ink suspension. In carbone clearance test, Argan oil exhibited significantly phagocytic index dose-dependent against control group, indicating stimulation of the reticulo-endothelial system. Present study thus reveals that argan oil holds promise as immunomodulatory agent, which act by stimulating dose dependent phagocytic function.

  9. Screening for lipase activity in the oil palm.

    Sambanthamurthi, R; Rajanaidu, N; Hasnah Parman, S

    2000-12-01

    The oil palm mesocarp contains an endogenous lipase which is strongly activated at low temperature. Lipase activity is thus very conveniently assayed by prior exposure of the fruits to low temperature. More than 100 oil palm samples from the germplasm collection of the Palm Oil Research Institute of Malaysia (now known as the Malaysian Palm Oil Board) were screened for non-esterified fatty acid activity using both the low-temperature activation assay and a radioactivity assay. The results showed good correlation between assay procedures. The different samples had a very wide range of lipase activity. Elaeis oleifera samples had significantly lower lipase activity compared with E. guineensis (var. tenera) samples. Even within E. guineensis (var. tenera), there was a wide range of activity. The results confirmed that lipase activity is genotype-dependent. Selection for lipase genotypes is thus possible and this will have obvious commercial value. PMID:11171201

  10. Effect Of GAMMA Radiation On Antimicrobial Activity And Chemical Constituents Of Marjoram (Majorana Hortensis Essential Oil

    Field experiment was set up to study the response of marjoram plant grown on sandy soil and inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. and/or B. polymixa in combination with organic fertilizers. The extracted oil was irradiated with gamma irradiation at doses of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 kGy. The chemical constituents of the essential oils were analyzed by GC-Ms techniques after exposure to gamma radiation. The gamma irradiated essential oils of marjoram were tested for their antimicrobial activities against some pathogenic microorganisms i.e. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enteritidis, Pseudomonas citri, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viride and Aspergillus flavus. Extracted oil was the best when soil was treated with faba bean straw and inoculated with B. polymixa + Bradyrhizobium sp. Similarly, the extracted oil from plant cultivated in soil treated with sheep manure in combination with B. polymixa recorded the highest value. Results also revealed that gamma irradiation doses increased the antimicrobial activity with different magnitudes. The essential oil extracted from herb exposed to 30 kGy was found to be the most active antimicrobial with slight increases in the main components.

  11. Modeling the Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Essential Oils from Plant Materials

    Sovová, H. (Helena)

    2012-01-01

    Different types of mathematical models were applied in the last decade to simulate kinetics of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of essential oils from aromatic plants. Compared to the extraction of fatty oils, modeling of extraction of essential oils is more complicated due to their potential fractionation, co-extraction of less soluble compounds, and stronger effect of flow pattern on extraction yield, which is connected with solute adsorption on plant matrix. Fitting the SFE models to e...

  12. Comparative plant sphingolipidomic reveals specific lipids in seeds and oil.

    Tellier, Frédérique; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2014-07-01

    Plant sphingolipids are a highly diverse family of structural and signal lipids. Owing to their chemical diversity and complexity, a powerful analytical method was required to identify and quantify a large number of individual molecules with a high degree of structural accuracy. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with a single elution system coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) in the positive multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, detailed sphingolipid composition was analyzed in various tissues of two Brassicaceae species Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa. A total of 300 molecular species were identified defining nine classes of sphingolipids, including Cers, hCers, Glcs and GIPCs. High-resolution mass spectrometry identified sphingolipids including amino- and N-acylated-GIPCs. The comparative analysis of seedling, seed and oil sphingolipids showed tissue specific distribution suggesting metabolic channeling and compartmentalization. PMID:24731258

  13. The life cycle emission of greenhouse gases associated with plant oils used as biofuel

    Reijnders, L.

    2011-01-01

    Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions associated with biofuels should not only consider fossil fuel inputs, but also N2O emissions and changes in carbon stocks of (agro) ecosystems linked to the cultivation of biofuel crops. When this is done, current plant oils such as European rapeseed oil and oil from soybeans and oil palms cultivated on recently deforested soils have higher life cycle greenhouse gas emissions than conventional diesel.

  14. Distillation Parameters for Pilot Plant Production of Laurus nobilis Essential oil

    Temel Özek

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils have increasing importance in flavour and fragrance industries. They are obtained by distillation techniques. In order to produce an oil with market potential its optimum production parameters have to be well known prior to its commercial production. Determination of the steam distillation parameters of commercially available Laurel leaves oil in pilot plant scale is described. The effect of steam rate and processing time play a major role in distillation of essential oils. Dis...

  15. Biochemical Activities of Iranian Cymbopogon olivieri (Boiss) Bor. Essential Oil.

    Mahboubi, M; Kazempour, N

    2012-07-01

    Cymbopogon olivieri essential oil from aerial parts was analyzed by gas chromotography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and led to the identification of 38 compounds. Piperitone (72.8%), 4-carene (11.8%) and β-himachalene (7.6%) were found as the major components of the oil. The antimicrobial activity was achieved using disc-diffusion and microbroth dilution assays and microbicidal kinetics of oil was screened against different microorganisms. The possible antioxidant activity of oil was evaluated by diphenylpicrylhydrazyl free-radical scavenging system. The oil had excellent antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The oil exhibited inhibitory effect against Bacillus subtilis and fungi. Dvalues of oil were 12.5, 10 and 2.4 min for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, respectively. The IC50 value of Cymbopogon olivieri oil was 35 mg/ml and its antioxidant activity was lower than that of butylated hydroxytoluene. Cymbopogon olivieri oil possesses compounds with antimicrobial properties that can be used as antimicrobial agents. PMID:23626392

  16. Biochemical activities of iranian Cymbopogon olivieri (Boiss Bor. essential oil

    M Mahboubi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon olivieri essential oil from aerial parts was analyzed by gas chromotography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and led to the identification of 38 compounds. Piperitone (72.8%, 4-carene (11.8% and β-himachalene (7.6% were found as the major components of the oil. The antimicrobial activity was achieved using disc-diffusion and microbroth dilution assays and microbicidal kinetics of oil was screened against different microorganisms. The possible antioxidant activity of oil was evaluated by diphenylpicrylhydrazyl free-radical scavenging system. The oil had excellent antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The oil exhibited inhibitory effect against Bacillus subtilis and fungi. D values of oil were 12.5, 10 and 2.4 min for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, respectively. The IC 50 value of Cymbopogon olivieri oil was 35 mg/ml and its antioxidant activity was lower than that of butylated hydroxytoluene. Cymbopogon olivieri oil possesses compounds with antimicrobial properties that can be used as antimicrobial agents.

  17. [Effects of macrophytes pyrolysis bio-oil on Skeletonema costatum antioxidant enzyme activities].

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Feng-Min; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Shan, Shi; Li, Jie; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2013-02-01

    In order to reveal the preliminary inhibition mechanisms of aquatic plants bio-oils on Skeletonema costatum, effects of Arundo donax L. 300 degees C, Ph. australis Trin. 400 degrees C and Typha orientalis Pres1 400 degrees C bio-oils on the concentration change of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of antioxidant enzymes system (SOD, POD and CAT) were evaluated. The results showed that the higher Ihe Bio-oil concentrations, the higher the MDA contents in Skeletonema costatum was, and when the Bio-oil concentration was 10 mg.L-1 the MDA concentration increased with the reaction time. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity also increased with the increase of bio-oil concentration. For Arundo donax L 300 degrees C and Typha orientalis Presl 400 degrees C bio-oil, when the reaction time was longer, the S0D activity of Skeletonema costatum first increased and then decreased, and in both cases the maximum SOD activity was measured at 24 h. reaching 93.6 U (10(7) cells)-1 and 8.23 U (10(7) cells)-1, respectively. For Ph. australis Trin 400 degrees C bio-oil, the SOD activity kept increasing within 72 h. The peroxidase ( POD) activity of Skeletonema costatum also increased with the increase of bio-il concentrations. In the presence of Arundo donax L. 300 degrees C and Ph. australis Trin 400 degrees C bio-oil, the POD activity of Skeletonma, costatum first increased and then decreased, while with Typha orientalis Presl 400 degrees C bio-oil the POD activity increased with fluctuations. For all the three bio-oils, the catalase (CAT) activities increased first and then decreased when the reaction time was prolonged, and the higher the bio-oils concentration, the greater the CAT activity was. Pyrolysis bio-oils enhance the activity of antioxidant enzymes, leading to intracellular oxidative stress in the algae, which seems to be the main inhibitory mechanism for algae PMID:23668127

  18. Dioxin and PAH emissions from a shale oil processing plant in Estonia

    Schleicher, O.; Jensen, A.A. [FORCE Technology, Soborg (Denmark); Roots, O. [Estonian Environmental Research Centre (EERC), Tallinn (Estonia); Herrmann, T. [ERGO Forschungsgesellschaft GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Tordik, A. [AS Narva Elektrijaamad, Narva (Estonia)

    2004-09-15

    In March 2003, dioxin emissions were measured from a shale oil producing plant located near the city of Narva in Estonia. The measurement was a part of a project on measuring the dioxin emission from four oil shale fired boilers at two power plants located near the city of Narva in Estonia. These power plants produce more than 90% of the electricity consumption in Estonia by combusting more than 10 million tons of oil shale per year, which is around 85 % of the total consumption of oil shale in the country. The oil plant is the second largest consumer of oil shale, with an annual consumption of around 800,000 ton. Two other smaller plants producing oil from oil shale is known to exist in Estonia, and one in Australia. These measurements of dioxin air emission from oil shale pyrolysis are the first performed in Estonia. The aim of the measurements was to get background data for the estimation of the annual dioxin emission from the use of oil shale in pyrolysis processes in Estonia, in order to improve or qualify the estimation based on emissions factors for large coal fired power stations given in the recent DANCEE Project: Survey of anthropogenic sources of dioxins in the Baltic Region. The Danish environmental assistance to Eastern Europe (DANCEE) has sponsored the project, and dk-TEKNIK ENERGY and ENVIRONMENT (now FORCE Technology) was responsible for the measurements, which where conducted in cooperation with EERC in Tallinn.

  19. Influence of Tunisian aromatic plants on the prevention of oxidation in soybean oil under heating and frying conditions.

    Saoudi, Salma; Chammem, Nadia; Sifaoui, Ines; Bouassida-Beji, Maha; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Bazzocchi, Isabel L; Silva, Sandra Diniz; Hamdi, Moktar; Bronze, Maria Rosário

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the oxidative stability of soybean oil by using aromatic plants. Soybean oil flavored with rosemary (ROS) and soybean oil flavored with thyme (THY) were subjected to heating for 24h at 180°C. The samples were analyzed every 6h for their total polar compounds, anisidine values, oxidative stability and polyphenols content. The tocopherols content was determined and volatile compounds were also analyzed. After 24h of heating, the incorporation of these plants using a maceration process reduced the polar compounds by 69% and 71% respectively, in ROS and THY compared to the control. Until 6h of heating, the ROS kept the greatest oxidative stability. The use of the two extracts preserves approximately 50% of the total tocopherols content until 18h for the rosemary and 24h for the thyme flavored oils. Volatile compounds known for their antioxidant activity were also detected in the formulated oils. Aromatic plants added to the soybean oil improved the overall acceptability of potato crisps (p<0.05) until the fifteenth frying. PMID:27374561

  20. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of peppermint (Mentha piperita L. Essential oil

    Mohaddese Mahboubi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Peppermint with antiseptic and known healing properties is a plant from the Labiatae family. In this study, we analyzed the chemical composition of essential oil from the flowering aerial part of peppermint by GC and GC/MS. Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated against bacteria, fungi and yeast by micro broth dilution assay. The fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC and FIC Index (FICI and related isobologram curve were determined by check board micro titer assay. The results exhibited that the MIC, MLC value of peppermint oil against different kinds of microorganisms were in the range of 0.125-2 and 0.125- >64 µl/ml, respectively. Candida albicans was the most sensitive microorganism and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the less sensitive ones. The oil showed synergistic activities with vancomycin, gentamycin, and amphotericin B with the FICI less of 0.5. This oil could be used as natural antibiotics and may decrease the effective dose of antibiotics.

  1. Sexual Differences in Chemical Composition and Aroma-active Compounds of Essential Oil from Flower Buds of Eurya japonica.

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Usami, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takio; Tsuji, Kaoru; Takehara, Manami; Hori, Yuki

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the composition of essential oil from buds of male and female Eurya japonica flowers and to determine the aroma-active compounds of this plant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), sensory evaluation, and odor activity values (OAV). The oils contained eighty-five compounds. We identified for the first time forty-four compounds in E. japonica. Through sensory evaluation, nineteen aroma-active compounds were identified by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). Because the chemical composition can affect the interaction between plants and herbivorous insects, our results suggest that essential oils from male and female flower buds of E. japonica differently affect herbivores. Sexual differences in essential oils deserve further investigations in this plant-insect system. PMID:26972466

  2. Microbicide activity of clove essential oil (Eugenia caryophyllata)

    Nuñez, L.; M.D. Aquino

    2012-01-01

    Clove essential oil, used as an antiseptic in oral infections, inhibits Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as yeast. The influence of clove essential oil concentration, temperature and organic matter, in the antimicrobial activity of clove essential oil, was studied in this paper, through the determination of bacterial death kinetics. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the microorganisms selected for a biological test. To determine the temper...

  3. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against Paenibacillus larvae

    Gende, L. B.; Pires, Sância; Fernandez, N.J.; Damiani, M; Churio, M.S.; Fritz, R.; Eguaras, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    American foulbrood is a serious bacterial disease that affects Apis mellifera colonies; the causative agent is Paenibacillus larvae [1 ]. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro the antimicrobial activity of 32 essential oils against P. larvae. Oils from 21 botanical species were analyzed by gas chromatography (CG and CG/EM). All essential oils were classified according to the composition of their main components in two groups: benzene ring compounds (BRC) and terpene com...

  4. Treatment of Oily Wastewater Produced From Old Processing Plant of North Oil Company

    Dr. Faris Hammoodi Al-Ani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this research were to study and analyses oily wastewater characteristics originating from old-processing plant of North Oil Company and to find a suitable and simple method to treat the waste so it can be disposed off safely. The work consists of two stages; the first was the study of oily wastewater characteristics and its negative impacts. The results indicated that oil and grease were the most dominant pollutant with concentration range between 1069 – 3269.3 mg/l that must be removed; other pollutants were found to be within Iraqi and EPA standards. The next stage was the use of these characteristics to choose the proper technology to treat that wastewater. This stage was divided into two stages: the first stage was a jar tests to find the optimum doses of alum, lime and powdered activated carbon (PAC. The second stage was the treatment by a batch pilot plant constructed for this purpose employing the optimum doses as determined from the first stage to treat the waste using a flotation unit followed by a filtration-adsorption unit. The removal efficiencies of flotation unit for oil and grease, COD, and T.S.S found to be 0.9789, 0.974, and 0.9933, respectively, while the removal efficiency for T.D.S was very low 0.0293. From filtration – adsorption column the removal efficiencies of oil and grease, T.D.S, COD, and T.S.S were found to be 0.9486, 0.8908, 0.6870, and 0.7815, respectively. The overall removal efficiencies of pilot plant were 0.9986, 0.8939, 0.9921, and 0.9950, respectively. The results indicated that this type of treatment was the simplest and most effective method that can be used to treat produced oily wastewater before disposal

  5. Comparative chemical and antimicrobial study of nine essential oils obtained from medicinal plants growing in Egypt

    Nashwa Tarek; Hossam M Hassan; Sameh M.M. AbdelGhani; I.A. Radwan; Ola Hammouda; Ahmed O. El-Gendy

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils are one of interesting natural products group that are used in different aspects of life due to their various biological activities. This study investigate the antimicrobial activities of 9 herbal essential oils on survival and growth of selected pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation method and were analyzed using GC/MS technique. The oils were tested for their antimicrobial activity against 2 Gram +ve, Staphylococcus aureus (...

  6. Distillation Time as Tool for Improved Antimalarial Activity and Differential Oil Composition of Cumin Seed Oil.

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Gawde, Archana; Cantrell, Charles L; Astatkie, Tess; Schlegel, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    A steam distillation extraction kinetics experiment was conducted to estimate essential oil yield, composition, antimalarial, and antioxidant capacity of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) seed (fruits). Furthermore, regression models were developed to predict essential oil yield and composition for a given duration of the steam distillation time (DT). Ten DT durations were tested in this study: 5, 7.5, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, 360, 480, and 600 min. Oil yields increased with an increase in the DT. Maximum oil yield (content, 2.3 g/100 seed), was achieved at 480 min; longer DT did not increase oil yields. The concentrations of the major oil constituents α-pinene (0.14-0.5% concentration range), β-pinene (3.7-10.3% range), γ-cymene (5-7.3% range), γ-terpinene (1.8-7.2% range), cumin aldehyde (50-66% range), α-terpinen-7-al (3.8-16% range), and β-terpinen-7-al (12-20% range) varied as a function of the DT. The concentrations of α-pinene, β-pinene, γ-cymene, γ-terpinene in the oil increased with the increase of the duration of the DT; α-pinene was highest in the oil obtained at 600 min DT, β-pinene and γ-terpinene reached maximum concentrations in the oil at 360 min DT; γ-cymene reached a maximum in the oil at 60 min DT, cumin aldehyde was high in the oils obtained at 5-60 min DT, and low in the oils obtained at 240-600 min DT, α-terpinen-7-al reached maximum in the oils obtained at 480 or 600 min DT, whereas β-terpinen-7-al reached a maximum concentration in the oil at 60 min DT. The yield of individual oil constituents (calculated from the oil yields and the concentration of a given compound at a particular DT) increased and reached a maximum at 480 or 600 min DT. The antimalarial activity of the cumin seed oil obtained during the 0-5 and at 5-7.5 min DT timeframes was twice higher than the antimalarial activity of the oils obtained at the other DT. This study opens the possibility for distinct marketing and utilization for these improved oils. The antioxidant

  7. Fumigant toxicity of plant essential oils against Camptomyia corticalis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    Kim, Jun-Ran; Haribalan, Perumalsamy; Son, Bong-Ki; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of 98 plant essential oils against third instars of cecidomyiid gall midge Camptomyia corticalis (Loew) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) was examined using a vapor-phase mortality bioassay. Results were compared with that of a conventional insecticide dichlorvos. Based on 24-h LC50 values, all essential oils were less toxic than dichlorvos (LC50, 0.027 mg/cm3). The LC50 of caraway (Carum carvi L.) seed, armoise (Artemisia vulgaris L.), clary sage (Salvia sclarea L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf], niaouli (Melaleuca viridiflora Gaertner), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.), cassia especial (Cinnamomum cassia Nees ex Blume), Dalmatian sage (Salvia offcinalis L.), red thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), bay [Pimenta racemosa (P. Mill.) J.W. Moore], garlic (Allium sativum L.), and pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L.) oils is between 0.55 and 0.60 mg/cm3. The LC50 of cassia (C. cassia, pure and redistilled), white thyme (T. vulgaris), star anise (Illicium verum Hook.f.), peppermint (Mentha X piperita L.), wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens L.), cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume) bark, sweet marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), Roman chamomile [Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All.], eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.),Virginian cedarwood (Juniperus virginiana L.), pimento berry [Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr.], summer savory (Satureja hortensis L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.), and coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) oils is between 0.61 and 0.99 mg/cm3. All other essential oils tested exhibited low toxicity to the cecidomyiid larvae (LC50, >0.99 mg/cm3). Global efforts to reduce the level of highly toxic synthetic insecticides in the agricultural environment justify further studies on the active essential oils as potential larvicides for the control of C. corticalis populations as fumigants with contact action. PMID:22928313

  8. Chemical composition and antiprotozoal activities of Colombian Lippia spp essential oils and their major components.

    Escobar, Patricia; Milena Leal, Sandra; Herrera, Laura Viviana; Martinez, Jairo Rene; Stashenko, Elena

    2010-03-01

    The chemical composition and biological activities of 19 essential oils and seven of their major components were tested against free and intracellular forms of Leishmania chagasi and Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as well as Vero and THP-1 mammalian cell lines. The essential oils were obtained from different species of Lippia, a widely distributed genus of Colombian plants. They were extracted by microwave radiation-assisted hydro-distillation and characterised by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major components were geranial, neral, limonene, nerol, carvacrol, p-cymene, gamma-terpinene, carvone and thymol. The essential oil of Lippia alba exhibited the highest activity against T. cruzi epimastigotes and intracellular amastigotes with an IC50 of 5.5 microg/mL and 12.2 microg/mL, respectively. The essential oil of Lippia origanoides had an IC50 of 4.4 microg/mL in L. chagasi promastigotes and exhibited no toxicity in mammalian cells. Thymol (IC50 3.2 +/- 0.4 microg/mL) and S-carvone (IC50 6.1 +/- 2.2 microg/mL), two of the major components of the active essential oils, were active on intracellular amastigotes of T. cruziinfected Vero cells, with a selective index greater than 10. None of the essential oils or major components tested in this study was active on amastigotes of L. chagasi infected THP-1 cells. PMID:20428679

  9. Chemical composition and antiprotozoal activities of Colombian Lippia spp essential oils and their major components

    Patricia Escobar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and biological activities of 19 essential oils and seven of their major components were tested against free and intracellular forms of Leishmania chagasi and Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as well as Vero and THP-1 mammalian cell lines. The essential oils were obtained from different species of Lippia, a widely distributed genus of Colombian plants. They were extracted by microwave radiation-assisted hydro-distillation and characterised by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major components were geranial, neral, limonene, nerol, carvacrol, p-cymene, γ-terpinene, carvone and thymol. The essential oil of Lippia alba exhibited the highest activity against T. cruzi epimastigotes and intracellular amastigotes with an IC50 of 5.5 μg/mL and 12.2 μg/mL, respectively. The essential oil of Lippia origanoides had an IC50 of 4.4 μg/mL in L. chagasi promastigotes and exhibited no toxicity in mammalian cells. Thymol (IC50 3.2 ± 0.4 μg/mL and S-carvone (IC50 6.1 ± 2.2 μg/mL, two of the major components of the active essential oils, were active on intracellular amastigotes of T. cruziinfected Vero cells, with a selective index greater than 10. None of the essential oils or major components tested in this study was active on amastigotes of L. chagasi infected THP-1 cells.

  10. Microstructures of superhydrophobic plant leaves - inspiration for efficient oil spill cleanup materials.

    Zeiger, Claudia; Rodrigues da Silva, Isabelle C; Mail, Matthias; Kavalenka, Maryna N; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    The cleanup of accidental oil spills in water is an enormous challenge; conventional oil sorbents absorb large amounts of water in addition to oil and other cleanup methods can cause secondary pollution. In contrast, fresh leaves of the aquatic ferns Salvinia are superhydrophobic and superoleophilic, and can selectively absorb oil while repelling water. These selective wetting properties are optimal for natural oil absorbent applications and bioinspired oil sorbent materials. In this paper we quantify the oil absorption capacity of four Salvinia species with different surface structures, water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) and Lotus leaves (Nelumbo nucifera), and compare their absorption capacity to artificial oil sorbents. Interestingly, the oil absorption capacities of Salvinia molesta and Pistia stratiotes leaves are comparable to artificial oil sorbents. Therefore, these pantropical invasive plants, often considered pests, qualify as environmentally friendly materials for oil spill cleanup. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of oil density and viscosity on the oil absorption, and examine how the presence and morphology of trichomes affect the amount of oil absorbed by their surfaces. Specifically, the influence of hair length and shape is analyzed by comparing different hair types ranging from single trichomes of Salvinia cucullata to complex eggbeater-shaped trichomes of Salvinia molesta to establish a basis for improving artificial bioinspired oil absorbents. PMID:27529805

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Copaiba (Copaifera officinalis) and Pracaxi (Pentaclethra macroloba) Oils against Staphylococcus Aureus: Importance in Compounding for Wound Care.

    Guimarães, Anna Luísa Aguijar; Cunha, Elisa Alves; Matias, Fernanda Oliveira; Garcia, Patrícia Guedes; Danopoulos, Panagiota; Swikidisa, Rosita; Pinheiro, Vanessa Alves; Nogueira, Rodrigo José Lupatini

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest is the largest reserve of natural products in the world. Its rich biodiversity of medicinal plants has been utilized by local populations for hundreds of years for the prevention and treatment of various diseases and ailments. Oil extracts from plant species such as Copaifera officinalis and Pentaclethra macroloba are used in compounded formulations for their antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, emollient, moisturizing, and wound-healing activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro bacteriostatic effect of two Amazonian oils, Copaiba and Pracaxi, against Staphylococcus aureus, a clinically important microorganism responsible for wound infection, to support the use of these oils as novel natural products for compounded wound-treatment modalities. The antibacterial activity of Copaiba and Pracaxi oils against a standard strain of Staphylococcus aureus was assessed using broth microdilution to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of the oil extracts. Copaiba oil demonstrated antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, with a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of 0.3125 mg/mL and a Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of 0.3125 mg/mL. Conversely, Pracaxi oil failed to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth. While additional studies are required to further evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Pracaxi oil, even low concentrations of Copaiba oil effectively inhibited Staphylococcus aureus growth, supporting its potential use as a promising adjuvant in compounded topical formulations for wound and scar healing. PMID:27125055

  12. An Integrated Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Divergent Evolutionary Pattern of Oil Biosynthesis in High- and Low-Oil Plants

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Shi-Bo; Li, Qi-Gang; Song, Jian; Hao, Yu-Qi; Zhou, Ling; Zheng, Huan-Quan; Dunwell, Jim M.; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Seed oils provide a renewable source of food, biofuel and industrial raw materials that is important for humans. Although many genes and pathways for acyl-lipid metabolism have been identified, little is known about whether there is a specific mechanism for high-oil content in high-oil plants. Based on the distinct differences in seed oil content between four high-oil dicots (20~50%) and three low-oil grasses (<3%), comparative genome, transcriptome and differential expression analyses were used to investigate this mechanism. Among 4,051 dicot-specific soybean genes identified from 252,443 genes in the seven species, 54 genes were shown to directly participate in acyl-lipid metabolism, and 93 genes were found to be associated with acyl-lipid metabolism. Among the 93 dicot-specific genes, 42 and 27 genes, including CBM20-like SBDs and GPT2, participate in carbohydrate degradation and transport, respectively. 40 genes highly up-regulated during seed oil rapid accumulation period are mainly involved in initial fatty acid synthesis, triacylglyceride assembly and oil-body formation, for example, ACCase, PP, DGAT1, PDAT1, OLEs and STEROs, which were also found to be differentially expressed between high- and low-oil soybean accessions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed distinct differences of oleosin in patterns of gene duplication and loss between high-oil dicots and low-oil grasses. In addition, seed-specific GmGRF5, ABI5 and GmTZF4 were predicted to be candidate regulators in seed oil accumulation. This study facilitates future research on lipid biosynthesis and potential genetic improvement of seed oil content. PMID:27159078

  13. In vitro antioxidant activities of Asteraceae Plants

    Vijaylakshmi, S.; Nanjan, M.J.; Suresh, B.

    2009-01-01

    Anaphalis neelgerriana DC and Cnicus wallichi DC belonging to the family Asteraceae (Compositae) are important medicinal plants indigenous to Nilgiris. Since the related species Anaphalis morrisonicola and Cnicus benedictus were reported for its anti cancer activities, the above mentioned plants were screened for Invitro antioxidant activity. In vitro antioxidant studies were carried out by DPPH, Nitric oxide and Hydrogen peroxide methods for the aerial part extracts of the plants. Different ...

  14. Radiocaesium activity in rape oil and in rape cake after a wet deposition event

    After a release of radionuclides in agricultural areas there can be concerns on the levels of radionuclides in food products produced. The uptake of radionuclides via the above ground plant parts is a very important transport route into the food chain for humans as caesium is relatively mobile inside plants. In the production of rape oil the use of a processing factor (Pf) is used to estimate the activity concentration of radioactivity in the final oil product based on the activity concentration in rape seeds. The processing factor has been estimated to be 0.004 for caesium in rape oil by IAEA, and is based on a limited numbers of studies (1). In this project we analysed the activity concentration of radiocaesium (134Cs) in rape oil and in rape cake from rape seeds contaminated after a wet deposition event with 134Cs. With the information of activity concentration of 134Cs in rape oil and in rape cake, we calculated the Pf-value and confirm or suggest new enhanced Pf-value. We analysed the activity concentration of 134Cs in rape oil and in rape cake from spring oilseed rape seeds (Brassica napus L.) that had been contaminated experimentally by wet deposited 134Cs in an earlier experiment by Bengtsson et al. (2013). The estimation of activity concentration of 134Cs in rape oil and in rape cake was achieved by performing extraction of the oil (and other extractable compounds) from the seeds based on the Randall extraction method (Randall, 1974) using petroleum ether as extraction chemical. The extracted oil and the rape cake samples were weighed and the activity concentration was measured with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. Pf-values were calculated by dividing the measured activity concentration in rape oil after extraction by the activity concentration in oilseed rape seeds before extraction. Results from the present study will be presented at the international conference on radioecology and environmental radioactivity in Barcelona. We acknowledge the

  15. Radiocaesium activity in rape oil and in rape cake after a wet deposition event

    Chaiko, Y.; Rappe-George, M.; Bengtsson, S. [Department of Soil and Environment (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    After a release of radionuclides in agricultural areas there can be concerns on the levels of radionuclides in food products produced. The uptake of radionuclides via the above ground plant parts is a very important transport route into the food chain for humans as caesium is relatively mobile inside plants. In the production of rape oil the use of a processing factor (Pf) is used to estimate the activity concentration of radioactivity in the final oil product based on the activity concentration in rape seeds. The processing factor has been estimated to be 0.004 for caesium in rape oil by IAEA, and is based on a limited numbers of studies (1). In this project we analysed the activity concentration of radiocaesium ({sup 134}Cs) in rape oil and in rape cake from rape seeds contaminated after a wet deposition event with {sup 134}Cs. With the information of activity concentration of {sup 134}Cs in rape oil and in rape cake, we calculated the Pf-value and confirm or suggest new enhanced Pf-value. We analysed the activity concentration of {sup 134}Cs in rape oil and in rape cake from spring oilseed rape seeds (Brassica napus L.) that had been contaminated experimentally by wet deposited {sup 134}Cs in an earlier experiment by Bengtsson et al. (2013). The estimation of activity concentration of {sup 134}Cs in rape oil and in rape cake was achieved by performing extraction of the oil (and other extractable compounds) from the seeds based on the Randall extraction method (Randall, 1974) using petroleum ether as extraction chemical. The extracted oil and the rape cake samples were weighed and the activity concentration was measured with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. Pf-values were calculated by dividing the measured activity concentration in rape oil after extraction by the activity concentration in oilseed rape seeds before extraction. Results from the present study will be presented at the international conference on radioecology and environmental radioactivity

  16. Antimicrobial activity of Ethiopian medicinal plants

    Bernášková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    In vitro antimicrobial activity of eighteen Ethiopian medicinal plant species that were selected based on ethnobotanical information on their traditional use to treat infectious diseases was determined by the broth microdilution method. The antimicrobial activity of ethanol extracts of selected plants against potentially pathogenic microorganism such as Bacillus cereus, Bacteroides fragilis, Candida albicans, Clostridium perfringens, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytog...

  17. Antibacterial activity of essential oils: potential applications in food

    Burt, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its antibacterial activity, oregano oil has lately become interesting as a potential 'natural' food preservative. Oregano oil was found to be a fast acting and effective inhibitor of a strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7, the causative agent of a serious gastro-enteritis, and was lethal to thi

  18. Microbial Inoculation Improves Growth of Oil Palm Plants (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    Om, Azlin Che; Ghazali, Amir Hamzah Ahmad; Keng, Chan Lai; Ishak, Zamzuri

    2009-01-01

    Introduction of diazotrophic rhizobacteria to oil palm tissues during the in vitro micropropagation process establishes an early associative interaction between the plant cells and bacteria. In the association, the diazotrophs provide the host plants with phytohormones and fixed nitrogen. This study was conducted to observe growth of bacterised tissue cultured oil palm plants under ex vitro conditions after 280 days of growth. Root dry weight, shoot dry weight, root volume, bacterial colonisa...

  19. Effect of Neem Oil on Sperm Mitochondrial Activity

    Prashant Patil; Gaikwad RD; Sawane MV; Waghmare VS

    2010-01-01

    It is a known fact that neem oil has some effect on motility of sperm. Motility of sperm depends on mitochondrial activity present in mid-piece of sperm. In the present study, the mitochondrial activity of sperm was evaluated after treating semen with the different quantities of neem oil. The mitochondrial activity was also evaluated after subjecting the semen samples for different incubation periods keeping the quantity of semen as well as that of neem oil same. Tests were done on thirty nor...

  20. EVALUATION OF ANTIULCER ACTIVITY OF CASTOR OIL IN RATS

    Rachhadiya Rakesh M.; Kabra Mahaveer Prasad; Shete Rajkumar V

    2011-01-01

    To study the antiulcer activity of oil of Ricinus communis seed using different models of gastric ulceration in rats. Antiulcer activity of castor oil was studied in rats by administration of ethanol or aspirin or by pyloric ligation. Castor oil was administered in the dose of 500 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg orally 30 min prior to ulcer induction. The antiulcer activity was assessed by determining and comparing the ulcer index in the test drug group with that of the ulcerated control group. Gastric ...

  1. COMPARATIVE CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF NORMAL AND ORGANIC GINGER OILS (ZINGIBER OFFICINALE ROSCOE

    Kamal Lochan Barman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils obtained from the rhizomes of normal and organic ginger plants (Zingiber officinale Roscoe were characterized by GC and GC‐MS. Zingiberene was the chief compound in both ginger oils. Organic ginger oil contained geranial (10.5% as the second main compound and had more oxygenated compounds (35.1% compared to normal ginger oil (31.9%. The organic ginger oil also contained β‐bisabolene (6.1%, ar‐curcumene (5.8%, sesquiphellandrene (2.6% and δ‐cadinene (2.2%. Antimicrobial activity of both the extracted oils was assessed against Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stephylococcus aureus, E. coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Shigella flexneri, Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium sp by disc diffusion method and obtained results are comparable with the reference compounds. The MIC values of the oils ranged from 20μg/mL to 1 μg/mL which is very significant. The study shows a wide application of oil extracted from organic ginger in the treatment of many bacterial and fungal diseases.

  2. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from Satureja horvatii Šilić (Lamiaceae

    BRANISLAVA LAKUSIC

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of the endemic species Satureja horvatii Šilić, collected in Montenegro. The essential oil was obtained from the aerial parts of the plant by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC–MS. From the 34 compounds representing 100 % of the oil, the major compound was the phenolic monoterpene thymol (63.37 %. The oil contained smaller amounts of g-terpinene (7.49 %, carvacrol methyl ether (4.92 %, carvacrol (4.67 %, p-cymene (4.52%, a-terpinene (1.81 %, borneol (1.58 %, a-thujene (1.56 %, b-caryophyllene (1.55 % and b-myrcene (1.44 %. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of S. horvatii was evaluated using the agar diffusion and broth microdilution methods. The essential oil exhibited antimicrobial activity to varying degrees against all the tested strains. The maximum activity of S. horvatii oil was observed against Gram-positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and against the yeast (Candida albicans. The oil exhibited moderate activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and weak activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study confirms that the essential oil of S. horvatii possesses antimicrobial activities in vitro against medically important pathogens.

  3. Phytochemical characterization, antimicrobial activity and reducing potential of seed oil, latex, machine oil and presscake of Jatropha curcas

    Sharma, Amit Kumar; Gangwar, Mayank; Kumar, Dharmendra; Nath, Gopal; Kumar Sinha, Akhoury Sudhir; Tripathi, Yamini Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, phytochemical studies and thin layer chromatography analysis of machine oil, hexane extract of seed oil and methanol extract of presscake & latex of Jatropha curcas Linn (family Euphorbiaceae). Materials and Methods: J. curcas extracts were subjected to preliminary qualitative phytochemical screening to detect the major phytochemicals followed by its reducing power and content of phenol and flavonoids in different fractions. Thin layer chromatography was also performed using different solvent systems for the analysis of a number of constituents in the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disc diffusion method, while the minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration were calculated by micro dilution method. Results: The methanolic fraction of latex and cake exhibited marked antifungal and antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids, steroids, glycosides, phenols and flavonoids. Reducing power showed dose dependent increase in concentration compared to standard Quercetin. Furthermore, this study recommended the isolation and separation of bioactive compounds responsible for the antibacterial activity which would be done by using different chromatographic methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), GC-MS etc. Conclusion: The results of the above study suggest that all parts of the plants possess potent antibacterial activity. Hence, it is important to isolate the active principles for further testing of antimicrobial and other biological efficacy.

  4. Phytochemical characterization, antimicrobial activity and reducing potential of seed oil, latex, machine oil and presscake of Jatropha curcas

    Amit Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, phytochemical studies and thin layer chromatography analysis of machine oil, hexane extract of seed oil and methanol extract of presscake& latex of Jatropha curcas Linn (family Euphorbiaceae. Materials and Methods: J. curcas extracts were subjected to preliminary qualitative phytochemical screening to detect the major phytochemicals followed by its reducing power and content of phenol and flavonoids in different fractions. Thin layer chromatography was also performed using different solvent systems for the analysis of a number of constituents in the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disc diffusion method, while the minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration were calculated by micro dilution method. Results: The methanolic fraction of latex and cake exhibited marked antifungal and antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids, steroids, glycosides, phenols and flavonoids. Reducing power showed dose dependent increase in concentration compared to standard Quercetin. Furthermore, this study recommended the isolation and separation of bioactive compounds responsible for the antibacterial activity which would be done by using different chromatographic methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, GC-MS etc. Conclusion: The results of the above study suggest that all parts of the plants possess potent antibacterial activity. Hence, it is important to isolate the active principles for further testing of antimicrobial and other biological efficacy.

  5. Antibacterial Activity and Composition of Essential Oils from Pelargonium Graveolens L’Her and Vitex Agnus-Castus L

    Alireza Ghannadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Essential oils are volatile compounds that have been used since Middle Ages as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, sedative, local anesthetic and food flavoring agents. In the current study, essential oils of Pelargonium graveolens L’Her and Vitex agnus-castus L. were analyzed for their antibacterial activities.Materials and Methods: The chemical compositions of essential oils were characterized by GC-MS. Disc diffusion method was used to study antimicrobial activity.Results and Conclusion: Inhibition zones showed that the essential oils of the two plants were active against all of the studied bacteria (except Listeria monocytogenes. The susceptibility of the strains changed with the dilution of essential oils in DMSO. The pure essential oils showed the most extensive inhibition zones and they were very effective antimicrobial compounds compared to chloramphenicol and amoxicillin. The most susceptible strain against these two essential oils was Staphylococcus aureus. It seems that β-citronellol is a prominent part of P. graveolens volatile oil and caryophyllene oxide is a famous and important part of V. agnus-castus volatile oil and their probable synergistic effect with other constituents are responsible for the antibacterial effects of these oils. However further studies must be performed to confirm the safety of these oils for use as antimicrobial agents and natural preservatives in different products.

  6. Composition, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antiproliferative activity of Origanum dictamnus (dittany) essential oil

    Mitropoulou, Gregoria; Fitsiou, Eleni; Stavropoulou, Elisavet; Papavassilopoulou, Eleni; Vamvakias, Manolis; Pappa, Aglaia; Oreopoulou, Antigoni; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2015-01-01

    Background Nowadays, there has been an increased interest in essential oils from various plant origins as potential antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antiproliferative agents. This trend can be mainly attributed to the rising number and severity of food poisoning outbreaks worldwide along with the recent negative consumer perception against artificial food additives and the demand for novel functional foods with possible health benefits. Origanum dictamnus (dittany) is an aromatic, tender perennial plant that only grows wild on the mountainsides and gorges of the island of Crete in Greece. Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antiproliferative properties of O. dictamnus essential oil and its main components and assess its commercial potential in the food industry. Design O. dictamnus essential oil was initially analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) to determine semi-quantitative chemical composition of the essential oils. Subsequently, the antimicrobial properties were assayed and the minimum inhibitory and non-inhibitory concentration values were determined. The antioxidant activity and cytotoxic action against the hepatoma adenocarcinoma cell line HepG2 of the essential oil and its main components were further evaluated by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay, respectively. Results The main constituents of O. dictamnus essential oil identified by GC–MS analysis were carvacrol (52.2%), γ-terpinene (8.4%), p-cymene (6.1%), linalool (1.4%), and caryophyllene (1.3%). O. dictamnus essential oil and its main components were effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella typhimurium, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Aspergillus niger. In addition, the estimated IC50 value for the DPPH radical scavenging activity for O. dictamnus essential oil was

  7. Composition, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antiproliferative activity of Origanum dictamnus (dittany essential oil

    Gregoria Mitropoulou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, there has been an increased interest in essential oils from various plant origins as potential antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antiproliferative agents. This trend can be mainly attributed to the rising number and severity of food poisoning outbreaks worldwide along with the recent negative consumer perception against artificial food additives and the demand for novel functional foods with possible health benefits. Origanum dictamnus (dittany is an aromatic, tender perennial plant that only grows wild on the mountainsides and gorges of the island of Crete in Greece. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antiproliferative properties of O. dictamnus essential oil and its main components and assess its commercial potential in the food industry. Design: O. dictamnus essential oil was initially analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS to determine semi-quantitative chemical composition of the essential oils. Subsequently, the antimicrobial properties were assayed and the minimum inhibitory and non-inhibitory concentration values were determined. The antioxidant activity and cytotoxic action against the hepatoma adenocarcinoma cell line HepG2 of the essential oil and its main components were further evaluated by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay and by the sulforhodamine B (SRB assay, respectively. Results: The main constituents of O. dictamnus essential oil identified by GC–MS analysis were carvacrol (52.2%, γ-terpinene (8.4%, p-cymene (6.1%, linalool (1.4%, and caryophyllene (1.3%. O. dictamnus essential oil and its main components were effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella typhimurium, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Aspergillus niger. In addition, the estimated IC50 value for the DPPH radical scavenging activity for O. dictamnus

  8. Acaricidal and repellent activities of essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus against Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Mesostigmata

    Dehghani-Samani Amir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: By considering an increase in drug resistance against red mites, finding the nonchemical herbal acaricide against Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer (Acari: Mesostigmata is necessary to kill them and to reduce the chemical resistance against chemical acaricides in this specie. Dermanyssus gallinae is a potential vector of the causal agent of several viral diseases such as Equine encephalitis and St. Louis encephalitis. It can be a vector of bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Mycobacterium spp. and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. It is also known to cause itching dermatosis in humans. In this study acaricidal and repellent activities of essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus against Dermanyssus gallinae were studied. Methods: After extracting the essential oil, different concentrations of the plant extract were prepared. Then, acaricidal effect of different concentrations was tested on poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, by dropping 3-4 drops of essential oil on mites. Repellent activity of essential oil was tested by Y-tube olfactometer bioassay. After the test, total number of killed and repellent mites reported. Results: Concentration of 1:2 or 50% had more acaricidal effect on mites. Also essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus had repellent activity against red mites. Conclusion: This study showed that essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus had acaricidal and repellent activities against red mites. Hence it might be used as a herbal acaricide against it to kill and to reduce the chemical resistance in this specie.

  9. In vitro efficacies of oils, silicas and plant preparations against the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae

    Maurer, Veronika; Perler, Erika; Heckendorn, Felix

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of physically acting substances (oils and silicas) and plant preparations for the control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer 1778). Reproduction and survival of fed D. gallinae females were evaluated in vitro for a total of 168 h using the ‘‘area under the survival curve’’ (AUC) to compare survival of the mites between treatments. Four oils (two plant oils, one petroleum spray oil and diesel), one soap, three silicas (one ...

  10. Larvicidal and mosquito repellent activities of Pine (Pinus longifolia, Family: Pinaceae oil

    M.A. Ansari, P.K. Mittal, R.K. Razdan & U. Sreehari

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Various plant-based products are safe and biodegradable alternatives tosynthetic chemicals for use against mosquitoes. Oil of Pinus longifolia is traditionally used forprotection against mosquitoes in some rural areas but there is no documented report of its use againstmosquitoes. The present study was undertaken to scientifically evaluate the activity of Pine oilagainst mosquitoes.Methods: The oil was procured from the market and its contents were chemically analysed. Larvicidalactivity of oil was tested in laboratory bioassays, while repellent action was studied during wholenight bait collections in field by direct application on the skin and after its impregnation on mats.Results: Results showed varying degree of larvicidal activity of Pine oil against mosquitoes with LC50values ranging between 82 and 112 ppm. The Pine oil had strong repellent action against mosquitoesas it provided 100% protection against Anopheles culicifacies for 11 h and 97% protection againstCulex quinquefasciatus for nine hours respectively. Electrically heated mats prepared from Pine oilprovided, 94 and 88% protection against An. culicifacies and Cx. quinquefasciatus for 10 and sevenhours respectively.Interpretaion & conclusion: Pine oil is effective against mosquito larvae at very higher doses whichare not of any practical utility. However, Pine oil showed strong repellent action against An. culicifacies(malaria vector and Cx. quinquefasciatus (pest mosquito. Thus its use could be popularised asmosquito repellent.

  11. Non-Edible Plant Oils as New Sources for Biodiesel Production

    M. Rafiqul Islam

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the concern on the availability of recoverable fossil fuel reserves and the environmental problems caused by the use those fossil fuels, considerable attention has been given to biodiesel production as an alternative to petrodiesel. However, as the biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils and animal fats, there are concerns that biodiesel feedstock may compete with food supply in the long-term. Hence, the recent focus is to find oil bearing plants that produce non-edible oils as the feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, two plant species, soapnut (Sapindus mukorossi and jatropha (jatropha curcas, L. are discussed as newer sources of oil for biodiesel production. Experimental analysis showed that both oils have great potential to be used as feedstock for biodiesel production. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME from cold pressed soapnut seed oil was envisaged as biodiesel source for the first time. Soapnut oil was found to have average of 9.1% free FA, 84.43% triglycerides, 4.88% sterol and 1.59% others. Jatropha oil contains approximately 14% free FA, approximately 5% higher than soapnut oil. Soapnut oil biodiesel contains approximately 85% unsaturated FA while jatropha oil biodiesel was found to have approximately 80% unsaturated FA. Oleic acid was found to be the dominant FA in both soapnut and jatropha biodiesel. Over 97% conversion to FAME was achieved for both soapnut and jatropha oil.

  12. Mode of action and variability in efficacy of plant essential oils showing toxicity against the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    George, D R; Smith, T J; Shiel, R S; Sparagano, O A E; Guy, J H

    2009-05-12

    This paper describes a series of experiments to examine the mode of action and toxicity of three plant essential oils (thyme, manuka and pennyroyal) to the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer), a serious ectoparasitic pest of laying hens. All three oils were found to be toxic to D. gallinae in laboratory tests with LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) values below 0.05, 0.20 and 0.30mg/cm(3), respectively, suggesting that these products may make for effective acaricides against this pest. Further experiments demonstrated that when mites were exposed to only the vapour phase of the essential oil without contact with the oil itself, mortality was consistently higher in closed arenas than in arenas open to the surrounding environment, or in control arenas. This suggests that all three essential oils were toxic to D. gallinae by fumigant action. In addition, in an experiment where mites were allowed contact with the essential oil in either open or closed arenas, mortality was always reduced in the open arenas where this was comparable to control mortality for thyme and pennyroyal essential oil treatments. This supports the findings of the previous experiment and also suggests that, with the possible exception of manuka, the selected essential oils were not toxic to D. gallinae on contact. Statistical comparisons were made between the toxicity of the selected essential oils to D. gallinae in the current work and in a previous study conducted in the same laboratory. The results demonstrated considerable variation in LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) values. Since both the essential oils and the mites were obtained from identical sources in the two studies, it is hypothesized that this variation resulted from the use of different 'batches' of essential oil, which could have varied in chemistry and hence acaricidal activity. PMID:19233565

  13. Modelling activity transport behavior in PWR plant

    The activation and transport of corrosion products around a PWR circuit is a major concern to PWR plant operators as these may give rise to high personnel doses. The understanding of what controls dose rates on ex-core surfaces and shutdown releases has improved over the years but still several questions remain unanswered. For example the relative importance of particle and soluble deposition in the core to activity levels in the plant is not clear. Wide plant to plant and cycle to cycle variations are noted with no apparent explanations why such variations are observed. Over the past few years this group have been developing models to simulate corrosion product transport around a PWR circuit. These models form the basis for the latest version of the BOA code and simulate the movement of Fe and Ni around the primary circuit. Part of this development is to include the activation and subsequent transport of radioactive species around the circuit and this paper describes some initial modelling work in this area. A simple model of activation, release and deposition is described and then applied to explain the plant behaviour at Sizewell B and Vandellos II. This model accounts for activation in the core, soluble and particulate activity movement around the circuit and for activity capture ex-core on both the inner and outer oxides. The model gives a reasonable comparison with plant observations and highlights what controls activity transport in these plants and importantly what factors can be ignored. (authors)

  14. Oil Industry Activities in Ghana: Community Perceptions and Sustainable Solutions

    George Agyei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and exploitation of oil reserves in Ghana has generated different expectations and reactions from the local population about the inevitable consequences for industrialization and economic development in the oil producing area. In pursuit of the perceptions and expectations of communities closer to the offshore operations, a mixture of semi-structured, open ended questions were randomly administered. In analyzing the perceptions and reactions of the local population to the prospects created by the oil discovery in commercial quantities, insights in sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR were considered. The study reveals that the people in the communities closer to the offshore operations share the same convictions and aspirations; that is they are comfortable with their existing sources of livelihood, afraid that these sources might be hurt from oil-related activities and demanding a just allocation of the expected economic benefits through a harmonization of local fishing, farming and oil extraction activities.

  15. Degradation of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters derived from Jatropha oil cake and their tumor-promoting activity.

    Nakao, Motoyuki; Hasegawa, Go; Yasuhara, Tadashi; Ishihara, Yoko

    2015-04-01

    Large amount of oil cake is generated during biodiesel production from Jatropha seeds. Although Jatropha oil cake is rich in plant nutrients, presence of toxic phorbol esters restricts the usage of oil cake as a fertilizer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the components and tumor promoting activity of phorbol esters in Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil and plants grown in the treated soil. Contents and their biological activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in soil and plants were sequentially analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in vitro cell transformation assay, respectively. Disappearance of Jatropha phorbol-ester-specific peaks were followed with HPLC during incubation of Jatropha oil cake with soil for five weeks. Along with the degradation of Jatropha phorbol ester in soil, tumor-promoting activity in the sample was also attenuated and ultimately disappeared. Jatropha phorbol esters and tumor promoting activity were not detected from mustard spinach grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil. In addition, the esterase KM109 degrades DHPB (see definition below; Jatropha phorbol ester) and reduced its tumor-promoting activity. From these data, we conclude: (1) components and tumor promoting activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in the oil cake disappeared completely by incubation with soil for five-week, (2) Jatropha phorbol esters did not transfer into plants grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil, and (3) DHPB can be degraded by esterase from soil bacterium. These observations are useful for utilization of Jatropha oil cake as a fertilizer. PMID:25066610

  16. Antimicrobial activity and acute and chronic toxicity of the essential oil of Lippia origanoides

    Viviane A. Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a growing interest in medicinal plants, because of an increased demand for alternate therapies. In this study, the antimicrobial activity and toxicity of the essential oil of Lippia origanoides (L. origanoides were investigated. The essential oil of L. origanoides was extracted by steam-dragging distillation and its constituents were identified by chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Among the 15 compounds identified, the most abundant were carvacrol (29.00%, o-cymene (25.57%, and thymol methyl ether (11.50%. The essential oil was studied in antimicrobial assays to determine the MIC and MBC. The results indicated that a concentration of 120μL/mL of oil was sufficient to inhibit the growth of the following microorganisms: Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 and Salmonella cholerasuis (ATCC 10708. Acute and chronic toxic effects of orally administered oil were investigated in Wistar rats by using standard methods. Doses of 30, 60 and 120mg/kg of the essential oil did not induce significant changes in weight, behavior or hematological and biochemical parameters in the animals. There were no signs of any histopathological changes to the liver, kidneys or heart of the treated rats, suggesting that Lippia origanoides oil is non-toxic after oral administration in acute or chronic toxicity studies. The results obtained in this study show that the essential oil of L. origanoides has a high safety margin, with no detectable toxic effects in rats treated with doses to 120mg/kg. In addition, L. origanoides oil demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, E. coli and S. cholerasuis. Based on these findings, this essential oil may have practical application as a veterinary antimicrobial.

  17. Larvicidal activity of essential oil and methanol extract of Nepeta menthoides against malaria vector Anopheles stephensi

    Khanavi Mahnaz; Fallah Alireza; Vatandoost Hassan; Sedaghat Mahdi; Abai Mohammad Reza; Hadjiakhoondi Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the larvicidal activity of essential oil and methanol extract of theNepeta menthoides (N. menthoides) against main malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi). Methods: The essential oil of plant was obtained by Clevenger type apparatus and the methanol extract was supplied with Percolation method. Larvicidal activity was tested by WHO method. Twenty five fourth-instar larvae of An. stephensi were used in the larvicidal assay and four replicates were tested for each concentration. Five different concentrations of the oil and extract were tested for calculation of LC50 and LC90 values. Results: The LC50 and LC90 values were determined by probit analysis. LC50 was 69.5 and 234.3 ppm and LC90 was 175.5 and 419.9 ppm for the extract and essential oil respectively. Conclusions: According to the results of this study methanolic extract of plant exhibited more larvicidal activity than essential oil. This could be useful for investigation of new natural larvicidal compounds.

  18. Geospatial estimation of the impact of Deepwater Horizon oil spill on plant oiling along the Louisiana shorelines.

    Goovaerts, Pierre; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russell; Rissing, Matthew

    2016-09-15

    Stranded oil covering soil and plant stems in fragile Louisiana marshes was one of the most visible impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. As part of the assessment of marsh injury after the DWH spill, plant stem oiling was broken into five categories (0%, 0-10%, 10-50%, 50-90%, 90-100%) and used as the independent variable for estimating death of vegetation, accelerated erosion, and other metrics of injury. The length of shoreline falling into each of these stem oiling categories was therefore a key measure of the total extent of marsh injury, and its accurate estimation is the focus of this paper. First, we used geographically-weighted logistic regression (GWR) to explore and model spatially varying relationships between stem oiling field data and secondary information (oiling exposure category) collected during shoreline surveys. We then combined GWR probability estimates with field data using indicator cokriging to predict the probability of exceeding four stem oiling thresholds (0, 10, 50, and 90%) at 50 m intervals along the Louisiana shoreline. Cross-validation using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves demonstrate the greater prediction accuracy of the multivariate geostatistical approach relative to either aspatial regression or indicator kriging that ignores secondary information. PMID:27240202

  19. Study on Antimicrobiai and Antioxidant Activity of Essential Oils and Polyphenol in Mentha Plants%薄荷属植物精油和多酚类的抑菌性及抗氧化性研究

    吕爽; 田呈瑞; 韩莎莎

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of essential oil in Mentha piperita and Mentha cardiaca were determined in this study. Furthermore, the polyphenol content and antioxidant activity of solid residues in two mints were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the two essential oils exhibited inhibition effect on E. Coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes, however, without inhibitory effect was observed in the case of Salmonella enteritidis and Aspergillus niger. The antimicrobial ability of peppermint essential oil was stronger than Scotch spearmint essential oils. Besides, the polyphenol content in residues of peppermint was significantly decreased, but that in Scotch spearmint had no significantreduction. The residues of two mints had stronger ability of scavenging DPPH after water distillation, but the antioxidant ability in FRAP assay reduced significantly.%研究了椒样薄荷(Mentha piperita L.)与苏格兰留兰香(Mentha cardiaca G.)精油的抑菌活性,测定了精油的最小抑菌浓度(MIC)和最小杀菌浓度(MBC).同时对两种薄荷叶片以及精油提取后残渣的多酚含量和抗氧化性进行研究,以期为椒样薄荷与苏格兰留兰香的多角度开发利用提供理论依据.结果表明:2种薄荷精油对于大肠杆菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、鼠伤寒沙门氏菌和李斯特菌均有抑制作用,而对于肠炎沙门氏菌及黑曲霉没有抑制作用,椒样薄荷精油的抑菌效果比苏格兰留兰香精油强.另外,椒样薄荷多酚含量在提取精油后显著性减少,而苏格兰留兰香未显著性降低.两种薄荷精油提取后残渣具有较强的DPPH自由基清除能力,而FRAP抗氧化能力却显著性降低.

  20. Applications of nanoparticles in herbal medicine: zedoary turmeric oil and its active compound β-elemene.

    Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Shengpeng; Tan, Miao; Wang, Yitao

    2011-01-01

    Zedoary turmeric oil and its main active ingredient β-elemene are novel plant-derived anticancer agents with long-term clinical application history and low toxicity, which have been approved by the Chinese SFDA to treat different tumors including cancers of the brain, ovary, prostate, breast, lungs, liver, colon, and other tissues. Unfortunately, their hydrophobic properties, poor stabilities and low bioavailabilities seriously hamper their applications in clinic. Therefore, more attention should be paid to develop novel drug delivery systems for zedoary turmeric oil and β-elemene to enhance their overall quality. Recently, increased research has been carried out on a nanoparticle drug delivery system of zedoary turmeric oil and β-elemene to solve their poor aqueous solubilities and low bioavailabilities in vivo with much remarkable achievements springing up in the last decade. This review presents the novel nanoparticle formulations of zedoary turmeric oil and β-elemene and introduces the possible future prospects of their further study. PMID:22083983

  1. Essential Oil from Inula britannica Extraction with SF-CO2 and Its Antifungal Activity

    ZHAO Te; GAO Fei; ZHOU Lin; SONG Tian-you

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extraction technique of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) for the essential oil from Inula britannica flowers and its antifungal activities against plant pathogenic fungi for its potential application as botanical fungicide. The effects of factors, including extraction temperature, extraction pressure, SF-CO2 flow rate, flower powder size, and time on the essential oil yield were studied using the single factor experiment. An orthogonal experiment was conducted to determine the best operating conditions for the maximum extraction oil yield. Adopting the optimum conditions, the maximum yield reached 10.01% at 40°C temperature, 30 MPa pressure, 60 mesh flower powder size, 20 L h-1 SF-CO2 flow rate, and 90 min extraction time. The antifungal activities of I. britannica essential oil using the SF-CO2 against the most important plant pathogenic fungi were also examined through in vitro and in vivo tests. Sixteen plant pathogenic fungi were inhibited to varying degrees at 1 mg mL-1 concentration of the essential oil. The mycelial growth of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici was completely inhibited. The radial growths of Phytophthora capsici and Fusarium monilifome were also inhibited by 83.76 and 64.69%, respectively. In addition, the essential oil can inhibit the spore germination of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, Phytophthora capsici, Colletotrichum orbiculare, and Pyricularia grisea, and the corresponding inhibition rates were 98.26, 96.54, 87.89, and 87.35%respectively. The present study has demonstrated that the essential oil of I. britannica flowers extracted through the SF-CO2 technique is one potential and promising antifungal agent that can be used as botanical fungicide to protect crops.

  2. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    Yasser Shahbazi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7). Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity of the...

  3. Natural attenuation of weathered oil using aquatic plants in a farm in Southeast Mexico.

    Rivera-Cruz, María Del Carmen; Trujillo-Narcía, Antonio; Trujillo-Rivera, Eduardo A; Arias-Trinidad, Alfredo; Mendoza-López, María Remedios

    2016-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in field for three years to assess the sustainability of aquatic plants Leersia hexandra, Cyperus articulatus, and Eleocharis palustris for use in the removal of total hydrocarbons of weathered oil in four areas contaminated with 60916-119373 mg/kg of hydrocarbons. The variables evaluated were coverage of plant, dry matter, density of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, and the removal of total weathered oil. The variables showed statistical differences (p = 0.05) due to the effects of time and the amount of oil in the soil. The three aquatic plants survived on the farm during the 36-month evaluation. The grass L. hexandra yielded the greatest coverage of plant but was inhibited by the toxicity of the oil, which, in contrast, stimulated the coverage of C. articulatus. The rhizosphere of L. hexandra in control soil was more densely colonized by N-fixing bacteria, while the density of phosphate and potassium solubilizing rhizobacteria was stimulated by exposure to oil. C. articulatus coverage showed positive relationship with the removal of weathered oil; positive effect between rhizosphere and L. hexandra grass coverage was also identified. These results contributed to the removal of weathered oil in Gleysols flooded and affected by chronic discharges of crude oil. PMID:26939740

  4. Evaluation of yield, quality and antioxidant activity of essential oil of in vitro propagated Kaempferia galangaLinn

    Suprava Sahoo; Reena Parida; Sikha Singh; Rabindra N Padhy; Sanghamitra Nayak

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine chemical constituents and antioxidant properties of essential oil from rhizome of the medicinal plant,Kaempferia galanga(K. galanga)Linn.(Zingiberaceae) in conventionally propagated(CP) andin vitro propagated(IVP) plants.Methods:In vitro(micro) propagation ofK. galanga was done by inoculating explants on toMurashige andSkoog agar medium, supplemented with suitable combinations of phytohormones; the regenerants were transferred to soil for further growth.Essential oil preparations of bothCP andIVP rhizomes grown in soil, obtained by the hydro-distillation method were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.Antioxidant activities of essential oil samples were monitored. Results:Maximum numbers of regenerated shoots were found in the medium supplemented with1 mg/L benzyl adenine and0.5 mg/L indole-3-acetic acid.A total of6 compounds were identified from rhizomes fromCP andIVP plants that yielded96.9% and97.81% of the total oil contents, respectively.The major compound of rhizome oil identified fromCP andIVP rhizomes was ethyl p-methoxy cinnamate in quantities,82.01% and71.77%, respectively, without any compositional variation.Antioxidant properties of essential oil preparations were assessed by the2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH) and hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging assays.Moreover, antioxidant activities of rhizome-oil fromIVP plants were better than that ofCP oil samples.Conclusions:As IVP rhizomes had better oil yield, those could be used for a large scale commercial propagation for sustainable use of essential oil.The principal chemical in the essential oil, ethyl p-methoxy cinnamate could help apothecary, for several ailments.

  5. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  6. Biological and Nonbiological Antioxidant Activity of Some Essential Oils.

    Pérez-Rosés, Renato; Risco, Ester; Vila, Roser; Peñalver, Pedro; Cañigueral, Salvador

    2016-06-15

    Fifteen essential oils, four essential oil fractions, and three pure compounds (thymol, carvacrol, and eugenol), characterized by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were investigated for biological and nonbiological antioxidant activity. Clove oil and eugenol showed strong DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical scavenging activity (IC50 = 13.2 μg/mL and 11.7 μg/mL, respectively) and powerfully inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils stimulated by PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) (IC50 = 7.5 μg/mL and 1.6 μg/mL) or H2O2 (IC50 = 22.6 μg/mL and 27.1 μg/mL). Nutmeg, ginger, and palmarosa oils were also highly active on this test. Essential oils from clove and ginger, as well as eugenol, carvacrol, and bornyl acetate inhibited NO (nitric oxide) production (IC50 oils of clove, red thyme, and Spanish oregano, together with eugenol, thymol, and carvacrol showed the highest myeloperoxidase inhibitory activity. Isomers carvacrol and thymol displayed a disparate behavior in some tests. All in all, clove oil and eugenol offered the best antioxidant profile. PMID:27214068

  7. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  8. Anti-Ulcer Activity of Essential Oil Constituents

    Francisco de Assis Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils have attracted considerable worldwide attention over the last few decades. These natural products have wide-ranging pharmacological activities and biotechnological applications. Faced with the need to find new anti-ulcer agents and the great effort on the development of drugs for the treatment of ulcers, in this review, the anti-ulcer activities of 21 bioactive compounds found in essential oils are discussed.

  9. Anti-Ulcer Activity of Essential Oil Constituents

    Francisco de Assis de Oliveira; Luciana Nalone Andrade; Élida Batista Vieira de Sousa; Damião Pergentino de Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils have attracted considerable worldwide attention over the last few decades. These natural products have wide-ranging pharmacological activities and biotechnological applications. Faced with the need to find new anti-ulcer agents and the great effort on the development of drugs for the treatment of ulcers, in this review, the anti-ulcer activities of 21 bioactive compounds found in essential oils are discussed.

  10. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    Paul Schnitzler; Jürgen Reichling; Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infectio...

  11. Essential Oil Composition and Antigermination Activity of Artemisia dracunculus (Tarragon).

    Fraternale, Daniele; Flamini, Guido; Ricci, Donata

    2015-08-01

    The chemical composition of an Italian oil of tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) was analyzed by GC/EIMS. The major compound of the oil was estragole (73.3%), followed by limonene (5.4%), (E)-β-ocimene (5.3%), β-pinene (3.4%) and (Z)-β-ocimene (3.0%). The essential oil was tested "in vitro" for its antigermination activity against Raphanus sativus L., Lepidium sativum L, Papaver rhoeas L. and Avena fatua L. seeds and demonstrating a good inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent way. PMID:26434144

  12. In vitro activity of an essential oil against Leishmania donovani.

    Monzote, L; García, M; Montalvo, A M; Scull, R; Miranda, M; Abreu, J

    2007-11-01

    The in vitro antileishmanial effect of the essential oil from Chenopodium ambrosioides against Leishmania donovani was investigated. The product showed significant activity against promastigotes and amastigotes, with a 50% effective concentration of 4.45 and 5.1 microg/mL, respectively. The essential oil caused an irreversible inhibition of the growth of promastigotes after a treatment with 100 or 10 microg/mL for 1 or 24 h, respectively. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages was preserved at a concentration toxic to the parasite. The essential oil from C. ambrosioides may be a potential candidate drug to development a new agent to combat this parasitic disease. PMID:17724767

  13. Microbicide activity of clove essential oil (Eugenia caryophyllata

    L. Nuñez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Clove essential oil, used as an antiseptic in oral infections, inhibits Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as yeast. The influence of clove essential oil concentration, temperature and organic matter, in the antimicrobial activity of clove essential oil, was studied in this paper, through the determination of bacterial death kinetics. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the microorganisms selected for a biological test. To determine the temperature effect, they were assayed at 21° and 37° C. The concentration coefficient was determined with 0.4%, and 0.2% of essential oil. The influence of the presence of organic matter was determined with 0.4% of essential oil. The results obtained demonstrated that Escherichia coli were more sensitive even though the essential oil exerted a satisfactory action in three cases. In the three microbial species, 0.4% of essential oil at 21º C have reduced the bacterial population in 5 logarithmic orders. Organic matter reduces the antibacterial activity even though the bactericide efficacy was not lost. Clove essential oil can be considered as a potential antimicrobial agent for external use

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of Camellia japonica oil.

    Kim, Seungbeom; Jung, Eunsun; Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Moohan; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Deokhoon

    2012-03-01

    Camellia japonica oil (CJ oil) has been used traditionally in East Asia to nourish and soothe the skin as well as help restore the elasticity of skin. CJ oil has also been used on all types of bleeding instances. However, little is known about its anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, the anti-inflammatory effects of CJ oil and its mechanisms of action were investigated. CJ oil inhibited LPS-induced production of NO, PGE(2), and TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, expression of COX-2 and iNOS genes was reduced. To evaluate the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory activity of CJ oil, LPS-induced activation of AP-1 and NF-κB promoters was found to be significantly reduced by CJ oil. LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκBα, ERK, p38, and JNK was also attenuated. Our results indicate that CJ oil exerts anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating the expression of iNOS and COX-2 genes through inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 signaling. [BMB reports 2012; 45(3): 177-182]. PMID:22449705

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Zhumeria majdae Rech.F.& Wendelbo essential oil against different microorganisms from Iran

    Mahboubi Mohaddese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The monotypic Zhumeria majdae Rech.F. & Wendelbo was recently described as the first member of new genus Zhumeria (Lamiaceae. In Iranian folk medicine, the leaves of plant were used for antiseptic properties. The antimicrobial activity of Zhumeria majdae essential oil was evaluated against a panel of microorganisms including gram negative, gram positive, yeast and fungi using disc diffusion method and micro broth dilution assay. Generally, the oil exhibited similar levels of antimicrobial activity against different microorganisms but some microorganisms appear to be more sensitive. In particular, oil showed significant power against Klebsiella pneumoniae followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Vibrio cholera, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus cereus. Klebsiella pneumoniae with MIC and MBC values 0.5, 1 μl ml -1 was the most sensitive among the tested microorganisms. The oil showed bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerugenes. The oil showed inhibitory effect against Bacillus subtilis, Proteus vulgaris, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger. Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa among Gram negative bacteria and Bacillus subtilis among Gram positive ones and Aspergillus niger among fungi and yeast were the most resistant to the essential oil.

  16. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    Yasser Shahbazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7. Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS. The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth microdilution method and agar disk diffusion assay. According to the result of GC-MS analysis, 18 components were identified, accounting for 99.89% of the whole essential oil. The main components were carvone (78.76%, limonene (11.50%, β-bourbonene (11.23%, cis-dihydrocarveol (1.43%, trans-caryophyllene (1.04%, menthone (1.01%, menthol (1%, and terpinen-4-ol (0.99. The essential oil exhibited moderate level of antibacterial activity against all test microorganisms. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to M. spicata essential oil than Gram-negative bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive of the microorganisms to the antibacterial activity of M. spicata essential oil (inhibition zone = 22 mm and MIC and MBC = 2.5 µL/mL. Based on our results, the essential oil of M. spicata plant collected from Kermanshah province, west of Iran, has a potential to be applied as antibacterial agent.

  17. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Shahbazi, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7). Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth microdilution method and agar disk diffusion assay. According to the result of GC-MS analysis, 18 components were identified, accounting for 99.89% of the whole essential oil. The main components were carvone (78.76%), limonene (11.50%), β-bourbonene (11.23%), cis-dihydrocarveol (1.43%), trans-caryophyllene (1.04%), menthone (1.01%), menthol (1%), and terpinen-4-ol (0.99). The essential oil exhibited moderate level of antibacterial activity against all test microorganisms. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to M. spicata essential oil than Gram-negative bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive of the microorganisms to the antibacterial activity of M. spicata essential oil (inhibition zone = 22 mm and MIC and MBC = 2.5 µL/mL). Based on our results, the essential oil of M. spicata plant collected from Kermanshah province, west of Iran, has a potential to be applied as antibacterial agent. PMID:26351584

  18. Effect of Neem Oil on Sperm Mitochondrial Activity

    Prashant Patil

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available It is a known fact that neem oil has some effect on motility of sperm. Motility of sperm depends on mitochondrial activity present in mid-piece of sperm. In the present study, the mitochondrial activity of sperm was evaluated after treating semen with the different quantities of neem oil. The mitochondrial activity was also evaluated after subjecting the semen samples for different incubation periods keeping the quantity of semen as well as that of neem oil same. Tests were done on thirty normozoospermic semen samples with motile score more than 75%. It was found that as the quantity of neem oil increases, the mitochondrial activity decreases significantly (P < 0.001. Similar results were found, when same quantity of neem oil was treated with same quantity of semen, but incubating for different time durations. The mitochondrial activity decreases significantly (P < 0.001 from one minute to twenty minutes. So, it indicates that as the contact period between neem oil and semen increases the mitochondrial activity decreases significantly.

  19. Bacterial Structure and Characterization of Plant Growth Promoting and Oil Degrading Bacteria from the Rhizospheres of Mangrove Plants

    do Carmo, Flavia Lima; dos Santos, Henrique Fragoso; Martins, Edir Ferreira; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2011-01-01

    Most oil from oceanic spills converges on coastal ecosystems, such as mangrove forests, which are threatened with worldwide disappearance. Particular bacteria that inhabit the rhizosphere of local plant species can stimulate plant development through various mechanisms; it would be advantageous if t

  20. Development of New Elastomers and Elastic Nanocomposites from Plant Oils

    Zhu, Lin; Wool, Richard

    2006-03-01

    Economic and environmental concerns lead to the development of new polymers from renewable resources. In this research, new elastomers were synthesized from plant oil based resins. Acrylated oleic methyl ester (AOME), synthesized from high oleic triglycerides, can readily undergo free radical polymerization and form a linear polymer. To achieve the elastic properties, different strategies have been developed to generate an elastic network and control the crosslink density. The elastomers are reinforced by nanoclays. The intercalated state has a network structure similar to thermoplastic elastomers in which the hard segments aggregate to give ordered crystalline domains. The selected organically modified clay and AOME matrix have similar solubility parameters, therefore intercalation of the monomer/polymer into the clay layers occurs and the nano-scale multilayered structure is stable. In situ intercalation and solution intercalation were used to prepare the elastic nanocomposites. Dramatic improvement in mechanical properties was observed. Changes of tensile strength, strain, Young's modulus and fracture energy were related to the clay concentration. The fracture surface was studied to further understand clay effects on the mechanical properties. Self-Healing of the intercalated nanobeams, thermal stability, biocompatibility and biodegradability of this new elastomer were also explored.

  1. Active condensation of water by plants

    Prokhorov Alexey Anatolievich

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to some peculiarities of water condensation on the surface of plants . Arguments in support of the hypothesis that in decreasing temperature of leaves and shoots below the dew point, the plant can actively condense moisture from the air, increasing the duration of dewfall are presented. Evening dewfall on plant surfaces begins before starting the formation of fog. Morning condensation continues for some time after the air temperature exceeds the dew point . The phenomen...

  2. Chemical composition, antimicrobial activity and antiviral activity of essential oil of Carum copticum from Iran

    Reza Kazemi Oskuee

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: The essential oil showed an antiviral activity against phage when phage was pre-incubated with the essential oil prior to its exposure to B. cereus and without any pre-incubation with the phage, suggesting that the oil directly inactivated virus particles.

  3. Effect of Nutrient Amendments of Diesel Oil Polluted Soil on Plant Growth Parameters

    C.O. Akujobi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of nutrient amendments of diesel oil polluted soil on plant height, leaf area and leaf numbers of eggplant (Solanum melongena. Soil samples were polluted and amended separately with different weights of poultry waste, pig waste, cow dung and inorganic fertilizer. Soil samples were also polluted with diesel oil without amendment to achieve 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10% pollution. Samples were analyzed at two weeks interval for sixteen weeks. The plant growth parameters were affected adversely by the diesel oil pollution and the higher the level of pollution, the more the effect. The nutrient amendments were able to remedy the effect of the diesel oil pollution. The remediation effect was nutrient weight dependent and the best remediation effect was observed in poultry waste amended samples. This study has shown that diesel oil contaminated soil may have adverse effect on plants, but this can be remedied by addition of organic nutrient supplements especially poultry waste.

  4. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY AND EVALUATION OF THE ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS AND PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS OF PISTACIA LENTISCUS L

    K. Arab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims for the phytochemical study and evaluation of the antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds and essential oils of medicinal plant Pistacia lentiscus L. quantitatively and qualitatively. Through the results obtained, it appears that the leaves and fruits are rich in substances with a high antioxidant power. The yield of the phenolic compounds obtained from 10g to powder of plant is for leaves 116.49 % and 61.34 % for fruit . For essential oils, it is 0.253 ± 0.131 % for 100 g of plant material. The chromatographic profile of the essential oil of Pistacia lentiscus L. shows that monoterpenes are the major compound (9.675 % of identified molecules. The strong antioxidant activity of extracts obtained only confirms the traditional use of this plant by the local population.

  5. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY AND EVALUATION OF THE ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS AND PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS OF PISTACIA LENTISCUS L

    K. Arab

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work aims for the phytochemical study and evaluation of the antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds and essential oils of medicinal plant Pistacia lentiscus L. quantitatively and qualitatively. Through the results obtained, it appears that the leaves and fruits are rich in substances with a high antioxidant power. The yield of the phenolic compounds obtained from 10g  to powder of plant  is for leaves 116.49 %  and 61.34 % for fruit . For essential oils, it is 0.253 ± 0.131 % for 100 g of plant material. The chromatographic profile of the essential oil of Pistacia lentiscus L. shows that monoterpenes are the major compound (9.675 % of identified molecules. The strong antioxidant activity of extracts obtained only confirms the traditional use of this plant by the local population.

  6. [Determination of the antibacterial and antiviral activity of the essential oil from Minthostachys verticillata (Griseb.) Epling].

    Primo, V; Rovera, M; Zanon, S; Oliva, M; Demo, M; Daghero, J; Sabini, L

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro antiviral activity of the essential oil from Minthostachys verticillata was investigated against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PrV). The viral inhibition was assayed employing viral plaque reduction assay. The antiviral activity of the essential oil specifically affects PrV and HSV-1 multiplication, since it was found that non toxic effects on cells were observed at the concentrations assayed. The therapeutic index values were 10.0 and 9.5 for HSV-1 and PrV, respectively. The antibacterial activity was studied using a diffusion assay and the broth tube dilution method. Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to inhibition by plant essential oil than the gram-negative bacteria. The essential oil of M. verticillata was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) technique. Of the six components identified in the volatile oil, pulegone (44.56%) and menthone (39.51%) were the major constituents. The antimicrobial activity can be explained to some extent by the presence of pulegone. Results suggest that further investigations concerning the isolation of the substance responsible for the antimicrobial activity and an effort to define the mechanisms of action are warranted. PMID:11494754

  7. Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil and Extract of Hypericum elongatum

    Ghasemi, Younes; Khalaj, Amir; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Khosravi, Ahmad Reza; Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein

    HOFARIGHUN, RAEE flower, thousand eyes wort are popular names for Hypericum sp in Persian language mostly called H. perforatum. It has been used as antispasmodic, diuretic, antimigraine, antiepileptic and cholagouge. Tisane of these plants in red wine was used as snake bite and burning remedy. The volatile constituents, obtained from air-dried aerial parts of fruiting Hypericum elongatum were analyzed by GC/MS method. Thirty four components of about 96.50% of total oil were identified. Pinene (80.43%), Terpinene (4.23%) and Pinene (2.59%) were the principal components (87.16%). The essential oil and hydroalcoholic extract were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal and anti-yeast activities by using disc diffusion method. Screening of the antimicrobials was investigated on Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC 1112, Staphylococcus epidermidis PTCC 1114, Bacillus subtilis PTCC 1023, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 8043), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli PTCC 1338, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PTCC 1047, Salmonella typhi PTCC 1609), yeasts (Candida albicans ATCC 14053, Candida kefyr ATCC 3826) and fungi (Aspergillus niger PLM 1140, Aspergillus fumigatus PLM 712). The MIC of essential oil also was identified. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil against all of the microorganisms was observed, except Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus fumigatus. In spite of antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic extract against bacteria, there was no antimicrobial activity against fungi and yeasts. A survey of the literature revealed no reports dealing with chemical composition of essential oil and antimicrobial activity of Hypericum elongatum.

  8. Amtimicrobial activity of essential oil of Melissa officinalis L, Lamiaceae

    Aničić Nada V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Melissa officinalis was investigated in this paper. The essential oil was obtained by the principle of water and steam and analyzed by GC and GC-MS using FID and MSD. The main components of the oil of Melissa officinalis were geranial (17.30%, neral (14.70% and citronellal (10.70%. The antimicrobial properties were tested against the following bacterial species: B subtilis, B.cereus Bifidobacterium sp., Corynobacterium sp., E. coli, Klebsiella sp., L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, Listeria monocytogenes, P. vulgaris, P. aerugenosa, S. enteritidis, Shigella sp., S. aureus, and fungi Candida albicans, Alternarija sp. and Aspergillus niger. The diffusion technique was used for testing: the antimicrobial activity, and the MIC was determined by the broth dilution method. The essential oil of M. officinalis showed high antimicrobial activity.

  9. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds Present in Virgin Olive Oil

    Russell Keast

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  10. Comparison of Essential Oil Content, Constituents, and Antioxidant Activity of Nepeta Glomerulosa during Three Developmental Stages

    Moradi, H.; Azizi, M.; Rowshan, V.

    2014-12-01

    The genus Nepeta with the common Persian name "Pune-Sa" is one of the most important genera of Lamiaceae family. More than 250 species in the world and 67 annual or perennial species in Iran have been reported. Some of these species are valuable in medicine and are used for medicinal purposes. The aim of this study was to identify essential oil content, its chemical composition, and antioxidant activity in the N. glomerulosa during vegetative, flowering and seed set stages. The samples of N. glomerulosa in the three above-mentioned stages were collected from Abade region of Fars Province. The essential oil was obtained though hydrodistillation and was analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Essential oil of the plant in vegetative, flowering and seed set stages were measured to be 55, 53 and 53 components, respectively, with geranyl acetate (16.644%, 18.182% and 24.441%), geraniol (10.797%, 11.372% and 12.389%), caryophyllene oxide (8.302%, 10.515% and 6.661%), humulene epoxide ΙΙ (7.974%, 7.112% and 2.587%), α-pinene (4.743%, 4.126% and 6.724%), limonene (4.086%, 3.848% and 4.711%) and 1,8-cineol (3.397%, 4.609% and 3.759%) being the major components of the essential oil. The results confirmed that phonological stages have a significant effect on essential oils constituents. Geranyl acetate and geraniol increased by development of plant from vegetative to seed set stage and geranyl acetate was the main essential oils constituent of the plants throughout the three phonological stages. Antioxidant activity in flowering and seed set stages was significantly higher than vegetative stage, but compared with Gallic acid, which is a very strong antioxidant substance, had insignificant antioxidant activity.

  11. CNPC Active on International Oil Stage

    2008-01-01

    @@ China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) has strived to operate itself successfully worldwide in the past decade to show the competitiveness of China's State-owned industries. The Chinese oil giant has continued to boost its cooperation with its foreign counterparts in a large variety of sectors for sustainable business development both at home and overseas.

  12. Effect of commercially available plant-derived essential oil products on arthropod pests.

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Galle, Cindy L; Keith, Stephen R; Kalscheur, Nanette A; Kemp, Kenneth E

    2009-08-01

    Plant-derived essential oil products, in general, are considered minimum-risk pesticides and are exempt from Environmental Protection Agency registration under section 25(b) of the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. However, many of the plant-derived essential products available to consumers (homeowners) have not been judiciously evaluated for both efficacy and plant safety. In fact, numerous plant-derived essential oil products labeled for control of arthropod pests have not been subject to rigorous evaluation, and there is minimal scientific information or supporting data associated with efficacy against arthropod pests. We conducted a series of greenhouse experiments to determine the efficacy and phytotoxicity of an array of plant-derived essential oil products available to consumers on arthropod pests including the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Risso); western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande); twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch; sweetpotato whitefly B-biotype, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius); and green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Although the products Flower Pharm (cottonseed, cinnamon, and rosemary oil) and Indoor Pharm (soybean, rosemary, and lavender oil) provided > 90% mortality of citrus mealybug, they were also the most phytotoxic to the coleus, Solenostemon scutellarioides (L.) Codd, plants. Both GC-Mite (cottonseed, clove, and garlic oil) and Bugzyme (citric acid) were most effective against the twospotted spider mite (> or = 90% mortality). However, SMC (canola, coriander oil, and triethanolamine), neem (clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil), and Bug Assassin (eugenol, sodium lauryl sulfate, peppermint, and citronella oil) provided > 80% mortality. Monterey Garden Insect Spray, which contained 0.5% spinosad, was most effective against western flower thrips with 100% mortality. All the other products evaluated failed to provide sufficient control of western flower thrips with or = 4.5 of

  13. Boosting Newcastle disease vaccination efficacy under field conditions by aromatic plant essential oil extracts

    Mohammad S. Khalifeh; Abu-Basha, Ehab A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of commercially available aromatic plant essential oil extracts (MixOilTM) on the protection outcome achieved after a Newcastle disease (ND) vaccination. Antibody production, after a MixOil treatment administered along with a vaccination program applying a live attenuated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine, was assessed under field conditions. The antibody response was evaluated via a Hemagglutination Inhibition test and an Enzyme-Linked Imm...

  14. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens

    Francis Ocheng; Freddie Bwanga; Moses Joloba; Abier Softrata; Muhammad Azeem; Katrin Pütsep; Anna-Karin Borg-Karlson; Celestino Obua; Anders Gustafsson

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed ...

  15. Non-Edible Plant Oils as New Sources for Biodiesel Production

    M. Rafiqul Islam; K. Chris Watts; Suzanne M Budge; Martin S. Tango; Arjun B. Chhetri

    2008-01-01

    Due to the concern on the availability of recoverable fossil fuel reserves and the environmental problems caused by the use those fossil fuels, considerable attention has been given to biodiesel production as an alternative to petrodiesel. However, as the biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils and animal fats, there are concerns that biodiesel feedstock may compete with food supply in the long-term. Hence, the recent focus is to find oil bearing plants that produce non-edible oils as the f...

  16. EVALUATION OF ANTIULCER ACTIVITY OF CASTOR OIL IN RATS

    Rachhadiya Rakesh M.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To study the antiulcer activity of oil of Ricinus communis seed using different models of gastric ulceration in rats. Antiulcer activity of castor oil was studied in rats by administration of ethanol or aspirin or by pyloric ligation. Castor oil was administered in the dose of 500 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg orally 30 min prior to ulcer induction. The antiulcer activity was assessed by determining and comparing the ulcer index in the test drug group with that of the ulcerated control group. Gastric total acid output and pepsin activity were estimated in the pylorus ligated rats. Ranitidine and Sucralfate were used as a reference drug. The ulcer index in the castor oil treated animals was found to be significantly less in all the models compared to ulcerated control animals. This antiulcer property was more prominent in animals in whom ulcers were induced by ethanol, aspirin and pyloric ligation. Ranitidine (30 mg/kg produced a significant gastric ulcer protection when compared with the control group. The anti-ulcer activity of castor oil was however, less than that of ranitidine. Our results suggest that castor oil possesses significant antiulcer property which could be either due to cytoprotective action of the drug or by strengthening of gastric mucosa and thus enhancing mucosal defence.

  17. Inhibitory effect of essential oils obtained from plants grown in Colombia on yellow fever virus replication in vitro

    Martínez Jairo R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An antiviral drug is needed for the treatment of patients suffering from yellow fever. Several compounds present in plants can inactive in vitro a wide spectrum of animal viruses. Aim In the present study the inhibitory effect of essential oils of Lippia alba, Lippia origanoides, Oreganum vulgare and Artemisia vulgaris on yellow fever virus (YFV replication was investigated. Methods The cytotoxicity (CC50 on Vero cells was evaluated by the MTT reduction method. The minimum concentration of the essential oil that inhibited virus titer by more than 50% (MIC was determined by virus yield reduction assay. YFV was incubated 24 h at 4°C with essential oil before adsorption on Vero cell, and viral replication was carried out in the absence or presence of essential oil. Vero cells were exposed to essential oil 24 h at 37°C before the adsorption of untreated-virus. Results The CC50 values were less than 100 μg/mL and the MIC values were 3.7 and 11.1 μg/mL. The CC50/MIC ratio was of 22.9, 26.4, 26.5 and 8.8 for L. alba, L origanoides, O. vulgare and A. vulgaris, respectively. The presence of essential oil in the culture medium enhances the antiviral effect: L. origanoides oil at 11.1 μg/mLproduced a 100% reduction of virus yield, and the same result was observed with L. alba, O. vulgare and A. vulgaris oils at100 μg/mL. No reduction of virus yield was observed when Vero cells were treated with essential oil before the adsorption of untreated-virus. Conclusion The essential oils evaluated in the study showed antiviral activities against YFV. The mode of action seems to be direct virus inactivation.

  18. Antigenotoxic and antioxidant activities of Pituranthos chloranthus essential oils.

    Neffati, A; Bouhlel, I; Ben Sghaier, M; Boubaker, J; Limem, I; Kilani, S; Skandrani, I; Bhouri, W; Le Dauphin, J; Barillier, D; Mosrati, R; Chekir-Ghedira, L; Ghedira, K

    2009-03-01

    The SOS-chromotest in Escherichia coli is a widely used bacterial genotoxicity assay to test potential carcinogens. The aim of this work is to evaluate the genotoxic and antigenotoxic activities of essential oils obtained from aerial parts of Pituranthos chloranthus. The tested essential oils were not genotoxic towards both E. coli PQ37 and PQ35 strains. These essential oils reduced significantly Nifuroxazide and H(2)O(2)-induced genotoxicity. Essential oils showed a protective effect against damages induced by radicals, obtained from the photolysis of H(2)O(2), on DNA plasmid through free radical scavenging mechanisms. The scavenging capacity of these essential oils was also estimated by evaluating the inhibition of ABTS(+.) radical. PMID:21783938

  19. Oil Spill Adsorption Capacity of Activated Carbon Tablets from Corncobs in Simulated Oil-Water Mixture

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion; Sheila Adarlo Abacan; Gerald Garces Allorde; Ma. Cherrielyne Silda Umali

    2015-01-01

    Oil spill in bodies of water is one of severe environmental problems that is facing all over the country and in the world. Since oil is an integral part of the economy, increasing trend for its demand and transport of has led to a great treat in the surface water. One of the promising techniques in the removal of the oil spills in water bodies is adsorption using activated carbon form waste material such as corn cobs. The purpose of this study is to determine the adsorption capaci...

  20. Assessment of soil contamination by (210)Po and (210)Pb around heavy oil and natural gas fired power plants.

    Al-Masri, M S; Haddad, Kh; Doubal, A W; Awad, I; Al-Khatib, Y

    2014-06-01

    Soil contamination by (210)Pb and (210)Po around heavy oil and natural gas power plants has been investigated; fly and bottom ash containing enhanced levels of (210)Pb and (210)Po were found to be the main source of surface soil contamination. The results showed that (210)Pb and (210)Po in fly-ash (economizer, superheater) is highly enriched with (210)Pb and (210)Po, while bottom-ash (boiler) is depleted. The highest (210)Pb and (210)Po activity concentrations were found to be in economizer ash, whereas the lowest activity concentration was in the recirculator ash. On the other hand, (210)Pb and (210)Po activity concentrations in soil samples were found to be higher inside the plant site area than those samples collected from surrounding areas. The highest levels were found in the vicinity of Mhardeh and Tishreen power plants; both plants are operated by heavy oil and natural fuels, while the lowest values were found to be in those samples collected from Nasrieh power plant, which is only operated by one type of fuel, viz. natural gas. In addition, the levels of surface soil contamination have decreased as the distance from the power plant site center increased. PMID:24602817

  1. Effect of essential oil of Origanum rotundifolium on some plant pathogenic bacteria, seed germination and plant growth of tomato

    Dadaşoǧlu, Fatih; Kotan, Recep; Karagöz, Kenan; Dikbaş, Neslihan; Ćakmakçi, Ramazan; Ćakir, Ahmet; Kordali, Şaban; Özer, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine effect of Origanum rotundifolium's essential oil on some plant pathogenic bacterias, seed germination and plant growth of tomato. Xanthomonas axanopodis pv. vesicatoria strain (Xcv-761) and Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. michiganensis strain (Cmm) inoculated to tomato seed. The seeds were tested for germination in vitro and disease severity and some plant growth parameters in vivo. In vitro assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil treatment in seeds inoculated with Xcv-761 and at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil and streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. The least infected cotiledon number was observed at 500 µg/ml streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. In vivo assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 250 µl/ml essential oil teratment in tomato inoculated with Cmm. Lowest disease severity, is seen in the CMM infected seeds with 250 µl/ml essential oil application these results were statistically significant when compared with pathogen infected seeds. Similarly, in application conducted with XCV-761 infected seed, the lowest disease severity was observed for seeds as a result of 250 µl/ml essential oil application. Also according to the results obtained from essential oil application of CMM infected seeds conducted with 62,5 µl/ml dose; while disease severity was found statistically insignificant compared to 250 µl/ml to essential oil application, ıt was found statistically significant compared to pathogen infected seeds. The results showed that essential oil of O. rotundifolium has a potential for some suppressed plant disease when it is used in appropriate dose.

  2. SCREENING OF PLANTS FOR ANTI DERMATOPHYTE ACTIVITY

    V.S. Chauhan, A. Suthar, V. Naik and K. Salkar*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycotic infections of skin are caused by dermatophytes. Screening of plants for anti dermatophyte activity was carried out based on the literature search done. Native plants of Maharashtra (India were screened for anti dermatophyte activity. Various plant parts from different regions were collected and then extracted with three different solvents viz. alcohol, hydro-alcohol and aqueous. The obtained extracts were subjected for anti dermatophyte activity using agar-well diffusion technique. Three different concentrations of extract were checked for activity. Two species of dermatophytes, viz. - Trichophyton and Microsporum were used in the screening assay. Out of the twenty-eight plants screened by agar diffusion method, seven were found to be active with different activity profile. Methanol extract was the most active extract. Pterospermum suberifolium, Trachyspermum ammi, Peltaphorum pterocarpum, Ixora coccinia, Persicaria glabra, Terminallia elliptica and Cicca acida showed activity at different concentrations against the two species of dermatophytes. The data obtained can be used for further studying the anti dermatophyte potential of active plants.

  3. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Other Aroma-Therapeutic Oils

    Stephanie de Rapper; Guy Kamatou; Alvaro Viljoen; Sandy van Vuuren

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia essential oil was assessed in combination with 45 other oils to establish possible interactive properties. The composition of the selected essential oils was confirmed using GC-MS with a flame ionization detector. The microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay was undertaken, whereby the fractional inhibitory concentration (ΣFIC) was calculated for the oil combinations. When lavender oil was assayed in 1 : 1 ratios with othe...

  4. Physical and chemical characterization of residual oil-fired power plant emissions

    Although the toxicity of oil combustion emissions is a significant public health concern, few studies characterize the emissions from plant-scale utility boilers firing residual oil. This study remedies that deficiency by sampling and monitoring stack emissions from a 432 Giga Jo...

  5. Antibacterial activity of selected Myanmar medicinal plants

    Thirteen plants which are traditionally used for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea in Myanmar were selected and tested for antibacterial activity by using agar disc diffusion technique. Polar and nonpolar solvents were employed for extraction of plants. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extracts with the most significant predominant activity were evaluated by plate dilution method. The plants Eugenia jambolana, Quisqualis indica, Leucaena glauca and Euphorbia splendens var. 1 were found to show significant antibacterial activity. It was also observed that extracts using nonpolar solvents did not show any antibacterial activity and extracts using polar solvents showed antibacterial activity on tested bacteria, indicating that the active chemical compound responsible for the antibacterial action must be a polar soluble compound. (author)

  6. Environmental risk analysis for offshore oil and gas activities

    Brude, Odd Willy; Aspholm, Ole O.; Rudberg, Anders [Det Norske Veritas (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Offshore oil and gas activities always have a risk for environmental impact due to potential accidental releases of oil and gas. The environmental risk can be calculated as a combination of the frequency of such accidents to occur and their environmental consequences in terms of environmental damage to habitats or populations. A method for conducting environmental risk analysis has been in use in Norwegian offshore waters for a decade, with a continuously refinement of methodology over the past years. This paper outlines the principles in the MIRA method and gives examples and discussions regarding use in different environmental compartments. The risk assessment starts with identification of oil spill scenarios with frequencies of potential release rates and spill durations. The next step is to model the oil drift for each accidental oil spill scenario. Drift and fate of oil is modeled probabilistic. Based on the oil spill scenarios and their probability of oil pollution, the potential environmental damage is quantified for each scenario. The endpoint of environmental damage is reduction of a population and the resulting recovery time (in years) for various species and habitats. Environmental risk levels are then evaluated against the operating companies' environmental acceptance criteria. (author)

  7. Antimicrobial activity of some Iranian medicinal plants

    Ghasemi Pirbalouti Abdollah; Jahanbazi Parvin; Enteshari Shekoofeh; Malekpoor Fatemeh; Hamedi Behzad

    2010-01-01

    The major aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of the extracts of eight plant species which are endemic in Iran. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts of eight Iranian traditional plants, including Hypericum scabrum, Myrtus communis, Pistachia atlantica, Arnebia euchroma, Salvia hydrangea, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus daenensis and Kelussia odoratissima, were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Candida albi...

  8. Antimicrobial activity of amazonian medicinal plants

    Oliveira, Amanda A; Segovia, Jorge FO; Sousa, Vespasiano YK; Mata, Elida CG; Gonçalves, Magda CA; Bezerra, Roberto M; Junior, Paulo OM; Kanzaki, Luís IB

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aqueous extracts of currently utilized Amazonian medicinal plants were assayed in vitro searching for antimicrobial activity against human and animal pathogenic microorganisms. Methods Medium resuspended lyophilized aqueous extracts of different organs of Amazonian medicinal plants were assayed by in vitro screening for antimicrobial activity. ATCC and standardized microorganisms obtained from Oswaldo Cruz Foundation/Brazil were individually and homogeneously grown in agar plat...

  9. Diagnostics of the power oil-filled transformer equipment of thermal power plants

    Eltyshev, D. K.; Khoroshev, N. I.

    2016-08-01

    Problems concerning improvement of the diagnostics efficiency of the electrical facilities and functioning of the generation and distribution systems through the examples of the power oil-filled transformers, as the responsible elements referring to the electrical part of thermal power plants (TPP), were considered. Research activity is based on the fuzzy logic system allowing working both with statistical and expert information presented in the form of knowledge accumulated during operation of the power oil-filled transformer facilities. The diagnostic algorithm for various types of transformers, with the use of the intellectual estimation model of its thermal state on the basis of the key diagnostic parameters and fuzzy inference hierarchy, was developed. Criteria for taking measures allowing preventing emergencies in the electric power systems were developed. The fuzzy hierarchical model for the state assessment of the power oil-filled transformers of 110 kV, possessing high degree of credibility and setting quite strict requirements to the limits of variables of the equipment diagnostic parameters, was developed. The most frequent defects of the transformer standard elements, related with the disturbance of the isolation properties and instrumentation operation, were revealed after model testing on the real object. Presented results may be used both for the express diagnostics of the transformers state without disconnection from the power line and for more detailed analysis of the defects causes on the basis of the advanced list of the diagnostic parameters; information on those parameters may be received only after complete or partial disconnection.

  10. Detection of plant oil addition to cheese by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy

    Dankowska, Anna; Małecka, Maria; Kowalewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The fraudulent addition of plant oils during the manufacturing of hard cheeses is a real issue for the dairy industry. Considering the importance of monitoring adulterations of genuine cheeses, the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of cheese adulteration with plant oils was investigated. Synchronous fluorescence spectra were collected within the range of 240 to 700 nm with different wavelength intervals. The lowest detection limits of adulteration, 3.0 and 4.4%, respect...

  11. Nutritional Status of some Aromatic Plants Grown to Produce Volatile Oils under Treated Municipal Wastewater irrigation

    Khalifa, Ramadan Khalifa Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    To avoid any contamination risk of edible crops, the safety use of treated municipal wastewater is growing industrial non-food crops such as aromatic plants to produce volatile oils for manufacturing soaps, cosmetics and perfumes, etc. Therefore, two field experiments were conducted in a sandy soil to investigate the influence of treated domestic sewage effluents or freshwater (control) on the essential oils of geranium, peppermint, fennel, marjoram, and chamomile plants. In the first experim...

  12. Effects of mycorrhiza on growth and essential oil production in selected aromatic plants

    Waed Tarraf; Claudia Ruta; Francesca De Cillis; Anna Tagarelli; Luigi Tedone; Giuseppe De Mastro

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is widely investigated in aromatic herbs. Several studies have shown different effects on secondary metabolites, biomass production, as well as oil quantitative and qualitative aspects. The seeking to increase the yield of plants and their oils is an interesting topic in the world of medicinal and aromatic plant production. In tune with that, this study evaluated the effectiveness of two mycorrhiza fungi, Funneliformis mosseae (syn. Glomus mosseae) and Se...

  13. Effect of Nutrient Amendments of Diesel Oil Polluted Soil on Plant Growth Parameters

    C.O. Akujobi; R.A. Onyeagba; V.O. Nwaugo; N.N. Odu

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of nutrient amendments of diesel oil polluted soil on plant height, leaf area and leaf numbers of eggplant (Solanum melongena). Soil samples were polluted and amended separately with different weights of poultry waste, pig waste, cow dung and inorganic fertilizer. Soil samples were also polluted with diesel oil without amendment to achieve 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10% pollution. Samples were analyzed at two weeks interval for sixteen weeks. The plant growth parameters ...

  14. Evaluating Medicinal Plants for Anticancer Activity

    Elisha Solowey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants have been used for medical purposes since the beginning of human history and are the basis of modern medicine. Most chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment are molecules identified and isolated from plants or their synthetic derivatives. Our hypothesis was that whole plant extracts selected according to ethnobotanical sources of historical use might contain multiple molecules with antitumor activities that could be very effective in killing human cancer cells. This study examined the effects of three whole plant extracts (ethanol extraction on human tumor cells. The extracts were from Urtica membranacea (Urticaceae, Artemesia monosperma (Asteraceae, and Origanum dayi post (Labiatae. All three plant extracts exhibited dose- and time-dependent killing capabilities in various human derived tumor cell lines and primary cultures established from patients’ biopsies. The killing activity was specific toward tumor cells, as the plant extracts had no effect on primary cultures of healthy human cells. Cell death caused by the whole plant extracts is via apoptosis. Plant extract 5 (Urtica membranacea showed particularly strong anticancer capabilities since it inhibited actual tumor progression in a breast adenocarcinoma mouse model. Our results suggest that whole plant extracts are promising anticancer reagents.

  15. Composition and antibacterial activity of Abies balsamea essential oil.

    Pichette, André; Larouche, Pierre-Luc; Lebrun, Maxime; Legault, Jean

    2006-05-01

    The antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Abies balsamea (balsam fir) was evaluated against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The essential oil of A. balsamea was found to be inactive against E. coli (>100 microg/mL) and active against S. aureus, with an MIC of 56 microg/mL. The oil composition was analysed by GC-MS and the antibacterial activity of each oil constituent was determined. The essential oil of A. balsamea is essentially constituted of monoterpenes (>96%) and some sesquiterpenes. beta-pinene (29.9%), delta-3-carene (19.6%) and alpha-pinene (14.6%) were the major components. beta-pinene and delta-3-carene were found inactive against both bacteria strains. However, three constituents of the essential oil were active against S. aureus: alpha-pinene, beta-caryophyllene (0.4%) and alpha-humulene (0.2%) with MIC values of 13.6 microg/mL, 5.1 microg/mL and 2.6 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:16619365

  16. Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

    Yang, Zhenyu; Stigkær, Jens Peter; Løhndorf, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of plant-wide control philosophy to enhance the performance and capacity of the Produced Water Treatment (PWT) in offshore oil & gas production processes. Different from most existing facility- or material-based PWT innovation methods, the objective of this work...

  17. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  18. Repellent activity of some essential oils against two stored product beetles Callosobruchus chinensis L. and C. maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) with reference to Chenopodium ambrosioides L. oil for the safety of pigeon pea seeds

    Pandey, Abhay K; Palni, Uma T.; N. N. Tripathi

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils from 35 aromatic and medicinal plant species of Gorakhpur Division (U. P., India) were evaluated for their repellent activity against pulse bruchids Callosobruchus chinensis L. and C. maculatus F. of stored pigeon pea seeds. The oil concentration was at 0.36 μl/ml. Out of 35 essential oils, Adhatoda vasica Ness and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. oils showed absolute (100 %) insect repellency. Chenopodium oil exhibited 100 % mortality for both the test insects at 10 μl concentratio...

  19. Screening antifungal activities of selected medicinal plants.

    Quiroga, E N; Sampietro, A R; Vattuone, M A

    2001-01-01

    Plants synthesise a vast array of secondary metabolites that are gaining importance for their biotechnological applications. The antifungal activity of the ethanolic extracts of ten Argentinean plants used in native medicine is reported. Antifungal assays included radial growth inhibition, disk and well diffusion assays and growth inhibition by broth dilution tests. The chosen test fungi were yeasts, microfungi and wood-rot causing Basidiomycetes. Extracts of Larrea divaricata, Zuccagnia punctata and Larrea cuneifolia displayed remarkable activity in the assays against the majority of the test fungi. In addition to the former plants, Prosopanche americana also inhibited yeast growth. PMID:11137353

  20. Efficacy of plant essential oils on postharvest control of rots caused by fungi on different stone fruits in vivo.

    Lopez-Reyes, Jorge Giovanny; Spadaro, Davide; Prelle, Ambra; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2013-04-01

    The antifungal activity of plant essential oils was evaluated as postharvest treatment on stone fruit against brown rot and grey mold rot of stone fruit caused by Monilinia laxa and Botrytis cinerea, respectively. The essential oils from basil (Ocimum basilicum), fennel (Foeniculum sativum), lavender (Lavandula officinalis), marjoram (Origanum majorana), oregano (Origanum vulgare), peppermint (Mentha piperita), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), sage (Salvia officinalis), savory (Satureja montana), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), and wild mint (Mentha arvensis) were tested at two different concentrations on apricots (cv. Kyoto and cv. Tonda di Costigliole), nectarines (cv. Big Top and cv. Nectaross) and plums (cv. Italia and cv. TC Sun). The volatile composition of the essential oils tested was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The treatments containing essential oils from oregano, savory, and thyme at 1% (vol/vol) controlled both B. cinerea and M. laxa growing on apricots cv. Tonda di Costigliole and plums cv. Italia and cv. TC Sun; however, the same treatments were phytotoxic for the carposphere of nectarines cv. Big Top and cv. Nectaross. Treatments with 10% (vol/vol) essential oils were highly phytotoxic, notwithstanding their efficacy against the pathogens tested. The essential oils containing as major components α-pinene, p-cymene, carvacrol, and thymol showed similar results on stone fruit, so their antimicrobial activity and the phytotoxicity produced could be based on the concentration of their principal compounds and their synergistic activity. The efficacy of the essential oil treatments on control of fungal pathogens in postharvest depended on the fruit cultivar, the composition and concentration of the essential oil applied, and the length of storage. PMID:23575125

  1. Politics and economics to shape international oil and gas activity

    This paper reports that political and economic events play unusually strong roles in shaping worldwide oil and gas activity levels this year. Developments in the former U.S.S.R. will be critical. As the now-independent republics adopt new economic systems, production and demand patterns will change, as will exports from what has been the world's leading oil producer. Changing conditions in the Middle East among members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting countries also will affect the industry in the year following the brief Persian Gulf war. Unless worldwide demand surges unexpectedly, these substantial additions to supply will tend to weaken oil prices in 1992

  2. Chinese Players Active in International Oil and Gas Investment

    Di Xuefeng

    2011-01-01

    @@ In recent years, Chinese oil companies have been pacing the globe to secure energy assets to fuel the fast- growing Asian powerhouse's economy.China's enterprises eyed global expansion via mergers and acquisitions (M&A) in 2010 as the country's economic power was on increase.Apparently, China accelerated the pace of cross-border cooperation "in" its "go-world" policy last year, to tap into more natural resources through the M&A activities of its big oil and gas producers.Among the deals, 80 percent took place in Canada and South America and unconventional sources, including deepwater drilling and oil sands assets.

  3. In vitro antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity of cochlospermum tinctorium and C. planchonii leaf extracts and essential oils.

    Benoit-Vical, F; Valentin, A; Mallié, M; Bastide, J M; Bessière, J M

    1999-05-01

    The antimalarial and toxicological properties of Cochlospermum tinctorium and C. planchonii extracts and essential oils prepared from their leaves were studied. The oil components were extracted by hydrodistillation of the plant leaves and characterized by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Crude extracts and oils were tested for in vitro antimalarial activity on Plasmodium falciparum. The IC50 were evaluated after 24 and 72 h contact between the oils and the parasite culture, and ranged from 22 to 500 micrograms/ml. C. planchonii leaf oil yielded the best antimalarial effect (IC50: 22-35 micrograms/ml), while the most potent effect from crude leaf extracts was induced by C. tinctorium. The cytotoxicity of the leaf crude extracts and oils was assessed on the K562 cell line and showed IC50 values ranging between 33 and 2000 micrograms/ml. PMID:10364849

  4. Effect of Light Spectral Quality on Essential Oil Components in Ocimum Basilicum and Salvia Officinalis Plants

    A. S. IVANITSKIKH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In plants grown with artificial lighting, variations in light spectral composition can be used for the directed biosynthesis of the target substances including essential oils, e.g. in plant factories. We studied the effect of light spectral quality on the essential oil composition in Ocimum basilicum and Salvia officinalis plants grown in controlled environment. The variable-spectrum light modules were designed using three types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs with emission peaked in red, blue and red light, white LEDs, and high-pressure sodium lamps as reference. Qualitative and quantitative essential oil determinations were conducted using gas chromatography with mass selective detection and internal standard method.Sweet basil plant leaves contain essential oils (са. 1 % including linalool, pinene, eugenol, camphor, cineole, and other components. And within the genetic diversity of the species, several cultivar groups can be identified according to the flavor (aroma perceived by humans: eugenol, clove, camphor, vanilla basil. Essential oil components produce particular flavor of the basil leaves. In our studies, we are using two sweet basil varieties differing in the essential oil qualitative composition – “Johnsons Dwarf” (camphor as a major component of essential oils and “Johnsons Lemon Flavor” (contains large amount of citral defining its lemon flavor.In sage, essential oil composition is also very variable. As for the plant responses to the light environment, the highest amount of the essential oils was observed at the regimes with white and red + blue LED light. And it was three times less with red light LEDs alone. In the first two environments, thujone accumulation was higher in comparison with camphor, while red LED light and sodium lamp light favored camphor biosynthesis (three times more than thujone. The highest amount of eucalyptol was determined in plants grown with red LEDs.

  5. Antibacterial and antidermatophyte activities of some essential Oils from spices

    El Kady, I. A. [اسماعيل عبد الرزاق القاضي; El-Maraghy, S. S. Mohamed; Eman Mostafa M.

    1993-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of ten essential oil from different spices against the growth of various isolates of bacteria representing Gram-positive (seven isolates) and Gram-negative (four isolates) were studied. Eight antibacterial agents were included for comparative purposes. Results show that essential oils of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum Presl (Syn. C. zylanicum Blume) and cardamom (Elettaria cardamum White and Maton) were highly active against both Gram-negative an...

  6. Water treatment cuts deposition at oil and solvent recovery plant

    Guevara, N. Jr.; Weir, G.; Toy, D.A.

    1985-10-01

    To accommodate its process water needs, the Oil and Solvent Process Company (OSCO) of Azusa, CA uses city water containing over 69 ppm calcium (as CaCO/sub 3/) and over 15 ppm silica. The company requires a flow rate of 1800 gpm to cool its evaporative condensers. The previous water treatment program was unsatisfactory and, because of this, many of the cooling water condensers at the plant would regularly clog due to deposition. Of specific concern are the water chemistry limits (and corresponding deposition) of: calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, calcium phosphate, and silica. The chemical treatment program prescribed and initiated at OSCO includes: a molybdate-based mild steel corrosion inhibitor; a tolytrizole-based copper corrosion inhibitor, acid for pH control, chlorine and 1.5% chloromethylisothiazolin for bacterial control, and phosphonate and polyacrylate for inorganic antifouling. After over a year of operation under the prescribed chemical treatment program, OSCO has found that deposits have not occurred - even under operating conditions with calcium levels as high as 1850 ppm (as CaCO/sub 3/), a calcium sulfate multiplier exceeding 3.6 million, orthophosphate levels of 5 ppm (as PO/sub 4//sup =/), and silica levels as high as 315 ppm. There has been evidence that previous deposits have been removed. Condenser vacuums have subsequently risen from around 12'' to about 25'', effectively doubling production in the distillation condensers. Corrosion rates for mild steel, copper, and admiralty have been measured at below 2.1, 0.1, and 0.1 mpy, respectively with no signs of pitting. No observable chloride stress corrosion was noted in stainless steel.

  7. Gamma irradiation as activator of antioxidant activity and essential oil contents in lavender (Lavandula multifida) plantlets

    This study was conducted to evaluate the stimulation effect of γ-irradiation on the chemical composition of essential oils, total phenolic compounds, flavonoid contents and antioxidant activities in lavender plantlets (Lavandula multifida) at three multiplication stages. Lavender plantlets were irradiated using different γ- irradiation dose levels (0.0, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 Gy). After irradiation; plantlets were sectioned to start the multiplication stage (three subcultures). Increasing irradiation dose levels at multiplication stages significantly increased the total phenolic content and reached to the maximum increment at the dose level of 75 Gy (26.88 g/100 g DW) in zero time stage in comparison with the untreated plantlets (7.250 g/100 g DW). The highest content of flavonoids (21.50 g/100 g DW) was detected at dose level of 75 Gy at zero time stage (M0). The highest applied irradiation dose of 75 Gy gave the highest reducing power activity compared with control at zero time stage (M0). Scavenging activity by DPPH was increased gradually by increasing irradiation dose levels in all multiplication stages until the high dose of 75 Gy which gave the maximum scavenging activity (91.05%) in zero time stage. Also, there was a significant increase in antioxidant activity on linoleic acid system with increasing the dose of γ-irradiation level. The application of γ-irradiation at dose level of 15 Gy and M3 stage produced the highest value of essential oil content (0.12%), followed by 5 Gy treatments (0.082%). The most increased volatile oil compounds by γ-irradiation were; limonene which increased from 4.87% to 5.37% at 0.0 and 5 Gy, respectively and linalool increased from 86.07% to 91.5% at 0.0 and 15 Gy respectively. The present study suggests that γ-irradiation led to increase antioxidant activities of lavender plantlets by increasing the availability of free polyphenolic compounds and also the content of volatile oil. This shows that lavender plants may be

  8. EFFICACY OF ESSENTIAL OILS FROM MEDICINAL PLANTS IN CONTROL OF THE HAIRY ROSE BEETLE, TROPINOTA SQUALIDA (SCOPOLI) AND THEIR COMPARATIVE TOXICITY TO THE HONEY BEE, APIS MELLIFERA L.

    Mohammad S. Al-alawi

    2014-01-01

    The insecticidal activity of essential plants oils against an important insect pest of fruit trees, the hairy rose beetle, was evaluated in topical and feeding applications in the laboratory. Essential oils that caused more than 50% mortality were further tested against the hairy rose beetle and the honey bee using different concentrations and their relative toxicities were evaluated. Results showed that eucalyptol and fir oils outperformed other tested oils and caused 72 and 64% mortality, r...

  9. Free Radicals Scavenging Activity of Essential Oils and Different Fractions of Methanol Extract of Zataria Multiflora, Salvia Officinalis, Rosmarinus Officinalis, Mentha Pulegium and Cinnamomum Zeylanicum

    S Changizi Ashtiani; A Malekirad; N Hosseini; M Nazemi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Essential oils and extracts from medicinal plants are regarded as natural food preservatives and health promoting drugs. Considering their antioxidant activity, most of them can prevent oxidative stress. The present study was aimed to evaluate free radicals scavenging activity of essential oils and different fractions of methanol extracts from cinnamon, pennyroyal, black cumin, sage, rosemary and azkand. Methods: Antioxidant property of essential oils and different fractions of ...

  10. Kinetics of Isolation of Essential Oils from Plants

    Sovová, Helena

    Lisbon: Centro de Biotecnologia Vegetal, 2012 - (Figueiredo, A.; Barosso, J.; Pedro, .), s. 28 ISBN 978-989-20-3188-0. [International Symposium on Essential Oils /43./. Lisbon (PT), 05.09.2012-08.09.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : essential oils * distillation * extraction Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  11. Zero Discharge Performance of an Industrial Pilot-Scale Plant Treating Palm Oil Mill Effluent

    Jin Wang; Qaisar Mahmood; Jiang-Ping Qiu; Yin-Sheng Li; Yoon-Seong Chang; Li-Na Chi; Xu-Dong Li

    2015-01-01

    Palm oil is one of the most important agroindustries in Malaysia. Huge quantities of palm oil mill effluent (POME) pose a great threat to aqueous environment due to its very high COD. To make full use of discharged wastes, the integrated “zero discharge” pilot-scale industrial plant comprising “pretreatment-anaerobic and aerobic process-membrane separation” was continuously operated for 1 year. After pretreatment in the oil separator tank, 55.6% of waste oil in raw POME could be recovered and...

  12. Nematicidal activity of essential oils and volatiles derived from Portuguese aromatic flora against the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    Barbosa, P; Lima, A S; Vieira, P; Dias, L S; Tinoco, M T; Barroso, J G; Pedro, L G; Figueiredo, A C; Mota, M

    2010-03-01

    Twenty seven essential oils, isolated from plants representing 11 families of Portuguese flora, were screened for their nematicidal activity against the pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and the volatiles by distillation-extraction, and both were analysed by GC and GC-MS. High nematicidal activity was achieved with essential oils from Chamaespartium tridentatum, Origanum vulgare, Satureja montana, Thymbra capitata, and Thymus caespititius. All of these essential oils had an estimated minimum inhibitory concentration ranging between 0.097 and 0.374 mg/ml and a lethal concentration necessary to kill 100% of the population (LC(100)) between 0.858 and 1.984 mg/ml. Good nematicidal activity was also obtained with the essential oil from Cymbopogon citratus. The dominant components of the effective oils were 1-octen-3-ol (9%), n-nonanal, and linalool (both 7%) in C. tridentatum, geranial (43%), neral (29%), and β-myrcene (25%) in C. citratus, carvacrol (36% and 39%), γ-terpinene (24% and 40%), and p-cymene (14% and 7%) in O. vulgare and S. montana, respectively, and carvacrol (75% and 65%, respectively) in T. capitata and T. caespititius. The other essential oils obtained from Portuguese flora yielded weak or no activity. Five essential oils with nematicidal activity against PWN are reported for the first time. PMID:22736831

  13. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) Essential oil

    Mohaddese Mahboubi; Nastaran Kazempour

    2014-01-01

    Peppermint with antiseptic and known healing properties is a plant from the Labiatae family. In this study, we analyzed the chemical composition of essential oil from the flowering aerial part of peppermint by GC and GC/MS. Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated against bacteria, fungi and yeast by micro broth dilution assay. The fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) and FIC Index (FICI) and related isobologram curve were determined by check board micro titer assay. The results...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of propolis and essential oils and synergism between these natural products

    IS Probst; JM Sforcin; VLM Rall; AAH Fernandes; A Fernandes Júnior

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, Apis mellifera propolis and essential oils (EOs) obtained from aromatic plants were evaluated as alternative antimicrobials. We aimed to establish the antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts of propolis (EEP) from Apis mellifera and of EOs from Caryophyllus aromaticus, Zingiber officinale, Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Mentha piperita against 32 Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains from human clinical specimens. The antimicrobials were diluted in agar and ...

  15. Chemical composition, antimicrobial activity and antiviral activity of essential oil of Carum copticum from Iran

    Reza Kazemi Oskuee; Javad Behravan; Mohammad Ramezani

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of therapeutic effects of Carum copticum (C. copticum) has been the subject of several studies in recent years. Thymol the major component of C. copticum is a widely known anti-microbial agent. In this study, the antibacterial and anti viral activities of essential oil of C. copticum fruit were determined. Materials and Methods: Essential oil of C. copticum was analyzed by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The antimicrobial activity of the oil wa...

  16. Variation of essential oil composition of Melissa officinalis L. leaves during different stages of plant growth

    Keivan Saeb; Sara Gholamrezaee

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the best time of harvest for Melissa officinalis (M. officinalis) L. to gain highest amounts essential oil.Methods: M. officinalis leaves were harvested in three different stages (before flowering stage, flowering stage and after of flowering stage) and were dried. The essential oils were isolated by hydro- distillation and analyzed by GC/MS.Results: It showed that most essential oils of plants were in before flowering stage. In before flowering stage 37 compounds were identified in leaves oil of M.officinalis. The major components before flowering stage were decadienal (29.38%), geraniol (25.3%), caryophyllene oxide (8.75%), geranyl acetate (5.41%). In the flowering stage 36 compounds were identified as the major components of plant essential oils: decadienal (28.04%), geraniol (24.97%), caryophyllene oxide (7.55%), caryophyllene E (4.65%) and 16 components in the after flowering stage of plant were identified as the major components carvacrol (37.62%), methyl citronellate (32.34%), geranyl acetate (5.82%), caryophyllene (5.50%).Conclusions: The essential oils yields vary considerably from month-to-month and is also influenced by the micro-environment (sun or shade) in which the plant is growing. We found that the essential oil content of M. officinalis L. of leaves is significantly affected by harvesting stages.

  17. Antifungal Activity of the Essential Oil of Illicium verum Fruit and Its Main Component trans-Anethole

    Qi Wang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify natural products for plant disease control, the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum Hook. f. fruit was investigated for its antifungal activity on plant pathogenic fungi. The fruit essential oil obtained by hydro-distillation was analyzed for its chemical composition by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. trans-Anethole (89.5%, 2-(1-cyclopentenyl-furan (0.9% and cis-anethole (0.7% were found to be the main components among 22 identified compounds, which accounted for 94.6% of the total oil. The antifungal activity of the oil and its main component trans-anethole against plant pathogenic fungi were determined. Both the essential oil and trans-anethole exhibited strong inhibitory effect against all test fungi indicating that most of the observed antifungal properties was due to the presence of trans-anethole in the oil, which could be developed as natural fungicides for plant disease control in fruit and vegetable preservation.

  18. Chemical composition and antimicrobial and allelopathic activity of Tunisian Conyza sumatrensis (Retz.) E.WALKER essential oils.

    Mabrouk, Samia; Salah, Karima Bel Hadj; Elaissi, Ameur; Jlaiel, Lobna; Jannet, Hichem Ben; Aouni, Mahjoub; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2013-02-01

    Conyza sumatrensis (Retz.) E.WALKER (Asteraceae) is a spontaneous annual herb, fairly widespread throughout Tunisia, which has rarely been studied or valued in any sector. Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of different parts (flower heads, leaves, stems, and roots) of C. sumatrensis plants, which were collected in autumn (November 2007) at the flowering stage in the area of Monastir, Tunisia. In total, 98 compounds, representing 88.1-99.3% of the oil composition, were identified by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The root essential oil was distinguished by its high content in acetylenes (matricaria ester, 4; 74.3%), while those from flower heads and leaves were dominated by oxygenated sesquiterpenes (61.1 and 50.3%, resp.). The oils of C. sumatrensis from Tunisia belonged to a matricaria ester/caryophyllene oxide chemotype. All the oils were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal, and allelopathic activities. The results indicate that the leaf oil exhibited significant in vitro antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Proteus mirabilis and that the C. sumatrensis oils isolated from the aerial parts presented high mycelia-growth inhibition of Candida albicans and the filamentous fungi tested. Moreover, the essential oils of the different plant parts inhibited the shoot and root growth of Raphanus sativus (radish) seedlings. Indeed, the inhibition of the hypocotyl growth varied from 28.6 to 90.1% and that of the radicle from 42.3 to 96.2%. PMID:23418168

  19. Chemical Composition, Herbicidal and Antifungal Activity of Satureja cuneifolia Essential Oils from Spain.

    García-Rellán, David; Verdeguer, Mercedes; Salamone, Adele; Blázquez, María Amparo; Boira, Herminio

    2016-06-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils from Satureja cuneifolia growing in east Spain was analyzed by GC, GC/MS. Forty-five compounds accounting for 99.1% of the total oil were identified. Camphor (47.6%), followed by camphene (13.6%) were the main compounds. Their herbicidal and antifungal activity was tested in vitro against three weeds (Amaranthus hybridus, Portulaca oleracea and Conyza canadensis) and eleven common pathogenic or saprophytic fungi (Phytophthora citrophthora, P. palmivora, Pythium litorale, Verticillium dahlia, Rhizoctonia solani, Penicillium hirsutum, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Phaeoacremonium aleophilum, Phaemoniella chlamydospora, Cylindrocarpon liriodendri and C. macrodidymum). The essential oil was very active against A. hybridus and C. canadensis significantly inhibiting their germination and seedling growth. Minor activity was shown against P. oleracea, depending on the concentration applied. P. palmivora, P. citrophthora and Pa. chlamydospora were the most sensitive fungi to the treatment with the essential oil, whereas R. solani showed no inhibition. Results showed that S. cuneifolia essential oil could be used for biocontrol of weeds and fungal plant diseases. PMID:27534131

  20. CANDU nuclear plant configured for multiple oil sands and power applications

    There is a need to meet expanding demand in Alberta for electricity for an expanding economy, high-pressure steam for oil sands recovery, and hydrogen for bitumen upgrading. This demand must be satisfied in a sustainable, environmentally acceptable and economic manner. Nuclear technology, and in particular AECL's new ACR-1000 reactor, is emerging as the best way to meet these multiple demands. The ACR-1000 can be configured to supply both high-pressure steam and electricity with the steam / electricity ratio optimized to standard turbine-generator sizing and oil sands requirements - thereby affording more options for nuclear plant siting and deployment. Energy for oil sands applications can be supplied in several ways by a centralized nuclear plant with a uniquely configured Balance of Plant (BOP). Steam could be piped to one or several in-situ oil Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) operations within 15 km of the plant boundary. Electricity could be transmitted to more remote facilities including an electrolytic hydrogen plant for bitumen upgraders, resistance-heating devices used for extraction of oil from shale, and electric boilers that generate steam for small in-situ oil sands recovery facilities. The various product streams from the 1200 MWe Class ACR-1000 could be sold by the plant owner through a combination of long-term power purchase agreements and flexible contracts that respond to variable grid prices and demand. In addition the electrolytic hydrogen plant to also serve as an energy storage facility at times of low power demand. These flexible nuclear power plant configurations increase the potential to use clean nuclear energy for more environmentally benign oil sands recovery while still meeting future energy demands economic constraints. (author)

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of Camellia japonica oil

    Seungbeom Kim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Camellia japonica oil (CJ oil has been used traditionally in EastAsia to nourish and soothe the skin as well as help restore theelasticity of skin. CJ oil has also been used on all types ofbleeding instances. However, little is known about itsanti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, the anti-inflammatoryeffects of CJ oil and its mechanisms of action were investigated.CJ oil inhibited LPS-induced production of NO, PGE2, andTNF-α in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, expression of COX-2and iNOS genes was reduced. To evaluate the mechanism ofthe anti-inflammatory activity of CJ oil, LPS-induced activationof AP-1 and NF-κB promoters was found to be significantlyreduced by CJ oil. LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκBα, ERK,p38, and JNK was also attenuated. Our results indicate that CJoil exerts anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating theexpression of iNOS and COX-2 genes through inhibition ofNF-κB and AP-1 signaling. [BMB reports 2012; 45(3: 177-182

  2. Molluscicidal activity of some Moroccan medicinal plants.

    Hmamouchi, M; Lahlou, M; Agoumi, A

    2000-06-01

    Among 14 plants of Moroccan folk medicine tested for molluscicidal activity, ethyl acetate extract from Origanum compactum and hexane extracts from both Chenopodium ambrosioides and Ruta chalepensis were the most active (LC(90)=2.00, 2.23 and 2.23 mg l(-1), respectively) against the schistosomiasis-transmitting snail Bulinus truncatus. PMID:10844169

  3. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Citrus latifolia Tanaka Essential Oil and Limonene in Experimental Mouse Models

    Raquel Kummer; Fernanda Carolina Fachini-Queiroz; Camila Fernanda Estevão-Silva; Renata Grespan; Expedito Leite Silva; Ciomar Aparecida Bersani-Amado; Roberto Kenji Nakamura Cuman

    2013-01-01

    The genus Citrus (Rutaceae) includes several species of plants that produce some of the most cultivated fruits in the world, providing an appreciable content of essential oil. In folk medicine, they are used as a cholagogue, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, sedative, and antitoxic effects. Lemon essential oil has been used since ancient times for its antiseptic, carminative, diuretic, and eupeptic effects. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Citrus latifolia Tanaka...

  4. Phytochemical and Anti-oxidant Activity of Lavandula Angustifolia Mill. Essential oil on Preoperative Anxiety in Patients undergoing Diagnostic Curettage

    Foozieh Bakhsha; Masoumeh Mazandarani; Mohammad Aryaei; Seid Yaghub Jafari; Human Bayate

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of present work was mainly to phytochemical, antioxidant properties and examine the effect of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Essential oil on Preoperative Anxiety in Patients undergoing Diagnostic Curettage (Gorgan, Iran). Materials and Methods: Essential oil of plant in blooming was obtained by hydro distillation method (clavenger) and analysed by (GC/MS). Antioxidant activity determined by 1,1-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, anti anxiety effects were studie...

  5. Major Volatile Constituents and Biological Activities of Plant Chromolaena odorata (L. R.M. King & H. Rob

    Joshi RK

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromolaena odorata (L. R.M. King & H. Rob. (Asteraceae is a perennial herb, and used in traditional medicine. C. odorata has lead to identification of several compounds especially in the essential oils from various plant parts, and in this article the major compounds are compiled. The biological activities of the various extracts and essential oils are also discussed in brief.

  6. EFFICACY OF ESSENTIAL OILS FROM MEDICINAL PLANTS IN CONTROL OF THE HAIRY ROSE BEETLE, TROPINOTA SQUALIDA (SCOPOLI AND THEIR COMPARATIVE TOXICITY TO THE HONEY BEE, APIS MELLIFERA L.

    Mohammad S. Al-Alawi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal activity of essential plants oils against an important insect pest of fruit trees, the hairy rose beetle, was evaluated in topical and feeding applications in the laboratory. Essential oils that caused more than 50% mortality were further tested against the hairy rose beetle and the honey bee using different concentrations and their relative toxicities were evaluated. Results showed that eucalyptol and fir oils outperformed other tested oils and caused 72 and 64% mortality, respectively. These mortalities were not different from the application of the commercial insecticide, Deltamethrin. Moreover, eucalyptol and fir oils were more toxic to the hairy rose beetle than the dominant pollinator during fruit trees flowering, the honey bee. However, eucalyptol was relatively safer to the honey bees than fir oil. These findings indicate that eucalyptol might be applied during fruit trees bloom to control the hairy rose beetle even in the presence of honey bees if used for the crop pollination.

  7. Oil shale pyrolysis kinetics and variable activation energy principle

    Al-Ayed, Omar S. [Faculty of Engineering Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, P.O. Box 15008, Marka 11134 (Jordan); Matouq, M.; Anbar, Z.; Khaleel, Adnan M. [Faculty of Engineering Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, P.O. Box 15008, Marka 11134 (Jordan); Department of Basic Sciences, Prince Abdullah Bin-Ghazi of Science and Information, Al-Balqa Applied University (Jordan); Abu-Nameh, Eyad [Department of Basic Sciences, Prince Abdullah Bin-Ghazi of Science and Information, Al-Balqa Applied University (Jordan)

    2010-04-15

    A modified first order kinetic equation with variable activation energy is employed to model the total weight loss of Ellajjun oil shale samples. Fixed bed retort with 400 g of oil shale sample size is used in this study in 350-550 C temperature range. Variable heating rate, h, in the range 2.6-5 C min{sup -1} are tested. Activation energy was allowed to vary as a function of oil shale conversion. The value of the activation energy increased from 98 to 120 kJ mol{sup -1} while the corresponding frequency factor changed from 9.51 x 10{sup 5} to 1.16 x 10{sup 6}. Fischer Assay analysis of the studied samples indicated 12.2 wt.% oil content. The oil shale decomposition ranged from 3.2% to 28.0%. The obtained kinetic data are modeled using variable heating rate, pyrolysis temperature and variable activation energy principle in a nitrogen sweeping medium. Good fit to the obtained experimental data is achieved. (author)

  8. Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil: antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities

    Abdullah Ijaz Hussain

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate and compare the antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil, native to Pakistan. The essential oil content from the leaves of R. officinalis was 0.93 g 100g-1. The GC and GC-MS analysis revealed that the major components determined in R. officinalis essential oil were 1,8-cineol (38.5%, camphor (17.1%, α-pinene (12.3%, limonene (6.23%, camphene (6.00% and linalool (5.70%. The antiproliferative activity was tested against two cancer (MCF-7 and LNCaP and one fibroblast cell line (NIH-3T3 using the MTT assay, while, the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the reduction of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH and measuring percent inhibition of peroxidation in linoleic acid system. The disc diffusion and modified resazurin microtitre-plate assays were used to evaluate the inhibition zones (IZ and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of R. officinalis essential oil, respectively. It is concluded from the results that Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil exhibited antiproliferative, antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

  9. Effect of plant density and nitrogen rate on essential oils of marjoram under mediterranean conditions

    Quantitative analysis of essential oils of marjoram, which is grown in Jordan, yielded thymol as major compound. The yield of essential oils increased with the reduction of plant density. The increase in nitrogen dose (from 50 to 100 kg/ha) correlated with the increase in the yield of essential oils in all harvests, while with the increase in the dose of nitrogen from 100- 150 kg/ha, the yield of essential oils decreased. On the other hand, the nitrogen dose of 150 kg/ha correlated with essential oils containing the highest percentage of thymol (53.11%). A strong relation was found between the yield and the chemical composition of marjoram essential oils and applied agronomic treatments which require special attention. (author)

  10. Distillation Parameters for Pilot Plant Production of Laurus nobilis Essential oil

    Temel Özek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils have increasing importance in flavour and fragrance industries. They are obtained by distillation techniques. In order to produce an oil with market potential its optimum production parameters have to be well known prior to its commercial production. Determination of the steam distillation parameters of commercially available Laurel leaves oil in pilot plant scale is described. The effect of steam rate and processing time play a major role in distillation of essential oils. Distillation speed was high in the beginning of the process, then gradually reduced as the distillation proceeded. The main component of the oil of Laurel leaf oil was 1,8-cineole accumulating significantly in the early fractions.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils of Physalis angulata. L.

    Osho, A; Adetunji, T; Fayemi, S O; Moronkola, D O

    2010-01-01

    The need for a reduction in drug resistance led to the investigation of Argemone Mexicana L. as an agent against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Candida stellatoidea and Candida torulopsis, using well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentrations methods. The sensitivity of Bacillus Subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus to the essential oils of both the aerial and root parts were determined. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was resistant to the essential oil from both the aerial and root part of the plant. C. torulopsis, C. stellatoidea and C. albicans were susceptible to the essential oils from the aerial and root part of the plant. The minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging between 3.75 mg/ml and 4.0 mg/ml were recorded for Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae by the aerial and the root extracts, but P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were not susceptible to the aerial and root extracts. The observed inhibition of selected bacteria and fungi by oils of Physalis angulata makes it a promising antimicrobial agent. This study justifies its uses for treatment of sores, cuts, intestinal and digestive problems and some skin-diseases often reported in folkloric medicine. PMID:21731161

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Antileishmanial Activities of Pistacia vera Essential Oil.

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Saedi Dezaki, Ebrahim; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Sharifi, Iraj; Kheirandish, Farnaz; Rashidipour, Marzieh

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities of Pistacia vera essential oil and compare their efficacy with a reference drug, meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime®). This essential oil (0-100 µg/mL) was evaluated in vitro against the intracellular amastigote forms of Leishmania tropica (MHOM/IR/2002/Mash2) and then tested on cutaneous leishmaniasis of male BALB/c mice by Leishmania major (MRHO/IR/75/ER). In the in vitro assay, it could be observed that P. vera essential oil significantly (p vera essential oil were limonene (26.21%), α-pinene (18.07%), and α-thujene (9.31%). It was also found that P. vera essential oil had no significant cytotoxic effect on J774 cells. The present study found that P. vera essential oil showed considerable in vitro and in vivo effectiveness against L. tropica and L. major compared to the reference drug. These findings also provided the scientific evidence that natural plants could be used in traditional medicine for the prevention and treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:26829519

  13. Maltese Mushroom (Cynomorium coccineum L. as Source of Oil with Potential Anticancer Activity

    Antonella Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the potential anticancer properties of fixed oil obtained from Maltese mushroom (Cynomorium coccineum L., an edible, non-photosynthetic plant, used in traditional medicine of Mediterranean countries to treat various ailments and as an emergency food during the famine. We investigated the effect of the oil, obtained from dried stems by supercritical fractioned extraction with CO2, on B16F10 melanoma and colon cancer Caco-2 cell viability and lipid profile. The oil, rich in essential fatty acids (18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6, showed a significant growth inhibitory effect on melanoma and colon cancer cells. The incubation (24 h with non-toxic oil concentrations (25 and 50 μg/mL induced in both cancer cell lines a significant accumulation of the fatty acids 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 and an increase of the cellular levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 with anticancer activity. Moreover, the oil exhibited the ability to potentiate the growth inhibitory effect of the antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil in Caco-2 cells and to influence the melanin content in B16F10 cells. The results qualify C. coccineum as a resource of oil, with potential benefits in cancer prevention, for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications.

  14. Maltese mushroom (Cynomorium coccineum L.) as source of oil with potential anticancer activity.

    Rosa, Antonella; Nieddu, Mariella; Piras, Alessandra; Atzeri, Angela; Putzu, Danilo; Rescigno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the potential anticancer properties of fixed oil obtained from Maltese mushroom (Cynomorium coccineum L.), an edible, non-photosynthetic plant, used in traditional medicine of Mediterranean countries to treat various ailments and as an emergency food during the famine. We investigated the effect of the oil, obtained from dried stems by supercritical fractioned extraction with CO2, on B16F10 melanoma and colon cancer Caco-2 cell viability and lipid profile. The oil, rich in essential fatty acids (18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6), showed a significant growth inhibitory effect on melanoma and colon cancer cells. The incubation (24 h) with non-toxic oil concentrations (25 and 50 μg/mL) induced in both cancer cell lines a significant accumulation of the fatty acids 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 and an increase of the cellular levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) with anticancer activity. Moreover, the oil exhibited the ability to potentiate the growth inhibitory effect of the antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil in Caco-2 cells and to influence the melanin content in B16F10 cells. The results qualify C. coccineum as a resource of oil, with potential benefits in cancer prevention, for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:25629557

  15. Oil Spill Adsorption Capacity of Activated Carbon Tablets from Corncobs in Simulated Oil-Water Mixture

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill in bodies of water is one of severe environmental problems that is facing all over the country and in the world. Since oil is an integral part of the economy, increasing trend for its demand and transport of has led to a great treat in the surface water. One of the promising techniques in the removal of the oil spills in water bodies is adsorption using activated carbon form waste material such as corn cobs. The purpose of this study is to determine the adsorption capacity of activated carbon tablets derived from corncobs in the removal of oil. The properties of activated carbon produced have a pH of 7.0, bulk density of 0.26 g//cm3 , average pore size of 45nm, particle size of 18% at 60 mesh and 39% at 80 mesh, iodine number of 1370 mg/g and surface area of 1205 g/m2. The amount of bentonite clay as binder (15%,20%,30%, number of ACT (1,2,3 and time of contact(30,60,90 mins has been varied to determine the optimum condition where the activated carbon will have the best adsorption capacity in the removal of oil. Results showed that at 15% binder, 60 mins contact time and 3 tablets of activated carbon is the optimum condition which give a percentage adsorption of 22.82% of oil. Experimental data also showed that a Langmuir isotherm was the best fit isotherm for adsorption of ACT.

  16. Chemical composition and biological effects of Artemisia maritima and Artemisia nilagirica essential oils from wild plants of western Himalaya.

    Stappen, Iris; Wanner, Jürgen; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Ali, Abbas; Khan, Ikhlas A; Kaul, Vijay K; Lal, Brij; Jaitak, Vikas; Gochev, Velizar; Girova, Tania; Stoyanova, Albena; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2014-08-01

    Artemisia species possess pharmacological properties that are used for medical purposes worldwide. In this paper, the essential oils from the aerial parts of Artemisia nilagirica and Artemisia maritima from the western Indian Himalaya region are described. The main compounds analyzed by simultaneous GC/MS and GC/FID were camphor and 1,8-cineole from A. maritima, and camphor and artemisia ketone from A. nilagirica. Additionally, the oils were evaluated for their antibacterial, antifungal, mosquito biting deterrent, and larvicidal activities. A. nilagirica essential oil demonstrated nonselective antifungal activity against plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, Colletotrichum fragariae, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, whereas A. maritima did not show antifungal activity. Both Artemisia spp. exhibited considerable mosquito biting deterrence, whereas only A. nilagirica showed larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti. Antibacterial effects assessed by an agar dilution assay demonstrated greater activity of A. maritima essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to A. nilagirica. PMID:25127023

  17. PROCESSING IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT OFFGAS WITH A STRETFORD PLANT AT GEOKINETICS

    The paper discusses the use of EPA's transportable Stretford process pilot plant on a 700-acfm slipstream of in-situ shale oil retort offgas to investigate H2S removal efficiency and process compatibility. This was the fourth application of the pilot plant which had demonstrated ...

  18. Essential oil of Croton flavens L. (Welensali), a medicinal plant from Curacao

    Woerdenbag, HJ; Bos, R; van Meeteren, HE; Baarslag, JJJ; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW; Pras, N; do Rego Kuster, G; Petronia, RRL

    2000-01-01

    The volatile constituents from aerial and underground parts of Croton flavens L., a medicinal plant from Curacao, were investigated by GC and GC/MS (EI) analysis. The various plant parts yielded 0.27-0.50%, (v/w) essential oil on a dry weight basis. There were only small differences in the qualitati

  19. Biodegradation of the Oil Hydrocarbons in Wastewater with Immobilized Microbiological Activated Carbon

    李伟光; 朱文芳; 何华; 吕炳南

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of laboratory-scale-tests, the method of using immobilized biological activated carbon (IBAC) was found to be an efficient method to treat oil wastewater. In this research, pilot-scale studies were conducted to investigate the optimal range of factors, such as oil concentration, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). 39 strains of bacteria were isolated from activated sludge of a petrochemical wastewater treatment plant. After being acclimated and identified, these bacteria were immobilized on granular activated carbon. The degradation of organic compounds was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectromtry (GC-MS). As the results show that when the oil concentration is lower than 50 mg/L and corresponding values of HRT are longer than 1.0 h, the removal rate of immobilized biological activated carbon column can stably reach at least 70%. In the field studies, electron microscope analyses show that the predominant bacteria have been changed from Pseudomonas and Bacillus at the beginning to Bacillus only after 60 days of continuous operation, which suggests that the method with immobilized biological activated carbon column is the one with higher efficiency than that of the secondary floatation tank traditionally used in oil wastewater treatment.

  20. In Vitro Control of Post-Harvest Fruit Rot Fungi by Some Plant Essential Oil Components

    Gian Luigi Rana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Eight substances that are main components of the essential oils from three Mediterranean aromatic plants (Verbena officinalis, Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare, previously found active against some phytopathogenic Fungi and Stramenopila, have been tested in vitro against five etiological agents of post-harvest fruit decay, Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium italicum, P. expansum, Phytophthora citrophthora and Rhizopus stolonifer. The tested compounds were β-fellandrene, β-pinene, camphene, carvacrol, citral, o-cymene, γ-terpinene and thymol. Citral exhibited a fungicidal action against P. citrophthora; carvacrol and thymol showed a fungistatic activity against P. citrophthora and R. stolonifer. Citral and carvacrol at 250 ppm, and thymol at 150 and 250 ppm stopped the growth of B. cinerea. Moreover, thymol showed fungistatic and fungicidal action against P. italicum. Finally, the mycelium growth of P. expansum was inhibited in the presence of 250 ppm of thymol and carvacrol. These results represent an important step toward the goal to use some essential oils or their components as natural preservatives for fruits and foodstuffs, due to their safety for consumer healthy and positive effect on shelf life extension of agricultural fresh products.

  1. Releases of natural radionuclides from oil-shale-fired power plants in Estonia

    In the vicinity of two large oil-shale-fired power plants in northeast Estonia, depth-dependent activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in soil were determined by gamma spectrometry. In the surface soil considerably higher (or lower) concentrations of 40k, 226Ra and 232Th were found than in deeper soil layers. The observed increase or decrease of the enrichment of radionuclides for different sampling sites was dependent on the relative concentrations of radionuclides in fly-ash and in deep soil layers. The fraction of the radionuclides deposited onto the ground was characterized by a mean 226Ra/232Th activity concentration ratio of 2.2, approximately equal to the one (2.1) found for oil-shale filter ash. The atmospheric deposition rates of fly-ash radionuclides onto the ground were estimated and compared to other relevant published data. The migration of the deposited fly-ash radionuclides into soil was satisfactorily described assuming an exponential depth distribution with the relaxation length value, α-1 = 2.9 ± 0.6 cm, for both 226Ra and 232Th. (Author)

  2. A review of Jatropha curcas: an oil plant of unfulfilled promise

    Openshaw, K. [Alternative Energy Development Inc., Silver Spring, MD, (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Jatropha curcas is a multipurpose plant with many attributes and considerable potential. It is a tropical plant that can be grown in low to high rainfall areas and can be used to reclaim land, as a hedge and/or as a commercial crop. Thus, growing it could provide employment, improve the environment and enhance the quality of rural life. The establishment, management and productivity of jatropha under various climatic conditions are not fully documented. This is discussed and the gaps in the knowledge elucidated, especially its fertilizer requirements. The plant produces many useful products, especially the seed, from which oil can be extracted; this oil has similar properties to palm oil. the costs and returns of growing the plant and producing the plant oil are discussed and tabulated. Because it can be used in place of kerosene and diesel as a substitute for fuelwood, it has been promoted to make rural areas self sufficient if fuels for cooking, lighting and motive power. This strategy is examined and found not viable. Oil for soap making is the most profitable use. It is concluded that all markets for jatropha products should be investigated. If the potential of the plant is to be realized, much more research is required into the growing and management of Jatropha curcas and more information is needed on the actual and potential markets for all its products. (author)

  3. Suppression of allergic and inflammatory responses by essential oils derived from herbal plants and citrus fruits.

    Mitoshi, Mai; Kuriyama, Isoko; Nakayama, Hiroto; Miyazato, Hironari; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Kobayashi, Yuko; Jippo, Tomoko; Kuramochi, Kouji; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the biological activity of 20 essential oils (EOs) derived from herbal plants and citrus fruits. The in vitro anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory activities of these oils were investigated, and the EO which was found to have the strongest activity of the 20 EOs examined, was investigated further to identify its components and bioactive compounds. The in vitro anti-allergic activity was determined by measuring the release of β-hexosaminidase from rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells treated with the calcium ionophore, A23187. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity was determined by measuring the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in RAW264.7 murine macrophages treated with lipopolysaccharide. Among the EOs examined, lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf] elicited the strongest anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects. A principal component of this EO is citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-al) (74.5%), a mixture of the stereoisomers, geranial (trans-citral, 40.16%) and neral (cis-citral, 34.24%), as determined by chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The activities of citral and geranial are similar to those of lemongrass EO. These compounds elicited significant in vivo anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects, suppressing an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice and a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced inflammatory mouse ear edema, respectively. Our data demonstrate that lemongrass EO and its constituents, citral and geranial, may be a therapeutic candidate for allergic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24682420

  4. Cytotoxic Activity of Selected Nigerian Plants

    Sowemimo, A; M. Venter; Baatjies, L; Koekemoer, T

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most prominent human diseases which has stimulated scientific and commercial interest in the discovery of new anticancer agents from natural sources. The current study investigates the cytotoxic activity of ethanolic extracts of sixteen Nigerian plants used locally for the treatment of cancer using the MTT assay on the HeLa cell line. Sapium ellipticum leaves showed activity comparable to the reference compound Cisplatin and greater cytotoxic activity than Combretum panic...

  5. In vitro antifungal activity of the essential oil and the methanolic extract of Ruta chalepensis.

    Aouadhi, Ch; Ghazghazi, H; Hamrouni, S; Hasnaoui, B; Maaroufi, A

    2013-01-01

    Ruta chalepensis L. (Rutaceae), is an ancient aromatic medicinal plant still used in the traditional medicine of many countries as a laxative, antiinflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, abortifacient, antiepileptic, emmenagogue and for dermatopathy treatment. Regarding increasing prevalence of mycotoxins and inefficiency of methods used to decrease them, it is possible to use plants metabolites to decrease mycotoxins. This study was carried out to evaluate chemical composition, antifungal and anticandidal activities of R. chalepensis extracts. The chemical composition of its essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GCMS). The major components of R. chalepensis essential oil were menthol (49.92%), linalool (31.1%) and 2-hexanal (5.2%). The antifungal and anticandidal effects of the essential oil and methanolic extract of R. chalepensis leaves were studied by disc diffusion assay and broth dilution method. The obtained results showed that R. chalepensis extracts had a significant fungicidal effect against Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans. The inhibition zones diameters and the minimum inhibitory concentration values for tested microorganisms were in the range of 11-17 mm and 3.25-6.25% (v/v), respectively. The methanolic extract showed much better antimicrobial activity than the essential oil against three tested micro-organisms PMID:26012209

  6. Antifungal activity of essential oil Hyssopus officinalis L. against micopathogen Mycogone perniciosa (Mang

    Glamočlija Jasmina M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly cultivated mushroom species is the Agaricus bisporus Lange (Imb. One of the major pathogenic diseases of the cultivated mushroom in Serbia is Mycogone perniciosa (Mang. Biological control systems are not much used in mushroom cultivation. Medical and aromatic plants have been placed in the focus of intense studies. Pure culture of the M. perniciosa was isolated from infected A. bisporus. The essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis L. is used as a potential antifungal agent. The most abundant components in oil are isopinocamphone (43.29%, pinocamphone (16.79% and b-pinene (16.31%. Antifungal activity of Hyssop was investigated by the modified microatmosphere method. The minimal inhibitory quantity was 5 μL/mL and a minimal fungicidal quantity was 15-20 μL/mL. There is no report on the use of Hyssop essential oil in mushroom disease.

  7. Increased plant sterol and stanol levels in brain of Watanabe rabbits fed rapeseed oil derived plant sterol or stanol esters

    Fricke, Christiane B.; Schrøder, Malene; Poulsen, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    Foods containing plant sterol or stanol esters can be beneficial in lowering LDL-cholesterol concentration, a major risk factor for CVD. The present study examined whether high dietary intake of rapeseed oil (RSO) derived plant sterol and stanol esters is associated with increased levels of these...... form for 120 d (n 9 for each group). Concentrations of cholesterol, its precursor lathosterol, plant sterols and stanols in brain and additionally in liver and plasma were determined by highly sensitive GC-MS. High-dose intake of RSO derived plant sterols and stanols resulted in increased levels of...... these components in plasma and liver. In brain a limited uptake of plant sterols and stanols was proven, indicating that these compounds passed the blood-brain barrier and may be retained in the brain tissue of Watanabe rabbits. Plant stanol ester feeding lowered plant sterol levels in brain, liver, and...

  8. In vitro antifungal activity and cytotoxic effect of essential oils and extracts of medicinal and aromatic plants against Candida krusei and Aspergillus fumigatus Atividade antifúngica in vitro e os efeitos citotóxicos de óleos essenciais e extratos de plantas medicinais e aromáticas contra Candida krusei e Aspergillus fumigatus

    Julieth Correa-Royero

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The plants are usually used in traditional medicine as antimicrobial agents and their essential oils and extracts have been known to possess antifungal activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the activity of 32 essential oils and 29 extracts against C. krusei and A. fumigatus as well as the cytotoxic effect on Vero cells. Time-kill curve and interaction between antifungals and the most active sample against C. krusei, was also evaluated. The oils from C. ambrosioides and the extract of M. cucullata showed antifungal activity against C. krusei (GM-MIC 7.82 and 31.25 µg/mL, respectively. L. citriodora was actives against C. krusei and A. fumigates (GM-MIC = 99.21 µg/mL and 62.5 µg/mL respectively. Time-kill assays done with C. ambrosioides oil showed fungicidal activity at 4x MIC. The interaction of C. ambrosioides oil with itraconazole and amphotericin B was tested following the chequerboard technique. No interaction was detected for the combination of C. ambrosioides oil with amphotericin B and itraconazole (FICI range = 1.03-1.06 and 1.03-1.00, respectively. Cytotoxicity assays for all samples were carried out with MTT. Only the oil from Hedyosmun sp. and L. dulcis were cytotoxic.As plantas são geralmente utilizadas na medicina tradicional como agentes antimicrobianos e seus óleos essenciais e extratos foram conhecidos por possuir atividade antifúngica. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar in vitro a atividade de 32 óleos essenciais e 29 extratos contra Candida krusei e Aspergillus fumigatus, bem como o efeito citotóxico em células Vero. A curva do tempo-morte e a interação entre antifúngicos e Chenopodium ambrosioidese do extrato de Myrcia cucullata mostraram atividade antifúngica contra C. krusei (geometric means of the minimal inhibitory concentration [GM-MIC] 7,82 e 31,25 µg/mL, respectivamente. Lippia citriodora foi ativa contra C. krusei e A. fumigatus (GM-CIM = 99,21 µg/mL e 62,5 µg/mL, respectivamente. Os

  9. Spurious Activation of Digital Plant Protection System in Nuclear Power Plants

    The Reactor Protection System (RPS) of a nuclear power plant (NPP) is employed to detect abnormal (hazardous) condition of the plant and perform automatic safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. However, the reactor can shutdown within the normal range of plant process parameters, which is known as spurious trip of reactor. Spurious trip model for common process industries has been developed, which optimizes the maintenance frequency of a safety instrumented system (SIS) for process industries. Spurious activation of SIS due to constant random hardware failures has been addressed. The spurious activation of SIS for oil and gas industries has been defined with developing a set of formulas for STR. However, the maintenance human errors were not explicitly considered in those studies. Incidence of maintenance errors should be considered for spurious trip rate estimation since those are the major causes of unplanned shutdowns of process industries and nuclear power industries. Maintenance human error is an important factor for component failure and unplanned trip. There appears to be no model available which can estimate spurious trip frequency of a reactor caused by random hardware failure and maintenance human error in a digital plant protection system for nuclear power plants. Our model is well defined and pragmatic for quantification of spurious trip rate and explicitly considers maintenance human errors. Fault-tree analysis has been done to estimate the spurious trip frequency of digital plant protection system. The model may be employed by the plant maintainer as well as designers to identify the influential components responsible for high spurious trip rate

  10. Antibacterial Activity of Copaiba Oil Gel on Dental Biofilm

    Simões, Cláudia A.C.G.; Conde, Nikeila C. de Oliveira; Venâncio, Gisely N.; Milério, Patrícia S.L.L.; Bandeira, Maria F.C.L.; da Veiga Júnior, Valdir F.

    2016-01-01

    Amazonian biodiversity products that have been used for years in folk medicine, have emerged as feasible and promising alternatives for the inhibition of microorganisms in dental biofilm. Copaiba oil, a phytotherapic agent widely used by the Amazonian populations, is known for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anesthetic, healing and antitumor medicinal properties. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of copaiba oil (Copaifera multijuga) gel against strains of Streptococcus sp present in dental biofilm. Materials and Methods: The copaiba oil was obtained and the chemical components were identified. The oil emulsions were formulated and used with the Brain Heart Infusion agar diffusion method with strains of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus salivarius isolated from patients as well as standard strains of S. mitis (ATCC903), S. mutans (ATCC10449), S. sanguinis (ATCC15300) and S. oralis (ATCC10557). The study groups were as follows: experimental copaiba oil gel, 1% chlorhexidine gel (positive control) and base gel (negative control). The seeded plates were incubated at 37ºC for 12, 24 and 48 hours, respectively. The results obtained were analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk and Friedman Tests (p<0.05) for non parametric data and the Tukey test was used for pH values with 5% level of significance. Results: The experimental copaiba oil gel and 1% chlorhexidine gel showed antibacterial activity against the tested microorganisms. Conclusion: The copaiba oil gel demonstrated antibacterial activity against all the strains of Streptococcus sp tested, suggesting that it can be used for dental biofilm control. PMID:27386004

  11. Synergic antibacterial activity of some essential oils from Lamiaceae

    Sh. Fahimi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Despite the vast production of new antibiotics in the last three decades, resistance to these drugs by microorganisms has increased and essential oils (EOs have been recognized to possess antimicrobial properties. Methods:  In the present study, EOs obtained from aerial parts of Thymus vulgaris L., Lavandula angustifolia Mill., Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Mentha piperita L., were evaluated for their single and binary combined antibacterial activities against four Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: The results exhibited that some of the tested essential oils revealed antibacterial activities against the examined pathogens using broth microdilution method. Maximum activity of the testedessential oils was obtained from the combination of T. vulgaris and M. piperita essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC= 0.625 mg/mL. Conclusion: Combinations of the essential oils in this study showed synergic action against some pathogenic microorganisms which could be considered in medical and food industries as preservatives.

  12. 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: heavy oil recovery application

    This report describes the application of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) which operates in a process steam/cogeneration (PS/C) mode in supplying steam for enhanced recovery of heavy oil and in exporting electricity. The technical and economic merits of an 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C are compared with those of coal-fired plants and (product) oil-fired boilers for this application. The utility requirements for enhanced oil recovery were calculated by establishing a typical pattern of injection wells and production wells for an oil field similar to that of Kern County, California. The safety and licensing issues of the nuclear plant were reviewed, and a comparative assessment of the alternative energy sources was performed. Technically and economically, the HTGR-PS/C plant has attractive merits. The major offsetting factors would be a large-scale development of a heavy oil field by a potential user for the deployment of a 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C; plant and the likelihood of available prime heavy oil fields for the mid-1990 operation

  13. Development of Probiotic Candidate in Combination with Essential Oils from Medicinal Plant and Their Effect on Enteric Pathogens: A Review

    Shipradeep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and probiotics both have very high potential in terms of their antimicrobial activity against antibiotic-resistant enteric pathogens. The probiotics being enteric microorganism do not have any parasitic effect on human beings. They have been an integral part of daily food for centuries. They have been shown to have health beneficiary properties. The probiotics retard the growth of the microorganisms, while essential oil kills them. Combining the effect of medicinal plant extract and probiotics may be a new approach due to their complementary antimicrobial effects and practically no side effects. The synergistic effect of the essential oil and probiotics will be necessarily higher than using them alone as health product.

  14. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and dibenzofurans (PCDF) in oil shale and fly ash from oil shale-fired power plant in Estonia

    Estonian thermal power plants are the world largest thermal power plants burning low-grade local oil shale. During the European Dioxin project the concentration of dioxins was determined at Baltic Power Plant in oil shale and fly ash taken from electrostatic precipitators. The study of PCB and dioxin was carried out by Landesumweltamt Nordrhein-Westfahlen, Germany. Based on the analyses of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in oil shale and fly ash it was concluded that the power plants are probably not the major sources of dioxins

  15. Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Andréa Roveré Franz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Stored grains are subject to losses in quality nutritional value and in sanitation from the time they are stored to the time they are consumed. Botanical insecticides may offer an alternative solution for pest control. The objective was to test the insecticidal properties of the essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus (leaf, Zingiber officinale (root and Mentha sp. (leaf. The efficacy of these oils was tested to control the rice weevil, S. oryzae, using hydrodistillation. Chemical analysis of the essential oils was carried out by gas chromatography. Major components of C. citratus were geranial (48% and neral (31%, of Z. officinale were α-zingibereno (13%, geranial (16%, neral (10% and α-farneseno (5% and of Mentha sp. was menthol (92%. Bioassays were carried out by fumigation and topical application. In topical application assays, the essential oil of C. citratus had greater toxicity (LC50 0.027 µL mL-1 and shorter exposure time than the oils of the other two plants. After 24 h and 48 h, 70% and 100% mortality of S. oryzae occurred, respectively. In fumigation assays, essential oil of Z. officinale had a lower LC50 (1.18 µL cm-2 and 70% mortality after 24 h exposure. Therefore, we recommend the use of essential oils of C. citratus and Z. officinale to control the rice weevil S. oryzae.

  16. Anti-Candida albicans activity, cytotoxicity and interaction with antifungal drugs of essential oils and extracts from aromatic and medicinal plants Actividad contra Candida albicans, citotoxicidad e interacción con antifúngicos de aceites esenciales y extractos de plantas medicinales y aromáticas

    Verónica Tangarife-Castaño

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine anti-Candida albicans activity, cytotoxicity and drug interaction of essential oils and extracts from plants collected in Colombia. Materials and methods: The antifungal activity was evaluated following the AFST-EUCAST protocol. With most active samples, the inhibition of the formation of germ tubes and budding, the in vitro pharmacodynamics, using time-kill assays, and the interaction with itraconazole and amphotericin B following the chequerboard technique were evaluated. The cytotoxicity assay for all samples was done using MTT. Results: Strong activity in 17.57% of the samples was found. The lowest MIC values were obtained with Piper bredemeyeri Jacq and Lippia origanoides Kunth (B oils and Morinda royoc L extract. The three samples inhibited the formation of germ tubes and budding. P. bredemeyeri Jacq oil and M. royoc L extract samples showed fungicidal activity at 2xMIC. A synergistic effect was obtained with the combination of P. bredemeyeri Jacq oil and itraconazole, but not for the combination with amphotericin B. Active samples against C. albicans were not cytotoxic on Vero cells ATCC CCL-81, excluding P. bredemeyeri Jacq oil. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that Colombian medicinal and aromatic plants represent an untapped source of compounds with anti-C. albicans activity that could be a resource in the development of new therapeutic natural products.Objetivo. Determinar la actividad anti-Candida albicans, la citotoxicidad y la interacción con antifúngicos de aceites y extractos de plantas recolectadas en Colombia. Materiales y métodos. La actividad antifúngica fue evaluada siguiendo el protocolo Antifungal Susceptibility Testing Subcommittee of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (AFST-EUCAST. Con las muestras más activas se evaluó la inhibición de la formación de tubo germinal y la gemación, la farmacodinamia mediante curvas de tiempo muerte y la interacci

  17. Chemical Analysis and Biological Activity of the Essential Oils of Two Valerianaceous Species from China: Nardostachys chinensis and Valeriana officinalis

    Jianglin Zhao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate essential oils with biological activity from local wild plants, two valerianaceous species, Nardostachys chinensis and Valeriana officinalis, were screened for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activity. The essential oils were obtained from the roots and rhizomes of the two plants by hydro-distillation, and were analyzed for their chemical composition by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Calarene (25.31%, aristolone (13.35%, α-selinene (7.32% and β-maaliene (6.70% were the major compounds of the 23 identified components which accounted for 92.76% of the total oil of N. chinensis. Patchoulol (16.75%, α-pinene (14.81%, and β-humulene (8.19% were the major compounds among the 20 identified components, which accounted for 88.11% of the total oil of V. officinalis. Both oils were rich in sesquiterpene hydrocarbons as well as their oxygenated derivatives. Essential oils were shown to have broad spectrum antibacterial activity with MIC values that ranged from 62.5 μg/mL to 400 μg/mL, and IC50 values from 36.93 μg/mL to 374.72 μg/mL. The oils were also shown to have moderate antifungal activity to Candida albicans growth as well as inhibition of spore germination of Magnaporthe oryzae. Two essential oils were assessed by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching and ferrozine-ferrous ions assays, respectively, to show moderate antioxidant activity. Results suggest that the isolated essential oils could be used for future development of antimicrobial and antioxidant agents.

  18. Acute toxicity bioassay with native plants to evaluate an oil spill

    Vivien Pentreath; Elena González; Mercedes Barquín; Stella Maris Ríos; Susana Perales

    2015-01-01

    Plant bioassays are excellent tools for the evaluation of environmental risks. In particular the use of seeds of vascular plants is recommended due to their higher sensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of native plants in order for them to be used as biological indicators of environmental oil pollution in relation to a standardized bioindicator. We analyzed the germination index (GI) of Lactuca sativa L., Atriplex lampa (Moq.) D.Dietri. and Prosopis denudans in thirt...

  19. Cultivation of Herbs and Medicinal Plants in Norway - Essential Oil Production and Quality Control

    Rohloff, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Essential oils (EO) are plant secondary metabolites that are known for their fragrance and food flavour properties. They consist of a complex mixture of mono- and sesquiterpenes, phenyl propanoids and oxygenated compounds. EOs can be present in different plant organs and materials, and their storage is related to specialised secretory structures. The yield of EOs from plant raw materials by distillation or pressing may on average vary from 0.1 – 1%, thus restricting the major EO production to...

  20. GAOCMAO and its oil spill response activities in the Gulf

    Gulf Area Oil Companies Mutual Aid Organisation (GAOCMAO), has taken active steps in cooperation with its member companies, national and regional environmental organisation (ROPME) in an attempt to protect the Gulf from various sources of pollution. Specific attention was given to oil pollution response in terms of stockpiling of adequate equipment, training of personal and coordination through the application of pre-prepared contingency plans. All these activities tell us that a lot has been done to protect the Gulf environment from pollution. GAOCMAO, after many years of successful development looks to the future with confidence and renewed vigor. It is the intention of this organisation to enhance its member companies capabilities to respond to major incidents and to work closely with the national governmental, regional and international environmental organisations throughout the world, in fields appropriate to the Gulf oil industry. (author)